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Sample records for barrier emplacement experiment

  1. Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in Opalinus clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    exclusively devoted to the GBM: fabrication, emplacement equipments, and hydraulic, mechanical and geophysical (seismic) characterization in conventional laboratory. Chapter 4 refers to the excavation of the experimental drift, and to the geophysical (seismic, electric) and hydrogeological characterization of the near field of the clay rock. Chapter 5 is devoted to the installation of the different in situ test components, systems and instruments. The experimental in situ test results and interpretation is presented in Chapter 6, while their modelling and interpretation is presented in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 includes an assessment of the experiment results and overall conclusions, in relation to the declared project objectives. Chapter 9 consists of a list of references. Although a large number of bibliographic references have been used in this project, each included in the corresponding specific reports, the only references included herein are the specific reports detailing the various tasks performed to date, plus a few other reports considered to be essential. (Author)

  2. Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in opalinus clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    exclusively devoted to the GBM: fabrication, emplacement equipments, and hydraulic, mechanical and geophysical (seismic) characterization in conventional laboratory. Chapter 4 refers to the excavation of the experimental drift, and to the geophysical (seismic, electric) and hydrogeological characterization of the near field of the clay rock. Chapter 5 is devoted to the installation of the different in situ test components, systems and instruments. The experimental in situ test results and interpretation is presented in Chapter 6, while their modelling and interpretation is presented in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 includes an assessment of the experiment results and overall conclusions, in relation to the declared project objectives. Chapter 9 consists of a list of references. Although a large number of bibliographic references have been used in this project, each included in the corresponding specific reports, the only references included herein are the specific reports detailing the various tasks performed to date, plus a few other reports considered to be essential. (Author)

  3. Mont Terri Project - Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in Opalinus Clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J. C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E. [Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria (CIMNE), Barcelona (Spain); Alheid, H.-J. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Bluemling, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    The Engineered Barrier (EB) experiment was a full-scale test for the demonstration, in a horizontal drift, of an emplacement technics of the clay barrier, using a granular bentonite material in the upper part of this barrier and bentonite blocks at the bottom. The test has been carried out in a 6 m long section of a niche excavated in Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri underground laboratory. A steel dummy canister, with the same dimensions and weight as the real reference canisters, was placed on top of a bed of highly compacted bentonite blocks (in turn lying on a concrete bed), and the rest of the clay barrier volume was backfilled with a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM), made of very highly compacted pellets of different sizes. Hydro-mechanical instrumentation and an artificial hydration system (to accelerate the saturation of the clay barrier) were installed, and the test section sealed with a concrete plug. The evolution of the hydro-mechanical parameters along the hydration, both in the barrier and in the clayey rock formation, has been monitored during about 1.5 years, and modelled using the CODE-BRIGHT code. The EB experiment has proved that fully automated production of a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM) is possible and large quantities can be produced in due time in the required quality. Only minor modifications of existing production lines in industry for other applications were necessary to achieve this result. In the EB test section, a dry density of 1.36 g/cm{sup 3} of the emplaced GBM has been obtained. With this value it is estimated that the hydraulic conductivity of this material is lower than 5 x 10{sup -12} m/s and the swelling pressure is about 1.3 MPa. Even though the EB test section conditions are now not considered as representative of a true demonstration, it is deemed that the model emplacement testing results (dry density of about 1.40 g/cm{sup 3}) serve well to demonstrate the achievable densities expected in the real world setting. The

  4. Mont Terri Project - Heater experiment, engineered barriers emplacement and ventilations tests. No 1 - Swiss Geological Survey, Bern, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international Mont Terri project started in January 1996. Research is carried out in the Mont Terri rock laboratory, an underground facility near the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel (vicinity of St-Ursanne, Canton of Jura, Switzerland). The aim of the project is the geological, hydrogeological, geochemical and geotechnical characterisation of a clay formation, specifically of the Opalinus Clay. Twelve Partners from European countries and Japan participate in the project. These are ANDRA, BGR, CRIEPI, ENRESA, GRS, HSK, IRSN, JAEA, NAGRA, OBAYASHI, SCK.CEN and swisstopo. Since 2006, swisstopo acts as operator of the rock laboratory and is responsible for the implementation of the research programme decided by the partners. The three following reports are milestones in the research history of the Mont Terri project. It was the first time that an in-situ heating test with about 20 observation boreholes over a time span of several years was carried out in a clay formation. The engineered barrier emplacement experiment has been extended due to very encouraging measurement results and is still going on. The ventilation test was and is a challenge, especially in the very narrow microtunnel. All three projects were financially supported by the European Commission and the Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research. The three important scientific and technical reports, which are presented in the following, have been provided by a number of scientists, engineers and technicians from the Partners, but also from national research organisations and private contractors. Many fruitful meetings where held, at the rock laboratory and at other facilities, not to forget the weeks and months of installation and testing work carried out by the technicians and engineers. The corresponding names and organisations are listed in detail in the reports. Special thanks are going to the co-ordinators of the three projects for their motivation of the team during

  5. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods

  6. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M. [Ebasco Environmental, Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Phillips, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

  7. Design and emplacement of bentonite barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite is a well known sealing and buffer material for waste disposals in hard rock conditions. Bentonite was also tested as a sealing material for rock salt formations. Under salt conditions the hydraulic conductivity is higher and the swelling pressure is lower then under freshwater conditions using the same bentonite dry density. Because rock salt conditions are more ambitious for bentonite, the new research results of material design and emplacement technology are very useful for applications under freshwater conditions. Commercial available bentonites were tested by measurements of hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure at various dry densities. The result is the required emplacement dry density for each bentonite. Following an industrial production process for high compacted bentonite materials with low initial water content was developed. Bentonite blocks for drift sealings and compacts / granules for bulk mixtures for shaft sealings have been successful tested in large scale in situ tests in salt mines. Since 1998 about 500 t of bentonite blocks have been produced by the company Preiss-Daimler Industries GmbH - Feuerfestwerke Wetro. The blocks have a standard size of (250 x 125 x 62,5) mm. A proper fit of the blocks to the rock contour can be formed by sawing. The emplacement as dry brickwork is simple and reliable for the rough conditions in underground mines. The recent shaft sealing systems consist of a binary mixture of air dry compacted bentonite compacts and granules (moisture content 7 - 10 %). This material design and the production technology were developed in cooperation with the K and S Group. Both components of the bulk mixture (compacts and granules) are now produced at the plant 'Bergmannssegen-Hugo' (K and S Group). This material defines the actual best state of the art for bentonite sealing materials for long term stable shaft sealing systems, especially under difficult conditions like in salt mines. Since 2004 about 3000 t of

  8. The demonstration experiment Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation is being carried out for disposal of high level waste and spent nuclear fuel in a dual-purpose repository in a salt dome. Only a minor part of the spent fuel from nuclear power plants will be disposed of directly. The major part will be reprocessed. For the dual-purpose repository a reference concept for disposal of high level waste (HLW) and another one for spent fuel was developed. For direct disposal of spent LWR-fuel the reference concept consists of emplacement of self-shielded packages on the floor of emplacement drifts. For saving of space and cost, packages containing spent fuel possibly will be emplaced also in drifts above the filled and sealed HLW-boreholes. Immediately after emplacement of a package the drift will be backfilled with crushed salt. After backfilling the next disposal cask will be emplaced. Emplacement of these casks leads to effects which are rather different from the effects of HLW borehole emplacement. Because heat conductivity of the crushed salt backfill is lower than heat conductivity of compact rock salt, heating of the cask's vicinity will be faster than at borehole emplacement. This has been calculated, but validation of these calculations in experiments is necessary. Another new feature in this emplacement concept is backfilling of heat generating packages with crushed salt. Mathematical models exist for heat propagation, backfill compaction, and drift convergence, but they have to be validated by experiments. The purpose of the demonstration experiment Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement is to provide those data which are required for model validation and in a licensing procedure

  9. Analysis of the vaporization barrier above waste emplacement drifts

    OpenAIRE

    Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Yvonne

    2003-01-01

    Prediction of the amount of water that may seep into the waste emplacement drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the proposed geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The repository is to be located in thick, partially saturated fractured tuff that will be heated to above-boiling temperatures as a result of heat generation from the decay of nuclear waste. Since water percolating down towards the repository will be subject to vigorous boiling f...

  10. Granular bentonite production as buffer material for a full-scale emplacement ('FE') experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Swiss repository concept for the disposal of spent fuel (SF) and high-level vitrified waste (HLW), the canisters are emplaced in galleries surrounded by a bentonite buffer. These engineered barriers with favourable and well-known properties and predictable performance provide the secondary containment of the waste. The bentonite buffer has the following functions: a) to keep the canisters in place and protect them by homogenising the stress field; b) to mechanically stabilise the space between the canisters and the geological barrier; c) to act as a transport barrier for radionuclides and as a barrier for colloids; d) to ensure low corrosion rates of both the canister and the waste form and e) to limit microbial activity. In order to provide these functions, it is necessary for at least a significant part of the thickness of bentonite not to be altered in an unacceptable way by temperature or chemical interaction with the formation water or corrosion products of the canister. The FE experiment ('Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment') at Mont Terri URL, which develops and demonstrates on a 1:1 scale of the Swiss repository concept for disposal of SF and HLW in Opalinus Clay, is supported by the LUCOEX project, co-funded by the European Commission as part of the seventh Euratom research and training Framework Programme on nuclear energy. In this poster, a strategy based on previous experiences and the production concept based on current technology for producing a granular bentonite is presented. The main objectives of manufacturing granular bentonite for the LUCOEX/FE project are as follows: - Production of a suitable grain size distribution of the granules in order to achieve a target emplacement density and homogeneous emplacement; - Optimization of different parameters during the production process; - Evaluation of rational production processes for the production of suitable granular material; - Development

  11. Modelling waste emplacement and the physical changes to the sediment barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste (HGW) in the deep ocean bed, and the subsequent interaction between the waste and the surrounding sediments, would induce a number of changes to the sediments. This chapter describes the processes that have to be modelled to define these changes, and briefly reviews the models that have been developed as a part of the International Seabed Working Group's research programme. The experiments that have been performed by the SWG to validate these models are discussed, and the results of penetrator test performed in the Atlantic study areas are used to illustrate the application of in situ test data to model verification; a corollary of this work is that it is now possible to predict the final burial depth of a penetrator with a high degree of confidence. (author)

  12. Emplacement Drift System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Emplacement Drift System is part of the Engineered Barrier System and provides the interface between the various waste package (WP) systems and the Ground Control System. In conjunction with the various WPs, the Emplacement Drift System limits the release and transport of radionuclides from the WP to the Natural Barrier following waste emplacement. Collectively, the Emplacement Drift System consists of the structural support hardware (emplacement drift invert and WP emplacement pallet) and any performance-enhancing barriers (drip shields and invert ballast) installed or placed in the emplacement drifts. The Emplacement Drift System is entirely located within the emplacement drifts in the subsurface portion of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR); specifically, it is physically bounded by the Subsurface Facility System, the Ground Support System, and the Natural Barrier. The Emplacement Drift System supports the key MGR functions of limiting radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier, minimizing the likelihood of a criticality external to the WPs, limiting natural and induced environmental effects, and providing WP support. The Emplacement Drift System limits radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier by controlling the movement of radionuclides within the emplacement drift and to the Natural Barrier, and by limiting water contact with the WPs. The Emplacement Drift System provides physical support and barriers for emplaced WPs that reduce water contact. The Emplacement Drift WP spacing supports the thermal loading performance by complimenting drift layout and orientation as described in the system description document for the Subsurface Facility System. The Emplacement Drift System supports the WP and also provides an environment that aids in enhancing WP confinement performance. As part of the Engineered Barrier System, the Emplacement Drift System interfaces with the WP systems. The Emplacement Drift System also interfaces with the Natural Barrier

  13. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  14. Coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical experiment at Kamaishi Mine technical note 14-99-01. Verification of the buffer material emplacement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is an important part of the near field performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal to evaluate coupled thermo-hydromechanical (T-H-M) phenomena, e.g., thermal effects on groundwater flow through rock matrix and water seepage into the buffer material, the generation of swelling pressure of the buffer material, and thermal stresses potentially affecting porosity and fracture apertures of the rock. An in-situ T-H-M experiment named Engineered Barrier Experiment' was conducted at the Kamaishi Mine, in which the host rock is granodiorite, in order to establish conceptual models of the coupled T-H-M processes and to build confidence in mathematical models and computer codes. This report summarizes the results of the in-situ direct compaction technique to evaluate the appropriate conditions for this technique. The in-situ direct compaction technique is one of the major candidate emplacement techniques for the buffer material. This experiment consisted of the mock-up tests and the in-situ test. The mock-up tests showed the appropriate conditions for the in-situ direct compaction technique. For the in-situ experiment, the manufactured OT-9607 achieved dry density averaged 1.65 g/cm3, which matched the demand for the thermo-hydro-mechanical experiment. (author)

  15. Emplacement engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emplacement Engineering can be defined as that portion of a nuclear explosive project that is concerned with the emplacement of the explosive. This definition would then include virtually everything except the design and fabrication of the explosive and the post-shot-effects program. For future commercial application, the post-shot-effects program will essentially disappear. This emplacement portion of a nuclear explosive project constitutes a large fraction of the total project cost, but it has largely been overshadowed by the explosive and explosive-effects portions. As we move into commercial applications. Emplacement Engineering must receive more attention from both industry and government. To place emplacement costs in their proper relationship with total projects costs, we have performed a study of commercial underground nuclear explosive applications such as gas stimulation. Although there are many intangibles in such a study, we have been able to at least obtain some feel for the relative fractional costs of the non-explosive costs compared with the explosive costs. This study involved estimating the cost elements for applications using a single explosive at 5,000 ft, 10,000 ft, and 15,000 ft. For each depth, the cost estimates were made for a range of emplacement hole and explosive diameters. Results of these estimates for explosive-related costs, hole-related costs, and total costs are shown for the three depths. Note that the explosive package outside diameter is assumed as 2 inches less than the hole (or casing) inside diameter for all cases. For the 5,000-ft application the explosive-related costs dominate, and of particular importance is the indicated diameter for minimum total cost which occurs at approximately a 17.5-in. hole (15.5-in. explosive). The hole-related costs are in 'the same range as the explosive-related costs for the 10,000-ft application. For this case, the minimum total cost occurs at approximately a 14-in. hole (12-in. explosive

  16. Orientating analyses related to the experiment 'Thermal simulation of gallery emplacement' by means of the ADINA program system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The licencing of the reference concept of direct ultimate disposal of spent fuel elements requires the proof of safe handling, transport and storage of self-shielding containers in the repository. To be able to prove that, the demonstration test ''Thermal Simulation of Gallery Emplacement (TSS)'' is carried out in the Asse salt mine at a depth of 800 m to study the thermomechanical behaviour of the backfilling material, salt grit, and of the rock surrounding the containers. In addition, and accompanying the experiment, thermomechanical computer models are to be verified or validated on the basis of the measuring results. Orientating analyses are performed by means of the finite-element program system ADINA, using materials models available in ADINA. Because of the considerable insecurity as regards the determination of primary stresses and rock pressure, and the formulation of the materials laws in particular for the salt grit backfilling material, an attempt is made, by means of appropriate set-ups, to delimit, in terms of engineering, the thermomechanical behaviour of salt grit for a heated and unheated gallery. (orig./HP)

  17. Evaluation of noise barriers for soundscape perception through laboratory experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Joo Young; Jang, Hyung Suk; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, soundscape qualities have been investigated for the different types of urban noise barriers. Field measurements were performed: the sound pressure levels in front and back of the barriers were measured and the pictures were taken. Accordingly, laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the soundscape quality when each noise barrier existed. The experiments consisted of three parts; 1) audio-only condition, 2) visual-only condition, and 3) audio-visual condition. A...

  18. JET internal transport barriers: experiment vs theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large variety of JET discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been analysed in order to determine the main features which characterize turbulence stabilization at the barrier. It is found that the location of barriers is well correlated with regions where the ExB flow shearing rate exceeds the linear growth rate of the ion temperature gradient mode instability (γηi). A key point is the dependence of γηi on the magnetic shear: in the discharges of this database the reduction of γηi associated to very low or null magnetic shear favours the formation of an ITB. After the ITB formation a positive feedback occurs in which the ExB flow shear mechanism has the leading role and the position of the barrier may be no longer linked to the low shear region

  19. TMX-U Tandem-Mirror thermal-barrier experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal-barrier experiments have been carried out in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). Measurements of nonambipolar and ambipolar radial transport show that these transport processes, as well as end losses, can be controlled at modest densities and durations. Central-cell heating methods using ion-cyclotron heating (ICH) and neutral-beam injection have been demonstrated. Potential measurements with recently developed methods indicate that deep thermal barriers can be established

  20. Nuclear Physics Experiments Below The Coulomb Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1932, Cockcroft and Walton showed that (p,α) reactions with lithium were possible at energies near 100 keV. We report an undergraduate laboratory experiment with 90 keV protons colliding with a thick lithium target. The experiment allows students to observe the products of two reactions, to determine the product masses, and to learn techniques for deconvolving experimental spectra profiles.

  1. An RF cavity for barrier bucket experiment in the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A barrier bucket experiment in the AGS is planed in 1998. An accumulation of the beam, which intensity of 1.0 x 1014ppp is, acceleration after the injection with a barrier bucket scheme and other RF gymnastics experiments will be studied. An isolated RF pulse of 40 kV per cavity is necessary for the experiment. The RF frequency is 2 MHz and the isolated pulse is generated at the repetition rate of the revolution frequency of 357 kHz. We have developed the barrier cavity for this experiment. The cavity is loaded with FINEMET core. It has low Q value but high shunt impedance. It makes the necessary power less than that of ferrite-loaded cavity for an isolated RF pulse. (author)

  2. Emplacement Ventilation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify conceptual design options for the emplacement ventilation system, specifically within the emplacement drifts. The designs are based on the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II concept developed during the license application design selection exercise as described in the ''License Application Design Selection Report'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a) and in the emplacement drift ''Ventilation Model'' (CRWMS M and O 2000c). The scope of this analysis, as outlined in the development plan (CRWMS M and O 2000a), includes the following tasks: (1) Description of the air flow path in the emplacement drifts. (2) Examination of the exhaust options for air exiting the emplacement drifts. (3) Examination of the air control options in the emplacement drifts. (4) Discussion of following system components and structures: emplacement isolation doors, portable shadow shield and exhaust main partition. The objective of this analysis is to support site recommendation through input to the system description documents. Off-normal conditions are not discussed in this analysis

  3. Engineered barrier experiment. Power control and data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The engineered barrier concept for the storage of radioactive wastes is being tested at almost full scale at CIEMAT facilities. A data acquisition and control is an element of this experiment. This system would be operating for next three years. (Author)

  4. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10-5 adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M and O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure

  5. The first experiments on dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain uniform and stable discharge plasma in atmospheric pressure, dielectric barrier discharge experiments were carried out. Main purpose is to examine the applicability of dielectric barrier discharge to production processes of semi-conductors. LSIs and flat display panels. In the experiments, at first, quite stable and uniform discharge was obtained at atmospheric pressure. Effects of applied voltage and frequency on plasma uniformity were studied. Improvement of discharge uniformity by introducing gas flow of helium or nitrogen between the discharge gap was observed. Finally, surface cleaning effect of the present plasma was confirmed by observing contact angle of liquid droplet. At least for cleaning process, possibility of application as process plasma was suggested

  6. Disabled people and the Internet: experiences, barriers and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    PILLING, D; Barrett, P; Floyd, M.

    2004-01-01

    The UK government aims to make all its information and transactions available electronically by 2005. General use of the Internet also continues to grow. This report investigates the Internet's barriers and benefits for disabled people, and considers whether it acts as a means to reduce their social exclusion. The study surveys the views and experiences of disabled people, both Internet users and non-users. Topics covered include: what the Internet is used for; use of and difficulties wit...

  7. Environmental Management System and SMEs: EU Experience, Barriers and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Iraldo, Fabio; Testa, Francesco; Frey, Marco

    2010-01-01

    In the authors’ intention this paper represents the attempt to identify solutions, tools and incentives for SMEs to overcome constraints and difficulties they experience by implementing an EMS. Removing potential barriers and reinforcing economic incentives should be main targets in order to allow for a wide diffusion of EMS among SMEs. Some methods and possible instruments have been dealt with in this paper: working by group seemed to be a good way to diffuse information and to share imple...

  8. Solar energy emplacement developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Michael; Sauls, Bob

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design was developed for a Lunar Power System (LPS) composed of photovoltaic arrays and microwave reflectors fabricated from lunar materials. The LPS will collect solar energy on the surface of the Moon, transform it into microwave energy, and beam it back to Earth where it will be converted into usable energy. The Solar Energy Emplacement Developer (SEED) proposed will use a similar sort of solar energy collection and dispersement to power the systems that will construct the LPS.

  9. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  10. Career Barriers: How People Experience, Overcome, and Avoid Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Manuel

    This book defines career barriers, considers how people react to them, and offers ways to overcome and prevent them. It is geared towards people experiencing career barriers; for students at the start of their careers; for seasoned employees wanting to avoid or be prepared to deal with career barriers; and for managers, human resource…

  11. TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive

  12. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  13. DTR, Taut Wire System: An alarm barrier with experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Taut Wire Fence Alarm System concept was developed and introduced more that fifteen years ago in Israel. A sudden expansion of the nations's border lines, the difficulty to monitor intrusions along those elongated lines and the need for timely as well as accurate armed response to an intrusion attempt dictated the need for an alarming barrier. Traditionally, protection of perimeters was accomplished by the installation of a fence or other type obstacles (man made or natural) and surveillance by manned patrols, fixed observation posts, and/or electronic devices. Defense planners recognized therefore the need for an alarming barrier. A concentrated effort by scientists solved the problem by developing the first Taut Wire Fence Alarm System in a configuration of an alarm barrier. The system was specified to have an extremely low false alarm rate (FAR/NAR), high probability of detection, the capability to follow various terrains, operability in a wide range of environmental conditions, a capability to delay an intruder, ease of installation by unskilled labor, and low maintenance requirements. The authors try here to explain the various constraints and considerations given during the design stages of the Taut Wire Alarm System so as to bring the present magnitude of users to a better understanding of the system's operation

  14. Barriers to the adoption of telehealth and the Complete Ambient Assisted Living eXperiment (CAALYX)

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasiou, Athanasios; Boulos, N Kamel Boulos; The CAALYX Consortium

    2008-01-01

    We provide a brief overview of potential barriers to the adoption of healthcare shared by various stakeholders and present the approach taken by the Complete Ambient Assisted Living eXperiment European project.

  15. A Scoping Review of Immigrant Experience of Health Care Access Barriers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalich, Angela; Heinemann, Lyn; Ghahari, Setareh

    2016-06-01

    Canadian population-based surveys report comparable access to health care services between immigrant and non-immigrant populations, yet other research reports immigrant-specific access barriers. A scoping review was conducted to explore research regarding Canadian immigrants' unique experiences in accessing health care, and was guided by the research question: "What is currently known about the barriers that adult immigrants face when accessing Canadian health care services?" The findings of this study suggest that there are unmet health care access needs specific to immigrants to Canada. In reviewing research of immigrants' health care experiences, the most common access barriers were found to be language barriers, barriers to information, and cultural differences. These findings, in addition to low cultural competency reported by interviewed health care workers in the reviewed articles, indicate inequities in access to Canadian health care services for immigrant populations. Suggestions for future research and programming are discussed. PMID:26093784

  16. Experiences and barriers to implementation of clinical practice guideline for depression in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jaewon; Han, Changsu; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Pae, Chi-Un; Kim, Min-Jeong; Park, Sun-Young; Ahn, Jeonghoon

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines can improve health-care delivery, but there are a number of challenges in adopting and implementing the current practice guidelines for depression. The aim of this study was to determine clinical experiences and perceived barriers to the implementation of these guidelines in psychiatric care. Methods A web-based survey was conducted with 386 psychiatric specialists to inquire about experiences and attitudes related to the depression guidelines and barriers influ...

  17. Construction, emplacement, and retrievability (preclosure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each of the three preclosure subgroups of the Construction, Emplacement, and Retrievability Working Group adopted a six-step approach to identify and assess current needs in geotechnical modeling and characterization. This approach may be summarized as follows: identify phenomena related to emplacement of high-level nuclear wastes, identify types of models which are required to calculate the phenomena, establish the input data needs for the models, assess the current availability of the models, assess the current status of documentation, verification, and validation of the models, and determine the adequacy of instrumentation and measurement techniques to (a) validate the models, where necessary, and (b) obtain input data for design. Systematic application of these six steps leads to the establishment of the research requirements for geotechnical modeling and characterization. A summary of modeling techniques which apply to the three subsequent sections on construction, emplacement, and retrievability is presented. Research needs, which apply to all preclosure activities, are summarized

  18. Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond cryogenic barrier technology demonstration: Pre-barrier subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moline, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes that has since been drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by a tributary that empties into Melton Branch Creek and that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily {sup 90}Sr. Because of the proximity of the tributary to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the tributary, it is hypothesized that the HRE Pond is a source of contamination to he creek. As a means for temporary containment of contaminants within the impoundment, a cryogenic barrier technology demonstration was initiated in FY96 with a background hydrologic investigation that continued through FY97. Cryogenic equipment installation was completed in FY97, and freezing was initiated in September of 1997. This report documents the results of a hydrologic and geologic investigation of the HRE Pond/cryogenic barrier site. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the impoundment in order to meet the following objectives: (1) to provide a pre-barrier subsurface hydrologic baseline for post-barrier performance assessment; (2) to confirm that the impoundment is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments; and (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the impoundment. The methods of investigation included water level and temperature monitoring in a network of wells and standpipes in and surrounding the impoundment, a helium tracer test conducted under ambient flow conditions, and geologic logging during the drilling of boreholes for installation of cryogenic probes and temperature monitoring wells.

  19. Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond cryogenic barrier technology demonstration: Pre-barrier subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes that has since been drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by a tributary that empties into Melton Branch Creek and that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily 90Sr. Because of the proximity of the tributary to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the tributary, it is hypothesized that the HRE Pond is a source of contamination to he creek. As a means for temporary containment of contaminants within the impoundment, a cryogenic barrier technology demonstration was initiated in FY96 with a background hydrologic investigation that continued through FY97. Cryogenic equipment installation was completed in FY97, and freezing was initiated in September of 1997. This report documents the results of a hydrologic and geologic investigation of the HRE Pond/cryogenic barrier site. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the impoundment in order to meet the following objectives: (1) to provide a pre-barrier subsurface hydrologic baseline for post-barrier performance assessment; (2) to confirm that the impoundment is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments; and (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the impoundment. The methods of investigation included water level and temperature monitoring in a network of wells and standpipes in and surrounding the impoundment, a helium tracer test conducted under ambient flow conditions, and geologic logging during the drilling of boreholes for installation of cryogenic probes and temperature monitoring wells

  20. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-08-29

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented.

  1. Educational Experiences and Goals of Homeless Youth and Barriers to Reaching these Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Over one million youth (age 14-24) experience homelessness each year in the United States, about 5-8% of all youth. For homeless youth to become independent and avoid cycling through public services, consistent income is necessary. Barriers to gaining employment and subsequent income often stem from lack of education. Defining the educational goals of homeless youth and barriers in reaching them are crucial steps in the development of relevant and effective educational interventions. Using da...

  2. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented

  3. Experiments to determine the migration potential for water and contaminants in shallow land-burial facilities: design, emplacement, and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there have been many laboratory studies on water movement and contaminant transport, there is a need for more large scale field experiments. Large scale field experiments are necessary to (1) measure hydraulic conductivities on a scale typical of actual shallow land burial facilities and hazardous waste disposal facilities, (2) allow comparisons to be made between full scale and laboratory measurements, (3) verify the applicability of calculational methods for determining unsaturated hydraulic conductivities from water retention curves, and (4) for model validation. Experiments that will provide the information to do this are described in this paper. The results of these experiments will have applications for both the shallow land burial of low level radioactive wastes and the disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. These experiments will provide results that can be used in model verification for system performance. This type of data on experiments done at this scale has not been available, and are necessary for validating unsaturated transport models and other models used to predict long term system performance. Even though these experiments are done on crushed Bandelier Tuff, most models use physical properties of the backfill material such as density, porosity, and water retention curves. For this reason, once the models are validated in these experiments, they can be applied with confidence to other materials as long as the material properties are well characterized. In addition, from known water movement rates, calculable from the results of these experiments, requirements for other parts of the system such as liners, water diversion systems, and system cap requirements can be determined. Lastly, the results of these experiments and their use in model verification will provide a sound scientific basis on which to base decisions on system requirements and system design

  4. Electron thermal transport barriers in RTP: experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilham, A.M.R.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Cardozo, N. J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments in which very localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is scanned through the RTP plasma show sharp transitions, in which the electron temperature profile abruptly changes shape. The phenomenology-the profiles shapes, the sharp transitions-can be reproduced with a transport model which

  5. Elements of transport and emplacement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, undertaken to review proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high-level radioactive wastes in an underground repository, appropriate to the U.K. context, falls under the headings: basic design concepts; waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially shielded blocks; concept of emplacement in long boreholes; concept of emplacement in short boreholes; concept of emplacement in tunnels; methods of emplacement; stages of disposal; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; handling techniques within repository; conventional and radiological safety; costs; areas for further research and development. (U.K.)

  6. Barriers to Conducting Supervised Agricultural Experiences as Perceived by Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joey Blackburn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess preservice agriculture teachers’ perceptions of the importance of Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE and their views on barriers to conducting SAE. A census of the sophomore-level agricultural education course at Oklahoma State University was conducted to measure perceptions at the beginning and end of the course. This study was framed upon Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behavior. Results indicated that preservice teachers perceived SAE was an important component of agricultural education and important at the secondary school they attended. The greatest barrier to conducting SAE was their lack of familiarity with newer SAE categories. This was true at both the beginning and end of the course. It is recommended that preservice teachers receive instruction on and experiences in all types of SAE. This would increase the likelihood of preservice teachers perceiving they have control over this barrier regarding SAE implementation. This cohort of preservice teachers should be surveyed over time to determine change in their perceptions of barriers to SAE implementation as they progress in the agricultural education program and through their careers. Further, the views of in-service teachers should also be assessed to determine if perceived barriers differ with professional experience.

  7. Sensor emplacement testing at Poker Flat, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Anderson, K. E.; Azevedo, S.; Carothers, L.; Love, M.; Miller, P. E.; Parker, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Slad, G.; Thomas, D.; Aderhold, K.

    2013-12-01

    PASSCAL provides equipment and support for temporary seismic projects. Speed and efficiency of deployments are essential. A revised emplacement technique of putting broadband sensors directly into soil (aka direct burial) is being tested. The first phase (fall 2011 to spring 2013) comparing data quality and sensor stability between the direct burial and the traditional 1 m deep temporary PASSCAL-style vault in a wet and noisy site near San Antonio, NM is complete. Results suggest there is little or no difference in sensor performance in the relatively high-noise environment of this initial test. The second phase was started in November 2012 with the goal of making the same comparison, but at Poker Flat, Alaska, in a low-noise, high-signal, cold and wet environment, alongside a Transportable Array (TA) deployment to be used as a performance control. This location is in an accessible and secure area with very low site noise. In addition to benefiting future worldwide PASSCAL deployments, the Poker Flat experiment serves a secondary purpose of testing modifications necessary to successfully deploy and recover broadband stations in a cold environment with the limited logistics anticipated for remote Flexible Array (FA) and PASSCAL Program deployments in Alaska. Developing emplacement techniques that maintain high data quality and data return while minimizing logistics is critical to enable principle investigators to effectively and efficiently co-locate within the future TA Alaska footprint. Three Nanometrics sensors were installed in November 2012 in power-augered holes 76 cm in depth: a Trillium Compact Posthole (PH) and two Trillium 120PH units (one standard PH and one enhanced PHQ). The installations took less than 8 hours in -30°C conditions with 4 hours of usable daylight. The Compact PH and the 120PHQ are delivering data in realtime, while the 120PH is testing standalone power and data collection systems. Preliminary results compare favorably to each other as

  8. Modified Waste Emplacement Mode Design Alternative Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alternative emplacement modes presented in this report provide potential conceptual design options to the VA design that enhance human access to the emplacement drift area during abnormal events. The alternative conceptual designs emplace waste packages in configurations that reduce the level of radiation exposure utilizing shield doors, shield plugs, and concrete slabs to allow for human access during off-normal events. The alternative emplacements modes rank slightly lower than the VA design when evaluated against the eight criteria (i.e., postclosure performance; preclosure performance; assurance of safety; engineering acceptance, construction, operations and maintenance; schedule; cost and environmental considerations) presented in Section 5. However, the alternative emplacement modes allow the waste packages to be more accessible for human access to perform infrequent and unplanned events. The alternative emplacement modes were evaluated by a team of experts in assessing the confidence level that would be presented by each one of the design emplacement mode concepts (See Appendix A). The experts ranked the alternative emplacement mode concepts on a scale from A to E (i.e., A represents a high level of confidence and E represents the lowest level of confidence). The criteria in which the alternative modes were evaluated include the following: postclosure performance; preclosure performance; assurance of safety; engineering acceptance; construction, operations and maintenance; schedule; and cost. The results of the evaluation concluded that the alternative emplacement modes have a moderate level of confidence when evaluated against the selected criteria. Overall, the average rankings for the alternative emplacement modes presented in this report score below the VA reference design when analyzed against the evaluation criteria. Some limited calculations for the postclosure performance criteria were generated to determine the TSPA for each alternative

  9. Modified waste emplacement mode design alternative report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alternative emplacement modes presented in this report provide potential conceptual design options to the VA design that enhance human access to the emplacement drift area during abnormal events. The alternative conceptual designs emplace waste packages in configurations that reduce the level of radiation exposure utilizing shield doors, shield plugs, and concrete slabs to allow for human access during off-normal events. The alternative emplacements modes rank slightly lower than the VA design when evaluated against the eight criteria (i.e., postclosure performance; preclosure performance; assurance of safety; engineering acceptance, construction, operations and maintenance; schedule; cost and environmental considerations) presented in Section 5. However, the alternative emplacement modes allow the waste packages to be more accessible for human access to perform infrequent and unplanned events. The alternative emplacement modes were evaluated by a team of experts in assessing the confidence level that would be presented by each one of the design emplacement mode concepts (See Appendix A). The experts ranked the alternative emplacement mode concepts on a scale from A to E (i.e., A represents a high level of confidence and E represents the lowest level of confidence). The criteria in which the alternative modes were evaluated include the following: postclosure performance; preclosure performance; assurance of safety; engineering acceptance; construction, operations and maintenance; schedule; and cost. The results of the evaluation concluded that the alternative emplacement modes have a moderate level of confidence when evaluated against the selected criteria. Overall, the average rankings for the alternative emplacement modes presented in this report score below the VA reference design when analyzed against the evaluation criteria. Some limited calculations for the postclosure performance criteria were generated to determine the TSPA for each alternative

  10. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  11. Permeability of granular beds emplaced in vertical drill holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the permeabilities of granular materials emplaced in vertical drill holes used for underground nuclear tests, an experiment at the USDOE Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted. As the hole is being filled, falling material increases pressure above and within the granular beds beneath. When the filling operation starts or stops, a transient pressure response occurs within the beds; measurements of this response in beds of various compositions were made. The permeabilities after emplacement were found by matching analytical predictions of the response to these data. This information is useful in assuring the containment of nuclear tests conducted in such drill holes

  12. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report presents conceptual design information for a system to handle and emplace packages containing radioactive waste, in boreholes 16,400 ft deep or possibly deeper. Its intended use is for a design selection study that compares the costs and risks associated with two emplacement methods: drill-string and wireline emplacement. The deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept calls for siting a borehole (or array of boreholes) that penetrate crystalline basement rock to a depth below surface of about 16,400 ft (5 km). Waste packages would be emplaced in the lower 6,560 ft (2 km) of the borehole, with sealing of appropriate portions of the upper 9,840 ft (3 km). A deep borehole field test (DBFT) is planned to test and refine the DBD concept. The DBFT is a scientific and engineering experiment, conducted at full-scale, in-situ, without radioactive waste. Waste handling operations are conceptualized to begin with the onsite receipt of a purpose-built Type B shipping cask, that contains a waste package. Emplacement operations begin when the cask is upended over the borehole, locked to a receiving flange or collar. The scope of emplacement includes activities to lower waste packages to total depth, and to retrieve them back to the surface when necessary for any reason. This report describes three concepts for the handling and emplacement of the waste packages: 1) a concept proposed by Woodward-Clyde Consultants in 1983; 2) an updated version of the 1983 concept developed for the DBFT; and 3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. The systems described here could be adapted to different waste forms, but for design of waste packaging, handling, and emplacement systems the reference waste forms are DOE-owned high- level waste including Cs/Sr capsules and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design July 23, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report has

  13. Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System transports Waste Packages (WPs) from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) to the subsurface area of emplacement, and emplaces the WPs once there. The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System also, if necessary, removes some or all of the WPs from the underground and transports them to the surface. Lastly, the system is designed to remediate abnormal events involving the portions of the system supporting emplacement or retrieval. During emplacement operations, the system operates on the surface between the WHB and North Portal, and in the subsurface in the North Ramp, access mains, and emplacement drifts. During retrieval or abnormal conditions, the operations areas may also extend to a surface retrieval storage site and South Portal on the surface, and the South Ramp in the subsurface. A typical transport and emplacement operation involves the following sequence of events. A WP is loaded into a WP transporter at the WHB, and coupled to a pair of transport locomotives. The locomotives transport the WP from the WHB, down the North Ramp, and to the entrance of an emplacement drift. Once docked at the entrance of the emplacement drift, the WP is moved outside of the WP transporter, and engaged by a WP emplacement gantry. The WP emplacement gantry lifts the WP, and transports it to its emplacement location, where the WP is then lowered to its final resting position. The WP emplacement gantry remains in the drift while the WP transporter is returned to the WHB by the locomotives. When the transporter reaches the WHB, the sequence of operations is repeated. Retrieval of all the WPs, or a large group of WPs, under normal conditions is achieved by reversing the emplacement operations. Retrieval of a small set of WPs, under normal or abnormal conditions, is known as recovery. Recovery performed under abnormal conditions will involve a suite of specialized equipment designed to perform a variety of tasks to enable the recovery process. Recovery

  14. Drift emplaced waste package thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal calculations of the effects of radioactive waste decay heat on the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL) in conjunction with the B ampersand W Fuel Co. For a number of waste package spacings, these 3D transient calculations use the TOPAZ3D code to predict drift wall temperatures to 10,000 years following emplacement. Systematic temperature variation occurs as a function of fuel age at emplacement and Areal Mass Loading (AML) during the first few centuries after emplacement. After about 1000 years, emplacement age is not a strong driver on rock temperature; AML has a larger impact. High AMLs occur when large waste packages are emplaced end-to-end in drifts. Drift emplacement of equivalent packages results in lower rock temperatures than borehole emplacement. For an emplacement scheme with 50% of the drift length occupied by packages, an AML of 138 MTU/acre is about three times higher than the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design (SCP-CD) value. With this higher AML (requiring only 1/3 of the SCP-CD repository footprint), peak drift wall temperatures do not exceed 160 degrees C, but rock temperatures exceed the boiling point of water for about 3000 years. These TOPAZ3D results have been compared with reasonable agreement with two other computer codes

  15. Instrumentation and controls for waste emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine design concepts related to instrumentation, control, and remote handling systems presently under consideration for use in the waste package (WP) emplacement process at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The design concepts presented and evaluated within this analysis are based on the current system functions and criteria identified in the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M and O 2000e). This analysis focuses on the development of Instrumentation and Control (I and C) design concepts for the major elements of the waste emplacement process. It includes initial I and C designs for the Transport Locomotives, Waste Package Transporter, Emplacement Gantry, and Emplacement Gantry Carrier. Waste retrieval will be covered in a separate analysis. This document incorporates the latest repository design changes following the Project's evaluation of a series of Enhanced Design Alternatives (EDAs) (CRWMS M and O 1999f). Significant design changes include: thermal line loading of the emplacement drifts, closer spacing of the WPs, wider spacing and fewer emplacement drifts, continuous ventilation of all active emplacement drifts, thinner walled WP designs which will increase external radiation levels, a 50-year repository closure option, inclusion of a drip-shield, backfill as an option, and new conceptual designs for the waste emplacement vehicles and equipment (CRWMS M and O 2000b, section 6, Stroupe 2000). This analysis: Presents an overall I and C functional block diagram for the waste emplacement system (Section 6.4); Discusses and presents a general control system architecture for controlling mobile waste emplacement equipment (Section 6.5); Identifies specific I and C design concepts for the Transport Locomotives, Waste Package Transporter, Waste Emplacement Gantry, and Emplacement Gantry Carrier (Sections 6.6 to 6.8); Identifies and discusses data

  16. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  17. Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System transports Waste Packages (WPs) from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) to the subsurface area of emplacement, and emplaces the WPs once there. The system also, if necessary, removes some or all of the WPs from the underground and transports them to the surface. Lastly, the system is designed to remediate abnormal events involving the portions of the system supporting emplacement or retrieval. During emplacement operations, the system operates on the surface between the WHB and North Portal, and in the subsurface in the North Ramp, access mains, and emplacement drifts. During retrieval or abnormal conditions, the operations areas may also extend to a surface retrieval storage site and South Portal on the surface, and the South Ramp in the subsurface. A typical transport and emplacement operation involves the following sequence of events. A WP is loaded into a WP transporter at the WHB, and coupled to a pair of transport locomotives. The locomotives transport the WP from the WHB, down the North Ramp, and to the entrance of an emplacement drift. Once docked at the entrance of the emplacment drift, the WP is moved outside of the WP transporter, and engaged by a WP emplacement gantry. The gantry lifts the WP, and transports it to its emplacement location, where the WP is then lowered to its final resting position. The gantry remains in the drift while the WP transporter is returned to the WHB by the locomotives. When the transporter reaches the WHB, the sequence of operations is repeated. Retrieval of all the WPs, or a large group of WPs, under normal conditions is achieved by reversing the emplacement operations. Retrieval of a small set of WPs, under normal or abnormal conditions, is known as recovery. Recovery performed under abnormal conditions will involve a suite of specialized equipment designed to perform a variety of tasks to enable the recovery process. Recovery after abnormal events may require clearing of equipment

  18. Wire-rope emplacement of diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study reported here was initiated to determine if, with the Cable Downhole System (CDS) currently under development, there is an advantage to using continuous wire rope to lower the emplacement package to the bottom of the hole. A baseline design using two wire ropes as well as several alternatives are discussed in this report. It was concluded that the advantages of the wire-rope emplacement system do not justify the cost of converting to such a system, especially for LLNL's maximum emplacement package weights

  19. Violence Against Widows in Nepal: Experiences, Coping Behaviors, and Barriers in Seeking Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Bushra; Sabarwal, Shrutika; Decker, Michele R; Shrestha, Abina; Sharma, Kunda; Thapa, Lily; Surkan, Pamela J

    2016-05-01

    Widows are a vulnerable population in Nepal. This study examined Nepalese widows' experiences of violence, their coping strategies, and barriers faced in seeking help. Study participants were recruited from Women for Human Rights, an NGO in Nepal. A stratified purposive sampling approach was used to select 51 widows and 5 staff members for in-depth interviews. Twenty-seven women who experienced violence were included in this analysis. Data were analyzed and synthesized using a thematic analysis procedure. Widows reported a range of violent experiences perpetrated by family and community members that spanned psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. Women dealt with abusive experiences using both adaptive (e.g., attempting to move ahead, seeking social support, using verbal confrontation) and maladaptive coping strategies (e.g., suicidal thoughts or self-medication). However, they faced barriers to seeking help such as insensitivity of the police, perceived discrimination, and general lack of awareness of widows' problems and needs. Findings highlight the need for interventions across the individual, family, community, and policy levels. Avenues for intervention include creating awareness about widows' issues and addressing cultural beliefs affecting widows' lives. Furthermore, efforts should focus on empowering widows, promoting healthy coping, and addressing their individual needs. PMID:25657102

  20. Three integrated photovoltaic/sound barrier power plants. Construction and operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an international ideas competition by TNC Switzerland and Germany in 1996, six companies where given the opportunity to construct a prototype of their newly developed integrated PV-sound barrier concepts. The main goal was to develop highly integrated concepts, allowing the reduction of PV sound barrier systems costs, as well as the demonstration of specific concepts for different noise situations. This project is strongly correlated with a German project. Three of the concepts of the competition are demonstrated along a highway near Munich, constructed in 1997. The three Swiss installations had to be constructed at different locations, reflecting three typical situations for sound barriers. The first Swiss installation was the world first Bi-facial PV-sound barrier. It was built on a highway bridge at Wallisellen-Aubrugg in 1997. The operational experience of the installation is positive. But due to the different efficiencies of the two cell sides, its specific yield lies somewhat behind a conventional PV installation. The second Swiss plant was finished in autumn 1998. The 'zig-zag' construction is situated along the railway line at Wallisellen in a densely inhabited area with some local shadowing. Its performance and its specific yield is comparatively low due to a combination of several reasons (geometry of the concept, inverter, high module temperature, local shadows). The third installation was constructed along the motor way A1 at Bruettisellen in 1999. Its vertical panels are equipped with amorphous modules. The report show, that the performance of the system is reasonable, but the mechanical construction has to be improved. A small trial field with cells directly laminated onto the steel panel, also installed at Bruettisellen, could be the key development for this concept. This final report includes the evaluation and comparison of the monitored data in the past 24 months of operation. (author)

  1. Overcoming Barriers: Adolescents’ Experiences Using a Mobile Phone Dietary Assessment App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Åsa; Magnusson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of new technology has the potential to increase participation rates in dietary studies and improve the validity of collected dietary data. However, to evaluate the usability of developed dietary methods, qualitative studies of participants’ experiences and perceptions are needed. Objective To explore adolescents’ experiences using a newly developed mobile phone dietary assessment app, with a focus on factors that could affect their recording of dietary intake. Methods Focus group interviews were conducted with 75 participants who had used a newly developed mobile phone dietary assessment app in a quantitative evaluation study. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and the theoretical framework of Self Determination Theory was applied. Results The adolescents’ use of the mobile phone dietary assessment app was characterized by their struggle to overcome several perceived barriers. Facilitators that helped adolescents complete the method were also identified. Motivation was found to be an important facilitator, and intrinsically motivated participants completed the method because they found it fun to use. The autonomous extrinsically motivated participants completed the method for the greater good, in order to contribute to the study. The controlled extrinsically motivated participants completed the method to get a reward or avoid punishment. Amotivated participants did not complete the method. More motivated participants were assumed to be more able to overcome barriers and needed less facilitators. Conclusions Future studies that examine the recording of food intake should include systematic efforts that aim to minimize identified barriers and promote identified facilitators. Further research should specifically aim at studying methods for (and effects of) increasing intrinsic motivation by supporting autonomy, competence, and relatedness among adolescents asked to participate in dietary studies. PMID:27473462

  2. Physicians’ experience adopting the electronic transfer of care communication tool: barriers and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Grood C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloe de Grood, Katherine Eso, Maria Jose Santana Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess physicians' perceptions on a newly developed electronic transfer of care (e-TOC communication tool and identify barriers and opportunities toward its adoption. Participants and methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching center as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an e-TOC communication tool. The e-TOC technology was developed through iterative consultation with stakeholders. This e-TOC summary was populated by acute care physicians (AcPs and communicated electronically to community care physicians (CcPs. The AcPs consisted of attending physicians, resident trainees, and medical students rotating through the Medical Teaching Unit. The CcPs were health care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital to the community. AcPs and CcPs completed validated surveys assessing their experience with the newly developed e-TOC tool. Free text questions were added to gather general comments from both groups of physicians. Units of analysis were individual physicians. Data from the surveys were analyzed using mixed methods. Results: AcPs completed 138 linked pre- and post-rotation surveys. At post-rotation, each AcP completed an average of six e-TOC summaries, taking an average of 37 minutes per e-TOC summary. Over 100 CcPs assessed the quality of the TOC summaries, with an overall rating of 8.3 (standard deviation: 1.48; on a scale of 1–10. Thematic analyses revealed barriers and opportunities encountered by physicians toward the adoption of the e-TOC tool. While the AcPs highlighted issues with timeliness, usability, and presentation, the CcPs identified barriers accessing the web-based TOC summaries, emphasizing that the summaries were timely and the

  3. Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawson Anna P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking. Methods We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes. Results Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy

  4. Mechanisms Of Saucer-Shaped Sill Emplacement: Insight From Experimental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; Polteau, S.; Svensen, H.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2006-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that magma intrusions in sedimentary basins had a strong impact on petroleum systems. Most of these intrusions are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features can be observed in many sedimentary basins (i.e. the Karoo basin, South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; the Tunguska basin, Siberia; the Neuquén basin in Argentina). The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes. However, the mechanisms that govern their formation remain poorly constrained. Experiments were conducted to simulate the emplacement of saucer-shaped magma intrusions in sedimentary basins. The model rock and magma were fine-grained silica flour and molten vegetable oil, respectively. This modeling technique allows simultaneous simulation of magma emplacement and brittle deformation at a basin scale. For our purpose, we performed our experiments without external deformation. During the experiments, the oil was injected horizontally at constant flow rate within the silica flour. Then the oil initially emplaced in a sill, whereas the surface of the model inflated into a smooth dome. Subsequently, the oil propagated upwards along inclined sheets, finally reaching the surface at the edge of the dome. The resulting geometries of the intrusions were saucer-shaped sills. Then the oil solidified, and the model was cut in serial cross-sections through which the structures of the intrusive body and of the overburden can be observed. In order to constraint the processes governing the emplacement of such features, we performed a parametric study based on a set of experiments in which we systematically varied parameters such as the depth of emplacement and the injection flow rate of the oil. Our results showed that saucer diameters are larger at deeper level of emplacement. Opposite trend was obtained with varying injection flow rates. Based on our results, we conducted a detailed

  5. Barriers Experie nced by Middle School Students in the P rocess of Learning English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Çelik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available English has gained a significant role in technological, business, economic or political areas and has been a part of educational policies in different countries. However, many learners of English have difficulties in learning and using the language effectively due to a number of reasons. Accordingly, a descriptive study was conducted in order to investigate what kind of foreign language (English learning problems the middle school students experience in Turkey. A total of 164 (92 female and 72 male middle school students (5th, 6th, 7th, 8th grade in 4 public schools in Sakarya, Turkey participated in the study. The data were collected through an open-ended question and semi-structured interviews. The collected data were analyzed and coded thematically. The results have indicated that middle school students mostly face linguistic, instructional, affective barriers as well as lack of assistance and useful resource. Considering the findings, some possible reasons and suggestions were also provided to help teachers and learners overcome the relevant barriers in learning English as a foreign language (EFL in Turkey.

  6. The influence of negative ions in helium-oxygen barrier discharges: I. Laser photodetachment experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiersch, R.; Nemschokmichal, S.; Meichsner, J.

