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Sample records for barrier field tests

  1. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E. [Univ. of Wollongong (Australia); Stormont, J.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  2. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior

  3. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT

  4. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report presents the interpretation of data obtained (up to November 1, 1988) from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test site. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for the field tests for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities, at a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site in Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the tests is to provide the basis for determining whether tests planned for Yucca Mountain have the potential to be successful. Thirteen chapters discuss the following: mapping the electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate of the rock mass; changes in moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe; characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the heater borehole; electrical resistance heater installed in a 30-cm borehole; relative humidity measurements; the operation, design, construction, calibration, and installation of a microwave circuit that might provide partial pressure information at temperatures in excess of 200 degree C (392 degree F); pressure and temperature measurements in the G-Tunnel; the moisture collection system, which attempts to collect steam that migrates into the heater borehole; The borehole television and borescope surveys that were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes; preliminary scoping calculations of the hydrothermal conditions expected for this prototype test; the Data Acquisition System; and the results of the PEBSFT, preliminary interpretations of these results, and plans for the remainder of the test. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  5. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10-6 cm2/s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables

  6. Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Water erosion field tests for Hanford protective barriers: FY 1992 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, B.G.; Walters, W.H.

    1993-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Technology Development and the Office of Environmental Restoration of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of the study was to investigate the erosion potential of barrier soil covers from high-intensity rainfall events and to propose erosion mitigation criteria for the soil cover. Two sets of field plots were used in the testing program. Small plots (1 m{sup 2}) were used initially for scoping studies and larger plots (32.5 m{sup 2}) were used for a more comprehensive study of soil cover erosion. The study investigated the use of pea gravel admix and naturally established vegetation to reduce erosion of barrier soil covers.

  8. Water erosion field tests for Hanford protective barriers: FY 1992 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Technology Development and the Office of Environmental Restoration of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of the study was to investigate the erosion potential of barrier soil covers from high-intensity rainfall events and to propose erosion mitigation criteria for the soil cover. Two sets of field plots were used in the testing program. Small plots (1 m2) were used initially for scoping studies and larger plots (32.5 m2) were used for a more comprehensive study of soil cover erosion. The study investigated the use of pea gravel admix and naturally established vegetation to reduce erosion of barrier soil covers

  9. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  10. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  11. FIELD TEST INSTRUCTION 100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT DESIGN OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR SEQUESTRATION OF SR-90 SATURATED ZONE APATITE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER EXTENSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWLES NA

    2010-10-06

    The objective of this field test instruction is to provide technical guidance for aqueous injection emplacement of an extension apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRE) for the sequestration of strontium-90 (Sr-90) using a high concentration amendment formulation. These field activities will be conducted according to the guidelines established in DOE/RL-2010-29, 100-NR-2 Design Optimization Study, hereafter referred to as the DOS. The DOS supports the Federal Facility Agreement Consent Order (EPA et al., 1989), Milestone M-16-06-01, and 'Complete Construction of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at 100-N.' Injections of apatite precursor chemicals will occur at an equal distance intervals on each end of the existing PRE to extend the PRB from the existing 91 m (300 ft) to at least 274 m (900 ft). Field testing at the 100-N Area Apatite Treatability Test Site, as depicted on Figure 1, shows that the barrier is categorized by two general hydrologic conceptual models based on overall well capacity and contrast between the Hanford and Ringold hydraulic conductivities. The upstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by relatively low overall well specific capacity. This is estimated from well development data and a lower contrast in hydraulic conductivity between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formations. Comparison of test results from these two locations indicate that permeability contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation is significantly less over the upstream one-third of the barrier. The estimated hydraulic conductivity for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the upstream portion of the barrier based on observations during emplacement of the existing 91 m (300 ft) PRB is approximately 12 and 10 m/day (39 and 32 ft/day), respectively (PNNL-17429). However, these estimates should be used as a rough guideline only, as significant variability in hydraulic conductivity is likely to be observed in

  12. Field emission from finite barrier quantum structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study field emission from various finite barrier quasi-low dimensional structures, taking image force into account. To proceed, we first formulate an expression for field emission current density from a quantum dot. Transverse dimensions of the dot are then increased in turn, to obtain current densities respectively from quantum wire and quantum well with infinite potential energy barriers. To find out field emission from finite barrier structures, the above analysis is followed with a correction in the energy eigen values. In course, variations of field emission current density with strength of the applied electric field and structure dimensions are computed considering n-GaAs and n-GaAs/AlxGa1−xAs as the semiconductor materials. In each case, the current density is found to increase exponentially with the applied field, while it oscillates with structure dimensions. The magnitude of the emission current is less when the image force is not considered, but retains the similar field dependence. In all cases, the field emission from infinite barrier structures exceeds those from respective finite barrier ones

  13. Barrier Li Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYi-Min; LIXiao-Zhu; YANWen-Hong; BAOCheng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The methods for the few-body system are introduced to investigate the states of the barrier Li quantum dots (QDs) in an arbitrary strength of magnetic field. The configuration, which consists of a positive ion located on the z-axis at a distaneed from the two-dimensional QD plane (the x-y plane) and three electrons in the dot plane bound by the positive ion, is called a barrier Li center. The system, which consists of three electrons in the dot plane bound by the ion,is called a barrier Li QD. The dependence of energy of the state of the barrier Li QD on an external magnetic field B and the distance d is obtained. The angular momentum L of the ground states is found to jump not only with the variation orB but also with d.

  14. Barrier Li Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-Min; LI Xiao-Zhu; YAN Wen-Hong; BAO Cheng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The methods for the few-body system are introduced to investigate the states of the barrier Li quantumdots (QDs) in an arbitrary strength of magnetic field. The configuration, which consists of a positive ion located on thez-axis at a distance d from the two-dimensional QD plane (the x-y plane) and three electrons in the dot plane boundby the positive ion, is called a barrier Li center. The system, which consists of three electrons in the dot plane bound bythe ion, is called a barrier Li QD. The dependence of energy of the state of the barrier Li QD on an external magneticfield B and the distance d is obtained. The angular momentum L of the ground states is found to jump not only withthe variation of B but also with d.

  15. Field tests with vertical perforated drain pipes used for beach protection at Southern Holmsland Barrier on the Danish North Sea Coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    In accordance with the agreement of 18 August 2004 between Skagen Innovation Center (SIC) and the Danish Governmental Coastal Authority (KDI) a field test with the purpose of demonstrating the efficiency of the SIC vertical drain method as a mean for coastal protecting was initiated in a meeting 24...

  16. Field tests with vertical perforated drain pipes used for beach protection at Southern Holmsland Barrier on the Danish North Sea Coast (half year report)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    In accordance with the agreement of 18 August 2004 between Skagen Innovation Center (SIC) and the Danish Governmental Coastal Authority (KDI) a field test with the purpose of demonstrating the efficiency of the SIC vertical drain method as a mean for coastal protecting was initiated in a meeting 24...

  17. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  18. Testing of isolation barrier sealing surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation barrier doors are to be installed in the 105KE and 105KW basins as part of the 1994 unreviewed safety question (USQ) resolution plan to isolate the fuel storage basin from the fuel discharge chute. Included in this installation is the placement of new sealing surfaces for the barriers by affixing stainless steel plates to existing carbon steel angle bars with a specially formulated epoxy adhesive/sealant material. The sealant is a two-part component consisting of an epoxy resin (the condensation product of bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin) and a curing agent (a proprietary cycloaliphatic polyamine). The sealant is solvent free (complying with air pollution regulations) and capable of withstanding the surrounding radiation fields over an estimated 15-year service life. The epoxy sealant experiences negligible water damage partly because of its hydrophobic (water-repelling) nature. With bond tensile strengths measured at greater than 862 kPa (125 lbf/in2), the epoxy sealant is judged acceptable for its intended application. The four-hour pot life of the epoxy sealant provides sufficient time to apply the epoxy, examine the epoxy bead for continuity, and position the stainless steel sealing plates

  19. Testing of isolation barrier sealing surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-12-15

    Isolation barrier doors are to be installed in the 105KE and 105KW basins as part of the 1994 unreviewed safety question (USQ) resolution plan to isolate the fuel storage basin from the fuel discharge chute. Included in this installation is the placement of new sealing surfaces for the barriers by affixing stainless steel plates to existing carbon steel angle bars with a specially formulated epoxy adhesive/sealant material. The sealant is a two-part component consisting of an epoxy resin (the condensation product of bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin) and a curing agent (a proprietary cycloaliphatic polyamine). The sealant is solvent free (complying with air pollution regulations) and capable of withstanding the surrounding radiation fields over an estimated 15-year service life. The epoxy sealant experiences negligible water damage partly because of its hydrophobic (water-repelling) nature. With bond tensile strengths measured at greater than 862 kPa (125 lbf/in{sup 2}), the epoxy sealant is judged acceptable for its intended application. The four-hour pot life of the epoxy sealant provides sufficient time to apply the epoxy, examine the epoxy bead for continuity, and position the stainless steel sealing plates.

  20. Horizontal grout barrier project results of the latest testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites are situations where storage tanks and pits are leaking or have the potential to leak contamination into the soil. Subsequent leaching from rain and groundwater flow disperses the contamination far from the original site and, in some cases, into aquifers which serve as a drinking water source. Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) at Fernald working with the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) and two subcontractors, is pursuing the goal of placing a barrier beneath the contamination to prevent this dispersion. The technology being developed is an in situ approach based on directional drilling and jet grouting techniques developed in the oil fields. The unique barrier techniques being developed depend on innovative tooling and special grouts to install a horizontal barrier underground without disturbing the contaminated soils above. The initial tool designs were tested in December 1992 and were encouraging enough that the DOE agreed to fund continued development. A second set of designs were tested in August 1994. The testing results were less than expected but did provide a number of lessons learned. This paper reports on the third set of tool designs and the results of testing these tools prior to the full demonstration project at Fernald

  1. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  2. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  3. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals

  4. Vehicle-Barrier Tracking of a Scaled Crash Test for Roadside Barrier Design

    OpenAIRE

    Amato, Giuseppina; Ghosh, Bidisha; SIMMS, CIARAN

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the tracking system used to perform a scaled vehicle-barrier crash test is reported. The scaled crash test was performed as part of a wider project aimed at designing a new safety barrier making use of natural building materials. The scaled crash test was designed and performed as a proof of concept of the new mass-based safety barriers and the study was composed of two parts: the scaling technique and of a series of performed scaled crash tests. The scaling method was used for ...

  5. Biointrusion test plan for the Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a testing and monitoring plan for the biological component of the prototype barrier slated for construction at the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system. It is designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. The features of the barrier include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, covered with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype barrier over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions. Plants and animals will play a significant role in the hydrologic and water and wind erosion characteristics of the prototype barrier. Studies on the biological component of the prototype barrier will include work on the initial revegetation of the surface, continued monitoring of the developing plant community, rooting depth and dispersion in the context of biointrusion potential, the role of plants in the hydrology of the surface and toe regions of the barrier, the role of plants in stabilizing the surface against water and wind erosion, and the role of burrowing animals in the hydrology and water and wind erosion of the barrier

  6. On electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Starikovskaia, S M; Allegraud, K; Guaitella, O; Rousseau, A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Analysis of available data on electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) was carried out. Experimental measurements of emission spectra in triggered and non?triggered sinusoidal surface DBD were performed. The obtained results were used for the calculation of electric field value. The comparison of data obtained and the results published by other authors is presented.

  7. On electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starikovskaia, S M; Allegraud, K; Guaitella, O; Rousseau, A, E-mail: svetlana.starikovskaya@lpp.polytechnique.f [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-03-31

    Analysis of available data on electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) was carried out. Experimental measurements of emission spectra in triggered and non-triggered sinusoidal surface DBD were performed. The results obtained were used for the calculation of electric field value. The comparison of data obtained and the results published by other authors is presented.

  8. 105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test

  9. 105-KE Isolation Barrier Leak Rate Acceptance Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) contains the completed and signed Acceptance Procedure (ATP) for the 105-KE Isolations Barrier Leak Rate Test. The Test Engineer`s log, the completed sections of the ATP in the Appendix for Repeat Testing (Appendix K), the approved WHC J-7s (Appendix H), the data logger files (Appendices T and U), and the post test calibration checks (Appendix V) are included.

  10. 105-KE Isolation Barrier Leak Rate Acceptance Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) contains the completed and signed Acceptance Procedure (ATP) for the 105-KE Isolations Barrier Leak Rate Test. The Test Engineer's log, the completed sections of the ATP in the Appendix for Repeat Testing (Appendix K), the approved WHC J-7s (Appendix H), the data logger files (Appendices T and U), and the post test calibration checks (Appendix V) are included

  11. Subsurface barrier demonstration test strategy and performance specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was developed to help specify a major demonstration test project of subsurface barrier systems supporting the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The document focuses discussion on requirements applicable to demonstration of three subsurface barrier concepts: (1) Injected Material, (2) Cryogenic, and (3) Desiccant. Detailed requirements are provided for initial qualification of a technology proposal followed by the pre-demonstration and demonstration test requirements and specifications. Each requirement and specification is accompanied by a discussion of the rationale for it. The document also includes information on the Hanford Site tank farms and related data; the related and currently active technology development projects within the DOE's EM-50 Program; and the overall demonstration test strategy. Procurement activities and other preparations for actual demonstration testing are on hold until a decision is made regarding further development of subsurface barriers. Accordingly, this document is being issued for information only

  12. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance

  13. Additional electric field in real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, R. K.; Aslanova, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    In real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode (TMBS diode) additional electric field (AEF) the whole is formed in the near contact region of the semiconductor and its propagation space is limited with the barrier metal and the metallic electrodes of MOS structures. Effective potential barrier height TMBS diode is formed via resulting electric field of superposition AEF and electric field of space charge region (SCR) semiconductor. The dependence of the resulting electric field intensity of the distance towards the inside the semiconductor is nonlinear and characterized by a peak at a certain distance from the interface. The thickness of the SCR in TMBS diode becomes equal to the trench depth. Force and energy parameters of the AEF, and thus resulting electric field in the SCR region, become dependent on the geometric design parameters TMBS diode. The forward I-V characteristic TMBS diode is described by the thermionic emission theory as in conventional flat Scottky diode, and in the reverse bias, current is virtually absent at initial voltage, appears abruptly at a certain critical voltage.

  14. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers

  15. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

  16. A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier

  17. Plan for metal barrier selection and testing for NNWSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a geological repository for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The Nuclear Waste Management Projects (NWMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for design, testing, and performance analysis of the NNWSI waste packages. One portion of this work is the selection and testing of the material for container construction. The anticipated container design is for this material to be a corrosion resistant metal called the metal barrier. This document is the publication version of the Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) for the Metal Barrier Selection and Testing Task. The SIP serves as a formal planning document for the investigation and is used to assign quality assurance levels to the activities of the task. This document is an informal version for information distribution and has the sections on ''Schedule and Milestones'' and the ''Quality Assurance Level Assignment Sheets'' removed

  18. 105-KE Basin isolation barrier leak rate test analytical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides analytical developments in support of the proposed leak rate test of the 105-KE Basin. The analytical basis upon which the K-basin leak test results will be used ti determine the basin leakage rates is developed in this report. The leakage of the K-Basin isolation barriers under accident conditions will be determined from the test results. There are two fundamental flow regimes that may exist in the postulated K-Basin leakage, viscous laminar and turbulent flow. An analytical development is presented for each flow regime. The basic geometry and nomenclature of the postulated leak paths are denoted

  19. Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs

  20. Vibration damage testing of thermal barrier fibrous blanket insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA Technologies is engaged in a long-term, multiphase program to determine the vibration characteristics of thermal barrier components leading to qualification of assemblies for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) service. The phase of primary emphasis described herein is the third in a series of acoustic tests and uses as background the more elemental tests preceding it. Two sizes of thermal barrier coverplates with one fibrous blanket insulation type were tested in an acoustic environment at sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. Three tests were conducted using sinusoidal and random noise for up to 200 h duration at room temperature. Frequent inspections were made to determine the progression of degradation using definition of stages from a prior test program. Initially the insulation surface adjacent to the metallic seal sheets (noise side) assumed a chafed or polished appearance. This was followed by flattening of the as-received pillowed surface. This stage was followed by a depression being formed in the vicinity of the free edge of the coverplate. Next, loose powder from within the blanket and from fiber erosion accumulated in the depression. Prior experience showed that the next stage of deterioration exhibited a consolidation of the powder to form a local crust. In this test series, this last stage generally failed to materialize. Instead, surface holes generated by solid ceramic particulates (commonly referred to as 'shot') constituted the stage following powdering. With the exception of some manufacturing-induced anomalies, the final stage, namely, gross fiber breakup, did not occur. It is this last stage that must be prevented for the thermal barrier to maintain its integrity. (orig./GL)

  1. Surface dielectric barrier discharges exhibiting field emission at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are investigated experimentally in CO2 from atmospheric pressure up to supercritical conditions. Two discharge regimes are generated using 10 kHz ac excitation. The ‘standard’ regime is similar to previously studied surface DBDs in terms of onset voltage as a function of pressure, as well as electrical and optical emission characteristics. However, a ‘field-emitting’ regime emerges starting from 0.7 MPa that exhibits constant onset voltage up to 7.9 MPa, purely continuum emission spectra in the visible/near-infrared range and current waveforms similar to an atmospheric-pressure Townsend discharge with ionization instabilities. The maximum amount of negative charge deposited as a function of the applied voltage amplitude is consistent with the Fowler–Nordheim equation, which demonstrates the presence of field emission. Furthermore, this behavior cannot be attributed to the Townsend or streamer ionization mechanisms, secondary electron emission or non-discharge processes. No field-emitting structures are specially added to the electrodes. The onset voltage of the field-emitting regime does not follow the modified Paschen's law for field emission-assisted breakdown. (paper)

  2. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs

  3. Development and Fatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. Durability of the coating systems remains a critical issue with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Thermal conductivity increase and coating degradation due to sintering and phase changes are known to be detrimental to coating performance. There is a need to characterize the coating thermal fatigue behavior and temperature limit, in order to potentially take full advantage of the current coating capability. In this study, thermal conductivity and cyclic fatigue behaviors of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings were evaluated under high temperature, large thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. The coating degradation and failure processes were assessed by real-time monitoring of the coating thermal conductivity under the test conditions. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces and failure modes under the cyclic thermal loads will be discussed in light of the high temperature mechanical fatigue and fracture testing results.

  4. COUPLEX2 test case modeling the near field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here the model to be used for the second level COUPLEX test case. It is based on a Near Field computation, taking into account the glass dissolution of vitrified waste, and the congruent release of several nuclides (including filiation chains), with their transport through the geological barrier. (author)

  5. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-07-21

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

  6. Field Soil Water Retention of the Prototype Hanford Barrier and Its Variability with Space and Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-08-14

    Engineered surface barriers are used to isolate underlying contaminants from water, plants, animals, and humans. To understand the flow processes within a barrier and the barrier’s ability to store and release water, the field hydraulic properties of the barrier need to be known. In situ measurement of soil hydraulic properties and their variation over time is challenging because most measurement methods are destructive. A multiyear test of the Prototype Hanford Barrier (PHB) has yielded in situ soil water content and pressure data for a nine-year period. The upper 2 m layer of the PHB is a silt loam. Within this layer, water content and water pressure were monitored at multiple depths at 12 water balance stations using a neutron probe and heat dissipation units. Valid monitoring data from 1995 to 2003 for 4 depths at 12 monitoring stations were used to determine the field water retention of the silt loam layer. The data covered a wide range of wetness, from near saturation to the permanent wilt point, and each retention curve contained 51 to 96 data points. The data were described well with the commonly used van Genuchten water retention model. It was found that the spatial variation of the saturated and residual water content and the pore size distribution parameter were relatively small, while that of the van Genuchten alpha was relatively large. The effects of spatial variability of the retention properties appeared to be larger than the combined effects of added 15% w/w pea gravel and plant roots on the properties. Neither of the primary hydrological processes nor time had a detectible effect on the water retention of the silt loam barrier.

  7. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  8. Engineered Barrier System Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01

  9. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-10-26

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the 100 Areas at the Hanford Site. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at the Hanford Site.

  11. Field tests using radioactive matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years, the assessment of possible radiological consequences of a terrorist attack associated with a release of radioactive substances (RaS) has been in the focus of interest of emergency preparedness and radiation protection specialists, as well as experts dealing with the dispersion of harmful substances in the atmosphere. Suitable tools for these analyses are applications of mathematical and physical models and simulation of this attack under 'realistic' conditions. The work presented here summarises the results of four tests, in which a RaS (a Tc-99 m solution) was dispersed over a free area with the use of an industrial explosive. Detection methods and techniques employed in these tests are described and values characterising the RaS dispersion--dose rates, surface activities in horizontal and vertical directions, volume activities, their space and time distributions and mass concentrations of aerosols produced after the explosion are presented and compared. These data will be applied to a comparison of outcomes of models used for the assessment of radiation accidents as well as in future field tests carried out under conditions of more complex geometry (indoor environment, terrain obstacles, etc.). (authors)

  12. Field tests using radioactive matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouza, Z; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Michalek, V; Rulik, P; Skrkal, J; Hovorka, J

    2010-06-01

    During recent years, the assessment of possible radiological consequences of a terrorist attack associated with a release of radioactive substances (RaS) has been in the focus of interest of emergency preparedness and radiation protection specialists, as well as experts dealing with the dispersion of harmful substances in the atmosphere. Suitable tools for these analyses are applications of mathematical and physical models and simulation of this attack under 'realistic' conditions. The work presented here summarises the results of four tests, in which a RaS (a Tc-99 m solution) was dispersed over a free area with the use of an industrial explosive. Detection methods and techniques employed in these tests are described and values characterising the RaS dispersion--dose rates, surface activities in horizontal and vertical directions, volume activities, their space and time distributions and mass concentrations of aerosols produced after the explosion are presented and compared. These data will be applied to a comparison of outcomes of models used for the assessment of radiation accidents as well as in future field tests carried out under conditions of more complex geometry (indoor environment, terrain obstacles, etc.). PMID:20089512

  13. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  14. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by placing a reactant material (in this experiment, metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  15. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  16. Microscopic determinations of fission barriers (mean-field and beyond)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a help of the selfconsistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approach with the D1S effective Gogny interaction and the Generator Coordinate Method (GCM) we incorporate the transverse collective vibrations to the one-dimensional model of the fission-barrier penetrability based on the traditional WKB method. The average fission barrier corresponding to the least-energy path in the two-dimensional potential energy landscape as function of quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom is modified by the influence of the transverse collective vibrations along the nuclear path to fission. The set of transverse vibrational states built in the fission valley corresponding to a successively increasing nuclear elongation produces the new energy barrier which is compared with the least-energy barrier. These collective states are given as the eigensolutions of the GCM purely vibrational Hamiltonian. In addition, the influence of the collective inertia on the fission properties is displayed, and it turns out to be the decisive condition for the possible transitions between different fission valleys. (author)

  17. Evaluation of properties and thermal stress field for thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 齐红宇; 杨晓光; 李旭

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal stress field of the hot section with thermal barrier coating (TBCs), the thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of top-coat are the physical key properties. The porosity of top-coat was tested and evaluated under different high temperatures. The relationship between the microstructure (porosity of top-coat) and properties of TBCs were analyzed to predict the thermal properties of ceramic top-coat, such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The temperature and stress field of the vane with TBCs were simulated using two sets of thermal conductivity data and elastic modulus, which are from literatures and this work, respectively. The results show that the temperature and stress distributions change with thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The differences of maximum temperatures and stress are 6.5% and 8.0%, respectively.

  18. Preliminary engineering specifications for a test demonstration multilayer protective barrier cover system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents preliminary engineering specifications for a test protective barrier cover system and support radiohydrology facility to be constructed at the Hanford Protective Barrier Test Facility (PBTF). Construction of this test barrier and related radiohydrology facility is part of a continuing effort to provide construction experience and performance evaluation of alternative barrier designs used for long-term isolation of disposed radioactive waste materials. Design specifications given in this report are tentative, based on interim engineering and computer simulation design efforts. Final definitive design specifications and engineering prints will be produced in FY 1986. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  19. Protective barrier program: Test plan for plant community dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are jointly developing protective barriers for the long term isolation of low-level radioactive defense waste for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Arid Sites. Protective barriers have been identified as an integral part of the overall final disposal strategy for low-level defense waste at the Arid Sites (DOE 1987). At present, the conceptual design of the Arid Site protective barrier is a multilayer structure that will minimize waster infiltration into and through the underlying waste, and will prevent intrusion into the waste by plant roots, animals, and humans. This multilayer system consists of a fine soil layer overlying a coarse sand and/or gravel geo-filter overlying a layer of large cobbles or basalt riprap. Plants contribute several crucial functions to the overall performance of the protective barrier.Through transpiration, plants are capable of removing considerably more moisture from a given volume of soil than the physical process of evaporation alone. This becomes especially important after periods of excessive precipitation when the possibility of saturation of the textural break and leeching to the buried waste is increased. Plants also function in significantly reducing the amount of wind and water erosion that would be expected to occur on the barrier surface. In addition to these physical functions, plants also influence other biotic effects on barrier performance

  20. Test methods for evaluating and comparing the performance of side impact barrier faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coo, P.J.A. de; Roberts, A.; Seeck, A.; Cesari, D.

    1998-01-01

    Side-impact safety of passenger cars is assessed in Europe in a full-scale test using a moving barrier. The front of this barrier is deformable and represents the stiffness of an 'average' car. The EU Directive 96/27/EC on side impact protection has adopted the EEVC Side Impact Test Procedure, inclu

  1. Exact field ionization rates in the barrier suppression-regime from numerical TDSE calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, D; Mulser, P.

    1998-01-01

    Numerically determined ionization rates for the field ionization of atomic hydrogen in strong and short laser pulses are presented. The laser pulse intensity reaches the so-called "barrier suppression ionization" regime where field ionization occurs within a few half laser cycles. Comparison of our numerical results with analytical theories frequently used shows poor agreement. An empirical formula for the "barrier suppression ionization"-rate is presented. This rate reproduces very well the ...

  2. Thermionic field emission in GaN nanoFET Schottky barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical stability approach that enables the evaluation of the mulitvariate thermionic field emission parameters at Schottky barriers is presented. The method is general, requiring only the effective mass and relative dielectric constant for a given semiconductor. The approach is demonstrated in a first-time analysis of the barrier heights, tunneling probabilities and potential drops for changes in the Schottky barriers of gallium nitride nano-field effect transistors in a long-duration heavy ion radiation extreme environment. The investigation yielded fundamental insights into behavior that would be challenging to predict a priori. (paper)

  3. Small-scale experimental tests of tandem mirror machines with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of current physical understanding of tandem mirrors with thermal barriers. Physicists who understand tandem mirrors can use this document as a preliminary guide to the physical issues and experimental problems involved. This report will focus upon the issues that can be tested experimentally, and on the areas needing experimental and theoretical inventions. The next section discusses the plasma potentials and plasma confinement which correspond to a tandem mirror with thermal barriers, assuming the barriers exist in steady-state. The creation of a barrier is discussed, i.e., the natural tendency of the barrier cell to fill with plasma must be countered by pumping ions out of the barrier. The design of a barrier-pumping experiment for TMX is described

  4. HIV Testing Implementation in Two Urban Cities: Practice, Policy, and Perceived Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Camden J Hallmark; Skillicorn, Jennifer; Giordano, Thomas P; Davila, Jessica A.; McNeese, Marlene; Rocha, Nestor; Smith, Avemaria; Cooper, Stacey; Castel, Amanda D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although funding has supported the scale up of routine, opt-out HIV testing in the US, variance in implementation mechanisms and barriers in high-burden jurisdictions remains unknown. Methods We conducted a survey of health care organizations in Washington, DC and Houston/Harris County to determine number of HIV tests completed in 2011, policy and practices associated with HIV testing, funding mechanisms, and reported barriers to testing in each jurisdiction and to compare results ...

  5. Integrated modelling of near field and engineered barrier system processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Integrating Model (YMIM) is an integrated model of the Engineered Barrier System. It has been developed to assist project managers at LLNL in identifying areas where research emphasis should be placed. The model was designed to be highly modular so that a model of an individual process could be easily modified or replaced without interfering with the models of other processes. The modules modelling container failure and the dissolution of nuclides include particularly detailed, temperature dependent models of their corresponding processes

  6. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what

  7. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes2. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in2 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses

  8. Preliminary tests of an electrokinetic barrier to prevent heavy metal pollution of soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, R.J. [Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering Group, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rjl1@eng.cam.ac.uk; Muntoni, A. [Dipartimento di Geoingegneria e Tecnologie Ambientali dell' Universita degli Studi di Cagliari Piazza d' Armi, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Dipartimento di Geoingegneria e Tecnologie Ambientali dell' Universita degli Studi di Cagliari Piazza d' Armi, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Winfield, K.C. [Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering Group, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-25

    Sardinia has to deal with significant environmental problems related to heavy-metal contamination, mainly located at its abandoned mining districts. In particular, acid mine drainage management and groundwater pollution are typical problems associated with mining activities which constitute a serious threat to human health. To prevent contaminant spread over the adjacent environment, it is of great interest to consider using an electric field as a containment fence to counteract pollutant transport. In this application, contaminant transport due to a hydraulic gradient driving force is prevented by the combined effect of electro-osmosis and electro-migration. Although there are other alternative containment technologies, the electrokinetic fence offers many advantages, as it is easy to operate, there is a minimal exposure to the operating personnel and it is likely to be effective for a wide range of contaminants. In this work, both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) tests have been carried out. In the 1D tests, the efficiency of an electrokinetic barrier to prevent cadmium from polluting an uncontaminated sample was investigated; soil pH, metal concentration and current intensity have been monitored; results indicate that the barrier can prevent or significantly reduce heavy-metal contamination from spreading against a hydraulic gradient of 7. In 2D tests, two rows of electrodes inserted in a horizontally flat soil tank were used to generate an electric field. It was found that an electric field of 125 V m{sup -1} was sufficient to prevent significant copper incursion from a contaminant flow under a hydraulic gradient of 1.3.

  9. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices

  10. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-05-19

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices.

  11. Barrier function test: Laboratory evaluation of the protective function of some barrier creams against cashewnut shell oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasricha J

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A barrier function test has been designed to screen the protective capacity of a cream against the cauterizing effect of cashew nut shell oil (CNSO on the skin. The test consists of applying the barrier cream on a 5 cm circular area of skin on the back of a human volunteer and then at its centre applying a 1 cm sq Whatman no. 3 paper disc soaked in the CNSO for 15 minutes and looking for the evidence of cauterization reaction after 48 hours. Of the various creams containing a variety of paraffins, bees wax, polyethylene glycols, methyl cellulose gel, and petrolatum, only polyethylene glycol (PEG cream was found to afford adequate protection against cashew nut shell oil. Addition of 10% zinc oxide or 10% kaolin to the PEG cream did not seem to afford any additional protection. Castor oil already being used by the workers was found to be inferior to the PEG cream.

  12. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Barriers to workplace HIV testing in South Africa: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, Martin; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low workplace HIV testing uptake makes effective management of HIV and AIDS difficult for South African organisations. Identifying barriers to workplace HIV testing is therefore crucial to inform urgently needed interventions aimed at increasing workplace HIV testing. This study reviewed literature on workplace HIV testing barriers in South Africa. Pubmed, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo and SA Publications were systematically researched. Studies needed to include measures to assess perceived or real barriers to participate in HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) at the workplace or discuss perceived or real barriers of HIV testing at the workplace based on collected data, provide qualitative or quantitative evidence related to the research topic and needed to refer to workplaces in South Africa. Barriers were defined as any factor on economic, social, personal, environmental or organisational level preventing employees from participating in workplace HIV testing. Four peer-reviewed studies were included, two with quantitative and two with qualitative study designs. The overarching barriers across the studies were fear of compromised confidentiality, being stigmatised or discriminated in the event of testing HIV positive or being observed participating in HIV testing, and a low personal risk perception. Furthermore, it appeared that an awareness of an HIV-positive status hindered HIV testing at the workplace. Further research evidence of South African workplace barriers to HIV testing will enhance related interventions. This systematic review only found very little and contextualised evidence about workplace HCT barriers in South Africa, making it difficult to generalise, and not really sufficient to inform new interventions aimed at increasing workplace HCT uptake. PMID:26560013

  14. Testing two-field inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and to constrain classes of two-field models using WMAP data. Using covariant formalism, we first develop a framework for understanding the background field kinematics and introduce a ''slow-turn'' approximation. Next, we find covariant expressions for the evolution of the adiabatic/curvature and entropy/isocurvature modes, and we discuss how the evolution of modes can be inferred mostly from the background kinematics and the geometry of the field manifold. From these expressions, we derive semianalytic formulas for the curvature, isocurvature, and cross spectra, and the standard spectral observables, all to second order in the slow-roll and slow-turn approximations. In tandem, we show how our covariant formalism provides useful intuition into how the general features of the inflationary Lagrangian translate into distinct features in the observable power spectra. In particular, we find that key features of the power spectra can be directly read off from the nature of the roll path, the curve the field vector rolls along with respect to the two-dimensional field manifold. For example, models whose roll path makes a sharp turn around 60 e-foldings before the end of inflation tend to be ruled out because they produce stronger departures from scale invariance than are allowed by the latest CMB observations. Finally, we apply our formalism to confront four classes of two-field models with WMAP data, including doubly quadratic and quartic potentials and nonstandard kinetic terms, showing how whether a model is ruled out or not depends not only on certain features of the inflationary Lagrangian, but also on the initial conditions. Ultimately, for a two-field model to be consistent with observations, we show that it must possess the right balance of certain

  15. Near Field Modeling of the Effects of Sound Barriers on Flow and Dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Gazzolo, Brandn

    2012-01-01

    Previous research of air quality in the vicinity of roadways has used either field measurements, where results are site specific, or modeling, which can be computationally expensive or too simplified and misleading. The presented research consists of a systematical laboratory and numerical investigation of the influence of different sound barrier (SB) configurations on the dispersion from roadways. Sound Barriers can be seen along the sides of freeways, especially in Southern California. The ...

  16. Field testing of bioenergetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubly labeled water provides a direct measure of the rate of carbon dioxide production by free-living animals. With appropriate conversion factors, based on chemical composition of the diet and assimilation efficiency, field metabolic rate (FMR), in units of energy expenditure, and field feeding rate can be estimated. Validation studies indicate that doubly labeled water measurements of energy metabolism are accurate to within 7% in reptiles, birds, and mammals. This paper discusses the use of doubly labeled water to generate empirical models for FMR and food requirements for a variety of animals

  17. Testing and monitoring plan for the permanent isolation surface barrier prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, G.W.; Cadwell, L.L.; Freeman, H.D.; Ligotke, M.W.; Link, S.O.; Romine, R.A.; Walters, W.H. Jr.

    1993-06-01

    This document is a testing and monitoring plan for a prototype barrier to be constructed at the Hanford Site in 1993. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system, designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. These features include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, vegetated with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions.

  18. Timed testing with TorX: the Oosterschelde storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belinfante, Axel; Gijsen, M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the automatic testing of the control software of the Oosterschelde kering, a storm surge barrier. The automatic testing includes automatic test case derivation and automatic test execution. This project is a joint effort of CMG and the computer science group "Formal Methods and Tools" a

  19. Analyzing Educational Testing Service Graduate Major Field Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The Educational Testing Service (ETS) created the Graduate Major Field Test in Business (GMFT-B) for MBA students. This test is administered to all MBA classes at Jacksonville University for the purpose of measuring student academic achievement and growth, as well as to assess educational outcomes. The test is given in the capstone course,…

  20. CHARM Facility Test Area Radiation Field Description

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Specification document summarising the radiation field of the CHARM facility test area. This will act as a guide to any potential users of the facility as to what they can expect in terms of radiation, given in the form of radiation spectra information and fluence for each test position, along with general radiation maps for the test area and Montrac test location.

  1. Field kit and method for testing for the presence of gunshot residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacy, Philip J.; Walker, Pamela K.

    2003-09-02

    A field test kit for gunshot residue comprises a container having at least compartments separated by a barrier. A surface is tested by wiping it with a swab and placing the swab in a first compartment. The barrier is then breached, permitting reagent in the second compartment to flow onto the swab. The first compartment is transparent, and a color change will be observed if the reagent reacts with gunshot residue.

  2. Study of 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky diode using field guard ring termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode, PiN diode and junction barrier Schottky diode terminated by field guard rings are designed, fabricated and characterised. The measurements for forward and reverse characteristics have been done, and by comparison with each other, it shows that junction barrier Schottky diode has a lower reverse current density than that of the Schottky barrier diode and a higher forward drop than that of the PiN diode. High-temperature annealing is presented in this paper as well to figure out an optimised processing. The barrier height of 0.79 eV is formed with Ti in this work, the forward drop for the Schottky diode is 2.1 V, with an ideality factor of 3.2, and junction barrier Schottky diode with blocking voltage higher than 400 V was achieved by using field guard ring termination. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Field study of gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions: Protective Barrier Program Status Reprt - FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Thiede, M.E.; Kemp, C.J.; Cadwell, L.L. Link, S.O.

    1990-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are collaborating on a field study of the effects of gravel admixtures on plant growth and soil water storage in protective barriers. Protective barriers are engineered earthern covers designed to prevent water, plants, and animals from contacting buried waste and transporting contaminants to groundwater or the land surface. Some of the proposed designs include gravel admixtures or gravel mulches on the barrier surface to control soil loss by wind and runoff. The purpose of this study is to measure, in a field setting, the influence of surface gravel additions on soil water storage and plant cover. The study plots are located northwest of the Yakima Gate in the McGee Ranch old field. Here we report the status of work completed in FY 1989 on the creation of a data management system, a test of water application uniformity, field calibration of neutron moisture gages, and an analysis of the response of plants to various combinations of gravel admixtures and increased rainfall. 23 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Electric Field Control of the Resistance of Multiferroic Tunnel Junctions with Magnetoelectric Antiferromagnetic Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merodio, P.; Kalitsov, A.; Chshiev, M.; Velev, J.