    2016-04-01

    This work is the experimental part of a comprehensive study that aims to understand the influence of negative ions on the development of atmospheric pressure barrier discharges in electronegative systems. The investigations will be complemented by a 1D numerical fluid simulation. Laser photodetachment experiments were performed in a glow-like barrier discharge operated in helium with admixtures of oxygen up to 1 vol.% at a gas pressure of 500 mbar. The discharge gap between the glass-coated electrodes was 3 mm. The discharge properties were characterized by electrical measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. Laser photodetachment of {{\\text{O}}-} , {\\text{O}}2- , and {\\text{O}}3- was studied using the fundamental and second harmonic wavelength of a Nd-YAG laser. The laser photodetachment of negative ions influences the breakdown characteristics when the laser is fired during the prephase of the discharge only. The breakdown voltage is reduced, which indicates an enhanced pre-ionization initiated by the detached electrons. Systematic variations in the laser pulse in time, the axial laser beam position, the laser pulse energy, and the laser wavelength provided detailed knowledge on this process. The investigation underlines the importance of the discharge prephase in general and aims to differentiate between the negative ion species {{\\text{O}}-} , {\\text{O}}2- , and {\\text{O}}3- .

  7. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification

  8. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Muller, S.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification.

  9. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  10. "It was an education in portion size". Experience of eating a healthy diet and barriers to long term dietary change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdiarmid, J I; Loe, J; Kyle, J; McNeill, G

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the expectations and experience of actually eating a healthy diet and using this experience to identify barriers to healthy eating and sustainable dietary change. Fifty participants (19-63 yrs) were provided with a healthy diet (i.e. complied with dietary recommendations) for three consecutive days. Afterwards a semi-structured interview was carried out to explore expectations, experience and barriers to healthy eating. Using a thematic analysis approach eight dominant themes emerged from the interviews. Four related to expectations and experience of healthy eating; realisation of what are appropriate portion sizes, an expectation to feel hungry, surprise that healthy diets comprised normal food, the desire for sweet snacks (e.g. chocolate). This demonstrated there are some misconception about healthy eating and distorted views of portion size. Four more themes emerged relating to barriers to healthy eating; competing priorities, social, peer and time pressure, importance of value for money, a lack of desire to cook. Poor knowledge of healthy eating or a lack of cooking skills were the least common barrier, suggesting that future interventions and policy to improve dietary intakes need to focus on social, cultural and economic issues rather than on lack of knowledge or skills. PMID:24076020

  11. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  12. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4

  13. Emplacement of small and large buffer blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes emplacement of a buffer structure encircling a spent fuel canister to be deposited in a vertical hole. The report deals with installability of various size blocks and with an emplacement gear, as well as evaluates the achieved quality of emplacement and the time needed for installing the buffer. Two block assembly of unequal size were chosen for examination. A first option involved small blocks, the use of which resulted in a buffer structure consisting of small sector blocks 200 mm in height. A second option involved large blocks, resulting in a buffer structure which consists of eight blocks. In these tests, the material chosen for both block options was concrete instead of bentonite. The emplacement test was a three-phase process. A first phase included stacking a two meter high buffer structure with small blocks for ensuring the operation of test equipment and blocks. A second phase included installing buffer structures with both block options to a height matching that of a canister-encircling cylindrical component. A third phase included testing also the installability of blocks to be placed above the canister by using small blocks. In emplacement tests, special attention was paid to the installability of blocks as well as to the time required for emplacement. Lifters for both blocks worked well. Due to the mass to be lifted, the lifter for large blocks had a more heavy-duty frame structure (and other lifting gear). The employed lifters were suspended in the tests on a single steel wire rope. Stacking was managed with both block sizes at adequate precision and stacked-up towers were steady. The stacking of large blocks was considerably faster. Therefore it is probably that the overall handling of the large blocks will be more convenient at a final disposal site. From the standpoint of reliability in lifting, the small blocks were safer to install above the canister. In large blocks, there are strict shape-related requirements which are

  14. Uniformity of a dielectric barrier glow discharge: experiments and two-dimensional modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and calculated results of uniformity in a glow dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) under sub-atmospheric pressures are reported. Driven by a square-wave power source, the discharge in a parallel-electrode DBD system shows uniform or various lateral structures under different conditions. There exists a critical frequency below which the DBD is uniform for almost all the applied voltages. Above the critical frequency, a non-uniform (patterned) discharge is observed and the patterned structures change with frequency and voltage. A two-dimensional fluid modeling is performed on this DBD system which shows similar results in agreement with the experiments. The simulations reveal that the distribution of the space electron density at the beginning of each voltage pulse plays an important role in achieving the uniformity. Uniform space charge results in a uniform DBD. The patterned DBD always evolves from the initial uniform state to the eventual non-uniform one. During this process, the space electrons form a patterned distribution ahead of the surface charges and lead to non-uniform discharge channels.

  15. Bentonite barriers. New experiments and state of the art. Bentonite as barrier material for the sealing of underground disposal sites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite is intensively investigated from many institutes for its properties and feasibility as engineering barrier material for many environmental facilities like landfill, underground landfill for chemotoxic waste and also HLW repositories. A summary of the current state of knowledge regarding the origin of bentonites and different processes through bentonite is provided together with the potential further research and development needs. Diffusion experiments with gas (CO2, H2, CH4 and SF6) and heavy metals Pb, Cd and Cs in highly saline solution (50 % and 90 % NaCl solutions, 90 % IP21 solution) at room temperature and atmosphere pressure conditions through compacted MX-80 bentonite with three different bulk dry densities (1,400 kg/m3,1,600 kg/m3 and/or 1,800 kg/m3) were performed. Numerical simulations of some experiments were undertaken.

  16. Comparative study of pulsed corona and dielectric barrier discharges using single-streamer modeling and NO decomposition experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-streamer modeling is carried out to compare the the characteristics of non-the pulsed equilibrium plasmas in the pulsed corona and dielectric barrier discharges. The numerical simulation predicts that the pulsed corona discharge is more efficient for generating N species whereas the dielectric barrier discharge is more effective for generating O species. NO decomposition experiments are then in order to verify such numerical predictions and find the influence of the steamer characteristics on the generation of chemically active species. (author)

  17. CO2 Dissociation using the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Experiment (VADER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindon, Michael Allen

    As of 2013, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) estimates that the world emits approximately 36 trillion metric tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere every year. These large emissions have been correlated to global warming trends that have many consequences across the globe, including glacial retraction, ocean acidification and increased severity of weather events. With green technologies still in the infancy stage, it can be expected that CO2 emissions will stay this way for along time to come. Approximately 41% of the emissions are due to electricity production, which pump out condensed forms of CO2. This danger to our world is why research towards new and innovative ways of controlling CO2 emissions from these large sources is necessary. As of now, research is focused on two primary methods of CO2 reduction from condensed CO2 emission sources (like fossil fuel power plants): Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and Carbon Capture and Utilization (CCU). CCS is the process of collecting CO2 using absorbers or chemicals, extracting the gas from those absorbers and finally pumping the gas into reservoirs. CCU on the other hand, is the process of reacting CO2 to form value added chemicals, which can then be recycled or stored chemically. A Dielectric Barrier discharge (DBD) is a pulsed, low temperature, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma which creates high energy electrons suitable for dissociating CO2 into its components (CO and O) as one step in the CCU process. Here I discuss the viability of using a DBD for CO2 dissociation on an industrial scale as well as the fundamental physics and chemistry of a DBD for CO2 dissociation. This work involved modeling the DBD discharge and chemistry, which showed that there are specific chemical pathways and plasma parameters that can be adjusted to improve the CO2 reaction efficiencies and rates. Experimental studies using the Versatile Atmospheric dielectric barrier Discharge ExpeRiment

  18. Emplacement-related layering in magma slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Textures and structures such as layering, grading and foliations preserved in igneous rocks offer a glimpse into the magma emplacement process. However, despite recent advances, a full and proper understanding of the fluid dynamics of congested fluid-particle mixtures during shear remains elusive. This is a shame as without recourse to such fundamental understanding, the interpretation of structural field data in the context of magma flow remains problematic. One way to gain insight into the process is to treat flowing magma as a dynamic material with a rheology similar to sheared, congested slurries. The idea that dense magma equates to a high temperature slurry is an attractive one, and opens up a way to examine the emplacement process that does not rely on equilibrium thermodynamics as a final explanation for commonly observed igneous structures. Using the Basement Sill, Antarctica, as a world class example of a magmatic slurry, shearing at high Peclet (Pe) number where particle diffusion is negligible has the potential to impart a rich diversity of structures including layering, grading and flow segregation. Work to model numerically the flow of the Basement Sill slurry using a range of theoretical and experimentally-derived non-Newtonian magma rheologies will be presented and assessed. A key impilcation is that in addition to more classical explanations such as compaction and gravitational settling, igneous layering can also arise spontaneously during shear associated with the ascent and emplacement of congested magma. A final aspect of the emplacement model considers the irregular geometry of the Basement Sill boundaries. Movement of magma along these boundaries results in the formation of local eddies and fluid swirl/back-flow that add additional complexity to macroscopic flow field.

  19. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  20. TBV 361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization

  1. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  2. HRE-Pond Cryogenic Barrier Technology Demonstration: Pre- and Post-Barrier Hydrologic Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moline, G.R.

    1999-06-01

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee. The pond received radioactive wastes from 1957 to 1962, and was subsequently drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by an unnamed stream that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily {sup 90}Sr. Because of the proximity of the stream to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the stream, it was hypothesized that the HRE Pond has been a source of contamination to the creek. The HRE-Pond was chosen as the site of a cryogenic barrier demonstration to evaluate this technology as a means for rapid, temporary isolation of contaminants in the type of subsurface environment that exists on the ORR. The cryogenic barrier is created by the circulation of liquid CO{sub 2} through a system of thermoprobes installed in boreholes which are backfilled with sand. The probes cool the subsurface, creating a vertical ice wall by freezing adjacent groundwater, effectively surrounding the pond on four sides. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the pond prior to, during, and after the cryogenic barrier emplacement. The objectives were (1) to provide a hydrologic baseline for post-banner performance assessment, (2) to confirm that the pond is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments, (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the pond, and (4) to measure changes in hydrologic conditions after barrier emplacement in order to assess the barrier performance. Because relatively little information about the subsurface hydrology and the actual configuration of the pond existed, data from multiple sources was required to reconstruct this complex system.

  3. HRE-Pond Cryogenic Barrier Technology Demonstration: Pre- and Post-Barrier Hydrologic Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee. The pond received radioactive wastes from 1957 to 1962, and was subsequently drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by an unnamed stream that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily 90Sr. Because of the proximity of the stream to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the stream, it was hypothesized that the HRE Pond has been a source of contamination to the creek. The HRE-Pond was chosen as the site of a cryogenic barrier demonstration to evaluate this technology as a means for rapid, temporary isolation of contaminants in the type of subsurface environment that exists on the ORR. The cryogenic barrier is created by the circulation of liquid CO2 through a system of thermoprobes installed in boreholes which are backfilled with sand. The probes cool the subsurface, creating a vertical ice wall by freezing adjacent groundwater, effectively surrounding the pond on four sides. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the pond prior to, during, and after the cryogenic barrier emplacement. The objectives were (1) to provide a hydrologic baseline for post-banner performance assessment, (2) to confirm that the pond is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments, (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the pond, and (4) to measure changes in hydrologic conditions after barrier emplacement in order to assess the barrier performance. Because relatively little information about the subsurface hydrology and the actual configuration of the pond existed, data from multiple sources was required to reconstruct this complex system

  4. Barriers to Social Integration for People with Disabilities. The Polish Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Twardowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of social integration consists in creating opportunities for the disabled to participate in normal life, providing access to all public institutions and social situations in which fully able people participate. Social integration in this meaning is a long way and numerous barriers are likely to appear. Barriers are all obstacles which make it difficult or impossible for the disabled to participate in the mainstream of social life and to perform socially apprecia...

  5. Role of Inelastic Tunneling through the Barrier in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Experiments on Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Pilgram, S.; T. M. Rice; Sigrist, M.

    2006-01-01

    The tunneling path between the CuO2-layers in cuprate superconductors and a scanning tunneling microscope tip passes through a barrier made from other oxide layers. This opens up the possibility that inelastic processes in the barrier contribute to the tunneling spectra. Such processes cause one or possibly more peaks in the second derivative current-voltage spectra displaced by phonon energies from the density of states singularity associated with superconductivity. Calculations of inelastic...

  6. Design options for HLW repository operation technology. (3) Transportation and horizontal emplacement of pre-fabricated EBS module (PEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the repository operation technologies for high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the pre-fabricated engineered barrier system module (PEM) was carried out the examination of handling and emplacement technique for engineered barrier system (EBS). The PEM technology was examined to confirm technological applicability. The PEM is concept of the integration of EBS as the module in the surface facilities, and transporting the module underground facilities. This concept is the one of the candidate concepts of horizontal emplacement techniques for EBS in Japan. Therefore, PEM is the same level large size and heavy weight as EBS, and it is necessary to examine the applicability of handling and emplacement techniques. Full-scale level tests were performed to confirm the applicability of these techniques with the air bearing/air jack devices. In the tests, we prepared the testing devices of full-scale level size/weight and confirmed the applicability of these technologies as an elemental technology on the condition of considering the environment of an underground tunnel. The air bearing test that produced the surface-roughness of the tunnel environment was carried out the evaluation concerning the transportation performance of the air bearing. And, the air jack test was carried out the holding and emplacement of PEM. The repository operation technology with the air bearing/jack device was confirmed to execute the examination, and to apply to handling and emplacement technique for PEM. (author)

  7. Study on knowledge, experiences and barriers to mammography among working women from Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Khokhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mammography is not a popular screening tool for deducting breast cancer in India although regular screening is associated with reduced mortality from breast cancer. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to find out knowledge, experiences and barriers to mammography among working women of Delhi. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2013 among working women from Delhi, India. The study was conducted as a part of ongoing training workshops organized for women on early detection of breast cancer. Total of eight such programs were organized and were attended by a total of 439 women. Each participant got a self-administered questionnaire to fill. Data was entered in Microsoft Excel and analysis was done using Statistical product and service solutions (SPSS version 21 (IBM. RESULTS: A total of 439 participants were included in the study. 230 (52.4% of the women were more than 40 years of age. Only four participants (1% had not heard about the term mammography before. Less than half (45.1% of the participants knew correctly the purpose of a mammogram. Only 11.8% of the women knew correctly about the age of getting the first baseline mammogram. Knowledge of frequency of getting the mammogram was also low only 95 (21.6% correctly knew about it. Only 59 (11.9% correctly responded that one needs to go to an imaging facility located either in a hospital or elsewhere to get mammogram done. Main experience shared by the women regarding mammography was that 42 (95.45% did not know anything about the procedure when they went for this investigation. Out of a total of 230 women over 40 years of age only 38 (16.5% had ever got a mammogram carried out. There is a statistically significant association between education status and practice of mammography (P < 0.05. There were 18 women with family history of breast cancer out, of which 10 (55.5% had got mammography carried out. 192 out of

  8. The Study of Barrier Function of Collagen Membrane “Osteoplast” in Healing Bone Defects in an Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov S.Y.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to study barrier properties of collagen membrane “Osteoplast” (“Vitaform”, Russia in closing critical bone defect in an experiment. Materials and Methods. The experiments have been carried out on 20 rabbits of “chinchilla” breed. Results. “Osteoplast”, a membrane made on the basis of bone collagen, is reabsorbed and serves as a safe barrier for fibroblasts migration into bone defect area. Its application enables to protect the defect area from fibrous tissue penetrating and initiate bone regeneration. Osseous tissue beneath a membrane goes few differentiation stages, has classical structure including all structural elements (osteons, lacunes, blood vessels that provides its perfect strength characteristics.

  9. Migrant Sexual Health Help-Seeking and Experiences of Stigmatization and Discrimination in Perth, Western Australia: Exploring Barriers and Enablers

    OpenAIRE

    Josephine Agu; Roanna Lobo; Gemma Crawford; Bethwyn Chigwada

    2016-01-01

    Increasing HIV notifications amongst migrant and mobile populations to Australia is a significant public health issue. Generalizations about migrant health needs and delayed or deterred help-seeking behaviors can result from disregarding the variation between and within cultures including factors, such as drivers for migration and country of birth. This study explored barriers and enablers to accessing sexual health services, including experiences of stigma and discrimination, within a purpos...

  10. Boring and lining horizontal emplacement holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systems for and techniques for constructing suitable emplacement holes are being considered for an underground nuclear waste repository. This study is an investigation of methods to bore and line horizontal boreholes of varying lengths. The development prototype boring machine already designed has been selected to bore the long holes (350 ft.), while the method selected to bore short holes, 42, 58, and 75 ft. involves two separate systems: one to bore the hole, the other to line the hole. The systems described in this report are not off-the-shelf, but represent a reasonable extension of current technology. 2 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs

  11. Emplacement Scenarios for Volcanic Domes on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Steve M.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2012-01-01

    One key to understanding the history of resurfacing on Venus is better constraints on the emplacement timescales for the range of volcanic features visible on the surface. A figure shows a Magellan radar image and topography for a putative lava dome on Venus. 175 such domes have been identified with diameters ranging from 19 - 94 km, and estimated thicknesses as great as 4 km. These domes are thought to be volcanic in origin and to have formed by the flow of viscous fluid (i.e., lava) on the surface.

  12. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  13. What are the main barriers to healthy eating among families? A qualitative exploration of perceptions and experiences of Tehranian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Maryam; Amiri, Parisa; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Momenan, Amir Abbas; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-06-01

    Despite women playing a pivotal role in shaping nutritional patterns in their families, it is the men whose ideas and preferences, after children, influence the selection and consumption of daily foods among Iranian families. This study focused on exploring the main barriers to healthy eating as experienced by male participants of the Tehran Lipid Glucose Study (TLGS). A grounded theory approach was used for analyzing participants' experiences and their perceptions regarding these barriers. Participants were 98 men, aged 25-65 years, selected and recruited from the TGLS cohort. Data collection was conducted through fourteen semi-structured focus group discussions, between 2008 and 2009. All interviews and focus group discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Constant comparative analysis of the data was conducted manually according to the Strauss and Corbin analysis method. The most important barriers to healthy eating were: (i) Personal factors, which included two subthemes--lack of knowledge and personal taste, (ii) Communication and modeling included two subthemes--other individuals and media/advertisements; (iii) Modernization included two subthemes--nutrition transition and women's role; and (iv) Lack of access to healthy foods, which included four subthemes--Inadequate confidence, perceived risk, high cost and time limitations. Appropriate attention and prioritized policy-making to modify the socio-environmental barriers to healthy eating were explored in the current study, along with effective educational programs that could help to promote healthy eating among Iranian families. PMID:25725485

  14. Barriers and solutions for expansion of electricity grids—the German experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a lack of synchronization in the expansion of renewable energies and the modernization of the electricity grid infrastructure. Main barriers to grid development are the insufficient regulatory framework, an inefficient allocation of planning and authorization competences and a lack of public acceptance of new grids. As response to these barriers, Germany has implemented a fundamental reform of the planning and authorization of high voltage power lines. We analyze the new regime as to what extent it is able to eliminate existing barriers to grid expansion and thus can serve as model for other countries. We find that the establishment of a single authority competent for planning, authorization and regulation may abolish existing lack of coordination. Also, the implementation of early participation on basis of various consultations phases has been proved to be very successful in the establishment of the first grid development plan. Stricter administrative time-limits and sanctions are likely to have an accelerating effect. And an increased openness to new technologies on basis of pilot project gives grid operators more flexibility in grid development. Recently, the European Commission adopted the German approach in its policy guidelines for other EU members. - Highlights: • Assessment of barriers to electricity grid infrastructure. • Needs for better, simplified and uniform regulatory framework. • German reform of planning and authorization procedure

  15. Possibilities and Barriers for Energy Conservation in a Liberalised Electricity Market: Danish Utility Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    1999-01-01

    development.Commercial competition has a short time horizon and a goal function of profit maximizing. In contrast to this, creation of a sustainable development requires long time horizons and comprehensive societal planning and regulation.This paper analyses the possibilities and barriers for promoting a...

  16. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ISOLATION DOOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine key design concepts related to the control system presently under consideration for remotely operating the emplacement drift isolation doors at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will discuss the key design concepts of the control system that may be utilized for remotely monitoring, opening, and closing the emplacement drift isolation doors. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Discuss the purpose and function of the isolation doors (Presented in Section 7.1). (2) Review the construction of the isolation door and other physical characteristics of the doors that the control system will interface with (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Discuss monitoring and controlling the operation of the isolation doors with a digital control system (either a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system or a Distributed Control System (DCS)) (Presented in Section 7.3). (4) Discuss how all isolation doors can be monitored and controlled from a subsurface central control center (Presented in Section 7.4). This analysis will focus on the development of input/output (I/O) counts including the types of I/O, redundancy and fault tolerance considerations, and processor requirements for the isolation door control system. Attention will be placed on operability, maintainability, and reliability issues for the system operating in the subsurface environment with exposure to high temperatures and radiation

  17. Magma deformation and emplacement in rhyolitic dykes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Ellen; Tuffen, Hugh; James, Mike; Wynn, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Silicic eruption mechanisms are determined by the rheological and degassing behaviour of highly-viscous magma ascending within shallow dykes and conduits. However, we have little knowledge of how magmatic behaviour shifts during eruptions as dykes and conduits evolve. To address this we have analysed the micro- to macro-scale textures in shallow, dissected rhyolitic dykes at the Tertiary Húsafell central volcano in west Iceland. Dyke intrusion at ~3 Ma was associated with the emplacement of subaerial rhyolitic pyroclastic deposits following caldera formation[1]. The dykes are dissected to ~500 m depth, 2-3 m wide, and crop out in two stream valleys with 5-30 m-long exposures. Dykes intrude diverse country rock types, including a welded ignimbrite, basaltic lavas, and glacial conglomerate. Each of the six studied dykes is broadly similar, exhibiting obsidian margins and microcrystalline cores. Dykes within pre-fractured lava are surrounded by external tuffisite vein networks, which are absent from dykes within conglomerate, whereas dykes failed to penetrate the ignimbrite. Obsidian at dyke margins comprises layers of discrete colour. These display dramatic thickness variations and collapsed bubble structures, and are locally separated by zones of welded, brecciated and flow-banded obsidian. We use textural associations to present a detailed model of dyke emplacement and evolution. Dykes initially propagated with the passage of fragmented, gas-charged magma and generation of external tuffisite veins, whose distribution was strongly influenced by pre-existing fractures in the country rock. External tuffisites retained permeability throughout dyke emplacement due to their high lithic content. The geochemically homogenous dykes then evolved via incremental magma emplacement, with shear deformation localised along emplacement boundary layers. Shear zones migrated between different boundary layers, and bubble deformation promoted magma mobility. Brittle

  18. Migrant Sexual Health Help-Seeking and Experiences of Stigmatization and Discrimination in Perth, Western Australia: Exploring Barriers and Enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Josephine; Lobo, Roanna; Crawford, Gemma; Chigwada, Bethwyn

    2016-01-01

    Increasing HIV notifications amongst migrant and mobile populations to Australia is a significant public health issue. Generalizations about migrant health needs and delayed or deterred help-seeking behaviors can result from disregarding the variation between and within cultures including factors, such as drivers for migration and country of birth. This study explored barriers and enablers to accessing sexual health services, including experiences of stigma and discrimination, within a purposive sample of sub-Saharan African, Southeast Asian, and East Asian migrants. A qualitative design was employed using key informant interviews and focus group discussions. A total of 45 people with ages ranging from 18 to 50 years, participated in focus group discussions. Common barriers and enablers to help seeking behaviors were sociocultural and religious influence, financial constraints, and knowledge dissemination to reduce stigma. Additionally, common experiences of stigma and discrimination were related to employment and the social and self-isolation of people living with HIV. Overcoming barriers to accessing sexual health services, imparting sexual health knowledge, recognizing variations within cultures, and a reduction in stigma and discrimination will simultaneously accelerate help-seeking and result in better sexual health outcomes in migrant populations. PMID:27187423

  19. Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This letter report outlines a methodology and provides resource information for the Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis (DBEMHA). The main purpose is identify the accident hazards and accident event sequences associated with the two emplacement mode options (wireline or drillstring), to outline a methodology for computing accident probabilities and frequencies, and to point to available databases on the nature and frequency of accidents typically associated with standard borehole drilling and nuclear handling operations. Risk mitigation and prevention measures, which have been incorporated into the two emplacement designs (see Cochran and Hardin 2015), are also discussed. A key intent of this report is to provide background information to brief subject matter experts involved in the Emplacement Mode Design Study. [Note: Revision 0 of this report is concentrated more on the wireline emplacement mode. It is expected that Revision 1 will contain further development of the preliminary fault and event trees for the drill string emplacement mode.

  20. Study on a transportation and emplacement system of pre-assembled EBS module for HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HLW disposal is one of the largest issue to utilize Nuclear power safely. In the past study, the concept, which buffer materials and Overpacked waste were transported into underground respectively, have shown. The concept of pre-assembled engineered barrier has advantage to simplify the logistics and emplacement procedure, however there are difficulties to support heavy weight of pre-assembled package by equipment under the condition of little clearance between tunnel and package. In this study, Combination of air bearing and two degree-of-freedom wheels were suggested for transportation, and air jack was suggested for unloading and emplacement system. Also, whole system for transportation and emplacement procedure was designed, and Scale model test was examined to evaluate the feasibility of these concept and functions. (author)

  1. Construction and operational experiences of engineered barrier test facility for near surface disposal of LILW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Beak; Park, Se Moon; Kim, Chang Lak [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Engineered barrier test facility is specially designed to demonstrate the performance of engineered barrier system for the near-surface disposal facility under the domestic environmental conditions. Comprehensive measurement systems are installed within each test cell. Long-and short-term monitoring of the multi-layered cover system can be implemented according to different rainfall scenarios with artificial rainfall system. Monitoring data on the water content, temperature, matric potential, lateral drainage and percolation of cover-layer system can be systematically managed by automatic data acquisition system. The periodic measurement data are collected and will be analyzed by a dedicated database management system, and provide a basis for performance verification of the disposal cover design.

  2. Culture as a barrier to rural women's entrepreneurship: experience from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsike, C

    2000-03-01

    This article identifies the important issues addressed by programs and projects that are aimed at promoting women's equality through entrepreneurship and suggests several actions for future focus of gender programs and training. Culture was seen as a barrier to the self-confident and autonomous economic activities of women in Zimbabwe. Likewise, structural barriers such as lack of marketable skills, time and ability to travel, land and assets, education, and position as primary family providers all compounded to the problem of entrepreneurship among women. Establishment of policy approaches for women like vocational skills training augmented by training in business skills and marketing, however, are insufficient since it failed to discuss and transfer behavioral skills necessary to make one an entrepreneur. To conclude, programs must be designed to empower personal skills and self-awareness, as well as address the constraints to entrepreneurship, and macroeconomic policy change. PMID:12349641

  3. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  4. Concept of Operation for Waste Transport, Emplacement, and Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman T. Raczka

    2001-07-02

    The preparation of this technical report has two objectives. The first objective is to discuss the base case concepts of waste transport, emplacement, and retrieval operations and evaluate these operations relative to a lower-temperature repository design. Aspects of the operations involved in waste transport, emplacement and retrieval may be affected by the lower-temperature operating schemes. This report evaluates the effects the lower-temperature alternatives may have on the operational concepts involved in emplacing and retrieving waste. The second objective is to provide backup material for the design description, in a traceable and defensible format, for Section 2 of the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document.

  5. Iranian Women’s Experiences of Health Information Seeking Barriers: A Qualitative Study in Kerman

    OpenAIRE

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Sabzevari, Sakineh; Negahban Bonabi, Tayebeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women as active health information seekers play a key role in determining lifestyle and possible implementation of preventive measures, thereby improving the health of individuals, families and society. Although studies indicate that equipping people with adequate health information leads to optimal health outcomes, sometimes the complexity of human behavior and presence of barriers and limitations expose them to challenges. Objectives: This study was designed to explore women's e...

  6. WP EMPLACEMENT CONTROL AND COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective and scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major control and communication equipment necessary for waste package emplacement at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the required equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. This task was evaluated in accordance with QAP-2-0 and found not to be quality affecting. Therefore, this document was prepared in accordance with NAP-MG-012. The following control and communication equipment are addressed in this document: (1) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's); (2) Leaky Feeder Radio Frequency Communication Equipment; (3) Slotted Microwave guide Communication Equipment; (4) Vision Systems; (5) Radio Control Equipment; and (6) Enclosure Cooling Systems

  7. WP EMPLACEMENT CONTROL AND COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.T. Raczka

    1997-10-02

    The objective and scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major control and communication equipment necessary for waste package emplacement at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the required equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. This task was evaluated in accordance with QAP-2-0 and found not to be quality affecting. Therefore, this document was prepared in accordance with NAP-MG-012. The following control and communication equipment are addressed in this document: (1) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's); (2) Leaky Feeder Radio Frequency Communication Equipment; (3) Slotted Microwave guide Communication Equipment; (4) Vision Systems; (5) Radio Control Equipment; and (6) Enclosure Cooling Systems.

  8. Emplacement of sandstone intrusions during contractional tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Giuseppe; Grippa, Antonio; Bureau, Denis; Alsop, G. Ian; Hurst, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Sandstone injections are created by the forceful emplacement of remobilized sand in response to increases in overpressure. However, the contribution provided by horizontal compressive stress to the build-up in overpressure, and the resulting emplacement of sand injection complexes, is still to be substantiated by robust field observations. An opportunity to address this issue occurs in Central California where a large volume of sandstone intrusions record regionally-persistent supra-lithostatic pore-pressure. Detailed fieldwork allows sandstone-filled thrusts to be recognized and, for the first time, permits us to demonstrate that some sandstone intrusions are linked to contractional deformation affecting the western border of the Great Valley Basin. Fluidized sand was extensively injected along thrust surfaces, and also fills local dilatant cavities linked to thrusting. The main aims of this paper are to provide detailed descriptions of the newly recognized syn-tectonic injections, and describe detailed cross-cutting relationships with earlier sandstone injection complexes in the study area. Finally, an evolutionary model consisting of three phases of sand injection is provided. In this model, sand injection is linked to contractional tectonic episodes affecting the western side of the Great Valley Basin during the Early-Middle Cenozoic. This study demonstrates that sand injections, driven by fluid overpressure, may inject along thrusts and folds and thereby overcome stresses associated with regional contractional deformation. It is shown that different generations of sand injection can develop in the same area under the control of different stress regimes, linked to the evolving mountain chain.

  9. Experiences of Barriers and Facilitators for Physical Activity from People with Mental Disorders who Participated in a Physical Activity Project : - An Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Katarina; Loelv, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Experiences of Barriers and Facilitators for Physical Activity from People with Mental Disorders who Participated in a Physical Activity Project - An Interview Study   Purpose: To explore the experiences regarding perceived barriers and facilitators for physical activity of three participants with mental disorders who took part in the Norwegian Physical Activity Mentor project. Design and methods: Descriptive qualitative design. Individual semi-structured interviews were used for data collec...

  10. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care: experiences from the English Integrated Care Pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2008, the English Department of Health appointed 16 'Integrated Care Pilots' which used a range of approaches to provide better integrated care. We report qualitative analyses from a three year multi-method evaluation to identify barriers and facilitators to successful integration of care.  Theory and methods. Data were analysed from transcripts of 213 in-depth staff interviews, and from semi-structured questionnaires (the 'Living Document' completed by staff in pilot sites at six points over a two-year period. Emerging findings were therefore built from 'bottom up' and grounded in the data. However, we were then interested in how these findings compared and contrasted with more generic analyses. Therefore after our analyses were complete we then systematically compared and contrasted the findings with the analysis of barriers and facilitators to quality improvement identified in a systematic review by Kaplan et al (2010 and the analysis of more micro-level shapers of behaviour found in Normalisation Process Theory (May et al 2007. Neither of these approaches claims to be full blown theories but both claim to provide mid-range theoretical arguments which may be used to structure existing data and which can be undercut or reinforced by new data. Results and discussion. Many barriers and facilitators to integrating care are those of any large scale organisational change. These include issues relating to leadership, organisational culture, information technology, physician involvement, and availability of resources. However, activities which appear particularly important for delivering integrated care include personal relationships between leaders in different organisations, the scale of planned activities, governance and finance arrangements, support for staff in new roles, and organisational and staff stability. We illustrate our analyses with a 'routemap' which identifies questions that providers may wish to consider when

  11. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care: experiences from the English Integrated Care Pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2008, the English Department of Health appointed 16 'Integrated Care Pilots' which used a range of approaches to provide better integrated care. We report qualitative analyses from a three year multi-method evaluation to identify barriers and facilitators to successful integration of care. Theory and methods. Data were analysed from transcripts of 213 in-depth staff interviews, and from semi-structured questionnaires (the 'Living Document' completed by staff in pilot sites at six points over a two-year period. Emerging findings were therefore built from 'bottom up' and grounded in the data. However, we were then interested in how these findings compared and contrasted with more generic analyses. Therefore after our analyses were complete we then systematically compared and contrasted the findings with the analysis of barriers and facilitators to quality improvement identified in a systematic review by Kaplan et al (2010 and the analysis of more micro-level shapers of behaviour found in Normalisation Process Theory (May et al 2007. Neither of these approaches claims to be full blown theories but both claim to provide mid-range theoretical arguments which may be used to structure existing data and which can be undercut or reinforced by new data.Results and discussion. Many barriers and facilitators to integrating care are those of any large scale organisational change. These include issues relating to leadership, organisational culture, information technology, physician involvement, and availability of resources. However, activities which appear particularly important for delivering integrated care include personal relationships between leaders in different organisations, the scale of planned activities, governance and finance arrangements, support for staff in new roles, and organisational and staff stability. We illustrate our analyses with a 'routemap' which identifies questions that providers may wish to consider when planning

  12. Direct burial and vault emplacement data quality comparison at Dotson Ranch, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, B. C.; Aderhold, K.; Anderson, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Parker, T.; Miller, P. E.; Slad, G. W.; Reusch, A.

    2013-12-01

    noise levels are similar at all sensors and are likely due to cultural activity and temperature fluctuations. The conclusion from this study is that the shallow vault emplacement method does not provide significant improvement in data quality compared to direct burial emplacement method. Further experiments are underway in a less noisy environment at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska.

  13. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  14. Relating rock avalanche morphology to emplacement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Prager, Christoph; Bösmeier, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The morphology, structure and sedimentological characteristics of rock avalanche deposits reflect both internal emplacement processes and external influences, such as runout path characteristics. The latter is mainly predisposed by topography, substrate types, and hydrogeological conditions. Additionally, the geological setting at the source slope controls, e.g. the spatial distribution of accumulated lithologies and hence material property-related changes in morphology, or the maximum clast size and amount of fines of different lithological units. The Holocene Tschirgant rock avalanche (Tyrol, Austria) resulted from failure of an intensely deformed carbonate rock mass on the southeast face of a 2,370-m-high mountain ridge. The initially sliding rock mass rapidly fragmented as it moved towards the floor of the Inn River valley. Part of the 200-250 x 106 m3 (Patzelt 2012) rock avalanche debris collided with and moved around an opposing bedrock ridge and flowed into the Ötz valley, reaching up to 6.3 km from source. Where the Tschirgant rock avalanche spread freely it formed longitudinal ridges aligned along motion direction as well as smaller hummocks. Encountering high topography, it left runup ridges, fallback patterns (i.e. secondary collapse), and compressional morphology (successively elevated, transverse ridges). Further evidence for the mechanical landslide behaviour is given by large volumes of mobilized valley-fill sediments (polymict gravels and sands). These sediments indicate both shearing and compressional faulting within the rock avalanche mass (forming their own morphological units through, e.g. in situ bulldozing or as distinctly different hummocky terrain), but also indicate extension of the spreading landslide mass (i.e. intercalated/injected gravels encountered mainly in morphological depressions between hummocks). Further influences on its morphology are given by the different lithological units. E.g. the transition from massive dolomite

  15. Neutron emission spectroscopy results for internal transport barrier and mode conversion ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on (3He)D plasmas at JET was studied with the time of flight optimized rate (TOFOR) spectrometer dedicated to 2.5 MeV dd neutron measurements. In internal transport barrier (ITB) plasma experiments with large 3He concentrations (X(3He)>15%) an increase in neutron yield was observed after the ITB disappeared but with the auxiliary neutral beam injection and ICRH power still applied. The analysis of the TOFOR data revealed the formation of a high energy (fast) D population in this regime. The results were compared to other mode conversion experiments with similar X(3He) but slightly different heating conditions. In this study we report on the high energy neutron tails originating from the fast D ions and their correlation with X(3He) and discuss the light it can shed on ICRH-plasma power coupling mechanisms.

  16. Opportunities for and Barriers to Powerful and Transformative Learning Experiences in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Benjamin B.; Rowland, Gordon; Reuning-Hummel, Carrie; Codner, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Powerful and transformative learning experiences display characteristics in common with each other. Emerging communication technologies may increase opportunities for powerful and transformative learning experiences. To explore this question, there are four sections to this article. First, it is observed that there are many interesting synergies…

  17. Teleoperation of the Small Emplacement Excavator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project is under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to convert a military tractor called the Small Emplacement Excavator (SEE) from conventional, manual control to teleoperated control. The SEE is equipped with a backhoe on the back end and multiple blade attachments for the front The SEE is typically used by the US Army for excavation of unexploded ordinance and for battlefield excavation tasks such as entrenchments and foxholes. Because of the risk of personnel injury from explosions during bomb excavation, the US Army is interested in remotely operating the SEE. Excavation of unexploded bombs requires backhoe operations that are very similar to some of the operations envisioned for retrieval of buried radioactive waste at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Therefore, teleoperation of the SEE is being sponsored jointly by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development, Robotics Technology Development Program, and the Department of Defense (DOD), US Army Program Manager-Ammunition Logistics. After initial development activities at ORNL in 1992, teleoperation of the SEE will be demonstrated at other DOE and DOD sites during FY 1993. The performance of the system will be enhanced through planned follow-on development. The objective of this project is to merge recently developed DOE remote operations technology with proven military heavy equipment in a cost-effective manner. The result will be a remotely operated excavating device that both DOE and DOD can replicate inexpensively and apply widely to hazardous field operations

  18. Dike emplacement on Venus and on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Dan; Mckenzie, James M.; Saunders, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to long linear features visible in SAR images of the surface of Venus. They are shallow graben a few kilometers across. Calculations show that dike emplacement can account for such features if the top of the dikes is a few kilometers below the surface of the planet. The dikes are often curved near their probable sources, and the magnitude of the regional stress field estimated from this curvature is about 3 MPa, or similar to that of earth. On both Venus and earth, dikes often form intersecting patterns. Two-dimensional calculations show that this behavior can occur only if the stress field changes with time. Transport of melt over distances as large as 2000 km in dikes whose width is 30 m or more occurs in some continental shields on earth and can also account for linear features on Venus that extend for comparable distances. Such transport is possible because the viscosity and thermal conductivity of both the melt and the wall rock are small.

  19. Pre-college experiences in and out of the classroom lead to first-year barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. E.; Kaplita, E.; McKenzie, D. A.; Jones, R.; May, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Students often enter college with preconceived notions about science. These misconceptions, coupled with a potential for a limited number of science classes during college for non-science majors, can make correcting misconceptions a very daunting challenge. In order to efficiently commutate climate science in a limited number of science classes, instructors need to understand the student experiences that have created their preconceived notions. In many cases, a lack of data about student's experiences leads to instructors simply guessing at how students are thinking about and interacting with science. Student surveys were used in our work to quantify pre-college experiences, both in and out of the classroom, in order to examine the connection to both academic major and choice of college or university students attended. Surveys were given to nearly 400 students across 4 different schools in the Oklahoma City Metro area. The location of students (rural or urban) affected science experiences as well as what types of actives (local libraries, museums, or parks) were available to the students. Connections between the timing of experience (elementary through high school) and the type of experience (in the classroom, with family/friends, or on their own) may influence choice of college or university as well as academic major. A better understating of positive student science experiences will allow instructors to better tailor their pedagogy and facilitate better connections between climate science and students.

  20. Social Barriers to Cooperation: Experiments on the Extent and Nature of Discrimination in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Castillo; Ragan Petrie; Maximo Torero

    2006-01-01

    We present a series of experiments to understand the nature and extent of discrimination in urban Lima, Peru. The experiments exploit varying degrees of information on performance and personal characteristics as people sort into groups to test for statistical versus taste-based discrimination. This allows us to examine the nature of discrimination. Our sample is similar to the racial and socio-economic diversity of young adults in urban Lima. This allows us to look at the extent of discrimina...

  1. Topographic and Stochastic Influences on Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards, and interpreting the significance of lava morphology on Earth and other planetary surfaces. Active pahoehoe lobes on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, were examined on 21-26 February 2006 using oblique time-series stereo-photogrammetry and differential global positioning system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the local discharge rate for peripheral lava lobes was generally constant at 0.0061 +/- 0.0019 m3/s, but the areal coverage rate of the lobes exhibited a periodic increase every 4.13 +/- 0.64 minutes. This periodicity is attributed to the time required for the pressure within the liquid lava core to exceed the cooling induced strength of its margins. The pahoehoe flow advanced through a series of down slope and cross-slope breakouts, which began as approximately 0.2 m-thick units (i.e., toes) that coalesced and inflated to become approximately meter-thick lobes. The lobes were thickest above the lowest points of the initial topography and above shallow to reverse facing slopes, defined relative to the local flow direction. The flow path was typically controlled by high-standing topography, with the zone directly adjacent to the final lobe margin having an average relief that was a few centimeters higher than the lava inundated region. This suggests that toe-scale topography can, at least temporarily, exert strong controls on pahoehoe flow paths by impeding the lateral spreading of the lobe. Observed cycles of enhanced areal spreading and inflated lobe morphology are also explored using a model that considers the statistical likelihood of sequential breakouts from active flow margins and the effects of topographic barriers.

  2. Oxidation of volatile organic compound vapours by potassium permanganate in a horizontal permeable reactive barrier under unsaturated conditions: experiments and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghareh Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    In this research we evaluated the potential of using solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier (HPRB) for oxidizing VOC vapours in the unsaturated zone. We have performed batch experiments, short column, and long column experiments, and have fully analyzed the da

  3. Underserved, Underrepresented, Unprepared: Experiences of African American Females in Community College with Barriers to Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobe, LaWanda D.

    2013-01-01

    African American women are enrolling and returning to college in large numbers across many community college campuses, especially those women who would be characterized as nontraditional students. This qualitative study examined and analyzed the experiences, stresses, and coping mechanisms of first generation, nontraditional, single parent,…

  4. Latina/o Food Industry Employees' Work Experiences: Work Barriers, Facilitators, Motivators, Training Preferences, and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Garriott, Patton O.; Flores, Lisa Y.; Cho, Seonghee; Groves, James

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the work experiences, job satisfaction, and work behaviors of Latina/o restaurant workers. A total of 10 semistructured focus group (N = 75) interviews were conducted in the Midwest and Southwest. Data were analyzed using a combination of Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR; Hill et al., 2005; Hill, Thompson, &…

  5. FEBEX: Full-Scale engineered barriers experiment in crystalline host-rock: preoperational phase. Synthesized report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FEBEX project is being cofinanced by the EC under contract F 14WCT950006. In addition to the EC, seven partners from three countries of the EU. (France, Germany, and Spain) as well as one from EFTA (Switzerland) are participating in the project. ENRESA is the coordinating partner with NAGRA assisting in coordinating some aspects. The project consists of two large-scale tests and a series of complimentary laboratory tests. The work is being executed by the following organizations: CIEMAT, AITEMIN, UP-DIT (CIMNE), ULC, CSIC-Zaidin, and UPM (SPAIN) ANDRA and G.3S (FRANCE) GRS (GERMANY). This report includes a synthesized description of the experiment from its conception through the installation of the two large-scale tests (from the middle of 1994 to the beginning of 1997, preoperation stage). The experiment is described in detail in a series of specific reports. (Author)

  6. An examination of how women and underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities experience barriers in biomedical research and medical programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Devasmita

    Women in medicine and biomedical research often face challenges to their retention, promotion, and advancement to leadership positions (McPhillips et al., 2007); they take longer to advance their careers, tend to serve at less research-intensive institutions and have shorter tenures compared to their male colleagues (White, McDade, Yamagata, & Morahan, 2012). Additionally, Blacks and Hispanics are the two largest minority groups that are vastly underrepresented in medicine and biomedical research in the United States (AAMC, 2012; NSF, 2011). The purpose of this study is to examine specific barriers reported by students and post-degree professionals in the field through the following questions: 1. How do women who are either currently enrolled or graduated from biomedical research or medical programs define and make meaning of gender-roles as academic barriers? 2. How do underrepresented groups in medical schools and biomedical research institutions define and make meaning of the academic barriers they face and the challenges these barriers pose to their success as individuals in the program? These questions were qualitatively analyzed using 146 interviews from Project TrEMUR applying grounded theory. Reported gender-role barriers were explained using the "Condition-Process-Outcome" theoretical framework. About one-third of the females (across all three programs; majority White or Black between 25-35 years of age) reported gender-role barriers, mostly due to poor mentoring, time constraints, set expectations and institutional barriers. Certain barriers act as conditions, causing gender-role issues, and gender-role issues influence certain barriers that act as outcomes. Strategies to overcome barriers included interventions mostly at the institutional level (mentor support, proper specialty selection, selecting academia over medicine). Barrier analysis for the two largest URM groups indicated that, while Blacks most frequently reported racism, gender barriers

  7. Oxidation of volatile organic compound vapours by potassium permanganate in a horizontal permeable reactive barrier under unsaturated conditions: experiments and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ghareh Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    In this research we evaluated the potential of using solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier (HPRB) for oxidizing VOC vapours in the unsaturated zone. We have performed batch experiments, short column, and long column experiments, and have fully analyzed the data. In the batch experiments, we investigated the ability of potassium permanganate to fully oxidize three selected target compounds, namely, trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol. We also ...

  8. Barriers to Practical Learning in the Field: A Qualitative Study of Iranian Nursing Students’ Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanpour, Faezeh; Azodi, Parviz; Azodi, Farzan; Khansir, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical training is an integral part of nursing education; however, some studies have shown that it is not always efficient. Objectives This study aimed to find out the factors that can impede nursing students’ clinical learning. Materials and Methods In this qualitative study, data were collected via reflective journal writing. Purposeful sampling was used, and 12 senior nursing students were recruited to the study. The data were analyzed using a content analysis method. Results Three main categories were derived, including inappropriate communication, ineffective role models, and theory-practice gaps. Students perceived that inappropriate communication between instructors, staff members, and students had the greatest impact on student learning. The competence of clinical instructors and staff is an important factor affecting students’ training. The clinical learning environment does not always integrate theory and practice together. Conclusions Nursing students did not experience effective clinical learning. Having expert instructors and supportive communication are important factors in creating a clinical learning environment.

  9. Engineered barrier experiments and analytical studies on coupled thermal - hydraulic - chemical processes in bentonite buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is anticipated that thermal - hydraulic - mechanical - chemical (THMC) processes will be coupled in the bentonite buffer material of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The main contributors to these processes are heat arising from the radioactive decay of the vitrified waste, infiltration of groundwater from the host rock and/or leachate from the cementitious component of the repository, and the consequent increase in swelling pressure and chemical reactions. In order to evaluate these coupled processes in the bentonite buffer material, it is necessary to take steps towards the development of a credible and robust THMC model. The current paper describes the measured data of an engineering-scale coupled THC process experiment and the calculated results of a THC model undergoing development. The coupled experiment used an electric heater, bentonite blocks and a mortar block, subjected to infiltrating water to simulate a high-alkaline porewater derived from the concrete tunnel support seeping into the bentonite buffer material under a thermal gradient provided by the vitrified waste. Temperature and water content of the bentonite buffer material were measured by several sensors continuously for several months. After this time, the buffer material was sampled. The results of mineral analysis of the samples suggested that the precipitate of amorphous hydrate with silica was found in the buffer material in contact with the mortar. The developing THC model simulated C-S-H gel precipitation as a secondary mineral in the exact same locality because of the solution being saturated with respect to portlandite and chalcedony, thereby providing some confidence in the chemical feature of the developing THC model. Some important issues in the future development of the model were also identified, including the concentration of porewater being influenced by vapor movement in the bentonite buffer material due to heating from the vitrified waste and geochemical reactions

  10. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials, Rev. 01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials (CRWMS M and O 1999a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999b), and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and crushed rock ballast. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts; (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period; (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment; (4) Evaluate factors affecting longevity of cement grouts for fully grouted rock bolt system. Provide updated information on cement grout mix design for fully grouted rock bolt system; and (5) Evaluate longevity of materials for the emplacement drift invert

  11. Managing in the Contemporary World: Rape Victims' and Supporters' Experiences of Barriers within the Police and the Health Care System in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muganyizi, Projestine S.; Nystrom, Lennarth; Axemo, Pia; Emmelin, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Grounded theory guided the analysis of 30 in-depth interviews with raped women and community members who had supported raped women in their contact with the police and health care services in Tanzania. The aim of this study was to understand and conceptualize the experiences of the informants by creating a theoretical model focusing on barriers,…

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs, fluctuations and crash events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Batha, S. H.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Chance, M. S.; DeLa Luna, E.; Dunlap, J. L.; England, A. C.; Isler, R. C.; Jones, S.; Kaye, S. M.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S. F.; Post-Zwicker, A. P.; Sanchez Sanz, J.; Sauthoff, N. R.; Seki, T.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1998-06-01

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quiet periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E × B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E × B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs fluctuations and crash events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quite periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E x B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E x B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  14. Incapacity, Indebtedness and Illegality: Everyday Experiences of Poverty and Barriers to Better Life and Mobility for a Migrant Community in Delhi, India.

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Frances Lily

    2012-01-01

    This research offers an ethnographic account of what can be learned about poverty and mobility from Bhatu people’s biographical narratives and everyday experiences. Historically nomadic and labelled a ‘criminal caste’ and ‘backward class’, this migrant community from village Rajasthan now lives in a ‘slum’ resettlement colony on the margins of Delhi. The findings show that Bhatu people’s experiences are shaped by accumulative, interlinked barriers of incapacity, illegality and indebtedness...

  15. RESEARCH: Influence of Social, Biophysical, and Managerial Conditions on Tourism Experiences Within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer; Inglis

    2000-07-01

    / Managing protected areas involves balancing the enjoyment of visitors with the protection of a variety of cultural and biophysical resources. Tourism pressures in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) are creating concerns about how to strike this balance in a marine environment. Terrestrial-based research has led to conceptual planning and management frameworks that address issues of human use and resource protection. The limits of acceptable change (LAC) framework was used as a conceptual basis for a study of snorkeling at reef sites in the GBRWHA. The intent was to determine if different settings existed among tourism operators traveling to the reef and, if so, to identify specific conditions relating to those settings. Snorkelers (N = 1475) traveling with tourism operations of different sizes who traveled to different sites completed surveys. Results indicated that snorkelers who traveled with larger operations (more people and infrastructure) differed from those traveling with smaller operations (few people and little on-site infrastructure) on benefits received and in the way that specific conditions influenced their enjoyment. Benefits related to nature, escape, and family helped to define reef experiences. Conditions related to coral, fish, and operator staff had a positive influence on the enjoyment of most visitors but, number of people on the trip and site infrastructure may have the greatest potential as setting indicators. Data support the potential usefulness of visitor input in applying the LAC concept to a marine environment where tourism and recreational uses are rapidly changing. PMID:10799642

  16. Identifying the Barriers to Women's Agency in Domestic Violence: The Tensions between Women's Personal Experiences and Systemic Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Aldridge

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in knowledge and understanding about the impacts of domestic violence on women's lives, global research on violence against women shows there is a need for research that not only places women centre stage in research praxis, but also that involves them more collaboratively in genuine dialogue about their experiences, including their agentic stances. This is especially the case for marginalised and socially excluded women victims of domestic violence, such as those who are not known or do not present to services and who survive abusive relationships alone or with little outside support. Evidence from two studies reported here—secondary analysis of women with severe and enduring mental health problems and a collaborative narrative project with unsupported women victims of domestic violence—suggest that women's capacity for agency are compromised by a number of critical factors, and that these are also reflected in the tensions between micro–macro analyses and understanding of the impact of domestic violence on women. This article considers the barriers to women's agency from the women's perspective and in the context of broader, systemic dynamics, including the denial or obscuring of abuse by governments and states and the consequences of stringent fiscal retrenchment that put women at increased risk of domestic violence.

  17. 8Dim calculations of the third barrier in $^{232}$Th and a conflict between theory and experiment on uranium nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jachimowicz, P; Skalski, J

    2013-01-01

    We find the height of the third fission barrier $B_{III}$ and energy of the third minimum $E_{III}$ in $^{232}$Th using the macroscopic - microscopic model, very well tested in this region of nuclei. For the first time it is done on an 8-dimensional deformation hypercube. The dipole distortion is included among the shape variables to assure that no important shapes are missed. The saddle point is found on a lattice containing more than 50 million points by the immersion water flow (IWF) method. The shallow third minimum, $B_{III}-E_{III}\\approx 0.36$ MeV, agrees with experimetal data of Blons et al. This is in a sharp contrast with the status of the IIIrd minima in $^{232-236}$U: their experimental depth of $\\geq3$ MeV contradicts all realistic theoretical predictions. We emphasize the importance of repeating the experiment on $^{232}$Th, by a technique similar to that used in the uranium nuclei, for settling the puzzle of the third minima in actinides.

  18. Fluid (Air/Water) Cushion Transportation Technology for Emplacing Heavy Canisters into Horizontal Disposal Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposal of certain types of radioactive waste canisters in a deep repository involves handling and emplacement of very heavy loads. The weight of these particular canisters can be in the order of 20 to 50 metric tons. They generally have to be handled underground in openings that are not much larger than the canisters themselves as it is time consuming and expensive to excavate and backfill large openings in a repository. This therefore calls for the development of special technology that can meet the requirements for safe operation at an industrial scale in restrained operating spaces. Air/water cushion lifting systems are used world wide in the industry for moving heavy loads. However, until now the technology needed for emplacing heavy cylindrical radioactive waste packages in bored drifts (with narrow annular gaps) has not been previously developed or demonstrated. This paper describes the related R and D work carried out by ANDRA (for air cushion technology) and by SKB and Posiva (for water cushion technology) respectively, mainly within the framework of the European Commission (EC) funded Integrated Project called ESDRED (6. European Framework Programme). The background for both the air and the water cushion applications is presented. The specific characteristics of the two different emplacement concepts are also elaborated. Then the various phases of the Test Programmes (including the Prototype phases) are detailed and illustrated for the two lifting media. Conclusions are drawn for each system developed and evaluated. Finally, based on the R and D experience, improvements deemed necessary for an industrial application are listed. The tests performed so far have shown that the emplacement equipment developed is operating efficiently. However further tests are required to verify the availability and the reliability of the equipment over longer periods of time and to identify the modifications that would be needed for an industrial application in a

  19. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and

  20. Role of the morphology of Salix tillers barriers in marly sediment trapping efficiency in gully floor under ecological restoration: a flume experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erktan, A.; Pianu, B.; Lucisine, P.; Rey, F.

    2012-04-01

    In the southern French Alps, the brittleness of the black marls, combined to the erosivity of the rain and the scarce vegetative cover, has led to high sediment yields at the exit of gullies. From the observation that gullies, with a 20% vegetative cover located in the lower gully bed, can shut down gully exit activity through sediment trapping, a bioengineering strategy to restore eroded gullies has been developed. It consists implanting a linear brush layer of Salix tillers, resprouting from cuttings arranged perpendicularly to the flow in gullies beds, on a dead-wood sill. Implanting vegetative barriers to increase sedimentation is a well-known strategy. Nevertheless, only few studies investigated the link between the barriers morphology and their efficiency in sediment trapping. Our goal was therefore to link the morphology of Salix tillers barriers to their sediment trapping efficiency. Salix tillers barriers with various morphologies have been recreated in a flume experiment (flow features: 0,5L/s; 60s duration; sediment concentration 33g/L). First, we recreated barriers aged of 2 to 9 years-old as we observed in the field. The young-shaped barriers show dense (spacing: 55mm) and thin stems (2mm) while the older ones show opposite morphological features (spacing: 2,5cm and diameter: 9mm). Thus, we tested the influence of the distribution of an invariant surface of tillers obstacle in sediment trapping efficiency. Then, we investigated the influence of oak litter on sediment efficiency of both young and old-shaped Salix tillers barriers. Fifteen replicates were conducted for each barrier tested. The sediment trapping efficiency is given by the ratio of the dried trapped sediment mass divided by the dried sediment mass initially loaded. Results show that the distributions of the tillers influence significantly the sediment trapping efficiency. The young-shaped barriers trap significantly more sediment than the old-shaped one. The oak litter increases

  1. Post emplacement environment of waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project to determine the changes in water chemistry due to reaction of the Topopah Spring tuff with natural groundwater at temperatures up to 1500C. The reaction extent has been investigated as a function of rock-to-water ratio, temperature, reaction time, physical state of the samples, and geographic location of the samples within the tuff unit. Results of these experiments will be used to provide information on the water chemistry to be expected if a high-level waste repository were to be constructed in the Topopah Spring tuff. 6 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  2. Self-sealing barriers of clay/sand mixtures - lessons learnt from in-situ experiment and retrospective modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. With respect to the international experience gained in the field of geological radioactive waste disposal it is widely agreed that the overall detection of the geo-hydraulic conditions and their changes due to geo-mechanical disturbances via in-situ measurements is one of the most relevant prerequisites for sound understanding of host rock behaviour. An adequate understanding of related coupled processes is needed for the development of reliable physical models needed for numerical simulation repository performance. With respect to disposal in clay formations, GRS therefore performs experiments at Mont Terri underground research laboratory. The main objective of the SB-Experiment presented in this paper is to test and demonstrate that the advantageous sealing properties of clay/sand mixtures determined preliminarily in the laboratory can technically be realized and maintained under repository relevant in-situ conditions, such as a high installation density of about 1.9 g/cm3 and low swelling pressures of about 0.3 - 0.5 MPa. Clay/sand-mixtures exhibit a high permeability to gas between 1E-13 and 1E-15 m2 in the dry state and a low gas entry pressure and a moderate permeability to gas between 1E-16 and 1E-17 m2 in the saturated state while the permeability to water of about 1E-18 m2 is comparable to that of the undisturbed host rock. Therefore gaseous corrosion products will be preferentially conducted by the backfilling and will thus not lead to the opening of new pathways in the host rock. In the framework of the SB experiment (Self-sealing Barriers of clay/sand mixtures) a series of small in-situ tests in several vertical boreholes with a diameter of 0.31 m and depth of 3.0 m have been installed in October 2005 at the underground laboratory at Mont Terri. The boreholes have been backfilled with clay/sand-mixtures of different mixture ratios as well as pure MX-80 bentonite. The sealing properties such as

  3. Salt Repository Project waste emplacement mode decision paper: Revison 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a recommendation as to the mode of waste emplacement to be used as the current basis for site characterization activity for the Deaf Smith County, Texas, high level nuclear waste repository site. It also presents a plan for implementing the recommendation so as to provide a high level of confidence in the project's success. Since evaluations of high-level waste disposal in geologic repositories began in the 1950s, most studies emplacement in salt formations employed the vertical orientation for emplacing waste packages in boreholes in the floor of the underground facility. This orientation was used in trials at Project Salt Vault in the 1960s. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has recently settled on a combination of vertical and horizontal modes for various waste types. This paper analyzes the information available and develops a project position upon which to base current site characterization activities. The position recommended is that the SRP should continue to use the vertical waste emplacement mode as the reference design and to carry the horizontal mode as a ''passive'' alternative. This position was developed based upon the conclusions of a decision analysis, risk assessment, and cost/schedule impact assessment. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. An Experimental Study of Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Permeable Porous Media Using Polymer-Enhanced Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2005-12-22

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. One possible cause for premature chromate breakthrough is associated with the presence of high-permeability zones in the aquifer. In these zones, groundwater moves relatively fast and is able to oxidize iron more rapidly. There is also a possibility that the high-permeability flow paths are deficient in reducing equivalents (e.g. reactive iron), required for barrier performance. One way enhancement of the current barrier reductive capacity can be achieved is by the addition of micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer. The potential emplacement of zero-valent iron (Fe0) into high-permeability Hanford sediments (Ringold Unit E gravels) using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers was investigated in three-dimensional wedge-shaped aquifer models. Polymers were used to create a suspension viscous enough to keep the Fe0 in solution for extended time periods to improve colloid movement into the porous media without causing a permanent detrimental decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Porous media were packed in the wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone in between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel surrounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments.

  5. Comparative Noise Performance of Portable Broadband Sensor Emplacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Justin; Arias-Dotson, Eliana; Beaudoin, Bruce; Anderson, Kent

    2015-04-01

    IRIS PASSCAL has supported portable broadband seismic experiments for close to 30 years. During that time we have seen a variety of sensor vaults deployed. The vaults deployed fall into two broad categories, a PASSCAL style vault and a Flexible Array style vault. The PASSCAL vault is constructed of materials available in-county and it is the Principle Investigator (PI) who establishes the actual field deployed design. These vaults generally are a large barrel placed in a ~1 m deep hole. A small pier, decoupled from the barrel, is fashioned in the bottom of the vault (either cement, paving stone or tile) for the sensor placement. The sensor is insulated and protected. Finally the vault is sealed and buried under ~30 cm of soil. The Flexible Array vault is provided to PIs by the EarthScope program, offering a uniform portable vault for these deployments. The vault consists of a 30 cm diameter by 0.75 cm tall piece of plastic sewage pipe buried with ~10 cm of pipe above grade. A rubber membrane covers the bottom and cement was poured into the bottom, coupling the pier to the pipe. The vault is sealed and buried under ~30 cm of soil. Cost, logistics, and the availability of materials in-country are usually the deciding factors for PIs when choosing a vault design and frequently trades are made given available resources. Recently a third type of portable broadband installation, direct burial, is being tested. In this case a sensor designed for shallow, direct burial is installed in a ~20 cm diameter by ~1 m deep posthole. Direct burial installation costs are limited to the time and effort required to dig the posthole and emplace the sensor. Our initial analyses suggest that direct burial sensors perform as well and at times better than sensor in vaults on both horizontal and vertical channels across a range of periods (<1 s to 100 s). Moving towards an instrument pool composed entirely of direct burial sensors (some with integrated digitizers) could yield higher

  6. “A constant struggle to receive mental health care”: health care professionals’ acquired experience of barriers to mental health care services in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Rugema, Lawrence; Krantz, Gunilla; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Persson, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Rwanda, many people are still mentally affected by the consequences of the genocide and yet mental health care facilities are scarce. While available literature explains the prevalence and consequences of mental disorders, there is lack of knowledge from low-income countries on health care seeking behavior due to common mental disorders. Therefore, this study sought to explore health care professionals' acquired experiences of barriers and facilitators that people with common m...

  7. Barriers to HIV Testing Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM): Experiences from Clark County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharr, Jennifer R.; Lough, Nancy L.; Ezeanolue, Echezona E.

    2016-01-01

    Clark County, Nevada had a 52% increase in newly diagnosed HIV infections in young people age 13-24 with 83% of the new diagnoses in this age group being men who have sex with men (MSM). HIV testing and counseling is critical for HIV prevention, care and treatment, yet young people are the least likely to seek HIV testing. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to HIV testing experienced by young MSM in Clark County, Nevada. We conducted a qualitative focus group discussion to identify barriers and facilitators to HIV testing among eleven young MSM in March, 2015. The primary barrier to HIV testing identified by the group was a lack of awareness or knowledge about testing for HIV. Other barriers within the person included: fear of results, fear of rejection, and fear of disclosure. Barriers identified within the environment included: access issues, stigma, and unfriendly test environments for young people. In addition to increasing awareness, intervention to increase HIV testing among MSM young people should incorporate access to testing in environments where the adolescents are comfortable and which reduces stigma. HIV testing sites should be convenient, accessible and young person/gay friendly.

  8. Experiences and barriers to Health-Related Quality of Life following liver transplantation: a qualitative analysis of the perspectives of pediatric patients and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Rachel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines health-related quality of life (HRQOL experiences and barriers facing young people who have received a liver transplant (LT. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with children and adolescents who have undergone LT and their parents. Findings indicate that LT fosters substantially improved child and adolescent HRQOL; however, young people also experience challenges such as difficulties with medication compliance, self-management of care routines, physical activity restrictions, and undesirable medical procedures. Implications and recommendations for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  9. An optimization procedure for borehole emplacement in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specifying the position and orientation of the 'next borehole(s)' in a fractured medium, from prior incomplete knowledge of the fracture field and depending on the objectives assigned to this new borehole(s), is a crucial point in the iterative process of site characterization. The work described here explicitly includes site knowledge and specific objectives in a tractable procedure that checks possible borehole characteristics, and rates all trial boreholes according to their compliance with objectives. The procedure is based on the following ideas : Firstly, the optimization problem is strongly constrained, since feasible borehole head locations and borehole dips are generally limited. Secondly, a borehole is an 'access point' to the fracture network. Finally, when performing a flow or tracer test, the information obtained through the monitoring system will be best if this system detects the largest possible share of the flow induced by the test, and if it cuts the most 'interesting' flow paths. The optimization is carried out in four steps. 1) All possible borehole configurations are defined and stored. Typically, several hundred possible boreholes are created. Existing boreholes are also specified. 2) Stochastic fracture networks reproducing known site characteristics are generated. 3) A purely geometrical rating of all boreholes is used to select the 'geometrically best' boreholes or groups of boreholes. 4) Among the boreholes selected by the geometrical rating, the best one(s) is chosen by simulating the experiment for which it will be used and checking flowrates through possible boreholes. This method is applied to study the emplacement of a set of five monitoring boreholes prior to the sinking of a shaft for a planned underground laboratory in a granite massif in France (Vienne site). Twelve geometrical parameters are considered for each possible borehole. A detailed statistical study helps decide on the shape of a minimization function. This is then used

  10. Emplacement of the Nain anorthosite : diapiric versus conduit ascent

    OpenAIRE

    Royse, Katherine; Park, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    Estimation of settling velocities of large orthopyroxene megacrysts, found within anorthosite intrusions, are calculated and compared with ascent rates achieved by diapirism and conduit propagation. Calculations suggest that diapirism is far too slow to be an appropriate ascent mechanism for anorthositic crystal mush and favour conduit emplacement. The intrusions of the Nain Plutonic Suite (NPS) are located along the Abloviak shear zone, which marks the boundary between the Nain and Churchill...

  11. Posthole Broadband Sensor Emplacement vs. Surface Vaults: Observations of Comparative Noise Performance and Trade-offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, J. R.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Barstow, N.; Pfeifer, M.; Anderson, K. R.; Frassetto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in seismometer design have diversified the range of instruments available for use in temporary field installations. IRIS programs, primarily PASSCAL and the Transportable Array (TA), have helped steer development of these new instruments to meet these evolving needs. PASSCAL operates a small pool of posthole broadband sensors, purpose built for direct burial. Near surface posthole installations are a new, cost effective, and logistically simple technique for broadband emplacement that is an alternative to the vault installations used in portable broadband seismic experiments for nearly 30 years. Direct burial installation is limited to the time and effort required to dig the borehole and emplace the sensor, thus reducing both material costs and time to install. Also, in Alaska, extreme environments and difficult logistics make standard TA tank vaults inappropriate for most sites. TA has developed improved deployment strategies for these environments. There, holes for posthole sensors are hammer- drilled or augered to several meters depth in soil, permafrost, or bedrock and then cased. These emplacement costs are generally less than standard TA vaults. We compare various installation techniques for test cases as well as general deployments of PASSCAL and TA stations. Automated noise performance analyses have been part of the TA throughout its operation, but until recently vault performance for portable installations supported by the PASSCAL program was sparse. In this study, we select a suite of co-located direct burial and surface vault installations and compare their noise performance using probability density functions. Our initial analyses suggest that direct burial sensors have lower noise levels than vault installations on both horizontal and vertical channels across a range of periods spanning <1 s to 100 s. However, most of these initial experiments for PASSCAL were with sensors not purpose built for direct burial and it became obvious that a sensor

  12. Influence of surface charges on the structure of a dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure: experiment and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Celestin, S.; Bonaventura, Z.; Guaitella, O; Rousseau, A.; A. Bourdon

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) in air at atmospheric pressure and at low frequency are mainly constituted of thin transient plasma filaments (or microdischarges) with radii of a few hundreds of micrometers. In this work, we consider a point-to-plane geometry with the dielectric covering the plane electrode. Plasma filaments are initiated by streamers, starting from the high-field region close to the point electrode. The plasma filaments deposit charges on the ...

  13. Development and validation of a model of bio-barriers for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated aquifers using laboratory column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, T; Bhallamudi, S Murty; Philip, Ligy

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale transport and biotransformation experiments and mathematical model simulations were carried out to study the effectiveness of bio-barriers for the containment of hexavalent chromium in contaminated confined aquifers. Experimental results showed that a 10cm thick bio-barrier with an initial biomass concentration of 0.205mg/g of soil was able to completely contain a Cr(VI) plume of 25mg/L concentration. It was also observed that pore water velocity and initial biomass concentration are the most significant parameters in the containment of Cr(VI). The mathematical model developed is based on one-dimensional advection-dispersion reaction equations for Cr(VI) and molasses in saturated, homogeneous porous medium. The transport of Cr(VI) and molasses is coupled with adsorption and Monod's inhibition kinetics for immobile bacteria. It was found that, in general, the model was able to simulate the experimental results satisfactorily. However, there was disparity between the numerically simulated and experimental breakthrough curves for Cr(VI) and molasses in cases where there was high clay content and high microbial activity. The mathematical model could contribute towards improved designs of future bio-barriers for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated aquifers. PMID:17161527

  14. Three integrated photovoltaic/sound barrier power plants. Construction and operational experience; Drei integrierte PV-Schallschutz Versuchsfelder. Bau und Erprobung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordmann, T.; Froelich, A.; Clavadetscher, L.

    2002-07-01

    After an international ideas competition by TNC Switzerland and Germany in 1996, six companies where given the opportunity to construct a prototype of their newly developed integrated PV-sound barrier concepts. The main goal was to develop highly integrated concepts, allowing the reduction of PV sound barrier systems costs, as well as the demonstration of specific concepts for different noise situations. This project is strongly correlated with a German project. Three of the concepts of the competition are demonstrated along a highway near Munich, constructed in 1997. The three Swiss installations had to be constructed at different locations, reflecting three typical situations for sound barriers. The first Swiss installation was the world first Bi-facial PV-sound barrier. It was built on a highway bridge at Wallisellen-Aubrugg in 1997. The operational experience of the installation is positive. But due to the different efficiencies of the two cell sides, its specific yield lies somewhat behind a conventional PV installation. The second Swiss plant was finished in autumn 1998. The 'zig-zag' construction is situated along the railway line at Wallisellen in a densely inhabited area with some local shadowing. Its performance and its specific yield is comparatively low due to a combination of several reasons (geometry of the concept, inverter, high module temperature, local shadows). The third installation was constructed along the motor way A1 at Bruettisellen in 1999. Its vertical panels are equipped with amorphous modules. The report show, that the performance of the system is reasonable, but the mechanical construction has to be improved. A small trial field with cells directly laminated onto the steel panel, also installed at Bruettisellen, could be the key development for this concept. This final report includes the evaluation and comparison of the monitored data in the past 24 months of operation. (author)

  15. Engineered Barriers and Geological Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A geological disposal system comprises a system of multiple barriers, both natural and man-made, to provide long-term isolation and containment of radioactive waste. Various geological formations are stable and potentially suitable for geological disposal. Engineered barriers are designed to work in an integrated fashion together with the host geological formation. Much research has been carried out to develop engineered barrier systems suitable for use in different host rocks and with different waste types. These studies continue both nationally and within the framework of multilateral international projects, in facilities such as underground research laboratories. Geological disposal is the preferred method for long term management of radioactive waste. In each repository the long-term isolation and containment of the waste is achieved by the host geological formation and the system of engineered barriers. Any engineered barrier system (EBS) is made of several components, each taking different safety roles that are relied upon at different times in the lifetime of the repository. Research, demonstration and development of EBS materials, as well as of their manufacturing and emplacement technologies are important endeavours in national waste management programmes and the subject of international cooperation. These studies and demonstrations have considerably enhanced confidence in the production of the EBS components and in their performance under repository conditions

  16. Validating Cellular Automata Lava Flow Emplacement Algorithms with Standard Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. A.; Connor, L.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Gallant, E.

    2015-12-01

    A major existing need in assessing lava flow simulators is a common set of validation benchmark tests. We propose three levels of benchmarks which test model output against increasingly complex standards. First, imulated lava flows should be morphologically identical, given changes in parameter space that should be inconsequential, such as slope direction. Second, lava flows simulated in simple parameter spaces can be tested against analytical solutions or empirical relationships seen in Bingham fluids. For instance, a lava flow simulated on a flat surface should produce a circular outline. Third, lava flows simulated over real world topography can be compared to recent real world lava flows, such as those at Tolbachik, Russia, and Fogo, Cape Verde. Success or failure of emplacement algorithms in these validation benchmarks can be determined using a Bayesian approach, which directly tests the ability of an emplacement algorithm to correctly forecast lava inundation. Here we focus on two posterior metrics, P(A|B) and P(¬A|¬B), which describe the positive and negative predictive value of flow algorithms. This is an improvement on less direct statistics such as model sensitivity and the Jaccard fitness coefficient. We have performed these validation benchmarks on a new, modular lava flow emplacement simulator that we have developed. This simulator, which we call MOLASSES, follows a Cellular Automata (CA) method. The code is developed in several interchangeable modules, which enables quick modification of the distribution algorithm from cell locations to their neighbors. By assessing several different distribution schemes with the benchmark tests, we have improved the performance of MOLASSES to correctly match early stages of the 2012-3 Tolbachik Flow, Kamchakta Russia, to 80%. We also can evaluate model performance given uncertain input parameters using a Monte Carlo setup. This illuminates sensitivity to model uncertainty.

  17. Quantum state-resolved CH4 dissociation on Pt(111): coverage dependent barrier heights from experiment and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirokazu; Chen, Li; Beck, Rainer D; Colón-Dìaz, Inara; Jackson, Bret

    2013-12-21

    The dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on Pt(111) was studied using quantum state-resolved methods at a surface temperature (T(s)) of 150 K where the nascent reaction products CH3(ads) and H(ads) are stable and accumulate on the surface. Most previous experimental studies of methane chemisorption on transition metal surfaces report only the initial sticking coefficients S0 on a clean surface. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), used here for state resolved reactivity measurements, enables us to monitor the CH3(ads) uptake during molecular beam deposition as a function of incident translational energy (E(t)) and vibrational state (ν3 anti-symmetric C-H stretch of CH4) to obtain the initial sticking probability S0, the coverage dependence of the sticking probability S(θ) and the CH3(ads) saturation coverage θ(sat). We observe that both S0 and θ(sat) increase with increasing E(t) as well as upon ν3 excitation of the incident CH4 which indicates a coverage dependent dissociation barrier height for the dissociation of CH4 on Pt(111) at low surface temperature. This interpretation is supported by density functional calculations of barrier heights for dissociation, using large supercells containing one or more H and/or methyl adsorbates. We find a significant increase in the activation energies with coverage. These energies are used to construct simple models that reasonably reproduce the uptake data and the observed saturation coverages. PMID:24177276

  18. Kimberlite emplacement models — The implications for mining projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubec, Jaroslav

    2008-06-01

    The significance of the emplacement model for kimberlite pipes, or sheets, is commonly recognized in resource geology. However, its importance is not always appreciated in the mine design process. The fact is that knowledge of the orebody geometry, character of the contact zones, internal structures, rock mass competency and distribution of inclusions could directly influence the selection of the underground mining method, pit wall stability, dilution, treatability, and the dewatering strategy. The problems are exacerbated in smaller pipes and narrower sheets, and in more irregular shapes; they are more apparent in underground mining as opposed to open cast. Various kimberlite emplacement processes have a major impact on the nature of the kimberlite orebody and host rocks that will influence the mine design and mining strategy. Failure to understand these processes can adversely affect the economic outcome for developing a mine. It is therefore important to investigate those processes in order to better characterize the mining constraints and risks, and more accurately predict the mine's economic viability.

  19. A model for radial dike emplacement in composite cones based on observations from Summer Coon volcano, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Moats, W.P.; Fink, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    We mapped the geometry of 13 silicic dikes at Summer Coon, an eroded Oligocene stratovolcano in southern Colorado, to investigate various characteristics of radial dike emplacement in composite volcanoes. Exposed dikes are up to about 7 km in length and have numerous offset segments along their upper peripheries. Surprisingly, most dikes at Summer Coon increase in thickness with distance from the center of the volcano. Magma pressure in a dike is expected to lessen away from the pressurized source region, which would encourage a blade-like dike to decrease in thickness with distance from the center of the volcano. We attribute the observed thickness pattern as evidence of a driving pressure gradient, which is caused by decreasing host rock shear modulus and horizontal stress, both due to decreasing emplacement depths beneath the sloping flanks of the volcano. Based on data from Summer Coon, we propose that radial dikes originate at depth below the summit of a host volcano and follow steeply inclined paths towards the surface. Near the interface between volcanic cone and basement, which may represent a neutral buoyancy surface or stress barrier, magma is transported subhorizontally and radially away from the center of the volcano in blade-like dikes. The dikes thicken with increasing radial distance, and offset segments and fingers form along the upper peripheries of the intrusions. Eruptions may occur anywhere along the length of the dikes, but the erupted volume will generally be greater for dike-fed eruptions far from the center of the host volcano owing to the increase in driving pressure with distance from the source. Observed eruptive volumes, vent locations, and vent-area intrusions from inferred post-glacial dike-fed eruptions at Mount Adams, Washington, USA, support the proposed model. Hazards associated with radial dike emplacement are therefore greater for longer dikes that propagate to the outer flanks of a volcano. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  20. Subsurface barrier validation with the SEAtrace{trademark} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn; William Lowry; Veraun Chipman

    1999-09-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, Science and Engineering Associates has completed development and testing of a subsurface barrier verification and monitoring system. This system, called SEAtrace{trademark}, is able to locate and size leaks with a high degree of accuracy in subsurface barriers that are emplaced in an unsaturated medium. It uses gaseous tracer injection, in-field real-time monitoring, and real time data analysis to evaluate barrier integrity. The approach is: Conservative as it measures vapor leaks in a containment system whose greatest risk is posed by liquid leaks; Applicable to any impermeable type of barrier emplacement technology in the unsaturated zone; Inexpensive as it uses readily available, non-toxic, nonhazardous gaseous tracers, does not require an inordinately large number of sampling points, and injection and sampling points can be emplaced by direct push techniques; Capable of assessing not only a barrier's initial integrity, but can also provide long-term monitoring. To date, six demonstrations of the system have been completed. Results from two of the demonstrations are detailed in this report. They include the final developmental demonstration of the SEAtrace system and a comparison demonstration of two tracer based verification technologies. The final developmental demonstration of SEAtrace was completed at a naval facility in Brunswick, Maine. The demonstration was funded solely by the DOE and was performed in cooperation with the US Navy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

  1. Ethnic and Social Barriers to Cooperation: Experiments Studying the Extent and Nature of Discrimination in Urban Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Máximo Torero; Marco Castillo; Ragan Petrie

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a series of experiments on discrimination in urban Lima, Peru. The experiments exploit degrees of information on performance as a way to assess how personal characteristics affect how people sort into groups, and the results show that behavior is not correlated with personal socio-economic and racial characteristics. However, people do use personal characteristics to sort themselves into groups. Height is a robust predictor of being desirable, as is being a woman. Looking ...

  2. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  3. Dielectric barrier discharges in helium at atmospheric pressure: experiments and model in the needle-plane geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental and numerical modelling study of dielectric barrier discharges in pure, flowing helium at atmospheric pressure, in a 3.0 mm length needle-plane gap. Ultra-high speed imaging and synchronous, real-time dual detection (optical-electrical) diagnostics have been carried out. The high-voltage electrode was a hyperboloidal steel needle with a sharp point of 40 μm radius, while the grounded electrode was covered with 1.6 mm of Al2O3. The surface of the latter was either bare (case 1) or coated with ∼20 nm of semiconducting graphite (case 2) or metallic aluminium (case 3), all at floating potential. Axial [z(t)] and radial [r(t)] time-evolutions (≤2 μs) of discharge propagation across the gap were found to depend very strongly upon surface charging or conduction (cases 1-3). A two-dimensional model of the needle-plane discharge, based on coupled solution of the continuity equations for electrons, ions and excited neutral particles and of Poisson's equation, was found to agree very well with the observed [r,z](t) behaviour

  4. Diabetes and diet: Managing dietary barriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of coping with

  5. Remote excavation using the telerobotic small emplacement excavator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing remote excavation technologies for the Office of Technology Development, Robotics Technology Development Program. This work is being done to meet the need for remote excavation and removal of radioactive and contaminated buried waste at several DOE sites. System requirements are based on the need to uncover and remove waste from burial sites in a way that does not cause unnecessary personnel exposure or additional environmental contamination. Goals for the current project are to demonstrate dexterous control of a backhoe with force feedback and to implement robotic operations that will improve productivity. The Telerobotic Small Emplacement Excavator is a prototype system that incorporates the needed robotic and telerobotic capabilities on a commercially available platform. The ability to add remote dexterous teleoperation and robotic operating modes is intended to be adaptable to other commercially available excavator systems

  6. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE EMPLACEMENT/RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste emplacement/retrieved system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2000). This QA classification incorporates the current MGR design and the results of the ''Design Basis Event Frequency and Dose Calculation for Site Recommendation'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The content and technical approach of this analysis is in accordance with the development plan ''QA Classification of MGR Structures, Systems, and Components'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b).

  7. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE EMPLACEMENT/RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste emplacement/retrieved system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2000). This QA classification incorporates the current MGR design and the results of the ''Design Basis Event Frequency and Dose Calculation for Site Recommendation'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a). The content and technical approach of this analysis is in accordance with the development plan ''QA Classification of MGR Structures, Systems, and Components'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b)

  8. Barriers and Enablers to the Use of Virtual Worlds in Higher Education: An Exploration of Educator Perceptions, Attitudes and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Sue; Scutter, Sheila; Jacka, Lisa; McDonald, Marcus; Farley, Helen; Newman, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds have been used for more than a decade in higher education for teaching and learning. Since the 1980s, academics began using virtual worlds as an exciting and innovative new technology to provide their students with new learning experiences that were difficult to provide any other way. But since that time,…

  9. FEBEX-DP. Dismantling the ''full-scale engineered barrier experiment'' after 18 years of operation at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, Florian; Gaus, Irina [Nagra, Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The FEBEX experiment at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) consists of an in-situ full-scale engineered barrier system (EBS) test for the disposal of high-level waste (HLW). It is performed under natural conditions in crystalline rock in which the canisters are placed horizontally in drifts and are surrounded by a clay barrier constructed of highly compacted bentonite blocks. A partial dismantling and sampling of the EBS was carried out during 2002. Heating of the FEBEX started in 1997 and since then a constant temperature of 100 deg C has been maintained, while the bentonite buffer has been slowly hydrating in a natural way. A total of 632 sensors in the bentonite barrier, the rock mass, the heaters and the service zone record temperature, water saturation, humidity, total pressure, displacement, and water pressure. The hydration pattern is relatively symmetric, with no major differences along the axis. Although the host rock is characterized by heterogeneities with zones of higher permeability, the resaturation process is driven by the suction of the bentonite rather than by the availability of water in the rock, especially in the early phase. After 17 years, the water content in the buffer close to the heater still continues to increase slowly. The hydraulic pore pressures in the buffer and the geosphere have practically stabilized. The total pressure in general continues to increase in most points into the buffer, where in some parts pressures of over 6 MPa are registered. The long monitoring phase and the partial dismantling in 2002 indicate that the EBS has largely performed as expected and the major processes and couplings affecting the buffer saturation during the initial thermal period identified prior to the start of the experiment have been confirmed. A comprehensive report documents and reviews the state of the FEBEX (Lanyon and Gaus, 2013). After 18 years of operation the experiment will be excavated and dismantled in 2015. The main objectives of the FEBEX

  10. FEBEX-DP. Dismantling the ''full-scale engineered barrier experiment'' after 18 years of operation at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FEBEX experiment at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) consists of an in-situ full-scale engineered barrier system (EBS) test for the disposal of high-level waste (HLW). It is performed under natural conditions in crystalline rock in which the canisters are placed horizontally in drifts and are surrounded by a clay barrier constructed of highly compacted bentonite blocks. A partial dismantling and sampling of the EBS was carried out during 2002. Heating of the FEBEX started in 1997 and since then a constant temperature of 100 deg C has been maintained, while the bentonite buffer has been slowly hydrating in a natural way. A total of 632 sensors in the bentonite barrier, the rock mass, the heaters and the service zone record temperature, water saturation, humidity, total pressure, displacement, and water pressure. The hydration pattern is relatively symmetric, with no major differences along the axis. Although the host rock is characterized by heterogeneities with zones of higher permeability, the resaturation process is driven by the suction of the bentonite rather than by the availability of water in the rock, especially in the early phase. After 17 years, the water content in the buffer close to the heater still continues to increase slowly. The hydraulic pore pressures in the buffer and the geosphere have practically stabilized. The total pressure in general continues to increase in most points into the buffer, where in some parts pressures of over 6 MPa are registered. The long monitoring phase and the partial dismantling in 2002 indicate that the EBS has largely performed as expected and the major processes and couplings affecting the buffer saturation during the initial thermal period identified prior to the start of the experiment have been confirmed. A comprehensive report documents and reviews the state of the FEBEX (Lanyon and Gaus, 2013). After 18 years of operation the experiment will be excavated and dismantled in 2015. The main objectives of the FEBEX

  11. Constructing bottom barriers with met grouting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibazaki, M.; Yoshida, H. [Chemical Grouting Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Installing a bottom barrier using conventional high pressure jetting technology and ensuring barrier continuity is challenging. This paper describes technology that has been developed and demonstrated for the emplacement of bottom barriers using pressures and flow rates above the conventional high pressure jetting parameters. The innovation capable of creating an improved body exceeding 5 meters in diameter has resulted in the satisfying connection and adherence between the treated columns. Besides, the interfaces among the improved bodies obtain the same strength and permeability lower than 1 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec as body itself. A wide variety of the thickness and the diameter of the improved mass optimizes the application, and the method is nearing completion. The paper explains an aspect and briefs case histories.

  12. Eruptive Variations During the Emplacement of Cerro Pinto, an Ambitious Rhyolite Dome, Puebla, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, B.; Riggs, N.; Carrasco-Nunez, G.

    2006-12-01

    Cerro Pinto is a rhyolite dome complex located in the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The complex is composed of four tuff rings and four domes that were emplaced in three distinct eruptive stages marked by changes in vent location and eruptive character. Each of these stages contained eruptive sequences that follow simple rhyolite-dome models, in which a pyroclastic phase is followed immediately by effusive dome emplacement. However, some aspects of the eruptive history, such as the occurrence of explosive reactivation and dome destruction through a lateral blast are uncommon in small rhyolitic structures and are more commonly associated with polygenetic structures, such as stratovolcanoes or calderas. In these larger structures, new pulses of magma often initiate reactivation, but at Cerro Pinto the story is different. Major and trace element geochemistry suggest that Cerro Pinto was sourced by a small, isolated magma chamber, unassociated with any surrounding silicic centers and did not experience any change in chemical composition over the course of the eruption. Based on these data and field observations, it is inferred that Cerro Pinto's eruptive variations were not the result of the influx of a new magma batch, but were the result of both phreatomagmatic interactions and the presence of a small magma chamber that was zoned with respect to volatiles. Both of these factors are commonly encountered in volcanologic studies, but documentation of their influence on smaller structures is under represented. Rhyolite domes have long been considered relatively simple volcanic structures with only localized hazard implications. However, the eruptive variations displayed by Cerro Pinto suggest that isolated rhyolite dome evolutions can be much more complex with the potential for explosive reactivation and dome collapse; events that must be taken into consideration when making hazard assessments.

  13. Geomagnetic Investigation of Sandstone Dikes of the Colorado Front Range, for Determination of Age and Mode of Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, D.; Petronis, M. S.; Siddoway, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    In the Colorado Front Range, an array of sandstone dikes has intrigued geologists for over a century (Cross 1894,GSAB, 5, 525). Within their crystalline host, the dikes reach widths >7m and have a lateral extent of 70km along the Ute Pass Fault (UPF). The essential questions of sediment source, emplacement mode, and age of the dikes are unanswered. We present new paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) results used to determine the age and emplacement behavior of the dikes. The eleven dikes selected for magnetic studies have sharp, planar margins, and share the systematic geometry of the NW striking subvertical dike array. They exhibit little or no overprint by brittle fracturing/shear associated with the UPF. Our approach involved the use of paleomagnetic techniques to isolate the characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM), which we used to limit the age of the dikes' magnetization. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS),arising from alignment of detrital magnetite, serves as a proxy for the orientation of flow during dike emplacement. U-Pb detrital zircon ages, obtained previously, did not provide a useful constraint on emplacement age because the dominant age matches that of the prevalent host,1.03Ga Pikes Peak Granite. IRM acquisition experiments were performed to identify the principal magnetic phases as a mixture of Fe-Ti oxide phases, likely to be low-Ti magnetite and hematite. The sandstone consists of sub-rounded to rounded sand-sized quartz, angular feldspar (600°C. Some samples carry a characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) of NW declination with shallow positive inclination, while others yield a characteristic remanent magnetization of SE declination with shallow inclination. By correlation with paleomagnetic results from the region, our findings indicate an age Permian or older. The NW directed ChRM may signify a magnetization of Neoproterozoic age, while the SE directed ChRM is more consistent with a

  14. Barriers and facilitators to participation in physical activity: The experiences of a group of South African adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchar, Lauren; Bantjes, Jason; Swartz, Leslie; Derman, Wayne

    2016-02-01

    Participation in regular physical activity promotes physical health and psychosocial well-being. Interventions are thus needed to promote physical activity, particularly among groups of individuals, such as persons with disability, who are marginalised from physical activity. This study explored the experiences of a group of South African adolescents with cerebral palsy. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 adolescents with cerebral palsy. The results provided insight into a range of factors that promote and hinder participation in physical activity among adolescents with cerebral palsy in resource-scarce environments. PMID:24607923

  15. Mafic Plinian volcanism and ignimbrite emplacement at Tofua volcano, Tonga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, J. T.; Cronin, S. J.; Turner, S. P.; Cooper, L. B.

    2011-11-01

    Tofua Island is the largest emergent mafic volcano within the Tofua arc, Tonga, southwest Pacific. The volcano is dominated by a distinctive caldera averaging 4 km in diameter, containing a freshwater lake in the south and east. The latest paroxysmal (VEI 5-6) explosive volcanism includes two phases of activity, each emplacing a high-grade ignimbrite. The products are basaltic andesites with between 52 wt.% and 57 wt.% SiO2. The first and largest eruption caused the inward collapse of a stratovolcano and produced the `Tofua' ignimbrite and a sub-circular caldera located slightly northwest of the island's centre. This ignimbrite was deposited in a radial fashion over the entire island, with associated Plinian fall deposits up to 0.5 m thick on islands >40 km away. Common sub-rounded and frequently cauliform scoria bombs throughout the ignimbrite attest to a small degree of marginal magma-water interaction. The common intense welding of the coarse-grained eruptive products, however, suggests that the majority of the erupted magma was hot, water-undersaturated and supplied at high rates with moderately low fragmentation efficiency and low levels of interaction with external water. We propose that the development of a water-saturated dacite body at shallow (roof to cause sudden evacuation of material, producing a Plinian eruption column. Following a brief period of quiescence, large-scale faulting in the southeast of the island produced a second explosive phase believed to result from recharge of a chemically distinct magma depleted in incompatible elements. This similar, but smaller eruption, emplaced the `Hokula' Ignimbrite sheet in the northeast of the island. A maximum total volume of 8 km3 of juvenile material was erupted by these events. The main eruption column is estimated to have reached a height of ˜12 km, and to have produced a major atmospheric injection of gas, and tephra recorded in the widespread series of fall deposits found on coral islands 40-80 km

  16. Use of an Intermediate-Scale Tank to Study Strategies for Modified NZVI Emplacement for Effective Treatment of DNAPL Source Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Mittal, M.; Phenrat, T.; Fagerlund, F.; Kim, H.; Cihan, A.; Lowry, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sources act as long term sources of ground water contamination. Emplacing modified nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI) particles in the source zone and area immediately downstream of the source zone may serve the dual purpose of reducing the mass transfer from entrapped DNAPL and reductive dechlorination of the dissolved mass, thus reducing the total mass loading to the plume. Placement of NZVI is expected to alter porosity resulting in flow bypassing which may reduce treatment efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction will depend on the NZVI mass emplacement and its distribution. Another issue of concern is whether DNAPL mass rebounds if the emplaced NZVI is oxidized. In an ongoing study, the basic processes of NZVI reactivity and mass flux reduction were investigated in small cells, columns and tanks. To understand these processes and upscale them to larger systems, a series of experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional intermediate scale tank. This paper presents the results from one of these experiments that focused on evaluating the effects of emplacing the modified NZVI particles in the source zone with the DNAPL and to intercept the dissolved plume immediately down gradient of the source with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the net mass flux loading to the plume. A 5 cm x 5 cm PCE source zone in a coarse sand lens embedded in a finer sand matrix was created in an intermediate scale tank 2.4 m x 1.2 m x 0.55 m. The mass flux generation from source zone and the plume configuration were monitored using aqueous samples extracted at 4 vertical arrays containing 9 ports in each. Polymer coated NZVI particles were injected 7.5 cm downstream of the source zone creating a reactive zone of 14 cm x 14 cm x 5.5 cm such that the particles blanketed the PCE source zone. Dissolved PCE concentrations were monitored after NZVI injection using the same vertical sampling array. Dechlorination byproducts were monitored to

  17. Thermal analysis of nuclear waste emplacement in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welded tuff is being evaluated as a possible medium in which to store nuclear waste. This report analyzes the heat effects of emplacing radioactive waste in welded tuff below the water table at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). One-, two-, and three-dimensional calculations were used to evaluate the heat effects of spent fuel (SF) and commercial high-level waste (CHLW) in three regions: the very-near field, the room and pillar, and the far field. It was assumed that the canistered waste was placed in a borehole with no additional waste packaging. As a result of the calculations, interim reference-repository conditions of a gross thermal loading (GTL) of 100 kW/acre and a 20% extraction ratio (ER) were defined for both SF and CHLW. For these conditions, far-field temperatures remain below 1000C and those in the room-and-pillar domain below 1200C. In the very-near field, canister centerline temperatures are 1950C for SF and 2950C for CHLW; borehole wall temperatures are 1840C for SF and 2220C for CHLW. (The room-and-pillar and far-field temperatures are recognized as upper limits.) Once a full waste package is defined, canister loading may have to be reduced to prevent excessively high temperature within the waste package

  18. The offshore disposal of radioactive waste by drilled emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preferred solution that emerged from this study was for a concrete semi-submersible platform to be maintained in position by a dynamic positioning station keeping system. The radioactive waste would be carried out to the platform contained in transfer flasks and loaded on to the platform. There, inside a flooded compartment, the flasks would be opened and the canisters lifted out and formed into strings which would then be lowered to the sea bed using drill pipe and guided into the previously drilled hole. Most of the operations for emplacing the waste are either within the bounds of existing technology or are within foreseeable development. However there remain considerable difficulties in recovering from various malfunctions, in particular a dropped string of canisters. Disposal of 400 m3 per year is within the capacity of a single offshore platform, though certain restrictions on the operation may be necessary if the waste is in the small diameter (300 mm) form. The cost of disposal of waste by this means would add about 0.2% to the cost of generation. The costs of disposal are not excessive and should not therefore be a deterrent from choosing this system if it should prove to be more reliable than any other system. (author)

  19. Emplacement mechanism of Linglong granitoid complex, Shandong Peninsula, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Linglong granitoid complex (LGC) is composed of four major plutonic units that intruded and cooled in the Middle Jurassic (170-155 Ma). Gravity-anomaly modeling indicates that the LGC is a sheet-like laccolith, less than 10 km thick, that dips shallowly below the surface toward the Tancheng-Lujiang (Tan-Lu) fault, a major lithospheric structure in Eastern China. Measurements of foliation in the field and measurements of planar and linear magnetic fabrics from the study of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in the LGC indicate that foliation is dominantly shallowly dipping and magnetic lineation is mainly parallel to the dip direction of the laccolith toward the Tan-Lu fault zone. The trend of lineations is consistent with flow of magma up the thrust to reach shallower levels. The magma of the LGC probably originated by crustal melting within the Tan-Lu fault zone and the emplacement of magma occurred along a shallowly-dipping thrust that drained the Tan-Lu fault zone, the mechanism of which is mainly dike-fed model.

  20. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification. The demonstration was installed at a benign site at the Hanford Geotechnical Test Facility, 400 Area, Hanford, Washington. The composite barrier was emplaced beneath a 7,500 liter tank. The tank was chosen to simulate a typical DOE Complex waste form. The stresses induced on the waste form were evaluated during barrier construction. The barrier was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45 degree angle to the ground, forming a conical shaped barrier with the waste form inside the cone. Two overlapping rows of cylindrical cement columns were grouted in a honeycomb fashion to form the secondary backdrop barrier layer. The primary barrier, a high molecular weight polymer manufactured by 3M Company, was then installed providing a relatively thin inner liner for the secondary barrier. The primary barrier was emplaced by panel jet grouting with a dual wall drill stem, two phase jet grouting system

  1. Understanding innovators' experiences of barriers and facilitators in implementation and diffusion of healthcare service innovations: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Julie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare service innovations are considered to play a pivotal role in improving organisational efficiency and responding effectively to healthcare needs. Nevertheless, healthcare organisations encounter major difficulties in sustaining and diffusing innovations, especially those which concern the organisation and delivery of healthcare services. The purpose of the present study was to explore how healthcare innovators of process-based initiatives perceived and made sense of factors that either facilitated or obstructed the innovation implementation and diffusion. Methods A qualitative study was designed. Fifteen primary and secondary healthcare organisations in the UK, which had received health service awards for successfully generating and implementing service innovations, were studied. In-depth, semi structured interviews were conducted with the organisational representatives who conceived and led the development process. The data were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Four main themes were identified in the analysis of the data: the role of evidence, the function of inter-organisational partnerships, the influence of human-based resources, and the impact of contextual factors. "Hard" evidence operated as a proof of effectiveness, a means of dissemination and a pre-requisite for the initiation of innovation. Inter-organisational partnerships and people-based resources, such as champions, were considered an integral part of the process of developing, establishing and diffusing the innovations. Finally, contextual influences, both intra-organisational and extra-organisational were seen as critical in either impeding or facilitating innovators' efforts. Conclusions A range of factors of different combinations and co-occurrence were pointed out by the innovators as they were reflecting on their experiences of implementing, stabilising and diffusing novel service initiatives. Even though the innovations

  2. Breaking Down Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty at 11 higher education institutions in California, New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico have been experimenting with computer conferencing on the BESTNET (Bilingual English-Spanish Telecommunications Network). The growing system is credited with creating an international student-faculty community that crosses cultural barriers for…

  3. Information barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An information barrier (IB) consists of procedures and technology that prevent the release of sensitive information during a joint inspection of a sensitive nuclear item, and provides confidence that the measurement system into which it has been integrated functions exactly as designed and constructed. Work in the U.S. on radiation detection system information barriers dates back at least to 1990, even though the term is more recent. In January 1999, an Information Barrier Working Group (IBWG) was formed in the United States to help coordinate technical efforts related to information barrier research and development (R and D). This paper presents an overview of the efforts of this group, by its present and former Chairs, as well as recommendations for further information barrier R and D. Progress on the demonstration of monitoring systems containing IBs is also provided. From the U.S. IBWG perspective, the top-level functional requirements for the information barrier portion of an integrated radiation signature-information barrier inspection system are twofold: The host must be assured that its classified information is protected from disclosure to the inspecting party; and The inspecting party must be confident that the integrated inspection system measures, processes, and presents the radiation-signature-based measurement conclusion in an accurate and reproducible manner. It is the position in the United States that in the absence of any agreement to share classified nuclear weapons design information while implementing an inspection regime, the need to protect host country classified warhead design information is paramount and overrules the need to provide confidence to the inspecting party regarding the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements. The U.S. IBWG has reached a consensus on several critical design elements that define a general standard for radiation signature information barrier design. Technical specialists from cooperating parties must be

  4. Barriers and post-closure monitoring (AL121125)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project focuses on the rapid implementation of near-surface barriers, biotreatment, and post-closure monitoring technology. It uses water-permeable and biologic barriers that chemically capture and/or degrade contaminants without significantly altering the natural water flow regime. Barrier approaches are being tested for two different applications. The first is the use of barriers for confinement of chemical contaminants for in-trench treatments with leach systems or an in-place bioreactor. The second is an enhancement of the current practice of emplacing grout or clay slurry walls into direct horizontal surface and subsurface water flows around a contaminated area by integrating permeable reactive barriers and petroleum reservoir gel/foam/polymer technology

  5. Conceptual designs of automated systems for underground emplacement and retrieval of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current designs of underground nuclear waste repositories have not adequately addressed the possibility of automated, unmanned emplacement and retrieval. This report will present design methodologies for development of an automated system for underground emplacement of nuclear waste. By scaling generic issues to different repositories, it is shown that a two vehicle automated waste emplacement/retrieval system can be designed to operate in a fail-safe mode. Evaluation of cost at this time is not possible. Significant gains in worker safety, however, can be realized by minimizing the possibility of human exposure

  6. Evidence for dike emplacement beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska in 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, D.C.; Power, J.A.; Moran, S.C.; Cashman, K.V.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Two earthquake swarms, comprising 88 and 2833 locatable events, occurred beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska, in May and August of 1996. Swarm earthquakes ranged in magnitude from -0.9 to 3.3. Increases in SO2 and CO2 emissions detected during the fall of 1996 were coincident with the second swarm. No other physical changes were observed in or around the volcano during this time period. No eruption occurred, and seismicity and measured gas emissions have remained at background levels since mid-1997. Earthquake hypocenters recorded during the swarms form a cluster in a previously aseismic volume of crust located to the south of Iliamna's summit at a depth of -1 to 4 km below sea level. This cluster is elongated to the NNW-SSE, parallel to the trend of the summit and southern vents at Iliamna and to the regional axis of maximum compressive stress determined through inversion of fault-plane solutions for regional earthquakes. Fault-plane solutions calculated for 24 swarm earthquakes located at the top of the new cluster suggest a heterogeneous stress field acting during the second swarm, characterized by normal faulting and strike-slip faulting with p-axes parallel to the axis of regional maximum compressive stress. The increase in earthquake rates, the appearance of a new seismic volume, and the elevated gas emissions at Iliamna Volcano indicate that new magma intruded beneath the volcano in 1996. The elongation of the 1996-1997 earthquake cluster parallel to the direction of regional maximum compressive stress and the accelerated occurrence of both normal and strike-slip faulting in a small volume of crust at the top of the new seismic volume may be explained by the emplacement and inflation of a subvertical planar dike beneath the summit of Iliamna and its southern satellite vents. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emplacement mechanism of Linglong granitoid complex, Shandong Peninsula, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN; Tianfeng

    2001-01-01

    , Wang Bincheng, Xu Jinfang et al., Geochemical background research of lead isotopic for regional rock in Eastern Shandong, Collection of Geology and Seeking Mineral Deposits (in Chinese with English abstract), 1994, 9(1): 65-77.[11]Berger, A. R., Pitcher, W. S., The structure in granitoid rocks: A review on the granitic structure, Proceedings of the Geologist Association, 1972, 81(part 3): 421-461.[12]Shaw, H. R., Fracture mechanism of magma transport from the mantle to the surface, in Physics of Magmatic Process (ed. Hargraves. R. B.), Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980, 201-264.[13]Ramsay, J. G., Emplacement mechanics of the Chindamora Batholith, Zimbabwe, J. Structural Geology, 1981, 3: 93-105.[14]Castrol, A., On granitoid emplacement and related structure: A review, Geol. Rundsch., 1987, 76: 101-124.[15]Apperson, K. D., Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic areas, Science, 1991, 254: 670-678.[16]Tikoff, B., Teyssier, C., Crustal-scale, an echelon-shear tensional bridge: A possible solution to the batholithic room problem, Geology, 1992, 20: 927-930.[17]Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources of Shandong Province, Regional Geology of Shandong Province (in Chinese with English abstract), Beijing: Geological Publishing House, 1991, 595.[18]Miao Laicheng, Luo Zhenkuan, Guan Kan et al., The implication of the SHRIMP U-Pb age in zircon to the petrogenesis of the Linglong granite, East Shandong Province, Acta Petrologica Sinica (in Chinese with English abstract), 1998, 14(2): 198-206.[19]Bathal, R. S., Magnetic anisotropy of rocks, Earth Science Review, 1971, 7: 227-253.[20]Hrouda, F., Magnetic anisotropy of rocks and its application in geology and geophysics, Geophysical Survey, 1982, 5: 37-82.[21]Rochette, P., Jackson, M., Aubourg, C., Rock magnetism and the interpretation of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, Reviews of Geophysics, 1992, 30(3): 209-226.[22

  8. Emplacement of Fahrenheit crater ejecta at the Luna-24 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Luna-24 site is situated in Mare Crisium at a range of 18.4 km from Fahrenheit, an Eratosthenian-aged crater 6.4 km in diameter. Fahrenheit's ejecta deposits have been degraded to such an extent that secondary craters and rays cannot be unambiguously identified in the vicinity of the Luna-24 site. On the basis of an analogy between Fahrenheit and Lichtenberg B (a much younger crater of comparable size located in northern Oceanus Procellarum) Fahrenheit ejecta deposits near the sample site are inferred to have consisted of secondary crater clusters, subradially aligned secondary crater chains, and lineated terrain furrowed by fine-scale radial grooves. At the range of the Luna-24 site more than 80% of the mare surface should have been morphologically disturbed by the ballistic deposition of Fahrenheit ejecta. Blocks and fragment clusters of primary Fehrenheit ejecta ranging up to 5-20 m in diameter are inferred to have impacted the local surface at velocities of 165-230 m s-1 forming secondary craters ranging up to 100m in diameter. The maximum depth of excavation of primary Fahrenheit ejecta deposited near the sample site is estimated to be at least 100m. Primary Fahremheit ejecta is expected to constitute a substantial fraction of the exterior deposits emplaced at the range of the Luna-24 site. Microgabbro and monomineralic fragments discovered in the Luna-24 drill core may have been derived from gabbroic rocks transported to the sample site by the Fahrenheit cratering event. This hypothesis is consistent with the widespread occurrence and characteristics of Fahrenheit ejecta anticipated in the vicinity of the Luna-24 site. (Auth.)