    2016-06-01

    Based on model calculations, we predict a magnetoelectric tunneling electroresistance effect in multiferroic tunnel junctions consisting of ferromagnetic electrodes and magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic barriers. Switching of the antiferromagnetic order parameter in the barrier in applied electric field by means of the magnetoelectric coupling leads to a substantial change of the resistance of the junction. The effect is explained in terms of the switching of the orientations of local magnetizations at the barrier interfaces affecting the spin-dependent interface transmission probabilities. Magnetoelectric multiferroic materials with finite ferroelectric polarization exhibit an enhanced resistive change due to polarization-induced spin-dependent screening. These results suggest that devices with active barriers based on single-phase magnetoelectric antiferromagnets represent an alternative nonvolatile memory concept.

  5. Field testing of sulphide electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulphide ion selective electrodes have been developed at BARC, for determination of Ag+ and S- ions directly and Cl- and CN- ions indirectly. The electrodes were tested for their use in sulphide environments in the EAD (Effluent After Dilution) stream at the Heavy Water Plant, Kota. The electrodes are suitable in the concentration range of 16000 ppm to 0.002 ppm, with a slope of 29-31 mV per decade change in the sulphide ion concentration. The response time is less than 10 seconds. These electrodes are reliable for continuous on-line use for a long period. (author). 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  6. Transport properties of Dirac electrons in graphene based double velocity-barrier structures in electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lei [College of Physical Science and Information Engineering, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050024 (China); Department of Medical Physics, Basic Medical College, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050017 (China); Li, Yu-Xian [College of Physical Science and Information Engineering, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050024 (China); Liu, Jian-Jun, E-mail: liujj@mail.hebtu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Information Engineering, Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050024 (China); Physics Department, Shijiazhuang University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050035 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Using transfer matrix method, transport properties in graphene based double velocity-barrier structures under magnetic and electric fields are numerically studied. It is found that velocity barriers for the velocity ratio (the Fermi velocity inside the barrier to that outside the barrier) less than one (or for the velocity ratio greater than one) have properties similar to electrostatic wells (or barriers). The velocity barriers for the velocity ratio greater than one significantly enlarge the resonant tunneling region of electrostatic barriers. In the presence of magnetic field, the plateau width of the Fano factor with a Poissonian value shortens (or broadens) for the case of the velocity ratio less than one (or greater than one). When the Fermi energy is equal to the electrostatic barrier height, for different values of the velocity ratio, both the conductivities and the Fano factors remain fixed. -- Highlights: ► We model graphene based velocity-barrier structures in electric and magnetic fields. ► Velocity barrier for ξ<1 (ξ>1) have property similar to electrostatic well (barrier). ► Velocity barrier for ξ>1 enlarge the resonant tunneling region of electrostatic barrier. ► The plateau width of Fano factor shortens (or broadens) for the case of ξ<1 (or ξ>1). ► The conductivity remains fixed at the point of E{sub F}=U{sub 0} for different values of ξ.

  7. Transport properties of Dirac electrons in graphene based double velocity-barrier structures in electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using transfer matrix method, transport properties in graphene based double velocity-barrier structures under magnetic and electric fields are numerically studied. It is found that velocity barriers for the velocity ratio (the Fermi velocity inside the barrier to that outside the barrier) less than one (or for the velocity ratio greater than one) have properties similar to electrostatic wells (or barriers). The velocity barriers for the velocity ratio greater than one significantly enlarge the resonant tunneling region of electrostatic barriers. In the presence of magnetic field, the plateau width of the Fano factor with a Poissonian value shortens (or broadens) for the case of the velocity ratio less than one (or greater than one). When the Fermi energy is equal to the electrostatic barrier height, for different values of the velocity ratio, both the conductivities and the Fano factors remain fixed. -- Highlights: ► We model graphene based velocity-barrier structures in electric and magnetic fields. ► Velocity barrier for ξ1) have property similar to electrostatic well (barrier). ► Velocity barrier for ξ>1 enlarge the resonant tunneling region of electrostatic barrier. ► The plateau width of Fano factor shortens (or broadens) for the case of ξ1). ► The conductivity remains fixed at the point of EF=U0 for different values of ξ.

  8. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr–Newman or Kerr–Newman–anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  9. Influence of the male ejaculate on post-mating prezygotic barriers in field crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Larson

    Full Text Available Post-copulatory interactions between males and females involve highly coordinated, complex traits that are often rapidly evolving and divergent between species. Failure to produce and deposit eggs may be a common post-mating prezygotic barrier, yet little is known about what prevents the induction of egg-laying between species. The field crickets, Gryllus firmus and G. pennsylvanicus are isolated by a one-way reproductive incompatibility; G. pennsylvanicus males fail to fertilize G. firmus eggs or to induce normal egg-laying in G. firmus females. We use experimental crosses to elucidate the role of accessory gland-derived vs. testis-derived components of the G. firmus male ejaculate on egg-laying in conspecific and heterospecific crosses. Using surgical castrations to create 'spermless' males that transfer only seminal fluid proteins (SFPs we test whether G. firmus male SFPs can induce egg-laying in conspecific crosses and rescue egg-laying in crosses between G. pennsylvanicus males and G. firmus females. We find G. firmus SFPs induce only a small short-term egg-laying response and that SFPs alone cannot explain the normal induction of egg-laying. Gryllus firmus SFPs also do not rescue the heterospecific cross. Testis-derived components, such as sperm or prostaglandins, most likely stimulate egg-laying or act as transporters for SFPs to targets in the female reproductive tract. These results highlight the utility of experimental approaches for investigating the phenotypes that act as barriers between species and suggest that future work on the molecular basis of the one-way incompatibility between G. firmus and G. pennsylvanicus should focus on divergent testis-derived compounds or proteins in addition to SFPs.

  10. HIV testing implementation in two urban cities: practice, policy, and perceived barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camden J Hallmark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although funding has supported the scale up of routine, opt-out HIV testing in the US, variance in implementation mechanisms and barriers in high-burden jurisdictions remains unknown. METHODS: We conducted a survey of health care organizations in Washington, DC and Houston/Harris County to determine number of HIV tests completed in 2011, policy and practices associated with HIV testing, funding mechanisms, and reported barriers to testing in each jurisdiction and to compare results between jurisdictions. RESULTS: In 2012, 43 Houston and 35 DC HIV-testing organizations participated in the survey. Participants represented 85% of Department of Health-supported testers in DC and 90% of Department of Health-supported testers in Houston. The median number of tests per organization was 568 in DC and 1045 in Houston. Approximately 50% of organizations in both DC and Houston exclusively used opt-in consent and most conducted both pre- and post-test counseling with HIV testing (80% of organizations in DC, 70% in Houston. While the most frequent source of funding in DC was the Department of Health, Houston organizations primarily billed the patient or third-party payers. Barriers to testing most often reported were lack of funding, followed by patient discomfort/refusal with more barriers reported in DC. CONCLUSIONS: Given unique policies, resources and programmatic contexts, DC and Houston have taken different approaches to support routine testing. Many organizations in both cities reported opt-in consent approaches and pre-test counseling, suggesting 2006 national HIV testing recommendations are not being followed consistently. Addressing the barriers to testing identified in each jurisdiction may improve expansion of testing.

  11. Low Schottky Barrier Black Phosphorus Field-Effect Devices with Ferromagnetic Tunnel Contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Madhushankar, B N; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P; Bettadahalli Nandishaiah, Madhushankar

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has been recently unveiled as a promising 2D direct bandgap semiconducting material. Here, ambipolar field-effect transistor behavior of nanolayers of BP with ferromagnetic tunnel contacts is reported. Using TiO2 /Co contacts, a reduced Schottky barrier <50 meV, which can be tu

  12. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across m...

  13. Electron Transport in Graphene-Based Double-Barrier Structure under a Time Periodic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei-Tao; WANG Shun-Jin

    2011-01-01

    The transport property of electron through graphene-based double-barrier under a time periodic field is investigated. We study the influence of the system parameters and external field strength on the transmission probability.The results show that transmission exhibits various kinds of behavior with the change of parameters due to its angular anisotropy. One could control the values of transmission and conductivity as well as their distribution in each band by tuning the parameters.

  14. Buildings, fields of activity, testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1969 the activities of the Materialpruefungsanstalt Stuttgart (MPA) have grown quickly as planned, especially in the field of reactor safety research, which made it necessary to increase the staff to approximately 165 members, to supplement the machines and equipment and to extend the fields of activities occasioning a further departmental reorganization. At present the MPA has the following departments: 1. Teaching (materials testing, materials science and strength of materials) 2. Materials and Welding Technology 3. Materials Science and General Materials Testing with Tribology 4. Design and Strength 5. Creep and Fatigue Testing 6. Central Facilities 7. Vessel and Component Testing. (orig./RW)

  15. Monolayer borophene electrode for effective elimination of both the Schottky barrier and strong electric field effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. Z.; Xiong, S. J.; Wu, X. L.

    2016-08-01

    The formation of Schottky barriers between 2D semiconductors and traditional metallic electrodes has greatly limited the application of 2D semiconductors in nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, metallic borophene was used as a substitute for the traditional noble metal electrode to contact with the 2D semiconductor. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that no Schottky barrier exists in the borophene/2D semiconductor heterostructure. The contact remains ohmic even with a strong electric field applied. This finding provides a way to construct 2D electronic devices and sensors with greatly enhanced performance.

  16. Test method for the microbiological barrier properties of wrapping materials ; new approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn ACP de; Wagner P

    1993-01-01

    The study shows that the new approach, as proposed by CEN TC102 wg4, for the development of a test method for the determination the microbial barrier properties of packaging materials for medical devices does not give the expected advances over the in 1990 presented LGM test method (RIVM-report 9190

  17. Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July1996, BN transmitted Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site to the United States Department of Energy, under Contract DE-AC08-91NV10833. The 1996 paper had a limited distribution and was not reviewed for public release. In 2007, National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) made minor revisions to conform to current editorial standards of the NNSA/NSO and to meet current security requirements for public release. The primary purpose of this study was to identify types of engineered passive barriers that could deter future intrusion into buried low-level radioactive waste, particularly intrusion by drilling water wells. The study considered drilling technology, many natural and man-made materials, and both underground and above-ground barriers. Based on cost and effectiveness, the report recommended underground barriers consisting of a layer of rubble or tires. An aboveground barrier mound might also prove effective, but would cost more, and may become an attractive nuisance (e.g., might, after their purpose has been forgotten, encourage exploration for the sake of satisfying curiosity). Advances in drilling technology could render any engineered barriers ineffective if there is motivation to penetrate the barriers

  18. Multianalyte Tests for the Early Detection of Cancer: Speedbumps and Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Tainsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become very clear that a single molecular event is inadequate to accurately predict the biology (or pathophysiology of cancer. Furthermore, using any single molecular event as a biomarker for the early detection of malignancy may not comprehensively identify the majority of individuals with that disease. Therefore, the fact that technologies have arisen that can simultaneously detect several, possibly hundreds, of biomarkers has propelled the field towards the development of multianalyte-based in vitro diagnostic early detection tests for cancer using body fl uids such as serum, plasma, sputum, saliva, or urine. These multianalyte tests may be based on the detection of serum autoantibodies to tumor antigens, the presence of cancer-related proteins in serum, or the presence of tumor-specific genomic changes that appear in plasma as free DNA. The implementation of non-invasive diagnostic approaches to detect early stage cancer may provide the physician with evidence of cancer, but the question arises as to how the information will affect the pathway of clinical intervention. The confirmation of a positive result from an in vitro diagnostic cancer test may involve relatively invasive procedures to establish a true cancer diagnosis. If in vitro diagnostic tests are proven to be both specific, i.e. rarely produce false positive results due to unrelated conditions, and sufficiently sensitive, i.e. rarely produce false negative results, then such screening tests offer the potential for early detection and personalized therapeutics using multiple disease-related targets with convenient and non-invasive means. Here we discuss the technical and regulatory barriers inherent in development of clinical multianalyte biomarker assays.

  19. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications

  20. Financial Strain and Regional Unemployment as Barriers to Job Search Self-Efficacy: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahling, Jason J.; Melloy, Robert; Thompson, Mindi N.

    2013-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT) emphasizes the potential impact of contextual barriers on vocational self-efficacy, interests, and goals. However, most tests of SCCT to date have focused exclusively on person-level, perceptual barriers rather than objective, macroeconomic barriers that may influence large groups of people. In this study, we…

  1. Multidimensionally constrained relativistic mean-field study of triple-humped barriers in actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Lu, Bing-Nan; Vretenar, Dario; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Potential energy surfaces (PES's) of actinide nuclei are characterized by a two-humped barrier structure. At large deformations beyond the second barrier, the occurrence of a third barrier was predicted by macroscopic-microscopic model calculations in the 1970s, but contradictory results were later reported by a number of studies that used different methods. Purpose: Triple-humped barriers in actinide nuclei are investigated in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). Methods: Calculations are performed using the multidimensionally constrained relativistic mean field (MDC-RMF) model, with the nonlinear point-coupling functional PC-PK1 and the density-dependent meson exchange functional DD-ME2 in the particle-hole channel. Pairing correlations are treated in the BCS approximation with a separable pairing force of finite range. Results: Two-dimensional PES's of 226,228,230,232Th and 232,235,236,238U are mapped and the third minima on these surfaces are located. Then one-dimensional potential energy curves along the fission path are analyzed in detail and the energies of the second barrier, the third minimum, and the third barrier are determined. The functional DD-ME2 predicts the occurrence of a third barrier in all Th nuclei and 238U . The third minima in 230 ,232Th are very shallow, whereas those in 226 ,228Th and 238U are quite prominent. With the functional PC-PK1 a third barrier is found only in 226 ,228 ,230Th . Single-nucleon levels around the Fermi surface are analyzed in 226Th, and it is found that the formation of the third minimum is mainly due to the Z =90 proton energy gap at β20≈1.5 and β30≈0.7 . Conclusions: The possible occurrence of a third barrier on the PES's of actinide nuclei depends on the effective interaction used in multidimensional CDFT calculations. More pronounced minima are predicted by the DD-ME2 functional, as compared to the functional PC-PK1. The depth of the third well in Th isotopes decreases

  2. Test method for the microbiological barrier properties of wrapping materials ; new approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijn ACP; Wagner P.

    1993-01-01

    The study shows that the new approach, as proposed by CEN TC102 wg4, for the development of a test method for the determination the microbial barrier properties of packaging materials for medical devices does not give the expected advances over the in 1990 presented LGM test method (RIVM-report 919000001, June 1990). The material qualification obtained by means of a materials test does not provide any relevant information about the expected performance of the material when formed into a final...

  3. Never tested for HIV in Latin-American migrants and Spaniards: prevalence and perceived barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Hoyos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing the uptake of HIV testing and decreasing the number of undiagnosed people is a priority for HIV prevention. Understanding the barriers that hinder people from testing is vital, particularly when working with especially vulnerable populations like migrants. Most data available on migrants are based on African migrants in the UK, while barriers to HIV testing in Latin-American migrants living in Europe remain unexplored. Still, they account for a quarter of new diagnosis in Spain and suffer higher rates of delayed diagnosis. Methods: Between May 2008 and March 2011, a mobile unit offered free rapid HIV tests in different Spanish cities. We compared the prevalence of no previous testing, adjusting for potential confounders by two multivariate logistic models, and described differences in perceived barriers to testing in Latin-American migrants living in Spain versus Spaniards. Participants included men who have sex with men (MSM, men who have sex exclusively with women (MSW, and women. Results: Of the 5920 individuals who got tested and answered a self-administered questionnaire, 36.5% were MSM (20.4% previously untested, 28.9% were MSW (49% previously untested and 34.6% were women (53% previously untested. Almost one quarter were Latin-American, of whom 30% had never been tested versus 45% of untested Spaniards. After adjusting for potential confounders, Spaniards were more likely to report no previous testing than Latin-Americans among women and MSW all together (Odds Ratio (OR=2.0; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.7–2.4 and among MSM (OR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.2–2.0. Among the 2455 who had never undergone an HIV test before, main barriers to testing were low perceived risk (54% Spaniards vs. 47% Latin-American and concerns arising from the loss of anonymity (19.5% vs. 16.9%. Fear of rejection or discrimination and fear of legal problems were a barrier for <2%. Conclusions: Latin-American migrants living in Spain were more

  4. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb3Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation

  5. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cautley, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bohac, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Francisco, P. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Shen, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Gloss, S. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  6. Blood-brain barrier permeability in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields used in wireless communication

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Bertil R.; Leif G Salford; Brun, Arne

    1997-01-01

    iological effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been studied in Fischer 344 rats of both sexes. The rats were not anaesthetised during the exposure. All animals were sacrificed by perfusion–fixation of the brains under chloralhydrate anaesthesia after the exposure. The brains were perfused with saline for 3–4 minutes, and thereafter perfusion fixed with 4% formaldehyde for 5–6 minutes. Whole coronal sections of the brains were d...

  7. Testing for Barriers to Energy Conservation -- an Application of a Vintage Model

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Ingham; James Maw; Alistair Ulph

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we use a sophisticated vintage model of the production structure of the U.K manufacturing sector to analyze the pattern of energy conservation over the period 1971-1987 and to test whether there is evidence of significant market imperfections which could act as barriers to energy conservation.

  8. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  9. The Barrier Magnetic Separator for the Treatment of Weakly Magnetic Ores: Laboratoryscale Investigations and Industrial Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Turkenich, A. M.; Baranov, U. D.; Ruditsky, A. V.

    2002-01-01

    The principle of action of the barrier separator for beneficiation of coarse weakly magnetic ores is described. New data of laboratory-scale investigations of beneficiation of manganese ore and mineral sands are introduced. The results of tests in the Volnogorsk State Mining and Metallurgical Plant (VSMMP) show high technological effectiveness and reliability of the experimental separator.

  10. Prevalence and barriers to HIV testing among mothers at a tertiary care hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Barriers to HIV testing in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yuri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One-third of all new HIV infections in Cambodia are estimated to be due to mother-to-child transmission. Although the Ministry of Health adopted a policy of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC, nearly a quarter of pregnant mothers were not tested in 2007. Greater acceptance of HIV testing is a challenge despite Cambodia's adoption of the PITC policy. Methods A hospital-based quantitative and cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of and barriers to HIV testing among mothers after delivery at the National Maternal and Child Health Center in Phnom Penh. The Center is one of the largest maternal and child care hospitals in the country to offer PITC services. All 600 eligible mothers who were admitted to the hospital after delivery from October to December 2007 were approached and recruited. Data were collected via a semi-structured questionnaire. Results The prevalence of HIV testing among women who delivered at the hospital was 76%. In multivariate logistic regression, factors such as the perceived need to obtain a partner's permission to be tested (OR=0.27, 95% CI=0.14-0.51, p Conclusion To achieve greater acceptance of HIV testing, counseling on HIV prevention and treatment must be provided not only to mothers but also to their partners. In addition, utilization of non-laboratory staff such as midwives to provide HIV testing services in rural health facilities could lead to the greater acceptance of HIV testing.

  11. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  12. Hypersensitivity test to electric magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The so-called electromagnetic hypersensitivity (RH) syndrome includes a number of unspecific, medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electric and magnetic fields. As a whole, laboratory tests have provided inconclusive results, in part due to the fact that many individuals show nuclear, inconsistent responses to repeated experimental field-exposures. It has been proposed that such inconsistencies could be due in part to distress caused by the lab test itself. We have developed a test to be conducted at the patient's residence, allowing for long-term follow up of exposure-response assessment and avoiding the laboratory environment and the presence of the researcher as potential stressors and confounding factors. In a pilot test, EMDEX-II magnetometers were used to continuously recording power-frequency magnetic fields in the residence of a patient with perceived EH. The patient's symptoms included distress, headache and dizziness, among other ailments. Magnetographic data of a total of 123 recording days were plotted against the corresponding data on occurrence of the symptoms episodes. As a whole, the results did not show positive linear correlation between the daily occurrence of the episode and the exposures levels recorded during the day or during the day before. These preliminary results are little supportive of the hypothesis that the patient's ailments are caused or worsened by a putative hypersensitivity to residential exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields in the 0.02-4.00 μT range. (Author) 29 refs

  13. Field testing driver night vision devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Kolletzki, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the available methodologies to field test driver night vision devices ranging from vehicle mounted camera’s to head-mounted NVG’s. As in flight trials, a formidable challenge is to collect meaningful performance measures. Night vision systems for land and air systems show many

  14. Cytotoxicity evaluation of a new self-adhering flowable composite by dentin barrier test

    OpenAIRE

    Ülker, Hayriye Esra; Ülker, Mustafa; Özcan, Erhan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new self-adhering flowable composite (Vertise Flow) in a dentin barrier test device using three-dimensional cultures of bovine dental pulp derived cells.MATERIALS AND METHOD: Artificial cell culture perfusion chambers were separated into two compartments using a 500 µm dentin disc. In the lower compartment, a pulp chamber was created by placing the three-dimensional cultures onto the dentin disc. Test materials were introd...

  15. Schottky barrier breakdown in Si stimulation by exciton drift in inhomogeneous electric field at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental study of the mechanism of the Schottky barrier breakdown stimulation in photoexcited silicon in the strong electric field at 4.2 K is presented. The effect of photoexcitation intensity and the intensity of the electric field applied, as well as the influence of their time on breakdown mechanism were studied. It is shown that Schottky barrier breakdown occurs due to the narrowing of the spatial charged region caused by the exciton drift under the inhomogeneous electric field and electron recombination at the barrier ionized impurity levels

  16. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the open-quotes Site Decommissioning Management Planclose quotes (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona's Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data

  17. Ambipolar ballistic electron emission microscopy studies of gate-field modified Schottky barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Y. L.; Pelz, J. P.

    2010-06-01

    Four-terminal ambipolar ballistic electron emission microscopy studies are conducted on Au/Si and Cu/Si Schottky contacts fabricated on back-gated silicon-on-insulator wafers, allowing the electric field to be varied so that both electron (n)- and hole (p)-Schottky barrier heights can be measured at the same sample location. While the individual n- and p-Schottky barrier heights varied by more than 200 meV between the Au/Si and Cu/Si contacts, for a given sample they sum to within 15 meV of the same value, indicating that the individual variations are due to variations in a local surface dipole as compared with tip effects or variations in local composition.

  18. Compact toroid formation using barrier fields and controlled reconnection in the TRX-1 field reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRX-1 is a new 20 cm diameter, 1-m long field reversed theta pinch with a magnetic field swing of 10 kG in 3 μsec. It employs z discharge preionization and octopole barrier fields to maximize flux trapping on first half cycle operation. Cusp coils are used at the theta pinch ends to delay reconnection and fast mirror coils are used to trigger reconnection at a time designed to maximize axial heating efficiency and toroid lifetime. These controls are designed to study toroid formation methods which are claimed to be especially efficient by Russian experimenters. Studies have been conducted on flux trapping efficiency, triggered reconnection, and equilibrium and lifetime

  19. USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of perfluorocarbon gas tracers (PFT) on a subsurface barrier with known flaws was conducted at the Waldo Test Site operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA). The tests involved the use of five unique PFTs with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm3/min and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls, and one flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated. Simultaneous with the PFT tests, SEA conducted tests with another gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)

  20. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across magnetic islands are also presented. In qualitative agreement with recent experiments in large helical device and DIII-D, it is shown that the elliptic (O) and hyperbolic (X) points of magnetic islands have a direct impact on the spatio-temporal dependence of the amplitude of modulated heat pulses.

  1. Schottky barrier and contact resistance of InSb nanowire field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dingxun; Kang, N.; Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Dick, Kimberly A.; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of the electrical contact properties of semiconductor nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs) plays a crucial role in the use of semiconducting NWs as building blocks for future nanoelectronic devices and in the study of fundamental physics problems. Here, we report on a study of the contact properties of Ti/Au, a widely used contact metal combination, when contacting individual InSb NWs via both two-probe and four-probe transport measurements. We show that a Schottky barrier of height {{{Φ }}}{{SB}}∼ 20 {{meV}} is present at the metal–InSb NW interfaces and its effective height is gate-tunable. The contact resistance ({R}{{c}}) in the InSb NWFETs is also analyzed by magnetotransport measurements at low temperatures. It is found that {R}{{c}} in the on-state exhibits a pronounced magnetic field-dependent feature, namely it is increased strongly with increasing magnetic field after an onset field {B}{{c}}. A qualitative picture that takes into account magnetic depopulation of subbands in the NWs is provided to explain the observation. Our results provide solid experimental evidence for the presence of a Schottky barrier at Ti/Au–InSb NW interfaces and can be used as a basis for design and fabrication of novel InSb NW-based nanoelectronic devices and quantum devices.

  2. Schottky barrier and contact resistance of InSb nanowire field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dingxun; Kang, N; Ghalamestani, Sepideh Gorji; Dick, Kimberly A; Xu, H Q

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of the electrical contact properties of semiconductor nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs) plays a crucial role in the use of semiconducting NWs as building blocks for future nanoelectronic devices and in the study of fundamental physics problems. Here, we report on a study of the contact properties of Ti/Au, a widely used contact metal combination, when contacting individual InSb NWs via both two-probe and four-probe transport measurements. We show that a Schottky barrier of height [Formula: see text] is present at the metal-InSb NW interfaces and its effective height is gate-tunable. The contact resistance ([Formula: see text]) in the InSb NWFETs is also analyzed by magnetotransport measurements at low temperatures. It is found that [Formula: see text] in the on-state exhibits a pronounced magnetic field-dependent feature, namely it is increased strongly with increasing magnetic field after an onset field [Formula: see text]. A qualitative picture that takes into account magnetic depopulation of subbands in the NWs is provided to explain the observation. Our results provide solid experimental evidence for the presence of a Schottky barrier at Ti/Au-InSb NW interfaces and can be used as a basis for design and fabrication of novel InSb NW-based nanoelectronic devices and quantum devices. PMID:27232588

  3. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  4. Dynamic characteristics of double-barrier nanostructures with asymmetric barriers of finite height and widths in a strong ac electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenkov, V. A., E-mail: v.a.chuenkov@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The theory of the interaction of a monoenergetic flow of injected electrons with a strong high-frequency ac electric field in resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) structures with asymmetric barriers of finite height and width is generalized. In the quasi-classical approximation, electron wavefunctions and tunneling functions in the quantum well and barriers are found. Analytical expressions for polarization currents in RTDs are derived in both the general case and in a number of limiting cases. It is shown that the polarization currents and radiation power in RTDs with asymmetric barriers strongly depend on the ratio of the probabilities of electron tunneling through the emitter and collector barriers. In the quantum mode, when δ = ε − ε{sub r} = ħω ≪ Γ (ε is the energy of electrons injected in the RTD, ħ is Planck’s constant, ω is the ac field frequency, ε{sub r} and Γ are the energy and width of the resonance level, respectively), the active polarization current in a field of E ≈ 2.8ħω/ea (e is the electron charge and a is the quantum-well width) reaches a maximum equal in magnitude to 84% of the direct resonant current, if the probability of electron tunneling through the emitter barrier is much higher than that through the collector barrier. The radiation-generation power at frequencies of ω = 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} s{sup −1} can reach 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2} in this case.

  5. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  6. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  7. Travinfo Field Operational Test Evaluation Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Randolph; Yim, Y. B.; Khattak, Asad; Miller, Mark; Weissenberger, Stein

    1995-01-01

    TravInfo is a Field Operational Test (FOT) sponsored by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration. The goal of the project is to implement a centralized traveler information center to collect, integrate, and broadly disseminate timely and accurate traveler information in the San Francisco Bay Area. This evaluation plan describes the scope, methods, and procedures to measure the effectiveness of the project. The TravInfo evaluation will contain four evaluation elements: institutional, technology...

  8. Dynamic conductivity of symmetric three-barrier plane nanosystem in constant electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Voitsekhivska

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of dynamic conductivity of nanosystem is developed within the model of rectangular potentials and different effective masses of electron in open three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure in a constant homogeneous electric field. The application of this theory for the improvement of operating characteristics of quantum cascade laser active region (for the experimentally investigated In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As heterosystem proves that for a certain geometric design of nanosystem there exists such minimal magnitude of constant electric field intensity, at which the electromagnetic field radiation power together with the density of current flowing through the separate cascade of quantum laser becomes maximal.

  9. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cautley, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bohac, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Francisco, P. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Shen, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Gloss, S. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  10. 105-KE Basin isolation barrier leak rate test analytical development. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides an analytical development in support of the proposed leak rate test of the 105-KE Basin. The analytical basis upon which the K-basin leak test results will be used to determine the basin leakage rates is developed in this report. The leakage of the K-Basin isolation barriers under postulated accident conditions will be determined from the test results. There are two fundamental flow regimes that may exist in the postulated K-Basin leakage: viscous laminar and turbulent flow. An analytical development is presented for each flow regime. The basic geometry and nomenclature of the postulated leak paths are denoted

  11. Multidimensionally-constrained relativistic mean-field study of triple-humped barriers in actinides

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jie; Vretenar, Dario; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Potential energy surfaces (PES's) of actinide nuclei are characterized by a two-humped barrier structure. At large deformations beyond the second barrier, the occurrence of a third one was predicted by macroscopic-microscopic model calculations in the 1970s but contradictory results were later obtained with a number of different models. In this paper, triple-humped barriers in actinide nuclei are investigated with covariant density functional theory (CDFT). Calculations are performed using the multidimensionally-constrained relativistic mean field (MDC-RMF) model, with functionals PC-PK1 and DD-ME2 in the particle-hole channel, while pairing correlations are treated in the BCS approximation with a separable and finite range pairing force. Two-dimensional PES's of $^{226,228,230,232}$Th and $^{232,234,236,238}$U are mapped and the third minima on these surfaces are located. In a second step the one-dimensional potential energy curves along the fission path are analyzed in detail and the energies of the second ...

  12. Novel field-effect schottky barrier transistors based on graphene-MoS 2 heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, He

    2014-08-11

    Recently, two-dimensional materials such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS 2) have been demonstrated to realize field effect transistors (FET) with a large current on-off ratio. However, the carrier mobility in backgate MoS2 FET is rather low (typically 0.5-20 cm2/V.s). Here, we report a novel field-effect Schottky barrier transistors (FESBT) based on graphene-MoS2 heterojunction (GMH), where the characteristics of high mobility from graphene and high on-off ratio from MoS2 are properly balanced in the novel transistors. Large modulation on the device current (on/off ratio of 105) is achieved by adjusting the backgate (through 300 nm SiO2) voltage to modulate the graphene-MoS2 Schottky barrier. Moreover, the field effective mobility of the FESBT is up to 58.7 cm2/V.s. Our theoretical analysis shows that if the thickness of oxide is further reduced, a subthreshold swing (SS) of 40 mV/decade can be maintained within three orders of drain current at room temperature. This provides an opportunity to overcome the limitation of 60 mV/decade for conventional CMOS devices. The FESBT implemented with a high on-off ratio, a relatively high mobility and a low subthreshold promises low-voltage and low-power applications for future electronics.

  13. Construction and operational experiences of engineered barrier test facility for near surface disposal of LILW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Beak; Park, Se Moon; Kim, Chang Lak [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Engineered barrier test facility is specially designed to demonstrate the performance of engineered barrier system for the near-surface disposal facility under the domestic environmental conditions. Comprehensive measurement systems are installed within each test cell. Long-and short-term monitoring of the multi-layered cover system can be implemented according to different rainfall scenarios with artificial rainfall system. Monitoring data on the water content, temperature, matric potential, lateral drainage and percolation of cover-layer system can be systematically managed by automatic data acquisition system. The periodic measurement data are collected and will be analyzed by a dedicated database management system, and provide a basis for performance verification of the disposal cover design.

  14. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehm, F.; Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K.

    2015-12-01

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10-5 g(H2O)/m2/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  15. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10−5 g(H2O)/m2/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity

  16. Field tests using radioactive matter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of field tests with explosive dispersal of a radioactive substance (RaS) are presented. The paper deals with tests exploiting artificial obstacles as a continuation and expansion of the tests used in this study performed in free area described previously. The essential goal of the tests was to estimate the distribution of the released RaS in the case of intentional abuse of radioactive sources and to get a set of data applicable to testing physical or mathematical models of propagation. Effects of different geometrical and meteorological conditions on the distribution of dispersed RaS were studied via the assessment of dose rate, surface and volume activities, aerosol mass and activity aerodynamic diameters. The principal results can be summarised as follows: the prevalent proportion of the activity of the radionuclide dispersed by an explosion (born by the blast wave and by air convection) is transferred to the detection system/collecting pads essentially within the first minute. Enhanced aerosol mass concentrations were also detected within the same period. The RaS carried by the blast wave passed through the polygon (50 m) within<1 s. An expected crucial impact of meteorological conditions at the moment of the explosion and shortly after was proved by the tests. (authors)

  17. Field tests using radioactive matter 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulik, P; Prouza, Z; Hovorka, J; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Fronka, A; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Skrkal, J

    2013-04-01

    Results of field tests with explosive dispersal of a radioactive substance (RaS) are presented. The paper deals with tests exploiting artificial obstacles as a continuation and expansion of the tests used in this study performed in free area described previously. The essential goal of the tests was to estimate the distribution of the released RaS in the case of intentional abuse of radioactive sources and to get a set of data applicable to testing physical or mathematical models of propagation. Effects of different geometrical and meteorological conditions on the distribution of dispersed RaS were studied via the assessment of dose rate, surface and volume activities, aerosol mass and activity aerodynamic diameters. The principal results can be summarised as follows: the prevalent proportion of the activity of the radionuclide dispersed by an explosion (born by the blast wave and by air convection) is transferred to the detection system/collecting pads essentially within the first minute. Enhanced aerosol mass concentrations were also detected within the same period. The RaS carried by the blast wave passed through the polygon (50 m) within <1 s. An expected crucial impact of meteorological conditions at the moment of the explosion and shortly after was proved by the tests. PMID:22923250

  18. Performance Test of CCTV in a Test Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 12-13, 2010, US President Obama hosted a Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, DC, to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism, an issue which he has identified as the most immediate and extreme threat to global security. The Summit focused on the security of nuclear materials, nonproliferation, disarmament, and peaceful nuclear energy. At the summit, the Republic of Korea was chosen as the host of the next Summit in 2012. This series of events reflects the growing global interest on 'Nuclear Security' and as the host country of the next Nuclear Summit it is the time for Korea to strengthen the physical protection regime for nuclear facilities as a first step of securing its nuclear security capability. KINAC has been operating Test field as a mean of preparing solid backup data for reviewing and revising DBT (Design Basis Threat) and to test components of the conventional physical protection system. CCTV is a key component which is used worldwide for the assessment measure of alarms. In terms of performance test of CCTV, there are several elements such as image quality, coverage and mechanical features (speed of zoom-in-out, capture, angle shift etc.). Speaking of image quality acquired by the CCTV, the quality is subject to resolution, monitor specification, camera housing, camera mounting and lightening. Thus it is clear that performance tests on image quality should consider those factors and vary the factors respectively in order to verify the influence and the interaction among those. Nevertheless due to the restrictions of the current Test field, this paper focuses on the image quality through resolution test under the various lightening conditions

  19. Characterization, origin and hierarchy of lateral shale-barriers in the Petrocedeno heavy oil field, Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegner, J. [Petrocedeno, Total E and P (Venezuela); Bejarano, C. [Petrocedeno, PDVSA, CVP (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    The Petrocedeno heavy oil field located in the western part of the Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela, is in its last stages of primary recovery with over 10 years of production and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects are now being considered. A better reservoir characterization is required to implement those EOR projects and thus the aim of the study is to improve understanding of the reservoir barriers and baffles. Based on available data, core description and wire-line pressure depletion data from the Petrocedeno field, a shale barrier model was developed. It was found that thick mudstone may provide shale barriers and interact with production. In addition a hierarchy for the Petrocedeno area was proposed. This study provided a better understanding of shale barriers in the Petrocedeno heavy oil field but further research should be undertaken to refine the recognition of shale origin.

  20. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R.; Auriemma, F.; Fassina, A.; Martines, E.; Terranova, D.; Sattin, F.

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation.

  1. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  2. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR

  3. Issues related to field testing in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has brought out the unique properties of tuffs and related them to needs associated with their use as a host rock for a high level nuclear waste repository. Major issues of temperature, pore water, joints, and depositional patterns have been identified and related responses and impacts outlined in Table 1. Planned experiments have been outlined and their relationships to the rock mechanics issues summarized in Table 2. The conclusions from this paper are: (1) tuff is a complex rock and basic phenomenological understanding is incomplete; and (2) available field test facilities will be used for a series of experiments designed to improve phenomenological understanding and support repository design efforts

  4. Issues related to field testing in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.M.

    1982-12-31

    This paper has brought out the unique properties of tuffs and related them to needs associated with their use as a host rock for a high level nuclear waste repository. Major issues of temperature, pore water, joints, and depositional patterns have been identified and related responses and impacts outlined in Table 1. Planned experiments have been outlined and their relationships to the rock mechanics issues summarized in Table 2. The conclusions from this paper are: (1) tuff is a complex rock and basic phenomenological understanding is incomplete; and (2) available field test facilities will be used for a series of experiments designed to improve phenomenological understanding and support repository design efforts.