  9. Barrier for the H2CO→H2+CO reaction: A discrepancy between high-level electronic structure calculations and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unimolecular dissociation of formaldehyde to H2+CO was studied using extended basis set calculations and a variety of medium-to-high accuracy correlation recovery techniques. These included second and fourth order perturbation theory, multireference configuration interaction wave functions, coupled cluster theory with perturbative triples and full iterative triples, and estimated full configuration interaction wave functions. The intrinsic error of the electronic structure methods was assessed by extrapolating total energies to the complete basis set limit. Our best estimate of the barrier height, including zero point vibrational effects, is 81.9±0.3 kcal/mol, almost 3 kcal/mol larger than the experimental value of 79.2±0.8 kcal/mol. This estimate includes corrections for the effects of finite basis set truncation (which is negligible at the quintuple zeta level), higher order correlation recovery, core/valence correlation, and scalar relativistic effects. Using the same theoretical approach, we estimate the exothermicity of the dissociation reaction to be -1.6 kcal/mol, compared to experimental values in the -0.4 to -2.2 kcal/mol range. New calculations of the unimolecular dissociation rate constants using a variety of techniques failed to reconcile theory and experiment. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  10. Young Adult Cancer Survivors' Experience with Cancer Treatment and Follow-Up Care and Perceptions of Barriers to Engaging in Recommended Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann

    2016-09-01

    We examined correlates of low engagement in the healthcare system, experiences with survivorship care, barriers to follow-up care, and potential resources for promoting follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancers. We conducted a mixed-method study involving surveys of 106 survivors of childhood cancer aged 18-34 recruited from a university-affiliated children's hospital and an NCI-designated cancer center in the Southeastern USA. Phone-based semistructured interviews were then conducted in a subset of 26. Assessments included health factors, psychosocial factors, healthcare system interaction, and interest in resources to promote engagement in healthcare. Survey participants were on average 22.14 (SD = 3.16) years old, 50.0 % female, and 77.4 % White. Overall, 46.0 % had attended survivorship clinic, 47.2 % reported receiving a treatment summary, 68.9 % had a primary care provider, and 17.0 % reported no interaction with healthcare in the past 2 years. Correlates of less than annual healthcare provider visits included being older (p = 0.003), being male (p adult care. Participants highlighted the need for educational and psychosocial resources, particularly technology-based resources. Multilevel interventions are needed to increase engagement in survivorship care among young adult cancer survivors. Technology-based resources addressing social support and mental well-being are intervention possibilities. PMID:25948413

  11. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  12. Young Adult Cancer Survivors’ Experience with Cancer Treatment and Follow-Up Care and Perceptions of Barriers to Engaging in Recommended Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We examined correlates of low engagement in the healthcare system, experiences with survivorship care, barriers to follow-up care, and potential resources for promoting follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancers. We conducted a mixed-method study involving surveys of 106 survivors of childhood cancer aged 18–34 recruited from a university-affiliated children’s hospital and an NCI-designated cancer center in the Southeastern USA. Phone-based semistructured interviews were then conducted in a subset of 26. Assessments included health factors, psychosocial factors, healthcare system interaction, and interest in resources to promote engagement in healthcare. Survey participants were on average 22.14(SD=3.16) years old, 50.0 % female, and 77.4 % White. Overall, 46.0 % had attended survivorship clinic, 47.2 % reported receiving a treatment summary, 68.9 % had a primary care provider, and 17.0 % reported no interaction with healthcare in the past 2 years. Correlates of less than annual healthcare provider visits included being older (p=0.003), being male (pneed for educational and psychosocial resources, particularly technology-based resources. Multilevel interventions are needed to increase engagement in survivor-ship care among young adult cancer survivors. Technology-based resources addressing social support and mental well-being are intervention possibilities. PMID:25948413

  13. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  14. Investigating lava-substrate interactions through flow experiments with syrup, wax, and molten basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, M. E.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Among the many factors influencing the complex process of lava flow emplacement, the interaction with the substrate onto which flow is emplaced plays a central role. Lava flows are rarely emplaced onto smooth or regular surfaces. For example, at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, lava flows regularly flow over solid rock, vegetation, basaltic or silica sand, and man-made materials, including asphalt and concrete. In situ studies of lava-substrate interactions are inherently difficult, and often dangerous, to carry-out, requiring the design of controllable laboratory experiments. We investigate the effects of substrate grain size, cohesion, and roughness on flow mobility and morphology through a series of flow experiments using analog materials and molten basalt. We have developed a series of experiments that allow for adjustable substrate parameters and analyze their effects on lava flow emplacement. The first set of experiments are performed at the Fluids Mechanics Laboratory at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and focus on two analog materials: polyethylene glycol (PEG), a commercially available wax, and corn syrup. The fluids were each extruded onto a series of scaled substrate beds to replicate the emplacement of lava in a natural environment. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that irregular topography, particularly topography with a height amplitude similar to that of the flow itself, can affect flow morphology, width, and velocity by acting as local barriers or culverts to the fluid. This is expected from observations of fluid flow in natural environments. A follow-up set of experiments will be conducted in Fall 2015 at the Syracuse University (SU) Lava Project Lab. In this set, we will pour molten basalt directly onto a series of substrates representing natural environments found on the Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System. These experiments will allow for analysis of the effects of basaltic composition and high temperatures on lava-substrate heat

  15. Mare Basalt Volcanism: Generation, Ascent, Eruption, and History of Emplacement of Secondary Crust on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Wilson, L.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analyses of the generation, ascent, intrusion and eruption of basaltic magma provides new insight into magma source depths, supply processes, transport and emplacement mechanisms (dike intrusions, effusive and explosive eruptions).

  16. The emplacement of peridotites and associated oceanic rocks from the Lizard Complex, southwest England.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, C.A.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Styles, M.T.

    2002-01-01

    Upper mantle peridotites and associated oceanic rocks from the Lizard Complex, southwest England, preserve evidence for a multistage geological history. Steeply dipping pre-emplacement fabrics record high-temperature (900-1100 degreesC) shearing and exhumation of the mantle peridotites apparently formed during localized NE-SW rifting in a pull-apart basin setting (c. 400-390 Ma). Associated oceanic rocks (Landewednack amphibolites) preserve a pre-emplacement prograde brown amphibole-bearing m...

  17. Calculations of radiation field arising from heat generating radioactive waste emplaced in ocean sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy deposition rates from heat generating radioactive wastes emplaced in ocean sediments have been calculated. Two disposal options are considered; a penetrator, in which waste canisters are placed and then dropped into the ocean sediments; and a drilled option in which waste canisters are placed in a bored hole. Energy deposition rates are presented in tabular and graphical form for times between emplacement (50 years cooling) and 1000 years cooling to enable radiolysis rates and hence material corrosion rates to be determined. (author)

  18. Thermal Effects of Basaltic Sill Emplacement in Source Rocks on Maturation and Hydrocarbon Generation

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In sedimentary basins sills have a tendency to become emplaced in litholgies of lower mechanical competence, like shales, which can possess source rock qualities. In this study has the thermal effects of thick sills on sedimentary rock units at Svalbard, Norway, been investigated. This study should be directly relevant for sills in large scale sedimentary basins. If sills were emplaced in contact with the source rocks at great burial depth, a "source rock on a hot plate" type of situation...

  19. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed

  20. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

  1. Information barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An information barrier (IB) consists of procedures and technology that prevent the release of sensitive information during a joint inspection of a sensitive nuclear item, and provides confidence that the measurement system into which it has been integrated functions exactly as designed and constructed. Work in the U.S. on radiation detection system information barriers dates back at least to 1990, even though the terminology is more recent. In January 1999 the Joint DoD-DOE Information Barrier Working Group was formed in the United States to help coordinate technical efforts related to information barrier R and D. This paper presents an overview of the efforts of this group, by its Chairs, as well as recommendations for further information barrier R and D. Progress on the demonstration of monitoring systems containing IBs is also provided. From the U.S. perspective, the basic, top-level functional requirements for the information barrier portion of an integrated radiation signature-information barrier inspection system are twofold: The host must be assured that his classified information is protected from disclosure to the inspecting party; and The inspecting party must be confident that the integrated inspection system measures, processes, and presents the radiation-signature-based measurement conclusion in an accurate and reproducible manner. It is the position of the United States that in the absence of any agreement to share classified nuclear weapons design information in the conduct of an inspection regime, the requirement to protect host country classified warhead design information is paramount and admits no tradeoff versus the confidence provided to the inspecting party in the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements. The U.S. has reached an internal consensus on several critical design elements that define a general standard for radiation signature information barrier design. These criteria have stood the test of time under intense

  2. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  3. Self-sealing barriers of sand/bentonite-mixtures in a clay repository. SB-experiment in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years ago, GRS performed laboratory investigations on the suitability of clay/mineral mixtures as optimized sealing materials in underground repositories for radioactive wastes /JOC 00/ /MIE 03/. The investigations yielded promising results so that plans were developed for testing the sealing properties of those materials under representative in-situ conditions in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (MTRL). The project was proposed to the ''Projekttraeger Wassertechnologie und Entsorgung (PtWT+E)'', and finally launched in January 2003 under the name SB-project (''Self-sealing Barriers of Clay/Mineral Mixtures in a Clay Repository''). The project was divided in two parts, a pre-project running from January 2003 until June 2004 under contract No. 02E9713 /ROT 04/ and the main project running from January 2004 until June 2012 under contract No. 02E9894 with originally PtWT+E, later renamed as PTKA-WTE. In the course of the pre-project it was decided to incorporate the SB main project as a cost shared action of PtWT+E and the European Commission (contract No. FI6W-CT-2004-508851) into the EC Integrated Project ESDRED (Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs) performed by 11 European project partners within the 6th European framework programme. The ESDRED project was terminated prior to the termination of the SB project. Interim results were reported by mid 2009 in two ESDRED reports /DEB09/ /SEI 09/. This report presents the results achieved in the whole SB-project comprising preceding laboratory investigations for the final selection of suited material mixtures, the conduction of mock-up tests in the geotechnical laboratory of GRS in Braunschweig and the execution of in-situ experiments at the MTRL.

  4. Observation of an engineered barrier experiment in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (CH) with geophysical and hydraulic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the European Commission project EB 'Engineered Barrier Experiment in Opalinus Clay, which aims at the demonstration of a new concept for the construction of HLW repositories in horizontal drifts, in competent clay formations, high frequency seismic, acoustic emission, geo-electric and hydraulic in-situ measurements were performed. Investigations were carried out at different stages after the excavation of the EB niche as well as after the placement of a dummy canister, the sealing with a concrete plug and hydration of the backfill. The initial geophysical characterisation shows a clearly identified EDZ in the roof up to a depth of about 70 cm. At the sidewalls the EDZ reaches a depth of about 10 cm. Highest hydraulic transmissivities were observed at a distance of about 50 cm from the wall. After sealing the EB niche, a change in geo-mechanical rock parameters with time was expected due to the swelling of the backfill and local stress redistributions. These developments were monitored with seismic transmission (diurnal) and acoustic emission (permanent) measurements over a time span of 19 months. Geo-electric measurements were repeated at two and hydraulic measurements at three different stages after the sealing. Results show a decrease in seismic amplitude damping and an increase in seismic velocities in parts of the EDZ and the backfill which can be interpreted as a compaction due to saturation. Acoustic emission events are very rare. During the first 13 months about 100 events could be detected. Resistivities derived from geo-electric measurements indicate a rather homogeneous distribution of the backfill material and are suitable to define boundaries between disturbed and intact rock zones. Hydraulic transmissivities decrease of 2 to 2.5 orders of magnitude within about 2 years. (authors)

  5. Self-sealing barriers of sand/bentonite-mixtures in a clay repository. SB-experiment in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Czaikowski, Oliver; Hartwig, Lothar; Hellwald, Karsten; Komischke, Michael; Miehe, Ruediger; Zhang, Chun-Liang

    2012-10-15

    Several years ago, GRS performed laboratory investigations on the suitability of clay/mineral mixtures as optimized sealing materials in underground repositories for radioactive wastes /JOC 00/ /MIE 03/. The investigations yielded promising results so that plans were developed for testing the sealing properties of those materials under representative in-situ conditions in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (MTRL). The project was proposed to the ''Projekttraeger Wassertechnologie und Entsorgung (PtWT+E)'', and finally launched in January 2003 under the name SB-project (''Self-sealing Barriers of Clay/Mineral Mixtures in a Clay Repository''). The project was divided in two parts, a pre-project running from January 2003 until June 2004 under contract No. 02E9713 /ROT 04/ and the main project running from January 2004 until June 2012 under contract No. 02E9894 with originally PtWT+E, later renamed as PTKA-WTE. In the course of the pre-project it was decided to incorporate the SB main project as a cost shared action of PtWT+E and the European Commission (contract No. FI6W-CT-2004-508851) into the EC Integrated Project ESDRED (Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs) performed by 11 European project partners within the 6th European framework programme. The ESDRED project was terminated prior to the termination of the SB project. Interim results were reported by mid 2009 in two ESDRED reports /DEB09/ /SEI 09/. This report presents the results achieved in the whole SB-project comprising preceding laboratory investigations for the final selection of suited material mixtures, the conduction of mock-up tests in the geotechnical laboratory of GRS in Braunschweig and the execution of in-situ experiments at the MTRL.

  6. Degradation of concrete-based barriers by Mg-containing brines: From laboratory experiments via reactive transport modelling to overall safety analysis in repository scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Matthias; Wilhelm, Stefan; Hagemann, Sven; Xie, Mingliang; Wollrath, Jürgen; Preuss, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    The Morsleben nuclear waste repository (ERAM) for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste is located in an old rock salt and potash mine in Northern Germany. From 1971 to 1998, approximately 36 800 m3 of waste have been disposed of. Now, waste disposal is finished, and the repository has to be backfilled and sealed. The closure concept is based on extensive backfilling of the salt mine with an inexpensive concrete mixture. The major disposal areas, containing most of the waste, will be isolated from the rest of the mine building by sealing the connecting access tunnels. The good geological situation (an intact cap rock with very small flow rates) provides an excellent basic condition for a safe repository. However, the access of water to the remaining parts of the mine cannot be excluded. The brines that are formed in contact with potash salts will contain Mg in a concentration that depends on various factors and cannot be predicted. For backfill and closure of the repository, no common material chemically stable against brines of all possible compositions is available. Salt concrete has a low permeability but is corroded by brines containing Mg, whilst concrete based on Sorel phases is decomposed if the Mg-content of the brines is too low. In each of these alternatives, corrosion results in a strong increase of permeability and a loss of the mechanical integrity of the material. However, for large hydraulic seals the flow of corroding brines is limited because of the high hydraulic resistance of the barrier. Thus, the barriers will persist for a long time in spite of the chemical incompatibility of building material and brine. For the planning of the backfill and closure measures as well as for the license application procedure it is crucial to demonstrate that the seals of the major disposal areas will keep their function for a sufficient long time. This lifetime depends among others on the corrosion capacity of the brine to the building material, on the

  7. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the hydrogen permeation barriers which can be applied to the structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Pb-17Li blanket designs, although barriers are also necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers which provide greater than a 1000- fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors (PRFs) of 1000 to over 100000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison with laboratory experiments, i.e. less than 150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the radiation- and electric-field-induced enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower PRFs during in-reactor experiments. (orig.)

  8. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of hydrogen permeation barriers that can be applied to structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Li17-Pb blanket designs, although barriers also appear necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers that provide greater than a 1000 fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors, PRFS, from 1000 to over 100,000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison to laboratory experiments, i.e., <150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the REID enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower permeation reduction factors during in-reactor experiments

  9. Thermal barrier coating materials

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, David R.; Simon R. Phillpot

    2005-01-01

    Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  10. Employment and Adults Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Current Status and Experiences of Barriers, Accommodations, and Stress in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punch, Renée

    2016-01-01

    In an integrative review of the literature covering the period 2004-2016, the author presents a current picture of the situation of people who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) relative to employment and careers-particularly the barriers, facilitators, and stress levels experienced by working DHH adults. First, an overview is provided of findings from recent reports on employment outcomes for people who are DHH. Second, the author reviews the literature on employment and workplace barriers, facilitators, and accommodations for people who are DHH, and relates findings about DHH people's workplace-related stress and fatigue levels and the associated issues of job demand, job control, and social support in the workplace. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings, in particular the ways in which barriers to full participation of DHH people in the labor market can be addressed. PMID:27477043

  11. Equipment for the emplacement of heat-producing waste in long horizontal boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emplacement of heat-producing waste in long horizontal holes may offer several technical and economic advantages over shallow vertical hole emplacement. Less of the host rock suffers damage as a result of drift construction; the heat from the waste can be isolated from the access drifts for long periods of time; and the amount of rock which must be excavated is much less than in traditional disposal scenarios. One of the major reasons that has been used to reject the long hole concept in the past and adhere to the shallow vertical hole concept is the equipment required to drill the holes and to emplace and retrieve the waste. Such equipment does not currently exist. It clearly is more difficult to drill a 600 to 1000 foot horizontal hole, possibly 3 to 4 feet in diameter, and place a canister of waste at the end of it than to drill a 30 foot vertical hole and lower the waste to the bottom. A liner, for emplacement hole stabilization, appears to be feasible by adapting existing technology for concrete slip forming or jacking in a steel liner. The conceptual design of the equipment to drill long horizontal holes, emplace waste and retrieve waste will be discussed. Various options in concept will be presented as well as their advantages and disadvantages. The operating scenario of the selected concept will be described as well as solutions to potential problems encountered

  12. A comprehensive review of the barriers and promoters health workers experience in delivering prevention of vertical transmission of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Roseanne C; McMahon, Devon E; Young, Sera L

    2016-06-01

    Despite significant biomedical and policy advances, 199,000 infants and young children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) became infected with HIV in 2013, indicating challenges to implementation of these advances. To understand the nature of these challenges, we sought to (1) characterize the barriers and facilitators that health workers encountered delivering prevention of vertical transmission of HIV (PVT) services in SSA and (2) evaluate the use of theory to guide PVT service delivery. The PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using keywords barriers, facilitators, HIV, prevention of vertical transmission of HIV, health workers, and their synonyms to identify relevant studies. Barriers and facilitators were coded at ecological levels according to the Determinants of Performance framework. Factors in this framework were then classified as affecting motivation, opportunity, or ability, per the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability (MOA) framework in order to evaluate domains of health worker performance within each ecological level. We found that the most frequently reported challenges occurred within the health facility level and spanned all three MOA domains. Barriers reported in 30% or more of studies from most proximal to distal included those affecting health worker motivation (stress, burnout, depression), patient opportunity (stigma), work opportunity (poor referral systems), health facility opportunity (overburdened workload, lack of supplies), and health facility ability (inadequate PVT training, inconsistent breastfeeding messages). Facilitators were reported in lower frequencies than barriers and tended to be resolutions to challenges (e.g., quality supervision, consistent supplies) or responses to an intervention (e.g., record systems and infrastructure improvements). The majority of studies did not use theory to guide study design or implementation. Interventions addressing health workers' multiple ecological levels of interactions, particularly the health

  13. Emplacement feasibility of a multi-tier, expanded capacity repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    / mining practices. (ii) Radiation Hazards: T he presence of the waste-filled drifts 30 m above or below other drifts might cause elevated radiation exposures to workers during drift excavation and subsequent operations. It is well established that a 1-m or so cylinder of concrete, as used in dry cask surface storage at nuclear facilities, is sufficient to reduce radiation emanating from the concrete to safe levels. Radiation intensity declines exponentially with thickness of the 'container'. Thus, radiation levels in the adjacent tunnels will be negligible. (iii) Thermal effects: The natural rock temperature at Yucca Mountain is 24 deg C. Analysis indicates that heat generated by radioactive decay of the waste-filled drifts will cause a maximum temperature increase of <60 deg C above ambient (i.e., 84 deg C) at a radial distance of 30 m from the filled drift. Calculations indicate that the readily achievable removal of 75 watts /m of drift length is sufficient to bring the temperature in the drift to ambient 24oC. Removal of heat generated during the rock excavation process by tunnel boring machine (TBM), a more severe challenge, has been proven in deep mines in South Africa. The ventilation requirements to drive supplementary drifts at 30-m from a waste-filled drift and maintain a 24 deg C drift environment will be no different from the requirements when driving waste emplacement drifts already excavated. (iv) Thermo-mechanical effects: Increase in the rock temperature due to heat generated in the waste-filled drifts will produce thermal stresses in the rock that will be superimposed on the pre-existing rock stresses. The increased stresses will decline in proportion to the square of the distance, expressed as a ratio of the drift radius (2.75 m), from the heated drift. For example, at 25 m (i.e. 9 radii) spacing, the increase in stress at the supplementary tunnels will be (1/9)2 or approximately 1%. Based on existing engineering practice and experience, it is concluded

  14. Barriers in diabetes self management

    OpenAIRE

    Rising, Carl Johan; Lauwersen, Asbjørn Flyger; Stoustrup, Sune Wiingaard

    2013-01-01

    This project seeks to expand on the question: What barriers may occur in diabetes patients' self-care, and how can doctors and patients communicate across professionalism? This project deals with the barrier that may arise between the transfer of highly professional knowledge and patient. The project seeks to create an understanding on how diabetes patients, which is the target audience, understands and experience their illness, and thereby mapping key elements for further focus, to better th...

  15. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  16. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Return to Work Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals Experience- A Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sze Loon; Loh, Siew Yim; Su, Tin Tin

    2015-06-01

    Return to work (RTW) can be a challenging occupational health (OH) issue among previously-employed colorectal cancer survivors. This study aimed to explore the various perceived barriers and facilitators encountered during the RTW process in cancer survivorship, from the perception of healthcare professionals (HCP). Face to face, semistructured interviews were carried out on twelve HCP (government and private sectors) from various disciplines. Data collected were transcribed verbatim and data management was aided by NVivo software 8.0. A new theory from contextual data was generated using open coding, axial coding and selective coding. The HCP shared numerous barriers and facilitators associated with RTW, under four categories. The key barriers were disturbing side effects, psychological barriers (personal factor), compensation (financial factor), poor ability to multitask (work-related factor), long paid medical leaves policy, employer's lackadaisical attitude, lack of knowledge and awareness of RTW (environmental factor). Key facilitators identified were desire to resume working life and to contribute to society (personal factor), financial pressure, maintain organizational health insurance (financial factor), less physically demanding job (work-related factor), supportive workplace and strict organizational policy on medical leaves (environmental factor). While not all HCP were trained in RTW, they all agreed that RTW is important for survivors and workplace. Occupational health doctors have a direct role in helping survivors RTW. Early Intervention on RTW during survivorship should involve occupational health doctors and employers, targeting the modifiable factors (environmental and work-related) to improve RTW after cancer. PMID:26073502

  17. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report

  18. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-21

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

  19. The basic concept of the PEM emplacement method and its long-term safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUMO studied the basic concept of the PEM emplacement method which is a promising method for the emplacement of the EBS in a repository. In setting the concept, it is important not only to ensure the engineering feasibility but also to secure the long-term safety. Thus, NUMO carried out a preliminary simulation on chemical interaction between the EBS materials and residual materials to investigate the influences of residual materials on the performance of the EBS. In this paper, we report the results of the chemical simulation. (author)

  20. Emplacement time of Salai Patai carbonatite, Malakand, Pakistan, from fission track dating of zircon and apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, A.A.; Khan, H.A. (N.E.D., Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan). SSNTD-Lab.); Butt, K.A. (Atomic Energy Minerals Centre, Lahore (Pakistan))

    1991-01-01

    Based on fission track dating of zircon and apatite, the emplacement history of Salai Patai carbonatite has been traced. It has been estimated that the carbonatite was emplaced along the thrust plane associated with the Indian-Eurasian plate collision during the Oligocene period followed by some thermal/tectonic episode during Early Miocene. This negates the previous proposal that all carbonatites found in Pakistan are a part of a 200 km long alkaline province associated with the rifting of Peshawar Valley during Late Cretaceous or early tertiary. (author).

  1. Preliminary one-dimensional thermal analysis of waste emplacement in tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulmer, B.M.; Lappin, A.R.

    1980-04-01

    One-dimensional calculations of near-field temperatures resulting from waste emplacement in a multiple-layered tuff stratigraphy are presented. Results indicate a marked sensitivity of peak temperatures to assignment of in-situ fluid pressure, geothermal-heat flux, waste type, and location of waste relative to a specific stratigraphic discontinuity. Under the criterion that allowable initial-power densities are limited by the occurrence of boiling at a distance of 10 m from emplaced waste, allowable power densities are calculated to range up to 150 kW/acre or more, depending upon geothermal heat flux and waste type.

  2. Uncertainty and sensitivity results for pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time were conducted. Although preliminary, a number of interesting results were obtained. Uncertainty in the groundwater travel time statistics, as measured by the coefficient of variation, increases and then decreases as the modeled system transitions from matrix-dominated to fracture-dominated flow. The uncertainty analysis also suggests that the median, as opposed to the mean, may be a better indicator of performance with respect to the regulatory criterion. The sensitivity analysis shows a strong correlation between an effective fracture property, fracture porosity, and failure to meet the regulatory pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time criterion of 1000 years

  3. The TSS project: Thermal simulation of drift emplacement. Final report. Phase 2. 1993-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reference concept for spent fuel management of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany comprises both the reprocessing of spent fuel assemblies by recycling the uranium and plutonium and disposing the waste in boreholes in a salt dome and the direct disposal of the spent fuel elements. The direct disposal provides the packaging of the fuel rods in self shielding Pollux casks and their emplacement in the drifts of a repository mine in rock salt. The remaining volume of the drifts is backfilled with crushed salt immediately after the emplacement of the casks. (orig./GL)

  4. Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

    2000-03-01

    A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

  5. Magma Emplacement at Lemptegy Volcano, Chaîne Des Puys, France based on Structures, Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility and Paleomagnetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, M. S.; Delcamp, A.; van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2009-12-01

    The Lemptegy volcano is a strombolian double scoria cone in the Chaîne Des Puys, Auvergne, France that erupted about 32,000 years ago. The first cinder cone formed during a trachy-basalt eruption as a satellite vent of the Puy de Gouttes scoria cone. The second edifice developed as an individual eruption soon after. Since 1946, the Lemptegy volcano has been quarried for scoria and today offers unprecedented exposure of the shallow plumbing system (dikes and sills) of a volcano. In order to map the internal flow architecture of the plumbing system, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data were collected from ten dikes that occur near the central volcanic edifice. In total, twenty sites were established with one to four sites in each dike and 504 specimens analysed. Our sampling scheme allows for the magma flow pattern to be established within the margins and central part of the intrusions as well as possible along strike flow variation. AMS results yield a remarkably consistent dataset that provides constraints on emplacement. The degree of anisotropy is low to moderate and ellipsoid shapes are dominantly oblate. The maximum susceptibility axis (K1) and the imbrications of the magnetic foliation planes indicate northwest subhorizontal magma flow. These data are consistent with shear-related structures (e.g., tension gashes, Riedel shears, elongate vesicles) that show magma flow towards the central edifice. In addition, paleomagnetic data from each dike allows for an assessment of the emplacement sequence. We postulate that as each dike was emplaced it may have "shouldered" aside earlier dikes or dikes may have been displaced by localized slumping of the edifice. Based on modern-day scoria cone construction, we assume that the emplacement of the intrusions occurred over a very short time period relative to secular variation and we expect that all dikes record essentially the same geomagnetic field direction. Demagnetization experiments are underway and

  6. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification

  7. Early experiences on the feasibility, acceptability, and use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests at peripheral health centres in Uganda-insights into some barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiimwe Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While feasibility of new health technologies in well-resourced healthcare settings is extensively documented, it is largely unknown in low-resourced settings. Uganda's decision to deploy and scale up malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs in public health facilities and at the community level provides a useful entry point for documenting field experience, acceptance, and predictive variables for technology acceptance and use. These findings are important in informing implementation of new health technologies, plans, and budgets in low-resourced national disease control programmes. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative descriptive study at 21 health centres in Uganda was undertaken in 2007 to elucidate the barriers and facilitators in the introduction of mRDTs as a new diagnostic technology at lower-level health facilities. Pre-tested interview questionnaires were administered through pre-structured patient exit interviews and semi-structured health worker interviews to gain an understanding of the response to this implementation. A conceptual framework on technology acceptance and use was adapted for this study and used to prepare the questionnaires. Thematic analysis was used to generate themes from the data. Results A total of 52 of 57 health workers (92% reported a belief that a positive mRDT result was true, although only 41 of 57 (64% believed that treatment with anti-malarials was justified for every positive mRDT case. Of the same health workers, only 49% believed that a negative mRDT result was truly negative. Factors linked to these findings were related to mRDT acceptance and use, including the design and characteristics of the device, availability and quality of mRDT ancillary supplies, health worker capacity to investigate febrile cases testing negative with the device and provide appropriate treatment, availability of effective malaria treatments, reliability of the health commodity supply chain, existing national

  8. EVALUATION OF RISKS AND WASTE CHARACTERIZATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE TRANSURANIC WASTE EMPLACED IN WIPP DURING 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Channell, J.K.; Walker, B.A.

    2000-05-01

    Specifically this report: 1. Compares requirements of the WAP that are pertinent from a technical viewpoint with the WIPP pre-Permit waste characterization program, 2. Presents the results of a risk analysis of the currently emplaced wastes. Expected and bounding risks from routine operations and possible accidents are evaluated; and 3. Provides conclusions and recommendations.

  9. RADIOLOGICAL RELEASES DUE TO AIR AND SILICA DUST ACTIVATION IN EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the quantity and significance of annual Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface normal radiological releases due to neutron activation of air and silica dust in emplacement drifts. This calculation includes the following items: (1) Calculate activation of ventilation airflow through emplacement drifts to quantify radioactive gaseous releases; and (2) Calculate the bounding potential activated silica dust concentration and releases. The sources of silica dust may arise from air supply to emplacement drifts as well as host rock around emplacement drifts. For this calculation, the source of dust is conservatively assumed to be the host rock (Assumption 3.6), which is subject to long-term neutron exposure resulting in saturated radioactivity. The scope of this calculation is limited to releases from activated air and silica dust only, excluding natural radioactive releases such as radon or releases from defective waste packages (breached or contaminated). This work supports the repository ventilation system design and Preclosure Safety Analysis. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package (CRWMS M and O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and Operation Contractor] 1999a, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE [U.S. Department of Energy] 2003). The performance of the calculation and development of this document are carried out in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculation and Analyses'' and LP-3.30Q-BSC, ''Hazards Analysis System''

  10. From Embodiment to Emplacement: Re-Thinking Competing Bodies, Senses and Spatialities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this article I discuss how a shift from theories of embodiment to one of emplacement can inform how we understand the performing body in competitive and pedagogical contexts. I argue that recent theoretical advances concerning the senses, human perception and place offer new analytical possibilities for understanding skilled performances and…

  11. The emplacement of pahoehoe lavas on Kilauea and in the Deccan Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Sheth

    2006-12-01

    There is a growing interest in deciphering the emplacement and environmental impact of flood basalt provinces such as the Deccan, India. Observations of active volcanism lead to meaningful interpretations of now-extinct volcanic systems. Here, I illustrate and discuss the morphology and emplacement of the modern and active lava flows of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, and based on them, interpret the compound pahoehoe lavas of the Deccan Traps. The latter are vastly larger (areally extensive and voluminous) than Kilauea flows, and yet, their internal architecture is the same as that of Kilauea flows, and even the sizes of individual flow units often identical. Many or most compound flows of the Deccan Traps were emplaced in a gentle, effusive, Kilauea-like fashion. Bulk eruption rates for the Deccan province are unknown, and were probably high, but the local eruption rates of the compound flows were no larger than Kilauea’s. Large (≥ 1000 km3) individual compound pahoehoe flows in the Deccan could have been emplaced at Kilauea-like local eruption rates (1 m3/sec per metre length of fissure) in a decade or less, given fissures of sufficient length (tens of kilometres), now exposed as dyke swarms in the province.

  12. EVALUATION OF RISKS AND WASTE CHARACTERIZATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE TRANSURANIC WASTE EMPLACED IN WIPP DURING 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specifically this report: 1. Compares requirements of the WAP that are pertinent from a technical viewpoint with the WIPP pre-Permit waste characterization program, 2. Presents the results of a risk analysis of the currently emplaced wastes. Expected and bounding risks from routine operations and possible accidents are evaluated; and 3. Provides conclusions and recommendations

  13. Fish barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to literature reviews laboratory experiments with both strobe light and different kinds of sound stimuli were carried out. In the experiments silver eel, brown trout, arctic char and salmon smolts were tested. The experiments showed that in darkness silver eel avoided strobe light with intensities between 0.4 and 8.7 lux with 80-90% avoidance in 8.7 lux. The avoidance reactions decreased when background light was raised to 9 lux. Brown trout did not show as strong avoidance reactions possibly due to aggressive behaviour between different individuals of brown trout. The avoidance reaction was however more pronounced in dim background lift with an intensity of 5 lux than in darkness. The experiments also showed that the avoidance reactions started within a few seconds after exposure to strobe light. The frequencies 6.0 and 15 Hz were more effective as triggers of avoidance reactions than were the frequencies 2.1 and 160 Hz. Arctic char did not show any avoidance reactions to strobe light. It was actually attracted to strobe light with the frequency 160 Hz in total darkness and indifferent in dim background light 10 lux. Experiments in running water also showed that salmon smolts could be diverted from an area exposed to strobe light with the frequency 15.0 Hz. The effect was more pronounced in darkness than in dim background light and also more pronounced when water current was 20 cm/s than when it was 40 or 60 cm/s. Experiments to test the avoidance reactions to sound was also performed. The evaluation of these results where however complicated by the fact that the fishes swam rapidly to and fro in the experimental chamber and thus by pure chance very frequently were close to the sound generator

  14. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  15. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock volume 1: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involves isolating the waste in corrosion-resistant containers emplaced and sealed within a vault at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The case for the acceptability of the concept as a means of safely disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste is presented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) The disposal concept permits a choice of methods, materials, site locations and designs. The EIS presents a case study of the long-term (i.e., postclosure) performance of a hypothetical implementation of the concept, referred to in this report as the reference disposal system. The reference disposal system is based on borehole emplacement of used CANDU fuel in Grade-2 titanium alloy containers in low-permeability, sparsely fractured plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. We evaluate the long-term performance of another hypothetical implementation of the concept based on in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. The geological characteristics of the geosphere assumed for this study result in short groundwater travel times from the disposal vault to the surface. In the present study, the principal barrier to the movement of contaminants is the long-lasting copper container. We show that the long-lasting container can effectively compensate for a permeable host rock which results in an unfavourable groundwater flow condition. These studies illustrate the flexibility of AECL's disposal concept to take advantage of the retention, delay, dispersion, dilution and radioactive decay of contaminants in a system of natural barriers provided by the geosphere and hydrosphere and of engineered barriers provided by the waste form, container, buffer, backfills, other vault seals and grouts. In an actual implementation, the engineered system would be designed for the geological conditions encountered at the host site. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  16. Temperature, humidity and air flow in the emplacement drifts using convection and dispersion transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, G.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Bahrami, D.; Halecky, N.

    2009-10-01

    A coupled thermal-hydrologic-airflow model is developed, solving for the transport processes within a waste emplacement drift and the surrounding rockmass together at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Natural, convective air flow as well as heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during post-closure are explicitly simulated, using the MULTIFLUX model. The conjugate, thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the rockmass are solved with the TOUGH2 porous-media simulator in a coupled way to the in-drift processes. The new simulation results show that large-eddy turbulent flow, as opposed to small-eddy flow, dominate the drift air space for at least 5000 years following waste emplacement. The size of the largest, longitudinal eddy is equal to half of the drift length, providing a strong axial heat and moisture transport mechanism from the hot to the cold drift sections. The in-drift results are compared to those from simplified models using a surrogate, dispersive model with an equivalent dispersion coefficient for heat and moisture transport. Results from the explicit, convective velocity simulation model provide higher axial heat and moisture fluxes than those estimated from the previously published, simpler, equivalent-dispersion models, in addition to showing differences in temperature, humidity and condensation rate distributions along the drift length. A new dispersive model is also formulated, giving a time- and location-variable function that runs generally about ten times higher in value than the highest dispersion coefficient currently used in the Yucca Mountain Project as an estimate for the equivalent dispersion coefficient in the emplacement drift. The new dispersion coefficient variation, back-calculated from the convective model, can adequately describe the heat and mass transport processes in the emplacement drift example.

  17. Buffered and unbuffered dike emplacement on Earth and Venus - Implications for magma reservoir size, depth, and rate of magma replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Head, J. W., III

    1993-01-01

    Models of the emplacement of lateral dikes from magma chambers under constant (buffered) driving pressure conditions and declining (unbuffered) driving pressure conditions indicate that the two pressure scenarios lead to distinctly different styles of dike emplacement. In the unbuffered case, the lengths and widths of laterally emplaced dikes will be severely limited and the dike lengths will be highly dependent on chamber size; this dependence suggests that average dike length can be used to infer the dimensions of the source magma reservoir. On Earth, the characteristics of many mafic-dike swarms suggest that they were emplaced in buffered conditions (e.g., the Mackenzie dike swarm in Canada and some dikes within the Scottish Tertiary). On Venus, the distinctive radial fractures and graben surrounding circular to oval features and edifices on many size scales and extending for hundreds to over a thousand km are candidates for dike emplacement in buffered conditions.

  18. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  19. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  20. Barriers to nursing care in emergency wards

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudi, Hosein; Mohmmadi, Eesa; Abbas EBADI

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caring is the essence of nursing. Since care is influenced by cultural, economic, and social factors, various diverse barriers exist in the realization of care. The aim of the study was to clarify barriers to caring in emergency patients based on experiences of nurses and patients and their relatives. Materials and Methods: A qualitative design of content analysis was used to identify the barriers to caring in emergency patients. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 Iranian ...

  1. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  2. Breaching barriers to collaboration in public spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemann, Trine; Mitchell, Robb

    2014-01-01

    Technology provoking disparate individuals to collaborate or share experiences in the public space faces a difficult barrier, namely the ordinary social order of urban places. We employed the notion of the breaching experiment to explore how this barrier might be overcome. We analyse responses to a...... life in public spaces. Arising from this, we argue for the importance of qualities such as availability, facilitation, perspicuous settings, and perspicuous participants to encourage and support co-located strangers to collaborate and share experiences....

  3. Lunar mare deposits associated with the Orientale impact basin: New insights into mineralogy, history, mode of emplacement, and relation to Orientale Basin evolution from Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data from Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, J.; Head, J.W.; Staid, M.; Pieters, C.M.; Mustard, J.; Clark, R.; Nettles, J.; Klima, R.L.; Taylor, L.

    2011-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) image and spectral reflectance data are combined to analyze mare basalt units in and adjacent to the Orientale multiring impact basin. Models are assessed for the relationships between basin formation and mare basalt emplacement. Mare basalt emplacement on the western nearside limb began prior to the Orientale event as evidenced by the presence of cryptomaria. The earliest post-Orientale-event mare basalt emplacement occurred in the center of the basin (Mare Orientale) and postdated the formation of the Orientale Basin by about 60-100 Ma. Over the next several hundred million years, basalt patches were emplaced first along the base of the Outer Rook ring (Lacus Veris) and then along the base of the Cordillera ring (Lacus Autumni), with some overlap in ages. The latest basalt patches are as young as some of the youngest basalt deposits on the lunar nearside. M3 data show several previously undetected mare patches on the southwestern margins of the basin interior. Regardless, the previously documented increase in mare abundance from the southwest toward the northeast is still prominent. We attribute this to crustal and lithospheric trends moving from the farside to the nearside, with correspondingly shallower density and thermal barriers to basaltic magma ascent and eruption toward the nearside. The wide range of model ages for Orientale mare deposits (3.70-1.66 Ga) mirrors the range of nearside mare ages, indicating that the small amount of mare fill in Orientale is not due to early cessation of mare emplacement but rather to limited volumes of extrusion for each phase during the entire period of nearside mare basalt volcanism. This suggests that nearside and farside source regions may be similar but that other factors, such as thermal and crustal thickness barriers to magma ascent and eruption, may be determining the abundance of surface deposits on the limbs and farside. The sequence, timing, and elevation of mare basalt deposits

  4. Dyke emplacement and propagation: a new laboratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, R.; Benson, P.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that magma ascends trough the crust by the process of dyking. During dyke movement crustal rocks, specifically the volcano's basement rocks, fracture due to the stress imposed by the ascending magma, thus providing conduits for magma transport. Dykes are frequently seen in the field and have been reproduced via numerical and analogue studies. However, a number of assumptions regarding rock mechanical behavior frequently has to be made as such data are very hard to directly measure at the pressure/temperature conditions of interest: high temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Such data are key to simulating the magma intrusion dynamics through the lithologies that underlie the volcanic edifice. To bridge this gap, we have performed a suite of rock deformation experiments in both compressive and tensile regimes, using a Paterson-type triaxial apparatus on representative lithologies present in the basement of Mt. Etna. In the compressive regime, we find that sedimentary rocks present at a depth of aproximately 2 km show a B/D transition at around 300 degC and significant weakening with temperatures exceeding 400 degC. Volcanic rocks (basalt) shows a significant change in deformation behavior only at temperatures exceeding 800 degC. Such a large contrast in mechanical properties could be favorable for dyke deflection or dyke arrest. However, in the tensile regime, it remains a significant technical challenge to precisely reproduce the conditions of dyking in the lab. As a starting point, we are now testing an analogue material to replace the magma to avoid such high temperatures, relying of maintaining similar temperature/viscosity ratios between magma/country rock in the laboratory and the field. We chose PMMA (a.k.a. plexiglass) for this task as it displays a large range in viscosities (log(visc)range = 10 - 1) with temperatures between 100 and 300 degC, making it an excellent analogue material. In addition PMMA solidifies after the sample cools

  5. Transport barriers in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are some publications with indications that the formation of transport barriers in toroidal devices could take place in the vicinity of low order rational surfaces (RS). It is necessary to note that the environs of RS have very important peculiarities. In particular, a stochastic layer of magnetic field lines forms instead of separaterix which must separate the island surfaces from the adjacent to them non-island surfaces in stellarator magnetic configurations. The attempt to realize the formation of transport barriers near RS and to study their influence on the RF discharge plasma confinement was undertaken in presented experiments on the U-3M torsatron. The presupposition was made that the radial electric field profile would have sharp change on the width of stochastic layer near RS in the case of collisionless longitudinal motion of electrons in this layer. Experimental data obtained on the U-3M torsatron during the formation of interior and edge transport barriers are in a good agreement with this presupposition. The results of experiments on the U-3M torsatron are discussed in comparison with data of other helical systems. It is shown that the number of dependences (the threshold power and density, the time of barrier formation, the localization of radial electric field shear layer) are in a good agreement for all these systems. In conclusion, the common features of formation of transport barriers in non- axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric systems are discussed. (author)

  6. Magnetic fabrics and their relationship with the emplacement of the Piracaia pluton, SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, M. Irene B.; Pressi, Leonardo Frederico; de Assis Janasi, Valdecir

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic fabric and rock-magnetism studies were performed on the four units of the 578 ± 3-Ma-old Piracaia pluton (NW of São Paulo State, southern Brazil). This intrusion is roughly elliptical (~32 km2), composed of (i) coarse-grained monzodiorite (MZD-c), (ii) fine-grained monzodiorite (MZD-f), which is predominant in the pluton, (iii) monzonite heterogeneous (MZN-het), and (iv) quartz syenite (Qz-Sy). Magnetic fabrics were determined by applying both anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM). The two fabrics are coaxial. The parallelism between AMS and AARM tensors excludes the presence of a single domain (SD) effect on the AMS fabric of the units. Several rock-magnetism experiments performed in one specimen from each sampled units show that for all of them, the magnetic susceptibility and magnetic fabrics are carried by magnetite grains, which was also observed in the thin sections. Foliations and lineations in the units were successfully determined by applying magnetic methods. Most of the magnetic foliations are steeply dipping or vertical in all units and are roughly parallel to the foliation measured in the field and in the country rocks. In contrast, the magnetic lineations present mostly low plunges for the whole pluton. However, for eight sites, they are steep up to vertical. Thin-section analyses show that rocks from the Piracaia pluton were affected by the regional strain during and after emplacement since magmatic foliation evolves to solid-state fabric in the north of the pluton, indicating that magnetic fabrics in this area of the pluton are related to this strain. Otherwise, the lack of solid-state deformation at outcrop scale and in thin sections precludes deformation in the SW of the pluton. This evidence allows us to interpret the observed magnetic fabrics as primary in origin (magmatic) acquired when the rocks were solidified as a result of magma flow, in which steeply

  7. Emplacement technology for the direct disposal of spent fuel into deep vertical boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early sixties it was decided to investigate salt formations on its suitability to host heat generating radioactive waste in Germany. In the reference repository concept consequently the emplacement of vitrified waste canisters in deep vertical boreholes inside a salt mine was considered whereas spent fuel should be disposed of in self shielding casks (type POLLUX) in horizontal drifts. The POLLUX casks, 65 t heavy carbon steel casks, will be laid down on the floor of a horizontal drift in one of the disposal zones to be constructed in the salt dome at the 870 m level. The space between casks and drift walls will be backfilled with crushed salt. The transport, the handling und the emplacement of POLLUX casks were subject of successfully performed demonstration and in situ tests in the nineties and resulted in an adjustment of the atomic law. The borehole disposal concept comprises the emplacement of unshielded canisters with vitrified HLW in boreholes with a diameter of 60 cm and a depth of up to 300 m. In order to facilitate the fast encapsulation of the waste canister by the host rock (rock salt), no lining of the boreholes is planned. With regard to harmonize and optimize the emplacement technology for both categories of packages (vitrified waste and spent fuel) alternatives were developed. In this context the borehole emplacement technique for consolidated spent fuel as already foreseen for high-level reprocessing waste was reconsidered. This review resulted in the design of a new disposal package, a fuel rod canister (type 'BSK 3'), and an appropriate modified transport and emplacement technology. This concept (called BSK 3-concept) provides the following optimization possibilities: (i) A new steel canister of the same diameter (43 cm) as the standardized HLW canisters applied for high-level waste and compacted technological waste from reprocessing abroad can be filled with fuel rods of 3 PWR or 9 BWR fuel assemblies. (II) The standardized canister

  8. Experiment and performance study on the performance of brushless doubly-fed machine with barrier rotor%磁障转子无刷双馈电机运行特性及实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岳; 王凤翔

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the magnetic coupled performance of brushless doubly-fed machines(BD-FM), a magnetic barrier rotor structure of BDFM with simple structure and good performance is pro-posed. A 6/2 poles numbers and rated power 5 kW brushless-fed reluctance machine with magnetic barri-er rotor was designed by ansoft software. The characteristic of operation for BDFM with magnetic barrier rotor was analyzed. On these bases, the open-loop experiment of variable speed constant frequency (VSCF) for BDFG with magnetic barrier rotor was realized. The theoretical analysis and experimental study show that the performance of BDFM with reluctance rotor can be effectively improved by adding magnetic barrier properly in the rotor core, and the machine can keep the same advantages of simple structure and low cost as that of the normal reluctance rotor.%针对普通凸极磁阻转子无刷双馈电机的转子耦合能力差、效率低的问题,提出一种结构简单、性能良好的磁障转子结构,设计了额定功率为5kW、6/2极的转子带磁障的无刷双馈磁阻电机,运用有限元法分析了转子带磁障无刷双馈磁阻电机的电动和发电运行特性,在此基础上,对转子带磁障的无刷双馈电机进行了变速恒频发电的开环实验。理论分析和实验研究结果表明:适当在转子铁心中加入磁障,可以有效改善转子带磁障的无刷双馈磁阻电机的性能,同时又保留普通凸极磁阻转子结构简单和成本低廉的优点,为今后设计大功率磁障转子无刷双馈磁阻电机提供有价值的参考依据。

  9. Geological Disposal of Nuclear Waste: Investigating the Thermo-Hygro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Coupled Processes at the Waste Canister- Bentonite Barrier Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C. W.; Davie, D. C.; Charles, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of nuclear waste is being increasingly considered to deal with the growing volume of waste resulting from the nuclear legacy of numerous nations. Within the UK there is 650,000 cubic meters of waste safely stored and managed in near-surface interim facilities but with no conclusive permanent disposal route. A Geological Disposal Facility with incorporated Engineered Barrier Systems are currently being considered as a permanent waste management solution (Fig.1). This research focuses on the EBS bentonite buffer/waste canister interface, and experimentally replicates key environmental phases that would occur after canister emplacement. This progresses understanding of the temporal evolution of the EBS and the associated impact on its engineering, mineralogical and physicochemical state and considers any consequences for the EBS safety functions of containment and isolation. Correlation of engineering properties to the physicochemical state is the focus of this research. Changes to geotechnical properties such as Atterberg limits, swelling pressure and swelling kinetics are measured after laboratory exposure to THMC variables from interface and batch experiments. Factors affecting the barrier, post closure, include corrosion product interaction, precipitation of silica, near-field chemical environment, groundwater salinity and temperature. Results show that increasing groundwater salinity has a direct impact on the buffer, reducing swelling capacity and plasticity index by up to 80%. Similarly, thermal loading reduces swelling capacity by 23% and plasticity index by 5%. Bentonite/steel interaction studies show corrosion precipitates diffusing into compacted bentonite up to 3mm from the interface over a 4 month exposure (increasing with temperature), with reduction in swelling capacity in the affected zone, probably due to the development of poorly crystalline iron oxides. These results indicate that groundwater conditions, temperature and corrosion

  10. Factors influencing repository design for in-room emplacement in plutonic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro are studying the feasibility of disposal of nuclear fuel waste. A component of the research is the development of conceptual designs of disposal facilities including the surface and underground facilities necessary to receive, package and dispose of nuclear fuel waste, and the vault sealing systems to aid in its containment. This paper describes some of the principal factors influencing the design of a disposal vault using copper containers and an in-room emplacement configuration. These factors include: in situ stress conditions, room stability and design, container and cask design, engineered sealing materials and emplacement machinery. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  11. STRUCTURAL CALCULATION OF AN EMPLACEMENT PALLET STATICALLY LOADED BY A WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to static load from the mounted waste package (WP). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This calculation is associated with the waste emplacement systems design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The finite element solutions are performed by using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. The results of these calculations are provided in terms of maximum stress intensity magnitudes

  12. A multidisciplinary study on the emplacement mechanism of the Qingyang-Jiuhua Massif in Southeast China and its tectonic bearings. Part I: structural geology, AMS and paleomagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Wei; Chen, Yan; Faure, Michel; Shi, Y.H.; Martelet, Guillaume; Hou, Q.L.; Lin, Wei; Le Breton, Nicole; Wang, Q.C.