  5. Bentonite engineered barrier building method for radioactive waste on sub-surface disposal test project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The engineering barriers such as clay and concrete materials are planned to use for covering radioactive waste in cavern-type disposal facility. The requirement to clay barrier is very low permeability, which could be satisfied by high density Bentonite, and such a compaction method will be needed. Two methods, compaction and air shot, were tested in engineering scale for constructing a high-density clay barrier. Two types of compaction equipments, 'Teasel plate' and 'Plate compacter', were developed and engineering scale experiments were performed for compacting Bentonite only and Bentonite-sand-aggregate mixture. As a result, the Teasel plate can reach higher density Bentonite in relatively short time in comparison to other equipments. While, regarding air shot method, an air-shot machine in a tunnel construction site was tested by different water adding methods (wet, dry, and half wet). It is concluded that the dry and half wet constructing methods will achieve reasonable workability. As a result, the best construction option can be chosen according to the locations of radioactive waste facility. (author)

  6. 3X-100 blade field test.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  7. Fiber optic sensor applications in field testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiber optic sensors (F.O.S.) are defined, and the application of this technology to measuring various phenomonon in diverse and hostile environments are discussed. F.O.S. advantages and disavantages both technically and operationally are summarized. Three sensor techniques - intensity, interferometric, and polarization - are then discussed in some detail. General environmental instrumentation and controls that support the Nuclear Weapons Test Program at the Nevada Test Site are discussed next to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the programmatic task. This will aid in recognizing the various difficulties of the traditional measurement techniques at the NTS and the potential advantages that fiber optic measurement systems can provide. An F.O.S. development program is then outlined, depicting a plan to design and fabricate a prototype sensor to be available for field testing by the end of FY84. We conclude with future plans for further development of F.O.S. to measure more of the desired physical parameters for the Test Program, and to eventually become an integral part of an overall measurement and control system

  8. Electric field in an AC dielectric barrier discharge overlapped with a nanosecond pulse discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of ns discharge pulses on the AC barrier discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry is studied using time-resolved measurements of the electric field in the plasma. The AC discharge was operated at a pressure of 300 Torr at frequencies of 500 and 1750 Hz, with ns pulses generated when the AC voltage was near zero. The electric field vector is measured by ps four-wave mixing technique, which generates coherent IR signal proportional to the square of electric field. Absolute calibration was done using an electrostatic (sub-breakdown) field applied to the discharge electrodes, when no plasma was generated. The results are compared with one-dimensional kinetic modeling of the AC discharge and the nanosecond pulse discharge, predicting behavior of both individual micro-discharges and their cumulative effect on the electric field distribution in the electrode gap, using stochastic averaging based on the experimental micro-discharge temporal probability distribution during the AC period. Time evolution of the electric field in the AC discharge without ns pulses, controlled by a superposition of random micro-discharges, exhibits a nearly ‘flat top’ distribution with the maximum near breakdown threshold, reproduced quite well by kinetic modeling. Adding ns pulse discharges on top of the AC voltage waveform changes the AC discharge behavior in a dramatic way, inducing transition from random micro-discharges to a more regular, near-1D discharge. In this case, reproducible volumetric AC breakdown is produced at a well-defined moment after each ns pulse discharge. During the reproducible AC breakdown, the electric field in the plasma exhibits a sudden drop, which coincides in time with a well-defined current pulse. This trend is also predicted by the kinetic model. Analysis of kinetic modeling predictions shows that this effect is caused by large-volume ionization and neutralization of surface charges on the dielectrics by ns discharge pulses. The present

  9. 6H-SiC Schottky barrier source/drain NMOSFET with field-induced source/drain extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Xiao-Yan; Zhang Yi-Men; Zhang Yu-Ming; Gao Jin-Xia

    2005-01-01

    A novel SiC Schottky barrier source/drain NMOSFET(SiC SBSD-NMOSFET) with field-induced source/drain(FISD) extension is proposed and demonstrated by numerical simulation for the first time. In the new device the FISD extension is induced by a metal field-plate lying on top of the passivation oxide, and the width of Schottky barrier is controllde by the metal field-plate. The new structure not only eliminates the effect of the significantly improves the on-state current. Moreover, the performance of the present device exhibits very weak dependence on the widths of sidewalls.

  10. Recurrent dynamic states and passage of packets of intense rf field through parabolic plasma-density barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of the energy of an rf field through the supercritical regions of inhomogeneous plasma media may be due to the existence of frequency-tunable dynamic states of the rf field in the inhomogeneous medium, of considerable interest among these are the states that correspond to the identity transformation of nonlinear wave packets as they move through density barriers. In this study the authors have found such dynamic states for rf fields described by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with a parabolic density barrier

  11. The long term behaviour of the near-field barrier surrounding a deep underground repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research to identify the factors which govern or influence the long-term behaviour of the near-field of a nuclear waste repository. The near-field components include the engineered barriers and the natural rock mass although the behaviour of the rock mass is of greater significance over the long-term. The factors which govern the near-field behaviour consist of the processes which operate, and the properties or parameters of the rock mass which might be modified by them. The methods which are available for the prediction of the near-field behaviour have been identified, and the emphasis on computer based methods is noted. Summary details of generic computer techniques are provided for different process modelling requirements. An attempt is made to indicate how different processes will be important at various stages during the life of the repository and how the evaluation of performance assessment process modelling requires input from empirical models and the results of other process predictions. (Author)

  12. Intracellular electric fields produced by dielectric barrier discharge treatment of skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of atmospheric pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. These effects are attributed to both production of beneficial radicals which intersect with biological reaction chains and to the surface and intracellular generation of electric fields. In this paper, we report on computational studies of the intersection of plasma streamers in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in air with human skin tissue, with emphasis on the intracellular generation of electric fields. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the skin and the intracellular production of electrical currents. The short duration of a single plasma filament in DBDs and its intersection with skin enables the intracellular penetration of electric fields. The magnitude of these electric fields can reach 100 kV cm-1 which may exceed the threshold for electroporation.

  13. Intracellular electric fields produced by dielectric barrier discharge treatment of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2010-05-01

    The application of atmospheric pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. These effects are attributed to both production of beneficial radicals which intersect with biological reaction chains and to the surface and intracellular generation of electric fields. In this paper, we report on computational studies of the intersection of plasma streamers in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in air with human skin tissue, with emphasis on the intracellular generation of electric fields. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the skin and the intracellular production of electrical currents. The short duration of a single plasma filament in DBDs and its intersection with skin enables the intracellular penetration of electric fields. The magnitude of these electric fields can reach 100 kV cm-1 which may exceed the threshold for electroporation.

  14. Intracellular electric fields produced by dielectric barrier discharge treatment of skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J, E-mail: nbabaeva@umich.ed, E-mail: mjkush@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-05-12

    The application of atmospheric pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. These effects are attributed to both production of beneficial radicals which intersect with biological reaction chains and to the surface and intracellular generation of electric fields. In this paper, we report on computational studies of the intersection of plasma streamers in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in air with human skin tissue, with emphasis on the intracellular generation of electric fields. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the skin and the intracellular production of electrical currents. The short duration of a single plasma filament in DBDs and its intersection with skin enables the intracellular penetration of electric fields. The magnitude of these electric fields can reach 100 kV cm{sup -1} which may exceed the threshold for electroporation.

  15. Experimental investigation of electron transport across a magnetic field barrier in electropositive and electronegative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. B.; Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we experimentally investigate the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} drift of electrons in low temperature plasmas containing a magnetic field barrier; a plasma configuration commonly used in gridded negative ion sources. A planar Langmuir probe array is developed to quantify the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} drift of electrons over the cross-section of the ion-extraction region of an ion–ion plasma source. The drift is studied as a function of pressure using both electropositive plasmas (Ar), as well electronegative plasmas (Ar and SF6 mixtures), and is demonstrated to result from an interaction of the applied magnetic field and the electric fields in the sheath and pre-sheath near the transverse boundaries. The drift enhances electron transport across the magnetic field by more than two orders of magnitude compared with simple collisional transport, and is found to be strongly dependant on pressure. The lowest pressure resulted in the highest influence of the drift across the extraction area and is found to be 30%.

  16. Experimental testing of impact force on rigid and flexible barriers - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, Georg; Hübl, Johannes; Chiari, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Trattenbach endangers the main western railway track of Austria by floods and debris flows. Three check dams for debris retention were built in the proximal fan area several decades ago. With regard to an improvement of the protective function, these structures have to be renewed. The recent concept of the uppermost barrier is a type of an energy dissipation net structure, stopping debris flows with the ability of self-cleaning by subsequent floods or by machinery employment. The access to the basin is achieved through the slit when the net has been removed. This technical structure consists of a rigid open crown dam with a 4m wide slit. This slit is closed with a flexible net. To verify this protective system, 21 small scale experiments were conducted to test and optimize this new type of Slit Net Dam. To determine the forces on the barrier, in a first setup of experiments the impact forces on a rigid wall with 24 load cells were measured. In the second setup the slit barrier with the net was investigated. On four main cables the anchor forces were measured. In a further setup the basal distance between the channel and lowest net was varied. To study the emptying of the basin and the dosing effect on debris flows.

  17. Barriers to the Uptake of Human-based Test Methods, and How to Overcome Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Kathy; Drake, Tamara; Coleman, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Although there is growing concern as to the questionable value of animal-based methods for determining the safety and efficacy of new medicines, which has in turn led to many groups developing innovative human-based methods, there are many barriers to their adoption for regulatory submissions. The reasons for this are various, and include a lack of confidence that the available human-based methods, be they in vivo, in silico or in vitro, can be sufficiently predictive of clinical outcomes. However, this is not the only problem: the issue of validation presents a serious impediment to progress, a particularly frustrating situation, in view of the fact that the existing animal-based methods have never themselves been formally validated. Superimposed upon this is the issue of regulatory requirements, where, although regulators may be willing to accept non-animal approaches in place of particular animal tests, nowhere is this explicitly stated in their guidelines. Such problems are far from trivial, and represent major hurdles to be overcome. In addition, there are a range of other barriers, real or self-imposed, that are hindering a more-predictive approach to establishing a new drug's clinical safety and efficacy profiles. Some of these barriers are identified, and ways forward are suggested. PMID:26551287

  18. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  19. Spectroscopic measurements of electric field distributions in dielectric barrier discharges in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of spectroscopic studies of plasmas generated in dielectric barrier discharges between flat ceramic electrodes supplied by AC voltage in pure hydrogen atmosphere under low-pressure conditions are presented. Stark splitting of the Hα Balmer line was used to measure the electric field strengths in the discharge volume. The optical instrumentation and the detection system allow to perform spatial and time resolved measurements separately for the π and σ Stark components. The measured spatial light intensity distributions are averaged data obtained by integrating signals from many half-periods of the AC voltage supply. This fact has been taken into account when comparing our averaged data with results of theoretical models which are yielding time dependent results

  20. A simple drain current model for Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a new computational model to efficiently simulate carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNT-FET). In the model, a central region is formed by a semiconducting nanotube that acts as the conducting channel, surrounded by a thin oxide layer and a metal gate electrode. At both ends of the semiconducting channel, two semi-infinite metallic reservoirs act as source and drain contacts. The current-voltage characteristics are computed using the Landauer formalism, including the effect of the Schottky barrier physics. The main operational regimes of the CNT-FET are described, including thermionic and tunnel current components, capturing ambipolar conduction, multichannel ballistic transport and electrostatics dominated by the nanotube capacitance. The calculations are successfully compared to results given by more sophisticated methods based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF)

  1. Modeling a Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with ferromagnetic contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a model of a Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET), with ferromagnetic contacts, has been developed. The emphasis is put on analysis of current-voltage characteristics as well as shot (and thermal) noise. The method is based on the tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Green's function technique. The calculations show that, at room temperature, the shot noise of the CNT-FET is Poissonian in the sub-threshold region, whereas in elevated gate and drain/source voltage regions the Fano factor gets strongly reduced. Moreover, transport properties strongly depend on relative magnetization orientations in the source and drain contacts. In particular, one observes quite a large tunnel magnetoresistance, whose absolute value may exceed 50%

  2. Electromechanical Breakdown of Barrier-Type Anodized Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Under High Electric Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Yao, Xi

    2016-02-01

    Barrier-type anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were formed on a polished aluminum substrate via electrochemical anodization in 0.1 mol/L aqueous solution of ammonium pentaborate. Electromechanical breakdown occurred under high electric field conditions as a result of the accumulation of mechanical stress in the film-substrate system by subjecting it to rapid thermal treatment. Before the breakdown event, the electricity of the films was transported in a highly nonlinear way. Immediately after the breakdown event, dramatic cracking of the films occurred, and the cracks expanded quickly to form a mesh-like dendrite network. The breakdown strength was significantly reduced because of the electromechanical coupling effect, and was only 34% of the self-healing breakdown strength of the AAO film.

  3. Barriers to HIV Testing Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM): Experiences from Clark County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharr, Jennifer R.; Lough, Nancy L.; Ezeanolue, Echezona E.

    2016-01-01

    Clark County, Nevada had a 52% increase in newly diagnosed HIV infections in young people age 13-24 with 83% of the new diagnoses in this age group being men who have sex with men (MSM). HIV testing and counseling is critical for HIV prevention, care and treatment, yet young people are the least likely to seek HIV testing. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to HIV testing experienced by young MSM in Clark County, Nevada. We conducted a qualitative focus group discussion to identify barriers and facilitators to HIV testing among eleven young MSM in March, 2015. The primary barrier to HIV testing identified by the group was a lack of awareness or knowledge about testing for HIV. Other barriers within the person included: fear of results, fear of rejection, and fear of disclosure. Barriers identified within the environment included: access issues, stigma, and unfriendly test environments for young people. In addition to increasing awareness, intervention to increase HIV testing among MSM young people should incorporate access to testing in environments where the adolescents are comfortable and which reduces stigma. HIV testing sites should be convenient, accessible and young person/gay friendly.

  4. Field testing method for photovaltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gerber N.

    For remote areas, where solar photovoltaic modules are the only source of power, it is essential to perform preventive maintenance to insure that the PV system works properly; unfortunately, prices for PV testers range from 1,700 to 8,000. To address this issue, a portable inexpensive tester and analysis methodology have been developed. Assembling a simple tester, which costs $530 and weighs about 5 pounds, and using the Four-Parameters PV Model, we characterized the current-voltage (I-V) curve at environmental testing conditions; and then employing radiation, temperature, and age degradation sensitivity equations, we extrapolated the I-V curve to standard testing conditions. After applying the methodology to three kinds of silicon modules (mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline, and thin-film), we obtained maximum power points up to 97% of the manufacturer's specifications. Therefore, based on these results, it is reasonably accurate and affordable to verify the performance of solar modules in the field.

  5. Geologic disposal of radioactive waste: program plan for field testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of program plans is being developed to address the field testing needs for various candidate repository host rocks: salt, granitic rocks, tuff, and basalt. This document, NWTS-80(1), is the first plan of the series, and is intended to provide the framework on which subsequent, rock-specific program plans will be based. The series of Field Testing Program Plans (the NWTS-80 series) is as follows: NWTS-80(1) - Geologic Disposal of Radioactive Waste: Program Plan for Field Testing; NWTS-80(2) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Salt; NWTS-80(3) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Granitic Rock; NWTS-80(4) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Basalt at Hanford; and NWTS-80(5) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Tuff at Nevada Test Site. These plans will be revised on a regular basis as issues are resolved or new ones identified, to reflect the evolution of the Field Testing Program

  6. Effect of barrier width on the exciton states in coupled quantum wells in an applied electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalertporn, Kanchana

    2016-05-01

    The effect of barrier width on the exciton states in coupled quantum wells has been theoretically studied using an efficient approach. By solving the Schrödinger equation in real space, the electron and hole energies and wave functions are calculated in the presence of an applied electric field. It is found that with zero electric field the energy splitting of the doublets is large in the case of thin barrier width. However for thicker barrier width, the Stark effect is stronger at large electric field. The exciton states, binding energies and oscillator strength are also calculated as a function of electric field. There is shown the direct-to-indirect crossover of the exciton ground state at approximately F = 10 kV/cm and F = 5 kV/cm for Lb = 2 nm and Lb = 4 nm respectively, corresponding to the dramatic decrease of its binding energy and oscillator strength. This direct-to-indirect crossover happens at lower electric field for thicker barrier width. We have also studied the light-matter coupling and calculated the DX, IX and CM components of the polariton states as a function of electric field.

  7. The performance of in situ grown Schottky-barrier single wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhixian [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Jin, Rongying [ORNL; Subedi, Alaska P [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Kim, Eugene [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Electrical transport measurements were used to study device behavior that results from the interplay of defects and inadvertent contact variance that develops in as-grown semiconducting single wall carbon nanotube devices with nominally identical Au contacts. The transport measurements reveal that as-grown nanotubes contain defects that limit the performance of field-effect transistors with ohmic contacts. In Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors the device performance is dominated by the Schottky barrier and the nanotube defects have little effect. We also observed strong rectifying behavior attributed to extreme contact asymmetry due to the different nanoscale roughness of the gold contacts formed during nanotube growth.

  8. The performance of in situ grown Schottky-barrier single wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Zhixian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Eres, Gyula; Jin Rongying; Subedi, Alaska; Mandrus, David [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Eugene H [Department of Physics, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4 (Canada)], E-mail: zxzhou@wayne.edu

    2009-02-25

    Electrical transport measurements were used to study device behavior that results from the interplay of defects and inadvertent contact variance that develops in as-grown semiconducting single wall carbon nanotube devices with nominally identical Au contacts. The transport measurements reveal that as-grown nanotubes contain defects that limit the performance of field-effect transistors with ohmic contacts. In Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors the device performance is dominated by the Schottky barrier and the nanotube defects have little effect. We also observed strong rectifying behavior attributed to extreme contact asymmetry due to the different nanoscale roughness of the gold contacts formed during nanotube growth.

  9. The performance of in situ grown Schottky-barrier single wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical transport measurements were used to study device behavior that results from the interplay of defects and inadvertent contact variance that develops in as-grown semiconducting single wall carbon nanotube devices with nominally identical Au contacts. The transport measurements reveal that as-grown nanotubes contain defects that limit the performance of field-effect transistors with ohmic contacts. In Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors the device performance is dominated by the Schottky barrier and the nanotube defects have little effect. We also observed strong rectifying behavior attributed to extreme contact asymmetry due to the different nanoscale roughness of the gold contacts formed during nanotube growth.

  10. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehm, F., E-mail: frederik.nehm@iapp.de; Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10{sup −5} g(H{sub 2}O)/m{sup 2}/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  11. The application of the barrier-type anodic oxidation method to thickness testing of aluminum films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Xiao, Ruihua; Yang, Pengfei; Hu, Baofu; Yao, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The thickness of the active metal oxide film formed from a barrier-type anodizing process is directly proportional to its formation voltage. The thickness of the consumed portion of the metal film is also corresponding to the formation voltage. This principle can be applied to the thickness test of the metal films. If the metal film is growing on a dielectric substrate, when the metal film is exhausted in an anodizing process, because of the high electrical resistance of the formed oxide film, a sudden increase of the recorded voltage during the anodizing process would occur. Then, the thickness of the metal film can be determined from this voltage. As an example, aluminum films are tested and discussed in this work. This method is quite simple and is easy to perform with high precision.

  12. Streamer development in barrier discharge in air: spectral signatures and electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoder, Tomas; Simek, Milan; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Prukner, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    Electrical breakdown in the upper atmosphere takes form of so called Transient Luminous Events (TLE). Down to the certain pressure limit, the first phases of the TLE-phenomena are controlled by the streamer mechanism. In order to understand the development of these events, streamers in 10 torr air were generated in volume barrier discharge. Stability and reproducibility of generated streamers were secured by proper electrode geometry and specific applied voltage waveform. In this work, spectrally resolved measurements of the streamer head emission with high spatial and temporal resolution are presented. Precise recordings of the emission of the second positive and first negative systems of molecular nitrogen allowed the determination of the spatio-temporal development of the reduced electric field in the streamer head. This unique experimental result reveals in more details the early stages of the streamer development and gives, besides values for streamer velocity and its diameter, quantitative information on the magnitude of the electric field. T.H. was financed through the ESF Programme TEA-IS (Grant No. 4219), M.S. and V.P. by the AVCR under collaborative project M100431201 and Z.B. acknowledges the support of grant of Czech Science Foundation GA15-04023S.

  13. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  14. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  15. The burden of knowing: balancing benefits and barriers in HIV testing decisions. a qualitative study from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgensen Marte; Tuba Mary; Fylkesnes Knut; Blystad Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Background Client-initiated HIV counselling and testing has been scaled up in many African countries, in the form of voluntary counselling and testing (VCT). Test rates have remained low, with HIV-related stigma being an important barrier to HIV testing. This study explored HIV testing decisions in one rural and one urban district in Zambia with high HIV prevalence and available antiretroviral treatment. Methods Data were collected through 17 in-depth interviews and two focus group...

  16. Multidimensionally-constrained relativistic mean-field study of triple-humped barriers in actinides

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jie; Lu, Bingnan; Vretenar, Dario; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Potential energy surfaces (PES's) of actinide nuclei are characterized by a two-humped barrier structure. At large deformations beyond the second barrier the occurrence of a third one was predicted by Mic-Mac model calculations in the 1970s, but contradictory results were later reported. In this paper, triple-humped barriers in actinide nuclei are investigated with covariant density functional theory (CDFT). Calculations are performed using the multidimensionally-constrained relativistic mean...

  17. The integrated interaction between high-level waste glass and the near field barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to assess the long-term stability of high-level waste glass in the geological disposal conditions of the Boom clay formation (Mol site, Belgium). In particular, research efforts were concentrated on the measurement of the dissolution rate of high-level waste glass in the presence of the host rock (Boom clay) and engineered barriers. The influence of three candidate backfill materials (bentonite, sand, and concrete) on the dissolution rate is assessed. The dissolution rate of high-level waste glass is measured by performing leaching experiments in the presence of claywater, Boom clay, and various canister, overpack, and backfill materials. These corrosion tests were carried out at 90 degrees Celsius and at different exposed surface area to volume ratios, namely 10 m-1, 100 m-1, and 1000 m-1. The duration of the tests varies from 30 to 90 days. From the experimental results is concluded that the dissolution of the Pamela/DWK SM513 glass is not affected by the presence of the three candidate backfill materials while in the presence of concrete, the dissolution of the glass is reduced in the short-term. (A.S.)

  18. Engineered Barrier System - Manufacturing, Testing and Quality Assurance. Report from a Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of preparations for review of future license applications, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) organised a workshop on the engineered barrier system for the KBS-3 concept, with the focus on manufacturing, testing and quality assurance. The main purpose of the workshop was to identify critical issues in the demonstration of how long-term safety requirements could be fulfilled for the engineered barriers. The workshop included presentations related to engineered barrier manufacturing and testing held by external experts, and working group sessions to prepare questions to the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB). SKB presentations were followed by an informal questioning and discussion with SKB representatives. This report includes a presentation of the questions posed by the working groups, SKB's replies to these questions as well as a summary of the working group discussions. The conclusions and viewpoints presented in this report are those of one or several workshop participants. During the workshop many issues regarding manufacturing, testing and quality assurance of the engineered barriers were discussed. The central themes in the questions and discussions are summarised as follows: There is a need to specify how the functional requirements for the buffer and backfill will be achieved in practise. Issues of particular interest are material selection, compaction density, initial water content and manufacturing methods for bentonite blocks. A major problem that must be addressed is the long period required to obtain relevant results from large-scale testing. The uncertainties relating to the wetting and subsequent swelling processes of the bentonite buffer have implications for analysis of the canister. It is necessary to know now non-uniform the bentonite swelling pressure could be in a worst case pressure differential, in order to evaluate the sufficiency of 'as tested' canister performance. Regarding the copper shell of the

  19. Electric- and exchange-field controlled transport through silicene barriers: Conductance gap and near-perfect spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study ballistic electron transport through silicene barriers, of width d and height U, in the presence of an exchange field M and a normal electric field Ez. Away from the Dirac point (DP), the spin- and valley-resolved conductances, as functions of U, exhibit resonances while close to it there is a pronounced dip that can be transformed into a transport gap by varying Ez. The charge conductance gc changes from oscillatory to a monotonically decreasing function of d beyond a critical Ez and this can be used to realize electric-field-controlled switching. Further, the field M splits each resonance of gc into two spin-resolved peaks. The spin polarization near the DP increases with Ez or M and becomes nearly perfect above certain of their values. Similar results hold for double barriers

  20. A Qualitative Study of Barriers to the Utilization of HIV Testing Services Among Rural African American Cocaine Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Patricia B.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Curran, Geoffrey M.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study is about barriers to the utilization of HIV testing as perceived by African Americans who have recently used cocaine and who live in the rural Delta region of Arkansas. Affordability, physical accessibility, and geographic availability were not perceived as barriers to HIV testing in this sample, yet acceptability was still perceived as poor. Acceptability due to social mores and norms was a major barrier. Many said testing was unacceptable because of fear of social costs. Many were confident of being HIV-negative based on risky assumptions about testing and the notification process. Small-town social and sexual networks added to concerns about reputation and risk. System approaches may fail if they focus solely on improving access to HIV services but do not take into consideration deeply internalized experiences of rural African Americans as well as involvement of the community in developing programs and services. PMID:24039279

  1. Quasi-stationary states of electrons interacting with strong electromagnetic field in two-barrier resonance tunnel nano-structure

    OpenAIRE

    M.V. Tkach; Ju.O. Seti; O.M. Voitsekhivska

    2012-01-01

    An exact solution of non-stationary Schrodinger equation is obtained for a one-dimensional movement of electrons in an electromagnetic field with arbitrary intensity and frequency. Using it, the permeability coefficient is calculated for a two-barrier resonance tunnel nano-structure placed into a high-frequency electromagnetic field. It is shown that a nano-structure contains quasi-stationary states the spectrum of which consists of the main and satellite energies. The properties of resonance...

  2. From Their Voices: Barriers to HIV Testing among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Remain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alex Washington

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV testing continues to be a major priority for addressing the epidemic among young Black men who have sex with men (BMSM. Methods: This study explored barriers to HIV testing uptake, and recommendations for motivating HIV testing uptake among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM aged 18 to 30. BMSM (N = 36 were recruited through flyers and social media for six focus groups. Results: From the perspectives and experiences of young BMSM, participants recommended that information be included in HIV testing messages that would help young BMSM do self HIV-risk appraisals. Particularly, participants recommended that more knowledge about Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP and the role of PrEP in safer-sex practices be provided. This information is important to help those untested, or who infrequently test, better understand their risk and need for testing. Likewise, participants recommended that more information about a person being undetectable and the risk of condomless sex with an HIV negative sex partner; this information will be helpful for both the HIV negative and HIV positive sex partner for making safer sex decisions. Participants also recommended that interventions should focus on more than drug use as risk; the risk posed by the use of alcohol before and during sex deserves attention among young BMSM. Conclusions: These findings may inform new HIV testing interventions being tailored for young BMSM. The interventions should also consider revisiting street-based peer-outreach approaches for those young BMSM with limited access to social media campaigns due to limited access or infrequent use of social media.

  3. Test of Nonlocality with an Atom-Field Entangled State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the test of nonlocality with atom-field entanglement. An atom is sent through a cavity filled with a coherent field with a small amplitude. The dispersive interaction leads to atom-field entanglement.Then the field is driven by a classical current. The Bell inequality can be tested by the joint measurement of the parity of the field and the atomic state.

  4. Site Characterization for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Hardin, E. L.; Freeze, G. A.; Sassani, D.; Brady, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is at the beginning of 5-year Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT) to investigate the feasibility of constructing and characterizing two boreholes in crystalline basement rock to a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft). The concept of deep borehole disposal for radioactive waste has some advantages over mined repositories, including incremental construction and loading, the enhanced natural barriers provided by deep continental crystalline basement, and reduced site characterization. Site characterization efforts need to determine an eligible site that does not have the following disqualifying characteristics: greater than 2 km to crystalline basement, upward vertical fluid potential gradients, presence of economically exploitable natural resources, presence of high permeability connection to the shallow subsurface, and significant probability of future seismic or volcanic activity. Site characterization activities for the DBFT will include geomechanical (i.e., rock in situ stress state, and fluid pressure), geological (i.e., rock and fracture infill lithology), hydrological (i.e., quantity of fluid, fluid convection properties, and solute transport mechanisms), and geochemical (i.e., rock-water interaction and natural tracers) aspects. Both direct (i.e., sampling and in situ testing) and indirect (i.e., borehole geophysical) methods are planned for efficient and effective characterization of these site aspects and physical processes. Borehole-based characterization will be used to determine the variability of system state (i.e., stress, pressure, temperature, and chemistry) with depth, and interpretation of material and system parameters relevant to numerical site simulation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  5. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  6. Barriers for Compliance to Breast, Colorectal, and Cervical Screening Cancer Tests among Hispanic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Diaz, Christine; Betancourt, Elba; Ruiz-Candelaria, Yelitza; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics are less likely to undergo screening tests for colorectal cancer and cervical cancer than non-Hispanic whites. Compliance with mammography, fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), colonoscopy, and cervical smears (PAP) and barriers for compliance were studied. A descriptive study was performed with 194 ambulatory patients while they attended routine medical visits. Women are more likely than men to undergo a colonoscopy. Conversely, FOBT was most likely reported by men. Reasons for compliance with FOBT differed by gender. Men were most likely to avoid FOBT due to lack of knowledge whereas women reported that physicians do not recommend the procedure. Both men and women reported that lack of physician’s recommendation was their primary reason for not undergoing a colonoscopy. Men tend to report lack of knowledge about colonoscopy procedure. A higher mammogram utilization rate was reported by women older than 40 years. PAP smears were reported by 74% of women older than 21 years. The major reasons for avoiding mammography and PAP tests were having a busy schedule, fear, and feeling uncomfortable during the procedure. In a multivariate regression analysis, occupational status was found to be a predictor for compliance with FOBT and colonoscopy. PMID:26703676

  7. Barriers for Compliance to Breast, Colorectal, and Cervical Screening Cancer Tests among Hispanic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Miranda-Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hispanics are less likely to undergo screening tests for colorectal cancer and cervical cancer than non-Hispanic whites. Compliance with mammography, fecal occult blood testing (FOBT, colonoscopy, and cervical smears (PAP and barriers for compliance were studied. A descriptive study was performed with 194 ambulatory patients while they attended routine medical visits. Women are more likely than men to undergo a colonoscopy. Conversely, FOBT was most likely reported by men. Reasons for compliance with FOBT differed by gender. Men were most likely to avoid FOBT due to lack of knowledge whereas women reported that physicians do not recommend the procedure. Both men and women reported that lack of physician’s recommendation was their primary reason for not undergoing a colonoscopy. Men tend to report lack of knowledge about colonoscopy procedure. A higher mammogram utilization rate was reported by women older than 40 years. PAP smears were reported by 74% of women older than 21 years. The major reasons for avoiding mammography and PAP tests were having a busy schedule, fear, and feeling uncomfortable during the procedure. In a multivariate regression analysis, occupational status was found to be a predictor for compliance with FOBT and colonoscopy.

  8. Barriers for Compliance to Breast, Colorectal, and Cervical Screening Cancer Tests among Hispanic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Diaz, Christine; Betancourt, Elba; Ruiz-Candelaria, Yelitza; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics are less likely to undergo screening tests for colorectal cancer and cervical cancer than non-Hispanic whites. Compliance with mammography, fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), colonoscopy, and cervical smears (PAP) and barriers for compliance were studied. A descriptive study was performed with 194 ambulatory patients while they attended routine medical visits. Women are more likely than men to undergo a colonoscopy. Conversely, FOBT was most likely reported by men. Reasons for compliance with FOBT differed by gender. Men were most likely to avoid FOBT due to lack of knowledge whereas women reported that physicians do not recommend the procedure. Both men and women reported that lack of physician's recommendation was their primary reason for not undergoing a colonoscopy. Men tend to report lack of knowledge about colonoscopy procedure. A higher mammogram utilization rate was reported by women older than 40 years. PAP smears were reported by 74% of women older than 21 years. The major reasons for avoiding mammography and PAP tests were having a busy schedule, fear, and feeling uncomfortable during the procedure. In a multivariate regression analysis, occupational status was found to be a predictor for compliance with FOBT and colonoscopy. PMID:26703676

  9. Dissipated power and induced velocity fields data of a micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for active flow control☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescini, E.; Martínez, D.S.; De Giorgi, M.G.; Francioso, L.; Ficarella, A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have gained great interest among all the active flow control devices typically employed in aerospace and turbomachinery applications [1,2]. Compared with the macro SDBDs, the micro single dielectric barrier discharge (MSDBD) actuators showed a higher efficiency in conversion of input electrical power to delivered mechanical power [3,4]. This article provides data regarding the performances of a MSDBD plasma actuator [5,6]. The power dissipation values [5] and the experimental and numerical induced velocity fields [6] are provided. The present data support and enrich the research article entitled “Optimization of micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator models based on experimental velocity and body force fields” by Pescini et al. [6]. PMID:26425667

  10. From microscopic to macroscopic dynamics in mean-field theory: effect of neutron skin on fusion barrier and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we introduce a method to reduce the microscopic mean-field theory to a classical macroscopic dynamics at the initial stage of fusion reaction. We show that TDHF (Time-dependent Hartree-Fock) could be a useful tool to infer information on the fusion barrier as well as on one-body dissipation effect. We apply the reduction of information to the case of head-on reaction between a 16O and 16,22,24,28O in order to quantify the effect of neutron skin on fusion. We show that the precise determination of fusion barrier requires, in addition to the relative distance between center of mass, the introduction of an additional collective coordinate that explicitly breaks the neutron-proton symmetry. With this additional collective variable, we obtain a rather precise determination of the barrier position, height and diffuseness as well as one-body friction. (author)

  11. From microscopic to macroscopic dynamics in mean-field theory: effect of neutron skin on fusion barrier and dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D

    2001-07-01

    In this work, we introduce a method to reduce the microscopic mean-field theory to a classical macroscopic dynamics at the initial stage of fusion reaction. We show that TDHF (Time-dependent Hartree-Fock) could be a useful tool to infer information on the fusion barrier as well as on one-body dissipation effect. We apply the reduction of information to the case of head-on reaction between a {sup 16}O and {sup 16,22,24,28}O in order to quantify the effect of neutron skin on fusion. We show that the precise determination of fusion barrier requires, in addition to the relative distance between center of mass, the introduction of an additional collective coordinate that explicitly breaks the neutron-proton symmetry. With this additional collective variable, we obtain a rather precise determination of the barrier position, height and diffuseness as well as one-body friction. (author)

  12. Field studies of engineered barriers for closure of low level radioactive waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated water flow data logging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system. Field data is presented to show the effects of slope and slope length on the performance of each landfill cover design for the first 15 months of this field experiment

  13. Field study of moisture damage in walls insulated without a vapor barrier. Final report for the Oregon Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsongas, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    Considerable uncertainty has existed over whether or not wall insulation installed without a vapor barrier causes an increased risk of moisture damage (wood decay) within walls. This report describes the results of one of the first major studies in the country aimed at finding out if such a moisture problem really exists. The exterior walls of a total of 96 homes in Portland, Oregon were opened, of which 70 had retrofitted insulation and 26 were uninsulated and were a control group. The types of insulation included urea-formaldehyde foam (44), mineral wool (16), and cellulose (10). In each opened wall cavity the moisture content of wood was measured and insulation and wood samples were taken for laboratory analysis of moisture content and for the determination of the presence of absence of decay fungi. Foam shrinkage was also measured. To evaluate the possible influence of the relative air tightness of the homes, fan depressurization tests were run using a door blower unit. The field and laboratory test results indicating the lack of a moisture damage problem in existing homes with wood siding in climates similar to that of western Oregon are described along with results of a statistical analysis of the data. Related problems of interest to homeowners and insulation installers are noted. The standard operating procedures used throughout the study are discussed, including the home selection process, quantitative and qualitative techniques used to identify wall locations with the highest moisture content, wall opening and data/sample collection methodology, laboratory analysis of samples, data processing and analysis, and applicability of the results. Recommendations for furutre tests are made. Finally, the potential and desirability for future retrofitting of wall insulation is explored.

  14. Barriers to HIV testing and characteristics associated with never testing among gay and bisexual men attending sexual health clinics in Sydney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian P Conway

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men have increased over the past decade in Australia. HIV point-of-care testing (POCT was introduced in Australia in 2011 as a strategy to increase HIV testing by making the testing process more convenient. We surveyed gay and bisexual men undergoing POCT to assess barriers to HIV testing and characteristics associated with not having previously tested for HIV (never testing. Methods: During 2011 and 2012, gay and bisexual men who were undergoing POCT at four Sydney sexual health clinics self-completed questionnaires assessing testing history and psychological and structural barriers to HIV testing. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess associations between patient characteristics and never testing. Results: Of 1093 participants, 981 (89.9% reported ever testing for HIV and 110 (10.1% never testing. At least one barrier to testing was reported by 1046 men (95.7%, with only 47 men (4.3% not reporting any barrier to testing. The most commonly reported barriers to testing were annoyance at having to return for results (30.2%, not having done anything risky (29.6%, stress in waiting for results (28.4%, being afraid of testing positive (27.5% and having tested recently (23.2%. Never testing was independently associated with being non-gay-identified (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–3.2, being aged less than 25 years (AOR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6–3.8, living in a suburb with few gay couples (AOR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2–3.0, being afraid of testing HIV-positive (AOR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0–2.4, not knowing where to test (AOR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.3–11.2 and reporting one or no sexual partners in the last six months (AOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.2–6.2. Conclusions: Barriers to HIV testing were commonly reported among the clinic-based gay and bisexual men in this study. Our findings suggest further health promotion and prevention strategies are needed to address the

  15. Barriers to HIV testing and characteristics associated with never testing among gay and bisexual men attending sexual health clinics in Sydney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Damian P; Holt, Martin; Couldwell, Deborah L; Smith, Don E; Davies, Stephen C; McNulty, Anna; Keen, Phillip; Cunningham, Philip; Guy, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men have increased over the past decade in Australia. HIV point-of-care testing (POCT) was introduced in Australia in 2011 as a strategy to increase HIV testing by making the testing process more convenient. We surveyed gay and bisexual men undergoing POCT to assess barriers to HIV testing and characteristics associated with not having previously tested for HIV (never testing). Methods During 2011 and 2012, gay and bisexual men who were undergoing POCT at four Sydney sexual health clinics self-completed questionnaires assessing testing history and psychological and structural barriers to HIV testing. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess associations between patient characteristics and never testing. Results Of 1093 participants, 981 (89.9%) reported ever testing for HIV and 110 (10.1%) never testing. At least one barrier to testing was reported by 1046 men (95.7%), with only 47 men (4.3%) not reporting any barrier to testing. The most commonly reported barriers to testing were annoyance at having to return for results (30.2%), not having done anything risky (29.6%), stress in waiting for results (28.4%), being afraid of testing positive (27.5%) and having tested recently (23.2%). Never testing was independently associated with being non-gay-identified (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–3.2), being aged less than 25 years (AOR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6–3.8), living in a suburb with few gay couples (AOR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2–3.0), being afraid of testing HIV-positive (AOR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0–2.4), not knowing where to test (AOR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.3–11.2) and reporting one or no sexual partners in the last six months (AOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.2–6.2). Conclusions Barriers to HIV testing were commonly reported among the clinic-based gay and bisexual men in this study. Our findings suggest further health promotion and prevention strategies are needed to address the

  16. Mean-field description of fusion barriers with Skyrme's interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrowolski, A.; Pomorski, K.; Bartel, J. E-mail: bartel@sbgat192.in2p3.fr

    2003-12-29

    Fusion barriers are determined in the framework of the Skyrme energy-density functional together with the semi-classical approach known as the Extended Thomas-Fermi method. The barriers obtained in this way with the Skyrme interaction SkM{sup *} turn out to be close to those generated by phenomenological models like those using the proximity potentials. It is also shown that the location and the structure of the fusion barrier in the vicinity of its maximum and beyond can be accurately described by a simple analytical form depending only on the masses and the relative isospin of target and projectile nucleus.