    2014-01-01

    During the Cretaceous, the South China Block (SCB) experienced a widely distributed extensional event including numerous plutons emplacement and basin opening. Investigations on the tectonic regime coeval with pluton emplacement, and emplacement mechanism of the pluton remain relatively rare in the SCB. In order to address these questions, a multidisciplinary approach, including field structural and petrographic observations, anisotropy magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and paleomagnetic analyses...

  13. Water and contaminant movement: migration barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration barriers are used in shallow land burial facilities to slow or stop the movement of water and contaminants and are discussed here as a single component embedded in a complex environmental system. Analytical solutions to solute transport equations are used to approximate the behavior of migration barriers and to derive design criteria for control of subsurface water and contaminant migration. Various types of migration barriers are compared and design recommendations are made for shallow land burial trench caps and liners. Needed improvements and suggested field experiments for future designs of migration barriers are then discussed relative to the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  14. Compressional granite-emplacement model: structural and magnetic study of the Trives Massif (NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Berdiel, T.; Aranguren, A.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.

    1998-10-01

    The Trives granodiorite is a syntectonically emplaced pluton belonging to the great Manzaneda batholith, which has intruded into the gneisses of the Ollo de Sapo Formation (northern part of the Iberian Variscan belt) during Carboniferous times. Combined metamorphic, petrofabric, structural and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility studies reveal that interactions between regional metamorphism, deformation and magmatism played the main role in strain partitioning in and around the emplacing Trives pluton. Low-dipping S-C structures carrying N140°E-trending stretching lineations exist in both the roof-pendants which contain sillimanite bearing gneisses and in the subjacent granodiorites which are located in the central areas of the Trives pluton, whereas subvertical shear zones but with the same stretching lineation orientations are found along the pluton margins. At deeper levels of the Trives granodiorite, there are fabrics which are related to the crystallization of magma at the emplacement level. In these rocks, magnetic foliations are mainly steeply dipping and magnetic lineations are N140°E-trending. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data here is consistent with field-observed macroscopic structures. Samples showing solid-state deformation display magnetic foliations and lineations subparallel to C-planes and their macroscopic stretching lineations, respectively. The foliations and lineations of magmatic origin are characterized by lower degrees of anisotropy. Structural maps of magmatic and solid-state deformation structures suggest that the emplacement of the Trives pluton was controlled by D 3-deformational structures, N140°E-trending transcurrent shear zones and crustal detachments, which developed in response to a NE-SW compressional stress field.

  15. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO2 gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a "high-temperature" case with temperatures exceeding the bo...

  16. Comparative evaluations of the thermomechanical responses for three high level waste canister emplacement alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural responses of three room and canister configurations proposed for the underground storage of high level nuclear wastes have been compared. Coupled secondary creep and heat transfer computations indicate that the future retrieval of waste is most readily assured with a design that combines a low extraction ratio (large pillars) with waste emplacement into the floors of each storage room. Thermoelastic computations show minimal room closure in comparison to room closure due to creep deformations

  17. Radiation doses in granite around emplacement holes in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Final comparisons are made between measured and calculated radiation doses around the holes in which the spent fuel was emplaced in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. Neutron doses were found to be negligible compared with gamma doses. Good agreement was found between the doses predicted by Monte Carlo calculations and those measured by short-exposure thermoluminescence dosimetry. Poor agreement was found between the calculational results and doses measured by exposure of LiF optical-absorption-type dosimeters for long periods, probably because of an inability to accurately correct for fade resulting from elevated temperature exposure over several months. The maximum dose to the rock occurred at the walls of the emplacement holes, and amounted to 1.6 MGy (1.6 x 108 rad) in granite for the emplacement period of nearly 3 years. It is recommended that dose evaluations for future high-level nuclear waste storage facilities also be performed by combining calculations and dosimetry. Passive dosimetry techniques, if used, should involve short exposures, so that laboratory calibrations can be performed with duplicate time, temperature, dose rate, and dose parameters. An attractive alternative would be to use active ionization chambers, inserted only periodically. These could be calibrated under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions, and could be read directly. 23 references, 7 figures, 8 tables

  18. Mechanical degradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain - A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation

  19. Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-07-05

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

  20. Field Features And Mode Of Emplacement Of Pegmatites Of Keffi Area North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Keffi area of North Central Nigeria hosts numerous pegmatite bodies which are related to the surrounding granitic intrusions islocated about 45 km east of the Federal Capital Territory Abuja Nigeria. Petrological investigation of the pegmatites and surrounding host rocks aimed at characterising and understanding field relations and mode of emplacement of the rocks with a view to assess their mineralisation potentials were carried out. From the field observations the pegmatites were characterised into 1 Pelitic schist-amphibolite hosted pegmatites and 2 Granitoids orthogneisses hosted pegmatites and the granites into 1 the Bakin Ayini biotite granites 2 the Angwan Madugu biotite-muscovite granites and 3 the Sabongida biotite-muscovite granites. It is clear that those discordantly emplaced in pelitic schists varied in shape and size with length and width ranging from 400-2000m and 2-20m respectively some are huge isolated sill-like and flat-lying whilst those hosted in orthogneisses are narrow ranging in length 40-1000m and width 1-4m crosscutting and vertically oriented along shear zones which suggest passive emplacement

  1. Emplacement and dewatering of the world's largest exposed sand injectite complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Timothy J.; Rowe, Christie D.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2012-08-01

    Sandstone injectites form by up or down-section flow of a mobilized sand slurry through fractures in overlying rock. They act as reservoirs and high-permeability conduits through lower permeability rock in hydrocarbon systems. The Yellow Bank Creek Complex, Santa Cruz County, California is the largest known exposure of a sandstone injectite in the world. The complex contains granular textures that record processes of sand slurry flow, multiple pore fluids, and dewatering after emplacement. The injection was initially mobilized from a source containing both water and hydrocarbons. The water-sand slurry reached emplacement depth first, due to lower fluid viscosity. As the sand slurry emplaced, the transition from slurry flow to pore water percolation occurred. This transition resulted in preferred flow channels ˜6 mm wide in which sand grains were weakly aligned (laminae). The hydrocarbon-sand slurry intruded the dewatering sands and locally deformed the laminae. Compaction of the injectite deposit and pore fluid escape caused spaced compaction bands and dewatering pipes which created convolutions of the laminae. The hydrocarbon-rich sand slurry is preserved today as dolomite-cemented sand with oil inclusions. The laminae in this injectite are easily detected due to preferential iron oxide-cementation of the well-aligned sand laminae, and lack of cement in the alternating laminae. Subtle textures like these may develop during sand flow and be present but difficult to detect in other settings. They may explain permeability anisotropy in other sand deposits.

  2. The ongoing dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Vazquez, Angel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity of Popocatépetl volcano has been characterized by emplacement and subsequent destruction of a succession of lava domes. Between the onset of the current eruption in 1994 and the time of this submission, 38 episodes of lava dome formation and removal have been identified. Each dome has showed particular features related to the magma extrusion process. Among other manifestations, dome-emplacement events have been usually accompanied by relatively low-intensity, protracted explosions referred to as exhalations. After variable times of residence, emplacements have ended in partial or total destruction of the domes by strong vulcanian explosions that produced sizeable ash plumes, with most of them also ejecting incandescent debris onto the volcano flanks. Here, we present a detailed account for the observed activity related to the domes' growth and destruction, related seismic monitoring signals, and morphological features of the domes based on 19 years of visual observations and image analysis. We then discuss a model for the process of dome growth and destruction and its hazard implications.

  3. The Swedish Concept for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Differences Between Vertical and Horizontal Waste Canister Emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) is preparing for the review of licence applications related to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) refers to its proposals for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel as the KBS-3 concept. In the KBS-3 concept, SKB plans that, after 30 to 40 years of interim storage, spent fuel will be disposed of at a depth of about 500 m in crystalline bedrock, surrounded by a system of engineered barriers. The principle barrier to radionuclide release is a cylindrical copper canister. Within the copper canister, the spent fuel is supported by a cast iron insert. Outside the copper canister is a layer of bentonite clay, known as the buffer, which is designed to provide mechanical protection for the canisters and to limit the access of groundwater and corrosive substances to their surfaces. The bentonite buffer is also designed to sorb radionuclides released from the canisters, and to filter any colloids that may form within the waste. SKB is expected to base its forthcoming licence applications on a repository design in which the waste canisters are emplaced in vertical boreholes (KBS-3V). However, SKB has also indicated that it might be possible and, in some respects, beneficial to dispose of the waste canisters in horizontal tunnels (KBS-3H). There are many similarities between the KBS-3V and KBS-3H designs. There are, however, uncertainties associated with both of the designs and, when compared, both possess relative advantages and disadvantages. SKB has identified many of the key factors that will determine the evolution of a KBS-3H repository and has plans for research and development work in many of the areas where the differences between the KBS-3V and KBS-3H designs mean that they could be significant in terms of repository performance. With respect to the KBS-3H design, key technical issues are associated with: 1. The accuracy of deposition drift construction. 2. Water

  4. Communicating across barriers at home and abroad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper intends to catalyze the exchange of experience among technical communicators in meeting the challenge of communicating across a multitude of barriers: linguistic, disciplinary, cultural, political, intellectual, and emotional.

  5. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  6. Thermal modeling of pluton emplacement and associated contact metamorphism:Parashi stock emplacement in the Serranía de Jarara (Alta Guajira, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuluaga C. Carlos A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    In the northernmost portion of the Serrania de Jarara (Alta Guajira, Colombia, low - medium grade metamorphic rocks from the Etpana Metamorphic Suite were thermally affected by emplacement of a small calc-alkaline intrusion (Parashi Stock. Detailed petrographic analysis in collected rock samples across the NE and NW plutonic contacts show occurrences of textural and mineralogical changes in the country rock fabric that evidence contact metamorphism overprinting regional metamorphism of the Etpana Suite. These changes include growth of andalusite (chiastolite, calcic clinopyroxeneand amphibole porphyroblast crosscutting Sn+1 metamorphicfoliation. Hornblende-plagioclase barometry (ca. 3.1 kbar and cooling models for the stock show maximum time temperature evolution in the country rock at the interpreted depth of intrusion (ca. 11 km and help to evaluate the behavior of the country rock with the changing local geotherm.

  7. The EC/NEA engineered barrier systems project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents examples from various disposal programmes and discusses lessons that may be drawn relating to disposal system design and the use of underground tests. Many useful large-scale experiments have been conducted in underground laboratories that have allowed an assessment of the feasibility of methods for tunnel construction, waste package emplacement, buffer and backfill emplacement, tunnel seal construction, etc. In general, these tests have been successful and have shown that the necessary techniques for manufacturing and installing EBS components are feasible and available. In some cases, tests have shown that designs or techniques need to be adjusted, or have enabled identification of the factors to be taken into account in future optimisation studies. Further trials of some methods are still required, particularly at the repository or industrial scale. Further experiments are also likely to be required to increase understanding of the long-term behaviour of the EBS after installation. (author)

  8. Enhancing the design of in situ chemical barriers with multicomponent reactive transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the need for systematic control of field-scale performance in the emplacement and operation of in situ chemical treatment barriers; in particular, it addresses the issue of how the local coupling of reaction kinetics and material heterogeneities at the laboratory or bench scale can be accurately upscaled to the field. The authors have recently developed modeling analysis tools that can explicitly account for all relevant chemical reactions that accompany the transport of reagents and contaminants through a chemically and physically heterogeneous subsurface rock or soil matrix. These tools are incorporated into an enhanced design methodology for in situ chemical treatment technologies, and the new methodology is demonstrated in the ongoing design of a field experiment for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) project at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The ISRM design approach, which systematically integrates bench-scale and site characterization information, provides an ideal test for the new reactive transport techniques. The need for the enhanced chemistry capability is demonstrated by an example that shows how intra-aqueous redox kinetics can affect the transport of reactive solutes. Simulations are carried out on massively parallel computer architectures to resolve the influence of multiscale heterogeneities on multicomponent, multidimensional reactive transport. The technology will soon be available to design larger-scale remediation schemes

  9. Barrier Certificates Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Liyun; Gan, Ting; Xia, Bican; Zhan, Naijun

    2013-01-01

    A barrier certificate can separate the state space of a con- sidered hybrid system (HS) into safe and unsafe parts ac- cording to the safety property to be verified. Therefore this notion has been widely used in the verification of HSs. A stronger condition on barrier certificates means that less expressive barrier certificates can be synthesized. On the other hand, synthesizing more expressive barrier certificates often means high complexity. In [9], Kong et al consid- ered how to relax the ...

  10. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  11. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they

  12. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project

  13. Evaluation of emplacement sensors for detecting radiation and volatile organic compounds and for long-term monitoring access tubes for the BWCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document evaluates sensors for detecting contaminants in the excavated waste generated by the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS). The Barrier Placement Machine (BPM) removes spoils from under a landfill or plume and places it on a conveyor belt on the left and right sides of the BPM. The spoils will travel down the conveyor belts past assay monitors and be deposited on top of the site being worked. The belts are 5 ft wide and transport approximately 15 ft3 /minute of spoils. This corresponds to a 10 ft per hour BPM advance rate. With a 2 in. spoils height the belt speed would be 3.6 in. per second. The spoils being removed are expected to be open-quotes cleanclose quotes (no radiation or volatile organics above background levels). To ensure that the equipment is not digging through a contaminated area, assay equipment will monitor the spoils for mg radiation and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The radiation monitors will check for gross radiation indication. Upon detection of radiation levels above a predetermined setpoint, further evaluation will be performed to determine the isotopes present and their quantity. This will require hand held monitors and a remote monitoring station. Simultaneously, VOC monitors will monitor for predetermined volatile/semi-volatile organic compounds. A Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) monitor is recommended for this operation. Specific site requirements and regulations will determine setpoints and operation scenarios. If VOCs are detected, the data will be collected and recorded. A flat panel display will be mounted in the BPM operator''s cab showing the radio nuclide and VOC monitoring data. As the BPM advances, a 3-in. diameter PVC tube will be placed on the bottom of the barrier slot in front of the 12 to 16-in. containment barrier being emplaced

  14. The inner membrane barrier of lipid membranes experienced by the valinomycin/Rb+ complex: charge pulse experiments at high membrane voltages.

    OpenAIRE

    Bihler, H; Stark, G.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetic analysis of charge pulse experiments at planar lipid membranes in the presence of macrocyclic ion carriers has been limited so far to the low voltage range, where, under certain simplifying conditions, an analytical solution is available. In the present study, initial voltages of up to 300 mV were applied to the membrane, and the voltage decay through the conductive pathways of the membrane was followed as a function of time. The system of differential equations derived from the t...

  15. “Whatever you are gay, straight whatever...” stereotyped from the outside: an exploration of women footballers’ gender barriers and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Bethan; Evans, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Women can be empowered by playing historically masculine sports, but can also encounter criticism and marginalisation if gender boundaries are challenged. The principal aim of the present study was to examine the lived experiences of 18-22 year old women football players from a University in the East of England. The study adopted a Bourdieusian framework to examine how participants contested and negotiated gendered practices within their sport. The ways in which participants adopted symbolic ...

  16. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information...... from risk analysis with operational safety management....

  17. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information...... from risk analysis with operational safety management....

  18. Safety- barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2008-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called 'bow-tie' diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation of safety-barrier diagrams to other methods such as fault...... trees and Bayesian networks is discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk analysis with operational safety management....

  19. Sensor Emplacement Techniques and Seismic Noise Analysis for USArray Transportable Array Seismic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, A.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Woodward, R.; Sauter, A.

    2013-12-01

    In preparation for the upcoming deployment of EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has supported exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement, and communication concepts appropriate for this challenging high-latitude environment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and in the lower-48 of the U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the weight of the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where there are few roads, cellular communications are scarce, most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the state. We will review the methods used for directly emplacing broadband seismometers in comparison to the current methods used for the lower-48 TA. These new methods primarily focus on using a portable drill to make a bored hole three to five meters, beneath the active layer of the permafrost, or by coring 1-2 meters deep into surface bedrock. Both methods are logistically effective in preliminary trials. Subsequent station performance has been assessed quantitatively using probability density functions summed from power spectral density estimates. These are calculated for the continuous time series of seismic data recorded for each channel of the seismometer. There are five test stations currently operating in Alaska. One was deployed in August 2011 and the remaining four in October 2012. Our results show that the performance of seismometers in Alaska with auger-hole or core-hole installations can sometimes exceed that of the quietest TA stations in the lower-48, particularly horizontal components at long periods. A

  20. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced its design are also presented, including materials handling, general logistics, and separation of radiological and nonradiological operations. Modifications to the used-fuel packaging plant for the filling and sealing of the copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal containers and a brief description of the common surface facilities needed by the disposal vault and the packaging plant are provided. The implementation of the disposal facility is outlined, describing the project stages and activities and itemizing a specific plan for each of the project stages: siting, construction, operation; decommissioning; and closure. (author)

  1. Risk assessment for waste emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administered by the Carlsbad Area Office, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is designed to permanently dispose of transuranic waste left from US nuclear weapons research and production. Project facilities, located 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, include disposal rooms mined 2,150 feet beneath the earth's surface in a stable, ancient salt formation. The US Department of Energy has established and analyzed the safety basis for handling and emplacement of contact-handled transuranic waste for disposal at the WIPP. The safety basis consists of management, design, construction, operation, and engineering characteristics necessary to protect the public, workers, and environment from the safety and health hazards posed by waste handling and emplacement operations. An assessment of hazards and the associated risk to safety was included in the effort. The hazard assessment technique used at the WIPP is a creative systematic interaction of a multi-disciplinary team that could be applied to other waste management activities. The qualitative assessment approach, which ranks hazards by likelihood and significance of consequence, would be useful for a wide range of risk analysis efforts. Hazards were systematically identified and assessed to evaluate the potential internal, external, and natural phenomena events that can cause the identified hazards to develop into accidents. The hazard assessment employed at the WIPP identified deviations from the intended design and operation of the waste handling system, analyzed potential accident consequences to the public and workers, estimated likelihood of occurrence, and evaluated associated preventative and mitigative features. It was concluded from the assessment that proposed WIPP waste emplacement operations and design are sufficient to ensure safety of the public, workers, and environment

  2. Emplacement temperatures of the November 22, 1994 nuee ardente deposits, Merapi Volcano, Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voight, B.; Davis, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A study of emplacement temperatures was carried out for the largest of the 22 November 1994 nuée ardente deposits at Merapi Volcano, based mainly on the response of plastic and woody materials subjected to the hot pyroclastic current and the deposits, and to some extent on eyewitness observations. The study emphasizes the Turgo–Kaliurang area in the distal part of the area affected by the nuée ardente, where nearly 100 casualties occurred. The term nuée ardente as used here includes channeled block-and-ash flows, and associated ash-clouds of surge and fallout origins. The emplacement temperature of the 8 m thick channeled block-and-ash deposit was relatively high, ∼550°C, based mainly on eyewitness reports of visual thermal radiance. Emplacement temperatures for ash-cloud deposits a few cm thick were deduced from polymer objects collected at Turgo and Kaliurang. Most polymers do not display a sharp melting range, but polyethylene terephthalate used in water bottles melts between 245 and 265°C, and parts of the bottles that had been deformed during fabrication molding turn a milky color at 200°C. The experimental evidence suggests that deposits in the Turgo area briefly achieved a maximum temperature near 300°C, whereas those near Kaliurang were <200°C. Maximum ash deposit temperatures occurred in fallout with a local source in the channeled block-and-ash flow of the Boyong river valley; the surge deposit was cooler (∼180°C) due to entrainment of cool air and soils, and tree singe-zone temperatures were around 100°C.

  3. A feasibility study of the disposal of radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments by drilled emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the second phase of a study of the feasibility of disposal and isolation of high level radioactive waste in holes drilled deep into the sediments of the ocean. In this phase, work has concentrated on establishing the state of the art of the various operations and developing the design, in particular the drilling operation, the loading of flasks containing waste canisters from supply vessels onto the platform, the handling of radioactive waste on board, and its emplacement into predrilled holes. In addition, an outline design of the offshore platform has been prepared. (author)

  4. Ophiolite emplacement by collision between the Sula Platform and the Sulawesi Island Arc, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Eli A.; McCaffrey, Robert; Joyodiwiryo, Yoko; Stevens, Scott

    1983-11-01

    Much of the tectonic complexity displayed in eastern Indonesia results from a series of Neogene collision events between island arcs, continental fragments, and the Australian continent. Here we examine the emplacement of a large ophiolite belt, resulting from the Miocene collision between the Sulawesi island arc and a continental fragment, the Sula platform. We present the results of several marine geophysical expeditions to the SW Molucca Sea and the NW Banda Sea, plus gravity and geology on the east arms of Sulawesi. The Batui thrust separates the ophiolite from sedimentary rocks deformed along the leading edge of the Sula platform. We mapped this thrust eastward from Sulawesi along the southern margin of the Gorontalo basin. The latter is floored by oceanic crust, and its south edge is uplifted against the thrust. Thus the Sulawesi ophiolite can be traced offshore to its origin as basement of the Gorontalo basin. The ophiolite is composed of harzburgite in the Southeast Arm and passes upward through a complex of gabbros and diabase dikes in the East Arm. Ophiolite melange underlies the harzburgites on the Southeast Arm beneath low-angle thrust contacts where seen. Our local observations show the melange to be composed of thrust packets of both serpentine and red shale matrix varieties. The packets are several hundred meters thick, and the melange, where studied, has a moderate north to northeast dipping foliation. This orientation, if regionally representative of the melange fabric, is consistent with a significant northward component of movement of the lower plate, probably the Sula platform or its margin. Where the ophiolite is in contact with rocks of the central schist belt, it dips under the schist, but where it encounters melange, or Mesozoic or Paleogene sedimentary rocks, the ophiolite is thrust over them. The tectonic overlap sequence, from west to east, is schist over ophiolite over older sediments or melange. The ophiolite appears to have been

  5. Interprofessional experiences of recent healthcare graduates: A social psychology perspective on the barriers to effective communication, teamwork, and patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Krist; Outram, Sue; Gilligan, Conor; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Achieving safe, quality health care is highly dependent on effective communication between all members of the healthcare team. This study explored the attitudes and experiences of recent healthcare graduates regarding interprofessional teamwork and communication within a clinical setting. A total of 68 pharmacy, nursing, and medicine graduates participated in 12 semi-structured focus group discussions in clinical workplaces across three Australian states. Discussion focussed on graduates' experiences of interprofessional education and its impact on their capacity for interprofessional teamwork and communication. The Social Identity and Realistic Conflict theories were used as a framework for qualitative data analysis. A consistent pattern of profession-focussed, rather than patient- or team-focussed goals was revealed along with reports of negative stereotyping, hierarchical communication, and competition for time with the patient. Graduates acknowledged the importance of communication, teamwork, and patient-centred care and felt a better understanding of the roles of other health professionals would assist them to work together for patients' wellbeing. Identifying workplace identities and differential goals has uncovered possible motivations underlying health professionals' behaviour. These insights may help improve interprofessional collaboration by focusing attention on common team goals, increasing feelings of worth and being valued among different professionals, and decreasing the need for competition. PMID:26230377

  6. Emplacement of lava flow fields: Application of terrestrial studies to Alba Patera, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological data are at present the major source of information for extraterrestrial lavas. Effusion conditions must therefore be inferred from the final shapes of flow fields, generally using terrestrial lavas as analogues and so presupposing similar emplacement regimes on Earth and other planets. Studies of terrestrial lavas suggest that the overall development of flow fields is systematic and that a general, normalized relation can be established linking the final dimensions of a flow field (specifically, average thickness and the ratio of maximum width to maximum length) to underlying slope and eruption duration, independent of explicit knowledge of discharge rate, gravitational acceleration, lava density, and rheology. This relation is applied to lavas on the Martian volcano Alba Patera, on which two distinct planimetric types of lava flow fields are identified, and eruption durations, average discharge rates, and average velocities are obtained. Imposing the constraint of a terrestrial emplacement regime, the model yields internally consistent results for subliquidus lavas and suggests that, at least for basaltic-basaltic andesitic compositions, the essential conditions of eruption may have been similar to those currently observed on Earth

  7. Structural features and emplacement of the late Svecofennian Perniö granite sheet in southern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selonen, O.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The 1840-1830 Ma old Perniö granite occupies the southern margin of the Sauvo-Perniö granite area located in the western part of the late Svecofennian granite-migmatite zone in southern Finland. The S-type Perniö granite is light to dark red, medium- to coarse-grained with euhedral K-feldspar phenocrysts forming the porphyritic texture of the granite. The high grade supracrustal volcanic rocks and mica gneisses in the Sauvo-Perniö granite area show polyphase deformation. The D1 is characterized by isoclinal and intrafolial Fl folds. During the D2 the supracrustal sequence was thrusted towards the northwest. Combined ductile E-W shear movements and NNW-SSE compressional movements defined a transpressional tectonic regime during the D3 deformation. The Perniö granite intruded along subvertical mid-crustal feeder channels and was emplaced as a sheet or sheets along subhorizontal shear zones during the late stage of the F3 folding. After intruding into the shear zones the viscous granite magma was deformed. The K-feldspar phenocrysts in the granite acted as rigid particles in a viscous matrix and were rotated and imbricated in response to shearing along the subhorizontal shear zones indicating movements of the upper side of the granite sheet towards the west. Strike-slip dilatancy pumping is suggested as a possible mechanism for the emplacement of the Perniö granite.

  8. Hazard and consequence analysis for waste emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Carlsbad Area Office established and analyzed the safety bases for the design and operations as documented in the WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Additional independent efforts are currently underway to assess the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) isolation period as required by 40 CFR 191. The structure of the WIPP SAR is unique due to the hazards involved, and the agreement between the State of New Mexico and the DOE regarding SAR content and format. However, the hazards and accident analysis philosophy as contained in DOE-STD-3009-94 was followed as closely as possible, while adhering to state agreements. Hazards associated with WIPP waste receipt, emplacement, and disposal operations were systematically identified using a modified Hazard and Operability Study (HAZOP) technique. The WIPP HAZOP assessed the potential internal, external, and natural phenomena events that can cause the identified hazards to develop into accidents. The hazard assessment identified deviations from the intended design and operation of the waste handling system, analyzed potential accident consequences to the public and workers, estimated likelihood of occurrence, and evaluated associated preventative and mitigative features. It was concluded from the assessment that the proposed WIPP waste emplacement operations and design are sufficient to ensure safety of the public, workers, and environment, over the 35 year disposal phase

  9. Mine stability evaluation of panel 1 during waste emplacement operations at WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific objectives of the work were defined by the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) as follows: (1) assess the stability of panel 1 during the proposed operation of waste emplacement; (2) estimate the amount of time before room closure would be expected to transfer rock loads to the waste packages. The work consisted of (1) an analysis of geotechnical data and a review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) plans for waste emplacement in panel 1, (2) an evaluation of ground conditions based on data analysis and observations of changes in ground conditions since the first evaluation in 1993 (USBM 1993), and (3) preparation of a report and presentation of the results to EEG staff. Excluded from this study are radiological safety issues and policies. The study is based on data provided by DOE and Westinghouse Electric Corporation (operator of the site) and conversations with DOE and Westinghouse personnel. MTI cannot independently verify the accuracy of the data within the scope of this study and recommends independent evaluations of data gathering, quality assurance procedures, and structural designs. The operator has the ultimate responsibility for structural designs and has expressed a strong commitment to ensuring worker safety

  10. Effects of annular air gaps surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister in deep geologic storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annular air spaces surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister in deep geologic storage will have significant effects on the long-term performance of the waste form. Addressed specifically in this analysis is the influence of a gap on the thermal response of the waste package. Three dimensional numerical modeling predicts temperature effects for a series of parameter variations, including the influence of gap size, surface emissivities, initial thermal power generation of the canister, and the presence/absence of a sleeve. Particular emphasis is placed on determining the effects these variables have on the canister surface temperature. We have identified critical gap sizes at which the peak transient temperature occurs when gap widths are varied for a range of power levels. It is also shown that high emissivities for the heat exchanging surfaces are desirable, while that of the canister surface has the greatest influence. Gap effects are more pronounced, and therefore more effort should be devoted to optimal design, in situations where the absolute temperature of the near field medium is high. This occurs for higher power level emplacements and in geomedia with low thermal conductivities. Finally, loosely inserting a sleeve in the borehole effectively creates two gaps and drastically raises the canister peak temperature. It is possible to use these results in the design of an optimum package configuration which will maintain the canister at acceptable temperature levels. A discussion is provided which relates these findings to NRC regulatory considerations

  11. Deformation Structures associated with the emplacement of high level intrusions: A study of Trachyte Mesa Intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. I. R.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Jarvis, I.; Murphy, P.; Davidson, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Most studies of sill and laccolith complexes have focused on the internal architecture and thermal effects of these intrusions, while few have looked in detail at host rock deformation structures associated with their emplacement. Various sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms have been proposed (e.g. radial growth/ bulldozing, and two-stage growth), each with their own distinct deformation style. Compressional structures likely dominate during radial growth (bulldozing) emplacement, while extensional structures are more likely to form during two-stage growth emplacement. In this study we focus on deformation structures (faults, deformation bands and joints) associated with emplacement of Tertiary sills and laccolith intrusions in the Henry Mountains, Utah. Trachyte Mesa, the most distal satellite intrusion to the Mt. Hilliers intrusive centre, is an elongate (NE-SW) laccolith concordant with the Entrada sandstone it intrudes. The intrusion is comprised of multiple, stacked intrusive sheets. Two structural transects across the northwest lateral margin have identified distinct structural domains within the host rock that reflect both temporal and kinematic variations in deformation. Three deformation phases are identified, interpreted to be pre-, syn- and late-emplacement structures. A background set of deformation bands (phase 1), trending oblique to the intrusion margin, is apparent across the entire area. A second set of deformation bands (phase 2) overprint the early phase. These are characterised by conjugate deformation bands that parallel the intrusion margin, and increase in intensity and spacing towards the intrusion. Within this same zone a series of calcite filled normal faults, striking parallel and perpendicular to the intrusion margin, are apparent. Due to their spatial, kinematic and overprinting relationships we interpret these to be linked to the emplacement of the intrusive body. Overprinting all other structures, are two sets of tensile joints

  12. Verification of the integrity of barriers using gas diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, D.B. [SPECTRA Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, C.V. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.

    1997-06-01

    In-situ barrier materials and designs are being developed for containment of high risk contamination as an alternative to immediate removal or remediation. The intent of these designs is to prevent the movement of contaminants in either the liquid or vapor phase by long-term containment, essentially buying time until the contaminant depletes naturally or a remediation can be implemented. The integrity of the resultant soil-binder mixture is typically assessed by a number of destructive laboratory tests (leaching, compressive strength, mechanical stability with respect to wetting and freeze-thaw cycles) which as a group are used to infer the likelihood of favorable long-term performance of the barrier. The need exists for a minimally intrusive yet quantifiable methods for assessment of a barrier`s integrity after emplacement, and monitoring of the barrier`s performance over its lifetime. Here, the authors evaluate non-destructive measurements of inert-gas diffusion (specifically, SF{sub 6}) as an indicator of waste-form integrity. The goals of this project are to show that diffusivity can be measured in core samples of soil jet-grouted with Portland cement, validate the experimental method through measurements on samples, and to calculate aqueous diffusivities from a series of diffusion measurements. This study shows that it is practical to measure SF{sub 6} diffusion rates in the laboratory on samples of grout (Portland cement and soil) typical of what might be used in a barrier. Diffusion of SF{sub 6} through grout (Portland cement and soil) is at least an order of magnitude slower than through air. The use of this tracer should be sensitive to the presence of fractures, voids, or other discontinuities in the grout/soil structure. Field-scale measurements should be practical on time-scales of a few days.

  13. Multilayer moisture barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  14. Tantalum oxide coatings as candidate environmental barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Moldovan, Monica; Weyant, C. M.; Johnson, D. Lynn; Faber, K. T.

    2004-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) oxide, due to its high-temperature capabilities and thermal expansion coefficient similar to silicon nitride, is a promising candidate for environmental barriers for silicon (Si) nitride-based ceramics. This paper focuses on the development of plasma-sprayed Ta oxide as an environmental barrier coating for silicon nitride. Using a D-optimal design of experiments, plasma-spray processing variables were optimized to maximize coating density. The effect of processing variables on c...

  15. A Semigroup Expansion for Pricing Barrier Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new asymptotic expansion method for pricing continuously monitoring barrier options. In particular, we develop a semigroup expansion scheme for the Cauchy-Dirichlet problem in the second-order parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs arising in barrier option pricing. As an application, we propose a concrete approximation formula under a stochastic volatility model and demonstrate its validity by some numerical experiments.

  16. Feasibility of permeation grouting for constructing subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efforts are being made to devise technologies that provide interim containment of waste sites while final remediation alternatives are developed. Permeation grouting, a technique used extensively in the civil and mining engineering industry has been investigated as a method for emplacing a subsurface containment barrier beneath existing waste sites. Conceptually an underlying barrier is placed by injecting grout into the formation at less than fracturing pressure from a series of directionally drilled boreholes beneath the waste site. This study evaluated the penetration and performance characteristics in varying soil conditions of four different grout materials (two microfine cements, mineral wax, and sodium silicate) at a field scale. Field testing consisted of grout injection via sleeve (tube-a'-manchette) pipe into both vertical and horizontal borehole configurations at the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration site at Sandia National Laboratories. Prior to, during, and after grout injection non-intrusive geophysical techniques were used to map grout flow. Following the tests, the site was excavated to reveal details of the grout permeation, and grouted soil samples were cored for laboratory characterization. The non-intrusive and intrusive grout mapping showed preferential flow patterns, i.e., the grout tended to follow the path of least resistance. Preliminary testing indicates that permeation grouting is a feasible method for emplacing a low permeability subsurface barrier in the semi-arid unconsolidated alluvial soils common to the Southwest. Despite the success of this project, difficulties in predicting grout flow in heterogeneous soils and non-intrusive methods for imaging grout location and continuity are issues that need more attention

  17. The Role of Capillary Barrier in Reducing Moisture Content on Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of the performance of engineered capillary barriers at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site, in which 1.67-m-diameter waste packages are to be emplaced in 5-m-diameter tunnels according to current design, brings up aspects not commonly considered in more typical applications of capillary barriers (e.g., near-surface landfills). Engineered capillary barriers typically consist of two layers of granular materials with a sloping interface, in which the contrast in capillarity between the layers keeps infiltrating water in the upper layer. One issue is the effect of thermohydrologic processes that would occur at elevated repository temperatures (and temperature gradients). For example, backfill materials may be altered from that of the as-placed material by the hydrothermal regime imposed by the emplacement of waste in the repository, changing hydrologic properties in a way that degrades the performance of the barrier. A reduction of permeability in the upper layer might diminish the capacity of the upper layer to divert incoming seepage or to cause a ''vapor lid'' whereby buoyant vapor flow would be trapped, then condense and drain onto waste packages. Other concerns are the result of highly spatially and temporally variable seepage distribution and the very limited spatial scale available for flow attenuation and diversion

  18. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons FR-om the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned

  19. A design study for the isolation of the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site using the viscous liquid barrier technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a description of the design study for a pilot-scale field demonstration of the Viscous Liquid Barrier (VLB) technology, a new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The demonstration site was Retention Basin 281-3H, a shallow catchment basin at the Savannah River Site, which is contaminated mainly by radionuclides (137Cs, 90Sr, and 238Pu). The goals of the field demonstration were (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier in order to isolate the contaminants, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier. The site was characterized, and preliminary hydraulic conductivity data were obtained from core samples. Based on the site characteristics and the functional requirements, a conceptual model was developed, the barrier specifications were defined, and lance injection was selected as the emplacement method. The injection strategy for the subsurface conditions at the site was determined using numerical simulations. An appropriate variant of Colloidal Silica (CS) was selected as the barrier liquid based on its relative insensitivity to interactions with the site soils, and the formulation for optimum site performance was determined. A barrier verification strategy, including hydraulic, pneumatic, tracer, and geophysical methods, was developed. A lance water injection test was conducted in order to obtain representative estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and its distribution for the design of the barrier emplacement. The water injection test demonstrated the lack of permeable zones for CS injection, and a decision not to proceed with the barrier emplacement was reached

  20. The internal geology and emplacement history of the Renard 2 kimberlite, Superior Province, Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, C. E.; Hetman, C. M.; Lepine, I.; Skelton, D. S.; McCandless, T. E.

    2009-11-01

    The Renard 2 kimberlite is located in the Otish Mountains region of Quebec, Canada and is one of the largest pipes in the Renard cluster. The cluster consists of nine kimberlite bodies and was discovered in 2001 by Ashton Mining of Canada Inc. and its joint venture partner SOQUEM Inc. Renard 2 was emplaced into Archean meta-greywacke derived migmatite, gneiss and granite of the Opinaca Subprovince of the eastern Superior Province at approximately 640.5 ± 2.8 Ma. An undetermined amount of erosion has occurred since emplacement with the present surface expression of the pipe estimated to be 0.75 ha. This kimberlite is interpreted as a steep-sided diatreme with minor irregularities in the external shape. The dominant infill is a massive volcaniclastic kimberlite (MVK) that is classified as tuffisitic kimberlite breccia (TKB) and is characterized by a high proportion of granitoid country rock xenoliths. A second dominant infill is a texturally complex, less diluted coherent kimberlite (CK) characterized locally by a transitional textures between CK and TKB. Surrounding the diatreme is a significant zone of variable width comprised of extensively brecciated country rock (+/-kimberlite) and referred to as marginal breccia. In addition to the two main rock types infilling the pipe, a number of hypabyssal kimberlite (HK) dykes and irregular shaped intrusions occur throughout the body, along the pipe contacts, within the marginal breccia and in the surrounding country rock. Geological features displayed by Renard 2 are similar to those described from Class 1 kimberlites of the Kimberley area of South Africa, the Gahcho Kué cluster of Canada and the Pimenta Bueno kimberlite field of Brazil. The economic evaluation of Renard 2 is in progress and to date has included extensive diamond and reverse circulation drilling as well as the collection of an underground bulk sample. Results from material sampled from Renard 2, including a 2449 tonne bulk sample, suggest Renard 2 has

  1. Emplacement of Basaltic Flow Fields: New Insights Using MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, J. M.; Ramsey, M. S.; Crown, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Surface units that reflect local emplacement conditions within the 1969-1974 Mauna Ulu lava flow field (Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii) have been identified and are being mapped using field observations and remote sensing analyses. Investigation of a preliminary study site on and below Holei Pali utilized high-resolution color aerial photographs [Byrnes and Crown, 2000. J Geophys Res 106, 2139-2151] and TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) airborne data. Four surface units were identified that are related to the state of the lava during emplacement and were found to be correlated with the pre-eruption topography but not to the major lava tube segments mapped previously. These units show variations at visible wavelengths related to color, the presence of a glassy surface crust, and unit (dm- to m-scale) morphology. Variations at thermal wavelengths are presumably related to surface variations in phenocryst abundance, vesicles/micron-scale roughness, and glass. Interpretations based on the TIMS data are significantly limited by noise in available data covering the flow field. The present study uses MASTER (MODIS/ASTER airborne simulator) data to extend the spatial and spectral coverage of the Mauna Ulu flow field. Preliminary analyses of the data (corrected for atmospheric effects) indicate that: (1) additional classes of surface units (such as shelly pahoehoe) can be identified within the flow field, and (2) systematic changes in emplacement occurred from the proximal to the medial and distal portions of the flow field. Comparison with ASTER images indicates that similar classes of surface units may be discriminated in both datasets, though MASTER is preferable for this study because it provides: (1) higher spatial resolution (especially in thermal bands), and (2) constant pixel size for all wavelengths. These factors allow for discrimination of smaller flow units and more accurate correlation of visible- and thermal-wavelength spectral signatures. The higher

  2. Syntectonic emplacement of the Middle Jurassic Concon Mafic Dike Swarm, Coastal Range, central Chile (33 degrees S)

    OpenAIRE

    C. Creixell; M.A. Parada; Roperch, Pierrick; D. Morata; Arriagada, C; Arce, C.P. de

    2006-01-01

    The Concon Mafic Dike Swarm (CMDS) consists of basaltic to andesitic dikes emplaced into deformed Late Palcozoic granitoids during the development of the Jurassic arc of central Chile. The dikes are divided into an early group of thick dikes (512 in) and a late group of thin dikes (0.5-3 m). Two new amphibole Ar-40/Ar-39 dates obtained from undeformed and deformed dikes, constrain the age of emplacement and deformation of the CMDS between 163 and 157 Ma. Based on radiometric ages, field obser...

  3. Development of engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and 316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  4. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  5. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen barriers are disclosed which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures. 2 claims, 3 figures

  6. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  7. Revisiting Emplacement Depths of the Fine Gold Intrusive Suite, West-Central Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, D.; Lackey, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Fine Gold Intrusive Suite (FGIS) is a large intrusive complex in the west central portion of the Sierra Nevada Batholith. Portions of the Sierra Nevada Batholith have been well studied for plutonic pressure and crystallization histories (e.g., Ague and Brimhall, 1988, GSAB), whereas the regional depth of emplacement of the FGIS is not well characterized, and in previous work pressure estimates were not corrected for crystallization temperatures. An accurate sense of barometric gradient in the FGIS is important to evaluate the roles of pre-batholithic structural breaks in controlling magma emplacement levels, and also to reconstruct erosional levels within the Sierra Nevada as a whole. In this study, samples from the FGIS, all from the Bass Lake Tonalite, were petrographically characterized to identify those samples that contain mineral assemblage and crystallization textures appropriate for application of the Aluminum-in-Hornblende barometer of Hammarstrom and Zen (1986) re-calibrated by Anderson and Smith (1995). Analysis of these samples and use of the barometer results in both pressure and temperature of crystallization. FGIS amphiboles are typical magnesio-hornblende on average: K0.2Na0.1Ca1.8[Mg2.4(Al,Fe3+)(0.2-0.6)]Si6.7Ti0.1Al1.3O22(OH)2. Plagioclase compositional ranges are Ab(54-69)An(30-45)Or(0-1). Bass Lake Tonalite data of Ague and Brimhall (1988) were re-calculated for typical plagioclase composition in the Bass Lake Tonalite (Ab62An37Or1), yielding slightly higher crystallization pressures (3.3 to 5.8 kbar) than the original range (2.4 to 4.5 kbar). New FGIS crystallization pressures of 2.6 to 3.5 kbar match the recalculated data well, thus providing larger coverage for estimates of emplacement depth. Apparent temperatures from adjacent amphibole and plagioclase rims were found to be 691 to 767°C. When all barometric data are considered together, and uncertainties of the calibration are factored in, we find that FGIS crystallization pressures

  8. Approach to calculation of pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a methodology for calculating the pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as part of the work it is doing to determine whether the site is suitable for development as a repository and, if it is suitable, to obtain authorization and a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to construct and operate a geologic repository at the site. The task of developing the methodology is formidable because flow in the unsaturated zone at the site is complex and because the methodology must be consistent with DOE's interpretation of its requirement. This paper describes the DOE approach, which incorporates model development work being conducted by the Sandia National Laboratory and the U.S. Geological Survey, to developing the required methodology

  9. Subsurface ices at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site: Assessing emplacement mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Mellon, M. T.; Skemer, P. A.; Shaw, A.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the emplacement of subsurface ices on Mars: vapor diffusion from the atmosphere, freezing of bodies of surface water (e.g., lakes or oceans), buried glaciers, or accumulation and burial of packed snow. These formation mechanisms predict different physical properties for the subsurface ices: vapor diffusion should produce pore ice, whereas other mechanisms should produce massive, relatively pure ice. NASA's Phoenix Lander uncovered two types of ice at its 2008 landing site on the northern plains of Mars: a light-toned ice (Dodo-Goldilocks) that broke into pieces during backhoe operations; and a hard, darker icy surface that had to be scraped to provide particulate materials for sampling (Snow White). Here, we use spectra from Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) and a non-linear mixing model with ice and soil components to determine the ice to soil ratio of the ices exposed at the Phoenix landing site. We find Dodo-Goldilocks consists of almost pure water ice. The darker icy material contains ~30 wt% ice (~55 vol%), indicating that it probably formed as pore ice between grains of soil. We conclude that these two types of ice represent two different emplacement mechanisms and periods of deposition. Snow White ice was probably deposited via vapor diffusion from the atmosphere. Dodo-Goldilocks ice was probably deposited through an ice-lens or needle ice mechanism. Buried snow or glacial ice is unlikely for Dodo-Goldilocks, given its restricted spatial extent and the fact that the site is covered by large rocks.

  10. Sequence of magma emplacement and sulfide saturation in the Gaojiacun-Lengshuiqing intrusive complex (SW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Marian; Wilson, Allan H.; Yao, Yong; Chunnett, Gordon; Luo, Yaonan

    2010-08-01

    The Lengshuiqing area contains several small intrusions made up of peridotite ± quartz diorite ± granite spatially associated with the Gaojiacun pluton (gabbroids + peridotite + diorite). Ni-Cu sulfide ore occur at Lengshuiqing, hosted in peridotite. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating produced the ages of 803 ± 4.2 Ma (peridotite), 807 ± 2.6 Ma (oikocrystic hornblende gabbro), 809 ± 4.3 Ma (hornblende gabbronorites) for the Gaojiacun pluton and 807 ± 3.8 Ma (diorite, intrusion I), 817 ± 6.3 Ma (quartz diorite, intrusion II) and 817 ± 5 Ma (peridotite, intrusion 101) for Lengshuiqing. These ages suggest the emplacement of the Gaojiacun pluton later than the intrusions from Lengshuiqing. The olivine from Lengshuiqing does not contain sulfide inclusions and is relatively Ni-rich (1,150-1,550 ppm Ni), suggesting its crystallisation before the sulfide saturation that generated the Ni-Cu deposits. The olivine of the gabbros in the Gaojiacun pluton is Ni-poor (250-800 ppm), which indicates crystallisation from a severely metal-depleted magma after a sulfide saturation event. The olivine in the peridotites from the Gaojiacun pluton has 800-1,150 ppm Ni and contains sulfide inclusions. Moreover, geological evidence suggests the genesis of the peridotites from Gaojiacun in conduits that were ascending through the gabbroids. A sequence of at least three stages of magma emplacement is proposed: (1) Lengshuiqing; (2) gabbroids from Gaojiacun; (3) peridotites from Gaojiacun. Given the age differences, the intrusions at Lengshuiqing and the Gaojiacun pluton might have been produced by different magmatic events.