  17. Nanometer-scale test of the Tung model of Schottky-barrier height inhomogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung has shown [Phys. Rev. B 45, 13509 (1992)] that a range of 'nonideal' behaviors observed in metal/semiconductor (MS) Schottky diodes could be quantitatively explained by assuming that specific microscopic distributions of nanometer-sized 'patches' of reduced barrier height exist at the MS interface. Here we report a simultaneous microscopic and macroscopic test of this model as applied to metal/6H-SiC Schottky diodes, by (1) measuring the nm-scale barrier-height distribution (BHD) of particular Schottky diodes using ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM), (2) extending the Tung model to calculate the expected nm-scale BHD for particular parameter values, and (3) quantitatively relating the measured nm-scale BHD of a particular Schottky diode to its macroscopic I-V characteristic. Our studies indicate that (1) for relatively ideal diodes, both the microscopic and macroscopic behaviors are explained well by the Tung model with a large coverage (>5%) of shallow patches, (2) the measured BHDs are nearly identical for relatively ideal and highly nonideal diodes, and (3) a simple Tung model can account for highly nonideal behavior only by assuming an unphysical patch distribution in which the excess current is dominated by a few patches in the extreme tail of the patch distribution. Our measurements instead suggest that all the diodes contain a broad 'intrinsic' distribution of shallow patches, while the large excess current in highly nonideal diodes is due to a few large defects of extrinsic origin. This last conclusion is consistent with a recent study by Skromme and co-workers [J. Electron. Mater. 29, 376 (2000)

  18. Preliminary test on filling gap behavior of the swollen buffer in the engineering barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In geological disposal of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the engineered barrier system (EBS) (buffer, waste packages (capsulate the vitrified waste)) is installed in the space of a repository using the remote control technique due to protect workers from radiation. The block type buffer, as one of the candidate options of the installation of the buffer, has the gap between buffer and rock or waste package. In this case, the highly compacted buffer will be used to fill the gap by the swollen buffer. Swelling of the buffer is considered to begin from the surface of the buffer where groundwater infiltrates. Infiltration of groundwater into the buffer is considered to be 3 dimensional, because the gap and the infiltration points of the buffer are distributed spatially. Therefore, the scatter of the swelling points of the buffer causes the non-uniformity of the swelling of the buffer. Such non-uniformity of the swelling of the buffer will affect the thickness of the buffer between waste package and rock mass. Then, preliminary tests that simulate 3 dimensional filling gap behavior of the swollen buffer were performed. The test results showed the swollen buffer filled the gap rapidly. There is scatter of the density of the buffer early, but the tendency that the density of the buffer became uniformity with time was observed. It is considered that the swelling and fluidity of the buffer occurs simultaneously, the swelling of the buffer for filling the gap will affect the thickness of the buffer. (author)

  19. Above-well, Stark, and potential-barrier resonances of an open square well in a static external electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanouilidou, A

    2004-01-01

    Besides the well known Stark resonances, which are localized in the potential well and tunnel through the potential barrier created by the dc-field, "strange" long and short-lived resonances are analytically obtained. These resonances are not localized inside the potential well. We show that the narrow ones are localized above the potential well. These narrow resonances give rise to a {\\it peak structure} in a 1D scattering experiment. We also show that the broad overlapping resonances are associated with the static electric field potential barrier. These "strange" overlapping resonances do not give rise to a {\\it peak structure} in a 1D scattering experiment. We propose a 2D experimental set-up where in principle these short-lived states should be observed as {\\it peaks}. Broad overlapping resonances, associated only with the static electric field potential barrier, could also have observable effects in a $N>1$ array of quantum wells in the presence of a truncated static electric field. This last problem is ...

  20. Field Cone Penetration Tests with Various Penetration Rates - Test Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    The test site is located at Nordre Ringgade near the town called Dronninglund in the northern Jutland in Denmark. The site area is relatively flat, and was chosen because it has a size of approximately 3 ha and contains a relatively thick deposit of silty soils. Furthermore the groundwater was...

  1. Electric field modulation of Schottky barrier height in graphene/MoSe{sub 2} van der Waals heterointerface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, Yohta; Moriya, Rai, E-mail: moriyar@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: tmachida@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Morikawa, Sei; Yabuki, Naoto [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki, E-mail: moriyar@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: tmachida@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrate a vertical field-effect transistor based on a graphene/MoSe{sub 2} van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure. The vdW interface between the graphene and MoSe{sub 2} exhibits a Schottky barrier with an ideality factor of around 1.3, suggesting a high-quality interface. Owing to the low density of states in graphene, the position of the Fermi level in the graphene can be strongly modulated by an external electric field. Therefore, the Schottky barrier height at the graphene/MoSe{sub 2} vdW interface is also modulated. We demonstrate a large current ON-OFF ratio of 10{sup 5}. These results point to the potential high performance of the graphene/MoSe{sub 2} vdW heterostructure for electronics applications.

  2. A field study of capillary and hydraulic barriers in landfill covers varying in slope at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the USA, institutional control and maintenance of low-level radioactive waste repositories are expected to cease 100 years after the closure of a waste site. After this time, the repository's engineered barriers and geohydrologic conditions need to act passively to isolate the radionuclides for an additional 300 to 500 years. A field research program was initiated at the Los alamos National Laboratory in 1980 to develop technology for the closure and stabilization of shallow and burial sites

  3. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  4. Field and laboratory test methods for geomembranes during waste management facility construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazardous waste management facilities are required to use approved lining and leak detection systems to prevent the migration of waste into the environment. Synthetic flexible membrane liners (FMLs) have effectively served as the critical barrier for waste containment and fluid migration. The U.S. EPA has established minimum technology requirements for the construction of lined facilities that include detailed and documented Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) plans. The U.S. EPA (EPA) recognizes that CQA during field construction is imperative for successful completion of project work and long-term facility operation. This paper discusses the importance of CQA during FML installation and the practical aspects of implementing a successful CQA program. Standard methods used for FML evaluation, in both the field and laboratory, are discussed and specific aspects of seam testing and data evaluation are addressed. The general importance of comprehensive definition of geomembrane seam field failures is strongly emphasized so that an appropriate response to test failures can be recommended

  5. Field tests of the mobile robot Sherpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes recent demonstrations of the transport capabilities, inside nuclear buildings, of the six egged robot SHERPA, developed by the CEA (Atomic Energy Commission) robotic team. Results of the tests carried out at Chooz-B and Trino Vercellesse Nuclear Power Plants, respectively in June 1993 and in January 1994, in the framework of the European Community TELEMAN Programme, are presented. (authors). 10 refs., 13 figs

  6. The penetration barrier of water through graphynes' pores: first-principles predictions and force field optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Hernández, Marta I; Campos-Martínez, José; Pirani, Fernando; Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Graphynes are novel two-dimensional carbon-based materials that -due to their nanoweb-like structure- have been proposed as molecular filters, especially for water purification technologies. In this work we carry out first principles electronic structure calculations at the MP2C level of theory to assess the interaction between water and graphyne, graphdiyne and graphtriyne pores. The computed penetration barriers suggest that water transport is unfeasible through graphyne while being unimpeded for graphtriyne. Nevertheless, for graphdiyne, which presents a pore size almost matching that of water, a low barrier is found which in turn disappears if an active hydrogen bond with an additional water molecule on the opposite side of the opening is taken into account. These results support the possibility of using graphtriyne as an efficient membrane for water filtration but, in contrast with previous determinations, they do not exclude graphdiyne. In fact, the related first principles penetration barrier leads to ...

  7. Field testing and model validation of motor-generators

    OpenAIRE

    Agüero, Jorge Luis; Beroqui, Mario César; Issouribehere, Fernando; Biteznik, Carlos E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the field tests conducted by the IITREE-LAT to verify the performance of motor-generators are presented. These machines are used as distributed energy resources (DER) in oil fields and different cities across Argentina. On the basis of these tests, the models regarding generator, power-speed control system and voltage control system are presented.

  8. Reactive geothermal transport simulations to study the formation mechanism of an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-01

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): one is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  9. The Savannah River environmental technology field test platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal goal in the development of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is transferring them to organizations and individuals for use in site assessment and compliance monitoring. The Savannah River technology Center (SRTC) has been developing a program to rigorously field test promising environmental technologies that have not undergone EPA equivalency testing. The infrastructure and staff expertise developed as part of the activities of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program allows field testing of technologies without the difficulties of providing remote field support. By providing a well-characterized site and a well-developed infrastructure, technologies are tested in actual field scenarios to determine their appropriate applications in environmental characterization and monitoring activities. The field tests provide regulatory organizations, potential industrial partners, and potential users with the opportunity to evaluate the technology's performance and its utility for implementation in environmental characterization and monitoring programs. This program has resulted in the successful implementation of several new technologies

  10. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles, and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design.

  11. Tests for the characterization of bentonite used in the manufacture of clay geo synthetic barriers (GBR-C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonites are clays essentially composed of the smectite minerals. they are used in the manufacture of Clay Geosynthetic Barriers )GBR-C) which are low-permeability geosynthetic materials, forming part of the lining technologies and construction waterproofing systems. This article shows a series of testing to evaluate the quality of the bentonite for such use. Correlation between different testing has also been established in order to identify the most suitable ones for their characterization. (Author) 8 refs.

  12. Goldstone field test activities: Sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The goals are to conduct a research and development program aimed at determining the most effective way to do SETI within the constraints of current technology and estimated budgets. The general search strategy adopted is that which is recommended by the SETI Science Working Group. The strategy for an all sky survey for SETI was further developed over the last year. Scan patterns, scan rates, and signal detection algorithms were developed. Spectral power measurement instrumentation was tested at the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A specially designed radio frequency interference (RFI) measurement system was built and installed at the Venus Station. A data base management system for storage and retrieval of the RFI data was partially implemented on a VAX 750 computer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. Test of QED at critical field strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  14. Field studies of engineered barriers for closure of low level radioactive waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. This plot size and these slopes were chosen to complement similar experiments currently being performed at the Universities of Hamburg, Munchen, Darmstadt, and Karlsruhe, Germany, as part of the US Department of Energy's International Technology Exchange and Environmental Restoration programs. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated waterflow data-logging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system. Field data are presented to show the effects of slope and slope length on the performance of each landfill cover design for the first 15 months of this field experiment

  15. Summary of activities at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility, October 1, 1995 to January 31, 1997, and initial data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replicates of two engineered barrier designs (a thick soil barrier and a bio/capillary barrier) were constructed in the test plots of the facility. Prior to placement of any soil in the test plots, instruments were calibrated and attached to plot instrument towers, which were then installed in the test plots. Soil from Spreading Area B was installed in the test plots in lifts and compacted. Instruments attached to the instrument tower were placed in shallow trenches dug in the lifts and buried. Each instrument was checked to make sure it functioned prior to installation of the next lift. Soil samples were collected from each lift in one plot during construction for later determination of physical and hydraulic properties. After completion of the test plots, the data acquisition system was finalized, and data collection began. Appropriate instrument calibration equations and equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction techniques are described. Initial data show test plot soils drying throughout the summer and early fall. This corresponds to low rainfall during this period. Infiltration of water into the test plots was first detected around mid-November with several subsequent episodes in December. Infiltration was verified by corresponding measurements from several different instruments ime domain reflectometry (TDR), neutron probe, thermocouple psychrometers, and heat dissipation sensors Tensiometer data does not appear to corroborate data from the other instruments. Test plots were warmer on the side closest to the access trench indicating a temperature effect from the trench. This resulted in greater soil moisture freezing with less and shallower infiltration on the far side of the plots than on the side closest to the trench. At the end of this monitoring period, infiltration in all but two of the test plots has reached the 155-cm depth. Infiltration in test plots B2 and S3 has reached only the 140-cm depth. The monitored infiltration events have not

  16. Optimal Magnetic Field for Crossing Super-Para-Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Brain Blood Barrier: A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysam Z. Pedram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD techniques. The MD model is used to enhance our understanding of the dynamic behavior of SPMNs crossing the endothelial cells in the presence of a gradient magnetic field. Actuation of NPs under weak magnetic field offers the great advantage of a non-invasive drug delivery without the risk of causing injury to the brain. Furthermore, a weak magnetic portable stimulator can be developed using low complexity prototyping techniques. Based on MD simulation results in this paper, SPMNs can cross the cell membrane while experiencing very weak mechanical forces in the range of pN. This study also derives guidelines for the design of the SPMNs dedicated to crossing the BBB using external magnetic fields.

  17. Field testing of absorption bed clogging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On-site wastewater treatment systems throughout North America most commonly use absorption beds to re-introduce treated wastewater from rural properties into the groundwater. With proper design and operating conditions these systems can work well for over 20 years with some reports of over 40 years. However, failure rates as high as 30% for on-site systems are reported and the most common mode of failure is the clogging of the soil absorption system. Research under laboratory settings has been conducted in a number of institutions to demonstrate the key factors leading to failure. These include items such as poor design, excessive hydraulic loading, and high concentrations of wastewater constituents leading to the formation of an excessive biologic layer (the biomat) at the interface of the sand and gravel. Most of these studies have been on simplified systems under accelerated conditions leading to questions about the validity of the results for actual systems. This project was designed to determine the causes of clogging using actual systems so that questions about the effects of simplified testing could be avoided. In this study actual soil absorption systems with ages from 3 to 15 years were studied to determine the proportion of the bed that was 'failed'. Failure was defined as the portion of the bed which had a significant biomat present and ponding water. Measurements were made of the effluent rates, effluent quality, absorption bed characteristics and background soil conditions. The results confirmed the effect of background soils in that fine grain soils showed a much stronger tendency for biomat formation and reached failure sooner. What was of greatest importance was the effect of the wastewater constituents, most particularly BOD, on the expected bed life. With the exception of soil characteristics, BOD had greatest impact on the rate of failure. For normal operating conditions even a modest change in BOD, within the range of expected values, resulted

  18. Test ion transport in a collisional, field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of test-ions in a flux-coil generated, collisional, field-reversed configuration is measured via time-resolved tomographic reconstruction of Ar+ optical emission in the predominantly nitrogen plasma. Azimuthal test ion diffusion across magnetic field lines is found to be classical during the stable period of the discharge. Test ion radial confinement is enhanced by a radial electric field, reducing the observed outward radial transport rate below predictions based solely on classical cross-field diffusion rates. Test ion diffusion is ∼500 m2 s−1 during the stable period of the discharge. The electric field inferred from plasma potential measurements and from equilibrium calculations is consistent with the observed reduction in argon transport. (paper)

  19. Low-Speed Modes Linked to Public Transit Field Test Results

    OpenAIRE

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Access from public transit stations to employment and home locations can be a significant barrier to public transportation use in many urban regions, which is also commonly known as the "first and last mile" problem. The EasyConnect field test operated from August 2005 to December 2006 to introduce shared-use electric bicycles, non-motorized bicycles, and SegwayÆ Human Transporters (HTs) to employment centers in and around the Pleasant Hill BART District stations. EasyConnect linked 36 employ...

  20. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  1. Facilitators and barriers related to voluntary counseling and testing for HIV among young adults in Bo, Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoobun, Shalinee; Jetty, Anuradha; Koroma, Mohamed A; Kamara, Mohamed J; Kabia, Mohamed; Coulson, Reginald; Ansumana, Rashid; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2014-06-01

    In 2012, we interviewed a population-based sample of 285 young adult residents (age 18-35 years) of the city of Bo, Sierra Leone, about their attitudes toward and experience with voluntary testing and counseling (VCT) for HIV. In total, 33% of the participants (44% of women and 25% of men) reported having been tested for HIV at least once. More than 85% of those not previously tested indicated a willingness to be tested in the near future, but untested participants were nearly twice as likely as tested participants to report fears about family/partner rejection, job loss, and other potential consequences of testing. More than 90% of participants expressed a high desire for testing privacy, and the majority reported a preference for VCT at a facility far from home where no one would know them. Social barriers to HIV testing remain a challenge for HIV prevention in Sierra Leone. PMID:24203408

  2. Frozen soil barriers for hazardous waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, J.G.; Leger, R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fu, H.Y. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory and full field measurements have demonstrated the effectiveness of artificial ground freezing for the containment of subsurface hazardous and radioactive wastes. Bench tests and a field demonstration have shown that cryogenic barriers are impenetrable to aqueous and non aqueous liquids. As a result of the successful tests the US Department of Energy has designated frozen ground barriers as one of its top ten remediation technologies.

  3. Separability of test fields equations on the C -metric background

    Science.gov (United States)

    KofroÅ, David

    2015-12-01

    In the Kerr-Newman spacetime the Teukolsky master equation, governing the fundamental test fields, is of great importance. We derive an analogous master equation for the nonrotating C -metric which encompasses a massless Klein-Gordon field, neutrino field, Maxwell field, Rarita-Schwinger field and gravitational perturbations. This equation is shown to be separable in terms of "accelerated spin-weighted spherical harmonics." It is shown that, contrary to ordinary spin-weighted spherical harmonics, the "accelerated" ones are different for different spins. In some cases, the equations for eigenfunctions and eigenvalues are explicitly solved.

  4. AFSC/FMA/NPRB Halibut Bycatch Video Field Test

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data arise from a field test of electronic monitoring (EM) of vessels participating in the Pacific halibut fishery off Alaska. A side-by-side comparison was...

  5. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  6. Testing Multi-Field Inflation: A Geometric Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Courtney M

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach for testing inflation models with multiple scalar fields by linking geometric and kinematical features of their inflationary Lagrangians to observable quantities like the power spectra, bispectrum, and trispectrum. Our approach also provides geometric intuition for when a complicated multi-field model can be well-approximated by a model with one, two, or a handful of fields. To arrive at these results, we focus on the mode interactions, simplify them using a novel result, and then explore how these interactions depend on the geometry of the inflationary Lagrangian and on the kinematics of the associated field trajectory. In the process, we introduce a multi-field observable \\beta_2 that can potentially distinguish two-field scenarios from scenarios involving three or more effective fields. We also present a multi-field consistency relation, which involves the primordial bispectrum parameter f_{NL}, trispectrum parameter \\tau_{NL}, and other spectral observables. These combined results p...

  7. Grain Sorghum Field Emergence and Seed Vigor Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Detoni, Cezar Ernesto

    1997-01-01

    Poor emergence of sorghum [(Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench] affects the stand and potential yields. The major objective of this research was to find correlations among field emergence data and laboratory seed vigor tests. Thirty-two and 30 hybrids of sorghum were planted at three Virginia locations in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Field emergence was subsequently compared with results from laboratory tests that included: 1) standard germination; 2) osmotic-stress using po...

  8. Technical Report on Raster field test at a Water Board

    OpenAIRE

    Vriezekolk, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment of unavailability of telecommunication services is an important part of an organisation’s business continuity management. We developed the Raster method to enable organisations to assess their telecommunication service unavailability risks. To validate Raster in practice we conducted two field tests in which the Raster method was applied at a typical target organisation. This document reports on the second field test, at a Water Board in the Netherlands. This report describes ...

  9. TravInfo Field Operational Test Institutional Evaluation Final Results

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin; Deakin, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents the final analysis of a three part series of institutional evaluations of the TravInfo Field Operational Test from its inception in 1992 through its completion in 1998. The Field Operational Test was performed over a two-year period from September 1996 to September 1998. Funding for the TravInfo evaluation was from the Federal Highway Administration with a matching grant from the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). The institutional evaluation examined Tra...

  10. Field tests and commercialization of natural gas leak detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, D.S.; Jeon, J.S.; Kim, K.D.; Cho, Y.A. [R and D Center, Korea Gas Corporation, Ansan (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Objectives - (1) fields test of industrial gas leak detection monitoring system. (2) commericialization of residential gas leak detector. Contents - (1) five sets of gas leak detection monitoring system were installed at natural gas transmition facilities and tested long term stability and their performance. (2) improved residential gas leak detector was commercialised. Expected benefits and application fields - (1) contribution to the improvement of domestic gas sensor technology. (2) localization of fabrication technology for gas leak detectors. 23 refs., 126 figs., 37 tabs.

  11. Tunneling magnetoresistance tuned by a vertical electric field in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer with double magnetic barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the effect of a vertical electric field on the electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer modulated by the double magnetic barriers with parallel or antiparallel configuration. The results show that the electronic transmission properties in the system are sensitive to the magnetic-barrier configuration and the bias voltage between the graphene layers. In particular, it is found that for the antiparallel configuration, within the low energy region, the blocking effect is more obvious compared with the case for the parallel configuration, and even there may exist a transmission spectrum gap which can be arbitrarily tuned by the field-induced interlayer bias voltage. We also demonstrate that the significant discrepancy between the conductance for both parallel and antiparallel configurations would result in a giant tunneling magnetoresistance ratio, and further the maximal magnetoresistance ratio can be strongly modified by the interlayer bias voltage. This leads to the possible realization of high-quality magnetic sensors controlled by a vertical electric field in the AA-stacked graphene bilayer

  12. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Scott, E-mail: harri4s@cmich.edu [Department of Physics and Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States); Applied Condensed-Matter Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Mellinger, Axel, E-mail: axel.mellinger@cmich.edu [Department of Physics and Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75 μm, “sandwiched” between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6 kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251 kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25 μm or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40 μm at high electric fields.

  13. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75 μm, “sandwiched” between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6 kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251 kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25 μm or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40 μm at high electric fields

  14. Identifying Barriers to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing for Men Who Have Sex with Men in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Aeree; Cho, Byonghee; Kennedy, Harvey A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The principal objective of this study was to identify the barriers to testing for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Korea, something that might prove useful in future studies of this nature. Methods This study was conducted at gay bars nationwide in Korea. After considering several offline locations (gay bars) where MSM candidates are commonly located, random recruitment was performed using time–location sampling. A total of 944 individuals participated in this survey. A total sam...

  15. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  16. Remote field eddy current testing of ferromagnetic tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test ferromagnetic tubes using internal probes, Intercontrole and the CEA have carried out theoretical and experimental works and developed a method to adapt the Remote Field Eddy Current technique which has been known and used for 30 years now. This document briefly recalls the basic principles of the Remote Field Eddy Current technique, the various steps of the works carried out and mainly describes examples of field inspection of ferromagnetic tubes and pipes

  17. Measurement of magnetic field strengths in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of the proper magnetic field profile is fundamental to plasma confinement in magnetic mirror systems. The knowledge of this profile is important for the control of a variety of physical processes which affect particle confinement, including thermal barrier and potential well formation. A system of probes using the nuclear magnetic resonance of protons in magnetic fields is used to measure the field strengths at various points in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The system operates at high fields (1-12 T) with significant nonuniformity (≤ 1.5 T/m) by taking advantage of the phenomenon of spin echo. In addition, the probes can operate in the MFTF-B environment where low temperature capability and remote operation is necessary. These probes have been tested with laboratory magnets to develop an engineering model which relates probe signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio to probe parameters and magnetic field strengths and gradients. Engineering design formula and techniques are presented as well as data from laboratory test stands

  18. Yucca Mountain near-field environment considerations for engineered barrier system design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the suitability of Yucca Mountain (YM) as a potential site for the nation's first High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository. This responsibility includes materials testing and selections, design criteria development, waste form characterizations, performance assessments, and Near-Field (NF) environment characterization. These areas of responsibility are interrelated and to a large extent depend on environmental conditions surrounding the EBS components. The focus of this paper is to discuss what is currently known about the NF environment, particularly those aspects whose interaction with EBS components have significant impacts on the performance of the EBS and its ability to contribute to the isolation of radioactive waste. Reference designs and design/processes assumptions are used to evaluate the expected NF environmental conditions. This report will not focus on providing parameter values but rather on the processes that influence those parameters and on the impacts of those parameters on the performance of EBS components. Where values are given, they should be viewed as typical of YM as a whole but not necessarily representative of the actual NF environment conditions that surround the EBS components. 19 refs., 6 figs

  19. Jet Grouting. Control of execution and result parameters. Test fields - Experience in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article emphasizes the importance of Test Fields in project that includes the Jet Grouting technique. In particular, the Chilean experience is analyzed, where the Jet Grouting was first introduced by Pilots Terratest S. A. in the year 2010, only, only in 2011 the first project using jet columns was constructed. The versatilely of this technique allows its use in a wide variety of projects, for example, soil capacity improvement, settlement control, reduction of soil permeability and other environmental applications. Currently, the most common applications are underpinning existing foundations, ground improvement, lateral support of excavations, hydraulic barriers, slope stabilization, liquefaction control, among others. The Jet Grouting is one of the most demanding soil improvement technique and requires excellence in designing and execution engineers and other involved specialist. It is therefore essential to ensure exhaustive control to the execution and final parameters, in order to check that the product- Jet Grouting element-have the design properties, and implement modifications if necessary. Many authors strongly advises that if there is no comparable experience and even if there is, a Test Field of Jet Grouting elements has to be executed in site. This field consists in a nearby area with similar geotechnical conditions of the project, where Jet Grouting test columns will be constructed. This Test Field will allow selecting the most effective execution parameters and verifying that the final product has he correct design properties. (Author)

  20. Incentives and barriers to HIV testing in men who have sex with men in a metropolitan area in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Freire Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aimed to identify incentives and barriers to HIV testing in men who have sex with men (MSM. This was a cross-sectional study of MSM who had lived at least three months in greater metropolitan Fortaleza, Ceará State, Brazil, 2010. The study recruited 391 men ≥ 18 years of age who reported sexual relations with men in the previous six months, using Respondent Driven Sampling. Personal network and socio-demographic data were collected and HIV testing was offered, analyzed with RDSAT 6.0 and Stata 11.0. The majority were young (40.3%, had 5 to 11 years of schooling (57.3%, were single (85.1%, had low income (37.6%, and 58.1% had tested for HIV some time in life. Incentive to test: certainty of not being infected (34.1% and the exposure to national campaign Fique Sabendo [Know your Status] (34%. Barriers: trust in partner(s (21% and fear of discrimination if tested positive (20.3%. Policies should be developed to ensure test confidentiality and communication campaigns focusing on information gaps and encouragement for testing.

  1. Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

  2. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...... attenuation. Results show that the combination of the model and Field II can calculate the pressure within −15 % to 5 % RMS error for long excitation bursts and 7 % to 23 % for short excitation bursts. Furthermore it is shown that current simulations can be done within 1 % to maximum 33 % RMS error, where......Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...

  3. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  4. Development of a field test for evaluating aerobic fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, K; Yano, Y; Senjyu, H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reproducibility and utility of a standardised and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15 mISWRT]) to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 14 middle-aged participants performed the 15-m ISWRT 3 times within one week (Test 1, Test 2, Test 3). Reproducibility of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed), HRmax, and VO 2max for each test. The utility of the 15-m ISWRT for evaluating VO 2max over a wide range in middle-aged adults was tested by comparing the range of VO 2max obtained from the portable expired gas analyzer with the VO 2max reference values and ranges for health promotion published by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. A multiple comparison of distance completed in the 15-m ISWRT Test 1, Test 2, and Test 3 found no significant difference between Test 2 and Test 3. The ICC was 0.99 for Test 2 vs. Test 3. VO 2max measured from the 15-m ISWRT in Test 3 had a minimum value of 22.8 ml/kg/min and a maximum value of 38.7 ml/kg/min. In conclusion, the 15-m ISWRT is reliable and useful for evaluating VO 2max in middle-aged adults. PMID:22377946

  5. Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ

  6. Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

  7. Mechanical tests of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC) was designed to allow an overall mechanical test representative of the ITER toroidal field (TF) coils. The paper details the mechanical tests performed, compares them to model predictions and discusses the experience gained in the understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the ITER TF coils. The good agreement found between prediction given by a finite element model and mechanical measurements performed during the tests demonstrates that coil mechanical behaviour is well understood. The reproducibility of the evolution of stresses and coil deformation during testing including cycling tests showed that no measurable degradation of the mechanical properties of the coil occurred. This test contributed to the qualification of the design and manufacturing procedures of the ITER TF coils

  8. TEST OF AN ANIMAL DRAWN FIELD IMPLEMENT CART

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Spugnoli; Alessandro Parenti; Piernicola Masella; Esteban Melani

    2008-01-01

    The field performance of a horse-drawn hitch cart equipped with a PTO system powered by the two cart ground wheels have been investigated. For this purpose field tests on clay and turf soil, with varying ballast and PTO torque, have been carried out pulling the cart by a tractor. Preliminary tests were aimed at assessing the traction capability of horse breed. These tests showed that the mean draught force given by two of these horses was 173daN, average working speed was about 1m*s-1, result...

  9. Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions. The curriculum was field tested among seventh-grade urban students using a quasi-experimental design. Analysis of covariance of pre- and post-test sc...

  10. Magnetic field stimulated enhancement of the barrier for vortex penetration in bended bridges of thin TaN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Critical state in mesoscopic superconducting TaN structures has been studied. • Suppression of the current crowding by magnetic field has been investigated. • Maximum of critical current of bended TaN bridges is at non-zero magnetic field. • The critical current of 90° bended bridges increases by 37% in magnetic field. • Significant bulk pinning is in ultra-thin TaN mesoscopic structures. - Abstract: An increase of the supercurrent density in the vicinity of sharp bends of mesoscopic superconducting strips (the current crowding) leads to a decrease of the potential barrier for vortex penetration and thus to a decrease of the measured critical current IC of the strip in comparison to the de-pairing critical current. However, it has been shown that the Meissner currents induced by an external magnetic field of appropriate direction reduce the effect of current crowding resulting in an increase of the measured IC of superconducting mesoscopic structures with bends. We performed a detailed experimental investigation of the dependence of critical current on magnetic field in straight and bended bridges made from thin TaN films. Indeed, in the case of bridges with bends, the critical current reaches a maximum at non-zero magnetic fields which value increases with an increase of the angle of bends

  11. Experimental research on electric field jump in low magnetic fields: Detection of damage in new ex-situ MgB2 barriers in MgB2 wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explored the incorporation of field sweep (constant current and rapidly increasing magnetic field) into the four-probe method as a new technique to detect defects in barrier layers in superconducting MgB2 wires. This method allows us to observe jumps in the electric field in low magnetic fields. The scanning electron microscopy results indicate that such a jump originates from cracks in Nb barriers and ex-situ MgB2 barriers. Our research indicates that the field sweep allows us to detect damage to barriers that are made of superconducting materials. This method can be the basis for an industrial method for detecting damages in MgB2 wires. These defects reduce the critical current of MgB2 wire. Detection and removal of these defects will allow us to produce MgB2 wires with ex-situ MgB2 and Nb barriers that will have improved critical current density. Manufacturing of MgB2 wires with new ex-situ MgB2 barriers is a new technological concept. This type of barrier is cheaper and easier to manufacture, leading to cheaper MgB2 wires. Moreover, we show that critical current can be measured by two methods: current sweep (constant magnetic field and quickly increasing current) and field sweep. - Graphical abstract: Our results indicate that the jump electric field low magnetic fields. This jump indicates damage in Nb and ex situ MgB2 barrier. Detection and removal of defects will increase Jc in MgB2 wires and will increase the applicability of MgB2 wire. - Highlights: • Jump electric field in the 1 T indicates damage to the Nb barrier. • Jump resistance at 9 K indicates damage to the Nb barrier. • Jump electric field in low magnetic field indicates damage to ex situ MgB2 barrier. • Damage Nb and ex situ MgB2 barrier significantly reduces the critical current density in the MgB2 wire

  12. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and

  13. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

    2008-09-29

    Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and

  14. A field proof-of-concept of tomographic slug tests in an anisotropic littoral aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Lefebvre, René; Giroux, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Hydraulic tomography is increasingly recognized as a characterization approach that can image pathways or barriers to flow as well as their connectivity. In this study, we assess the performance of a transient analysis of tomographic slug test head data in estimating heterogeneity in horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh), hydraulic conductivity anisotropy (the ratio between vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity - Kv/Kh) and specific storage (Ss) under actual field conditions. The tomographic experiment was carried out between two wells in a moderately heterogeneous and highly anisotropic silt and sand littoral aquifer. In this field proof-of-concept, the inversion of the two-dimensional (2D) head dataset was computed with a 2D radial flow algorithm that considers Kh, Kv/Kh, Ss and wellbore storage effects. This study demonstrated that a transient analysis of tomographic slug tests is able to capture the key features of the littoral environment of the test: the vertical profiles of Kh and Kv are indeed in agreement with those from other field and laboratory tests, and Ss values exhibit physically plausible profiles. Furthermore, the simulation of independent inter-well hydraulic tests (slug and pumping tests screened over the entire aquifer) using resolved Kh, Kv/Kh and Ss tomograms produce responses very close to field observations. This study demonstrates that the effects of fine scale heterogeneity that induces K-anisotropy at larger scales can be captured through a transient analysis of tomographic slug tests, which are very difficult to quantify otherwise with conventional hydraulic tests, thus allowing a better representation of properties controlling flow and transport in aquifer systems.

  15. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  16. Barriers to the Development of Marital Health as a Health Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Clark E.

    1977-01-01

    The development of marital health as a bona fide health field is posited as the most viable means for obtaining funding for training, research and treatment concerning the marital dyad equal to such funding now available for other health fields. (Author)

  17. The burden of knowing: balancing benefits and barriers in HIV testing decisions. a qualitative study from Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgensen Marte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Client-initiated HIV counselling and testing has been scaled up in many African countries, in the form of voluntary counselling and testing (VCT. Test rates have remained low, with HIV-related stigma being an important barrier to HIV testing. This study explored HIV testing decisions in one rural and one urban district in Zambia with high HIV prevalence and available antiretroviral treatment. Methods Data were collected through 17 in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions with individuals and 10 in-depth interviews with counsellors. Interpretive description methodology was employed to analyse the data. Results 'To know your status' was found to be a highly charged concept yielding strong barriers against HIV testing. VCT was perceived as a diagnostic device and a gateway to treatment for the severely ill. Known benefits of prevention and early treatment were outweighed by a perceived burden of knowing your HIV status related to stigma and fear. The manner in which the VCT services were organised added to this burden. Conclusions This study draws on social stigma theory to enhance the understanding of the continuity of HIV related stigma in the presence of ART, and argues that the burden of knowing an HIV status and the related reluctance to get HIV tested can be understood both as a form of label-avoidance and as strong expressions of the still powerful embodied memories of suffering and death among non-curable AIDS patients over the last decades. Hope lies in the emerging signs of a reduction in HIV related stigma experienced by those who had been tested for HIV. Further research into innovative HIV testing service designs that do not add to the burden of knowing is needed.

  18. Potential barriers to rapid testing for human immunodeficiency virus among a commuter population in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshuma N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ndumiso Tshuma,1 Keith Muloongo,1 Geoffrey Setswe,2 Lucy Chimoyi,4 Bismark Sarfo,5 Dina Burger,6 Peter S Nyasulu3,7 1Community AIDS Response, Norwood, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2HIV/AIDS, STI and TB (HAST research program, Human Science Research Council (HSRC, Pretoria, South Africa; 3School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 4Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Research Institute (WHRI, Hillbrow, Johannesburg, South Africa; 5Department of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health University of Ghana, Legon-Accra, Ghana; 6The Research Office, Monash South Africa, Ruimsig, Johannesburg, South Africa; 7School of Health Sciences, Monash University, Ruimsig, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: This study aimed to determine barriers to accessing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV counseling and testing (HCT services among a commuter population.Methods: A cross-sectional, venue-based intercept survey was conducted. Participants were recruited during a 2-day community campaign at the Noord Street taxi rank in Johannesburg, South Africa. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire loaded onto an electronic data collection system and analyzed using Stata software. Factors contributing to barriers for HCT were modeled using multivariate logistic regression.Results: A total of 1,146 (567 male and 579 female individuals were interviewed; of these, 51.4% were females. The majority (59.5% were aged 25–35 years. Significant factors were age group (15–19 years, marital status (married, educational level (high school, distance to the nearest clinic (>30 km, area of employment/residence (outside inner city, and number of sexual partners (more than one. Participants aged 15–19 years were more likely to report low-risk perception of HIV as a barrier to HCT (odds ratio [OR] 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–2.59, the married were more likely to report low-risk perception of HIV

  19. Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables

  20. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application

  1. Field test of microbend fiber sensor for hospital use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report a field test of a microbend fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate, breathing pattern, Ballistocardiogram and heart rate during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Comparative experiments conducted between our sensor and commercial physiologic device on a healthy male subject showed an accuracy of +/-2bpm for simultaneous measurement of both breathing rate and heart rate. Our preliminary field test on simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects in the 3.0 Tesla MRI environment showed very good agreement compared with measurements obtained from conventional MRcompatible devices.