  11. Initial results of tuff borehole sealing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and field experiments are in progress to determine the performance that can be expected of cementitious and of earthen (bentonite) seals when emplaced in welded tuff. Laboratory testing includes materials characterization testing radial permeameter testing of cementitious borehole plugs emplaced in welded tuff cylinders, flow testing of bentonite and of bentonite/crushed tuff plugs, axial strength of cementitious borehole plugs emplaced in welded tuff, and fracture grouting experiments. Experimental work is performed in Apache Leap tuff, a formation exposed in east-central Arizona. Mineralogical, chemical, hydrological and mechanical characterization shows reasonable similarity between the Apache Leap tuff and the Topopah Spring tuff, the proposed Yucca Mountain repository host formation. The main conclusion from the mechanical characterization testing is that the tested tuff, not unexpectedly, is an extremely heterogeneous rock, with highly variable properties. A second notable observation is the extremely low saturated hydraulic conductivity of intact welded tuff, notwithstanding its very high porosity. Mixtures of bentonite and crushed tuff show that samples containing 25 or 35 percent bentonite (by weight) have permeabilities of the same order of magnitude as similarly prepared and emplaced samples consisting of bentonite only. Permeability is noticeably pressure-dependent. Short-term bond strengths of cementitious seals emplaced in tuff cylinders are moderately high, in the range of 3 to 8 MPa, with considerable variability. Results indicate a marked decrease in strength with increasing plug (or borehole) diameter. A pronounced strength loss occurs at 90C, but not at 70C. 12 refs., 6 figs

  12. Child Abuse Reporting Barriers: Iranian Nurses’ Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Borimnejad, Leili; Khoshnavay Fomani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although in many countries child abuse reporting is mandated, Iranian nurses report abused cases voluntary. Some of the cases are reported to the police and others are referred to welfare organizations or other non-governmental organizations. Absence of a uniform reporting system along with a lack of legal support in the specific cultural context of Iran has resulted challenges for the reporters of child abuse. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the Iranian nurses’ e...

  13. Electron tunneling across a tunable potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experiment where the elementary quantum electron tunneling process should be affected by an independent gate voltage parameter. We have realized nanotransistors where the source and drain electrodes are created by electromigration inducing a nanometer sized gap acting as a tunnel barrier. The barrier potential shape is in first approximation considered trapezoidal. The application of a voltage to the gate electrode close to the barrier region can in principle affect the barrier shape. Simulations of the source drain tunnel current as a function of the gate voltage predict modulations as large as one hundred percent. The difficulty of observing the predicted behaviour in our samples might be due to the peculiar geometry of the realized tunnel junction.

  14. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  15. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work by...

  16. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  17. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, C M

    2012-01-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf system for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf systems, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  18. Simultaneous batholith emplacement, terrane/continent collision, and oroclinal bending in the Blue Mountains Province, North American Cordillera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, J.; Verner, K.; Tomek, Filip; Holub, F. V.; Johnson, K.; Schwartz, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 6 (2015), s. 1107-1128. ISSN 0278-7407 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * North American Cordillera * orocline * pluton emplacement * terrane accretion * terrane/continent collision Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2014

  19. Granitic magma emplacement and deformation during early-orogenic syn-convergent transtension: The Stare Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, JUL (2015), s. 50-66. ISSN 0264-3707 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * Bohemian Massif * pluton emplacement * granite * transtension * Variscan orogeny Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.217, year: 2014

  20. Using micro-isotopic approaches to evaluate the origin and emplacement mechanism of the Basement Sill, Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J. P.; Jerram, D.; Petford, N.; Marsh, B.

    2005-12-01

    Isotopic fingerprinting of mineral phases in volcanic rocks has been successfully employed recently to track magma evolution and to identify populations from different sources. Integration of this approach with textural characterisation allows chemical evolution to be integrated with physical changes (growth, nucleation, mixing). In plutonic rocks this approach has been shown to be valid, despite the potential for isotopic re-equilibration during more protracted cooling than volcanic rocks. In fact, the degree of isotopic reequilibration can be used to constrain the cooling rate of the rock, which, in turn, relates to the emplacement history. At the Rum layered mafic intrusion, NW Scotland, isotopically distinct plagioclase cores and rims suggest relatively rapid cooling (at the scale of an individual layer) of the order 0.1°C per year, consistent with sill-like emplacement. The origin of isotopic variation is consistent with growth from a progressively contaminated magma prior to transport and deposition. The Basement Sill of the Dry Valleys Complex, Antarctica, contains an opx-rich tongue claimed to be emplaced as a crystal mush into a crystal-poor magmatic envelope. Given the broadly similar dimensions and compositions of the Rum Intrusion and Basement Sill we expect to be able to use micro-isotopic analyses of cumulus plagioclase crystals in the opx tongue to a) determine whether the magmatic source is the same as the rest of the sill, b) constrain the effects of contamination during crystal growth and emplacement and c) constrain cooling pathways

  1. Hanford 100-N Area In Situ Apatite and Phosphate Emplacement by Groundwater and Jet Injection: Geochemical and Physical Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate emplacement of phosphate into subsurface sediments in the Hanford Site 100-N Area by two different technologies: groundwater injection of a Ca-citrate-PO4 solution and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate and/or fish-bone apatite. In situ emplacement of phosphate and apatite adsorbs, then incorporates Sr-90 into the apatite structure by substitution for calcium. Overall, both technologies (groundwater injection of Ca-citrate-PO4) and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate/fish-bone apatite) delivered sufficient phosphate to subsur¬face sediments in the 100-N Area. Over years to decades, additional Sr-90 will incorporate into the apatite precipitate. Therefore, high pressure water jetting is a viable technology to emplace phosphate or apatite in shallow subsurface sediments difficult to emplace by Ca-citrate-PO4 groundwater injections, but further analysis is needed to quantify the relevant areal extent of phosphate deposition (in the 5- to 15-ft distance from injection points) and cause of the high deposition in finer grained sediments.

  2. Long-term Performance of Engineered Barrier Systems (PEBS) - An International EURATOM Project on the Study and Testing of Engineered Barriers for the Final Disposal of HAW Using PEBS as an Example - 13299

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mente, M. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The main aim of the PEBS project is to evaluate the sealing and barrier performance of the EBS over time, through development of a comprehensive approach involving experiments, model development, and consideration of the potential impacts on long-term safety functions. The experiments and models cover the full range of conditions, from initial emplacement of wastes (high heat generation and EBS re-saturation) through to later stage establishment of near steady state conditions, i.e. full re-saturation and thermal equilibrium with the host rock. These aspects will be integrated in a manner that will lead to greater certainty and thus greater confidence regarding the development from the initial transient state of the EBS to its long-term state, which provides the required isolation of the wastes. The work proposed within the project builds on existing knowledge and experience generated during recent years and supported by ongoing national and EC research programs. The project aims to provide a more complete description of the THM and THMC (thermo-hydro-mechanical- chemical) evolution of the EBS system, a more quantitative basis for relating the evolutionary behavior to the safety functions of the system, and a further clarification of the significance of residual uncertainties for long-term performance assessment. The importance of uncertainties arising from potential disagreement between the process models and the laboratory and in-situ experiments to be performed within PEBS, and their implications for an extrapolation of the results, will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on possible impacts on safety functions. In addition to the scientific-technical aims, the consortium will disseminate the basic findings to the broad scientific community within the EU, China and Japan, use expertise gained for public information purposes, and promote knowledge and technology transfer through training. (authors)

  3. Long-term Performance of Engineered Barrier Systems (PEBS) - An International EURATOM Project on the Study and Testing of Engineered Barriers for the Final Disposal of HAW Using PEBS as an Example - 13299

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the PEBS project is to evaluate the sealing and barrier performance of the EBS over time, through development of a comprehensive approach involving experiments, model development, and consideration of the potential impacts on long-term safety functions. The experiments and models cover the full range of conditions, from initial emplacement of wastes (high heat generation and EBS re-saturation) through to later stage establishment of near steady state conditions, i.e. full re-saturation and thermal equilibrium with the host rock. These aspects will be integrated in a manner that will lead to greater certainty and thus greater confidence regarding the development from the initial transient state of the EBS to its long-term state, which provides the required isolation of the wastes. The work proposed within the project builds on existing knowledge and experience generated during recent years and supported by ongoing national and EC research programs. The project aims to provide a more complete description of the THM and THMC (thermo-hydro-mechanical- chemical) evolution of the EBS system, a more quantitative basis for relating the evolutionary behavior to the safety functions of the system, and a further clarification of the significance of residual uncertainties for long-term performance assessment. The importance of uncertainties arising from potential disagreement between the process models and the laboratory and in-situ experiments to be performed within PEBS, and their implications for an extrapolation of the results, will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on possible impacts on safety functions. In addition to the scientific-technical aims, the consortium will disseminate the basic findings to the broad scientific community within the EU, China and Japan, use expertise gained for public information purposes, and promote knowledge and technology transfer through training. (authors)

  4. Protective barrier development: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protective barrier and warning marker systems are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth's surface at the Hanford Site. The barrier is designed to function in an arid to semiarid climate, to limit infiltration and percolation of water through the waste zone to near-zero, to be maintenance free, and to last up to 10,000 yr. Natural materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, clay, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity and to create an integrated structure with redundant features. These materials isolate wastes by limiting water drainage; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling emission of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion. Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory efforts to assess the performance of various barrier and marker designs will be discussed

  5. Information barriers and authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  6. Hemicellulose as barrier material

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas, Hartman

    2006-01-01

    Polysaccharides constitute an important source of raw materials for the packaging industry today. Polysaccharides have good natural barrier properties which are necessary for packaging films. Cellulose is the forerunner among renewable polymers for such applications. Hemicelluloses represent a new interesting breed of barrier materials. We have chosen to work with the hemicellulose O-acetyl-galactoglucomannan (AcGGM). The high water solubility of this particular hemicellulose extracted from p...

  7. Barriers to SCM implementing

    OpenAIRE

    M.E. Rosli; B. Md Dero; A.R. Ismail; M.N. Ab Rahman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper explores the barriers faced by Malaysian manufacturing companies in successfullyimplementing the Supply Chain Management (SCM). The study has highlighted some pertinent factorsperforming the barriers that are most frequently reported by the studied companies. Sixteen companies, fromservice and manufacturing companies were studied over a period of two years to assess their SCM practicesthrough survey and interview processes.Design/methodology/approach: This part discusses t...

  8. Morphology and Emplacement of the Muliwai a Pele Lava Channel, Mauna Ulu (Kilauea, Hawai'i)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A.; Rowland, S.

    2007-12-01

    (mean = 9 m), and the channel width varies between narrow (7-14 m wide) and broad (15-25 m wide) sections as the underlying slope begins to steepen. The over-deepening may be the result of thermal and mechanical erosion. (5) 5.1 - 5.6 km Distal - Over this section the channel descends the steep (20-30 °) slopes of Poliokeawe Pali, at the base of which the channel dies out to feed ~2.8 km of dispersed 'a'a flow. The channel features indicate variable supply over the course of emplacement, resulting in a three-stage construction process. First, a high effusion rate phase emplaced a basal 'a'a unit, that crops out along most of the medial section. Within this basal unit the channel developed. For the majority of the channel's life, lower-flux (<10 m3 s-1) flow dominated, and localized tubes developed under and between ponds of viscous lava collecting between blockages. Occasionally, short-lived (~100 3 s-1) surges emplaced fluid, vesicular lava to build pahoehoe overflow units. These surges also transported blockage material.

  9. Practice environment for nurse practitioners in California. Identifying barriers.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, A.L.; Gilliss, C L; Yoder, L

    1996-01-01

    Barriers exist that prevent nurse practitioners from using their primary health care knowledge and skills. We present the incidence of and specific barriers experienced by nurse practitioner respondents in California, the state with the largest number of nurse practitioners in the nation. A January 1995 survey was sent to all nurse practitioners certified in California to elicit their experiences regarding legal or social barriers in their practice, with space for an open-ended response. Of a...

  10. Incorporation of seawater into mid-ocean ridge lava flows during emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, S. Adam; Fornari, Daniel J.; Perfit, Michael R.; Ridley, W. Ian; Reed, Mark H.; Cann, Johnson R.

    2006-12-01

    Evidence for the interaction between seawater and lava during emplacement on the deep seafloor can be observed in solidified flows at a variety of scales including rapid quenching of their outer crusts and the formation of lava pillars through the body of the flow. Recently, an additional interaction, incorporation of heated seawater (vapor) into the body of a flow, has been proposed. Large voids and vesicles beneath the surface crusts of mid-ocean ridge crest lobate and sheet lava flows and lava drips found within those cavities have been cited as evidence for this interaction. The voids resulting from this interaction contribute to the high porosity of the shallow ocean crust and play an important role in crustal permeability and hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, and thus it is important to understand their origin. We analyze lava samples from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and intermediate-spreading Galapagos Spreading Center to characterize this process, identify the source of the vapor, and investigate the implications this would have on submarine lava flow dynamics. We find that lava samples that have interacted with a vapor have a zone of increased vesicularity on the underside of the lava crust and a coating of precipitate minerals ( i.e., crystal fringe) that are distinct in form and composition from those crystallized from the melt. We use thermochemical modeling to simulate the reaction between the lava and a vapor and find that only with seawater can we reproduce the phase assemblage we observe within the crystal fringes present in the samples. Model results suggest that large-scale contamination of the lava by mass exchange with the vapor is unlikely, but we observe local enrichment of the lava in Cl resulting from the incorporation of a brine phase separated from the seawater. We suggest that high eruption rates are necessary for seawater incorporation to occur, but the mechanism by which seawater enters the flow has yet to be

  11. Volcanic debris avalanche transport and emplacement: water content and fragmentation vs disaggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverato, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic Debris Avalanches are voluminous, heterogeneous mass-flows of poorly sorted sediments (micron - 10's m) that move downslope under the effect of gravity. They travel with extremely high velocity for long distances with very potential high destructive power. These flows may reach initial velocities as high as 100m/s, travel for several tens of kilometers, and spread over broad sectors. They are commonly considered as inertial dry grain flows where particle-particle interaction can be within a frictional and/or collisional regime. It is largely assumed that fragmentation of particles within a debris avalanche occurs primarily at the moment of the edifice failure, due to sudden material decompression and dilation. Following failure, the dislodged mass starts to slide or glide downslope, and progressive disaggregation begins. Only minimal fragmentation is thought to occur during flow due to grain-grain contact. Thus, the main process responsible for generating an interclast matrix during transport is the disaggregation of already fractured clasts and megaclasts, particularly those that are already diamictons. However, data obtained from the Pungarehu volcanic debris avalanche deposit (VDAD) illustrate that fragmentation of intact rock may also occur during debris avalanche motion and through collisional and frictional grain-grain contacts experienced during long-runout flow. More, depending on their water and clay content, these granular and block-sliding flows may transform into a debris flow with distance from source, changing completely their flow behaviour and enhancing their run-out and hazard impacts. Pungarehu VDAD (ca. 25 Ka cal.) was emplaced by the largest known collapse of the Taranaki volcano (New Zealand) occurred near the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), with snow and ice cover, fluids circulation, hydrothermal alteration and substantial groundwater present. This VDAD appears to encompass a range of flow behaviour from proximal unsaturated and unmixed

  12. Physical processes of shallow mafic dike emplacement near the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, P.T.; Gartner, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Some 200 shonkinite dikes, sills, and breccia bodies on the western Colorado Plateau of south-central Utah were intruded from approximately 3.7 to 4.6 Ma, contemporaneous with mafic volcanism along the nearby plateau margin. Thicknesses of dikes range to about 6 m; the log-normal mean thickness is 85 cm. Despite the excellent exposures of essentially all dikes in strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group, their number is indeterminate from their outcrop and spacing because they are everywhere greatly segmented. By our grouping of almost 2000 dike segments, most dikes are less than 2 km in outcrop length; the longest is 9 km. Because the San Rafael magmas were primitive and probably ascended directly from the mantle, dike lengths in outcrop are much less than their heights. The present exposures probably lie along the irregular upper peripheries of dikes that lengthen and merge with depth. Orientations of steps on dike contacts record local directions of dike-fracture propagation; about half of the measurements plunge less than 30??, showing that lateral propagation at dike peripheries is as important as the vertical propagation ultimately responsible for ascent. The San Rafael dikes, now exposed after erosion of about 0.5-1.5 km, appear to thicken and shorten upward, probably because near-surface vesiculation enhanced magmatic driving pressures. Propagation likely ceased soon after the first dike segments began to feed nearby sills or vented to initiate small-volume eruptions. Most of the dikes are exposed in clastic strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group. They probably acquired their strikes, however, while ascending along well-developed joints in massive sandstones of the underlying Glen Canyon Group. Rotation of far-field stresses during the emplacement interval cannot account for disparate strikes of the dikes, which vary through 110??, most lying between north and N25??W. Rather, the two regional horizontal principal stresses were probably nearly equal, and so

  13. Characterizing silicic rocks in the Parana Magmatic Province: an update in their origin and emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, A. F.; Nardy, A. R.; Machado, F. B.; Gravley, D. M.; Gualda, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP), a large igneous province in southern Brazil (with correlative rocks in western Africa), includes 800,000 km3 of flood basalts generated during the rifting that ultimately led to the opening of the South Atlantic and covers nearly 75% of the surface of the Paraná Basin. Towards the top of the volcanic pile, silicic rocks are observed in many areas. They comprise a small proportion of the total erupted volume (2.5%), yet correspond to a significant flare-up of silicic volcanism over a period of only a few million years. In Brazil, the silicic rocks are divided into two groups, the Chapecó Member, which appears more northerly and includes porphyritic, crystal-rich, high-Ti dacites and trachydacites; and the Palmas Member, which includes fine-grained, crystal-poor, low-Ti dacites and rhyolites. The mode of emplacement (lavas vs. pyroclastic flows) of the volcanic units has been the subject of much controversy. The aim of this project is to better understand the origin and evolution of the PMP silicic rocks. We are combining information from the regional to the thin section scale to better characterize eruption dynamics and magma distribution prior to eruption. In both Palmas and Chapecó units, we observe features consistent with emplacement in the form of pyroclastic density currents, e.g. fiamme, variable weathering patterns consistent with local variations in welding at the outcrop scale, vertical gas-escape structures, sedimentary dykes, and lythophysae. Some ignimbrite units can be traced for 10's of kilometers and with more research on their spatial distribution could reveal the location of eruptive centers. In the Palmas, ignimbrites can be observed juxtaposed against or overlying discrete eruptive centers in the form of discordant structures that resemble domes and coulees typical of lava extrusion and flow. However, many of the silicic rocks are ambiguous and difficult to characterize, with features that could be related

  14. Reconstruction of allochthonous salt emplacement from 3-D seismic reflection data, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, R.D. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Analysis of a 110 mi[sup 2] (284 km[sup 2]) three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey located at the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf edge documents the emplacement history of an allochthonous salt structure. A listric, counter-regional growth fault bounds the updip salt edge and apparently soles into a detachment surface from which salt was evacuated. The counter-regional fault system served as the feeder stock for the dome. The current salt shape is an asymmetric, elongated wedge with a diameter of 20,000 ft (6.1 km) and maximum thickness of 13,000 ft (4.0 km). A steep fault/salt contact bounded by small, oval- shaped withdrawal subbasins on the landward side contrasts with a shallow-dipping basinward salt/sediment contact. A relatively thin sediment cover onlaps the shallow basinward salt flank. Regional seismic lines support the presence of a detachment surface in the area apparently separating Upper Cretaceous to lower Tertiary( ) sediments from upper Miocene (7.0--5.4 Ma) and younger sediments. During the first stage, an allochthonous salt sheet was emplaced during the hiatus and then segmented. From the middle to late Pliocene (4.0--2.2 Ma), the salt structure evolved by downbuilding, remaining close to the ocean floor surface and covered by only a thin sediment veneer. After the beginning of the Illinoian glacial stage (0.85 Ma), the deep source salt layer was depleted and the dome was buried by up to 1,700 ft (520 m) of sediment during the third stage. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with structural disconformities indicate a possible salt evacuation surface or salt weld along the deep feeder stock. Geohistory diagrams indicate extremely rapid local subsidence in the withdrawal basin, which contains up to 12,000 ft (3.6 km) of Pleistocene sediment. Such acceleration subsidence, in conjunction with the fault/salt geometry, contributed to the development of hydrocarbon reservoirs near the dome flanks. 69 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Verification of the integrity of barriers using gas diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ barrier materials and designs are being developed for containment of high risk contamination as an alternative to immediate removal or remediation. The intent of these designs is to prevent the movement of contaminants in either the liquid or vapor phase by long-term containment, essentially buying time until the contaminant depletes naturally or a remediation can be implemented. The integrity of the resultant soil-binder mixture is typically assessed by a number of destructive laboratory tests (leaching, compressive strength, mechanical stability with respect to wetting and freeze-thaw cycles) which as a group are used to infer the likelihood of favorable long-term performance of the barrier. The need exists for a minimally intrusive yet quantifiable methods for assessment of a barrier's integrity after emplacement, and monitoring of the barrier's performance over its lifetime. Here, the authors evaluate non-destructive measurements of inert-gas diffusion (specifically, SF6) as an indicator of waste-form integrity. The goals of this project are to show that diffusivity can be measured in core samples of soil jet-grouted with Portland cement, validate the experimental method through measurements on samples, and to calculate aqueous diffusivities from a series of diffusion measurements. This study shows that it is practical to measure SF6 diffusion rates in the laboratory on samples of grout (Portland cement and soil) typical of what might be used in a barrier. Diffusion of SF6 through grout (Portland cement and soil) is at least an order of magnitude slower than through air. The use of this tracer should be sensitive to the presence of fractures, voids, or other discontinuities in the grout/soil structure. Field-scale measurements should be practical on time-scales of a few days

  16. Design of the human computer interface on the telerobotic small emplacement excavator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small emplacement excavator (SEE) is a ruggedized military vehicle with backhoe and front loader used by the U.S. Army for explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) and general utility excavation activities. This project resulted from a joint need in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for a remote controlled excavator for buried waste operations and the U.S. Department of Defense for remote EOD operations. To evaluate the feasibility of removing personnel from the SEE vehicle during high-risk excavation tasks, a development and demonstration project was initiated. Development of a telerobotic SEE (TSEE) was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a project funded jointly by the U.S. Army and the DOE. The TSEE features teleoperated driving, a telerobotic backhoe with four degrees of freedom, and a teleoperated front loader with two degrees of freedom on the bucket. Remote capabilities include driving (forward, reverse, brake, steering), power takeoff shifting to enable digging modes, deploying stabilizers, excavation, and computer system booting

  17. Modelling the short term, near field performance of an in-room emplacement configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the hydraulic performance of an in-room emplacement scenario. In this concept, two tubular shaped waste canisters are contained within a composite engineered shield of sand, sand/bentonite buffer, light backfill and dense backfill, all seated on a layer of high performance concrete. Because of anticipated excavation damage the elliptical shaped room has a 1.4m thick layer of fissured rock around its perimeter. A numerical study was employed to determine the extent of the granite 'near field' affected by the presence of the open excavation. A zone extending for 7m from the perimeter of the excavation was thus established. The time taken for the repository to fully saturate under isothermal conditions was initially predicted to be 12 years. Coupling the effects of temperature on to the flow of moisture increased the predicted time for saturation to 13 years. A sensitivity study showed that the time to achieve saturation is critically dependent on the assumed value for the coefficient of water storage capacity of the light backfill. Depending on the assumed magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the repository may take over 250 years to attain a saturated condition. (author)

  18. Quantitative monitoring of subsurface CO2 emplacement and leakage using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. L.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Spooner, N.; Gluyas, J.; Fung, C.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring CO2 emplacement and possible leakage is a major challenge; methods, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and expensive. A relevant alternative approach will use detection of cosmic ray muons, which has been used previously in archaeological and geological research as a technique for mapping features hidden underground. We developed a model to test if this concept would work for monitoring CO2 storage and show that muon detection is a viable method. To achieve this we used the well-established MUSUN/MUSIC computer codes to model changes in muon fluxes resulting from the introduction of supercritical CO2 into a simulated sandstone reservoir. Results from our first simulation indicate that we could detect as little as 0.4% change in the mean reservoir density at about 1 km depth, resulting from changing the relative proportions of CO2 and existing brine pore fluid. This change is equivalent to 7% of the pore volume in this particular case. However, other scenarios offer the promise of considerable increase in sensitivity. We will show how practical implementation can be achieved using state of the art drilling technology to place an array of detectors in short-radius side-track horizontal wells beneath the storage site. We conclude that with an appropriate design it will be possible to monitor and image the migration or loss of injected CO2 continuously using cosmic ray muons, a significant step towards implementing widescale CCS safely and help rapid introduction of this essential technology.

  19. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste

  20. Designing and Operating a Barrier Free Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Laurie S.; Potter, George T.

    An account of the Ramapo College (New Jersey) experience in the design and development of a barrier-free campus includes discussion of the academic and service problems that arise in meeting the needs of handicapped students in college. Special attention is given to: campus bathrooms, campus housing (ramps, locks, bathrooms, roommate selection,…

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  2. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  3. Therapeutic experiences of community gardens: putting flow in its place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    This paper develops the concept of therapeutic place experiences by considering the role of activity. Research of community gardening finds that particular tasks are therapeutic and exhibit the characteristics of flow, but those who lack influence over their community gardening are less likely to benefit from flow as their sense of control is reduced. The notion of emplaced flow is proposed to locate individual experiences amongst socio-spatial factors which limit self-determinacy and therefore affect wellbeing. Emplacing flow prompts critical reflection on who is excluded from therapeutic place experiences, and whether sites offering momentary escape have an enduring impact on wellbeing. PMID:24583563

  4. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  5. Quarter-scale modeling of room convergence effects on CH [contact-handled] TRU drum waste emplacements using WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] reference design geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the effect of horizontal room convergence on CH waste packages emplaced in the WIPP Reference Design geometry (rooms 13 feet high by 33 feet wide, with minus 3/8 inch screened backfill emplaced over and around the waste packages) as a function of time. Based on two tests, predictions were made with regard to full-scale 6-packs emplaced in the Reference Design geometry. These are that load will be transmitted completely through the stack within the first five years after waste emplacement and all drums in all 6-packs will be affected; that virtually all drums will show some deformation eight years after emplacement; that some drums may breach before the eighth year after emplacement has elapsed; and that based on criteria developed during testing, it is predicted that 1% of the drums emplaced will be breached after 8 years and, after 15 years, approximately 12% of the drums are predicted to be breached. 8 refs., 41 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Development of a design package for a viscous barrier at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes elements of a design for a pilot-scale field demonstration of a new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), which uses a new generation of barrier liquids for permeation grouting. The demonstration site was Retention Basin 281-3H, a shallow catchment basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS), originally built to control contaminated runoff for the H Reactor, and which has been contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The LBNL viscous barrier technology employs barrier liquids which, when injected into the subsurface, produce chemically benign nearly impermeable barriers through a very large increase in viscosity. The initially low-viscosity liquids are emplaced through multiple injection points in the subsurface and the intersecting plumes merge and completely surround the contaminant source and/or plume. Once in place, they gel or cure to form a nearly impermeable barrier. The barrier liquid to be used in this application is Colloidal Silica (CS), an aqueous suspension of silica microspheres in a stabilizing electrolyte. It has excellent durability characteristics, poses no health hazard, is practically unaffected by filtration, and is chemically and biologically benign

  7. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper will discuss the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification. The demonstration will take place at a cold site at the Hanford Geotechnical Test Facility, 400 Area, Hanford, Washington

  8. Functions of an engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defined in this document are the functions of components selected for an engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. The definitions provide a focal point for barrier material research and development by delineating the purpose and operative lifetime of each component of the engineered system. A five-component system (comprised of waste form, canister, buffer, overpack, and tailored backfill) is discussed in terms of effective operation throughout the course of repository history, recognizing that the emplacement environment changes with time. While components of the system are mutually supporting, redundancy is provided by subsystems of physical and chemical barriers which act in concert with the geology to provide a formidable barrier to transport of hazardous materials to the biosphere. The operating philosophy of the conceptual engineered barrier system is clarified by examples pertinent to storage in basalt, and a technical approach to barrier design and material selection is proposed. A method for system validation and qualification is also included which considers performance criteria proposed by external agencies in conjunction with site-specific models and risk assessment to define acceptable levels of system performance

  9. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  10. Fuzzy barrier distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy-ion collisions often produce a fusion barrier distribution with structures displaying a fingerprint of couplings to highly collective excitations [1]. Basically the same distribution can be obtained from large-angle quasi-elastic scattering, though here the role of the many weak direct-reaction channels is unclear. For 20Ne + 90Zr we have observed the barrier structures expected for the highly deformed neon projectile, but for 20Ne + 92Zr we find completely smooth distribution (see Fig.1). We find that transfer channels in these systems are of similar strength but single particle excitations are significantly stronger in the latter case. They apparently reduce the 'resolving power' of the quasi-elastic channel, what leads to smeared out, or 'fuzzy' barrier distribution. This is the first case when such a phenomenon has been observed.(author)

  11. Sustained-Release Permanganate: Passive Reactive Barriers for Green and Sustainable Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive materials in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have proven very useful for transforming or destroying organic waste in situ. Once emplaced they typically do not require a continued supply of electrical power and have the added benefit of creating a reactive zone for the destruction of contaminants in place. Controlled-release techniques have been utilized extensively in diverse fields such as pharmaceutical and agrochemical technologies. However, controlled- and sustained release of an oxidant during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is an emerging concept that is extremely relevant to the field of environmental remediation, yet to-date has received little attention. ISCO using the oxidants permanganate, persulfate, and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide has shown great promise for remediation of many recalcitrant organic contaminants of concern (COC). Because the oxidant also reacts with natural organic matter, inorganic soil constituents, and other reduced compounds, the presence of a protective barrier that controls oxidant release may enhance the efficiency of ISCO and allow for long-term low-cost treatment of chlorinated solvents. To this end, sustained-release permanganate (SRP) was developed. Paraffin wax was used as the environmentally benign and biodegradable matrix material for encapsulating the solid potassium permanganate (KMnO4) particles. The paraffin matrix protects the solid KMnO4 particles from fast dissolution and potentially undesirable nonproductive reactions. The SRP material contains between 60%-80% permanganate and can be formed as candles for direct push applications in reactive barriers, or chipped material for hydro-fracturing into low permeability media. One-dimensional (1-D) SRP column experiments were conducted to evaluate permanganate release behavior using deionized (DI) water as the influent or COC removal efficiency using dissolved trichloroethene (TCE) as the influent. The influent dissolved TCE concentrations were 1 mg/L and

  12. Emplacement of Amba Dongar Carbonatite-alkaline Complex at Cretaceous/Tertiary Boundary: Evidence from 40Ar-39Ar Chronology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotiranjan S Ray; Kanchan Pande; T R Venkatesan

    2000-03-01

    40Ar-39Ar analyses of three fresh alkaline rock samples and a phlogopite separate from a carbonatite from Amba Dongar carbonatite-alkaline complex of the Deccan Flood Basalt Province, India, yield indistinguishable precise plateau ages of 64.8 ± 0.6, 64.7 ± 0.5, 65.5 ± 0.8 and 65.3 ± 0.6 Ma, giving a mean plateau age of 65.0 ± 0.3 Ma, which is the age of emplacement of this complex. This age implies contemporaneity of Amba Dongar with several other carbonatite-alkaline activities of Chhota Udaipur subprovince and is consistent with their Reunion-Deccan plume origin hypothesis. The emplacement of these complexes at 65 Ma makes them very significant in the ongoing debate on the K/T extinctions owing to their capacity to rapidly inject a substantial amount of CO2 and SO2 into the atmosphere.

  13. Geology and tectonic magmatic of emplacement of a longitudinal dyke swarm of Nico Perez(Minas) URUGUAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mina Verdun Group (Precambrian) was deposited prior to the subvolcanic emplacement of a longitudinal dyke swarm of basaltic to andesitic composition (Minas Subvolcanic Swarm of the Mina Verdun quarry - Nico Perez Terrane, Minas, Uruguay). The swarm and its country rocks predated a tectono-metamorphic event that produced fragileductile shear zones associated with very low- to low-grade dislocation metamorphism. We interpreted a K-Ar whole rock datum of 485,2 ± 12,5 Ma (andesitic dyke) as a minimum cooling age in relation with late- to post-swarm emplacement deuteric alteration stage. Another K-Ar whole rock datum of 108,5 ± 2,9 Ma on a basaltic dyke was assumed here as a degasification stage, while its geological meaning is still matter of debate. The Minas Subvolcanic Dyke Swarm was intruded at high crustal levels, suggesting that the Minas region was affected by a period of extensional tectonics

  14. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project: Analysis of horizontal waste emplacement boreholes of a nuclear waste repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the design of a nuclear waste repository in tuff, two dimensional thermal and thermal-mechanical analyses of horizontal emplacement boreholes were performed using finite-element and boundary-element codes. In the finite-element analyses five different equivalent continuum models of a tuff rock mass were used to investigate the state of deformation and stress around the borehole for times up to 300 years following waste emplacement. These models were an isotropic linear elastic model, an ubiquitous joint model with single and orthogonal joints, an a compliant joint model also with single and orthogonal joints. The case of boreholes intersected by discrete fractures was analyzed using boundary-element models. The results of analyses using the various models of the borehole were consistent and indicated stable conditions even when low estimates of the strength of the joints within the tuff rock mass were assumed. 25 refs

  15. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: engineered barriers alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involves emplacing the waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The solid waste would be isolated from the biosphere by a multibarrier system consisting of engineered barriers, including long-lived containers and clay and cement-based sealing materials, and the natural barrier provided by the massive geological formation. The technical feasibility of this concept and its impact on the environment and human health are being documented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), which will be submitted for review under the federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. This report, one of nine EIS primary references, describes the various alternative designs and materials for engineered barriers that have been considered during the development of the Canadian disposal concept and summarizes engineered barrier concepts being evaluated in other countries. The basis for the selection of a reference engineered barrier system for the EIS is presented. This reference system involves placing used CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel bundles in titanium containers, which would then be emplaced in boreholes drilled in the floor of disposal rooms. Clay-based sealing materials would be used to fill both the space between the containers and the rock and the remaining excavations. In the section on waste forms, the properties of both used-fuel bundles and solidified high-level wastes, which would be produced by treating wastes resulting from the reprocessing of used fuel, are discussed. Methods of solidifying the wastes and the chemical durability of the solidified waste under disposal conditions are reviewed. Various alternative container designs are reviewed, ranging from preliminary conceptual designs to designs that have received extensive prototype testing. Results of structural performance, welding and inspection studies are also summarized. The corrosion of

  16. Progress in SLIP stacking and barrier bucket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slip stacking for pbar production has been operational in the Main Injector(MI) since December 2004 and has increased the beam intensity on the pbar target by more than 60%. We plan to use slip stacking for the NuMI neutrino experiment to effectively increasing the beam intensity to NuMI target by about a factor two in a MI cycle. In parallel with slip stacking, we plan to study fast momentum stacking using barrier buckets. One barrier rf system has been installed and tested, and a second system is being installed during the current shutdown. (author)

  17. The strain path and emplacement mechanism of lava flows: an example from Salina (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Guido

    2001-05-01

    A lava flow from Salina (southern Tyrrhenian Sea) consists of subcircular to ellipsoidal basaltic enclaves dispersed in a dacitic host. A 2D strain and kinematic analysis of the enclaves has been performed in order to determine (a) the relative contribution of the coaxial ( α) and non-coaxial ( γ) components to the bulk flow deformation, (b) the flow vorticity Wk, (c) the strain path and (d) the mechanism of flow emplacement. The axial ratio Rf and the angle φf between the long axis of the enclaves and the transport direction have been measured in 196 sites located at different distances from the vent. In the near vent zone α> γ whereas further from the vent γ> α. α values were always larger than 1, ranging from 1.6 in the near vent zone to 1 at the front. γ values were between 0.2 (at the back) and 2.6 (at the front). Wk was between 0.13 and 1 and increased from the back to the front. The enclaves result from the injection of basalt into dacite. Most of the deformation was acquired during the lava flow emplacement and not during the rise in the conduit (plug flow). The strain path depicted by the enclaves is consistent with that resulting from experimental analogue models and reveals that the lava suffers lateral extension near the vent. Further from the vent, the lava deforms according to an ideal non-coaxial model. The lava emplacement is mainly controlled by the gravity. Evidence of deformation induced by the magma pressure is lacking. Near the vent, the lava behaves as a hyperbolic flow whereas at the front it behaves as a simple shear flow. The mechanism of flow emplacement is consistent with a mixed 'viscous gliding-spreading' transport model at the back and with a 'viscous gliding' model at the front.

  18. Emplacement dynamics of phonolite magma into maar-diatreme structures - Correlation of field, thermal modeling and AMS analogue modeling data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Prokop; Dědeček, Petr; Mach, K.; Lexa, O.; Potužák, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 201, č. 1-4 (2011), s. 210-226. ISSN 0377-0273 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09011; GA AV ČR KJB301110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : phonolite * maar-diatreme * magma emplacement dynamics * thermal modeling * AMS analogue modeling * cavitation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.978, year: 2011

  19. The oceanic sediment barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burial within the sediments of the deep ocean floor is one of the options that have been proposed for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. An international research programme is in progress to determine whether oceanic sediments have the requisite properties for this purpose. After summarizing the salient features of this programme, the paper focuses on the Great Meteor East study area in the Northeast Atlantic, where most oceanographic effort has been concentrated. The geological geochemical and geotechnical properties of the sediments in the area are discussed. Measurements designed to determine the rate of pore water movement through the sediment column are described. Our understanding of the chemistry of both the solid and pore-water phases of the sediment are outlined, emphasizing the control that redox conditions have on the mobility of, for example, naturally occurring manganese and uranium. The burial of instrumented free-fall penetrators to depths of 30 m beneath the ocean floor is described, modelling one of the methods by which waste might be emplaced. Finally, the nature of this oceanic environment is compared with geological environments on land and attention is drawn to the gaps in our knowledge that must be filled before oceanic burial can be regarded as an acceptable disposal option. (author)

  20. Emplacement time of the Loe-Shilman carbonatite from NW Pakistan: Constraints from fission-track dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, N.U. [National Centre of Excellence in Geology, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)], E-mail: nimat_khattak@yahoo.com; Akram, M. [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, M.A. [National Centre of Excellence in Geology, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Khan, H.A. [COMSATS Headquarters, 4th Floor, Shahrah-e-Jamhuriat, G-5/2 Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2008-08-15

    The Loe-Shilman carbonatite complex is situated in the extreme west of the Peshawar Plain Alkaline Igneous Province (PAIP), near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. It comprises sill-form bodies emplaced along an E-W trending and N dipping fault zone in Paleozoic to Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of Khyber Agency. Fission-track dating studies on the apatite crystals using the external detector method and age standard approach (the {zeta} method) yielded an age of 30.0{+-}1.5Ma for the Loe-Shilman carbonatite. Close agreement between the previously determined radiometric ages from the same as well as the neighboring carbonatite complexes of the PAIP and the fission-track apatite age of this study indicates that the Loe-Shilman carbonatite was emplaced at relatively shallow crustal level and quickly cooled to low temperatures (<60{sup 0}C) required for the complete retention of fission tracks in apatite and that the fission-track age of this study is the emplacement age of the Loe-Shilman carbonatite.

  1. Transpressional granite-emplacement model: Structural and magnetic study of the Pan-African Bandja granitic pluton (West Cameroon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Njanko, T.; Njonfang, E.; Errami, E.; Rochette, P.; Fozing, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Pan-African NE-SW elongated Bandja granitic pluton, located at the western part of the Pan-African belt in Cameroon, is a K-feldspar megacryst granite. It is emplaced in banded gneiss and its NW border underwent mylonitization. The magmatic foliation shows NE-SW and NNE-SSW strike directions with moderate to strong dip respectively in its northern and central parts. This mostly, ferromagnetic granite displays magnetic fabrics carried by magnetite and characterized by (i) magnetic foliation with best poles at 295/34, 283/33 and 35/59 respectively in its northern, central and southern parts and (ii) a subhorizontal magnetic lineation with best line at 37/8, 191/9 and 267/22 respectively in the northern, central and southern parts. Magnetic lineation shows an `S' shape trend that allows to (1) consider the complete emplacement and deformation of the pluton during the Pan-African D 2 and D 3 events which occurred in the Pan-African belt in Cameroon and (2) reorganize Pan-African ages from Nguiessi Tchakam et al. (1997) compared with those of the other granitic plutons in the belt as: 686 ±17 Ma (Rb/Sr) for D 1 age of metamorphism recorded in gneiss; and the period between 604-557 Ma for D 2-D 3 emplacement and deformation age of the granitic pluton in a dextral ENE-WSW shear movement.

  2. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai’i with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai‘i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  3. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, N F; Sonnenthal, E L; Apps, J A

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO(2) gas, and aqueous species, and porosity-permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a "high-temperature" case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a "low-temperature" case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO(2) exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO(2) redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wall rock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the low-temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are largely within to

  4. Prototype pushing robot for emplacing vitrified waste canisters into horizontal disposal drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the French Underground Disposal concept, as described in ANDRA's (Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs) Dossier 2005, the Pushing Robot is an application envisaged for the emplacement (and the potential retrieval) of 'Vitrified waste packages', also called 'C type packages'. ANDRA has developed a Prototype Pushing Robot within the framework of the ESDRED Project (Engineering Studies and Demonstration of Repository Design) which is co-funded by the European Commission as part of the sixth EURATOM Research and Training Framework Programme (FP6) on nuclear energy (2002 - 2006). The Rationale of the Pushing Robot technology comes from various considerations, including the need for (1) a simple and robust system, capable of moving (and potentially retrieving) on up to 40 metres (m), a 2 tonne C type package (mounted on ceramic sliding runners) inside the carbon steel sleeve constituting the liner (and rock support) of a horizontal disposal cell, (2) small annular clearances between the package and the liner, (3) compactness of the device to be transferred from surface to underground, jointly with the package, inside a shielding cask, and (4) remote controlled operations for the sake of radioprotection. The initial design, based on gripping supports, has been replaced by a 'technical variant' based on inflatable toric jacks. It was then possible, using a test bench, to check that the Pushing Robot worked properly. Steps as high as 7 mm were successfully cleared by a dummy package pushed by the Prototype.. Based on the lessons learned by ANDRA's regarding the Prototype Pushing Robot, a new Scope of Work is being written for the Contract concerning an Industrial Scale Demonstrator. The Industrial Scale Demonstration should be completed by the end of the second Quarter of 2008. (authors)

  5. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO2 gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a ''high-temperature'' case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a ''loW--temperature'' case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO2 exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO2 redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wallrock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the loW--temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are small relative to

  6. Emplacement of Bankura anorthosite within Chhotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex, Eastern India. Application of AMS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The Proterozoic Chhotanagpur Granite Gneissic Complex (CGGC) is one of the major geological components of Peninsular India. It covers approximately 80,000 sq.km area. CGGC is dominantly made up of granite gneiss, granitoids, enclaves of meta-sediments and meta-basics. Anorthosite plutons are found at several places in CGGC and most of them are intruding into the granulite facies country rock. The Bankura anorthosite is the largest anorthosite pluton situated at the easternmost part of CGGC. In this part, the country rocks (gneiss, meta-sediments) exhibit three phases of deformation with the development of folds, foliations and lineations. At the margin with the country rock, the anorthosite body is banded. It is massive in the remaining major part. To find out whether the massive anorthosite body is at all affected by deformation, Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) study was carried out with oriented samples. From the AMS study of four samples collected from different parts of massive anorthosite, two phases of deformations are detected. The magnetic foliations from three samples are mostly east-west striking with moderate northerly dip. This magnetic foliation is parallel to the axial plane foliation of 2nd phase of deformation within the country rock. The magnetic lineations are also parallel to the lineations of 2nd phase of deformation in country rock. The fourth sample shows that the magnetic foliations and lineations are parallel to the 3rd phase of deformation of the country rock. The massive Bankura anorthosite body lacks any deformational feature in the field. But with the help of AMS study we can conclude that it endures the 2nd and 3rd phases of deformation and emplaced during the 1st phase of deformation of CGGC.

  7. Vertical movement in mare basins: relation to mare emplacement, basin tectonics, and lunar thermal history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial and temporal relationships of linear rilles and mare ridges in the Serenitatis basin region of the moon are explained by a combination of lithospheric flexure in response to basin loading by basalt fill and a time-dependent global stress due to the thermal evolution of the lunar interior. The pertinent tectonic observations are the radial distance of basin concentric rilles or graben from the mare center; the location and orientation of mare ridges, interpreted as compressive features; and the restriction of graben formation to times older than 3.6 +- 0.2 b.y. ago, while ridge formation continued after emplacement of the youngest mare basalt unit (approx.3 b.y. ago). The locations of the graben are consistent with the geometry of the mare basalt load expected from the dimensions of multiring basins for values of the thickness of the elastic lithosphere beneath Serenitatis in the range 25--50 km at 3.6--3.8 b.y. ago. The locations and orientations of mare ridges are consistent with the load inferred from surface mapping and subsurface radar reflections for values of the elastic lithosphere thickness near 100 km at 3.0--3.4 b.y. ago. The thickening of the lithosphere beneath a major basin during the evolution of mare volcanism is thus clearly evident in the tectonics. The cessation of rille formation and the prolonged period of ridge formation are attributed to a change in the global horizontal thermal stress from extension to compression as the moon shifted from net expansion to overall cooling and contraction. Severe limits as placed on the range of possible lunar thermal histories. The zone of horizontal extensional stresses peripheral to mare loads favors the edge of mare basins as the preferred sites for mare basalt magma eruption in the later stages of mare fill, although subsidence may lead to accumulation of such young lavas in basin centers

  8. Emplacement of the early Miocene Pinto Peak intrusion, Southwest Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, Michael S.; O'Driscoll, Brian

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution, we report rock magnetic, petrographic, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data from the Pinto Peak intrusion, all of which bear on volcanic construction. Rock magnetic data indicate that the dominant magnetic mineral phase is low-Ti titanomagnetite of multidomain grain size, the composition of which varies spatially across the intrusion. The intrusion is a porphyritic andesite dominated by Ca-rich plagioclase (>60%) as well as biotite, amphibole, olivine, and opaque minerals. Reflected light petrography reveals mostly euhedral-subhedral (titano)magnetite crystals that often form clustered glomerocrysts and stringers of equant crystals, without exhibiting a consistent mineral alignment fabric. Moderate-to-shallow plunging prolate magnetic susceptibility ellipsoids dominate the northern part of the intrusion while steeply dipping/plunging magnetic susceptibility ellipsoids are generally restricted to the southern part of the intrusion. The vent facies rocks yield moderate-to-steep oblate susceptibility ellipsoids. We interpret the flow pattern in the north to reflect subhorizontal flow of magma, filling a tabular sheet-like body associated with propagation of the intrusion to the north. We argue that the southern part of the intrusion represents the ascent site of the magma rising to shallow crustal levels along a steep feeder system. The oblate magnetic fabrics in the vent area plausibly represent flattening against the conduit walls as evidenced by a weak planar flow foliation observed in the vent conduit rocks. On reaching shallow crustal levels, the magma deformed and uplifted the roof rocks leading to gravitational instability. As the slide mass released from the roof, an explosive eruption ensued resulting in the emplacement of the Rocks of Paradise tuff and associated effusive lava flows. Following eruption, magma pressure decreased and the magma drained northward forming the northern intrusive phase.

  9. Generation and emplacement of fine-grained ejecta in planetary impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, R.R.; Gupta, V.; Campbell, B.A.; Ferguson, S.A.; Brown, J.C.W.; Fergason, R.L.; Carter, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    We report here on a survey of distal fine-grained ejecta deposits on the Moon, Mars, and Venus. On all three planets, fine-grained ejecta form circular haloes that extend beyond the continuous ejecta and other types of distal deposits such as run-out lobes or ramparts. Using Earth-based radar images, we find that lunar fine-grained ejecta haloes represent meters-thick deposits with abrupt margins, and are depleted in rocks 1cm in diameter. Martian haloes show low nighttime thermal IR temperatures and thermal inertia, indicating the presence of fine particles estimated to range from ???10??m to 10mm. Using the large sample sizes afforded by global datasets for Venus and Mars, and a complete nearside radar map for the Moon, we establish statistically robust scaling relationships between crater radius R and fine-grained ejecta run-out r for all three planets. On the Moon, ???R-0.18 for craters 5-640km in diameter. For Venus, radar-dark haloes are larger than those on the Moon, but scale as ???R-0.49, consistent with ejecta entrainment in Venus' dense atmosphere. On Mars, fine-ejecta haloes are larger than lunar haloes for a given crater size, indicating entrainment of ejecta by the atmosphere or vaporized subsurface volatiles, but scale as R-0.13, similar to the ballistic lunar scaling. Ejecta suspension in vortices generated by passage of the ejecta curtain is predicted to result in ejecta run-out that scales with crater size as R1/2, and the wind speeds so generated may be insufficient to transport particles at the larger end of the calculated range. The observed scaling and morphology of the low-temperature haloes leads us rather to favor winds generated by early-stage vapor plume expansion as the emplacement mechanism for low-temperature halo materials. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Structural control on basaltic dike and sill emplacement, Paiute Ridge mafic intrusion complex, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late Miocene basaltic sills and dikes in the Paiute Ridge area of southern nevada show evidence that their emplacement was structurally controlled. Basaltic dikes in this area formed by dilating pre-existing vertical to steeply E-dipping normal faults. Magma propagation along these faults must have required less energy than the creation of a self-propagated fracture at dike tips and the magma pressure must have been greater than the compressive stress perpendicular to the fault surface. N- to NE-trending en echelon dikes formed locally and are not obviously attached to the three main dikes in the area. The en echelon segments are probably pieces of deeper dikes, which are segmented perhaps as a result of a documented rotation of the regional stresses. Alternatively, changes in orientation of principal stresses in the vicinity of each en echelon dike could have resulted from local loads associated with paleotopographic highs or nearby structures. Sills locally branched off some dikes within 300 m of the paleosurface. These subhorizontal bodies occur consistently in the hanging wall block of the dike-injected faults, and intrude Tertiary tuffs near the Paleozoic-Tertiary contact. The authors suggest that the change in stresses near the earth's surface, the material strength of the tuff and paleozoic rocks, and the Paleozoic bedding dip direction probably controlled the location of sill formation and direction of sill propagation. The two largest sills deflected the overlying tuffs to form lopoliths, indicating that the magma pressure exceeded vertical stresses at that location and that the shallow level and large size of the sills allowed interaction with the free (earth's) surface. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eLavallée

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometres of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and welding of ignimbrites requires three transects of the glass transition. Magma needs to: 1 fragment during ascent, 2 liquefy and relax during deposition, agglutination and welding (sintering, and 3 quench by cooling into the glassy state. Here we show that welding is a rapid, syn-depositional process and that the welded ignimbrite sheet may flow for up to a few hours before passing through the glass transition a final time. Geospeedometry reveals that the basal vitrophyre of the Grey’s Landing ignimbrite underwent the glass transition at a rate of ~0.1 °C.min^-1 at 870 °C; that is, 30-180 °C below pre-eruptive geothermometric estimates. Application of a 1-D cooling model constrains the timescale of deposition, agglutination, and welding of the basal vitrophyre to less than 1 hour, and possibly even tens of minutes. Thermo-mechanical iteration of the sintering process indicates an optimal temperature solution for the emplacement of the vitrophyres at 966 °C. The vitrophyres reveal a Newtonian rheology up to 46 MPa, which suggests that the ash particles annealed entirely during welding and that viscous energy dissipation is unlikely from loading conditions alone, unless shear stresses imposed by the overlying ash flow were excessively high and sustained over long distances. The findings underline the value of the term 'lava-like' flow to describe the end rheology of Snake River-type ignimbrites, fully consistent with the typical lithofacies observed.

  12. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Russell, James; Andrews, Graham; Hess, Kai-Uwe; von Aulock, Felix; Kendrick, Jackie; Tuffen, Hugh; Biggin, Andy; Dingwell, Donald

    2015-02-01

    Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometres of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and welding of ignimbrites requires three transects of the glass transition. Magma needs to: 1) fragment during ascent, 2) liquefy and relax during deposition, agglutination and welding (sintering), and 3) quench by cooling into the glassy state. Here we show that welding is a rapid, syn-depositional process and that the welded ignimbrite sheet may flow for up to a few hours before passing through the glass transition a final time. Geospeedometry reveals that the basal vitrophyre of the Grey’s Landing ignimbrite underwent the glass transition at a rate of ~0.1 °C.min^-1 at 870 °C; that is, 30-180 °C below pre-eruptive geothermometric estimates. Application of a 1-D cooling model constrains the timescale of deposition, agglutination, and welding of the basal vitrophyre to less than 1 hour, and possibly even tens of minutes. Thermo-mechanical iteration of the sintering process indicates an optimal temperature solution for the emplacement of the vitrophyres at 966 °C. The vitrophyres reveal a Newtonian rheology up to 46 MPa, which suggests that the ash particles annealed entirely during welding and that viscous energy dissipation is unlikely from loading conditions alone, unless shear stresses imposed by the overlying ash flow were excessively high and sustained over long distances. The findings underline the value of the term 'lava-like' flow to describe the end rheology of Snake River-type ignimbrites, fully consistent with the typical lithofacies observed.

  13. Processes accompanying of mantle plume emplacement into continental lithosphere: Evidence from NW Arabian plate, Western Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Lower crustal xenoliths occurred in the Middle Cretaceous lamprophyre diatremes in Jabel Ansaria (Western Syria) (Sharkov et al., 1992). They are represented mainly garnet granulites and eclogite-like rocks, which underwent by deformations and retrograde metamorphism, and younger fresh pegmatoid garnet-kaersutite-clinopyroxene (Al-Ti augite) rocks; mantle peridotites are absent in these populations. According to mineralogical geothermobarometers, forming of garnet-granulite suite rocks occurred under pressure 13.5-15.4 kbar (depths 45-54 kn) and temperature 965-1115oC. At the same time, among populations of mantle xenoliths in the Late Cenozoic platobasalts of the region, quite the contrary, lower crustal xenoliths are absent, however, predominated spinel lherzolites (fragments of upper cooled rim of a plume head), derived from the close depths (30-40 km: Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2015). From this follows that ancient continental crust was existed here even in the Middle Cretaceous, but in the Late Cenozoic was removed by extended mantle plume head; at that upper sialic crust was not involved in geomechanic processes, because Precambrian metamorphic rocks survived as a basement for Cambrian to Cenozoic sedimentary cover of Arabian platform. In other words, though cardinal rebuilding of deep-seated structure of the region occurred in the Late Cenozoic but it did not affect on the upper shell of the ancient lithosphere. Because composition of mantle xenolithis in basalts is practically similar worldwide, we suggest that deep-seated processes are analogous also. As emplacement of the mantle plume heads accompanied by powerful basaltic magmatism, very likely that range of lower (mafic) continental crust existence is very convenient for extension of plume heads and their adiabatic melting. If such level, because of whatever reasons, was not reached, melting was limited but appeared excess of volatile matters which led to forming of lamprophyre or even kimberlite.

  14. Barriers in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ambjorn, Jan

    1994-01-01

    I discuss recent progress in our understanding of two barriers in quantum gravity: $c > 1$ in the case of 2d quantum gravity and $D > 2$ in the case of Euclidean Einstein-Hilbert gravity formulated in space-time dimensions $D >2$.

  15. Excavation Induced Hydraulic Response of Opalinus Clay - Investigations of the FE-Experiment at the Mont Terri URL in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, T.; Müller, H. R.; Garitte, B.; Sakaki, T.; Vietor, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) Experiment at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland is a full-scale heater test in a clay-rich formation (Opalinus Clay). Based on the Swiss disposal concept it simulates the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) evolution of a spent fuel / vitrified high-level waste (SF / HLW) repository tunnel in a realistic manner. The main aim of this experiment is to investigate SF / HLW repository-induced THM coupled effects mainly in the host rock but also in the engineered barrier system (EBS), which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks. A further aim is to gather experience with full-scale tunnel construction and associated hydro-mechanical (HM) processes in the host rock. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors (state-of-the-art sensors and measurement systems as well as fiber-optic sensors). The sensors are distributed in the host rock's near- and far-field, the tunnel lining, the EBS, and on the heaters. The heater emplacement and backfilling has not started yet, therefore only the host rock instrumentation is installed at the moment and is currently generating data. We will present the instrumentation concept and rationale as well as the first monitoring results of the excavation and ventilation phase. In particular, we investigated the excavation induced hydraulic response of the host rock. Therefore, the spatiotemporal evolution of porewater-pressure time series was analyzed to get a better understanding of HM coupled processes during and after the excavation phase as well as the impact of anisotropic geomechanic and hydraulic properties of the clay-rich formation on its hydraulic behavior. Excavation related investigations were completed by means of inclinometer data to characterize the non-elastic and time

  16. Barrier Data Base user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special purpose data base for physical security barriers has been developed. In addition to barriers, the entities accommodated by the Barrier Data Base (BDB) include threats and references. A threat is established as a configuration of people and equipment which has been employed to penetrate (or attempt to penetrate) a barrier. References are used to cite publications pertinent to the barriers and threats in the data base. Utilization and maintenance of the Barrier Data Base is achieved with LIST, QUERY, ENTER, DELETE, and CHANGE commands which are used to manipulate the data base entities

  17. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  18. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  19. Barriers to SCM implementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Rosli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper explores the barriers faced by Malaysian manufacturing companies in successfullyimplementing the Supply Chain Management (SCM. The study has highlighted some pertinent factorsperforming the barriers that are most frequently reported by the studied companies. Sixteen companies, fromservice and manufacturing companies were studied over a period of two years to assess their SCM practicesthrough survey and interview processes.Design/methodology/approach: This part discusses the research design and methodological issues upon whichthe research is based. The explanation includes two types of research methods, short survey and follow-upinterviews that were identified as being suitable to achieve the aims of this study, which is to identify the currentproblem of SCM practices within the Malaysian SMEs. Research design is a framework or plan for researchused as a guide in collecting and analysing data.Findings: The results showed that the barriers are depending on the types or group of companies business; suchas either it is an SME or a big company. The barriers inhibiting the practice of SCM can be summarized inthe following factors: partnership with suppliers, limited expertise, management commitment, understanding ofSCM, supported technologies and customer satisfaction. The findings are also compared with the results of asimilar study on SCM in other country.Practical implications: Some suggestions are also offered, which is believed to be a good strategy to the companiesto manage the SCM that will lead to sustainable competitive advantage and hence improve their market share.Originality/value: There are interesting barriers between the companies in Malaysia and other country in therespect of SCM implementation. These findings can be used by both Malaysian and other companies to worktogether or review the SCM strategies that will lead to sustainable competitive advantage and hence improvetheir business performance.

  20. Modelling of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators with thick electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskinson, A R; Hershkowitz, N, E-mail: hershkowitz@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    We have developed a new two-dimensional fluid simulation to model the plasma dynamics in surface dielectric barrier discharges operating in air. Single-barrier (one electrode insulated) and double-barrier (both electrodes insulated) discharges have been observed to generate a force in the nearby air, making them potentially useful as aerodynamic actuators. Many previous simulations of such discharges have modelled the electrodes as thin strips. We instead consider plasma actuators including cylindrical electrodes of various sizes. In single-barrier actuators, the size of the exposed electrode qualitatively affects the discharge dynamics, particularly with a negative-going applied voltage. For both geometries, the simulations predict the formation of plasma structures similar to those imaged in previous experiments. Experimentally observed increases in forces for actuators with smaller high-voltage electrodes were only reproduced for the single-barrier geometry. Due to limitations of computational power, voltage rates of change for all simulations were higher than those used in experiments.

  1. Scale Modelling of Railway Noise Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOTHERSALL, D. C.; HOROSHENKOV, K. V.; MORGAN, P. A.; SWIFT, M. J.

    2000-07-01

    Experiments were carried out in an anechoic chamber using a 1:20 scale model of a high-speed train to determine the insertion loss of various forms of track-side noise barrier. All the barriers investigated had the upper edge level with the bottom of the train windows and were positioned as close as possible to the train, within the limitations of the structure gauge. They thus provided attenuation of noise from sources in the lower portion of the train, in the region of the rails and wheels. The measured performance of plane screens with rigid and sound-absorbing surfaces is compared with values predicted by standard prediction methods for railway noise and the results of a numerical model. The effect of barrier shape and absorptive surfaces upon screening performance is investigated. Results are presented in terms of the insertion loss of the peak SPL of the pass-by profile for a single bogie noise source and for the whole train, and also insertion loss based onLAeq,1 h . Results for these three measures show similar trends. For the conditions tested insertion loss values for all the screens were lower when the ground behind the barrier was absorbing than when the ground was rigid. The relative changes in insertion loss for the different forms of barrier were similar for the two ground types. Insertion loss values for rigid screens were between 6 and 10 dB lower than those for similar screens with complete sound absorbing surfaces. The application of absorbing areas on rigid screens significantly increases the insertion loss by between 3 and 6 dB. The least efficient screen was a corrugated barrier with a rigid surface. The most efficient screens tested were plane and curved barriers with absorbing surfaces and a multiple edge screen with a part-absorbing surface.

  2. Barrier island arcs along abandoned Mississippi River deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penland, S.; Suter, J.R.; Boyd, Ron

    1985-01-01

    Generation of transgressive barrier island arcs along the Mississippi River delta plain and preservation of barrier shoreline facies in their retreat paths on the inner shelf is controlled by: (1) shoreface translation; (2) age of the transgression; and (3) the thickness of the barrier island arc sediment package. Barrier island arcs experience an average relative sea level rise of 0.50-1.00 cm yr-1 and shoreface retreat rates range from 5-15 m yr-1. Young barrier island arc sediment packages (Isles Dernieres) are thin and have experienced limited landward retreat of the shoreface. Older barrier island arcs (Chandeleur Islands) are thicker and have experienced significant landward movement of the shoreface because of the greater time available for retreat. If the transgressed barrier shoreline sediment package lies above the advancing ravinement surface, the entire sequence is truncated. A thin reworked sand sheet marks the shoreface retreat path. The base of the transgressive sediment package can lie below the ravinement surface in older barrier shorelines. In this setting, the superstructure of the barrier shoreline is truncated, leaving the basal portion of the transgressive sequence preserved on the inner shelf. A variety of transgressive stratigraphic sequences from sand sheets to truncated barrier islands to sand-filled tidal inlet scars have been identified by high resolution seismic profiling across the shoreface retreat paths of Mississippi delta barrier island arcs. One of these examples, the Isles Dernieres, represents a recently detached barrier island arc in the early stages of transgression. An older example, the Chandeleur Islands, represents a barrier island arc experiencing long-term shoreface retreat. This paper describes the stratigraphic character and preserved transgressive facies for the Isles Dernieres and Chandeleur Islands. ?? 1985.

  3. Vertical barriers with increased sorption capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradl, H.B. [Bilfinger + Berger Bauaktiengesellschaft, Mannheim (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Vertical barriers are commonly used for the containment of contaminated areas. Due to the very small permeability of the barrier material which is usually in the order of magnitude of 10-10 m/s or less the advective contaminant transport can be more or less neglected. Nevertheless, there will always be a diffusive contaminant transport through the barrier which is caused by the concentration gradient. Investigations have been made to increase the sorption capacity of the barrier material by adding substances such as organoclays, zeolites, inorganic oxides and fly ashes. The contaminants taken into account where heavy metals (Pb) and for organic contaminants Toluole and Phenantrene. The paper presents results of model calculations and experiments. As a result, barrier materials can be designed {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} depending on the individual contaminant range of each site (e.g. landfills, gasworks etc.). The parameters relevant for construction such as rheological properties, compressive strength and permeability are not affected by the addition of the sorbents.

  4. Vertical barriers with increased sorption capacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical barriers are commonly used for the containment of contaminated areas. Due to the very small permeability of the barrier material which is usually in the order of magnitude of 10-10 m/s or less the advective contaminant transport can be more or less neglected. Nevertheless, there will always be a diffusive contaminant transport through the barrier which is caused by the concentration gradient. Investigations have been made to increase the sorption capacity of the barrier material by adding substances such as organoclays, zeolites, inorganic oxides and fly ashes. The contaminants taken into account where heavy metals (Pb) and for organic contaminants Toluole and Phenantrene. The paper presents results of model calculations and experiments. As a result, barrier materials can be designed 'tailor-made' depending on the individual contaminant range of each site (e.g. landfills, gasworks etc.). The parameters relevant for construction such as rheological properties, compressive strength and permeability are not affected by the addition of the sorbents

  5. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Subduction initiation, recycling of Alboran lower crust, and intracrustal emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle in the Westernmost Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Marchesi, Claudio; Hidas, Károly; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Unraveling the tectonic settings and processes involved in the annihilation of subcontinental mantle lithosphere is of paramount importance for our understanding of the endurance of continents through Earth history. Unlike ophiolites -- their oceanic mantle lithosphere counterparts -- the mechanisms of emplacement of the subcontinental mantle lithosphere in orogens is still poorly known. The emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle peridotites is often attributed to extension in rifted passive margins or continental backarc basins, accretionary processes in subduction zones, or some combination of these processes. One of the most prominent features of the westernmost Mediterranean Alpine orogenic arcs is the presence of the largest outcrops worldwide of diamond facies, subcontinental mantle peridotite massifs; unveiling the mechanisms of emplacement of these massifs may provide important clues on processes involved in the destruction of continents. The western Mediterranean underwent a complex Alpine evolution of subduction initiation, slab fragmentation, and rollback within a context of slow convergence of Africa and Europe In the westernmost Mediterranean, the alpine orogeny ends in the Gibraltar tight arc, which is bounded by the Betic, Rif and Tell belts that surround the Alboran and Algero-Balearic basins. The internal units of these belts are mostly constituted of an allochthonous lithospheric domain that collided and overthrusted Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Mesozoic-Paleogene, South Iberian and Maghrebian rifted continental paleomargins. Subcontinental lithospheric peridotite massifs are intercalated between polymetamorphic internal units of the Betic (Ronda, Ojen and Carratraca massifs), Rif (Beni Bousera), and Tell belts. In the Betic chain, the internal zones of the allochthonous Alboran domain include, from bottom to top, polymetamorphic rock of the Alpujarride and Malaguide complexes. The Ronda peridotite massif -- the

  7. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 2: vault model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been undertaken to evaluate the design and long-term performance of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault based on a concept of in-room emplacement of copper containers at a depth of 500 m in plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The containers, each with 72 used CANDU fuel bundles, would be surrounded by clay-based buffer and backfill materials in an array of parallel rooms, with the excavation boundary assumed to have an excavation-disturbed zone (EDZ) with a higher permeability than the surrounding rock. In the anoxic conditions of deep rock of the Canadian Shield, the copper containers are expected to survive for >106 a. Thus container manufacturing defects, which are assumed to affect approximately 1 in 5000 containers, would be the only potential source of radionuclide release in the vault. The vault model is a computer code that simulates the release of radionuclides that would occur upon contact of the used fuel with groundwater, the diffusive transport of these radionuclides through the defect in the container shell and the surrounding buffer, and their dispersive and convective transport through the backfill and EDZ into the surrounding rock. The vault model uses a computationally efficient boundary integral model (BIM) that simulates radionuclide mass transport in the engineered barrier system as a point source (representing the defective container) that releases radionuclides into concentric cylinders, that represent the buffer, backfill and EDZ. A 3-dimensional finite-element model is used to verify the accuracy of the BIM. The results obtained in the present study indicates the effectiveness of a design using in-room emplacement of long-lived containers in providing a safe disposal system even under permeable geosphere conditions. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  8. Minutes of Fish Barrier Workshop

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Minutes of Fish Barrier Workshop held 27 May 2009 at DOC Waikato Area Office. Lists attendees and highlights topics to be covered in Fish Barrier Workshop.

  9. Design of engineered sorbent barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sorbent barrier uses sorbent material such as activated carbon or natural zeolites to prevent the migration of radionuclides from a low-level waste site to the aquifer. The sorbent barrier retards the movement of radioactive contaminants, thereby providing time for the radionuclides to decay. Sorbent barriers can be a simple, effective, and inexpensive method for reducing the migration of radionuclides to the environment. Designing a sorbent barrier consists of using soil and sorbent material properties and site conditions as input to a model which will determine the necessary sorbent barrier thickness to meet contaminant limits. The paper covers the following areas: techniques for measuring sorption properties of barrier materials and underlying soils, use of a radionuclide transport model to determine the required barrier thickness and performance under a variety of site conditions, and cost estimates for applying the barrier

  10. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  11. Predictors of Health Service Barriers for Older Chinese Immigrants in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel W. L.; Chau, Shirley B. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Elderly people from ethnic minority groups often experience different barriers in accessing health services. Earlier studies on access usually focused on types and frequency but failed to address the predictors of service barriers. This study examined access barriers to health services faced by older Chinese immigrants in Canada. Factor analysis…

  12. Reference thermal and thermal/mechanical analyses of drifts for vertical and horizontal emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional thermal and thermal/mechanical analyses of the designs of drifts for vertical and horizontal emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in tuff were performed using boundary-element and finite-element computer codes. The fine-element analyses considered the two extreme alternatives of continuous ventilation for 100 yr after waste emplacement and that of no ventilation at any time. The boundary-element code was utilized during scoping studies and it also provided independent verification of the results of the finite-element analyses. The analyses predict the development of increased horizontal stress levels in the rock mass as a result of waste emplacement. These are moderated significantly by ventilation in the case of vertical emplacement, because the drifts are spaced sufficiently close for a substantial amount of the heat generated by the waste to be removed by the ventilating air. Even without such a moderating influence, there is no evidence that the stresses induced by waste emplacement would lead to drift instability. For none of the cases considered was there any indication of a potential for failure of the rock matrix. Regions of overstress of joints were predicted in all cases, but such regions were small and are judged to be of little or no practical significance to the stability of the emplacement drift. 33 refs., 37 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables

  14. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling In Deep Repository Under The Effect of Emplacement Media Degradation - 13285

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is being actively considered and pursued in many countries, where low permeability geological formations are used to provide long term waste contaminant with minimum impact to the environment and risk to the biosphere. A multi-barrier approach that makes use of both engineered and natural barriers (i.e. geological formations) is often used to further enhance the containment performance of the repository. As the deep repository system subjects to a variety of thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) effects over its long 'operational' lifespan (e.g. 0.1 to 1.0 million years, the integrity of the barrier system will decrease over time (e.g. fracturing in rock or clay)). This is broadly referred as media degradation in the present study. This modelling study examines the effects of media degradation on diffusion dominant solute transport in fractured media that are typical of deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes, while the effects of degradation is studied using a pore network model that considers the media diffusivity and network changes. Model results are presented to demonstrate the use of a 3D pore-network model, using a novel architecture, to calculate macroscopic properties of the medium such as diffusivity, subject to pore space changes as the media degrade. Results from a reactive transport model of a representative geological waste disposal package are also presented to demonstrate the effect of media property change on the solute migration behaviour, illustrating the complex interplay between kinetic biogeochemical processes and diffusion dominant transport. The initial modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of a coupled modelling approach (using pore-network model and reactive

  15. PHARMACOVIGILANCE: BARRIERS AND CHALLENGES

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, S. K.; RAPELLIWAR A; S. Sutradhar; THAWARE P; Misra, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is a new discipline which deals with adverse drug or any drug related problems. Pharmacovigilance programme was not bed of roses but its path is laid with challenges and barriers. It is facing obstacles from deficiency from professional health personal to web-based sale of drugs, counterfeit drug to self-medication, etc. It is an integral part of the health sector and identification and reporting of adverse drug effects will have a positive impact on the public health. Impro...

  16. Sonic Crystal Noise Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Yung

    2012-01-01

    An alternative road traffic noise barrier using an array of periodically arranged vertical cylinders known as a Sonic Crystal (SC) is investigated. As a result of multiple (Bragg) scattering, SCs exhibit a selective sound attenuation in frequency bands called band gaps or stop bands related to the spacing and size of the cylinders. Theoretical studies using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE), Multiple Scattering Theory (MST) and Finite Element Method (FEM) have enabled study of the performance of SC ...

  17. Barrier infrared detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  18. PRIORITISING LEAN CONSTRUCTION BARRIERS IN UGANDA'S CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Mwanaki Alinaitwe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Engaging in lean construction efforts could prove to be highly rewarding for building firms in Uganda. However, lean construction is risky and can be disastrous if not properly managed. Lean production efforts in some other countries have not been successful due to the many barriers to its successful implementation. To enable sound lean construction efforts and to increase the chances of success in eliminating waste, a thorough investigation of the barriers is essential. This study presents 31 barriers and investigates their influence (strength on the success of lean construction initiatives. Structured interviews were carried out with technical managers of building firms to assess their perception of the barriers to lean production based on their experience at their firms. The strongest barrier is the provision of inputs exactly when required. Additionally, the barriers were ranked according to the ease of overcoming each. The easiest barrier to overcome is keeping the required items in the right place. Finally, a graphical aid is provided to enable decision makers to concentrate their efforts on the influential (strong, yet easy to overcome barriers. A lack of buildable designs and a participative management style for the workforce are the most important barriers to successful waste reduction in terms of strength and ease of overcoming. On the other hand, a lack of an organisational culture that supports teamwork, a lack of prefabrication and a lack of knowledgeable and skilled workers are regarded as low in strength, and at the same time difficult to overcome.

  19. The role of human capital in lowering barriers to engage in innovation: evidence from the Spanish innovation survey

    OpenAIRE

    D'Este, Pablo; Rentocchini, Francesco; Vega Jurado,Jaider M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of human capital in attenuating the barriers that block firms from engaging in innovation activities. The paper distinguishes between firms facing deterring barriers to innovation (firms deterred from engaging in innovation activities) and firms confronting revealed barriers (firms that experience barriers alongside their engagement in innovation activities). We investigate whether human capital has a particularly strong impact in lowering barriers among the for...

  20. Skin barrier modification with organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Clara; Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Manich, Albert; Coderch, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    The primary barrier to body water loss and influx of exogenous substances resides in the stratum corneum (SC). The barrier function of the SC is provided by patterned lipid lamellae localized to the extracellular spaces between corneocytes. SC lipids are intimately involved in maintaining the barrier function. It is generally accepted that solvents induce cutaneous barrier disruption. The main aim of this work is the evaluation of the different capability of two solvent systems on inducing changes in the SC barrier function. SC lipid modifications will be evaluated by lipid analysis, water sorption/desorption experiments, confocal-Raman visualization and FSTEM images. The amount of SC lipids extracted by chloroform/methanol was significantly higher than those extracted by acetone. DSC results indicate that acetone extract has lower temperature phase transitions than chloroform/methanol extract. The evaluation of the kinetics of the moisture uptake and loss demonstrated that when SC is treated with chloroform/methanol the resultant sample reach equilibrium in shorter times indicating a deterioration of the SC tissue with higher permeability. Instead, acetone treatment led to a SC sample with a decreased permeability thus with an improved SC barrier function. Confocal-Raman and FSTEM images demonstrated the absence of the lipids on SC previously treated with chloroform/methanol. However, they were still present when the SC was treated with acetone. Results obtained with all the different techniques used were consistent. The results obtained increases the knowledge of the interaction lipid-solvent, being this useful for understanding the mechanism of reparation of damaged skin. PMID:27184268

  1. Different emplacement mechanisms of the granitoids from the Sanabria-Viana do Bolo lineament (Iberian Massif, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegas, N.; Aranguren, A.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Ollo de Sapo Domain (OSD), a large antiform that delineates the Ibero-Armorican Arc within the northern part of the Iberian Massif in NW Spain, is pierced by several granitic plutons. The pre-, syn- or post-kinematic emplacement of such plutons is a current issue of debate. Here, we report the structural study, based on field and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data, of three granitic plutons located by the southern termination of the OSD. The structure of the OSD reflects the superposition of vertical folds with crenulation cleavage over older recumbent folds with slate cleavage or schistosity. The process of crustal shortening responsible for these structures ended in the development of dextral and sinistral strike-slip shear zones parallel to the vertical folds. The granites studied, the Veiga, Pradorramisquedo and Sanabria plutons, define a N130°E-trending lineament parallel to the structural grain of the Ollo de Sapo Domain. The granite lineament is located on a negative gravity anomaly (- 60 mgal), suggesting the existence of buried granites. The Sanabria granites are conformable with the schistosity of the country rocks, and are deformed by N130°E-trending dextral shear zones. In contrast, the Pradorramisquedo and the Veiga granites cut the structures of the metamorphic rocks. These observations suggest that the Sanabria granite is syn-kinematic and the remaining two plutons are post-kinematic. However, structural data show that the emplacement of the three plutons was related to a dextral transpressional strike-slip shear zone which is buried below the Pradorramisquedo and the Veiga plutons. The structural differences shown by these granites are to be related to the control of local conditions on migration and emplacement of melts.

  2. Uses of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in the study of emplacement processes of lava flows and dykes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is a powerful technique that can be used to explore in detail the mineral fabric of many types of rocks. In particular, it is well suited to determine mineral fabric of massive, otherwise featureless rocks, like for example the internal parts of many lava flows and dykes. Like most other mineral fabric indicators, the AMS is mainly acquired at a stage when flow-related deformation promotes a mineral array within the melted rock. Unlike is the case with other petrofabric methods, however, the effort required to obtain three-dimensional information of such mineral array using AMS is much reduced, although due to differences in the shape of various minerals involved in the process of fabric acquisition it is possible to find some differences between magnetic and optically determined mineral fabrics. When attention is given to the systematic variations of the AMS within a lava flow or dyke, however, the AMS method allows us to infer aspects of lava (magma) emplacement that are not easy to study through other traditional petrofabric techniques. Such detailed information can be used to obtain a detailed record of the internal deformation of one flow unit with relative ease and little effort. Despite of these advantages, the abundant information obtained from one single unit through AMS methods might not be interpreted in a simple form. The main complications arise from two contrasting premises. On the one hand it can be assumed that mineral fabric remains constant along one single unit, and therefore departures from an expected value are considered indicative of post-emplacement alteration. Alternatively, it can be considered that changes in the mineral fabric are to be expected due to changing conditions of emplacement. For this reason, a more thoroughly investigation that takes into consideration independent lines of information is always advisable. Nevertheless, AMS remains as the

  3. Sensitivity of the stability of a waste emplacement drift to variation in assumed rock joint parameters in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, M.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of a numerical analysis to determine the effects of variation of rock joint parameters on stability of waste disposal rooms for vertical emplacement. Conditions and parameters used were taken from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design report (MacDougall et al., 1987). Mechanical results are presented which illustrate the predicted distribution of stress, joint slip, and room deformations for times of initial excavation and after 50 years heating. 82 refs., 93 figs.

  4. Pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate critical factors in the performance of the site with respect to a criterion in terms of pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time. The degree of failure in the analytical model to meet the criterion is sensitive to the estimate of fracture porosity in the upper welded unit of the problem domain. Fracture porosity is derived from a number of more fundamental measurements including fracture frequency, fracture orientation, and the moisture-retention characteristic inferred for the fracture domain

  5. Barriers to learning from incidents and accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Dechy, N.; Dien, Y.; Drupsteen, L.; Felicio, A.; Cunha, C; Roed-Larsen, S.; Marsden, E.; Tulonen, T.; Stoop, J.; Strucic, M.; Vetere Arellano, A.L.; Vorm, J.K.J. van der; Benner, L.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides an overview of knowledge concerning barriers to learning from incidents and accidents. It focuses on learning from accident investigations, public inquiries and operational experience feedback, in industrial sectors that are exposed to major accident hazards. The document discusses learning at organizational, cross-organizational and societal levels (impact on regulations and standards). From an operational standpoint, the document aims to help practitioners to identify...

  6. Welfare Reform, Work Requirements, and Employment Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen Meara; Richard Frank

    2006-01-01

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act imposed work requirements on welfare recipients. Using 1999-2001 data from Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio, we compared the labor market and welfare experience of women with four employment barriers: poor mental health, moderate to heavy drug and alcohol use, a child with a behavior problem, and a child under the age of 3. Women with poor mental health and drug and alcohol users were much less likely to move into work than o...

  7. Message maps for safety barrier awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Kirsten; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Troen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    All people are exposed to risks in every-day life, but they seldom experience accidents. Therefore people often believe that these accidents will never happen, and they will see the risks no more. By increasing the ability to notice risks, to see safety barriers, and to assess the safety barriers’ performance parameters continuously, it is possible to create better risk awareness of employers, managers and employees. Better risk awareness of these stakeholders will make it possible that: • Ri...

  8. Coupling Seepage and Radionuclide Transport in and Around Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.; Steefel, C.

    2007-12-01

    The proposed nuclear waste repository of the United States is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Waste packages will be placed in deep (~350 m) underground drifts in volcanic tuff. Seepage may potentially occur at the repository drifts when the drifts get rewetted after a dryout period. The potential seepage water will be quickly evaporated or boiled to near dryness as long as it falls on the top of the hot waste package leading to formation of brine, precipitation of salts and volatilization of gases. These processes may potentially impact the long-term safety of waste packages in the drift. The objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a quantitative model of coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes potentially leading to brine formation, salt precipitation and gas volatilization on top of waste packages and/or a drip shield and (2) dynamically integrate such a model into the larger-scale models of processes within and around waste emplacement drifts, as well as into the smaller-scale waste-package corrosion models. Process models were implemented into an existing reactive transport numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, to allow modeling of (1) evaporative concentration to very high ionic strength (up to 40 molal), (2) boiling point elevation due to dissolved salts, (3) boiling/evaporation to dryness, and (4) salt deliquescence. An integrated near-field and in-drift THC simulation was run using a vertical 2-D grid extending from near the ground surface to the groundwater table, and covering a width equal to half the design drift spacing of 81 m. The integrated model was then used to simulate a discrete dripping event within the drift. The model considered the release of radionuclides into seepage water as this water contacts the waste package and flows through the invert. The precipitation of uranophane and Np-uranophane was also considered. These minerals form in the invert from the neutralization of mildly acidic seepage water by clay minerals

  9. Eruption style and flow emplacement in the Submarine North Arch Volcanic Field, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, David A.; Uto, Kozo; Satake, Kenji; Davis, Alicé S.

    prior to eruption formed low-relief lava shields. Vesiculation, and even fragmentation, of these alkalic magmas at water depths as great as 4300 m is caused by exsolution of much of their high initial volatile content, mainly CO2 with less H2O. One hyaloclastite sample contains thin glass bubble-wall fragments similar to those formed by mild explosions as seawater boils following mixing of magma and seawater. Low-viscosity dense lava is emplaced as sheet and channelized tube-fed flows that travel down gradients as small as 1.5 m/km (0.08°) and flow as far as 108 km from their vents.

  10. Tearing Down Disciplinary Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Juan G.

    1988-05-01

    Profesor Hannes Alfvén's life-long battle against scientific narrow-mindedness and parochial approaches to the solution of scientific problems is well known and deeply appreciated by this author. In this article the new interdisciplinary trends in science are critically examined and the psychological impacts of crumbling disciplinary barriers on the participating scientists are analyzed. Several examples of interdisciplinary research programs are discussed and some thoughts on the structural reform of scientific organizations, agencies, and universities needed to face these trends are given.

  11. Barriers to entry : abolishing the barriers to understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Keppler, Jan Horst

    2009-01-01

    BARRIERS TO ENTRY: ABOLISHING THE BARRIERS TO UNDERSTANDING by Jan-Horst Keppler Professor of economics Université Paris – Dauphine, LEDa, and Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne, PHARE Port.: (+33 6) 77 81 37 46; Email: . Abstract The concept of a barrier to entry has been discussed least since Bain (1956) with important contributions by Spence (1977), Dixit (1980) or Milgrom and Roberts (1982). The more recent discussion is synth...

  12. Optimum Barrier Height for SiC Schottky Barrier Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abd El-Latif; Alaa El-Din Sayed Hafez

    2013-01-01

    The study of barrier height control and optimization for Schottky barrier diode (SBD) from its physical parameters have been introduced using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. SBD is the rectifying barrier for electrical conduction across the metal semiconductor (MS) junction and, therefore, is of vital importance to the successful operation of any semiconductor device. 4H-SiC is used as a semiconductor material for its good electrical characteristics with high-power semiconductor ...

  13. Ballistic impact response of a coarse-aggregate barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical understanding of the damage inflicted to a protective barrier resulting from impact with a projectile is paramount to the intelligent design of advanced protective systems. The configuration of the protective barrier used for ballistic impact studies depends upon the overall protective device that the barrier is to represent. Although many barriers are homogeneous in configuration, a much broader class of barriers involves a non-uniform agglomeration of components. Such barriers can conceivably represent the means of protection for ammunition bunkers, nuclear reactors, armored military vehicles, or any asset for which protection against projectile impact is desired. Here, an experiment-oriented investigation aimed at gaining insight and understanding of the physical phenomena that occur when a projectile impacts a thin barrier consisting of a uniform, coarse aggregate was performed at the US Army Research Laboratory. The thin barrier target was an assembly of solid steel cylinders oriented in a 15-by-15 rod square-packed array. The projectile consisted of a solid aluminum cylinder with a diameter of approximately 2.5 aggregate diameters and a length of 1.25 aggregate element lengths. The impact velocity was 2 km/s. The data collected consisted of the crater size in the barrier, plastic deformation of individual cylinders, a lateral damage wave velocity from the strain gage signals, and the residual penetrator length. A detailed analysis of the damage inflicted on the aggregate elements of the barrier was performed. The analysis focused primarily on the steel cylinders that resided outside of the eroded crater zone. Iso-strain contours were mapped on the face of the barrier to shed insight into the contact mechanics of the individual aggregate elements. A semi-empirical aggregate deformation model was created to predict the magnitude of deformation that occurs to cylinders located outside the physical crater

  14. Feasibility studies of air placed techniques as emplacement means of different backfilling materials in underground radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air placed techniques are likely to be used as emplacement means of different backfilling materials in underground waste repositories. A literature survey of the air placed techniques and equipments leads to the choice of the dry process taking into account the emplacement constraints (distance: 300 m, flow: 10 m3/h) and the large variety of materials to be placed. Tests performed in the case of cement-based materials (with and without addition of silica fumes), for different types of cement and as a function of the incidence of the jet, show that it is possible to put in place mortars of good quality. However heterogeneity in the material composition is found when the jet is stopped. This problem may be partly solved by a better automation of the process. Complementary tests, carried out with the preselected clay of Fourges Cahaignes, clearly demonstrate the ability of the air placed technique to put in place pure clay: a dry density of 1.50kg/m3 is reached in the case of coarse material and for a final water content of 30% (in weight). Feasibility tests performed on clay-sand mixtures are not conclusive due to an unappropriate granulometry distribution of the sand. 11 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Asymmetric textural and structural patterns of a granitic body emplaced at shallow levels: The La Chinchilla pluton, northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchioli Grande, M.; Alasino, P. H.; Rocher, S.; Larrovere, M. A.; Dahlquist, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    New mapping and a detailed structural study of the La Chinchilla stock, Sierra de Velasco, NW Argentina, suggest an asymmetrical shape of the pluton and provide strong evidence for its shallow emplacement depth. The pluton is a Lower Carboniferous monzogranite composed of K-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase and biotite. It exhibits an internal asymmetric textural zoning, defined by porphyritic granite in the southeastern region to equigranular granite in the northwestern region. The presence of subhorizontal dikes in the northwestern area, where the contacts dip shallowly, and subvertical dikes intruding the host rock nearby steep-dipping intrusive contacts in the southeastern region are compatible with an overall asymmetrical shape and internal structure of this pluton. Considering published crystallization ages, a dominant strain field occurring at around 12 Ma is inferred based on magmatic fabrics in the pluton and its host rock (the Huaco pluton), with a principal shortening direction oriented SW-NE, consistent with the general NW-SE strike of the body. Field evidence supports brittle fracturing and block displacement as the dominant emplacement mechanism, suggesting that magmatic stoping dominated during the late stage of the evolution of the magma chamber.

  16. International Expert Review of SRCan: Engineered Barrier Issues. External review contribution in support of SKI's and SSI's review of SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David (Quintessa Limited, Henley-on-Thames (GB)); Bennett, David (TerraSalus Limited, Oakham (GB)); Apted, Mick (Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (US)); Saellfors, Goeran (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)); Saario, Timo (VTT Materials and Building (FI)); Segle, Peter (Inspecta, Stockholm (SE))

    2008-03-15

    of uncertainties in SKB's programme and safety reports, some of which relate to issues that appear to be of sufficient significance that they will need to be thoroughly addressed in the SR-Site safety report in time for the repository licence application. Other less urgent issues might be identified in SR-Can as uncertainties to be addressed through an appropriate performance confirmation programme. Performance confirmation may be defined as the programme of tests, experiments and analyses, conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the information used to demonstrate compliance with long-term safety standards for a geological repository. The most significant of the issues identified by the EBS review group include: - Demonstration of the feasibility of EBS emplacement. SKB will need to present more details on the reference EBS design, on its reference repository construction method, and on the specifications for the EBS materials. In particular, SKB still needs to demonstrate satisfactorily that the EBS can be successfully fabricated and emplaced in the appropriate configuration under repository conditions and at the rates that are projected to be required during waste disposal. SKB needs to develop and test quality assurance and quality control procedures for repository construction and operation, including EBS emplacement. SKB also needs to conduct further tests of EBS emplacement, and to characterise the as-emplaced EBS components. More generally, SKB should describe and explain in more detail how its schedule for developing plans and procedures and for conducting laboratory experiments and underground tests relates to the schedules for safety assessment and licensing. - Canister manufacture and integrity. The view of the review group is that SKB should consider a number of issues in greater detail to build further confidence in the proposed approach for canister manufacture and in the assessments of canister integrity and performance. For example, SKB could

  17. International Expert Review of SRCan: Engineered Barrier Issues. External review contribution in support of SKI's and SSI's review of SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    uncertainties in SKB's programme and safety reports, some of which relate to issues that appear to be of sufficient significance that they will need to be thoroughly addressed in the SR-Site safety report in time for the repository licence application. Other less urgent issues might be identified in SR-Can as uncertainties to be addressed through an appropriate performance confirmation programme. Performance confirmation may be defined as the programme of tests, experiments and analyses, conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the information used to demonstrate compliance with long-term safety standards for a geological repository. The most significant of the issues identified by the EBS review group include: - Demonstration of the feasibility of EBS emplacement. SKB will need to present more details on the reference EBS design, on its reference repository construction method, and on the specifications for the EBS materials. In particular, SKB still needs to demonstrate satisfactorily that the EBS can be successfully fabricated and emplaced in the appropriate configuration under repository conditions and at the rates that are projected to be required during waste disposal. SKB needs to develop and test quality assurance and quality control procedures for repository construction and operation, including EBS emplacement. SKB also needs to conduct further tests of EBS emplacement, and to characterise the as-emplaced EBS components. More generally, SKB should describe and explain in more detail how its schedule for developing plans and procedures and for conducting laboratory experiments and underground tests relates to the schedules for safety assessment and licensing. - Canister manufacture and integrity. The view of the review group is that SKB should consider a number of issues in greater detail to build further confidence in the proposed approach for canister manufacture and in the assessments of canister integrity and performance. For example, SKB could improve its canister

  18. Field and seismic evaluation of the block-and-ash flows emplaced from eruption columns of the 2005 Vulcanian explosions at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo; Vargas-Gutiérrez, Víctor R.

    2016-04-01

    The May-September 2005 Vulcanian explosion sequence was the most intense of all the activity during the recent 1998-2015 unrest at Volcán de Colima, Mexico. This study presents field measurements of volume and runout distances of block-and-ash flows emplaced from eruption columns that punctuated the six largest explosions of this sequence. The energy of these explosions and the emplacement duration of the pyroclastic flows were obtained from broadband seismic signals associated with these events. The field and seismic characteristics of the 2005 explosions at Volcán de Colima and associated block-and-ash flows showed that six explosions with energy ranging between 3.0 × 1011 and 1.5 × 1013 J emplaced the block-and-ash flows with volumes ranging between 1.8 × 105 and 3.1 × 105 m3 DRE (dense rock equivalent). Analysis of durations of seismic signals associated with the movement of the 2005 block-and-ash flows emplaced from the eruption columns allowed us to quantify them as M3-magnitude events using the techniques proposed by Zobin et al. (Bull Volcanol 67: 679-688, 2005) to quantify the block-and-ash flows emplaced from the partial collapse of the lava dome at Volcán de Colima.

  19. Barriers and aids in conducting research with older homeless individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, D

    1995-06-01

    Field notes of a qualitative pilot study of older homeless people in Cincinnati identified several barriers and aids to the study of homeless elders. Identified research barriers were researcher's lack of contextual wisdom (street smarts), locating elders, substance abuse, attrition, victimization, credibility of informants, and xenophobia. Identified research aids were friendliness of certain elders, openness of the researcher, attractive incentives in exchange for interviews, and service providers' willingness to share experiences. PMID:7568590

  20. Effect of Surfactant Mixtures on Skin Structure and Barrier Properties

    OpenAIRE

    James-Smith, Monica A.; Hellner, Brittney; Annunziato, Nancy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of two commonly studied surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C12TAB), on skin barrier properties. Using skin conductivity, FT-IR of stratum corneum samples, and penetration of radiolabelled SDS, we determined that addition of C12TAB lowers the ability of SDS to perturb skin’s barrier properties. Ultrafiltration experiments revealed that addition of C12TAB serves to decrease the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar ag...

  1. Sub- and near-barrier fusion reactions experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli G.

    2016-01-01

    Furthermore, light heavy-ion systems show cross section oscillations above the Coulomb barrier. Recent experiments have been performed on the fusion of 28,30Si+28,30Si systems where all phenomena cited above show up. In particular regular oscillations that have been revealed above the barrier for 28Si+28Si and have been interpreted as the consequence of the strong channel couplings and/or the oblate deformation of 28Si.

  2. Surface barrier for tritium permeation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To apply the surface barrier to reduce hydrogen permeation, the influence of the surface barrier on both the permeation and retention has been investigated considering physical and chemical stability of the barrier in fusion environment. Since energetic hydrogen from the plasma not only impinges directly into subsurface but also removes the front surface barrier, only the back surface barrier works reliably. Oxides, carbide and nitride are candidates as the barrier but their mechanical as well as chemical stability is an important concern, because very large thermal gradient and thermal cycling in fusion environment could enhance the crack initiation and exfoliation of the barrier. Therefore an appropriate barrier which is stable under a particular operating condition must be developed. The most reliable way to reduce the permeation is to use a metallic layer, but it must be rather thick. It should be noted that the back surface barrier to suppress the permeation inevitably increases the retention. Therefore an optimization between the permeation decrease and retention increase is necessary. An alternative way to reduce the plasma or ion driven permeation is to decrease the recombination coefficient at the back surface. However, large uncertainty in the observed recombination coefficients does not allow us to rely on the recombination limited process and further work is needed. 20 refs., 6 figs

  3. Racial Trade Barriers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jacob Halvas

    Aryanization is associated with Nazi Germany's policies to exclude Jews in the Germany from the economy in the pre-war years, but I will show it was a global policy from 1937. The utopian goal of international Aryanization was the total removal of Jews who traded with Germany anywhere in the world....... This paper analyzes the racial policies pursued in the foreign trade and argues that we need to recognize Aryanization as a world-wide policy in order to fully understand its character and possible consequences. I focus on the pre-war period and analyze the case of Denmark from three different perspectives......: perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The analysis will show that race, economy and foreign trade were combined in an attempt to raise racial trade barriers. This forced the question of German racial policies on the Danish government, Danish-Jewish businesses, and German companies involved in foreign trade...

  4. PHARMACOVIGILANCE: BARRIERS AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARMA S. K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacovigilance is a new discipline which deals with adverse drug or any drug related problems. Pharmacovigilance programme was not bed of roses but its path is laid with challenges and barriers. It is facing obstacles from deficiency from professional health personal to web-based sale of drugs, counterfeit drug to self-medication, etc. It is an integral part of the health sector and identification and reporting of adverse drug effects will have a positive impact on the public health. Improvement in knowledge in pharmacovigilance and communication from the top level to the grass-root level in the health sector will help in proper implementation of the programme. Patient should be educated to report any adverse effects after taking drug and stop relaying on acquiring information related to drugs in web. Proper detection, reporting and analysis would help to implement the programme for the betterment of society.

  5. Exposure, Uptake, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Lanone, Sophie

    The nanotechnologies market is booming, e.g., in the food industry (powder additives, etc.) and in medical applications (drug delivery, prosthetics, diagnostic imaging, etc.), but also in other industrial sectors, such as sports, construction, cosmetics, and so on. In this context, with an exponential increase in the number of current and future applications, it is particularly important to evaluate the problem of unintentional (i.e., non-medical) exposure to manufactured nanoparticles (so excluding nanoparticles found naturally in the environment). In this chapter, we begin by discussing the various parameters that must be taken into account in any serious assessment of exposure to man-made nanoparticles. We then list the potential routes by which nanoparticles might enter into the organism, and outline the mechanisms whereby they could get past the different biological barriers. Finally, we describe the biodistribution of nanoparticles in the organism and the way they are eliminated.

  6. Countermeasures and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  7. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  8. Direct access tariffs and barriers to choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current situation of the power market in Alberta was reviewed. Based on this review is was concluded that the province is a long way from being a competitive, liquid power market. Further, it was predicted that unless large power purchasers get actively involved in managing their options, identify realistic and competitive supply options and actively campaign for the removal of barriers to choice, they will experience significant cost increases in the year 2001 and beyond, due in large measure to the market power exercised by the four major utilities (TAU, EPCOR, APL and Powerex). Barriers to new supply such as the high cost of standby, uncertainties about transmission and natural gas prices, the delays to cogeneration caused by low oil prices, and the design of direct access tariffs by utilities, were also explored. The cumulative contribution of these factors to uncertainties in pool price, fixed price and transmission and distribution costs were outlined

  9. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45 degree angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained

  10. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, J.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

  11. The Sondalo gabbro contact aureole (Campo unit, Eastern Alps): implications for mid-crustal mafic magma emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, B.; Mohn, G.; Štípská, P.; Schulmann, K.; Manatschal, G.

    2016-05-01

    Contact aureoles rimming plutonic rocks are the locus of metamorphism and deformations witnessing magma emplacement mechanisms in the crust. In this study, structural and petrological observations are combined to mineral equilibria modelling to unravel the polyphase tectono-metamorphic history of the Permian Sondalo gabbro and its host rock, the Campo unit (Eastern Alps). The Campo unit consists of Grt-St-Ms-Bt-Pl-Qtz ± Sil ± And ± Crd mica schists attesting of a Carboniferous prograde P- T path, reaching 6 kbar/600 °C and subsequently 5.6 kbar/650 °C. This metamorphism is coeval with the formation of a sub-vertical NE-SW trending foliation (S1) and its overprint by a sub-vertical NW-SE trending foliation (S2). The heat brought by the Permian intrusives subsequently caused heating of the Campo unit at around 3-4 kbar/540 °C reflected by regional static crystallization of cordierite and andalusite porphyroblasts. During the intrusion of the Sondalo gabbro, thermal peak conditions are recorded by Grt-Sil-Spl-Crd-Ilm granulitic xenoliths at ~5.5 kbar/930 °C, subsequently exhumed at ~4 kbar during the development of a new foliation (S3). This foliation is localized around the pluton and moderately dips away from the centre of the pluton. In the migmatitic contact aureole, Grt-Sil-Bt-Pl-Qtz-Ilm and Grt-Sil-Crd-Spl-Bt-Kfs-Ilm residual rocks bear the new foliation (S3) and document a decompression from 6 kbar/750 °C to 5 kbar/725 °C and from 5.2 kbar/800 °C to reach 4.8 kbar/770 °C, respectively. The P- T- d paths recorded by the host rock and the xenoliths point to a two-step magma emplacement. First the Sondalo gabbro intruded the Campo unit causing heating of the host rock without deformation at 3-4 kbar. Second, the ductile flow along the pluton margins developed a new foliation (S3) during exhumation of the pluton and its immediate contact aureole from 6 to 4 kbar. Altogether, it indicates a progressive increase in mechanical coupling between the pluton

  12. Probing depth dependencies of melt emplacement on time dependent quantities in a continental rift scenario with melting and melt extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2014-05-01

    Since some years seismological observations provide increasing evidence of a discontinuity near the mid of older mantle lithosphere. Explanation may be a melt infiltration front (MIF) as upper margin of an evolving network of veins. These are formed by crystallized melt supplied by episodic melting events in the asthenosphere. To test this concept geodynamically we performed numerical modelling applying melting, extraction of melt and emplacement in a viscous matrix. Thereupon, we were faced to the problem defining an intrusion level for the melt. Findings of prior studies led to the need of movable, process dependent boundaries of the emplacement zone additionally making the process probably more self-consistent. Here we present a preliminary study exploring several empirical attempts to relate time dependent states to an upward moving boundary for intrusion. Modeled physics is based on thermo-mechanics of visco-plastic flow. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component (crust-mantle) and two phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature-, pressure-, and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation and the high Prandtl number approximation are used, elasticity is neglected and geometry is restricted to 2D. Approximation is done with the Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation (FDCON). Model guiding scenario is a extending thick lithosphere associated to by updoming asthenosphere probably additionally heated by a plume nearby. As the P-T conditions in the asthenosphere are near the solidus caused changes may increase melting and generate partial melt. Against conventional expectations on permeability at lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth a fast melt transport into and sometimes through the lithosphere often is observed. The

  13. State of the art for fabricating and emplacing concrete containers into large horizontal disposal caverns in the french geological repository - 59267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work presented in this paper was initialized by Andra in 2007. The work necessary for manufacturing and testing a full scale demonstrator is presently implemented. The case story is twofold. The first part is related to the initial development of a high performance concrete formulation used for fabricating concrete storage containers (containing Intermediate Level and Long Lived Waste primary canisters) to be stacked and emplaced into 400-m long concrete lined horizontal disposal vaults (also called cavern), excavated in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay host formation at a 550 to 600-m depth, with an inside diameter of approximately 8-m. The fabrication of the concrete boxes is illustrated. The second part presents the outcome at the end of the detailed design phase, for a system which is now being manufactured (for further test and assembly), for the emplacement of the concrete containers inside the vault. The application was engineered for remote emplacing a pile of 2 concrete containers (the containers are preliminarily stacked in a pile of 2, inside a hot cell, thanks to a ground travelling gantry crane). The emplacement process is justified and the related emplacement synoptic is illustrated. The test campaign is scheduled in 2011-2012. The successful completion of the technical trials is mandatory to confirm the mechanical feasibility of remotely emplacing concrete containers into large horizontal disposal caverns over long distances. The later display of the machinery at work in Andra's showroom will be instrumental for the confidence building process involving the various stakeholders concerned by the public enquiry period (mid-2013) preceding the deep geological repository license application (2014-2015). (authors)

  14. Barriers to adherence in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf; Boisen, Kirsten A;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment adherence is crucial in patients with cystic fibrosis, but poor adherence is a problem, especially during adolescence. Identification of barriers to treatment adherence and a better understanding of how context shapes barriers is of great importance in the disease. Adolescent reports of...... barriers to adherence have been studied, but studies of their parents' experience of such barriers have not yet been carried out. The aim of the present study was to explore barriers to treatment adherence identified by young patients with cystic fibrosis and by their parents....