  2. Development of a field test for upper-body power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, A L; Bailey, M L; Westings, S H

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a field test capable of measuring upper-body power through the use of a common weight-training apparatus, a Smith machine (SM), set up for bench press (BP) movement. A small, battery-operated digital timing device was designed and constructed to allow a precise calculation of power (in conjunction with measures of distance and force) for this specific movement, which involved an explosive press from the chest to a position just short of full arm extension. In pilot work, 1 repetition maximums (1RM) were determined on the SM BP for 3 male subjects, and by subsequently testing power on the same subjects at varying resistances, an average relative percentage of the 1RM-producing peak power values was found by power curve analysis for test standardization. Reliability was assessed (using 11 men) by SM power measurements taken over 3 days on the SM fitted with the timer. An intraclass R (0.998) indicated a high correlation between the 3 separate field-test trials. Finally, 8 male subjects were used to compare SM scores with a criterion measure, the Linea Isokinetic BP station (Loredan Biomedical, Inc., Sacramento CA). A Pearson product moment coefficient found a high correlation between the field test (SM) and Linea power scores (r = 0.987). A 2-tailed dependent t-test between the field and criterion scores was not significant, suggesting that no consistent error variable was present. It can be concluded that this is a valid field test of power for this movement. PMID:11710404

  3. Field tests-low input, side-wall vented boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litzke, W.L.; Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The Fan Atomized Burner (FAB) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Oil Heat Combustion Equipment Technology Program to provide a practical low-firing rate technology leading to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The development of the burner design and results of application testing have been presented in prior oil heat conferences over the past several years. This information is also summarized in a more comprehensive BNL report. The first field trial of a prototype unit was initiated during the 1994-95 heating season. This paper presents the results of the second year of testing, during the 1995-96 heating season. The field tests enable the demonstration of the reliability and performance of the FAB under practical, typical operating conditions. Another important objective of the field test was to demonstrate that the low input is adequate to satisfy the heating and hot water demands of the household. During the first field trial it was shown that at a maximum input rate of 0.4 gph (55,000 Btu/hr) the burner was able to heat a home with over 2,000 square feet of conditioned living space and provide adequate supply of domestic hot water for a family of six. The test is located in Long Island, NY.

  4. U.S. field testing programs and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  5. The X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility: A field-scale test of trichloroethylene dechlorination using iron filings for the X-120/X-749 groundwater plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L.; West, O.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Korte, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents by zero-valence iron has recently become the subject of intensive research and development as a potentially cost-effective, passive treatment for contaminated groundwater through reactive barriers. Because of its successful application in the laboratory and other field sites, the X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility (GTF) was constructed to evaluate reactive barrier technology for remediating trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The X-625 GTF was built to fulfill the following technical objectives: (1) to test reactive barrier materials (e.g., iron filings) under realistic groundwater conditions for long term applications, (2) to obtain rates at which TCE degrades and to determine by-products for the reactive barrier materials tested, and (3) to clean up the TCE-contaminated water in the X-120 plume. The X-625 is providing important field-scale and long-term for the evaluation and design of reactive barriers at PORTS. The X-625 GTS is a unique facility not only because it is where site remediation is being performed, but it is also where research scientists and process engineers can test other promising reactive barrier materials. In addition, the data collected from X-625 GTF can be used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of replacing the activated carbon units in the pump-and-treat facilities at PORTS.

  6. The X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility: A field-scale test of trichloroethylene dechlorination using iron filings for the X-120/X-749 groundwater plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents by zero-valence iron has recently become the subject of intensive research and development as a potentially cost-effective, passive treatment for contaminated groundwater through reactive barriers. Because of its successful application in the laboratory and other field sites, the X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility (GTF) was constructed to evaluate reactive barrier technology for remediating trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The X-625 GTF was built to fulfill the following technical objectives: (1) to test reactive barrier materials (e.g., iron filings) under realistic groundwater conditions for long term applications, (2) to obtain rates at which TCE degrades and to determine by-products for the reactive barrier materials tested, and (3) to clean up the TCE-contaminated water in the X-120 plume. The X-625 is providing important field-scale and long-term for the evaluation and design of reactive barriers at PORTS. The X-625 GTS is a unique facility not only because it is where site remediation is being performed, but it is also where research scientists and process engineers can test other promising reactive barrier materials. In addition, the data collected from X-625 GTF can be used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of replacing the activated carbon units in the pump-and-treat facilities at PORTS

  7. Field tests of the Liberty-Mead transmission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eilts, L.E.

    1979-08-01

    Summarized are results of the October 1977 field tests of the 383-km(238-mi), 345-kV, series-capacitor-compensated Liberty-Mead transmission line of the Western Area Power Administration. The test series included routine capacitor bypass and insertion tests, line switching tests, and staged-fault tests. Principal results are presented in several figures, tables, and oscillograms. The tests demonstrated that routine capacitor bypass and insertion do not adversely affect the power system; line switching surges are modest, but reclosing, using the existing switchgear, is precluded by trapped charge; high-speed capacitor bypass was achieved but reinsertion proceeded slower than permitted by the specifications; breaker interrupting performance was acceptable; and, excepting some minor problems that were identified, the line relaying schemes generally performed satisfactorily.

  8. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management

  9. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump

  10. A Study on the Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Behaviors in the Engineered Barrier System of a HLW Repository: Engineering-scale Validation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Owan; Kwon, S. K.; Park, J. H.; Cho, W. J.; Lee, Jae-Owan

    2007-06-15

    The T-H-M processes in the engineered barrier system are one of the major issues in the performance assessment of a HLW repository. In this study, it was conducted to design and construct the engineering-scale test facility which was a third-scale of the reference disposal system, and to investigate THM behavior of the engineered barrier system using the test facility. The computer modeling and interpreting methodology for THM behavior were also developed.

  11. Isothermal behaviour of a Gloetzl in the HAW test field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HAW test field in the Asse mine (Germany) is a one-to-one scale test facility of an underground repository. One objective of the HAW project is to measure thermally induced stresses and deformation fields in the surrounding rock. Many measuring instruments have been placed in specially drilled holes at various locations to measure pressure change in the test field. One of the types used is the so-called 'Gloetzl' pressure cell. The measuring result of a 'Gloetzl' is a combination of pressure build-up as result of local borehole deformation due to creep and stress changes due to changes in the global field around the measuring borehole. Especially in the isothermal and low temperature situation results are dominated by this local borehole deformation. To understand the measuring results of a 'Gloetzl' better an analysis had been performed in which time-dependent (isothermal) behaviour of the measuring hole is investigated using a finite element program. Delay between borehole drilling and final emplacement of the device into the borehole is varied. From the results it can be obtained that the time between drilling of the hole and 'Gloetzl'-emplacement influences the pressure result for a very long period of time and the recuperation to the boundary stresses needs more than 300 years. Thus, the measuring results of the 'Gloetzls' can not be considered to represent directly the stresses in the field. The behaviour under heated conditions needs more detailed analyses. (author). 2 refs.; 9 figs

  12. Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2–4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells′ cultures margins). -- Highlights: ► We present test chamber to be used for in vitro cell culture in static magnetic field. ► The technical data of the chamber construction was presented. ► 2D versus 3D simulation of static magnetic field distribution in chamber was reported. ► We report the accuracy of 2D calculation than 3D

  13. Field-testing a comprehensive approach simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, A. van der; Boonekamp, R.; Homberg, M. van den

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the field tests of a simulation based game aiming at raising awareness and creating a deeper understanding of the dynamics of the comprehensive approach (CA). The setting of this game is that of a failed state where an UN intervention takes place after massive conflict that requ

  14. Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field for Uav Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, R.; Jenerowicz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays the imagery data acquired from UAV sensors are the main source of all data used in various remote sensing applications, photogrammetry projects and in imagery intelligence (IMINT) as well as in other tasks as decision support. Therefore quality assessment of such imagery is an important task. The research team from Military University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodesy, Geodesy Institute, Department of Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry has designed and prepared special test field- The Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field (PIQuAT) that provides quality assessment in field conditions of images obtained with sensors mounted on UAVs. The PIQuAT consists of 6 individual segments, when combined allow for determine radiometric, spectral and spatial resolution of images acquired from UAVs. All segments of the PIQuAT can be used together in various configurations or independently. All elements of The Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field were tested in laboratory conditions in terms of their radiometry and spectral reflectance characteristics.

  15. Rock sealing - large scale field test and accessory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience from the pilot field test and the basic knowledge extracted from the lab experiments have formed the basis of the planning of a Large Scale Field Test. The intention is to find out how the 'instrument of rock sealing' can be applied to a number of practical cases, where cutting-off and redirection of groundwater flow in repositories are called for. Five field subtests, which are integrated mutually or with other Stripa projects (3D), are proposed. One of them concerns 'near-field' sealing, i.e. sealing of tunnel floors hosting deposition holes, while two involve sealing of 'disturbed' rock around tunnels. The fourth concerns sealing of a natural fracture zone in the 3D area, and this latter test has the expected spin-off effect of obtaining additional information on the general flow pattern around the northeastern wing of the 3D cross. The fifth test is an option of sealing structures in the Validation Drift. The longevity of major grout types is focussed on as the most important part of the 'Accessory Investigations', and detailed plans have been worked out for that purpose. It is foreseen that the continuation of the project, as outlined in this report, will yield suitable methods and grouts for effective and long-lasting sealing of rock for use at stategic points in repositories. (author)

  16. REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF WATTS NICKEL RINSE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field test was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a polyamide reverse-osmosis membrane in hollow fine fiber configuration for closed-loop treatment of rinse water from a Watts-type nickel bath. Performance of the membrane module was determined by measuring the prod...

  17. Field tests and examinations in cell of French fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the field tests carried out on more than 70 assemblies and those realized at the hot laboratory on a whole assembly of 25 rods taken from pressurized water power plants operating in France: dimension examination; fission gas release; oxidation and hydridation of cans

  18. High field, low current operation of engineering test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state engineering test reactors with high field, low current operation are investigated and compared to high current, lower field concepts. Illustrative high field ETR parameters are R = 3 m, α ∼ 0.5 m, B ∼ 10 T, β = 2.2% and I = 4 MA. For similar wall loading the fusion power of an illustrative high field, low current concept could be about 50% that of a lower field device like TIBER II. This reduction could lead to a 50% decrease in tritium consumption, resulting in a substantial decrease in operating cost. Furthermore, high field operation could lead to substantially reduced current drive requirements and cost. A reduction in current drive source power on the order of 40 to 50 MW may be attainable relative to a lower field, high current design like TIBER II implying a possible cost savings on the order of $200 M. If current drive is less efficient than assumed, the savings could be even greater. Through larger β/sub p/ and aspect ratio, greater prospects for bootstrap current operation also exist. Further savings would be obtained from the reduced size of the first wall/blanket/shield system. The effects of high fields on magnet costs are very dependent on technological assumptions. Further improvements in the future may lie with advances in superconducting and structural materials

  19. Model and analysis of drain induced barrier lowering effect for 4H-SiC metal semiconductor field effct transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Quan-Jun; Zhang Yi-Men; Jia Li-xin

    2009-01-01

    Based on an analytical solution of the two-dimensional Poisson equation in the subthreshold region. this paper investigates the behavior of DIBL(drain induced barrier lowering)effect for short channel 4H-SiC metal semiconductor field effect transistors(MESFETs). An accurate analytical model of threshold voltage shift for the asymmetric short channel 4H-SiC MESFET is presented and thus verified. According to the presented model. it analyses the threshold voltage for short channel device on the L/a(channel length/channel depth)ratio, drain applied voltage VDS and channel doping concentration ND, thus providing a good basis for the design and modelling of short channel 4H-SiC MESFETs device.

  20. 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes with semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon field plate termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the theoretical analysis of the 4H-SiC Schottky-barrier diodes (SBDs) with field plate termination, 4H-SiC SBD with semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon (SIPOS) FP termination has been fabricated. The relative dielectric constant of the SIPOS dielectric first used in 4H-SiC devices is 10.4, which is much higher than that of the SiO2 dielectric, leading to benefitting the performance of devices. The breakdown voltage of the fabricated SBD could reach 1200 V at leakage current 20 μA, about 70% of the theoretical breakdown voltage. Meanwhile, both of the simulation and experimental results show that the length of the SIPOS FP termination is an important factor for structure design. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Field testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: spent fuel test and radionuclide migration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two field tests in the Climax Stock are being conducted. The Climax Stock, a granitic instrusive, has been administratively excluded from consideration as a full-scale repository site. However, it provides a readily available facility for field testing with high-level radioactive materials at a depth (420 m) approaching that of a repository. The major test activity in the 1980 fiscal year has been initiation of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C). This test, which was authorized in June 1978, is designed to evaluate the generic feasibility of geologic storage and retrievability of commercial power reactor spent fuel assemblies in a granitic medium. In addition, the test is configured and instrumented to provide thermal and thermomechanical response data that will be relevant to the design of a repository in hard crystalline rock. The other field activity in the Climax Stock is a radionuclide migration test. It combines a series of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of existing hydrologic models for pretest predictions and data interpretation. Goals of this project are to develop: (1) field measurement techniques for radionuclide migration studies in a hydrologic regime where the controlling mechanism is fracture permeability; (2) field test data on radionuclide migration; and (3) a comparison of laboratory- and field-measured retardation factors. This radionuclide migration test, which was authorized in the middle of the 1980 fiscal year, is in the preliminary design phase. The detailed program plan was prepared and subjected to formal peer review in August. In September/October researchers conducted preliminary flow tests with water in selected near-vertical fractures intersected by small horizontal boreholes. These tests were needed to establish the range of pressures, flow rates, and other operating parameters to be used in conducting the nuclide migration tests. 21 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  2. Field Tests and Simulation of Lion-Head River Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Min Fang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lion-Head River Bridge is a twin bridge in parallel position. The east-bounded was designed and constructed as a traditional prestress concrete box girder bridge with pot bearings; and the west-bounded was installed with seismic isolation devices of lead rubber bearings. The behavior of the isolated bridge is compared with that of the traditional bridge through several field tests including the ambient vibration test, the force vibration test induced by shakers, the free vibration test induced by a push and fast release system, and the truck test. The bridges suffered from various extents of damage due to the Chi-Chi and the Chi-I earthquakes of great strength during the construction and had been retrofitted. The damage was reflected by the change of the bridges' natural frequencies obtained from the ambient vibration tests. The models of the two bridges are simulated by the finite element method based on the original design drawings. Soil-structure interaction was also scrutinized in this study. The simulation was then modified based on the results from the field tests. Dynamic parameters of bridges are identified and compared with those from theoretical simulation. The efficiency is also verified to be better for an isolated bridge.

  3. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsang, Chin-Fu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kneafsey, Timothy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borglin, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nakagawa, Seiji [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nihei, Kurt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  4. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers

  5. The Fourth Gravity Test and Quintessence Matter Field

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Molin; Yu, Fei; Gui, Yuanxing

    2010-01-01

    After the previous work on gravitational frequency shift, light deflection (arXiv:1003.5296) and perihelion advance (arXiv:0812.2332), we calculate carefully the fourth gravity test, i.e. radar echo delay in a central gravity field surrounded by static free quintessence matter, in this paper. Through the Lagrangian method, we find the influence of the quintessence matter on the time delay of null particle is presence by means of an additional integral term. When the quintessence field vanishes, it reduces to the usual Schwarzschild case naturally. Meanwhile, we also use the data of the Viking lander from the Mars and Cassini spacecraft to Saturn to constrain the quintessence field. For the Viking case, the field parameter $\\alpha$ is under the order of $10^{-9}$. However, $\\alpha$ is under $10^{-18}$ for the Cassini case.

  6. A PILOT STUDY COMPARING TWO FIELD TESTS WITH THE TREADMILL RUN TEST IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Aziz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET, with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT, in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p 0.05. In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05; and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06. The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance

  7. Regularity and separation from potential barriers for a non-local phase-field system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Londen, S.-O.; Petzeltová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 379, č. 2 (2011), s. 724-735. ISSN 0022-247X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/05/0164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : non-local phase -field systems * regularity of solutions * separation property * convergence to equilibria Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.001, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022247X11001065

  8. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Blazevski, D.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence...

  9. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system

  10. Pretest Calculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J · m-3 · K-1), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result

  11. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  12. Testing of the Toroidal Field model Coil (TFMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper shortly describes the Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) design, fabrication choices and issues with respect to technological and management aspects. The experience gained during the assembly and disassembly of the TFMC for phase 1 testing, as well as the assembly with the LCT coil for phase 2 testing will be reported. During phase 1 the TFMC was energised at 80 kA and was fast discharged several times without changes in the coil performances. The first test campaign has demonstrated the feasibility and operability of the ITER Toroidal Field coils including the joints. An in depth analysis of the test results will be presented in the paper. The goal for phase 2 testing is to determine the actual margins which have been achieved in the design and manufacture of the TFMC in selected areas. For this purpose, the TFMC will be operated beyond the design conditions in terms of current, temperature and parameters related to coil protection (discharge time constant, quench detection time). This second phase has started in September 2002 and will last about four months, therefore the test results can be used to optimise the ITER design, in particular on the conductors and insulation system. (author)

  13. Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Sofie Lindberg

    Full Text Available Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8 and part-time (N = 10 male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8 and women (N = 12, and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM and endurance (IE muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs. The highest significant (p<0.01 correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72 and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67, for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.81 and barbell shoulder press (rs = -0.77, for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = -0.82 and bench press (rs = -0.85, for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75 and bench press (rs = 0.83, for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.83 and bench press (rs = -0.82, and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = -0.58 and upright barbell row (rs = -0.70. In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7 with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity.

  14. General Atomic's superconducting high field test facility and initial performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic has established a high field test facility whose primary mission is to investigate the J-B-T and stability performance margins of commercial NbTi superconductor in the 10 tesla, 4.20K region. This work is part of the overall DOE/MFE/MAGNETIC SYSTEMS effort to provide an adequate technological base for construction of superconducting toroidal field coils for the next generation of large tokamak fusion devices. The principal components of the facility are the coil/cryostat assembly, the helium refrigerator-liquefier/compressor system, and the gaseous helium recovery and storage system. The epoxy impregnated, layer wound main background field coil generates 8 tesla within its 40 cm diameter bore. The insert background field coil was layer wound with cooling channels provided by ''barber pole'' mylar conductor insulation. Ten tesla is generated within its 22 cm bore. The initial performance of the facility will be discussed. Future testing calls for operating test coils with implanted heating elements to simulate mechanically induced perturbations. The normal zone growth and recovery behavior will be observed for various disturbance energies. This data will then be compared with results obtained from the transient recovery analysis developed at General Atomic

  15. Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

  16. A pulsed magnetic field test facility for conductors and joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and, in the US, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) fusion programs both require conductor and joint testing in a pulsed magnetic background field in order to demonstrate that these components can operate successfully in a simulated, fusion-machine environment. Here, a pulsed magnetic field test facility is under construction at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for testing large scale cable-in-conduit superconductor and joint samples. Separate, demountable split-pair solenoid and saddle coils provide a combination of fields which can be either transverse of parallel to the sample axis. The solenoid and saddle magnets together can provide transverse peak fields as high as 8.4 T. Peak parallel fields of 6.6 T can be generated with the solenoid alone. Ramp-up rates of 1.5 T/s and ramp-down rates of 20 T/s are possible. Sample currents up to 50 kA are provided by a superconducting current transformer. The sample is connected to the transformer secondary through a pair of low resistance joints. Supercritical helium is provided to the sample at flow rates up to 20 g/s, pressures up to 1 MPa, and temperatures from 4.7 to 10 K. Programmable logic controllers provide coordination of the magnetic field, sample current, and helium flow rate and temperature in the sample. Sample and facility instrumentation signals are processed and data is stored on a workstation-based data acquisition system with comprehensive data reduction capability. Facility details and status are described

  17. The fate of organic compounds in a cement-based repository: impact on the engineered barrier and the release of C-14 from the near field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of organic materials is taken into account in the safety analysis for a L/ILW (Low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste) repository in Switzerland with the aim of assessing possible impacts on the cement barrier. The waste forms to be disposed of in the planned L/ILW repository will contain HMW polymers and LMW monomeric organic materials. It is anticipated that these organic materials have different degradation rates and therefore different life times in a repository. While the decomposition of LMW organics is expected to be fast and complete during the oxic and early anoxic states of a repository, i.e. before and shortly after repository closure, the decomposition of the HMW polymeric materials is expected to be very slow and, for some materials, to occur over the entire life time of the repository. The degradation of organic materials generates CO2 which gives rise to carbonation of the cement barrier. The maximum acceptable loading of organics in the near field with no detrimental effect on radionuclide immobilization can be estimated on the assumption that at maximum 2/3 of the total portlandite inventory of hydrated cement is allowed to convert to CaCO3 in the case of waste compartments for which the cementitious barrier should remain intact. The maximum loading is determined by the inventory of the organic material under consideration as well as the carbon content and the oxidation state of carbon of the material. Carbon-14 bound in organic compounds is considered to be an important contributor to the annual dose released from a L/ILW repository. While the 14C inventory is well known, the chemical speciation of 14C in the cementitious near field upon liberation in the course of the corrosion of activated steel is only poorly understood. Preliminary corrosion tests with non-activated steel powders show the formation of gaseous and dissolved organic carbon species, e.g. alkanes/alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids, containing

  18. Field tests for evaluating the aerobic work capacity of firefighters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Sofie Lindberg

    Full Text Available Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter's ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory and indirect (field aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters' aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (r(s = -0.65 and -0.63, p<0.01, respectively. Absolute (mL · min(-1 and relative (mL · kg(-1 · min(-1 maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (r(s = -0.79 to 0.55 and -0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively. Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters' work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s · kg(-1, and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter's aerobic work capacity.

  19. A new apparatus for visual field testing with binocular fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa,Eiichi

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available A new instrument for visual field examination with binocular fixation is described. The binocular vision was dissociated with polarizing plates. Only the point of fixation was visible to both eyes while the testing chart (Amsler chart was visible to one eye in the use of this apparatus. The examination was done with both the patient's eyes open. With the use of this apparatus, not only was the visual line fixed steadily in order to detect various changes of the central visual field due to maculopathy or optic neuropathy and these changes were detected accurately and quickly, but also suppression scotoma associated with amblyopia or squint could be detected quantitatively.

  20. Reliability tests of electroless barriers against copper diffusion under bias-temperature stress with n- and p-type substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Fujishima, Shota; Yamashita, Makoto; Mitsumori, Akiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the similarity and difference of substrate conduction type in the time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) tests for the barrier integrity against Cu diffusion under bias-temperature stress (BTS), the TDDB reliability of electroless NiB and CoWP/NiB was determined by metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) structures on n-type Si (n-Si) substrates, and the test results were compared with those using p-type Si (p-Si) substrates. The TDDB results and mechanism were observed to be qualitatively the same as Cu diffusion for both conduction types. However, the TDDB lifetime using p-Si was found to be potentially shorter because of the reverse bias conditions than that using n-Si under the forward bias conditions.

  1. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Jonathan Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resor, Brian Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paquette, Joshua A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Jonathan Randall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  2. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the hydrogen permeation barriers which can be applied to the structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Pb-17Li blanket designs, although barriers are also necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers which provide greater than a 1000- fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors (PRFs) of 1000 to over 100000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison with laboratory experiments, i.e. less than 150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the radiation- and electric-field-induced enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower PRFs during in-reactor experiments. (orig.)

  3. Surface and volume activity distributions in field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article summarizes the results of 4 field tests in which a radioactive substance was dispersed over an open area by explosion using industrial explosives. The aim of the tests was to obtain reliable datasets characterizing the spread of the substance. Surface activities were determined using collecting paper filters located within a polygon area and then measured in laboratory using semiconductor spectrometry (HPGe detectors). Aerosols were sampled at selected sites to determine the volume activity of the dispersed radioactive substance, using both conventional sampling devices and cascade impactors. Meteorological conditions were also recorded. The surface and volume activity distributions over the affected area at real weather conditions were compared

  4. Development of analytical and numerical models for the assessment and interpretation of hydrogeological field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models of the flow and tracer tests in fractured aquifers are being developed for the further study of radioactive wastes migration in round water at the Lake Area, which is associated with one of the waste disposal site in Russia. The choice of testing methods, tracer types (chemical or thermal) and the appropriate models are determined by the nature of the ongoing ground-water pollution processes and the hydrogeological features of the site under consideration. Special importance is attached to the increased density of wastes as well as to the possible redistribution of solutes both in the liquid phase and in the absorbed state (largely, on fracture surfaces). This allows for studying physical-and-chemical (hydrogeochemical) interaction parameters which are hard to obtain (considering a fractured structure of the rock mass) in laboratory. Moreover, a theoretical substantiation is being given to the field methods of studying the properties of a fractured stratum aimed at the further construction of the drainage system or the subsurface flow barrier (cutoff wall), as well as the monitoring system that will evaluate the reliability of these ground-water protection measures. The proposed mathematical models are based on a tight combination of analytical and numerical methods, the former being preferred in solving the principal (2D axisymmetrical) class of the problems. The choice of appropriate problems is based on the close feedback with subsequent field tests in the Lake Area. 63 refs

  5. Development of analytical and numerical models for the assessment and interpretation of hydrogeological field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironenko, V.A.; Rumynin, V.G.; Konosavsky, P.K. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation); Pozdniakov, S.P.; Shestakov, V.M. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Roshal, A.A. [Geosoft-Eastlink, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    Mathematical models of the flow and tracer tests in fractured aquifers are being developed for the further study of radioactive wastes migration in round water at the Lake Area, which is associated with one of the waste disposal site in Russia. The choice of testing methods, tracer types (chemical or thermal) and the appropriate models are determined by the nature of the ongoing ground-water pollution processes and the hydrogeological features of the site under consideration. Special importance is attached to the increased density of wastes as well as to the possible redistribution of solutes both in the liquid phase and in the absorbed state (largely, on fracture surfaces). This allows for studying physical-and-chemical (hydrogeochemical) interaction parameters which are hard to obtain (considering a fractured structure of the rock mass) in laboratory. Moreover, a theoretical substantiation is being given to the field methods of studying the properties of a fractured stratum aimed at the further construction of the drainage system or the subsurface flow barrier (cutoff wall), as well as the monitoring system that will evaluate the reliability of these ground-water protection measures. The proposed mathematical models are based on a tight combination of analytical and numerical methods, the former being preferred in solving the principal (2D axisymmetrical) class of the problems. The choice of appropriate problems is based on the close feedback with subsequent field tests in the Lake Area. 63 refs.

  6. The roles of the magnetic field barrier and solar wind speed in ICME-associated Forbush decreases

    CERN Document Server

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    We study 50 cosmic ray Forbush decreases (FDs) from the Oulu neutron monitor data during 1997-2005 that were associated with Earth-directed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Such events are generally thought to arise due to the shielding of cosmic rays by a propagating diffusive barrier. The main processes at work are the diffusion of cosmic rays across the large-scale magnetic fields carried by the ICME and their advection by the solar wind. In an attempt to better understand the relative importance of these effects, we analyse the relationship between the FD profiles and those of the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and the solar wind speed (Vsw). Over the entire duration of a given FD, we find that the FD profile is generally well (anti)correlated with the B and Vsw profiles. This trend holds separately for the FD main and recovery phases too. For the recovery phases, however, the FD profile is highly anti-correlated with the Vsw profile, but not with the B profile. While the total duration o...

  7. Test method for the microbial barrier properties of packaging for medical devices ; RIVM method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn ACP de; Asten JAAM van; LGM

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important qualities of packaging for medical devices is the ability to keep the contents sterile. The quality of the packaging is determined by the quality of the material and the quality of the seals. The former is usually tested with test methods using micro-organisms. In hospitals

  8. The virtual fields method applied to spalling tests on concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available For one decade spalling techniques based on the use of a metallic Hopkinson bar put in contact with a concrete sample have been widely employed to characterize the dynamic tensile strength of concrete at strain-rates ranging from a few tens to two hundreds of s−1. However, the processing method mainly based on the use of the velocity profile measured on the rear free surface of the sample (Novikov formula remains quite basic and an identification of the whole softening behaviour of the concrete is out of reach. In the present paper a new processing method is proposed based on the use of the Virtual Fields Method (VFM. First, a digital high speed camera is used to record the pictures of a grid glued on the specimen. Next, full-field measurements are used to obtain the axial displacement field at the surface of the specimen. Finally, a specific virtual field has been defined in the VFM equation to use the acceleration map as an alternative ‘load cell’. This method applied to three spalling tests allowed to identify Young’s modulus during the test. It was shown that this modulus is constant during the initial compressive part of the test and decreases in the tensile part when micro-damage exists. It was also shown that in such a simple inertial test, it was possible to reconstruct average axial stress profiles using only the acceleration data. Then, it was possible to construct local stress-strain curves and derive a tensile strength value.

  9. On-site cell field test support program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  10. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  11. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  12. Dispersant field testing : a review of procedures and considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of a dispersant is defined by the amount of oil that the dispersant puts into the water column compared to the amount of oil that was initially spilled. Effectiveness is generally determined visually in plumes of dispersed oil that are visible from ships and aircraft. This paper describes 25 specific issues and technical concerns regarding field testing of dispersant effectiveness. Recent field tests were reviewed and literature that relates to testing procedures was sited. The 25 factors that are important for the appropriate outcome of dispersant field experiments include: mass balance; proper controls; analytical method; differential plume movement; time lag and length of time followed; mathematics of calculation and integration; lower and upper limits of analytical methods; use of remote sensing; thickness measurement; behaviour of oil with surfactant content; surfactant stripping; tracking surface oil and dispersed oil; recovering surface oil; visibility of oil from the surface; background levels of hydrocarbons; fluorescence of dispersant; herding; emulsion breaking; application success; heterogeneity of slick and plume; deposition measurements; true analytical standards; effect of wind on dispersant and slick; dispersant run-off; and weathering of the oil. It was concluded that the most important factors are the ability to determine mass balance, use proper controls, analytical methods and to avoid procedures that give incorrect results. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Development and field test of deformation sensors for concrete embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaudi, Daniele; Vurpillot, Samuel; Casanova, Nicoletta; Osa-Wyser, Annette

    1996-05-01

    Our laboratories have developed a measurement system called SOFO, based on low-coherence interferometry in singlemode optical fibers and allowing the measurement of deformations of the order of 1/100 mm. This system is especially useful for the long-term monitoring of civil structures such as bridges, tunnels, dams and geostructures. The SOFO system requires the installation of two fibers in the structure to be monitored. The first fiber should be in mechanical contact with the structure in its active region and follow the structure deformation in both elongation and shortening. The second fiber has to be installed freely in a pipe near the first one. This fiber acts as a reference and compensates for the temperature dependence of the index of refraction in the measurement fiber. This contribution presents the design process as well as the lab and field tests of a sensor responding to these requirements and adapted to the installation in concrete structures. The active region can be between 25 cm and 8 m in length, while the passive region can reach at least 20 m. While the reference is free, the measurement fiber (installed in the same pipe) is pre-stressed between two glue-points at each end of the active region. The glue was chosen in order to avoid any creeping problems even at temperatures up to 160 degree(s)C and elongation up to 2%. The sensor was tested in laboratory and field conditions. The lab tests included survival to concreting, high temperatures, freezing, thermal cycling, vibrations, cracking and corrosion; response to elongation and compression, measurement range and creeping of the glue points at high temperatures and high tensions. The field tests included installation of a number of these sensors in a bridge deck and in a tunnel vault. In these applications we tested the ease of use, the rapidity of installation and the survival rate.

  14. Flexible barrier materials for protection against electromagnetic fields and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszewski, Maciej

    2015-10-01

    Composite materials for electromagnetic shielding can be manufactured as textiles using conductive yarns and textiles with conductivity obtained by various finishing processes on textile surfaces. The EM shielding effectiveness of fabrics are improved by lowering its conductivity using different methods and materials. An alternative is the usage of new light shielding materials in the form of metallized nonwoven fabrics or textiles. Their advantages are: a general availability on the market, a low price, good mechanical properties (strength, elasticity) and resistance to the environmental conditions. The composite anisotropic materials with a sandwich structure constituting of materials with different spatial orientations of fibers allow one to achieve relatively high and constant values of the shielding effectiveness which, together with the materials' mechanical properties, leads to a wide range of applicability in various disciplines of modern technology. This article is devoted to innovative flexible materials shielding electromagnetic field. The results of the PEM shielding effectiveness obtained for the polypropylene (PP) nonwoven fabrics metallized by pulsed magnetron sputtering are presented.

  15. Accelerated relative sea-level rise and rapid coastal erosion: Testing a causal relationship for the Louisiana barrier islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, J.H.; Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Hansen, M.E.; Jaffe, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    The role of relative sea-level rise as a cause for the rapid erosion of Louisiana's barrier island coast is investigated through a numerical implementation of a modified Bruun rule that accounts for the low percentage of sand-sized sediment in the eroding Louisiana shoreface. Shore-normal profiles from 150 km of coastline west of the Mississippi delta are derived from bathymetric surveys conducted during the 1880s. 1930s and 1980s. An RMS difference criterion is employed to test whether an equilibrium profile form is maintained between survey years. Only about half the studied profiles meet the equilibrium Criterion this represents a significant limitation on the potential applicability of the Bruun rule. The profiles meeting the equilibrium criterion, along with measured rates of relative sea-level rise, are used to hindcast shoreline retreat rates at 37 locations within the study area. Modeled and observed shoreline retreat rates show no significant correlation. Thus in terms of the Bruun approach relative sea-level rise has no power for hindcasting (and presumably forecasting) rates of coastal erosion for the Louisiana barrier islands.

  16. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  17. Grimsel Test Site: modelling radionuclide migration field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the migration field experiments at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site, the processes of nuclide transport through a well defined fractured shear-zone in crystalline rock are being investigated. For these experiments, model calculations have been performed to obtain indications on validity and limitation of the model applied and the data deduced under field conditions. The model consists of a hydrological part, where the dipole flow fields of the experiments are determined, and a nuclide transport part, where the flow field driven nuclide propagation through the shear-zone is calculated. In addition to the description of the model, analytical expressions are given to guide the interpretation of experimental results. From the analysis of experimental breakthrough curves for conservative uranine, weakly sorbing sodium and more stronger sorbing strontium tracers, the following main results can be derived: i) The model is able to represent the breakthrough curves of the migration field experiments to a high degree of accuracy, ii) The process of matrix diffusion is manifest through the tails of the breakthrough curves decreasing with time as t-3/2 and through the special shape of the tail ends, both confirmed by the experiments, iii) For nuclide sorbing rapidly, not too strongly, linearly, and exhibiting a reversible cation exchange process on fault gouge, the laboratory sorption coefficient can reasonably well be extrapolated to field conditions. Adequate care in selecting and preparing the rock samples is, of course, a necessary requirement. Using the parameters determined in the previous analysis, predictions are made for experiments in a smaller an faster flow field. For conservative uranine and weakly sorbing sodium, the agreement of predicted and measured breakthrough curves is good, for the more stronger sorbing strontium reasonable, confirming that the model describes the main nuclide transport processes adequately. (author) figs., tabs., 29 refs

  18. The impact of farmers’ participation in field trials in creating awareness and stimulating compliance with the World Health Organization’s farm-based multiple-barrier approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amponsah, Owusu; Vigre, Håkan; Schou, Torben Wilde;

    2015-01-01

    The results of a study aimed as assessing the extent to which urban vegetable farmers’ participation in field trials can impact on their awareness and engender compliance with the World Health Organization’s farm-based multiple-barrier approach are presented in this paper. Both qualitative and qu...

  19. Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

    1982-05-01

    Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

  20. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  1. Field Measurements and Pullout Tests of Reinforced Earth Retaining Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈群; 何昌荣; 朱分清

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, field measurements and pullout tests of a new type of reinforced earth retaining wall, which is reinforced by trapezoid concrete blocks connected by steel bar, are described. Field measurements included settlements of the earth fill, tensile forces in the ties and earth pressures on the facing panels during the construction and at completion. Based on the measurements, the following statements can be made: ( 1 ) the tensile forces in the ties increased with the height of backfill above the tie and there is a tensile force crest in most ties; (2) at completion, the measured earth pressures along the wall face were between the values of the active earth pressures and the pressures at rest; (3) larger settlements occurred near the face of the wall where a zone of drainage sand and gravel was not compacted properly and smaller settlements occurred in the well-compacted backfill. The results of field pullout tests indicated that the magnitudes of pullout resistances as well as tensile forces induced in the ties were strongly influenced by the relative displacements between the ties and the backfill, and pullout resistances increased with the height of backfill above the ties and the length of ties.

  2. Cellular Apoptosis and Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in the Pre-Incubated Chicken Embryo’s Brain by Effect of Electromagnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Kalantari; Mohammad Reza Bigdeli; Maryam Shams-Lahijani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electromagnetic fields (EMF) have teratogenic effects during the embryonic development. In current study, histopathological and physiological effects of sinusoidal EMF on the brain were investigated. We sought to determine the apoptosis level and changes in blood brain barrier permeability in brain tissue of pre-incubated white leghorn hen eggs in the field of EMF. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 300 healthy, fresh, and fertilized eggs (55-65 g) were divided ...

  3. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL's Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal

  4. TEST OF AN ANIMAL DRAWN FIELD IMPLEMENT CART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Spugnoli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The field performance of a horse-drawn hitch cart equipped with a PTO system powered by the two cart ground wheels have been investigated. For this purpose field tests on clay and turf soil, with varying ballast and PTO torque, have been carried out pulling the cart by a tractor. Preliminary tests were aimed at assessing the traction capability of horse breed. These tests showed that the mean draught force given by two of these horses was 173daN, average working speed was about 1m*s-1, resulting a mean draught power developed by each horse of about 0.86kW. The PTO cart system performance has shown that the torque has not exceeded 2.4daN*m, maximum draught or PTO power was 1.15kW, rotation speed just higher than 400min-1, with mean efficiency of about 50%. These values are consistent with horse performance and small haymaking, fertilizing, seeding and chemical application machine requirements.

  5. Schottky barrier contrasts in single and bi-layer graphene contacts for MoS2 field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hyewon; Kim, Taekwang; Shin, Somyeong; Kim, Dahye; Kim, Hakseong; Sung, Ji Ho; Lee, Myoung Jae; Seo, David H.; Lee, Sang Wook; Jo, Moon-Ho; Seo, Sunae

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated single- and bi-layer graphene as source-drain electrodes for n-type MoS2 transistors. Ti-MoS2-graphene heterojunction transistors using both single-layer MoS2 (1M) and 4-layer MoS2 (4M) were fabricated in order to compare graphene electrodes with commonly used Ti electrodes. MoS2-graphene Schottky barrier provided electron injection efficiency up to 130 times higher in the subthreshold regime when compared with MoS2-Ti, which resulted in VDS polarity dependence of device parameters such as threshold voltage (VTH) and subthreshold swing (SS). Comparing single-layer graphene (SG) with bi-layer graphene (BG) in 4M devices, SG electrodes exhibited enhanced device performance with higher on/off ratio and increased field-effect mobility (μFE) due to more sensitive Fermi level shift by gate voltage. Meanwhile, in the strongly accumulated regime, we observed opposing behavior depending on MoS2 thickness for both SG and BG contacts. Differential conductance (σd) of 1M increases with VDS irrespective of VDS polarity, while σd of 4M ceases monotonic growth at positive VDS values transitioning to ohmic-like contact formation. Nevertheless, the low absolute value of σd saturation of the 4M-graphene junction demonstrates that graphene electrode could be unfavorable for high current carrying transistors.

  6. Schottky barrier contrasts in single and bi-layer graphene contacts for MoS2 field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated single- and bi-layer graphene as source-drain electrodes for n-type MoS2 transistors. Ti-MoS2-graphene heterojunction transistors using both single-layer MoS2 (1M) and 4-layer MoS2 (4M) were fabricated in order to compare graphene electrodes with commonly used Ti electrodes. MoS2-graphene Schottky barrier provided electron injection efficiency up to 130 times higher in the subthreshold regime when compared with MoS2-Ti, which resulted in VDS polarity dependence of device parameters such as threshold voltage (VTH) and subthreshold swing (SS). Comparing single-layer graphene (SG) with bi-layer graphene (BG) in 4M devices, SG electrodes exhibited enhanced device performance with higher on/off ratio and increased field-effect mobility (μFE) due to more sensitive Fermi level shift by gate voltage. Meanwhile, in the strongly accumulated regime, we observed opposing behavior depending on MoS2 thickness for both SG and BG contacts. Differential conductance (σd) of 1M increases with VDS irrespective of VDS polarity, while σd of 4M ceases monotonic growth at positive VDS values transitioning to ohmic-like contact formation. Nevertheless, the low absolute value of σd saturation of the 4M-graphene junction demonstrates that graphene electrode could be unfavorable for high current carrying transistors

  7. MEOR field pilot test; Biseibutsu EOR fuirudo tesuto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonebayashi, E.; Asaumi, H.; Taguchi, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Ono, K. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-30

    Since 1996, JNOC and JPGCL(Jilin Petroleum Group Co. Ltd.) have been carrying out MEOR pilot test in Fuyu-oilfield China. The objectives are; (1) improving oil recovery in the field, (2) evaluating laboratory-screened microorganisms in a real field, and (3) clarifying the oil recovery mechanisms. The construction of surface facility was finished at the end of June, 1997. The microorganisms (TRC-322, TU-7A) were pre-incubated in this plant before injection. TRC-322 and TU-7A were injected into 14 wells in target blocks: East 24-23 Block and East 24-26 Block and showed a high growth and metabolism in this reservoir as detected by a new monitoring method (including gene engineering technique). A new cored well was drilled in the center of the target block (East 24-26 Block) for the purpose of collecting recent reservoir data. (author)

  8. Fault detection by surface seismic scanning tunneling macroscope: Field test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    The seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) is proposed for detecting the presence of near-surface impedance anomalies and faults. Results with synthetic data are consistent with theory in that scatterers closer to the surface provide brighter SSTM profiles than those that are deeper. The SSTM profiles show superresolution detection if the scatterers are in the near-field region of the recording line. The field data tests near Gulf of Aqaba, Haql, KSA clearly show the presence of the observable fault scarp, and identify the subsurface presence of the hidden faults indicated in the tomograms. Superresolution detection of the fault is achieved, even when the 35 Hz data are lowpass filtered to the 5-10 Hz band.

  9. Electron linac diaphragmatic waveguide testing at high field gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of testing of two wavequide structures approximately one meter long of electron linacs in the running and standing wave modes at SHF pulse power up to 8 MW are presented. Both waveguiges operate on the π/2-type wave, and cells of the waveguide major part differ in loading parameters a/lambda and equel 0,0927, Rsub(s)=65 MOhm/m, and in the second variant a/lambda=0.0725 and Rsub(s)=72 MOhm/m. The tests conducted have shown, that conventional round diaphragmatic waveguide approximately one meter long manufactured according to accepted technology operates without break-downs at the frequency 3.2 GHz with the pulse duration tau=3 μs in the running wave mode at the 20 MeV/m average acceleration rate over the waveguide length, the 30 MeV/m maximum acceleration rate in central cells of the waveguide and the 40 MV/m, maximum electric fields on the surface of diaphragm bending radius in the standing wave mode at the 10 MeV/m, average acceleration rate over the length, 30 MeV/m accelerating fields in all the cells of the waveguide except injection ones, and the 50 MV/m maximum electric fields on the surface of bending radius of diaphragms. On the basis of the waveguide with a/lambda=0.0725 and Rsub(s)=72 MOhm/m with the active length 0.65 m a nondestructive test facility providing electron acceleration up to 8 MeV and bremsstrahlung inten

  10. Non-Tariff Barriers as a Test of Political Economy Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Philip I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a rough test of a broad and prominent class of political economy of trade models and finds them wanting. The class features governments with weighted social welfare functions, including the prominent model of Grossman and Helpman. Whether the government is the single domestic player or there are other players involved (as with the lobbies in the Grossman-Helpman case) the government ultimately acts as a unitary player in international dealings. Recent work has shown that s...

  11. Hypersensitivity test to electric magnetic fields; Test de hipersensibilidad a exposiciones residenciales a campos magneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda Maeso, A.; Martinez Pascual, M. A.

    2004-07-01

    The so-called electromagnetic hypersensitivity (RH) syndrome includes a number of unspecific, medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electric and magnetic fields. As a whole, laboratory tests have provided inconclusive results, in part due to the fact that many individuals show nuclear, inconsistent responses to repeated experimental field-exposures. It has been proposed that such inconsistencies could be due in part to distress caused by the lab test itself. We have developed a test to be conducted at the patient's residence, allowing for long-term follow up of exposure-response assessment and avoiding the laboratory environment and the presence of the researcher as potential stressors and confounding factors. In a pilot test, EMDEX-II magnetometers were used to continuously recording power-frequency magnetic fields in the residence of a patient with perceived EH. The patient's symptoms included distress, headache and dizziness, among other ailments. Magnetographic data of a total of 123 recording days were plotted against the corresponding data on occurrence of the symptoms episodes. As a whole, the results did not show positive linear correlation between the daily occurrence of the episode and the exposures levels recorded during the day or during the day before. These preliminary results are little supportive of the hypothesis that the patient's ailments are caused or worsened by a putative hypersensitivity to residential exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields in the 0.02-4.00 {mu}T range. (Author) 29 refs.

  12. In Situ XPS Chemical Analysis of MnSiO3 Copper Diffusion Barrier Layer Formation and Simultaneous Fabrication of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electrical Test MOS Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Conor; Brennan, Barry; McCoy, Anthony P; Bogan, Justin; Brady, Anita; Hughes, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Copper/SiO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices both with and without a MnSiO3 barrier layer at the Cu/SiO2 interface have been fabricated in an ultrahigh vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system, which allows interface chemical characterization of the barrier formation process to be directly correlated with electrical testing of barrier layer effectiveness. Capacitance voltage (CV) analysis, before and after tube furnace anneals of the fabricated MOS structures showed that the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer significantly improved electric stability of the device structures. Evidence of improved adhesion of the deposited copper layer to the MnSiO3 surface compared to the clean SiO2 surface was apparent both from tape tests and while probing the samples during electrical testing. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling measurements of the MOS test structures reveal distinct differences of copper diffusion into the SiO2 dielectric layers following the thermal anneal depending on the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer. PMID:26732185

  13. ITER poloidal field-full size joint sample: DC test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Poloidal Field-Full Size Joint Sample is a prototype sample dedicated to the tests of both conductor and joint relevant to the ITER Poloidal Field Coils. This sample, made of two straight conductor legs, connected at one end to each other, has been manufactured in industry and extensively tested in the SULTAN facility at Villigen, Switzerland. This paper is dedicated to a detailed analysis of the DC performances of the two legs, based on the same conductor layout, but with two different NbTi strands: a Nickel coated pure copper matrix strand from Europa Metalli (EM), and a bare strand from ALSTOM (AL), with internal cupronickel barrier. Critical currents, and/or quench currents, and current sharing temperatures have been measured in the range of interest for the ITER magnets, namely with a background field from 4 to 7 T, temperatures in the 4.5-7.5 K range, sample currents up to 80 kA. An 'instability' of this conductors, more pronounced in the EM leg despite the higher Cu:non-Cu ratio of the strand, has been evidenced, in agreement with other NbTi large conductors behavior. The effect of cycling on both critical and quench currents showed no significant evolution, as the test have been performed on virgin samples, and repeated after more than 500 electromagnetic cycles.The results allowed to evidence the features common to the two legs, peculiar to NbTi large CIC conductors, and the differences in the two legs performances, which could be attributed to a different current distribution among the main sub-cables (petals). (authors)

  14. Optimizing Field Campaigns Using A Hypothesis Testing Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harken, B. J.; Over, M. W.; Rubin, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Field campaigns in hydrogeology often aim to characterize aquifers for modeling and predicting flow and transport of contaminants to facilitate in some objective related to environmental protection or public health and safety. Many times these objectives depend on predicting the answer to a yes/no question, such as: will contaminant concentration in an aquifer surpass a threshold value? Will a contaminant reach a river outflow before it degrades? Is water from an extraction well safe for consumption? It remains difficult, however, to predict the extent to which a field campaign will improve modeling and prediction efforts or the chance of success in the original objective. Presented here is a method for designing field campaigns around the original objective by posing it in a hypothesis testing framework and optimizing campaigns with minimizing probability of error as the goal. The first step in this process is to formulate the null and alternative hypotheses, which represent the two possible outcomes of the yes/no question in the objective. The alternative hypothesis is the desirable outcome which requires a specified level of certainty to be accepted. The null hypothesis, on the other hand, is the "safe" fallback assumption, which is accepted if the alternative hypothesis lacks sufficient supporting evidence. Of key concern in designing field campaigns is the probability of making an error (Type I or Type II). A level of significance is chosen based on the severity of each type of error and the level of risk that is considered acceptable for each case. A field campaign can then be designed to gain enough information to reduce the probability of error to the acceptable level while expending as few resources as possible. A case study examined here is attempting to predict the arrival time of a contaminant in an aquifer. A scenario is first established in which a contaminant is travelling from a point source to a control plane, which could represent, for example, a

  15. Development and reliability of two core stability field tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Patrick M; Swensen, Thomas C

    2008-03-01

    Because of the recognized link between core stability and back and lower extremity injury in sport, additional field tests that assess the strength and power component of core stability are needed to identify athletes at risk of such injury. To that end, we developed and tested the reliability of the front and side abdominal power tests (FAPT and SAPT), which were adapted from plyometric medicine ball exercises. The FAPT and SAPT were performed by explosively contracting the core musculature using the arms as a lever to project a medicine ball. Twenty-four untrained young women (aged 20.9 +/- 1.1 year) completed three trials each of the FAPT and SAPT on separate nonconsecutive days. The average distance the medicine ball was projected on each day was recorded; power was inferred from this measure. There was an approximately 3% increase in the mean distance between the testing sessions for the FAPT and SAPT; this was not significant and indicates there was no learning effect in the measurement protocol. Heteroscedasticity was present in the SAPT data but not the FAPT data. For the FAPT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95, standard error of measurement was 24 cm, and random error using the limits of agreement method was 67.5 cm. For the SAPT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93, mean coefficient of variation was 9.8%, and the limits of agreement ratio was 36.8%. The FAPT and SAPT displayed excellent test-retest reliability, as well as acceptable measurement error. These findings suggest the FAPT and SAPT are reliable tests and may be used to assess the power component of core stability in young women. PMID:18550982

  16. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2

  17. Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskov, H.

    2010-08-15

    In order to prepare for a future use of hydrogen as a fuel gas it became evident that very little information existed regarding the compatibility between long-term exposure and transportation of hydrogen in natural gas pipelines. A program was therefore set to study the transportation in a small-scale pilot grid at the research centre in Hoersholm, Denmark. The test program included steel pipes from the Danish gas transmission grid and polymer pipes from the Danish and Swedish gas distribution grid. The test of polymer pipes was devised so that samples of all test pipes were cut out of the grid each year and analysis performed on these pipe samples; in this way any form of influence on the integrity of the polyethylene pipe would be detected. The analytical program for polymer was devised in order to detect any influence on the additivation of the polyethylene as this has an influence on oxidative resistance, as well as checking already encountered possible degradation caused by extrusion of the material. Further tools as rheology and melt flow rate were used for detecting any structural changes on the material. On the mechanical property side the tensile strength and modulus were followed as well as the most important property for the pipe line, namely slow crack growth. The results of the polymer pipe tests show no degradations of any kind related to the continuous hydrogen exposure for more than 4 years. This is a strong indication of the compatibility to hydrogen of the tested polymer materials PE 80 and PE 100. The object of the steel pipe test was to see the effect on fatigue life of existing natural gas transmission lines with hydrogen replacing the natural gas. Full-scale dynamic tests were performed using randomly selected cut-out API 5L X70 pipe sections with a diameter of 20 inches and a wall thickness of 7 millimetres from the Danish natural gas transmission system. The pipe sections contained field girth weld made during the installation of the pipe

  18. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of

  19. A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) media sequence for the remediation of heavy metal and hydrocarbon contaminated water: A field assessment at Casey Station, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statham, Tom M; Stark, Scott C; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-03-01

    A field trial was conducted at Casey Station, Antarctica to assess the suitability of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) media sequence for the remediation of sites containing both hydrocarbon and heavy metal contamination. An existing PRB was modified to assess a sequence consisting of three sections: (i) Nutrient release/hydrocarbon sorption using ZeoPro™ and granular activated carbon; (ii) Phosphorus and heavy metal capture by granular iron and sand; (iii) Nutrient and excess iron capture by zeolite. The media sequence achieved a greater phosphorus removal capacity than previous Antarctic PRB configurations installed on site. Phosphorus concentrations were reduced during flow through the iron/sand section and iron concentrations were reduced within the zeolite section. However, non-ideal flow was detected during a tracer test and supported by analysis of media and liquid samples from the second summer of operation. Results indicate that the PRB media sequence trialled might be appropriate for other locations, especially less environmentally challenging contaminated sites. PMID:26774301

  20. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45 degree angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained

  1. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, J.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

  2. Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-04-09

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

  3. Interlamellar cracking of thermal barrier coatings with TGOs by non-standard four-point bending tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A non-standard modified four-point bending specimen is adopted for delamination test. → Typical failure mode of the TBC system with TGO layer is demonstrated. → Fracture toughness of 8YSZ on a cold-sprayed MCrAlY coating is evaluated theoretically. - Abstract: This work concerns the failure mode and fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) deposited on a cold-sprayed MCrAlY bond coat (BC) after thermal oxidation. Upon high-temperature exposure, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was formed along the interface between the BC layer and YSZ ceramic coating layer through oxidation of the bond coat. By utilizing a non-standard modified four-point bending specimen, in conjunction with fractured surface examinations by scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscope, the failure mode of this thermal barrier coating (TBC) system has been checked experimentally. It is shown that delamination cracks firstly initiate at the YSZ/BC interface edge, and then propagate along a wavy path near the interface, not only through the TBC but also within the TGO and along the interlamellar interfaces. Through a theoretical analysis of the bending specimen, the fracture toughness of this TBC system, in terms of strain energy release rate, has been determined from the load-displacement curves which were recorded during the tests.

  4. Field tests of stress measurement techniques in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three underground field tests were performed in southeastern New Mexico as part of the US Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Research and Development Program. These tests, one in potash-rich halite and two in relatively pure halite (rock salt), investigated the feasibility of using borehole inclusion stressmeters to measure in situ stress and stress changes in salt. The tests provided a comparison of inclusion stressmeters and demonstrated various qualities of gage response, including time-dependent characteristics, repeatability, and the effects of preload. Three gage types comprising five gages were used: (1) the strain-gaged stressmeter (SGS); (2) two US Bureau of Mines (USBM) hydraulic pressure cells called the borehole pressure cell (BPC) and the cylindrical pressure cell (CPC); and (3) two development pressure cells called the USBMX and the Sandia Pressure Cell (SPC). Gage response has been reasonably consistent. However, further study is required of the correlations between gage types and between gage output and the in situ state of stress. 13 references, 16 figures, 2 tables

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program

  6. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    2002-09-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel

  7. Monitoring production using surface deformation: the Hijiori test site and the Okuaizu geothermal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production in geothermal reservoirs often leads to observable surface displacement. As shown in this paper, there is a direct relationship between such displacement and reservoir dynamics. This relationship is exploited in order to image fluid flow at two geothermal field sites. At the first locality, the Hijiori Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site, 17 tilt meters record deformation associated with a 2.2 km deep injection experiment. Images of fluid migration along a ring fracture system of the collapsed Hijiori caldera are obtained. At the Okuaizu geothermal field, leveling and tilt meter data provide constraints on long- and short-term fluid movement within the reservoir. A set of 119 leveling data suggest that the north-to-northeast trending Takiyagawa fault acts as a barrier to flow. The northwesterly oriented Chinoikezawa and Sarukurazawa faults appear to channel fluid from the southeast. The tilt data from Okuaizu indicate that a fault paralleling the Takiyagawa fault zone acts as a conduit to transient flow, on a time scale of several weeks. The volume strain in a region adjacent to the injection wells reaches a maximum and then decreases with time. The transient propagation of fluid along the fault may be due to pressure build-up, resulting from the re-initiation of injection. (author)

  8. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program

  9. Development of high-density bentonite barriers by means of spraying methods. Part 2. Investigation of field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have developed a method of constructing high-density bentonite by means of wet spraying to act as a backfill material in narrow places in radioactive waste disposal facilities. On the basis of the results of laboratory tests, they conducted field spraying tests to investigate the field conditions. The results of these tests are summarized as follows: 1) The bentonite could be sprayed smoothly by using a rotary spraying machine and a screw conveyor. 2) Provided that the air flow was at least 18.5 m3/min and the nozzle diameter did not exceed 25 mm, an average dry density of bentonite of 1.6 Mg/m3 or higher could be achieved. 3) The dry density was constant within the spraying distance range 500 mm ∼ 2000 mm. 4) With a nozzle diameter of 19 mm, a spraying distance of 1000 mm, and a water content of 19.5%, an average dry density of the sprayed bentonite of 1.6 Mg/m3 or higher and a rebound ratio not exceeding 30% was achieved. 5) The dry density of the sprayed bentonite decreased as the volume of bentonite supplied was increased, and it was shows to be closely related to the rotational speed of the spraying machine and the volume of bentonite sprayed from each hole. (author)

  10. Testing Einstein's Equivalence Principle with Supercluster Laniakea's Gravitational Field

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Zhi-Xing; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the parameterized post-Newtonian parameter $\\gamma$ values for different types of particles, or the same type of particles with different energies is an important method to test the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP). Assuming that the observed time delays are dominated by the gravitational potential of the Laniakea supercluster of galaxies, better results of EEP constraints can be obtained. In this paper, we apply photons from three kinds of cosmic transients, including TeV blazars, gamma-ray bursts as well as fast radio bursts to constrain EEP. With a gravitational field far more stronger than a single galaxy, we obtain 4--5 orders of magnitude more stringent than the pervious results.

  11. Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

  12. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:26012881

  13. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, N. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  14. Results of field testing the cement evaluation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, C.A.; Finlayson, C.G.; Van der Kolk, C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cement Evaluation Tool (CET) developed by Schlumberger employs a pulse-echo technique using eight sonic transducers to investigate the casing cement bond. The tool has been widely field tested in a clastic environment in Brunei (N.W. Borneo), across both oil and gas bearing reservoirs. Numerous comparisons of the CET with conventional CBL/VDL logs have been made. Across oil and water bearing intervals the CET is shown to compare favourably with the CBL/VDL and yields significant additional information on channeling, cement distribution, and the success of casing centralization. In addition, the accuracy of the acoustic calipers have proved sufficient to be used in assisting drilling and completion operations. The response of the tool to a microannulus has also been demonstrated by multiple runs under varying wellbore pressures.

  15. Evaluation of the reliability of two field hockey specific sprint and dribble tests in young field hockey players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, K.A.; Elferink-Gemser, M.T.; Visscher, C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the reliability of two field hockey specific tests: the shuttle sprint and dribble test (ShuttleSDT) and the slalom sprint and dribble test (SlalomSDT). METHODS: The shuttle sprint and dribble performances of 22 young male and 12 young female field hockey players were assess

  16. Development of a specific anaerobic field test for aerobic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Christiano Robles Rodrigues; Borelli, Marcello Tadeu Caetano; Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen's d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  17. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  18. Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

  19. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  20. Field test on temperature field and thermal stress for prestressed concrete box-girder bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoguo CHEN; Rui DING; Junjie ZHENG; Shibiao ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    A field test was conducted to investigate the distribution of temperature field and the variation of thermal stress for a prestressed concrete (PC) box-girder bridge. The change of hydration heat temperature consists of four periods: temperature rising period, constant temperature period, rapid temperature fall period and stow temperature fall period. The peak value of hydration heat temperature increases with the increasing casting temperature of concrete; the relation between them is approximately linear. According to field tests, the thermal stress incurred by hydration heat may induce temperature cracks on the PC box-girder. Furthermore, the nonlinear distribution of temperature gradient and the fluctuation of thermal stress induced by exposure to sunlight were also obtained based on continuous in-situ monitoring. Such results show that the prevailing Chinese Code (2004) is insufficient since it does not take into account the temperature gradient of the bottom slab. Finally, some preventive measures against temperature cracks were proposed based on related studies. The conclusions can provide valuable reference for the design and construction of PC box-girder bridges.

  1. NATURAL DURABILITY OF THREE WOOD SPECIES IN FIELD TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodolfo de Melo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the natural durability of heartwood and sapwood of Luhea divaricata, Carya illinoinensis and Platanus x acerifolia. Test samples measuring 2.5 x 2.5 x 30.0 cm (radial x tangential x longitudinal were placed in a pine forest stand and an open field. During a year, the samples were repeatedly weighed and evaluated by a rating system to determine mass loss and decay index, respectively. The results showed that regardless of species and type of wood, the forest environment is more favourable to decay than that of the open field. Despite the high correlation between mass loss and decay index, variations in the durability of wood were found between these parameters. The wood from the internal section of the log (sapwood was the more affected. For mass loss, no significant variation was observed for the species analyzed, however, for the decay index Platanus x acerifolia was shown to be the most affected.

  2. Testing neoclassical competitive market theory in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, John A

    2002-11-26

    This study presents results from a pilot field experiment that tests predictions of competitive market theory. A major advantage of this particular field experimental design is that my laboratory is the marketplace: subjects are engaged in buying, selling, and trading activities whether I run an exchange experiment or am a passive observer. In this sense, I am gathering data in a natural environment while still maintaining the necessary control to execute a clean comparison between treatments. The main results of the study fall into two categories. First, the competitive model predicts reasonably well in some market treatments: the expected price and quantity levels are approximated in many market rounds. Second, the data suggest that market composition is important: buyer and seller experience levels impact not only the distribution of rents but also the overall level of rents captured. An unexpected result in this regard is that average market efficiency is lowest in markets that match experienced buyers and experienced sellers and highest when experienced buyers engage in bargaining with inexperienced sellers. Together, these results suggest that both market experience and market composition play an important role in the equilibrium discovery process. PMID:12432103

  3. Field testing of a personal size-selective bioaerosol sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, L C; Bowry, A; Crook, B; Stancliffe, J D

    1999-08-01

    Existing samplers for the collection of bioaerosols have been designed with the aim of maintaining biological stability of the collected material, and in general do not select particles in accordance with international conventions for aerosol sampling. Many have uncharacterised sampling efficiencies and few are designed as personal samplers. If standard personal dust samplers are used for bioaerosols the viability of collected microorganisms may be compromised by dehydration. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel personal bioaerosol sampler designed to collect the inhalable dust fraction and further subdivide the sample into thoracic and respirable fractions. The new sampler was tested to see whether it enhanced the survival of the collected microorganisms, and was assessed for ease of use in the field and in subsequent laboratory analyses. A number of occupation-related field sites were selected where large concentrations of bioaerosols were to be expected. The prototype sampler was found to be simple to use. Analysis could be carried out with similar efficiency either with all three fractions together for a total count, or separately for size selective data. The sampler performed at least as well as the standard IOM filter method but with the added advantage of size fractionation. The field trials showed that for sampling periods lasting several hours, microorganism survival within the sampler was adequate for culture and identification of the organisms present. This new sampler is now commercially available. In addition to bioaerosol sampling, the principle of size selective sampling using porous foams can be applied to other occupational hygiene problems, and also to indoor air monitoring of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations. PMID:10518465

  4. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  5. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles, Orlando, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-11-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  6. Grain boundary barrier modification due to coupling effect of crystal polar field and water molecular dipole in ZnO-based structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface water molecules induced grain boundaries (GBs) barrier modification was investigated in ZnO and ZnMgO/ZnO films. Tunable electronic transport properties of the samples by water were characterized via a field effect transistor (FET) device structure. The FETs fabricated from polar C-plane ZnO and ZnMgO/ZnO films that have lots of GBs exhibited obvious double Schottky-like current-voltage property, whereas that fabricated from nonpolar M-plane samples with GBs and ZnO bulk single-crystal had no obvious conduction modulation effects. Physically, these hallmark properties are supposed to be caused by the electrostatical coupling effect of crystal polar field and molecular dipole on GBs barrier.

  7. Role of two-photon electronic transitions in the formation of active dynamic conductivity in a three-barrier resonance tunneling structure with an applied Dc electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of active dynamic conductivity in a three-barrier resonance tunneling structure subjected to the combined action of a weak electromagnetic field and a longitudinal dc electric field is developed with regard for the contribution of laser induced one- and two-photon electronic transitions with different frequencies. For this purpose, the full Schroedinger equation is solved in the effective mass approximation and with the use of the model of rectangular potential wells and barriers for an electron. The maximum contribution of two-photon transitions to the formation of the total active dynamic conductivity in laser-induced transitions is shown not to exceed 38%. Geometric configurations of the resonance tunneling structure, for which the laser radiation intensity increases due to laser induced two-photon electronic transitions, are determined

  8. Performance Test of a Magnetic Change Detection Sensorin a Test Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast development of technologies regarding detection sensors and access control systems allows the equipment designed by using those technologies to account for a greater part in facilities, physical protection system than ever before. The popular area for the equipment is an exterior intrusion detection system. The selection of intrusion detection equipment involves identifying the equipment and methods of installation that best meet the overall system objectives. The system objectives, including the purpose of the intrusion detection equipment and the types of assumed threats, should indicate the desired requirements of the exterior intrusion detection system in three primary areas: · Probability of detection of the intruder · Nuisance alarm rate and causes of the nuisance alarms · Vulnerability of the equipment to defeat These three areas are intimately interrelated with the characteristics of the particular equipment, the methods of installation and adjustment, the manner in which the equipment is interconnected, and the environment to which the equipment is exposed. While there are twenty nuclear power plants operating with various types of detection equipment deployed in Korea as of now, few studies have been conducted as to actual performance of deployed equipment and guidelines in both installing and operating those equipment. In order to tackle this lack of studies, KINAC established the test field and conducted some field tests on several sensors. This paper aims at describing the procedures and results of the tests on a magnetic change detection sensor (herein called the 'MCDS') and sharing experiences earned through the actual test

  9. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  10. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-05-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

  11. Why Physicians Don't Ask: Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Barriers to HIV Testing-Making a Case for a Patient-Initiated Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Monisha; Patel, Sajani; Kumar, Disha; Zheng, Micha Yin; Kallen, Michael A; Street, Richard L; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Giordano, Thomas P

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended HIV testing for all adolescents and adults aged 13 to 64 in health care settings with a HIV prevalence of at least 0.1%. However, 55% of US adults have never been tested and therefore do not know their HIV status. To understand suboptimal HIV testing rates, this study sought to illuminate interpersonal and intrapersonal physician barriers to HIV testing. One hundred and eighty physicians from health centers in Houston completed a survey based on Cabana's Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors model. One-third of the physicians faced at least 1 interpersonal barrier to HIV testing, such as a difference in age or language. Many (41%) physicians faced at least 1 intrapersonal barrier, such as believing their patients would be feeling uncomfortable discussing HIV. Notably, 71% of physicians would prefer their patients ask for the test. A patient-engaging campaign may be an innovative solution to increasing HIV testing and reducing the number of undiagnosed persons. PMID:25421929

  12. Testing the role of meander cutoff in promoting gene flow across a riverine barrier in ground skinks (Scincella lateralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Jackson

    Full Text Available Despite considerable attention, the long-term impact of rivers on species diversification remains uncertain. Meander loop cutoff (MLC is one river phenomenon that may compromise a river's diversifying effects by passively transferring organisms from one side of the river to the other. However, the ability of MLC to promote gene flow across rivers has not been demonstrated empirically. Here, we test several predictions of MLC-mediated gene flow in populations of North American ground skinks (Scincella lateralis separated by a well-established riverine barrier, the Mississippi River: 1 individuals collected from within meander cutoffs should be more closely related to individuals across the river than on the same side, 2 individuals within meander cutoffs should contain more immigrants than individuals away from meander cutoffs, 3 immigration rates estimated across the river should be highest in the direction of the cutoff event, and 4 the distribution of alleles native to one side of the river should be better predicted by the historical rather than current path of the river. To test these predictions we sampled 13 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA from ground skinks collected near three ancient meander loops. These predictions were generally supported by genetic data, although support was stronger for mtDNA than for microsatellite data. Partial support for genetic divergence of samples within ancient meander loops also provides evidence for the MLC hypothesis. Although a role for MLC-mediated gene flow was supported here for ground skinks, the transient nature of river channels and morphologies may limit the long-term importance of MLC in stemming population divergence across major rivers.

  13. Potential in vitro model for testing the effect of exposure to nanoparticles on the lung alveolar epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Derk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary barrier function plays a pivotal role in protection from inhaled particles. However, some nano-scaled particles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, have demonstrated the ability to penetrate this barrier in animal models, resulting in an unusual, rapid interstitial fibrosis. To delineate the underlying mechanism and specific bio-effect of inhaled nanoparticles in respiratory toxicity, models of lung epithelial barriers are required that allow accurate representation of in vivo systems; however, there is currently a lack of consistent methods to do so. Thus, this work demonstrates a well-characterized in vitro model of pulmonary barrier function using Calu-3 cells, and provides the experimental conditions required for achieving tight junction complexes in cell culture, with trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurement used as a biosensor for proper barrier formation and integrity. The effects of cell number and serum constituents have been examined and we found that changes in each of these parameters can greatly affect barrier formation. Our data demonstrate that use of 5.0 × 104 Calu-3 cells/well in the Transwell cell culture system, with 10% serum concentrations in culture media is optimal for assessing epithelial barrier function. In addition, we have utilized CNT exposure to analyze the dose-, time-, and nanoparticle property-dependent alterations of epithelial barrier permeability as a means to validate this model. Such high throughput in vitro cell models of the epithelium could be used to predict the interaction of other nanoparticles with lung epithelial barriers to mimic respiratory behavior in vivo, thus providing essential tools and bio-sensing techniques that can be uniformly employed.

  14. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  15. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement...) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical shock and vibration. (5) Ambient hydrocarbons—if using a FID...

  17. A planar Al-Si Schottky barrier metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor operated at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purches, W. E. [School of Physics, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Rossi, A.; Zhao, R. [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Kafanov, S.; Duty, T. L. [School of Physics, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS), School of Physics, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Dzurak, A. S. [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Australian Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T), UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Rogge, S.; Tettamanzi, G. C., E-mail: g.tettamanzi@unsw.edu.au [School of Physics, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Australian Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T), UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2015-08-10

    Schottky Barrier-MOSFET technology offers intriguing possibilities for cryogenic nano-scale devices, such as Si quantum devices and superconducting devices. We present experimental results on a device architecture where the gate electrode is self-aligned with the device channel and overlaps the source and drain electrodes. This facilitates a sub-5 nm gap between the source/drain and channel, and no spacers are required. At cryogenic temperatures, such devices function as p-MOS Tunnel FETs, as determined by the Schottky barrier at the Al-Si interface, and as a further advantage, fabrication processes are compatible with both CMOS and superconducting logic technology.

  18. A planar Al-Si Schottky barrier metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schottky Barrier-MOSFET technology offers intriguing possibilities for cryogenic nano-scale devices, such as Si quantum devices and superconducting devices. We present experimental results on a device architecture where the gate electrode is self-aligned with the device channel and overlaps the source and drain electrodes. This facilitates a sub-5 nm gap between the source/drain and channel, and no spacers are required. At cryogenic temperatures, such devices function as p-MOS Tunnel FETs, as determined by the Schottky barrier at the Al-Si interface, and as a further advantage, fabrication processes are compatible with both CMOS and superconducting logic technology

  19. Mont Terri Project - Heater experiment, engineered barriers emplacement and ventilations tests. No 1 - Swiss Geological Survey, Bern, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international Mont Terri project started in January 1996. Research is carried out in the Mont Terri rock laboratory, an underground facility near the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel (vicinity of St-Ursanne, Canton of Jura, Switzerland). The aim of the project is the geological, hydrogeological, geochemical and geotechnical characterisation of a clay formation, specifically of the Opalinus Clay. Twelve Partners from European countries and Japan participate in the project. These are ANDRA, BGR, CRIEPI, ENRESA, GRS, HSK, IRSN, JAEA, NAGRA, OBAYASHI, SCK.CEN and swisstopo. Since 2006, swisstopo acts as operator of the rock laboratory and is responsible for the implementation of the research programme decided by the partners. The three following reports are milestones in the research history of the Mont Terri project. It was the first time that an in-situ heating test with about 20 observation boreholes over a time span of several years was carried out in a clay formation. The engineered barrier emplacement experiment has been extended due to very encouraging measurement results and is still going on. The ventilation test was and is a challenge, especially in the very narrow microtunnel. All three projects were financially supported by the European Commission and the Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research. The three important scientific and technical reports, which are presented in the following, have been provided by a number of scientists, engineers and technicians from the Partners, but also from national research organisations and private contractors. Many fruitful meetings where held, at the rock laboratory and at other facilities, not to forget the weeks and months of installation and testing work carried out by the technicians and engineers. The corresponding names and organisations are listed in detail in the reports. Special thanks are going to the co-ordinators of the three projects for their motivation of the team during

  20. Information barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An information barrier (IB) consists of procedures and technology that prevent the release of sensitive information during a joint inspection of a sensitive nuclear item, and provides confidence that the measurement system into which it has been integrated functions exactly as designed and constructed. Work in the U.S. on radiation detection system information barriers dates back at least to 1990, even though the terminology is more recent. In January 1999 the Joint DoD-DOE Information Barrier Working Group was formed in the United States to help coordinate technical efforts related to information barrier R and D. This paper presents an overview of the efforts of this group, by its Chairs, as well as recommendations for further information barrier R and D. Progress on the demonstration of monitoring systems containing IBs is also provided. From the U.S. perspective, the basic, top-level functional requirements for the information barrier portion of an integrated radiation signature-information barrier inspection system are twofold: The host must be assured that his classified information is protected from disclosure to the inspecting party; and The inspecting party must be confident that the integrated inspection system measures, processes, and presents the radiation-signature-based measurement conclusion in an accurate and reproducible manner. It is the position of the United States that in the absence of any agreement to share classified nuclear weapons design information in the conduct of an inspection regime, the requirement to protect host country classified warhead design information is paramount and admits no tradeoff versus the confidence provided to the inspecting party in the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements. The U.S. has reached an internal consensus on several critical design elements that define a general standard for radiation signature information barrier design. These criteria have stood the test of time under intense

  1. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques

  2. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.E. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States); Christy, C.E. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Heath, R.E. [FERMCO, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  3. Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions. PMID:24364681

  4. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ...We are advising the public that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment concerning authorization to ship for the purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment, which is based on a risk analysis prepared to assess the risks associated with the field testing of this......

  5. Influence of Schottky drain contacts on the strained AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Zhi-Fang; Lin Zhao-Jun; Li Yuan-Jie; Luan Chong-Biao; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Rectangular Schottky drain A1GaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) with different gate contact areas and conventional A1GaN/A1N/GaN HFETs as control were both fabricated with same size.It was found there is a significant difference between Schottky drain A1GaN/A1N/GaN HFETs and the control group both in drain series resistance and in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) electron mobility in the gate--drain channel.We attribute this to the different influence of Ohmic drain contacts and Schottky drain contacts on the strained A1GaN barrier layer.For conventional AlGaN/AlN/GaN HFETs,annealing drain Ohmic contacts gives rise to a strain variation in the A1GaN barrier layer between the gate contacts and the drain contacts,and results in strong polarization Coulomb field scattering in this region.In Schottky drain A1GaN/A1N/GaN HFETs,the strain in the A1GaN barrier layer is distributed more regularly.

  6. Experimental and numerical analyses of high voltage 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky rectifiers with linearly graded field limiting ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Dong; Deng, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Yong-Wei; Wang, Yong; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Bo

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the successful fabrication of 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) rectifiers with a linearly graded field limiting ring (LG-FLR). Linearly variable ring spacings for the FLR termination are applied to improve the blocking voltage by reducing the peak surface electric field at the edge termination region, which acts like a variable lateral doping profile resulting in a gradual field distribution. The experimental results demonstrate a breakdown voltage of 5 kV at the reverse leakage current density of 2 mA/cm2 (about 80% of the theoretical value). Detailed numerical simulations show that the proposed termination structure provides a uniform electric field profile compared to the conventional FLR termination, which is responsible for 45% improvement in the reverse blocking voltage despite a 3.7% longer total termination length.

  7. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    : identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project

  8. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

  9. Characterization of CVD Mullite + CVD Alumina Coatings on Silicon Nitride Vanes in an Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, James A [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Zemskova, S. M. [Caterpillar Technical Center

    2006-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramic vanes coated with chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) mullite, CVD alumina, and plasma-sprayed tantalum oxide were exposed to field tests in an industrial gas turbine engine. Results varied due to expected non-uniformities in the CVD coating microstructures, but dense CVD mullite/alumina showed excellent stability and protective capacity after 1148 h of engine testing. Surfaces without CVD coatings experienced massive intragranular subsurface oxidation and/or rapid recession of the ceramic substrate due to volatilization of silica species formed by oxidation. These results suggest that thin (<5 {micro}m), dense, high-purity CVD mullite and CVD alumina are viable components for an environmental barrier coating system to protect structural ceramics in combustion environments.

  10. Geologic disposal of radioactive waste: program plan for field tests in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of program plans is being developed to address the field testing needs for various candidate repository host rocks: salt, granitic, tuff, and basalt. This document, NWTS-80(2), is the second plan of the series, and is intended to define and clarify the issues introduced in NWTS-80(1) as they apply specifically to salt. The series of Field Testing Program Plans (the NWTS-80 series) is as follows: (1) NWTS-80(1): Geologic Disposal of Radioactive Waste: Program Plan for Field Tests in Geologic Formations; (2) NWTS-80(2): Program Plan for Field Tests in Salt; (3) NWTS-80(3): Program Plan for Field Tests in Granitic Rock; (4) NWTS-80(4): Program Plan for Field Tests in Tuff at Hanford; (5) NWTS-80(5): Program Plan for Field Tests in Tuff at NTS. The topics addressed by NWTS-80(1) include: definition of field testing; role of field testing in repository development; technical issues to be addressed by field testing; and application of field testing results. NWTS-80(1) discusses these topics generally in application to all candidate host rock types in response to the general issues raised by other NWTS planning documents, the Earth Science Technical Plan and the NWTS Rock Mechanics Plan. Subsequent plans in this series discuss these topics in detail as they apply to specific rock types, resulting in a program plan series that can be used as a basis for further development of specific tests

  11. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  12. Field-based video pre-test counseling, oral testing and telephonic post-test counseling: Implementation of an HIV field testing package among high-risk Indian men

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling and then connected them to government facilities. 598 MSM and truck drivers participated in the FTP and completed surveys covering sociodemographics,...

  13. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification

  14. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Muller, S.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification.

  15. Economic analysis of engineered sorbent barrier technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the incremental cost of placing an engineered sorbent barrier beneath a shallow land burial (SLB) site in a humid climate. The cost estimates are also applicable to alternative uses of sorbent barrier technology such as redundant barriers around below-grade vaults. The preliminary costs presented represent only rough order-of-magnitude estimates. Further information obtained from field studies and refined performance models would allow a more precise cost estimate to be prepared. Flow-through column tests have shown that clinoptilolite is much more effective in sorbing strontium than indicated previously. The effectiveness of the barrier for cobalt was not as good as that measured previously. The costs in this paper are based on these updated data. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. Manufacturing and testing of fuel cans with barrier coating for LWR type reactors in USA and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers on manufacturing methods for fuel cans of zircalloy with barrier coating of zirconium prepared by pressing an internal tube into external one as well as by pressing of two-layer tubes with further rolling are reviewed. Heat treatment based on creation of the assigned gradient of temperature over tube wall cross section in order to change the structure of a thin layer of the outside surfce when conserving the initial structure of the rest cross section is developed to increase corrosion resistance. Eddy current and ultrasound methods for control of quality and thickness of the barrier layer of zirconium are used

  17. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS

  18. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  19. Novel Field Test Equipment for Lithium-Ion Batteries in Hybrid Electrical Vehicle Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Lindbergh; Olle Gelin; Pontus Svens; Marten Behm; Johan Lindstrom

    2011-01-01

    Lifetime testing of batteries for hybrid-electrical vehicles (HEV) is usually performed in the lab, either at the cell, module or battery pack level. Complementary field tests of battery packs in vehicles are also often performed. There are, however, difficulties related to field testing of battery-packs. Some examples are cost issues and the complexity of continuously collecting battery performance data, such as capacity fade and impedance increase. In this paper, a novel field test equipmen...

  20. Facilitators and Barriers to Linkage to HIV Care among Female Sex Workers Receiving HIV Testing Services at a Community-Based Organization in Periurban Uganda: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanwagi, Sharon; Matovu, Joseph K B; Kintu, Betty N; Kaharuza, Frank; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. While four in ten female sex workers (FSWs) in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with HIV, only a small proportion is enrolled in HIV care. We explored facilitators and barriers to linkage to HIV care among FSWs receiving HIV testing services at a community-based organization in periurban Uganda. Methods. The cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted among 28 HIV positive FSWs from May to July 2014. Key informant interviews were conducted with five project staff and eleven peer educators. Data were collected on facilitators for and barriers to linkage to HIV care and manually analyzed following a thematic framework approach. Results. Facilitators for linkage to HIV care included the perceived good quality of health services with same-day results and immediate initiation of treatment, community peer support systems, individual's need to remain healthy, and having alternative sources of income. Linkage barriers included perceived stigma, fear to be seen at outreach HIV clinics, fear and myths about antiretroviral therapy, lack of time to attend clinic, and financial constraints. Conclusion. Linkage to HIV care among FSWs is influenced by good quality friendly services and peer support. HIV service delivery programs for FSWs should focus on enhancing these and dealing with barriers stemming from stigma and misinformation. PMID:27493826

  1. Inter operability of smart field devices on an open field-bus: from laboratory tests to on-site applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a field trial held in EDF's R and D laboratories concerning smart field instruments (sensors, I/O modules, transmitters) operating on the WorldFIP field-bus. The trial put into operation a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system on the field-bus with available industrial field devices and software tools. The field trial enables EDF's teams to address the inter-operability issue regarding smart field devices and to prepare the forthcoming step from analog to fully digital measurement technology by evaluating new services and higher performances provided. Possible architectures for process control and on-site testing purposes have been identified. A first application for a flow-measuring rig is under way. It implements a WorldFIP field-bus based DCS with FIP/HART multiplexers, FIP and HART smart devices (sensors and actuators) and a field management system. (authors)

  2. Towards a clinical practice guide in pharmacogenomics testing for functional polymorphisms of drug-metabolising enzymes. Gene/drug pairs and barriers perceived in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A G Agúndez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of biomarkers is an issue of great importance with regard to adverse drug reactions. The potential of pharmacogenomic biomarkers has been extensively investigated in recent years. However, several barriers to implementing the use of pharmacogenomics testing exist. We conducted a survey among members of the Spanish Societies of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology to obtain information about the perception of such barriers and to compare the perceptions of participants about the relative importance of major gene/drug pairs.Of 11 potential barriers, the highest importance was attributed to lack of institutional support for pharmacogenomics testing, and to the issues related to the lack of guidelines. Of the proposed gene/drug pairs the highest importance was assigned to HLA-B/abacavir, UGT1A1/irinotecan and CYP2D6/tamoxifen. In this perspective article we compare the relative importance of 29 gene/drug pairs in the Spanish study with that of the same pairs in the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics study, and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to develop a guide for clinical practice in pharmacogenomics testing.

  3. Gate-modulated conductance of few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors in the subgap regime: Schottky barrier transistor and subgap impurity states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two key subjects stand out in the pursuit of semiconductor research: material quality and contact technology. The fledging field of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) faces a number of challenges in both efforts. This work attempts to establish a connection between the two by examining the gate-dependent conductance of few-layer (1-5L) WSe2 field effect devices. Measurements and modeling of the subgap regime reveal Schottky barrier transistor behavior. We show that transmission through the contact barrier is dominated by thermionic field emission (TFE) at room temperature, despite the lack of intentional doping. The TFE process arises due to a large number of subgap impurity states, the presence of which also leads to high mobility edge carrier densities. The density of states of such impurity states is self-consistently determined to be approximately 1–2 × 1013/cm2/eV in our devices. We demonstrate that substrate is unlikely to be a major source of the impurity states and suspect that lattice defects within the material itself are primarily responsible. Our experiments provide key information to advance the quality and understanding of TMDC materials and electrical devices

  4. Exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsters, Carolien C B M; van Iwaarden, Alexandra; van Weeren, René; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2014-10-01

    Regular exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses may, as in racing, potentially help to characterise fitness indices in different disciplines and at various competition levels and assist in understanding when a horse is 'fit to compete'. In this review an overview is given of the current state of the art of exercise testing in the Olympic disciplines of eventing, show jumping and dressage, and areas for further development are defined. In event horses, a simple four-step incremental exercise test measuring heart rate (HR), lactate concentration (LA) and velocity (V) is most often used. In dressage and riding horses, a wide variety of exercise tests have been developed, including incremental exercise tests, indoor riding tests and lunging tests. In show jumping, the use of a five-step incremental exercise test and exercise tests evaluating technical skills and fatigue of the horse has been reported. The velocity at a plasma LA of 4 mmol/L (VLA4) and HR recovery during submaximal exercise intensity have been shown to be the best parameters in event horses for predicting performance and impending injuries. In riding horses, the fitness level of horses is also an important determinant of injuries. Implementation of regular exercise testing and monitoring of training sessions may have important added value in the assessment of performance ability and potential future injuries in Warmblood sport horses. However, there is an urgent need to standardise methodologies and outcome parameters in order to make results comparable. PMID:25172838

  5. A Qualitative Analysis of Provider Barriers and Solutions to HIV Testing for Substance Users in a Small, Largely Rural Southern State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Patricia B.; Curran, Geoffrey M.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Integrating HIV testing programs into substance use treatment is a promising avenue to help increase access to HIV testing for rural drug users. Yet few outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States provide HIV testing. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to incorporating HIV testing with substance use treatment from the perspectives of treatment and testing providers in Arkansas. Methods We used purposive sampling from state directories to recruit providers at state, organization, and individual levels to participate in this exploratory study. Using an interview guide, the first and second authors conducted semi-structured individual interviews in each provider’s office or by telephone. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and entered into ATLAS.ti software (ATLAS.ti Scientific Sofware Development GmbH, Berlin, Germany). We used constant comparison and content analysis techniques to identify codes, categories, and primary patterns in the data. Findings The sample consisted of 28 providers throughout the state, 18 from the substance use system and 10 from the public/ community health system. We identified 7 categories of barriers: environmental constraints, policy constraints, funding constraints, organizational structure, limited inter- and intra-agency communication, burden of responsibility, and client fragility. Conclusions This study presents the practice-based realities of barriers to integrating HIV testing with substance use treatment in a small, largely rural state. Some system and/or organization leaders were either unaware of or not actively pursuing external funds available to them specifically for engaging substance users in HIV testing. However, funding does not address the system-level need for coordination of resources and services at the state level. PMID:24088216

  6. Final report of the Buffer Mass Test - Volume I: Scope, preparative field work and test arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buffer Mass Test was conducted in a 30 m long drift at 340 m depth in the Stripa mine, The main objective being to check the predicted functions of certain bentonite-based buffer materials in rock environment. These materials were blocks of highly compacted sodium bentonite placed in large boreholes simulating deposition holes for canisters, and on-site compacted sand/bentonite mixtures used as tunnel backfill. The blocks of bentonite embedded electrical heaters which served to produce heat so as to create conditions similar to those in a repository. The temperature in the initially non-saturated buffer materials was expected to be a function of the water uptake from the rock, which was also assumed to lead to rather high swelling pressures. The recording of these processes and of the moistening of the buffer materials , as well as of the associated build-up of piezometric heads at rock/buffer interfaces, was the major item of the field test. For this purpose the buffer materials and the rock were equipped with a large number of thermal elements, pressure and piezometric cells as well as moisture sensors. The choise of positions and properties of these gauges, which were connected to an effective data acquisition system, was based on predictions that required a careful site documentation with respect to the fracture characteristics and hydrological properties of the surrounding rock. (author)

  7. Field test of wireless sensor network in the nuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are appealing options for the health monitoring of nuclear power plants due to their low cost and flexibility. Before they can be used in highly regulated nuclear environments, their reliability in the nuclear environment and compatibility with existing devices have to be assessed. In situ electromagnetic interference tests, wireless signal propagation tests, and nuclear radiation hardness tests conducted on candidate WSN systems at AECL Chalk River Labs are presented. The results are favourable to WSN in nuclear applications. (author)

  8. Field test of wireless sensor network in the nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L., E-mail: lil@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Wang, Q.; Bari, A. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Deng, C.; Chen, D. [Univ. of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Jiang, J. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Alexander, Q.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are appealing options for the health monitoring of nuclear power plants due to their low cost and flexibility. Before they can be used in highly regulated nuclear environments, their reliability in the nuclear environment and compatibility with existing devices have to be assessed. In situ electromagnetic interference tests, wireless signal propagation tests, and nuclear radiation hardness tests conducted on candidate WSN systems at AECL Chalk River Labs are presented. The results are favourable to WSN in nuclear applications. (author)

  9. Radiotracer test in Kamojang geothermal field, West Java, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium radiotracer study has been carried out at Kamojang geothermal field. Tritium tracer has been added to reinjection water in a production well, and then tritium content has been monitored in the surrounding production wells

  10. Possible tests of curvature effects in weak gravitational fields

    OpenAIRE

    Preziosi, B.; G. M. Tino

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the possibility of detecting, with optical methods, particle and photon trajectories predicted by general relativity for a weak spherically-symmetric gravitational field. We discuss the required sensitivities and the possibility of performing specific experiments on the Earth.

  11. High performances simulation of ultrasonic fields for non destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic imaging is a commonly used method to detect and identify defects in a mechanical part in nuclear applications. For instance a common nuclear application is the inspection of steel pipes and nozzles. Nowadays massively parallel architectures enable the simulation of ultrasonic field emitted by a phased array transducer inspecting a part across a coupling medium. In this paper, regular field computation model will be discussed along its implementations on General Purpose Processors (GPP) and Graphic Processing Units (GPU). (authors)

  12. A semi-field approach to testing effects of fresh pesticide residues on bees in multiple-rate test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F.; Calis, J.N.M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a semi-field cage test specifically designed to test effects of delayed exposure to plant protection products. The trial involved the use of standardised mini-beehives. The principle of the trial was to prepare two groups of potted test plants per treatment. The first group of plants rem

  13. Simultaneous testing of multiclass organic contaminants in food and environment by liquid chromatography/dielectric barrier discharge ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Meyer, Cordula; Michels, Antje; Franzke, Joachim; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-11-21

    A Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization (DBDI) LC/MS interface is based on the use of a low-temperature helium plasma, which features the possibility of simultaneous ionization of species with a wide variety of physicochemical properties. In this work, the performance of LC/DBDI-MS for trace analysis of highly relevant species in food and environment has been examined. Over 75 relevant species including multiclass priority organic contaminants and residues such as pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine species, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and drugs of abuse were tested. LC/DBDI-MS performance for this application was assessed and compared with standard LC/MS sources (electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)). The used benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer features a 10 Hz polarity switching mode, so that both positive and negative ion mode acquisitions are possible with acquisition cycles matching the requirements of fast liquid chromatography. Both polar and nonpolar species (including those typically analyzed by GC/electron ionization-MS) can be tested in a single run using polarity switching mode. The methodology was found to be effective in detecting a wide array of organic compounds at concentration levels in the low ng L(-1) to μg kg(-1) range in wastewater and food matrices, respectively. The linearity was evaluated in an olive oil extract, obtaining good correlation coefficients in the studied range. Additionally, minor matrix effects (≤15% of signal suppression or enhancement) were observed for most of the studied analytes in this complex fatty matrix. The results obtained were compared with data from both ESI and APCI sources, obtaining a merged coverage between ESI and APCI in terms of analyte ionization and higher overall sensitivity for the proposed ion source based on the DBD principle. The use of this approach further extends the coverage of current LC/MS methods towards

  14. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  15. Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA)); Cooper, G.A. (Univ. of California, Berkley, CA (USA)); Curry, D.A. (International Drilling and Downhole Technology Centre in Aberdeen (Great Britian)); McCann, D. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA))

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

  16. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign

  17. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  18. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign

  19. Automated field testing of a track-type tractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Lay, Keith; Struble, Joshua; Allen, William; Subrt, Michael

    2003-09-01

    During the design process, earthmoving manufacturers routinely subject machines to rigorous, long-term tests to ensure quality. Automating portions of the testing process can potentially reduce the cost and time to complete these tests. We present a system that guides a 175 horsepower track-type tractor (Caterpillar Model D6R XL) along a prescribed route, allowing simple tasks to be completed by the automated machine while more complex tasks, such as site clean up, are handled by an operator. Additionally, the machine can be operated manually or via remote control and observed over the internet using a remote supervisor program. We envision that safety would be handled using work procedures, multiple over-ride methods and a GPS fence. The current system can follow turns within a half meter and straight sections within a quarter meter. The controller hardware and software are integrated with existing on-board electronic modules and allow for portability. The current system successfully handles the challenges of a clutch-brake drive train and has the potential to improve control over test variables, lower testing costs and enable testing at higher speeds allowing for higher impact tests than a human operator can tolerate.

  20. Remediation of chromate-contaminated ground water using zero-valent iron: Field test at USCG Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, R.W.; Paul, C.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, OK (United States). Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab.; Powell, R.M. [ManTech Environmental Research Services Corp., Ada, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A field test was conducted near an old hard-chrome plating facility on the USCG Support Center near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to evaluate the in situ remediation of ground water contaminated by hexavalent chromium using a passive permeable reactive barrier composed of a zero-valent iron-sand-aquifer material mixture. The remedial effectiveness of this innovative in situ technology was monitored over a one-year period. The success of this small-scale test has prompted a full-scale implementation of the technology at the site for late Spring 1996.

  1. Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely...

  2. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Jonathan C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paquette, Joshua A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Jonathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  3. Sound field control for a low-frequency test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    are needed, a hybrid mode can be used to utilize the pressure-field conditions at frequencies up to approx. 30 Hz while the higher frequencies are controlled by plane-wave generation. This approach allows for playback of levels at the lowest frequencies in the order of 125 dB while still maintaining...

  4. Long term performance of the Waterloo denitrification barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, W.D.; Cherry, J.A. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Beginning in 1991 a series of laboratory tests and small scale field trials were initiated to test the performance of an innovative permeable reactive barrier for treatment of nitrate from septic systems. The barrier promotes denitrification by providing an energy source in the form of solid organic carbon mixed into the porous media material. Advantages of the system for nitrate treatment are that the reaction is passive and in situ and it is possible to incorporate sufficient carbon mass in conveniently sized barriers to potentially provide treatment for long periods (decades) without the necessity for maintenance. However, longevity can only be demonstrated by careful long term monitoring of field installations. This paper documents four years of operating history at three small scale field trials; two where the denitrification barrier is installed as a horizontal layer positioned in the unsaturated zone below conventional septic system infiltration beds and one where the barrier is installed as a vertical wall intercepting a septic system plume at a downgradient location. The barriers have successfully attenuated 50-100% of NO{sup -}{sub 3}-N levels of up to 170 mg/L and treatment has remained consistent over the four year period in each case, thus considerable longevity is indicated. Other field trials have demonstrated this technology to be equally effective in treating nitrogen contamination from other sources such as landfill leachate and farm field runoff.

  5. Long term performance of the Waterloo denitrification barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning in 1991 a series of laboratory tests and small scale field trials were initiated to test the performance of an innovative permeable reactive barrier for treatment of nitrate from septic systems. The barrier promotes denitrification by providing an energy source in the form of solid organic carbon mixed into the porous media material. Advantages of the system for nitrate treatment are that the reaction is passive and in situ and it is possible to incorporate sufficient carbon mass in conveniently sized barriers to potentially provide treatment for long periods (decades) without the necessity for maintenance. However, longevity can only be demonstrated by careful long term monitoring of field installations. This paper documents four years of operating history at three small scale field trials; two where the denitrification barrier is installed as a horizontal layer positioned in the unsaturated zone below conventional septic system infiltration beds and one where the barrier is installed as a vertical wall intercepting a septic system plume at a downgradient location. The barriers have successfully attenuated 50-100% of NO-3-N levels of up to 170 mg/L and treatment has remained consistent over the four year period in each case, thus considerable longevity is indicated. Other field trials have demonstrated this technology to be equally effective in treating nitrogen contamination from other sources such as landfill leachate and farm field runoff

  6. Cellular Apoptosis and Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in the Pre-Incubated Chicken Embryo’s Brain by Effect of Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Kalantari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electromagnetic fields (EMF have teratogenic effects during the embryonic development. In current study, histopathological and physiological effects of sinusoidal EMF on the brain were investigated. We sought to determine the apoptosis level and changes in blood brain barrier permeability in brain tissue of pre-incubated white leghorn hen eggs in the field of EMF. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 300 healthy, fresh, and fertilized eggs (55-65 g were divided into experimental (3 groups, N=50, control (N=75 and sham (N=75 groups. Experimental eggs (inside the coil were exposed to 3 different intensities of 1.33, 2.66 and 7.32 mT and sham groups were also located inside the same coil but with no exposure, for 24 hrs before incubation. Control, sham and experimental groups were incubated in an incubator (38±0.5ºC, 60% humidity. Brains of 14 day old chicken embryos of all groups were removed, fixed in formalin (10%, stained with H & E and TUNEL, apoptotic cells were studied under light microscope. Brains of other embryos were prepared for scanning electron microscope. By injections of Evans blue, any possible changes in brain vessels were also investigated. Results: Our results showed electromagnetic fields have toxic effects on cell organelles and cell membranes. EMF would increase the level of cellular apoptosis in the brain. They also would tear up the blood vessels. Thereafter, they would affect the permeability of blood brain barrier of exposed chicken embryos. Conclusion: These findings suggest that electromagnetic fields induce different degrees of brain damages in chicken embryos brain tissue.

  7. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  8. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  9. Testing Multi-Field Inflation: A Geometric Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Tegmark, Max

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach for linking the power spectra, bispectrum, and trispectrum to the geometric and kinematical features of multifield inflationary Lagrangians. Our geometric approach can also be useful in determining when a complicated multifield model can be well approximated by a model with one, two, or a handful of fields. To arrive at these results, we focus on the mode interactions in the kinematical basis, starting with the case of no sourcing and showing that there is a series of m...

  10. Testing a Dynamic Neural Field model of children's category labeling

    OpenAIRE

    Twomey, Katherine; Horst, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Dynamic Neural Field models have shed light on the flexible and dynamic processes underlying young children’s emergent categorisation and word learning (DNF; e.g., Spencer & Schöner [1]). DNF models are a distinct class of neural network in which perceptual features can be represented topologically and time continuously, complementing existing connectionist models of cognitive development by building category representations that are available for inspection at any given stage in l...

  11. Test particle transport in magnetic fields with perturbed magnetic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial transport of circulating particles in a perturbed toroidal magnetic field configuration is calculated using the mapping technique. The specific models are stellarators with external perturbations and tokamaks with tearing modes. Coulomb collisions of the circulating particles are described by a Lorentz scattering model of random changes of the pitch angle. Particle orbits in a perturbated magnetic field lead to a deterministic map whereas the Coulomb collision introduce an extra stochastic process. First, the diffusion in a single chain of islands is studied by launching a sample of particles on the inner closed magnetic surface and calculating the loss rate. The presence of islands enhances the loss rate. In a second case the enhanced loss in a tokamak with two different islands on different resonant surfaces are investigated thus simulating tearing modes in tokamaks. It is found, that the loss rate across the island region grows rapidly if the islands overlap and the region in between becomes stochastic. In such a case the transport of particles is a mixture of stochastic diffusion of field lines and a random walk induced by Coulomb collisions. (orig.)

  12. CORRELATION BETWEEN SEED TESTS AND FIELD EMERGENCE OF TWO MAIZE HYBRIDS (SC704 AND SC500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. ALILOO

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Early emergence and stand establishment of maize (Zea mays L. are considered to be the most important yield-contributing factors. The influence of seed vigor on these factors is vital. Therefore, five laboratory tests and field experiment were conducted on basis of a randomized complete block design (RCBD with five replications in 2011, to evaluate the correlation among the seed vigor tests and field emergence of two maize hybrids (SC704 and SC500. In laboratory tests, differences between two hybrids for cold test and electrical conductivity test were significant (P≤0.01. The leachates of hybrid SC500 was 35% higher than the leachates of hybrid SC704. However, high germination percentage was obtained by hybrid SC740 in cold test. A Statistically significant difference was found between hybrids in field emergence percentage (P≤0.05. The field emergence of hybrid SC704 and hybrid SC500 was 71% and 37%, respectively. The farm emergence percentage had the significant negative correlation (-0.71 with conductivity test, but positive correlation (0.79 with cold test. No significant correlation between the standard seed germination and the field emergence was detected. Therefore, the standard germination test was not a good indicator for field emergence percentage. However, cold and conductivity tests were the best predictor of field emergence than all the other laboratory tests.

  13. Leprosy diagnosis: a device for testing the thermal sensibility of skin lesions in the field.

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, H.; Stumpe, B.

    1989-01-01

    A handy device for testing the thermal sensibility of skin lesions has been developed and field tested in various centres in Africa and India. The instrument performed satisfactorily and its use made testing for thermal sensibility in the field practicable and straightforward. Analysis of the results of testing 260 persons, most of whom exhibited a few lesions that were characteristic of early leprosy, showed that the rate of diagnosis of sensory impairment of such skin lesions, and hence the...

  14. Pressure Transient Analysis Using Generated Well Test Data from Simulation of Selected Wells in Norne Field

    OpenAIRE

    Yasin, Ilfi Binti Edward

    2012-01-01

    Several types of transient well testing in Norne field are presented in this thesis. One production well from each segment in Norne field was participated in different type of test. The well test data of all cases were generated from reservoir simulation. It allows flexibility in modifying reservoir model condition to understand different behavior of pressure response. The tests were first started by producing the well at a constant rate for 10 days, and then shutting-in the well for at least...

  15. Laboratory and field tests of corrosion inhibitors for an offshore application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjerve, Sofie; Fuhr, Geir Gundersen; Haldogaard, Geir

    2006-03-15

    Statoil started a R and D-project in 2002 where the goal was to implement environmental friendly corrosion control at a Statoil operated oil producing field. In this project the following tasks have been addressed: 1) Reduction of the chemical consumption. 2) Documentation of the discharge level of the corrosion inhibitor. 3) Documentation of the environmental impact. 4) Development of new environmentally friendly acceptable corrosion inhibitors. 5) Laboratory and field testing of new corrosion inhibitors. This paper describes laboratory and field tests of corrosion inhibitors for this project. The field tests were carried out on an offshore oil producing installation in the North Sea. Five corrosion inhibitor suppliers with totally eleven products were taking part in this test. All the products were tested in the laboratory. The four most promising products from the laboratory tests were tested in the field during a fourteen days offshore test. Only one of the tested products gave satisfactory results from the corrosion field test. Corrosion measurements were performed both with a Zero Resistance Ammetry (ZRA) probe installed directly into a flow line and with two side streams units. One side stream unit was connected upstream the test separator and the other unit was connected downstream the test separator. (author) (tk)

  16. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared ExB flow and Shafranov shift gradients are examined for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] enhanced reverse-shear (ERS) plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of ExB and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the ExB shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when ExB shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balance injection. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  18. Characterization of floating element balance for field panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, J. Travis; Gardner, Harrison; Swain, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Multiple experiments were performed to investigate and characterize the uncertainty and bias of a through-hull flush mounted floating element balance designed to measure the hydrodynamic drag forces of biofouling and marine coatings on 25 x 30 cm test panels. The instrument is located in a wet well on the aft portion of a 27' Chris Craft Commander. Testing occurs over a series of speeds ranging from a Froude number of 0.50-2.20 on calm days (force 3 or less) in waters along the central east coast of Florida. Recent modifications have been made to the instrumentation in an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the system. This study compares frictional drag measurements of the floating element balance to those obtained using the Clauser chart and Preston tube methods for a smooth surface. Boundary layer velocity profiles are examined to understand the nature of the flow over the testing section. Roughness function values for 60 and 220 grit sandpaper were calculated from data obtained using the floating element balance. These values were compared with previous work to examine the overall bias of the methodology. Repeat measurements for a smooth panel were analyzed to characterize the overall uncertainty in the system. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research under grants N00014-10-1-0919 and N00014-11-1-0915.

  19. Coupled barrier island-resort model: 2. Tests and predictions along Ocean City and Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2008-03-01

    The fate of coastlines and their human settlements under the effects of global climate change will depend critically on the nonlinear dynamics of and feedbacks between shoreline processes and human agency. This hypothesis is explored on the barrier island coastline of Ocean City and Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland, using a model-coupling natural coastal processes, including erosion, accretion, island overwash, alongshore sediment transport, dune growth and migration, inlet migration and ebb tidal delta growth to economics of tourist resort development through storm damage and beach and dune replenishment. Initiating the model in 1845, the RMS difference between model and measurements of the shoreline position in 2001 is 84.97 m compared to a net onshore migration of 472.2 m and the RMS difference between modeled and measured hotel room density in 2001 is 2950 rooms km-1 compared to a net gain of 28,824 rooms km-1. Simulations to year 3400 for a rate of sea level rise of 3.5 mm a-1 show a steady state barrier island position 158 m further offshore and 0.54 m lower in elevation compared to its natural counterpart. Changing the rate of sea level rise to 10.5 mm a-1 increases these differences to 288 m and 0.76 m. Changing storminess by increasing the standard deviation of storm size 50% diminishes coupling between resorts and barriers, bringing the natural and coupled attractors into near coincidence. These results suggest that predicted increases in the rate of sea level rise will lead to enhanced vulnerability for Ocean City.

  20. Cosmological tests of an axiverse-inspired quintessence field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Razieh; Grin, Daniel; Pradler, Josef; Raccanelli, Alvise; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the string axiverse idea, it has been suggested that the recent transition from decelerated to accelerated cosmic expansion is driven by an axion-like quintessence field with a sub-Planckian decay constant. The scenario requires that the axion field be rather near the maximum of its potential but is less finely tuned than other explanations of cosmic acceleration. The model is parametrized by an axion decay constant f , the axion mass m , and an initial misalignment angle |θi| which is close to π . In order to determine the m and θi values consistent with observations, these parameters are mapped onto observables: the Hubble parameter H (z ) at an angular-diameter distance dA(z ) to redshift z =0.57 , as well as the angular sound horizon of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale at z ≃0.57 by the BOSS survey and Planck measurements of CMB temperature anisotropies are then used to probe the {m ,f ,θi} parameter space. With current data, CMB constraints are the most powerful, allowing a fraction of only ˜0.2 of the parameter-space volume. Measurements of the BAO scale made using the SPHEREx or SKA experiments could go further, observationally distinguishing all but ˜10-2 or ˜10-5 of the parameter-space volume (allowed by simple priors) from the Λ CDM model.

  1. Cosmological tests of an axiverse-inspired quintessence field

    CERN Document Server

    Emami, Razieh; Pradler, Josef; Raccanelli, Alvise; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the string axiverse idea, it has been suggested that the recent transition from decelerated to accelerated cosmic expansion is driven by an axion-like quintessence field with a sub-Planckian decay constant. The scenario requires that the axion field be rather near the maximum of its potential, but is less finely tuned than other explanations of cosmic acceleration. The model is parametrized by an axion decay constant $f$, the axion mass $m$, and an initial misalignment angle $|\\theta_i|$ which is close to $\\pi$. In order to determine the $m$ and $\\theta_{i}$ values consistent with observations, these parameters are mapped onto observables: the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ at and angular diameter distance $d_{A}(z)$ to redshift $z= 0.57$, as well as the angular sound horizon of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale at $z\\simeq 0.57$ by the BOSS survey and Planck measurements of CMB temperature anisotropies are then used to probe the $\\left\\{m,...

  2. Field test of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting into rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline rocks have fractures which may cause unexpected routes of groundwater seepage. Cement grouting is one of the most effective methods to minimize seepage; however, cement materials may not be suitable for the purpose of extra-long durability, because cement is neutralized or degraded by chemical and physical influence of chemical reaction. Natural clay like bentonite is one of the most promising materials for seepage barrier; however, water/bentonite grout is so viscous that enough amount of bentonite can not be grouted into rock fractures. To increase bentonite content in grout with low viscosity, the utilization of ethanol as a mixing liquid was studied. Ethanol suppresses bentonite swelling, and more bentonite can be injected more than that of water/bentonite slurry. In this paper, grouting into in-situ rock mass fracture from the ground surface was tested to investigate the barrier performance and workability of ethanol/bentonite slurry as a grouting material. (author)

  3. A Permutation Test for Unbalanced Paired Comparisons of Global Field Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Benjamin T; Lawhern, Vernon J; Ries, Anthony J; Marathe, Amar R

    2016-05-01

    Global field power is a valuable summary of multi-channel electroencephalography data. However, global field power is biased by the noise typical of electroencephalography experiments, so comparisons of global field power on data with unequal noise are invalid. Here, we demonstrate the relationship between the number of trials that contribute to a global field power measure and the expected value of that global field power measure. We also introduce a statistical testing procedure that can be used for multi-subject, repeated-measures (also called within-subjects) comparisons of global field power when the number of trials per condition is unequal across conditions. Simulations demonstrate the effect of unequal trial numbers on global field power comparisons and show the validity of the proposed test in contrast to conventional approaches. Finally, the proposed test and two alternative tests are applied to data collected in a rapid serial visual presentation target detection experiment. The results show that the proposed test finds global field power differences in the classical P3 range; the other tests find differences in that range but also at other times including at times before stimulus onset. These results are interpreted as showing that the proposed test is valid and sensitive to real within-subject differences in global field power in multi-subject unbalanced data. PMID:26936593

  4. Integrated geological-engineering model of Patrick Draw field and examples of similarities and differences among various shoreline barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Szpakiewicz, M.J.; Jackson, S.R.; Chang, M.M.; Sharma, B.; Tham, M.K.; Cheng, A.M.

    1992-04-01

    The Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program at NIPER employs an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on the high priority reservoir class of shoreline barrier deposits to: (1) determine the problems specific to this class of reservoirs by identifying the reservoir heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of fluids; and (2) develop methods to characterize effectively this class of reservoirs to predict residual oil saturation (ROS) on interwell scales and improve prediction of the flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of critical reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability, porosity, pore geometry, mineralogy, and oil saturation) are essential for designing and implementing processes to improve sweep efficiency and thereby increase oil recovery. The methodologies and models developed in this program will, in the near- to mid-term, assist producers in the implementation of effective reservoir management strategies such as location of infill wells and selection of optimum enhanced oil recovery methods to maximize oil production from their reservoirs.

  5. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  6. Pilot Implementation: Learning from Field Tests in IS Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from the...... laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a fiveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  7. The Major Field Test in Business: A Solution to the Problem of Assurance of Learning Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeffrey J.; Stone, Courtenay Clifford; Zegeye, Abera

    2014-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being asked by numerous sources to provide assurance of learning assessments of their students and programs. Colleges of business have responded by using a plethora of assessment tools, including the Major Field Test in Business. In this article, the authors show that the use of the Major Field Test in Business for…

  8. Evaluation of the Field Test of Project Information Packages: Volume III--Resource Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salam, Nabeel; And Others

    The third of three volumes evaluating the first year field test of the Project Information Packages (PIPs) provides a cost analysis study as a key element in the total evaluation. The resource approach to cost analysis is explained and the specific resource methodology used in the main cost analysis of the 19 PIP field-test projects detailed. The…

  9. 76 FR 66032 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ...We are advising the public that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment concerning authorization to ship for the purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease Vaccine, H5 Subtype, Serotype 3, Live Marek's Disease Vector. The environmental assessment, which is based on a risk analysis prepared to......

  10. Wireless GPS system for module fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer's farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  11. Impact of the TiN barrier layer on the positive bias temperature instabilities of high-k/metal-gate field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Cheng; Gong, Jeng; Huang, Chih-Fang; Chung, Steve S.

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the impact of positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) on n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (n-MOSFET) with TiN barrier layer sandwiched between metal gate electrode and HfO2 dielectric. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the diffusion mechanism of oxygen and nitrogen as a result of the post metallization treatment was the root cause of the PBTI. In this mechanism, the oxygen during the post metallization annealing (PMA) was diffused into TiN layer and replaced the nitrogen in the TiN layer. Subsequently, these replaced nitrogens were diffused into the HfO2, from which these replaced nitrogen atoms were used to passivate the defects in the HfO2. Results show that by increasing the thickness of TiN barrier layer, the driving current and the PBTI of n-MOSFET can be greatly improved. The larger the thickness of the TiN layer is, the better the PBTI reliability becomes.

  12. Model assessment of protective barriers: Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.; Holford, D.J.

    1992-02-01

    Radioactive waste exists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in a variety of locations, including subsurface grout and tank farms, solid waste burial grounds, and contaminated soil sites. Some of these waste sites may need to be isolated from percolating water to minimize the potential for transport of the waste to the ground water, which eventually discharges to the Columbia River. Multilayer protective barriers have been proposed as a means of limiting the flow of water through the waste sites (DOE 1987). A multiyear research program (managed jointly by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company for the DOE) is aimed at assessing the performance of these barriers. One aspect of this program involves the use of computer models to predict barrier performance. Three modeling studies have already been conducted and a test plan was produced. The simulation work reported here was conducted by PNL and extends the previous modeling work. The purpose of this report are to understand phenomena that have been observed in the field and to provide information that can be used to improve hydrologic modeling of the protective barrier. An improved modeling capability results in better estimates of barrier performance. Better estimates can be used to improve the design of barriers and the assessment of their long-term performance.

  13. Development of engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and 316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  14. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  15. Hanle Effect Diagnostics of the Coronal Magnetic Field - A Test Using Realistic Magnetic Field Configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N -E; Wiegelmann, T

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of coronal phenomena, such as coronal plasma thermodynamics, faces a major handicap caused by missing coronal magnetic field measurements. Several lines in the UV wavelength range present suitable sensitivity to determine the coronal magnetic field via the Hanle effect. The latter is a largely unexplored diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields with a very high potential. Here we study the magnitude of the Hanle-effect signal to be expected outside the solar limb due to the Hanle effect in polarized radiation from the H {\\sc{i}} Ly$\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ lines, which are among the brightest lines in the off-limb coronal FUV spectrum. For this purpose we use a magnetic field structure obtained by extrapolating the magnetic field starting from photospheric magnetograms. The diagnostic potential of these lines for determining the coronal magnetic field, as well as their limitations are studied. We show that these lines, in particular H {\\sc{i}} Ly$\\beta$, are useful for such measurements.

  16. Test plan for the field evaluation and demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes test details of a full demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a mobile trailer capable of employing the use of soil fixatives, dust suppression agents, misting, and vacuum systems. These systems can perform a large number of contamination control functions to support the Office of Waste Technology Development (OTD) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) projects, transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, and emergency response for hazardous and radioactive materials incidents. The demonstration will include both performance testing at the North Holmes Laboratory Facility (NHLF) and field testing in conjunction with the Remote Excavation System Demonstration at the Cold Test Pit. The NHLF will test operational parameters using water only, and the field demonstration at the Cold Test Pit involves full scale operation of vacuum, fixant, misting, and dust suppression systems. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the field demonstration are included in this test plan

  17. Field-test programs of borehole plugs in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a general overview of the repository-sealing field test effort being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeast New Mexico. Summary descriptions of supporting activities, such as performance assessment and plugging materials development, are included to create the connection between modeling and laboratory activities as they relate to field results. Results of tests on a portion of a 17-year-old plug (Plug 217) recovered from a mine horizon and the Bell Canyon Test, in which a cement plug was emplaced to isolate a naturally pressurized aquifer, are given. Conclusions from these field plugging tests are included

  18. Early experiences on the feasibility, acceptability, and use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests at peripheral health centres in Uganda-insights into some barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiimwe Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While feasibility of new health technologies in well-resourced healthcare settings is extensively documented, it is largely unknown in low-resourced settings. Uganda's decision to deploy and scale up malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs in public health facilities and at the community level provides a useful entry point for documenting field experience, acceptance, and predictive variables for technology acceptance and use. These findings are important in informing implementation of new health technologies, plans, and budgets in low-resourced national disease control programmes. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative descriptive study at 21 health centres in Uganda was undertaken in 2007 to elucidate the barriers and facilitators in the introduction of mRDTs as a new diagnostic technology at lower-level health facilities. Pre-tested interview questionnaires were administered through pre-structured patient exit interviews and semi-structured health worker interviews to gain an understanding of the response to this implementation. A conceptual framework on technology acceptance and use was adapted for this study and used to prepare the questionnaires. Thematic analysis was used to generate themes from the data. Results A total of 52 of 57 health workers (92% reported a belief that a positive mRDT result was true, although only 41 of 57 (64% believed that treatment with anti-malarials was justified for every positive mRDT case. Of the same health workers, only 49% believed that a negative mRDT result was truly negative. Factors linked to these findings were related to mRDT acceptance and use, including the design and characteristics of the device, availability and quality of mRDT ancillary supplies, health worker capacity to investigate febrile cases testing negative with the device and provide appropriate treatment, availability of effective malaria treatments, reliability of the health commodity supply chain, existing national

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    OpenAIRE

    Prawoto, Y.; Sumeru, K.; W.B. WAN NIK

    2012-01-01

    Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking) SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracki...

  20. Field Load Acquisition and variable amplitude fatigue testing on maxi-scooter motorcycles

    OpenAIRE

    N. Petrone; M. Saraceni

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the present work was the instrumentation of a maxi scooter for the field collection of service loads acting on the scooter main components such as frame, fork, handlebar, rear frame and suspension. Service loads were collected on an instrumented Yamaha Tmax scooter equipped with 22 channels during a set of field tests that were representing a predefined road mix, covering a mileage of 270 km. Field load histories were used to develop an accelerated test procedure for the ac...

  1. The Savannah River Environmental Technology Field Test Platform: Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal goal in the development of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is transferring them to organizations and individuals for use in site assessment and compliance monitoring. The DOE complex has devised several strategies to facilitate this transfer including joint research projects between private industries and government laboratories or universities (CRADAs) and streamlined licensing procedures. One strategy that has been under-utilized is a planned sequence gradually moving from laboratory development and field demonstration to long term evaluation and onsite use. Industrial partnership and commercial production can be initiated at any step based on the performance, market, user needs, and costs associated with the technology. This approach allows use of the technology by onsite groups for compliance monitoring tasks (e.g. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management), while following parallel research and development organizations the opportunity to evaluate the long term performance and to make modifications or improvements to the technology. This probationary period also provides regulatory organizations, potential industrial partners, and potential users with the opportunity to evaluate the technology's performance and its utility for implementation in environmental characterization and monitoring programs

  2. Field-testing competing runoff source and hydrochemical conceptualisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, A. W.; Saffarpour, S.; Adams, R.; Costelloe, J. F.; McDonnell, J.

    2014-12-01

    There are competing conceptualisations of heterogeneity in catchment systems. It is often convenient to divide catchments into zones, for example the soil profile, groundwater aquifers (saturated zone), riparian zones, etc. We also often divide flow sources into distinct categories such as surface runoff, interflow and baseflow, implying a few distinct stores of water. In tracer hydrology we typically assume water from such zones has distinct and invariant chemistry that is used to infer the runoff source mixture through conservative mixing model techniques such as End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA). An alternative conceptualisation is that catchments consist of a large number of stores with varying residence times. In this case individual stores contribute a variable proportion of flow and may have a temporally varying composition due to processes such as evapo-concentration. Hence they have a variable influence on the hydrochemistry of runoff. In this presentation, examples from two field studies in southern Australia will be presented that examine the relationships between hydrologic and hydrochemical conceptualisations and the relative variation within and between different hydrologic zones. The implications for water quality behaviour will be examined and the additional behavioural complexities associated with interactions between runoff pathways for non-conservative chemical species will be discussed.

  3. Results of poplar clone testing in field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Saša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth vigor of 7 poplar clones was researched, i.e. 5 candidate clones for registration (B-81, B-229, PE 19/66, 182/81 and 129/8 and 2 clonal cultivars (1-214 and "Pannonia" which had been registered earlier. The taxonomy of the study poplar clones was as follows: B-81 (Populus deltoides, B-229 (Populus deltoides, PE 19/66 (Populus deltoides, 182/81 (Populus deltoides, 129/81 (Populus x euramericana, 1-214 (Populus x euramericana and "Pannonia" (Populus x euramericana. The research was performed in three field experiments established in 2002 on the area of the Forest Estate Sremska Mitrovica. Although the experiments were established with several planting spaces, the first information indicate that the candidate clone PE 19/66 had the greatest vigor on the optimal soil types (humofluviosol and fluvisol loamy form, while the candidate clone B-81 had the advantage on the less favored soil type (meadow black soil on loess alluvium. Based on the attained diameters and heights, it can be concluded that these are the successfully established plantations and that the candidate clones showed significant genetic potentials, which points to the fact that in future the production of poplar wood volume can be significantly increased.

  4. Hot-water aquifer storage: A field test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, A. D.; Molz, F. J.; Andersen, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The basic water injection cycle used in a large-scale field study of heat storage in a confined aquifer near Mobile, Alabama is described. Water was pumped from an upper semi-confined aquifer, passed through a boiler where it was heated to a temperature of about 55 C, and injected into a medium sand confined aquifer. The injection well has a 6-inch (15-cm) partially-penetrating steel screen. The top of the storage formation is about 40 meters below the surface and the formation thickness is about 21 meters. In the first cycle, after a storage period of 51 days, the injection well was pumped until the temperature of the recovered water dropped to 33 c. At that point 55,300 cubic meters of water had been withdrawn and 66 percent of the injected energy had been recovered. The recovery period for the second cycle continued until the water temperature was 27.5 C and 100,100 cubic meters of water was recovered. At the end of the cycle about 90 percent of the energy injected during the cycle had been recovered.

  5. Radiofrequency field emitted by mobile phones and alteration of the blood-brain barrier: how strong is the experimental evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: It is known that high power, thermal radiofrequency radiation (RFR) can alter the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability with a brain averaged specific absorption rate (BASAR) threshold evaluated at around 100 W/kg (1). Mobile communication technologies are using RFR with exposure guidelines for public local exposure at 2 W/kg, far lower than the threshold previously mentioned. However, in a paper recently published (2) the occurrence of BBB leakage and brain damage (presence of dark neurons) has been reported 50 days after a single 2-hour exposure of rats to a GSM-900 signal. In that investigation however, bias could have occurred as, for instance, exposed animals were mixed in terms of age (12- to 26-week old) and gender, while those differences were not taken into account in the analysis. Moreover, other groups have published contradictory results (3). Our group undertook a confirmation study of the Salford experiments within an international collaborative programme including technical improvements. Our study includes the detection of dark neurons, alteration of the permeability of the BBB and apoptosis 14 or 50 days after GSM-900 exposure. The exposure setup was the loop antenna that allows for head-only exposure. Five groups of 16 Fisher 344 rats (14 -week old) were exposed to GSM-900 during 2 hours at various SAR levels (0, 0.14 and 2.0 W/kg), or were used as cage control or positive controls. Positive controls were treated with kainic acid (10 mg/kg) or by cold injury (dry ice during 5 minutes). After exposure, rats were kept alive during 14 or 50 days to study brain damages. Then, they were anesthetized with urethane (i.p. 1.5 mg/kg), perfused with PBS and fixed with paraformaldehyde 4% (PAF 4%). Brains were extracted and put in cold PAF 4% during the following night, then placed in cold sucrose 20% during 2-3 days, frozen with isopentane and placed at -80 deg. C. Coding was done on brains. Frozen brains were cut in 3

  6. Test and evaluation of semiconductor components in mixed field radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon components have found extensive use in nuclear spectroscopy and counting, as described in many articles in the last three decades. These devices have found utility in radiation dosimetry because a diode, for instance, produces a current approximately 18000 times higher than any ionization chamber of equal sensitive volume. This reduces stringent requirements from the electronics used to amplify or integrate the current and / or allows approaching the ideal detector point for the mapping of radiation fields. For better performance, in the case of diodes, they are normally used with high inverse polarity to obtain a deeper barrier, less noise and shorter transit time. The aim of this work was the evaluation of these semiconductor components for application in ionizing radiation fields monitoring, in nuclear research reactors and radiotherapy facilities, for radiation protection and health physics purposes. Experimental configurations to analyze the performance of commercial semiconductors, such as silicon PIN Photodiodes and Silicon Surface Barrier Detectors, were developed and the performance of three different configurations of charge preamplifier with silicon components was also studied. Components were evaluated for application as neutron detectors, using some types of radiators (converters). The radiation response of these silicon components to neutron fields from nuclear research reactors IEA-R1 and IPEN-MB1 (thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons), from beam holes, experimental halls and AmBe neutron sources in laboratory was investigated. (author)

  7. THE STUDY OF BARRIERS TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Gorji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the barriers to individual entrepreneurship as well as comparing them in men and women population. This study was applied, correlation-survey method. Using field method, the data are collected from 113 men entrepreneurs and 65 women entrepreneurs. One questionnaire whose validity and reliability is verified by content and Cranach’s  methods is also used to collect the research data. To analyze the data, T-test and ANOVA are used. The results indicated that there is a meaningful difference between individual and environmental barriers to entrepreneurship and order of effectiveness of barriers in men and women.

  8. Seed vigour tests for predicting field emergence of maize under severe conditions

    OpenAIRE

    García de Yzaguirre, Álvaro; Lasa Dolhagaray, José Manuel

    1989-01-01

    [EN] With 40 to 50 different seed vigour tests available, appropiate procedures for choosing the best single test or combination the best predictors of seedling emergence of maize (Zea Mays L.) under severe conditions. Thirteen vigour tests and various field emergence trials were performed on six inbred lines and two commercial hybrids. The best single predictors of field emergence were identified by calculating simple correlation coefficients. The calculation of the geometric mean of the res...

  9. BARRIERS IN TRANSITION FROM PARENTAL LEAVE TO THE LABOR MARKET FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF UNEMPLOYED PARENTS WITH CHILDREN AND WORKERS IN THE FIELD OF ACTIVE EMPLOYMENT POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krausová Anna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article brings a presentation and discussion of the results from qualitative research conducted by research team members in the frame of research project (SGS1/FSS/2014, which was funded by Student research Fund by University of Ostrava. The qualitative research covered 21 unemployed parents with children (under 10 years and 15 workers working in the field of active employment policy. Semi-structured interviews with respondents were conducted in the period July-August 2014. Subsequently were analysed in Qualitative Data Analysis Software MAXQDA. Scientific aim of the research was to find out, with such barriers, contributing to long-term unemployment identify unemployed parents with children under 10 years in the transition from parental leave and which problems in reconciling work and family life identify workers working in the field of active employment policy in the Ostrava region. In the first part of article are introduced theoretical frameworks and issue of reconciliation of family and working life in specific phase of life cycle, which is return to the labour market after the end of parental leave. It is pointed out how the demands on the labour market undermine the stability of the family and its reproductive, educational and social care functions. Research has shown, that both groups of respondents identified barriers in low offers part-time jobs, jobs with flexible working hours, difficulties in working time arrangements by employers, problems with availability of kindergartens/nurseries. Parents considered the issue of legitimacy Labour Offices in job searching. The conclusion summarizes the problem formulation and concluding findings.

  10. Field test of new poplar clone in Shangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Guang-hua; JIANG Yue-zhong; QIAO Yu-ling; B.Nottola

    2003-01-01

    Poplar is one of the dominant tree species for the establishment of fast growing plantations in Shandong Province. Eighteen poplar clones belonging to Populus aigeiros section were introduced from Italy, Turkey and domestic regions. Populus deltoides cv. 'Lux' I-69/55 (I-69), which was widely used in Shandong Province, China, was taken as control clone (I-69). Following a randomized complete block design, seedling test and controlled afforestation trials were carried out at Juxian County, Caoxian County and Laiyang City. The results showed that the poplar clone (Populus × euramericana cv. '102/74'), namely 102/74, performed well both in terms of adaptability and growth rate. The mean height of 13.9 m (H), diameter at breast height of 18.0 cm (DBH) and volume growth of 0.1445 m3 (V) were 2.2 %, 21.6% and 52.9 % higher than those of I-69 (CK), respectively, at the age of 5 years at three experimental sites. Moreover, the clone can be propagated easily and showed high resistance to poplar disease, pest as well as salinity and had longer growing period. Furthermore, wood basic density and fiber length of new poplar clone (102/74) were as same as I-69 (CK). It was concluded that the selected clone (102/74) was ideal for the establishment of fast-growing poplar plantations, especially for the pulpwood plantations in Shandong Province.

  11. A comparison of results from dynamic-response field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Susan M.; Thresher, Robert W.; Wright, Alan D.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamic response of Howden's 330-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) and the Northern Power Systems 100-kW North Wind 100 HAWT has been measured. The Howden machine incorporates a 26-m-diameter, upwind, three-bladed, wood/epoxy rotor that operates at 42 rpm and is a rigid-hub design. The North Wind 100 rotor has a diameter of 17.8 m, is upwind, two-bladed, and constructed of fiberglass, and has a teetered hub. The Northern Power turbine's blades are fully pitchable, while the Howden machine uses pitchable blade tips. This paper will present the results from each of these test programs in an effort to compare the dynamic response of each turbine. The analysis will focus on rotor bending loads in terms of both time domain and frequency response. The FLAP code will be used to explore sensitivity to teeter stiffness and natural frequency placement to provide a better understanding of the differences in behavior caused by configuration alone. The results are presented in the form of normalized azimuth-averaged plots of the deterministic loads, and spectral density plots of the stochastic responses. This presentation of the results will contrast major response differences due to design configurations.

  12. The interaction between plasma filaments in dielectric barrier discharges and liquid covered wounds: electric fields delivered to model platelets and cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of wounds by atmospheric pressure plasmas in the context of plasma medicine typically proceeds through a liquid layer covering exposed cells. The wounds and their liquid covering often have irregular shapes with electrical properties (i.e. conductivity and permittivities) that may differ not only from wound-to-wound but also for a single wound as healing proceeds. The differing shapes and electrical properties extend into the liquid within the wound that typically contains cellular materials such as blood platelets. The plasma, wound, liquid and intra-liquid cellular components represent an interacting system of mutual dependence. In this paper, we discuss the results from a computational investigation of the treatment of small, liquid-covered wounds by filamentary dielectric barrier discharges. The sizes of the wounds are of the order of the plasma filaments and the liquid within the wound, an approximation of blood serum, contains idealized blood platelets. We find that the electrical properties of a wound can have significant effects on the spreading of the plasma on its surface by virtue of the deformation of the vacuum electric fields due to the shape, the effective capacitance of the wound and the discontinuities in electrical permittivity. This in turn effects the penetration of the electric field to cells under the liquid. The orientation and permittivity of the platelets relative to the liquid determines the electric fields that may stimulate the platelets. (paper)

  13. Force field analysis suggests a lowering of diffusion barriers in atomic manipulation due to presence of STM tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmrich, Matthias; Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Huber, Ferdinand; Weymouth, Alfred J; Okabayashi, Norio; Giessibl, Franz J

    2015-04-10

    We study the physics of atomic manipulation of CO on a Cu(111) surface by combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. In atomic manipulation, an adsorbed atom or molecule is arranged on the surface using the interaction of the adsorbate with substrate and tip. While previous experiments are consistent with a linear superposition model of tip and substrate forces, we find that the force threshold depends on the force field of the tip. Here, we use carbon monoxide front atom identification (COFI) to characterize the tip's force field. Tips that show COFI profiles with an attractive center can manipulate CO in any direction while tips with a repulsive center can only manipulate in certain directions. The force thresholds are independent of bias voltage in a range from 1 to 10 mV and independent of temperature in a range of 4.5 to 7.5 K. PMID:25910137

  14. Thermo-hydro-mechanical characterization of the Spanish reference clay material for engineered barrier for granite and clay HLW repository: laboratory and small mock up testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report refers to the work carried out by Technic Geologic Division of CIEMAT (CIEMAT.DT.TG) coordinated by SCK/CEN (Belgium), participating besides UPC-DIT and University of Wales on the framework of CEC Contract F12W-CT91-0102 (DOEO). It presents the results obtained. The total results on the project will be published by CE in the EUR series. The role of CIEMAT in this project was to carry out tests in which the conditions of the clay barrier in the repository were simulated. The interaction of heat coming from the wastes and of water coming from the geological medium has been reproduced on compacted clay blocks. For the performance of tests on high density compacted clay blocks (Task 2.1) and for the cementation and chemical-mineralogical transformation studies two different cells were designed and constructed in stainless steel: a thermohydraulic cell and an alteration cell. The experiments performed in these cells have provided us with a better knowledge of the heat source, hydration system and sensors, as well as interesting data on heat and water diffusion. A revision of the experiments performed on the thermohydraulic cell was presented at the ''International Workshop on Thermomechanics of Clays and Clay Barriers'' held in Bergamo in October'93 (Villar et al. 1993)

  15. EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  16. Surface barrier research at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, G.W.; Ward, A.L.; Fayer, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    At the DOE Hanford Site, a field-scale prototype surface barrier was constructed in 1994 over an existing waste site as a part of a CERCLA treatability test. The above-grade barrier consists of a fine-soil layer overlying coarse layers of sands, gravels, basalt rock (riprap), and a low permeability asphalt layer. Two sideslope configurations, clean-fill gravel on a 10:1 slope and basalt riprap on a 2:1 slope, were built and are being tested. Design considerations included: constructability; drainage and water balance monitoring, wind and water erosion control and monitoring; surface revegetation and biotic intrusion; subsidence and sideslope stability, and durability of the asphalt layer. The barrier is currently in the final year of a three-year test designed to answer specific questions related to stability and long-term performance. One half of the barrier is irrigated such that the total water applied, including precipitation, is 480 mm/yr (three times the long-term annual average). Each year for the past two years, an extreme precipitation event (71 mm in 8 hr) representing a 1,000-yr return storm was applied in late March, when soil water storage was at a maximum. While the protective sideslopes have drained significant amounts of water, the soil cover (2-m of silt-loam soil overlying coarse sand and rock) has never drained. During the past year there was no measurable surface runoff or wind erosion. This is attributed to extensive revegetation of the surface. In addition, the barrier elevation has shown a small increase of 2 to 3 cm that is attributed to a combination of root proliferation and freeze/thaw activity. Testing will continue through September 1997. Performance data from the prototype barrier will be used by DOE in site-closure decisions at Hanford.

  17. Surface barrier research at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the DOE Hanford Site, a field-scale prototype surface barrier was constructed in 1994 over an existing waste site as a part of a CERCLA treatability test. The above-grade barrier consists of a fine-soil layer overlying coarse layers of sands, gravels, basalt rock (riprap), and a low permeability asphalt layer. Two sideslope configurations, clean-fill gravel on a 10:1 slope and basalt riprap on a 2:1 slope, were built and are being tested. Design considerations included: constructability; drainage and water balance monitoring, wind and water erosion control and monitoring; surface revegetation and biotic intrusion; subsidence and sideslope stability, and durability of the asphalt layer. The barrier is currently in the final year of a three-year test designed to answer specific questions related to stability and long-term performance. One half of the barrier is irrigated such that the total water applied, including precipitation, is 480 mm/yr (three times the long-term annual average). Each year for the past two years, an extreme precipitation event (71 mm in 8 hr) representing a 1,000-yr return storm was applied in late March, when soil water storage was at a maximum. While the protective sideslopes have drained significant amounts of water, the soil cover (2-m of silt-loam soil overlying coarse sand and rock) has never drained. During the past year there was no measurable surface runoff or wind erosion. This is attributed to extensive revegetation of the surface. In addition, the barrier elevation has shown a small increase of 2 to 3 cm that is attributed to a combination of root proliferation and freeze/thaw activity. Testing will continue through September 1997. Performance data from the prototype barrier will be used by DOE in site-closure decisions at Hanford

  18. Evaluation of the thermal resistance of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier for tropical and humid conditions: Experimental study from field measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Miranville, Frédéric; Guichard, Stéphane; Boyer, Harry; Praene, Jean Philippe; Bigot, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental evaluation of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier (MRRB), installed according to the state of the art, on a dedicated test cell. An existing experimental device was completed with a specific system for the regulation of the airflow rate in the upper air layer included in a typical roof from Reunion Island. Several experimental sequences were conducted to determine the thermal resistance of the roof according to several parameters and following a specific method. The mean method, well known in international standards (ISO 9869 - 1994) for the determination of the thermal resistance using dynamic data, was used. The method was implemented in a building simulation code in order to allow the determination of the thermal indicator automatically. Experimental results are proposed according to different seasonal periods and for different values of the airflow rate in the upper air layer

  19. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  20. Missed Opportunities: barriers to HIV testing during pregnancy from a population based cohort study in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Elin C; Thorson, Anna Ekéus; Pariyo, George; Waiswa, Peter; Kadobera, Daniel; Marrone, Gaetano; Ekström, Anna Mia

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to assess population-level HIV-testing uptake among pregnant women, key for access to prevention-of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) services, and to identify risk factors for not being HIV tested,The study was conducted May 2008-May 2010 in the Iganga/Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site (HDSS), Eastern Uganda, during regular surveillance of 68,000 individuals. All women identified to be pregnant May-July 2008 (n=881) were interviewed about pregnancy-related issues and linked to the HDSS database for socio-demographic data. Women were followed-up via antenatal care (ANC) register reviews at the health facilities to collect data related to ANC services received, including HIV testing. Adjusted relative risk (aRR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for not being HIV tested were calculated using multivariable binomial regression among the 544 women who remained after record review.Despite high ANC attendance (96%), the coverage of HIV testing was 64%. Only 6% of pregnant women who sought ANC at a facility without HIV testing services were referred for testing and only 20% received counseling regarding HIV. At ANC facilities with HIV testing services, 85% were tested. Only 4% of the women tested had been couple tested for HIV. Living more than three kilometers away from a health facility with HIV testing services was associated with not being tested both among the poorest (aRR,CI; 1.44,1.02-2.04) and the least poor women (aRR,CI;1.72,1.12-2.63).The lack of on site HIV testing services and distant ANC facilities lead to missed opportunities for PMTCT, especially for the poorest women. Referral systems for HIV testing need to be improved and testing should be expanded to lower level health facilities. This is in order to ensure that the policy of HIV testing during pregnancy is implemented more effectively and that testing is accessible for all. PMID:22916089

  1. Flower closure in the field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis): a field test of the pollination hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Prokop, Pavol; NEUPAUEROVÁ, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    Although the behavioral plasticity of flower traits has received considerable attention, its adaptive value is not thoroughly understood. We experimentally examined flower opening/closure in field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), a species with short flower persistence (1 day) in which adaptive responses to pollination were not previously expected. In line with the pollination hypothesis we suggested that flower exposure in this species should respond to pollination. More specifically, we pre...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW FIELD TEST TO ASSESSMENT OF ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE FOR TEAM SPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Celal; Hikmet; Berkant Muammer; Caner; Mert; Belgin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is develop a new anaerobic field test (Modified Illinois Agility Test: Mod IAT) for team sports and investigate to reliability and reliationship with running-based anaerobic sprint test (RAST) and Wingate anaerobic power test (WAnT). Method: Fourtythree male athletes were participated (10 handball, 10 football and 9 basketball players; team sports group: TSG and middle-long distance runners; individual sports group:ISG). At first day, height and body compo...

  3. Review of excavation methods and their implications for the near-field barrier of a deep underground repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report reviews excavation techniques for use in the construction of deep underground radioactive waste repositories, gives a summary of responses of the host rock to excavation and the means of measuring that response and discusses techniques for predicting that response. The review of excavation techniques included technical developments and current practice. To this end an extensive database was developed reviewing major excavations in rock types relevant to disposal and the techniques employed. Creation of an underground opening alters the properties of the rock mass around it. This study identifies stress, displacement, rock mass deformability and permeability as key parameters and reviews how they may be determined. Finally the report discusses the techniques available for predicting the behaviour of the near-field host rock. This concentrates on methods of numerical analysis since existing empirical or analytical methods are not considered suitable. (author)

  4. Field test of the PNNL Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, R.J.; Ku, E.; Latner, N.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1998-07-01

    As part of the requirements of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Automated Radioxenon/Sampler Analyzer (ARSA) was designed and engineered by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The instrument is to provide near real-time detection and measurement of the radioxenons released into the atmosphere after a nuclear test. Forty-six field tests, designed to determine the performance of the ARSA prototype under simulated field conditions, were conducted at EML from March to December 1997. This final report contains detailed results of the tests with recommendations for improvements in instrument performance.

  5. Separability of test fields equations on the C-metric background

    CERN Document Server

    Kofroň, David

    2016-01-01

    In the Kerr-Newman spacetime the Teukolsky master equation, governing the fundamental test fields, is of great importance. We derive an analogous master equation for the non-rotating C-metric which encompass massless Klein-Gordon field, neutrino field, Maxwell field, Rarita-Schwinger field and gravitational perturbations. This equation is shown to be separable in terms of "accelerated spin weighted spherical harmonics". It is shown that, contrary to ordinary spin weighted spherical harmonics, the "accelerated" ones are different for different spins. In some cases, the equation for eigenfunctions and eigenvalues are explicitly solved.

  6. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  7. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot

  8. Testing the effect of transient Plio-Pleistocene barriers in monsoonal Australo-Papua: did mangrove habitats maintain genetic connectivity in the Black Butcherbird?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Anna M; Joseph, Leo; Omland, Kevin E; Cook, Lyn G

    2011-12-01

    Changes in climate and sea level are hypothesized to have promoted the diversification of biota in monsoonal Australia and New Guinea by causing repeated range disjunctions and restricting gene flow between isolated populations. Using a multilocus (one mtDNA locus, five nuclear introns) phylogeographic approach, we test whether populations of the mangrove and rainforest restricted Black Butcherbird (Cracticus quoyi) have diverged across several geographic barriers defined a priori for this region. Phylogeographic structure and estimates of divergence times revealed Plio-Pleistocene divergences and long-term restricted gene flow of populations on either side of four major geographic barriers between and within Australia and New Guinea. Overall, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that mesic-adapted species did not disperse across the open dry woodlands and grasslands that dominated the transient palaeo-landbridges during the Plio-Pleistocene despite the presence of mangrove forests that might have acted as dispersal corridors for mesic-adapted species. Our study offers one of the first multilocus perspectives on the impact of changes in climate and sea level on the population history of widespread species with disjunct ranges in Australia and New Guinea. PMID:22060632

  9. Summary of convergence and stress measurements in the Temperature-test-field 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of ongoing convergence measurements in the gallery sides, roof, and floor of Temperature-test-field 4 (TVF 4) will determine the alterations of the rock's physical parameters by the temperature increase. For this purpose wire and rod extensometers have been used. In the boreholes, which will be heated later on, convergence sounds are installed. To know the initial rock-mechanical conditions in the test field extensometer measurements will be necessary before heating

  10. Studies on Test Application at Field Test and Low Power Logic-BIST

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Senling

    2014-01-01

    Advances in semiconductor process technology have resulted in various aging issues in field operation of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits. For example, HCI (Hot carrier injection), BTI (Bias Temperature Instability), TDDB (Time Dependent Dielectric Breakdown) are well-known aging phenomena, and they can increase the circuit delay resulting in serious reliability problems. In order to avoid system failures caused by aging, recent design usually sets a certain timing margin in opera...

  11. Qualitative Assessment of Barriers and Facilitators of Access to HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Qian, Han-Zhu; Yin, Lu; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Lijuan; Jiang, Shulin; Lu, Hongyan; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H; Amico, K Rivet

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis of HIV is the entry point into the continuum of HIV care; a well-recognized necessary condition for the ultimate prevention of onward transmission. In China, HIV testing rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) are low compared to other high risk subgroups, yet experiences with HIV testing among MSM in China are not well understood. To address this gap and prepare for intervention development to promote HIV testing and rapid linkage to treatment, six focus groups (FGs) were conducted with MSM in Beijing (40 HIV-positive MSM participated in one of four FGs and 20 HIV-negative or status unknown MSM participated in one of two FGs). Major themes reported as challenges to HIV testing included stigma and discrimination related to HIV and homosexuality, limited HIV knowledge, inconvenient clinic times, not knowing where to get a free test, fear of positive diagnosis or nosocomial infection, perceived low service quality, and concerns/doubts about HIV services. Key facilitators included compensation, peer support, professionalism, comfortable testing locations, rapid testing, referral and support after diagnosis, heightened sense of risk through engagement in high-risk behaviors, sense of responsibility to protect self, family and partner support, and publicity via social media. Themes and recommendations were generally consistent across HIV-positive and negative/status unknown groups, although examples of enacted stigma were more prevalent in the HIV-positive groups. Findings from our study provide policy suggestions for how to bolster current HIV prevention intervention efforts to enhance 'test-and-treat' strategies for Chinese MSM. PMID:26186029

  12. Rotation Braking and Error Field Correction of the Test Blanket Module Induced Magnetic Field Error in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Experiments on DIII-D confirm that the tritium breeding test blanket modules (TBMs) in ITER will lead to a decrease of the plasma rotation in H-modes. Moreover, they suggest that long-wavelength correction fields applied with non-axisymmetric saddle coils will only be able to ameliorate a fraction of such a rotation reduction. The new finding obtained in rotating H-modes contrasts previous experiments, which showed that saddle coils are very effective in restoring resilience to locked modes in L-mode plasmas. The experiments use a TBM mock-up coil that has been especially designed to simulate the error field induced by the ferromagnetic steel of a pair of TBMs in one of ITER port. The TBM field is applied in rotating H-mode plasmas with shape, β and safety factor similar to the ITER baseline scenario. The n = 1 error field correction (EFC) is applied with a set of non-axisymmetric saddle coils (I-coil), whose currents are optimized in the presence of the TBM mock-up field using a newly developed non- disruptive technique that maximizes the plasma rotation. However, a test of the effectiveness of the TBM EFC yields that the optimized EFC can only recover approximately a quarter of the 30% rotation decrease attributed to the TBM error field. An alternative criterion to evaluate the 'goodness' of an EFC has been its effectiveness in canceling the n = 1 plasma response to the error field. Plasma response measurements in the TBM experiment show that the I-coil can indeed cancel the magnetic measurements of the n = 1 plasma response to the TBM mock-up field. The required currents are consistent with ideal MHD predictions using the IPEC code, but differ significantly from the currents that maximize the plasma rotation. The contrast between the limited effectiveness of n = 1 EFC in rotating H-modes and their ability to recover a low locking density in L-mode plasmas shows that the components of the non-axisymmetric field that braking the plasma at high rotation

  13. Enhancement of the Remote Field Eddy Current Testing Performed from Outside of a Magnetic Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Marek; Daniela Gombarska

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with design of remote field eddy current probe for non-destructive testing dedicated for inspection of ferromagnetic tubular material from outside. The remote field effect inside the tube wall is achieved by the medium of a magnetic shield covering the probe. Results of numeric simulations made for verification of probe characteristics confirmed the effectiveness of probe design.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF PRACTICES FOR MINIMIZING EMISSIONS FROM SOIL FUMIGATION USING FIELD PLOT TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission reduction is essential to minimize the potentially negative impact on air quality from soil fumigation. To develop practices for minimizing emissions, studies were conducted using field plot tests following similar operation procedures as in growers’ fields. Fumigant emissions were measured...

  15. Child-Robot Interaction in the Wild : Field Testing Activities of the ALIZ-E Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greeff, J. de; Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Fraaije, A.; Solms, L.; Wigdor, N.; Bierman, B.

    2014-01-01

    A field study was conducted in which CRI activities developed by the ALIZ-E project were tested with the project's primary user group: children with diabetes. This field study resulted in new insights in the modalities and roles a robot aimed at CRI in a healthcare setting might utilise, while in ad

  16. Construction and testing of the Nb3Sn coils for the High-Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was undertaken: (1) to establish manufacturing capability for a high-current, cryostable Nb3Sn conductor for the mirror fusion program; (2) to evaluate the conductor design with regard to manufacturability, windability, and cryostability; and (3) to provide a facility for testing insert coils of up to 1 m outer diameter at approximately 12 T

  17. EMISSION TEST REPORT, OMSS FIELD TEST ON CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses results of a parametric evaluation of powdered activated carbon for control of mercury (Hg) emission from a municipal waste cornbustor (MWC) equipped with a lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (SD/FF). The primary test objectives were to evaluate the effe...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... media, such as evacuated bags or tare-weighed PM sample media. (2) Operate the PEMS according to the..., including PM samples; for example you may condition an inertial PM balance substrate if you use an inertial balance to measure PM. (6) You may have personnel monitoring and adjusting the PEMS during a test, or...

  19. Relationships Between Anaerobic Performance, Field Tests and Game Performance of Sitting Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marszalek Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between anaerobic performance, field tests, game performance and anthropometric variables of sitting volleyball players. Twenty elite Polish sitting volleyball players were tested using the 30 s Wingate Anaerobic Test for arm crank ergometer and participated in six physical field tests. Heights in position to block and to spike, as well as arm reach were measured. Players were observed during the game on the court in terms of effectiveness of the serve, block, attack, receive and defense. Pearson analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used. The strongest correlations were found between the chest pass test and mean power and peak power (r=.846; p=.001 and r=.708; p=.0005, respectively, and also between the T-test and peak power (r= −.718; p=.001. Mean power correlated with the 3 m test (r= −.540; p=.014, the 5 m test (r= −.592; p=.006, and the T-test (r= −.582; p=.007. Peak power correlated with the 3 m test (r= −.632; p=.003, the 5 m test (r= −.613; p=.004, speed & agility (r= −.552; p=.012 and speed & endurance (r=−.546; p=.013. Significant correlations were observed between anthropometric parameters and anaerobic performance variables (p≤.001, and also between anthropometric parameters and field tests (p≤.05. Game performance and physical fitness of sitting volleyball players depended on their anthropometric variables: reach of arms, the position to block and to spike. The chest pass test could be used as a non-laboratory field test of anaerobic performance of sitting volleyball players.

  20. Relationships Between Anaerobic Performance, Field Tests and Game Performance of Sitting Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, Jolanta; Molik, Bartosz; Gomez, Miguel Angel; Skučas, Kęstutis; Lencse-Mucha, Judit; Rekowski, Witold; Pokvytyte, Vaida; Rutkowska, Izabela; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina

    2015-11-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between anaerobic performance, field tests, game performance and anthropometric variables of sitting volleyball players. Twenty elite Polish sitting volleyball players were tested using the 30 s Wingate Anaerobic Test for arm crank ergometer and participated in six physical field tests. Heights in position to block and to spike, as well as arm reach were measured. Players were observed during the game on the court in terms of effectiveness of the serve, block, attack, receive and defense. Pearson analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used. The strongest correlations were found between the chest pass test and mean power and peak power (r=.846; p=.001 and r=.708; p=.0005, respectively), and also between the T-test and peak power (r= -.718; p=.001). Mean power correlated with the 3 m test (r= -.540; p=.014), the 5 m test (r= -.592; p=.006), and the T-test (r= -.582; p=.007). Peak power correlated with the 3 m test (r= -.632; p=.003), the 5 m test (r= -.613; p=.004), speed & agility (r= -.552; p=.012) and speed & endurance (r=-.546; p=.013). Significant correlations were observed between anthropometric parameters and anaerobic performance variables (p≤.001), and also between anthropometric parameters and field tests (p≤.05). Game performance and physical fitness of sitting volleyball players depended on their anthropometric variables: reach of arms, the position to block and to spike. The chest pass test could be used as a non-laboratory field test of anaerobic performance of sitting volleyball players. PMID:26834870