  15. Institutional distributed energy interconnection barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This PowerPoint presentation provided an introduction to Encorp Inc., a leading provider of network technology and infrastructure management solutions for the distributed energy market. Encorp develops and markets software and hardware technology solutions for communications, control and networking of distributed energy. It is developing and implementing real-time, distributed energy-focused solutions for a wide variety of applications through new products and services which are technology neutral, and easily networked. Encorp controls more than 500 MW of distributed power with a total of 127 customers. This paper reviewed 3 barriers (regulatory, contractual/tariffs, and business practices) based on US experience. The challenge remaining is to determine if microgrids can be used effectively, and to determine the limitations of bi-directional power flows. The key issues regarding how end-users can share the costs and maximize on the benefits of distributed energy resources include: standby service charges, departing load charges, regulatory uncertainty, rate class degradation, lack of incentives for utility cost reduction, and lack of ability to create experimental tariffs. tabs., figs

  16. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...

  17. Hanford Protective Barriers Program asphalt barrier studies -- FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Protective Barrier (HPB) Program is evaluating alternative barriers to provide a means of meeting stringent water infiltration requirements. One type of alternative barrier being considered is an asphalt-based layer, 1.3 to 15 cm thick, which has been shown to be very effective as a barrier for radon gas and, hence, should be equally effective as a barrier for the larger molecules of water. Fiscal Year 1988 studies focused on the selection and formulation of the most promising asphalt materials for further testing in small-tube lysimeters. Results of laboratory-scale formulation and hydraulic conductivity tests led to the selection of a rubberized asphalt material and an admixture of 24 wt% asphalt emulsion and concrete sand as the two barriers for lysimeter testing. Eight lysimeters, four each containing the two asphalt treatments, were installed in the Small Tube Lysimeter Facility on the Hanford Site. The lysimeter tests allow the performance of these barrier formulations to be evaluated under more natural environmental conditions

  18. Conceptual design of retrieval systems for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have jurisdiction over the nuclear waste management program. Design studies were previously made of proposed repository site configurations for the receiving, processing, and storage of nuclear wastes. However, these studies did not provide operational designs that were suitable for highly reliable TRU retrieval in the deep geologic salt environment for the required 60-year period. The purpose of this report is to develop a conceptual design of a baseline retrieval system for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. The conceptual design is to serve as a working model for the analysis of the performance available from the current state-of-the-art equipment and systems. Suggested regulations would be based upon the results of the performance analyses

  19. Development and demonstration of prototype transportation equipment for emplacing HL vitrified waste canisters into small diameter bored horizontal disposal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over a period of 4 and years the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), working with a variety of Contractors mostly specializing in nuclear orientated mechanical applications, successfully designed, fabricated and demonstrated 2 very different prototype high level waste transport systems. The first system, based on air cushion technology, was developed primarily for very heavy loads (17 to 45 tonnes). The results of this work are described in a separate presentation (Paper 21) at this Conference. The second system, developed by Andra within the framework of the ESDRED Project, generally referred to as the 'Pushing Robot System' for vitrified waste canisters, is the subject of this paper. The 'Pushing Robot System' is a part of the French national disposal concept that is described in Andra's 'Dossier 2005'. The latter is a public document that can be viewed on Andra's web site (www.andra.fr). The 'Pushing Robot System' system is designed for the deep geological disposal (in clay formations) of 'C' type vitrified waste canisters. In its entirety the system provides for the transport, emplacement and, if necessary, the retrieval of those canisters. Nothing in the design of the Andra emplacement equipment would preclude its utilization in horizontal openings in other types of geological settings. Over a period of some 8 years Andra has developed the 'Pushing Robot System' in 3 phases. Initially there was only the 'Conceptual Design' (Phase 1) which was incorporated in the Dossier 2005. This was followed by Phase 2 i.e. the design and fabrication of a simplified full scale prototype system henceforth referred to a P1, which includes a Pushing Robot, a Dummy Canister and a Test Bench. P1 details were also incorporated in the Dossier 2005. Finally, during Phase 3, a second more comprehensive full scale prototype system P2 has been designed and is being assembled and tested this month. This system includes a Transport Shuttle, a Transfer Shielding Cask, a

  20. The Guitiriz granite, Variscan belt of northern Spain: extension-controlled emplacement of magma during tectonic escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranguren, Aitor; Tubia, JoséMaría; Bouchez, Jean Luc; Vigneresse, Jean Louis

    1996-03-01

    The Ollo de Sapo domain of the northern part of the Variscan belt of Spain, contains Precambrian and Ordovician metamorphic rocks intruded by the Guitiriz granite. The domain is bounded by two NS transcurrent shear zones. Detailed structural and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility studies of the Guitiriz pluton reveal a syntectonic emplacement, relative to movement on the two NS trending bounding shear zones, characterized by: (1) development of NS trending structural and magnetic fabrics: (2) concordant structures in granites and country rocks; and (3) development of shear zones along the east and west granite margins. Gravity data show two roots trending 110°E extending down to 4.5 km from an otherwise thin (Sapo Domain — bounded by two shear zones acting as conjugate strike-slip zones.

  1. Lack of inhibiting effect of oil emplacement on quartz cementation: Evidence from Cambrian reservoir sandstones, Paleozoic Baltic Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; Cyziene, Jolanta; Sliaupa, Saulius;

    2008-01-01

    cementation is derived from internal sources. Rather, in spite of large variation in porosity and quartz cement content, a regular pattern of porosity decrease is related to increasing temperature or depth. The observed heterogeneity is due to local factors that influence the precipitation of quartz cement......Currently, the question of whether or not the presence of oil in sandstone inhibits quartz cementation and preserves porosity is still debated. Data from a number of Cambrian sandstone oil fields and dry fields have been studied to determine the effects of oil emplacement on quartz cementation. The......, including sandstone architecture, i.e., distribution of shales within the sandstone bodies, and sandstone thickness. Heterogeneity is inherent to sandstone architecture and to the fact that silica for quartz cementation is derived from heterogeneously distributed local pressure solution. Models predicting...

  2. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement (TSS): In-situ instrumentation and numerical modeling of stress measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of the planned demonstration test Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement (TSS) BGR is carrying out in-situ-measurements of rock stresses, rock deformability and permeability of salt rock and backfill material. The following techniques developed and proved by BGR during the last years are planned to be used in the TSS project: overcoring technique, dilatometer technique, hard inclusion technique, slot-cutting techniques, large-flatjack technique, compensation tests in laboratory, vacuum tests, injection tests, and tracer tests. The purpose of measurements is to determine: the initial stress state; stress gradients around test drifts; stress change caused by mining activities, by creep and stress relaxation and by temperature; the in-situ load-deformation behavior of rock salt; the permeability of rock salt around test drifts; the compaction behavior of backfill material; and the load-deformation behavior of rock salt and borehole grout in laboratory tests

  3. Innovative technologies - Antiquated procedures how do we romove the barriers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper share the author's perspective, based on her experience, on the procedural, regulatory, institutional, and human barriers limiting the progress and effectiveness of decision making in the Federal government's efforts to develop and demonstrate innovative environmental cleanup technologies. The author has drawn upon her experience as a facilitator for the DOIT Committee process, the EPA/Clean Sites Public/Private Partnership, private industry technology development and demonstration consortia, knowledge gained from facilitating workshops on regulatory and institutional barriers to technology development, and ten years experience as a Superfund attorney. Two main topics are covered in this paper, the first focuses on the use of group processes for decision-making and makes recommendations for improving the success of these processes. The second focus of this paper is on barriers to and solutions for successful development, demonstration, and commercialization of new environmental technologies

  4. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  5. Engineered Barrier System Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01

  6. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  7. A LOOK AT CULTURAL BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. VRÂNCEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global market allows each individual to work in foreign countries. This fact is a great opportunity for business development, but also puts into light the problem of cultural barriers. Ineffective cross-cultural communication and collaboration can harm employees, customers, and other stakeholders. A company with employees from different cultures must acknowledge and understand these barriers in order to overcome them and to obtain the desired performance. The present study aims to expose the cultural barriers encountered by foreigners in a multinational company from Romania.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of predicted peak release rates from the engineered barrier system for a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any potential repository for the ultimate disposal of the nation's high-level radioactive wastes is subject to meeting post-closure regulatory requirements as specified by the NRC. Three NRC sub-system performance measures are relevant to the evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site and possible engineered barriers. These performance requirements are specified in 10 CFR 60. These include the substantially complete containment requirement, the engineered barrier system (EBS) release requirement, and the pre-waste emplacement groundwater travel time requirement. The present paper documents an initial evaluation of the peak EBS release rates. A number of key factors significantly impact the maximum release rate from the engineered barrier system. The authors have conducted four simulations to approximate the effects of delaying and spreading out the failure distribution that are based on different thermal loads and criteria for the initiation of aqueous corrosion. Using an assumed outer barrier of 10 cm and an inner barrier of 0.95 cm and the Stahl model for aqueous pitting corrosion, they have analyzed the EBS release rates for thermal loads of 28.5, 57 and 83 kW/Ac using temperature as the corrosion limiting factor and at 57 kW/Ac for saturation limiting the initiation of corrosion. The later had the earliest failures and the most rapid failure rates observed in the TSPA-1993 analyses so provides the upper bound on the release rates

  9. A new approach to performance assessment of barriers in a repository. Executive summary, draft, technical appendices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-barrier systems are accepted as the basic approach for long term environmental safe isolation of radioactive waste in geological repositories. Assessing the performance of natural and engineered barriers is one of the major difficulties in producing evidence of environmental safety for any radioactive waste disposal facility, due to the enormous complexity of scenarios and uncertainties to be considered. This report outlines a new methodological approach originally developed basically for a repository in salt, but that can be transferred with minor modifications to any other host rock formation. The approach is based on the integration of following elements: (1) Implementation of a simple method and efficient criteria to assess and prove the tightness of geological and engineered barriers; (2) Using the method of Partial Safety Factors in order to assess barrier performance at certain reasonable level of confidence; (3) Integration of a diverse geochemical barrier in the near field of waste emplacement limiting systematically the radiological consequences from any radionuclide release in safety investigations and (4) Risk based approach for the assessment of radionuclide releases. Indicative calculations performed with extremely conservative assumptions allow to exclude any radiological health consequences from a HLW repository in salt to a reference person with a safety level of 99,9999% per year. (orig.)

  10. Barriers and perceived limitations to early treatment of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kapil Saxena Boston Hemophilia Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Early treatment of bleeds in hemophilia patients, both with and without inhibitors, has been shown to be of immense benefit in the overall clinical outcome. Despite the advantages of treating the bleeding episodes early, significant barriers and limitations remain. The aim of this review is to highlight the various barriers and perceived limitations to early therapy of bleeding episodes, especially in patients who have developed inhibitors to factor VIII. The peer-reviewed literature was searched for articles on hemophilia patients, with and without inhibitors, and early treatment, to identify the barriers to early treatment and potential impact on patient outcomes. The most important barrier is the educational barrier, which involves lack of awareness among patients regarding the signs of a bleed, as well as importance of early therapy. It is also common for parents or caregivers of school-age children to exhibit inconvenience and scheduling barriers. Distance to the treatment center can also play a role here. Some patients experience financial barriers related to cost of clotting factor products, insurance coverage, or insurance caps and out-of-pocket costs. Rarely, there can also be problems related to venous access or home infusion. Lastly, multiple psychosocial barriers can prevent adherence to treatment regimens. Identification and addressing these individual barriers will result in improved compliance rates, prevent joint damage, be more cost-effective, and lead to better overall health of these patients. Keywords: hemophilia A, hemophilia B, inhibitors, outcomes, quality of life, cost of care

  11. Conceptual designs for waste packages for horizontal or vertical emplacement in a repository in salt for reference in the site characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes the options of horizontal and vertical emplacement, the addition of a phased repository, an additional waste form (intact spent fuel), revised geotechnical data appropriate for the Deaf Smith County site, new corrosion data for the container, and new repository design data. The waste package consists of waste form and canister within a thick-walled, low-carbon steel container surrounded by packing. The container is a hollow cylinder with a flat head welded to each end. The design concepts for the waste container or vertical and horizontal emplacement are identical. This report discusses the results of analyses of aspects of the reference waste package concept needing changes because of new data and information believed applicable to the Deaf Smith County site. Included are waste package conceptual designs or (1) the reference defense high-level waste form from the Savannah River Plant; (2) intact spent fuel with our pressurized-water-reactor or nine boiling-water-reactor assemblies per package for emplacement during Phase 1 of repository operation; and (3) spent fuel which has been disassembled and consolidated into a segmented cylindrical canister with rods from either 12 pressurized-water-reactor or 30 boiling-water-reactor assemblies per package for emplacement during Phase 2. 30 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs

  12. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province and the Columbia-Oregon Plateau Flood Basalts: Implications for models of flood basalt emplacement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ninad Bondre; Raymond A Duraiswami; Gauri Dole

    2004-12-01

    The nature and style of emplacement of Continental Flood Basalt (CFB) lava flows has been a atter of great interest as well as considerable controversy in the recent past. However, even a cursory review of published literature reveals that the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and Hawaiian volcanoes provide most of the data relevant to this topic. It is interesting to note, however, that the CRBG lava flows and their palaeotopographic control is atypical of other CFB provinces in the world. In this paper, we first present a short overview of important studies pertaining to the emplacement of flood basalt flows. We then briefly review the morphology of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) and the Columbia-Oregon Plateau flood basalts. The review underscores the existence of significant variations in lava flow morphology between different provinces, and even within the same province. It is quite likely that there were more than one way of emplacing the voluminous and extensive CFB lava flows. We argue that the establishment of general models of emplacement must be based on a comprehensive documentation of lava flow morphology from all CFB provinces.

  13. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

  14. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer

  15. Small-scale experimental tests of tandem mirror machines with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of current physical understanding of tandem mirrors with thermal barriers. Physicists who understand tandem mirrors can use this document as a preliminary guide to the physical issues and experimental problems involved. This report will focus upon the issues that can be tested experimentally, and on the areas needing experimental and theoretical inventions. The next section discusses the plasma potentials and plasma confinement which correspond to a tandem mirror with thermal barriers, assuming the barriers exist in steady-state. The creation of a barrier is discussed, i.e., the natural tendency of the barrier cell to fill with plasma must be countered by pumping ions out of the barrier. The design of a barrier-pumping experiment for TMX is described

  16. The effect of air-bubble barriers in containing oil-slick movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the performance of an air-bubble barrier and to determine the oil volume passage rate through such a barrier under various oil sample, wind, wave and current conditions. Two empirical equations were derived based on the laboratory data. The first equation determines the relationship between current velocity and the minimum airflow rate required to avoid oil flow through the barrier from the surface. The second equation predicts the dimensionless oil volume passage rate through the barrier under the surface per unit width when the required minimum airflow rate is given in order to prevent oil flow through the barrier from the surface. If the current and wind speed are given, both the minimum required airflow rate for avoiding oil flow through the barrier from the surface, and the dimensionless oil volume passage rate through the barrier under the surface per unit width can be determined. (author)

  17. Formation and collapse of internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical model of internal transport barrier (ITB) is developed. The transport model based on the self-sustained turbulence theory of the current-diffusive ballooning mode is extended to include the effects of ExB rotation shear. Delayed formation of ITB is observed in transport simulations. The influence of finite gyroradius is also discussed. Simulation of the current ramp-up experiment successfully described the radial profile of density, temperature and safety factor. A model of ITB collapse due to magnetic braiding is proposed. Sudden enhancement of transport triggered by overlaping of magnetic islands terminates ITB. The possibility of destabilizing global low-n modes is also discussed. (author)

  18. Variable parallax barrier spacing in autostereoscopic displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seon Kyu; Khym, Sungwon; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Sung-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    In general, multi-view autostereoscopic displays can only provide autostereoscopic images with little crosstalk at the optimum viewing distance (OVD) in the depth direction, limiting the mobility of viewers. Therefore, this paper proposes a method of increasing viewer mobility in the depth direction by varying the distance separating the parallax barrier and the display. Computer simulations and experiments were conducted to verify changes in the OVD resulting from the application of the proposed method. The results showed that the proposed method is effective at changing the OVD with respect to changes in the viewing distance. Therefore this method minimizes changes in the 3D image quality due to the viewer's depth location.

  19. A sealing performance in situ experiments project (SEALEX): main objectives and expected outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    60 cm) excavated from recent drifts (2008). Each experiment represents a generic seal mock-up (i.e. either at a relevant scale with respect to real cell seals, or with relevant characteristics), except the presence of an artificial re-saturation system and of some instrumentation. Two types of experiments are designed, the so-called reference tests (which include intra-core instrumentation) and the performance tests (no intra-core instrumentation) used to quantify the seal overall permeability. Planned Experiments: The seal considered as a base case is a core made of monolithic pre-compacted disks (70/30 MX80/sand mix), and both a reference test and a performance test will be emplaced. Then, conditions that may impact the long-term performance of a clay-based seal are explored by changing a single parameter at a time with respect to this base case: - The impact of the technological choices retained for the engineered barrier will be quantified by modifying either the core conditioning (jointed disks) or the core composition (jointed pre-compacted MX80/ sand mix, power-like pure MX80, monolithic pre-compacted disks with high (80%) sand content), - The impact of a saturation defect and of a confining plug failure will be quantified by a design adaptation to mimic such (un)loading. Emplacement of these in situ experiments will start mid-2010. Data obtained within this project will allow to improve numerical simulation tools and methods that are of prime importance to quantify the influence of key mechanisms at the long-term, to verify the order of magnitude of the components performance and to analyze the effects of perturbation prediction. (authors)

  20. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper;

    2014-01-01

    ) with in total 111 children (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to rank the children's perceived barriers......BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools...

  1. Barriers that do not fall

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco Arroyo, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    * Full title: "Barriers that do not fall. Access to citizenship and the right to vote in a comparative perspective: Germany / Spain". * Presentation in Conference "Border Transgressions" - Bonn Universität (Germany) - 8-9th May 2014

  2. Engineered barriers: current status 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises the current state of research relevant to assessing the performance of engineered barriers made of steel and concrete in radioactive waste repositories. The objective of these barriers is to contain substantially the radionuclides within them by providing both physical and chemical impediment to their release. The physical barriers are of most value for highly soluble isotopes with relatively short half-lives (eg 137Cs), since they can provide a measure of containment until a large fraction of the activity has decayed. In addition they can facilitate retrievability for some period after disposal. The chemical barriers operate by beneficial conditioning of the near field groundwater and providing sites for sorption of radionuclides. Both of these reduce the aqueous concentration of radionuclides in the near field. (author)

  3. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  4. Translating barriers into potential improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintzoglou, Themistoklis; Hansen, Karina Birch; Valsdottir, Thora;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to explore potential barriers to seafood consumption by The aim of this study is to explore potential barriers to seafood consumption by young adults and the parents of young children. Knowledge of these barriers will be used to assist the development of new....... Practical implications: Inputs for NPD related to convenience, attractiveness, quality, Inputs for NPD related to convenience, attractiveness, quality, trustworthiness, knowledge and requirements about seafood preparation are discussed. Originality/value: The present study combines qualitative methods to...... lead to practical input The present study combines qualitative methods to lead to practical input for NPD focusing on overcoming the barriers that keep consumers from choosing existing healthy seafood products. The importance of the consumers' confidence in their ability to successfully prepare a...

  5. Barriers to Effective Strategic Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Latif

    2012-01-01

    Despite the best intentions and a lot of hard work, strategic planning most predictably fails. It’s not that strategic planning is a bad idea but there are some barriers which involve in its failure. This paper explores how and where strategic planning goes awry and what executives can do about it. The study finds some of the most common barriers in effective strategic planning like, strict time limits, identical procedures, lack of accountability, power and influence which organizations freq...

  6. Superheavy nuclei and fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) description of heavy and superheavy nuclei (SHN). We will discuss the shell structure and magic numbers in the mass region of SHN, binding energies and α decay Q values, shapes of ground states and potential energy surfaces and fission barriers. We particularly focus on the multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (CDFT) and the applications of CDFT to the study of exotic nuclear shapes and fission barriers.

  7. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Fluor Technology, Inc., report and position paper concerning waste emplacement mode and its effect on repository conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recommendations for revising the Fluor Technology, Inc., draft position paper entitled Evaluation of Waste Emplacement Mode and the final report entitled Waste Package/Repository Impact Study include: reevaluate the relative rankings for the various emplacement modes; delete the following want objectives: maximize ability to locate the package horizon because sufficient flexibility exists to locate rooms in the relatively clean San Andres Unit 4 Salt and maximize far-field geologic integrity during retrieval because by definition the far field will be unaffected by thermal and stress perturbations caused by remining; give greater emphasis to want objectives regarding cost and use of present technology; delete the following statements from pages 1-1 and 1-2 of the draft position paper: ''No thought or study was given to the impacts of this configuration [vertical emplacement] on repository construction or short and long-term performance of the site'' and ''Subsequent salt repository designs adopted the vertical emplacement configuration as the accepted method without further evaluation.''; delete App. E and lines 8-17 of page 1-4 of the draft position paper because they are inappropriate; adopt a formal decision-analysis procedure for the 17 identified emplacement modes; revise App. F of the impact study to more accurately reflect current technology; consider designing the underground layout to take advantage of stress-relief techniques; consider eliminating reference to fuel assemblies <10 yr ''out-of-reactor''; model the temperature distribution, assuming that the repository is constructed in an infinitely large salt body; state that the results of creep analyses must be considered tentative until they can be validated by in situ measurements; and reevaluate the peak radial stresses on the waste package so that the calculated stress conditions more closely approximate expected in situ conditions

  8. Explosive lava-water interactions I: architecture and emplacement chronology of volcanic rootless cone groups in the 1783-1784 Laki lava flow, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2010-05-01

    To determine the relationships between rootless cone emplacement mechanisms, morphology, and spatial distribution, we mapped the Hnúta and Hrossatungur groups of the 1783-1784 Laki lava flow in Iceland. We based our facies maps on Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) measurements, photogeological interpretations, and supporting field observations. The study area covers 2.77 km2 and includes 2216 explosion sites. To establish the timing of rootless cone formation we incorporated tephrochronological constraints from eighty-eight stratigraphic sections and determined that the Hnúta and Hrossatungur groups are composite structures formed by the emplacement of six geographically and chronologically discrete domains. Rootless eruptions initiated in domain 1 on the first day of the Laki eruption (June 8, 1783) and lasted 1-2 days. The second episode of rootless activity began in domain 2 on June 11 and lasted 1-3 days. The four domains of the Hrossatungur group dominantly formed after June 14 and exhibit a complex emplacement sequence that reflects interactions between the Laki lava, contemporaneously emplaced rootless cones, and an existing topographic ridge. In the study area, we identify three distinct rootless cone archetypes (i.e., recurring morphological forms) that are related to tube-, channel-, and broad sheet lobe-fed eruptions. We assert that emplacement of lava above compressible substrates (e.g ., unconsolidated sediments) may trigger rootless eruptions by causing subsidence-induced flexure and failure of the basal crust, thereby allowing molten lava (fuel) to come into direct contact with groundwater (coolant) and initiating analogs to explosive molten fuel-coolant interactions (MFCIs).

  9. Dikes, sills, and stress-regime evolution during emplacement of the Jagged Rocks Complex, Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Navajo Nation, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, J. D. L.; Ort, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    The dikes and related intrusions formed below small volcanoes in volcanic fields are remnants of the simplest volcanic plumbing systems. Their geometry is controlled by interaction of magma-driven cracks with country rock, and reveals regional structural and stress patterns at the time of their emplacement. The shallow stress field, however, may change during the time an intrusion complex is emplaced, in response to addition or removal of magma and country rock during associated surface eruptions. The Jagged Rocks Complex, in the Miocene Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Navajo Nation, Arizona, is exposed 300-350 m below the pre-eruptive surface. It comprises a group of generally NW-SE striking dikes, punctuated in places by buds, a saucer-like intrusion, larger pyroclastic massifs and a diatreme. We made measurements of 13 dikes, divided into 172 segments, with thicknesses from 8 to 122 cm (mean 43 cm) and lengths of 60 to 780 m. Several sills and inclined sheets in places are thicker than dikes, having mean thicknesses of 48 cm and 73 cm respectively. Dikes typically show straight, parallel, and en echelon patterns, while sills and inclined sheets are curved. The northwestern dikes differ from the rest in containing large mafic crystals, and are inferred to have been emplaced after the others. We find that the strike of the overall complex (dikes and other sheets, elongate massifs and aligned sub-cylindrical bodies) reflects a crystalline-basement control that is evident throughout Hopi Buttes. Over the period of the complex's emplacement, local stress patterns were not stable. We infer that excavation of deep maar craters, and perhaps the construction of a scoria cone at the surface, modified the local stress patterns to favor emplacement of sills and en echelon dikes later in the complex's evolution, in contrast to simple straight dikes as the complex first formed.

  10. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J. [Geo-Con, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control.

  11. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF BARRIERS ON FLAME AND EXPLOSION WAVE IN GAS EXPLOSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林柏泉; 周世宁; 张仁贵

    1998-01-01

    This paper researches into the influence of barriers on flame and explosion wave in gasexplosion on the basis of experiment. The result shows that the barrier is very important to thetransmission of flame and explosion wave in gas explosion. When there are barriers, the speed oftransmission would be very fast and shock wave will appear in gas explosion, which would in-crease gas explosion power. The result of research is very important to prevent gas explosion anddecrease the power of it.

  13. Development and testing of the pneumatic lunar drill for the emplacement of the corner cube reflector on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K.; Currie, D.; Paulsen, G.; Szwarc, T.; Chu, P.

    2012-10-01

    Lunar Laser Ranging provides a highly accurate measurement of the distance between ground stations on Earth and reflectors on the surface of the Moon. Since retroreflectors were initially placed during the Apollo missions, the ground stations improved the ranging accuracy by a factor of 200 and now the Apollo-era arrays on the Moon pose a significant limitation to the ranging accuracy. The new Lunar Laser Ranging Retroreflector (i.e. the Lunar Laser Ranging retroreflector for the 21st century or LLRRA-21) would provide extensive new information on the lunar interior, general relativity, and cosmology. During the day/night lunar cycle, when the thermal variation of the surface is approximately 300 °C, the regolith will rise and fall by almost 500 μm. Yet, it is estimated that the thermal variation 0.5 m to 1 m below the surface is less than much 1 °C. Thus for the lunar emplacement to support 10s of microns ranging accuracy, the reflectors must be anchored to that thermally stable mass at 0.5 m or greater depth. In this paper, we present a novel method of deploying LLRRA-21 with a Corner Cube Reflector (CCR) on the Moon. The emplacement approach uses a gas-powered drill consisting of a >50 cm long, slim, hollow rod with a perforated anchor-cone at its lower end and the CCR mounted to the top. Gas supplied from a small tank is directed into and down the rod and out through the cone, lofting the soil out of the hole and allowing the rod to sink under its own weight to a depth of 0.5 m. To determine the system performance, we conducted several tests in compacted JSC-1a lunar soil simulant and inside a vacuum chamber. In several tests, the rod successfully sunk under its own weight of 16 N to a depth of 50 cm in 4-6 min. The pneumatic system is the game-changer for subsurface access. The extremely low mass and volume required to reach 50 cm, along with very simple penetration method allow the CCR to remain in a variety of payload architectures.

  14. Sill emplacement and corresponding ground deformation processes at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Hetherington, Rachel; van Wyk de Vries, Ben; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A consensus has emerged from a variety of disciplines over the past 15 years that Quaternary magmatism in Ethiopia is almost entirely dominated by dike intrusion. Focused dike intrusion within 60 km long, 20 km wide, rift zones is considered to mark the present day locus of extension in Ethiopia, and represent the proto-ridge axis location of an incipient ocean spreading centre. However, it has been suggested on the strength of Moho depths and Quaternary eruptive volumes in northernmost Ethiopia, that the final transition from continental rifting to incipient oceanic spreading may instead be characterised by an abrupt, rheologically driven, late-phase of crustal thinning. Development of a sedimentary basin and mantle decompression melting occurring in the Danakil Depression, driven by this late-phase crustal thinning, should result in a markedly different style of magmatism in the upper crust: i.e. field observations, high-resolution seismic reflection studies, and experimental modelling suggest that interconnected networks of sill intrusions dominate in sedimentary basins. Here, we present the first evidence from the Danakil Depression that links surficial structures, observed at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre, to the ongoing emplacement of an underlying sill. In particular, we use satellite imagery to examine a dome-shaped fold, associated fracture patterns, and surrounding lava flows, which we suggest likely formed in response to roof uplift above and extrusion from a saucer-shaped sill; i.e. a sub-horizontal inner sill encircled by an inward-dipping, transgressive inclined rim. InSAR observations by Pagli et al. (2012) of ground uplift and deflation occurring during the eruption of basaltic lava at Alu-Dalafilla in 2008 capture what we believe to be the first real-time evidence for intrusion-induced forced folding dynamics above a saucer-shaped sill. InSAR data further suggest that intrusion occurred at a depth of ~1 km, likely placing the sill within an

  15. Geochemistry and petrology of listvenite in the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman: Complete carbonation of peridotite during ophiolite emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Elisabeth S.; Kelemen, Peter B.

    2015-07-01

    Extensive outcrops of listvenite-fully carbonated peridotite, with all Mg in carbonate minerals and all Si in quartz-occur along the basal thrust of the Samail ophiolite in Oman. These rocks can provide insight into processes including (a) carbon fluxes at the "leading edge of the mantle wedge" in subduction zones and (b) enhanced mineral carbonation of peridotite as a means of carbon storage. Here we examine mineralogical, chemical and isotopic evidence on the temperatures, timing, and fluid compositions involved in the formation of this listvenite. The listvenites are composed primarily of magnesite and/or dolomite + quartz + relict Cr-spinel. In some instances the conversion of peridotite to listvenite is nearly isochemical except for the addition of CO2, while other samples have also seen significant calcium addition and/or variable, minor addition of K and Mn. Along margins where listvenite bodies are in contact with serpentinized peridotite, talc and antigorite are present in addition to carbonate and quartz. The presence of antigorite + quartz + talc in these samples implies temperatures of 80-130 °C. This range of temperature is consistent with dolomite and magnesite clumped isotope thermometry in listvenite (average T = 90 ± 15 °C) and with conventional mineral-water oxygen isotope exchange thermometry (assuming fluid δ18O near zero). CO2-bearing fluids responsible for the formation of listvenite were likely derived from underlying calcite-bearing metasediment during emplacement of the ophiolite. An internal Rb-Sr isochron from one listvenite sample yields an age of 97 ± 29 Ma, consistent with the timing of emplacement of the ophiolite over allochthonous sediments of the Hawasina group, and autochthonous sediments of the Arabian continental margin. Most of the initial 87Sr/86Sr values in the listvenite, ranging from 0.7085 to 0.7135, are significantly higher than seawater values and consistent with values measured in the underlying metasediments

  16. Lava Flow Emplacement Processes and Eruptive Characteristics of the Ontong Java Plateau: Inferences from High-Precision Glass Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, S. R.; Michael, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    High-precision major and volatile element analyses were performed on natural basaltic glass from ODP Leg 192 Sites 1185 and 1187 of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) as a way to correlate lava flows within and between ODP drill sites. The ultimate goal is to estimate the dimensions, emplacement style, and eruption characteristics of the high-MgO Kroenke-type lavas: the youngest known flows at the two sites. The 122-Ma Ontong Java Plateau is the largest known magmatic event in Earth's history, yet little is known of the emplacement style (e.g. flow dimensions and durations) of OJP lavas due to its submarine nature and burial beneath hundreds of meters of sediment. Basalt samples were recovered from 110- and 130-m thick core sections from Sites 1185B and 1187A, respectively. Total Kroenke-type lava thickness is 125 m at 1185B and >136 m at 1187. Site 1187A is located 146 km north of Site 1185B and lies ≈50 m shallower than Site 1187. Remarkably, all of the glass compositions from both sites fall on a common liquid line of descent, suggesting that all lavas were the product of a single eruption from a common magma chamber. The range of MgO compositions reflects a 20ºC range in temperature, representing ~1.9% crystallization of olivine + spinel. Using measured phenocryst abundance, we examine whether this crystallization occurred within the magma chamber or during long transport of lavas on the seafloor. More primitive lavas are present in the upper 30 m of Site 1185B (average of ~9.54 wt. % MgO), overlying more fractionated lavas (average of ~9.06 wt. % MgO). Lavas from Site 1187A bridge the gap between the high- and low-MgO groups of 1185B. In contrast to MORB, OJP glasses have no vesicles, suggesting they remained liquid for much longer during flow. Paleoeruption depths calculated from H2O and CO2 contents of glasses show no systematic variation with depth in Core 1185B, and range from ~2130-2650 mbsl, while Site 1187 shows deeper eruption depths of ~2410-3040 mbsl

  17. FEBEX: Full-Scale engineered barriers experiment in crystalline host-rock: preoperational phase. Synthesized report; FEBEX: experimento de barreras de ingenieria a gran escala en rocas cristalinas: etapa preoperacional. Informe de sintesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The FEBEX project is being cofinanced by the EC under contract F 14WCT950006. In addition to the EC, seven partners from three countries of the EU. (France, Germany, and Spain) as well as one from EFTA (Switzerland) are participating in the project. ENRESA is the coordinating partner with NAGRA assisting in coordinating some aspects. The project consists of two large-scale tests and a series of complimentary laboratory tests. The work is being executed by the following organizations: CIEMAT, AITEMIN, UP-DIT (CIMNE), ULC, CSIC-Zaidin, and UPM (SPAIN) ANDRA and G.3S (FRANCE) GRS (GERMANY). This report includes a synthesized description of the experiment from its conception through the installation of the two large-scale tests (from the middle of 1994 to the beginning of 1997, preoperation stage). The experiment is described in detail in a series of specific reports. (Author)

  18. Comparison of Edge and Internal Transport Barriers in Drift Wave Predictive Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, J.; Crombe, K.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, Volker; Tala, T.; Weiland, Jan; Lazzaro, Enzo

    2011-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only p...... internal barrier. For the edge barrier the edge density was varied and it turned out that a lower edge density gave a stronger barrier. Electromagnetic and nonlocal effects were important for both types of barriers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]......We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only...... polodal momentum and the temperatures were simulated. The internal barrier included an anomalous spinup of poloidal momentum similar to that in the experiment. Also the edge barrier was accompanied by a spinup of poloidal momentum. The experimental density (with no barrier) was used and kept fixed for the...

  19. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). (paper)

  20. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITCDextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). PMID:24457539

  1. The Blood-Brain Barrier: An Engineering Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eWong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been more than 100 years since Paul Ehrlich reported that various water-soluble dyes injected into the circulation did not enter the brain. Since Ehrlich’s first experiments, only a small number of molecules, such as alcohol and caffeine have been found to cross the blood-brain barrier, and it remains the major roadblock to treatment of many central nervous system diseases. At the same time, many central nervous system diseases are associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier that can lead to changes in permeability, modulation of immune cell transport, and trafficking of pathogens into the brain. Therefore advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier are key to advances in treatment of a wide range of central nervous system diseases. Over the past 10 years it has become recognized that the blood-brain barrier is a complex dynamic system that involves biomechanical and biochemical signaling between the vascular system and the brain. Here we reconstruct the structure, function, and transport properties of the blood-brain barrier from an engineering perspective. New insight into the physics of the blood-brain barrier could ultimately lead to clinical advances in the treatment of central nervous system diseases.

  2. Exploring the multi-humped fission barrier of 238U via sub-barrier photofission

    CERN Document Server

    Csige, L; Glodariu, T; Gulyás, J; Günther, M M; Habs, D; Karwowski, H J; Krasznahorkay, A; Rich, G C; Sin, M; Stroe, L; Tesileanu, O; Thirolf, P G

    2013-01-01

    The photofission cross-section of 238U was measured at sub-barrier energies as a function of the gamma-ray energy using, for the first time, a monochromatic, high-brilliance, Compton-backscattered gamma-ray beam. The experiment was performed at the High Intensity gamma-ray Source (HIgS) facility at beam energies between E=4.7 MeV and 6.0 MeV and with ~3% energy resolution. Indications of transmission resonances have been observed at gamma-ray beam energies of E=5.1 MeV and 5.6 MeV with moderate amplitudes. The triple-humped fission barrier parameters of 238U have been determined by fitting EMPIRE-3.1 nuclear reaction code calculations to the experimental photofission cross section.

  3. Exploring the multihumped fission barrier of 238U via sub-barrier photofission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csige, L.; Filipescu, D. M.; Glodariu, T.; Gulyás, J.; Günther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Karwowski, H. J.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Rich, G. C.; Sin, M.; Stroe, L.; Tesileanu, O.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2013-04-01

    The photofission cross section of 238U was measured at sub-barrier energies as a function of the γ-ray energy using a monochromatic, high-brilliance, Compton-backscattered γ-ray beam. The experiment was performed at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility at beam energies between Eγ=4.7 MeV and 6.0 MeV and with ˜3% energy resolution. Indications of transmission resonances have been observed at γ-ray beam energies of Eγ=5.1 MeV and 5.6 MeV with moderate amplitudes. The triple-humped fission barrier parameters of 238U have been determined by fitting empire-3.1 nuclear reaction code calculations to the experimental photofission cross section.

  4. Tritium barrier material study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a tritium barrier material study in China. The program include : (1)development of resistance hydrogen stainless steel 316L and HR-1 by vacuum induction metallurgy (VIM) and electroslag refining (ER), (2)preparation of coating films (TiC, TiN, TiC+TiN, etc.) on the stainless steel surface by improved technology of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD), (3)experiments of hydrogen and tritium permeation through 316L SS and HR-1 SS as well as their coating materials at temperatures 300 to 500degC and pressures 500 to 1300Pa for tritium, but at 400 at 600degC and 103 to 105Pa for hydrogen. Since 1986, a lot of important progresses in both material research and permeation experiments have been made. (author)

  5. Perceived Gender and Racial/Ethnic Barriers to STEM Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Porche, Michelle V.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined urban adolescents' perceptions of gender and racial/ethnic barriers to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) success, and their meaning-making and coping regarding these experiences. The sample includes surveys from 1024 high school-aged students and interviews from 53 students. Logistic…

  6. Government regulation of business in a changing institutional barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikova I.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the domestic experience in government regulation of business in a changing institutional barrier.Compared the degree of economic freedom in Ukraine. The emphasis is on the need to develop a national strategy of institutional development of domestic entrepreneurship.

  7. Asian American Educational Goals: Racial Barriers and Cultural Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2013-01-01

    Educational success among Asian American students has often been misunderstood as an occupational development separate from any experience of racism. However, several theorists have suggested that racial barriers in occupational mobility correlate with educational pursuits. Therefore, this research aims to examine the direct effect of perceived…

  8. System evaluation for the volume change of the engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the emplaced waste in TRU waste disposal facility, it may have the void for waste bodies it. And, generating void which accompanies those component elution in concrete pit and filler in which the cement material becomes the candidate material is assumed. It is considered that the security of the diffusion control in the bentonite is not done when these voids collapsed, and when it generated the volume change inside the buffer material (bentonite). The imperfect blockage of the void by not obtaining, the sufficient swelling permeability swelling bentonite is a cause on this. Then, volume change of the bentonite inside is analyzed in this study under the conservative estimation. And the following are tested: Self-sealing, maximum swelling rate, density distribution change of the bentonite. Evaluation of the engineered barrier system for volume change from the result was carried out. Prior to the evaluation, generating void was calculated based on the conservative estimation. The density of the buffer material as it assumed the blocking by buffer material uniformly swelling using this calculated data, was obtained. By the permeability got from existing research result which shows the relationship between density and permeability of the bentonite, it was confirmed to become diffusion control in the buffer material inside, in existing engineered barrier specification. Next, it was tested, when the conservative void of the superscription was assumed, in order to confirm whether it does the security, as permeability necessary for maintaining diffusion control, puts it for the swelling of actual bentonite. As the result, it was possible to confirm sufficient swelling performance in order to do the security of the diffusion control in Na-bentonite. However, the swelling performance greatly lowered by comparing Na-bentonite in Ca-bentonite with under 1/6. The increase of the permeability not do the security of the diffusion control, when it was based on void quantity

  9. Exceptional soft tissue fossilization of a Pleistocene vulture (Gyps fulvus): new evidence for emplacement temperatures of pyroclastic flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurino, Dawid A.; Bellucci, Luca; Schreve, Danielle; Sardella, Raffaele

    2014-07-01

    Volcanic sediments are often unsuitable for the fossilization of both hard and soft organic tissues, however, in some circumstances, they can provide unusual conditions for the preservation of remains. Here we report an exceptional case of soft tissue fossilization of a Late Pleistocene Eurasian griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) in the pyroclastic sequence of the Alban Hills volcanic region (SE Rome, Italy). CT analyses have revealed an exceptional natural cast of the complete head and neck that preserve extraordinary detail including the fossilized everted tongue, beak, feather insertions and the first record of the nictitating membrane of the eye. This fossilization (superior in detail even to the victims of the AD 79 Plinian eruption of Vesuvius) reveals no evidence of burning and requires re-evaluation of the thermal constraints in operation for the preservation of organic materials within pyroclastic sediments. The analysis of the external morphological features has provided key information regarding the taphonomic processes in operation, the emplacement temperatures of distal pyroclastic flow deposits and the relationships between organic materials and low temperature phreatomagmatic flows. This sheds light not only on the extremely rare situation of fossilization in volcanic contexts but also provides a new perspective on taphonomic studies of highly detailed casts of fossil vertebrates.

  10. Emplacement history and inflation evidence of a long basaltic lava flow located in Southern Payenia Volcanic Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Mauro I.; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Jalowitzki, Tiago L. R.; Orihashi, Yuji; Ponce, Alexis D.

    2015-02-01

    The El Corcovo lava flow, from the Huanul shield volcano in the southern Mendoza province (central-western Argentina) traveled a distance of 70 km and covered a minimum area of ~ 415 km2. The flow emplacement was controlled both by extrinsic (e.g., topography) and intrinsic (e.g., lava supply rate, lava physicochemical characteristics) factors. The distal portion of the lava flow reached the Colorado River Valley, in La Pampa Province, where it spread and then was confined by earlier river channels. Cross-sections through the flow surveyed at several localities show two vesicular layers surrounding a dense central section, where vesicles are absent or clustered in sheet-shaped and cylindrical-shaped structures. Lavas of the El Corcovo flow are alkaline basalts with low values of viscosity. The morphological and structural characteristics of the flow and the presence of landforms associated with lava accumulation are the evidence of inflation. This process involved the formation of a tabular sheet flow up to 4 m of thick with a large areal extent in the proximal sectors, while at terminal sectors frontal lobes reached inflation values up to 10 m. The numerous swelling structures present at these portions of the flow suggest the movement of lava in lava tubes. We propose that this aspect and the low viscosity of the lava allowed the flow travel to a great distance on a gentle slope relief.

  11. Indicators for Assessing Climate Change Resilience Resulting from Emplacement of Green Infrastructure Projects Across an Urban Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, E. S.; Omitaomu, O.; Sylvester, L.; Nugent, P.

    2015-12-01

    Many U.S. cities are exploring the potential of using green infrastructure (e.g., porous pavements, green roofs, street planters) to reduce urban storm water runoff, which can be both be a nuisance and costly to treat. While tools exist to measure local runoff changes resulting from individual green infrastructure (GI) projects, most municipalities currently have no method of analyzing the collective impact of GI projects on urban stormwater systems under future rainfall scenarios and impervious surface distribution patterns. Using the mid-sized city of Knoxville, Tennessee as a case study, we propose a set of indicators that can be used to monitor and analyze the collective effects of GI emplacement on urban storm water runoff volumes as well as to quantify potential co-benefits of GI projects (e.g., urban heat island reduction, reduced stream scouring) under different climate projection ensembles and population growth scenarios. These indicators are intended to help the city prioritize GI projects as opportunities arise, as well as to track the effectiveness of GI implementation over time. We explore the aggregation of these indicators across different spatial scales (e.g., plot, neighborhood, watershed, city) in order to assess potential changes in climate change resilience resulting from the collective implementation of GI projects across an urban landscape.

  12. Magmatic epidote, hornblende barometric estimates, and emplacement of the Conceicao das Creoulas pluton, Alto Pajeu Terrane, NE Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brasiliano-age magmatic epidote-bearing Conceicao das Creoulas batholith, in the Transversal Zone superterrane in northeastern Brazil, intruded migmatites and metagranitoids of the Riacho do Forno/Recanto Formations. This pluton is composed of porphyritic granodiorite and porphyritic monzogranite. Hornblendes in this pluton solidified between 6-7 Kbar in mafic enclaves and around 8 Kbar for porphyritic granodiorite as estimated by its Al contents. Temperatures for zircon saturation are in the 790-830 deg C range for the mafic enclaves and 800-850 deg C for the porphyritic granodiorite, whereas hornblende-plagioclase pairs yielded temperatures in the 670-690 de C range. In this pluton, epidote, undoubtedly of magmatic origin, with or without allanite cores, included in plagioclase, is rimmed by biotite or is partially resorpted by the magma. Sometimes, patches of hornblende and biotite are present inside epidote. Magmatic epidote compositions vary in the interval 20-25% mole of pistacite, and always exhibit Ti O2 < 0.20% by weight. This compositional range suggested crystallization along the NNO buffer. High initial ratio suggest a significant crustal component in the magma genesis. The magma probably was transported upward by diking and inflated outwards near or at its final site of emplacement, giving to the pluton a diapiric appearance. (author)

  13. Robotic lunar surface operations: Engineering analysis for the design, emplacement, checkout and performance of robotic lunar surface systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1990-01-01

    The assembly, emplacement, checkout, operation, and maintenance of equipment on planetary surfaces are all part of expanding human presence out into the solar system. A single point design, a reference scenario, is presented for lunar base operations. An initial base, barely more than an output, which starts from nothing but then quickly grows to sustain people and produce rocket propellant. The study blended three efforts: conceptual design of all required surface systems; assessments of contemporary developments in robotics; and quantitative analyses of machine and human tasks, delivery and work schedules, and equipment reliability. What emerged was a new, integrated understanding of hot to make a lunar base happen. The overall goal of the concept developed was to maximize return, while minimizing cost and risk. The base concept uses solar power. Its primary industry is the production of liquid oxygen for propellant, which it extracts from native lunar regolith. Production supports four lander flights per year, and shuts down during the lunar nighttime while maintenance is performed.

  14. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Malte Baron

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases.

  15. Penetration through the Skin Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates. During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous penetration. Finally, a short discussion of the advantages and challenges of each method is provided, which will hopefully allow the reader to improve decision making and treatment planning, as well as the evaluation of experimental studies of percutaneous penetration of chemicals. PMID:26844902

  16. Use of natural gas on heavy duty vehicles in Brazil: experience, current scene and barriers that still persist; Utilizacao do gas natural em veiculos pesados no Brasil: experiencia, cenario atual e barreiras que ainda persistem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Guilherme B.; Melo, Tadeu C.C.; Lastres, Luiz Fernando M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    In the 80's, because of the oil crisis, the Natural Gas (NG) appeared as a fuel with a great potential for Diesel replacement in Heavy Duty Vehicles. At that time, PETROBRAS with other companies have developed partial conversion technologies from Diesel to NG, known as 'Dual Fuel'. Engine dynamometer and vehicle bus tests have been developed to verify its technical and economical viability. Because of several factors, the Dual Fuel Program did not advance and the experience was interrupted. At the same time, other experiences using NG Otto Cycle bus engines, manufactured in Brazil, have been conducted, mainly at Sao Paulo, nevertheless, without expansion. Currently, factors as increase of the NG converted light vehicles fleet; the NG excess in the National Market, which has contributed to the NG distribution net expansion; the Environmental Legislature in vigor, that continuously determine lower emission limits; the government interest in increasing the NG energy matrix share and in reducing Diesel fuel consumption, and the low NG industrial demand, compose together a great scene to the diffusion of NG as substitute to the Diesel fuel in Heavy Duty Vehicles. (author)

  17. Barriers to Sexuality for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Unruh, Deanne; Lindstrom, Lauren; Scanlon, David

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) experience multiple barriers that may prevent them from understanding and exploring their own sexuality. These barriers prevent them from achieving the same autonomy and quality of life as their peers. This research synthesis focuses on 13 articles published between 2000 and 2013…

  18. Programmer's description of the Barrier Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Barrier Data Base is a body of information concerning different kinds of barriers that are used in safeguarding nuclear materials and installations. The two programs written for creating, updating, and manipulating the Barrier Data Base are discussed. The BARRIER program is used to add, delete, modify, display, or search for specific data in the data base. A utility program named NUMBER is used to compress and renumber the barrier and threat tables

  19. Using models to interpret the impact of roadside barriers on near-road air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Seyedmorteza; Ahangar, Faraz Enayati; Schulte, Nico; Venkatram, Akula

    2016-08-01

    The question this paper addresses is whether semi-empirical dispersion models based on data from controlled wind tunnel and tracer experiments can describe data collected downwind of a sound barrier next to a real-world urban highway. Both models are based on the mixed wake model described in Schulte et al. (2014). The first neglects the effects of stability on dispersion, and the second accounts for reduced entrainment into the wake of the barrier under unstable conditions. The models were evaluated with data collected downwind of a kilometer-long barrier next to the I-215 freeway running next to the University of California campus in Riverside. The data included measurements of 1) ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations at several distances from the barrier, 2) micrometeorological variables upwind and downwind of the barrier, and 3) traffic flow separated by automobiles and trucks. Because the emission factor for UFP is highly uncertain, we treated it as a model parameter whose value is obtained by fitting model estimates to observations of UFP concentrations measured at distances where the barrier impact is not dominant. Both models provide adequate descriptions of both the magnitude and the spatial variation of observed concentrations. The good performance of the models reinforces the conclusion from Schulte et al. (2014) that the presence of the barrier is equivalent to shifting the line sources on the road upwind by a distance of about HU/u∗ where H is the barrier height, U is the wind velocity at half of the barrier height, and u∗ is the friction velocity. The models predict that a 4 m barrier results in a 35% reduction in average concentration within 40 m (10 times the barrier height) of the barrier, relative to the no-barrier site. This concentration reduction is 55% if the barrier height is doubled.

  20. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Santra

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the analysis of fusion barrier distributions is not always an unambiguous test or a ‘fingerprint’ of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for 16O+208Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed. The barrier distributions derived from these excitation functions including many of the significant channels are featureless, although these channels have considerable effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously