WorldWideScience

Sample records for barrier coating systems

  1. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  2. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  3. Thermophysical and Thermomechanical Properties of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, the issue of coating durability under high temperature cyclic conditions is still of major concern. The coating failure is closely related to thermal stresses and oxidation in the coating systems. Coating shrinkage cracking resulting from ceramic sintering and creep at high temperatures can further accelerate the coating failure process. The purpose of this paper is to address critical issues such as ceramic sintering and creep, thermal fatigue and their relevance to coating life prediction. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes of the coating thermal conductivity and elastic modulus, fatigue and creep interactions, and resulting failure mechanisms during the simulated engine tests. Detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the thermal barrier coating systems provide a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  4. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  5. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  6. Measurement of interfacial shear mechanical properties in thermal barrier coating systems by a barb pullout method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.Q.; Mumm, D.R.; Karlsson, A.M.; Kagawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A test technique has been developed to facilitate evaluation of the fracture characteristics of coatings and interfaces in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. The methodology has particular application in analyzing delamination crack growth, where crack propagation occurs under predominantly mode II loading. The technique has been demonstrated by quantitatively measuring the effective delamination fracture resistance of an electron-beam physical vapor deposition TBC

  7. Improved performance thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Stecura, S.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings offer an attractive approach to improving the durability and efficiency of the hot section of heat engines. The coatings typically consist of an inner alloy bond coating about 0.01 cm thick resistant to oxidation and hot corrosion and an outer ceramic layer, usually a stabilized zirconia, 0.01-0.05 cm thick. Here, the materials, thermomechanical stress, and hot corrosion problems associated with thermal barrier coatings are reviewed along with the capabilities and limitations of current technology. The coatings discussed include ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY, ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCoCrAlY, ZrO2-MgO/NiCoCrAlY, CaO-SiO2/Co-Cr-Al-Y, and CaO-SiO2/NiCrAlY systems. It is emphasized that the performance of thermal barrier coatings is governed by many complex and interrelated factors, so that optimization of these coatings always involves certain tradeoffs. 27 references

  8. An investigation of enhanced capability thermal barrier coating systems for diesel engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, R. L.; Layne, J. L.; Schechter, B.

    1984-01-01

    Material systems and processes for the development of effective and durable thermal barriers for heavy duty diesel engines were investigated. Seven coating systems were evaluated for thermal conductivity, erosion resistance, corrosion/oxidation resistance, and thermal shock resistance. An advanced coating system based on plasma sprayed particle yttria stabilized zirconia (PS/HYSZ) was judged superior in these tests. The measured thermal conductivity of the selected coating was 0.893 W/m C at 371 C. The PS/HYSZ coating system was applied to the piston crown, fire deck and valves of a single cylinder low heat rejection diesel engine. The coated engine components were tested for 24 hr at power levels from 0.83 MPa to 1.17 MPa brake mean effective pressure. The component coatings survived the engine tests with a minimum of distress. The measured fire deck temperatures decreased 86 C (155 F) on the intake side and 42 C (75 F) on the exhaust side with the coating applied.

  9. Creep Behavior of Hafnia and Ytterbium Silicate Environmental Barrier Coating Systems on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Harder, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings will play a crucial role in future advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to significantly extend the temperature capability and stability of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) engine components, thus improving the engine performance. In order to develop high performance, robust coating systems for engine components, appropriate test approaches simulating operating temperature gradient and stress environments for evaluating the critical coating properties must be established. In this paper, thermal gradient mechanical testing approaches for evaluating creep and fatigue behavior of environmental barrier coated SiC/SiC CMC systems will be described. The creep and fatigue behavior of Hafnia and ytterbium silicate environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC CMC systems will be reported in simulated environmental exposure conditions. The coating failure mechanisms will also be discussed under the heat flux and stress conditions.

  10. Design and Environmental Factors Contributing to the Failure of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Matthew David

    Gas turbine engines are a staple of 21st century air and sea propulsion systems and are also a critical component in large-scale electricity generation. The hot-section components of these engines are protected by a complex ceramic and metal multi-layer coating called a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system. The failure of TBC systems occurs as a result of both thermo-chemical and thermo-mechanical degradation. This research involves exploring both of these mechanisms for two distinctly different issues. The United States Navy is currently making a push to implement the use of alternative fuels by 2012, but the use of these fuels (syngas, high hydrogen content, and alternatives to JP-8) presents significant materials durability challenges. Initial data suggests that high water vapor levels, high sulfur concentrations, and ash deposits from fuel impurities lead to unique, and severe, degradation modes. This research is aimed at addressing the effects of differing combustion environment characteristics on the corrosion and oxidation of TBC systems. On the industrial front, there is a constant driver to better understand and predict coating failure, particularly in air-plasma sprayed (APS) TBC systems. The morphology of the metal-ceramic interface is known to play a key role in the generation of compressive and tensile stresses that eventually cause coating failure in typical engine environments. Experimental evidence and field experience have shown that a tortuous interface is generally beneficial to coating lifetime. Nevertheless, for the past 40 years engineers have struggled to find a functional correlation between BC topology and coating system lifetime. This document also addresses the progress that has been made toward the establishment of this functional correlation.

  11. The Development of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Environment Effects on the Creep and Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Topics covered include: Environmental barrier coating system development: needs, challenges and limitations; Advanced environmental barrier coating systems (EBCs) for CMC airfoils and combustors; NASA EBC systems and material system evolutions, Current turbine and combustor EBC coating emphases, Advanced development, processing, testing and modeling, EBC and EBC bond coats: recent advances; Design tool and life prediction of coated CMC components; Advanced CMC-EBC rig demonstrations; Summary and future directions.

  12. Microstructure Evolution and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Evans, Laura J.; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coated SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced HfO2 and rare earth silicate environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), along with multicomponent hafnium and rare earth silicide EBC bond coats have been developed. The coating degradation mechanisms in the laboratory simulated engine thermal cycling, and fatigue-creep operating environments are also being investigated. This paper will focus on the microstructural and compositional evolutions of an advanced environmental barrier coating system on a SiC-SiC CMC substrate during the high temperature simulated durability tests, by using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will also be discussed. The detailed analysis results help understand the EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements to achieve more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings.

  13. Continuous fiber reinforced mesh bond coat for environmental barrier coating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, James; Das, Rupak; Roberts III, Herbert Chidsey; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2017-09-26

    A gas turbine blade may have a bond coat applied to its surface. A porous substrate may be applied to the bond layer and one or more protective layers may be applied to the bond layer such that the fiber mesh is embedded between the bond layer and the protective layer to prevent creep.

  14. Combined Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the EBC-CMC system durability, ensuring the successful implementations of the high temperature and lightweight engine component technologies for engine applications.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating and CMC developments for SiC/SiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions and processing methods. The emphasis has been particularly placed on thermomechanical and environment durability evaluations of EBC-CMC systems. We have also addressed the integration of the EBCs with advanced SiC/SiC CMCs, and studied the effects of combustion environments and Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) deposits on the durability of the EBC-CMC systems under thermal gradient and mechanical loading conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including multicomponent rare earth silicate EBCs and HfO2-Si based bond coats, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  15. Durability and CMAS Resistance of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper will emphasize advanced environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, by using advanced coating compositions and processing, in conjunction with mechanical and environment testing and durability validations. The coating-CMC degradations and durability in the laboratory simulated engine fatigue-creep and complex operating environments are being addressed. The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will be discussed. The results help understand the advanced EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements of more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings for successful applications of the component technologies and lifing methodologies.

  16. Thermal barrier coatings for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive NASA-Lewis program of coating development for aircraft gas turbine blades and vanes is presented. Improved ceramic layer compositions are investigated, along the MCrAlY bond films and the methods of uniform deposition of the coatings; the thermomechanical and fuel impurity tolerance limits of the coatings are being studied. Materials include the ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY system; the effects of the bond coat and zirconia composition on coating life and Mach 1 burner rig test results are discussed. It is concluded that Diesel engines can also utilize thermal barrier coatings; they have been used successfully on piston crowns and exhaust valves of shipboard engines to combat lower grade fuel combustion corrosion.

  17. Effect of Residual Stresses and Prediction of Possible Failure Mechanisms on Thermal Barrier Coating System by Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar-Far, M.; Absi, J.; Mariaux, G.; Shahidi, S.

    2010-09-01

    This work is focused on the effect of the residual stresses resulting from the coating process and thermal cycling on the failure mechanisms within the thermal barrier coating (TBC) system. To reach this objective, we studied the effect of the substrate preheating and cooling rate on the coating process conditions. A new thermomechanical finite element model (FEM) considering a nonhomogeneous temperature distribution has been developed. In the results, we observed a critical stress corresponding to a low substrate temperature and high cooling rate during spraying of the top-coat material. Moreover, the analysis of the stress distribution after service shows that more critical stresses are obtained in the case where residual stresses are taken into account.

  18. Development Status and Performance Comparisons of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft turbine engine systems, because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper presents current NASA EBC-CMC development emphases including: the coating composition and processing improvements, laser high heat flux-thermal gradient thermo-mechanical fatigue - environmental testing methodology development, and property evaluations for next generation EBC-CMC systems. EBCs processed with various deposition techniques including Plasma Spray, Electron Beam - Physical Vapor Deposition, and Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) will be particularly discussed. The testing results and demonstrations of advanced EBCs-CMCs in complex simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic fatigue, oxidizing-steam and CMAS environments will help provide insights into the coating development strategies to meet long-term engine component durability goals.

  19. TECHNOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Okovity; O. G. Devoino; V. A. Okovity; V. M. Astashinsky

    2016-01-01

    A technology for formation of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) based on zirconium dioxide has been developed in the paper. The paper investigates structures of phase composition and thermal stability of such developed coatings. Investigation results pertaining to formation of an oxide system ZrO2 – Y2O3, while using plasma spraying and subsequent high-energy processing, which allows to increase resistance of a thermal barrier coating to thermal cycling heat resistance of the coating at temperat...

  20. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  1. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  2. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  3. Thermal Gradient Cyclic Behavior of a Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating System on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier and environmental barrier coatings (TBCs and EBCs) will play a crucial role in future advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to significantly extend the temperature capability of the ceramic matrix composite (CMC) engine components in harsh combustion environments. In order to develop high performance, robust coating systems for effective thermal and environmental protection of the engine components, appropriate test approaches for evaluating the critical coating properties must be established. In this paper, a laser high-heat-flux, thermal gradient approach for testing the coatings will be described. Thermal cyclic behavior of plasma-sprayed coating systems, consisting of ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier and NASA Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) Program developed mullite+BSAS/Si type environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites, was investigated under thermal gradients using the laser heat-flux rig in conjunction with the furnace thermal cyclic tests in water-vapor environments. The coating sintering and interface damage were assessed by monitoring the real-time thermal conductivity changes during the laser heat-flux tests and by examining the microstructural changes after the tests. The coating failure mechanisms are discussed based on the cyclic test results and are correlated to the sintering, creep, and thermal stress behavior under simulated engine temperature and heat flux conditions.

  4. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  5. Porosity determination of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roode, Mark; Beardsley, Brad

    1988-01-01

    Coating porosity is believed to be a critical factor for the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A number of different techniques have been used to determine the porosities of thermal barrier coatings for diesel applications as part of a NASA/DOE sponsored study. A comparison is made between methods based on water immersion, optical microscopy, eddy current thickness measurements, and Archimedes principle for TBC porosity determination.

  6. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  7. Yttria-stabilized zirkonia / gadolinium zirconate double-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakan, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) research and development is driven by the desirability of further increasing the maximum inlet temperature in a gas turbine engine. A number of new top coat ceramic materials have been proposed during the last decades due to limited temperature capability (1200 C) of the state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (7 wt. % Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 , YSZ) at long term operation. Zirconate pyrochlores of the large lanthanides((Gd → La) 2 Zr 2 O 7 ) have been particularly attractive due to their higher temperature phase stability than that of the YSZ. Nonetheless, the issues related with the implementation of pyrochlores such as low fracture toughness and formation of deleterious interphases with thermally grown oxide (TGO, Al 2 O 3 ) were reported. The implication was the requirement of an interlayer between the pyrochlores and TGO, which introduced double-layer systems to the TBC literature. Furthermore, processability issues of pyrochlores associated with the different evaporation rates of lanthanide oxides and zirconia resulting in unfavorable composition variations in the coatings were addressed in different studies. After all, although the material properties are available, there is a paucity of data in the literature concerning the properties of the coatings made of pyrochlores. From the processability point of view the most reported pyrochlore is La 2 Zr 2 O 7 . Hence, the goal of this research was to investigate plasma-sprayed Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 (GZO) coatings and YSZ/GZO double-layer TBC systems. Three main topics were examined based on processing, performance and properties: (i) the plasma spray processing of the GZO and its impact on the microstructural and compositional properties of the GZO coatings; (ii) the cycling lifetime of the YSZ/GZO double-layer systems under thermal gradient at a surface temperature of 1400 C; (iii) the properties of the GZO and YSZ coatings such as thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion as well

  8. Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Glassy Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Julie Marie

    Engineering of alloys has for years allowed aircraft turbine engines to become more efficient and operate at higher temperatures. As advancements in these alloy systems have become more difficult, ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), often yttria (7 wt %) stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), have been utilized for thermal protection. TBCs have allowed for higher engine operating temperatures and better fuel efficiency but have also created new engineering problems. Specifically, silica based particles such as sand and volcanic ash that enter the engine during operation form glassy deposits on the TBCs. These deposits can cause the current industrial 7YSZ thermal barrier coatings to fail since the glass formed penetrates and chemically interacts with the TBC. When this occurs, coating failure may occur due to a loss of strain tolerance, which can lead to fracture, and phase changes of the TBC material. There have been several approaches used to stop calcium-magnesium aluminio-silcate (CMAS) glasses (molten sand) from destroying the entire TBC, but overall there is still limited knowledge. In this thesis, 7YSZ and new TBC materials will be examined for thermochemical and thermomechanical performance in the presence of molten CMAS and volcanic ash. Two air plasma sprayed TBCs will be shown to be resistant to volcanic ash and CMAS. The first type of coating is a modified 7YSZ coating with 20 mol% Al2O3 and 5 mol% TiO2 in solid solution (YSZ+20Al+5Ti). The second TBC is made of gadolinium zirconate. These novel TBCs impede CMAS and ash penetration by interacting with the molten CMAS or ash and drastically changing the chemistry. The chemically modified CMAS or ash will crystallize into an apatite or anorthite phase, blocking the CMAS or ash from further destroying the coating. A presented mechanism study will show these coatings are effective due to the large amount of solute (Gd, Al) in the zirconia structure, which is the key to creating the crystalline apatite or

  9. Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates for Rocket Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Jana; Fedorova, Tatiana; Bäker, Martin; Rösler, Joachim

    Currently a new generation of relaunchable space transportation system using liquid hydrogen/ liquid oxygen rocket engines is under development. The inner combustion chamber is exposed to extreme thermal loads and environmental attack during starts. To prevent failure of the cooling channels, a thermal barrier coating to provide thermal and oxidation protection could be applied. Thermal barrier coatings are state of the art for gas turbines and this concept should be transferred to copper substrates in rocket engine applications. The thermomechanical loading conditions are quite different from the gas turbine applications as heat fluxes and temperature gradients are much higher while overall service time is much shorter. As a start for optimization of a suitable coating, a material system known for gas turbines is employed. In this work a thermal barrier coating system is applied by atmospheric plasma spraying to the copper-based high strength alloy Cu-1%Cr-0.3%Zr. The bond coat consists of a NiCrAlY alloy, while partially stabilized zirconia is used as a top coat. Spraying parameter optimization for the new substrate is described. The reached coating system is tested in thermal cycling experiments, where no failure of the coating could be detected. In oxidation experiments good environmental protection of the coating is shown.

  10. High speed PVD thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beele, W.; Eschendorff, G.

    2006-01-01

    The high speed PVD process (HS-PVD) combines gas phase coating synthesis with high deposition rates. The process has been demonstrated for high purity YSZ deposited as a chemically bonded top thermal barrier with columnar structure of EB-PVD features. The process can manufacture EB-PVD like coatings that match in regards to their TGO-formation and columnar structure. Coatings with a columnar structure formed by individual columns of 1/4 of the diameter of a classical EB-PVD type TBC have been deposited. These coatings have the potential to prove a significant reduction in thermal conductivity and in erosion performance. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  12. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation. In the present thesis constitutive models are presented for the coating components and the most detrimental failure mechanisms. To simulate the thermomechanical failure response, the numerical mode...

  13. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  14. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-01-01

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life

  15. Thermal Barrier Coatings (les Revetements anti-mur de chaleur)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    a pyrometer at the coating surface and by means of thermocouples at the backside of the substrate. Substrates have been 2mm thick flat plates of...Temperature measurements are performed using a pyrometer at the TBC surface and thermocouples on the substrate. Specimen geometry is a flat plate of...Materials ( FGM ) concept for a TBC system can be suggested. 2. Graded Thermal Barrier Coating Systems Graded materials are characterized by a one or more

  16. Thermal barrier coatings - Technology for diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.H.; Lutz, J.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) are a development of the aerospace industry primarily aimed at hot gas flow paths in turbine engines. TBC consists of zirconia ceramic coatings applied over (M)CrAlY. These coatings can provide three benefits: (1) a reduction of metal surface operating temperatures, (2) a deterrent to hot gas corrosion, and (3) improved thermal efficiencies. TBC brings these same benefits to reciprocal diesel engines but coating longevity must be demonstrated. Diesels require thicker deposits and have challenging geometries for the arc-plasma spray (APS) deposition process. Different approaches to plasma spraying TBC are required for diesels, especially where peripheral edge effects play a major role. Bondcoats and ceramic top coats are modified to provide extended life as determined by burner rig tests, using ferrous and aluminum substrates

  17. Development and Property Evaluation of Selected HfO2-Silicon and Rare Earth-Silicon Based Bond Coats and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si and rare earth Si based EBC bond coat EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. High temperature properties of the advanced EBC systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep and oxidation resistance have been studied and summarized. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed some promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A technology for formation of thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide has been developed in the paper. The paper investigates structures of phase composition and thermal stability of such developed coatings. Investigation results pertaining to formation of an oxide system ZrO2 – Y2O3, while using plasma spraying and subsequent high-energy processing, which allows to increase resistance of a thermal barrier coating to thermal cycling heat resistance of the coating at temperature of 1100 °C. This leads to longer protection of bottom layer against high-temperature exposure. The methodology is based on complex metallographic, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy investigations of structural elements in composite plasma coatings of the ZrO2 – Y2O system. Resistance of plasma coatings (Мe – Cr – Al – Y/ZrO2 – Y2O3-type, used as TBC to protect gas turbine engine blades under conditions of frequent thermal cyclings is limited by cleavage of an outer ceramic layer. Structural and electron microprobe investigations have shown that as a result of thermal cycling an outer atmosphere due to porous structure of the ceramic coating layer, migrates to the surface of lower metal coating, causing its oxidation. As a result, the metal-ceramic Al2O3 layer is formed at a metal-ceramic interface and it changes a stress state of the coating that causes a reduction of protective properties. Thus, a high heat resistance of thermal barrier coatings depends on processes occurring at the interface between metal and ceramic coating layers. A laser impact on samples with TBC leads to changes in the structure of the oxide layer of ZrO2 – Y2O3. In this case its initial surface characterized by considerable relief is significantly flattened due to processing and the coating is fractured and it is separated in fragments. As the oxide coating has low thermal conductivity, and the time of laser exposure is about 10–3 sec, a heat flux

  19. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  20. Advanced Oxide Material Systems for 1650 Deg. C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S; Bansal, Narottam P; Miller, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    ... systems under engine high-heat-flux and severe thermal cycling conditions. In this report, the thermal conductivity and water vapor stability of selected candidate hafnia-, pyrochlore-, and magnetoplumbite-based TEBC materials are evaluated...

  1. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  2. Performance of Bond Coats Modified by Platinum Group Metals for Applications in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawancy, H. M.; Alhems, Luai M.; Aboelfotoh, M. O.

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated the partial replacement of Pt with other less expensive Pt group metals on the properties of γ' + γ bond coats used in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited on a nickel-base superalloy. The microstructure, thermal stability, oxidation behavior and performance in TBC systems of bond coats synthesized with Pt + Ru, Pt + Ir and Pt + Rh are compared with those of a reference bond coat synthesized with Pt. Yttria-stabilized zirconia has been employed as top coat in all coating systems. It is shown that at high temperatures all bond coats are degraded by interdiffusion and oxidation, however, with different kinetics. The lifetime of each TBC system is found to be limited by the cohesion between the thermally grown oxide and underlying bond coat. Differences in the behavior of various bond coats are correlated with their properties. Among the three Pt group metals investigated, the properties of the Pt + Ru bond coat are shown to closely approach those of the Pt bond coat. It is concluded that Ru with much lower cost presents a potential candidate for reducing the consumption of Pt.

  3. Relation of Thermal Conductivity with Process Induced Anisotropic Void Systems in EB-PVD PYSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria, A. Flores; Saruhan-Brings, B.; Ilavsky, J.

    2008-03-03

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by Electron-beam physical deposition (EB-PVD) protect the turbine blades situated at the high pressure sector of the aircraft and stationary turbines. It is an important task to uphold low thermal conductivity in TBCs during long-term service at elevated temperatures. One of the most promising methods to fulfil this task is to optimize the properties of PYSZ-based TBC by tailoring its microstructure. Thermal conductivity of the EB-PVD produced PYSZ TBCs is influenced mainly by the size, shape, orientation and volume of the various types of porosity present in the coatings. These pores can be classified as open (inter-columnar and between feather arms gaps) and closed (intra-columnar pores). Since such pores are located within the three-dimensionally deposited columns and enclose large differences in their sizes, shapes, distribution and anisotropy, the accessibility for their characterization is very complex and requires the use of sophisticated methods. In this work, three different EB-PVD TBC microstructures were manufactured by varying the process parameters, yielding various characteristics of their pores. The corresponding thermal conductivities in as-coated state and after ageing at 11000C/1h and 100h were measured via Laser Flash Analysis Method (LFA). The pore characteristics and their individual effect on the thermal conductivity are analysed by USAXS which is supported by subsequent modelling and LFA methods, respectively. Evident differences in the thermal conductivity values of each microstructure were found in as-coated and aged conditions. In summary, broader columns introduce higher values in thermal conductivity. In general, thermal conductivity increases after ageing for all three investigated microstructures, although those with initial smaller pore surface area show smaller changes.

  4. Relation of thermal conductivity with process induced anisotropic void system in EB-PVD PYSZ thermal barrier coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria, A. F.; Saruhan, B.; Ilavsky, J.; German Aerospace Center

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by Electron-beam physical deposition (EB-PVD) protect the turbine blades situated at the high pressure sector of the aircraft and stationary turbines. It is an important task to uphold low thermal conductivity in TBCs during long-term service at elevated temperatures. One of the most promising methods to fulfil this task is to optimize the properties of PYSZ-based ,TBC by tailoring its microstructure. Thermal conductivity of the EB-PVD produced PYSZ TBCs is influenced mainly by the size, shape, orientation and volume of the various types of porosity present in the coatings. These pores can be classified as open (inter-columnar and between feather arms gaps) and closed (intra-columnar pores). Since such pores are located within the three-dimensionally deposited columns and enclose large differences in their sizes, shapes, distribution and anisotropy, the accessibility for their characterization is very complex and requires the use of sophisticated methods. In this work, three different EB-PVD TBC microstructures were manufactured by varying the process parameters, yielding various characteristics of their pores. The corresponding thermal conductivities in as-coated state and after ageing at 1100C/1h and 100h were measured via Laser Flash Analysis Method (LFA). The pore characteristics and their individual effect on the thermal conductivity are analysed by USAXS which is supported by subsequent modelling and LFA methods, respectively. Evident differences in the thermal conductivity values of each microstructure were found in as-coated and aged conditions. In summary, broader columns introduce higher values in thermal conductivity. In general, thermal conductivity increases after ageing for all three investigated microstructures, although those with initial smaller pore surface area show smaller changes.

  5. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  6. Creep, Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Environmental Barrier Coating and SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Systems: The Role of Environment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for low emission SiCSiC CMC combustors and turbine airfoils have been developed to meet next generation engine emission and performance goals. This presentation will highlight the developments of NASAs current EBC system technologies for SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, their performance evaluation and modeling progress towards improving the engine SiCSiC component temperature capability and long-term durability. Our emphasis has also been placed on the fundamental aspects of the EBC-CMC creep and fatigue behaviors, and their interactions with turbine engine oxidizing and moisture environments. The EBC-CMC environmental degradation and failure modes, under various simulated engine testing environments, in particular involving high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity combustion conditions, will be discussed aiming at quantifying the protective coating functions, performance and durability, and in conjunction with damage mechanics and fracture mechanics approaches.

  7. Mechanisms of thermal barrier coating degradation and failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasi, J. T.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives and initial results of a Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Life Prediction Model Development Program are described. The goals of this program are to: identify and understand TBC failure modes; generate quantitative TBC life data; and develop and verify a TBC life prediction model. The coating being studied is a two layer thermal barrier system incorporating a nominal ten mil outer layer of seven percent yttria partially stabilized zirconia plasma deposited over an inner layer of highly oxidation resistant low pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coating. This coating currently is in flight service on turbine vane platforms in the JT-9D and PW2037 engines and is bill-of- material on turbine vane airfoils in the advanced PW4000 and IAE V2500 engines. Effort currently is in progress on the first task, which involves the identification and understanding of TBC failures. Five modes of coating damage were considered: thermomechanical ceramic failure; oxidative bond coat failure; hot corrosion; foreign object damage (FOD); and erosion.

  8. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  9. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  10. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  11. Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used extensively in modern gas turbine engines to thermally insulate air-cooled metallic components from the hot gases in the engine. These coatings typically consist of a zirconia-yttria ceramic that has been applied by either plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition. Future engines will rely even more heavily on TBCs and will require materials that have even higher temperature capability with improved insulation (i.e., lower thermal conductivity even after many hours at high temperature). This report discusses new TBCs that have been developed with these future requirements in mind. The Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is funding this effort, which has been conducted primarily at Glenn with contractor support (GE and Howmet) for physical vapor deposition. As stated, the new TBC not only had to be more insulating but the insulation had to persist even after many hours of exposure-that is, the new TBC had to have both lower conductivity and improved sintering resistance. A new type of test rig was developed for this task. This new test approach used a laser to deliver a known high heat flux in an essentially uniform pattern to the surface of the coating, thereby establishing a realistic thermal gradient across its thickness. This gradient was determined from surface and backside pyrometry; and since the heat flux and coating thickness are known, this permitted continuous monitoring of thermal conductivity. Thus, this laser rig allowed very efficient screening of candidate low-conductivity, sinter-resistant TBCs. The coating-design approach selected for these new low-conductivity TBCs was to identify oxide dopants that had the potential to promote the formation of relatively large and stable groupings of defects known as defect clusters. This approach was used because it was felt that such clusters would reduce conductivity while enhancing stability. The approach proved to be

  12. Effect of an Opaque Reflecting Layer on the Thermal Behavior of a Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric study using a two-flux approximation of the radiative transfer equation was performed to examine the effects of an opaque reflective layer on the thermal behavior of a typical semitransparent thermal barrier coating on an opaque substrate. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges where thermal radiation is important. Even with an opaque layer on each side of the semitransparent thermal barrier coating, scattering and absorption can have an effect on the heat transfer. In this work, a thermal barrier coating that is semitransparent up to a wavelength of 5 micrometers is considered. Above 5 micrometers wavelength, the thermal barrier coating is opaque. The absorption and scattering coefficient of the thermal barrier was varied. The thermal behavior of the thermal barrier coating with an opaque reflective layer is compared to a thermal barrier coating without the reflective layer. For a thicker thermal barrier coating with lower convective loading, which would be typical of a combustor liner, a reflective layer can significantly decrease the temperature in the thermal barrier coating and substrate if the scattering is weak or moderate and for strong scattering if the absorption is large. The layer without the reflective coating can be about as effective as the layer with the reflective coating if the absorption is small and the scattering strong. For low absorption, some temperatures in the thermal barrier coating system can be slightly higher with the reflective layer. For a thin thermal barrier coating with high convective loading, which would be typical of a blade or vane that sees the hot sections of the combustor, the reflective layer is not as effective. The reflective layer reduces the surface temperature of the reflective layer for all conditions considered. For weak and moderate scattering, the temperature of the TBC-substrate interface is reduced but for strong scattering, the temperature of the substrate is increased

  13. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (20) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating (20) consists essentially of a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula consisting essentially of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements selected from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof; where B is selected from the group of elements selected from Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof; n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  14. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  15. Novel hybrid polymeric materials for barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlacky, Erin Christine

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites, described as the inclusion of nanometer-sized layered silicates into polymeric materials, have been widely researched due to significant enhancements in material properties with the incorporation of small levels of filler (1--5 wt.%) compared to conventional micro- and macro-composites (20--30 wt.%). One of the most promising applications for polymer-clay nanocomposites is in the field of barrier coatings. The development of UV-curable polymer-clay nanocomposite barrier coatings was explored by employing a novel in situ preparation technique. Unsaturated polyesters were synthesized in the presence of organomodified clays by in situ intercalative polymerization to create highly dispersed clays in a precursor resin. The resulting clay-containing polyesters were crosslinked via UV-irradiation using donor-acceptor chemistry to create polymer-clay nanocomposites which exhibited significantly enhanced barrier properties compared to alternative clay dispersion techniques. The impact of the quaternary alkylammonium organic modifiers, used to increase compatibility between the inorganic clay and organic polymer, was studied to explore influence of the organic modifier structure on the nanocomposite material properties. By incorporating just the organic modifiers, no layered silicates, into the polyester resins, reductions in film mechanical and thermal properties were observed, a strong indicator of film plasticization. An alternative in situ preparation method was explored to further increase the dispersion of organomodified clay within the precursor polyester resins. In stark contrast to traditional in situ polymerization methods, a novel "reverse" in situ preparation method was developed, where unmodified montmorillonite clay was added during polyesterification to a reaction mixture containing the alkylammonium organic modifier. The resulting nanocomposite films exhibited reduced water vapor permeability and increased mechanical properties

  16. Lower-Conductivity Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) that have both initial and post-exposure thermal conductivities lower than those of yttria-stabilized zirconia TBCs have been developed. TBCs are thin ceramic layers, generally applied by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition, that are used to insulate air-cooled metallic components from hot gases in gas turbine and other heat engines. Heretofore, yttria-stabilized zirconia (nominally comprising 95.4 atomic percent ZrO2 + 4.6 atomic percent Y2O3) has been the TBC material of choice. The lower-thermal-conductivity TBCs are modified versions of yttria-stabilized zirconia, the modifications consisting primarily in the addition of other oxides that impart microstructural and defect properties that favor lower thermal conductivity.

  17. Development and Performance Evaluations of HfO2-Si and Rare Earth-Si Based Environmental Barrier Bond Coat Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si based EBC bond coat systems for SiCSiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. The coating design approach and stability requirements are specifically emphasized, with the development and implementation focusing on Plasma Sprayed (PS) and Electron Beam-Physic Vapor Deposited (EB-PVD) coating systems and the composition optimizations. High temperature properties of the HfO2-Si based bond coat systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1500 C. Thermal gradient heat flux low cycle fatigue and furnace cyclic oxidation durability tests were also performed at temperatures up to 1500 C. The coating strength improvements, degradation and failure modes of the environmental barrier coating bond coat systems on SiCSiC CMCs tested in simulated stress-environment interactions are briefly discussed and supported by modeling. The performance enhancements of the HfO2-Si bond coat systems with rare earth element dopants and rare earth-silicon based bond coats are also highlighted. The advanced bond coat systems, when

  18. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the effect of bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating life. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased total coating life. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coat thickness was also found to increase life.

  19. Development of metal based thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Il

    In this work, metal-based thermal barrier coatings (MBTBCs) have been produced, using high frequency induction plasma spraying (IPS) of iron-based nanostructured alloy powders. Important advances have been made over recent years to the development of ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for internal combustion engines application, but they are not yet applied in mass production situations. Besides the important economic considerations, the reliability of ceramic: TBCs is also an issue, being associated with the difficulty of predicting their "in-service" lifetime. Through engineering of the nano/amorphous structure of MBTBCs, their thermal conductivity can be made as low as those of ceramic-based TBCs, with reduced mean free paths of the electrons/phonons scattering. In this work, nano/amorphous structured coatings were deposited by IPS using the following spray parameters: spraying distance (210 ˜ 270 mm), plasma gas composition (Ar/N2), IPS torch power (24kW), and powder feed-rate (16g/min.). The structure and properties of the deposited layers were characterized through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) observations. The thermal diffusivity (alpha) properties of the MBTBCs were measured using a laser flash method. Density (rho) and specific heat (Cp) of the MBTBCs were also measured, and their thermal conductivity (k) calculated (k =alpharhoCp). The thermal conductivity of MBTBCs was found to be as low as 1.99 W/m/K. The heat treatment study showed that crystal structure changes, and grain size growth from a few nanometers to tenth of nanometers occurred at 550°C under static exposure conditions. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of MBTBCs was 13E-6/K, which is close to the TEC of cast iron and thus, closer to the TEC values of aluminium alloys than are conventional TBCs. Fracture toughness of MBTBCs has also been assessed by use of Vickers hardness tests, with a 500 g load for 15 s, and the results show that there are no measurable crack

  20. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  1. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  2. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  3. Surface Cracking and Interface Reaction Associated Delamination Failure of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    ...%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS/Si thermal and environmental barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were characterized after long-term combined laser thermal gradient and furnace cyclic...

  4. Metallurgical coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, L.C.; Whittaker, G.S.

    1984-05-01

    The present invention relates to a novel metallurgical coating system which provides corrosion resistance and non-stick properties to metallic components which are subjected to unusually severe operating conditions. The coating system comprises a first layer comprising tantalum which is deposited upon a substrate and a second layer comprising molybdenum disilicide which is deposited upon the first layer.

  5. Vehicle barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper

  6. Optical Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Mark Steven

    The high temperature properties of ceramic materials make them suitable for the extreme environments of gas combustion powered turbines. They are instrumental in providing thermal insulation for the metallic turbine components from the combustion products. Also, the addition of specific rare earth elements to ceramics creates materials with temperature diagnostic applications. Laser based methods have been applied to these ceramic coatings to predict their remaining thermal insulation service life and to explore their high temperature diagnostic capabilities. A method for cleaning thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) contaminated during engine operation has been developed using laser ablation. Surface contamination on the turbine blades hinders nondestructive remaining life prediction using photo luminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS). Real time monitoring of the removed material is employed to prevent damage to the underlying coating. This method relies on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to compute the cross correlation coefficient between the spectral emissions of a sample TBC that is contaminated and a reference clean TBC. It is possible to remove targeted contaminants and cease ablation when the top surface of the TBC has been reached. In collaboration with this work, Kelley's thesis [1] presents microscopy images and PLPS measurements indicating the integrity of the TBC has been maintained during the removal of surface contaminants. Thermographic phosphors (TGP) have optical emission properties when excited by a laser that are temperature dependent. These spectral and temporal properties have been investigated and utilized for temperature measurement schemes by many previous researchers. The compounds presented in this dissertation consist of various rare earth (Lanthanide) elements doped into a host crystal lattice. As the temperature of the lattice changes, both the time scale for vibrational quenching and the distribution of energy among atomic energy

  7. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: NASA's Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation reviews NASA environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development programs and the coating materials evolutions for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites in order to meet the next generation engine performance requirements. The presentation focuses on several generations of NASA EBC systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. The current EBC development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA 2700F candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance are described. The research and development opportunities for advanced turbine airfoil environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling are discussed.

  8. Erosion and foreign object damage of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.R.; Jaslier, Y.; Rickerby, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating technology is used in the hot sections of gas turbines to extend component life. To maximise these benefits, the thermal barrier coating has to remain intact throughout the life of the turbine. High velocity ballistic damage can lead to total thermal barrier removal, while erosion may lead to progressive loss of thickness during operation. This paper particularly addresses the erosion resistance and resistance to foreign object damage of thermal barrier coatings. It was found that EB-PVD thermal barriers are significantly more erosion resistant when impacted with alumina or silica, than the equivalent plasma spray coating, both at room temperature and 910 C. Examination of tested hardware, reveals that cracking occurs within the near surface region of the columns for EB-PVD ceramic and that erosion occurs by removal of these small blocks of material. In stark contrast, removal of material for plasma sprayed ceramic occurs through poorly bonded splat boundaries. Large particle impact results in severe damage to the EB-PVD thermal barrier, with cracks penetrating through the ceramic coating to the ceramic/bond coat interface. Material removal, per particle impact, increases with increased particle size. (orig.)

  9. INFLUENCE OF WORKPIECE SURFACE PREPARATION ON THERMAL BARRIER COATING DURABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Petrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article deals with the impact of workpiece surface quality on adhesive strength and durability of thermal barrier coating. The result revealed that the roughness of metal layer influences on the adhesion of ceramic coating and depends the thickness of ceramic crystals when using method of Electron beam deposition.

  10. Polymer derived ceramic composites as environmental barrier coatings on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Jessica D.

    Polymer derived ceramics have shown promise as a novel way to process low-dimensional ceramics such as fibers and coatings. They offer advantages over traditional ceramic processing routes including lower pyrolysis temperatures and the ability to employ polymeric processing techniques. The main drawback to preceramic polymers is that they undergo a shrinkage during pyrolysis that can be greater than 50-volume%. One way to overcome this shrinkage is to add filler particles, usually elemental or binary metals, which will expand upon reaction with the pyrolysis atmosphere, thereby compensating for the shrinkage of the polymer. The aim of this study is to develop a polymer derived ceramic composite coating on steel as a barrier to oxidation and carburization, while concurrently gaining insight as to the fundamental mechanisms for compositional and microstructural evolution within the system. A systematic approach to selecting the preceramic polymer and expansion agents was taken. Six commercially available poly(silsesquioxane) polymers and a polysiloxane were studied. Several metals and an intermetallic were considered as potential expansion agents. The most desirable polymer/expansion agent combination was achieved with poly(hydridomethylsiloxane) as the matrix and titanium disilicide as the filler. Processing parameters have been optimized and a relationship derived to predict final coating thickness based on slurry viscosity and dip coating withdrawal speed. Microstructural analysis reveals an amorphous composite coating of oxidized filler particles in a silica matrix. A diffusion layer is visible at the coating-steel interface, indicating good bonding. The optimized coatings are ˜18mum thick, have some residual porosity and a density of 2.57g/cm3. A systematic study of the phase transformations and microstructural changes in the coating and its components during pyrolysis in air is also presented. The system evolves from a polymer filled with a binary metal at

  11. Dip Process Thermal Barrier Coatings for Superalloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    melting Ce-Co or Ce-Ni alloy, By internally oxidizing these coatings, t is possible to obtain a duplex with a CeO2 -rich oxide scale as the outer layer... Slurry Fusion Coatings......................15 Ultra-Rich Cerium (.- 90%) Dip Coating on IN738 .......... 17 CONCLUSIONS...alloy powder slurried with an organic vehicle, then fired in an inert atmosphere. Our original concept was to selectively oxidize cerium, using CO/CO 2

  12. Experimental techniques for the characterization and development of thermal barrier coating bond coat alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert J.

    Thermal barrier coatings, commonly used in modern gas turbines and jet engines, are dynamic, multilayered structures consisting of a superalloy substrate, an Al-rich bond coat, a thermally grown oxide, and a ceramic top coat. Knowledge of the disparate material properties for each of the constituents of a thermal barrier coating is crucial to both better understanding and improving the performance of the system. The efforts of this dissertation quantify fundamental aspects of two intrinsic strain mechanisms that arise during thermal cycling. This includes measurement of the thermal expansion behavior for bond coats and superalloys as well as establishing specific ternary compositions associated with a strain-inducing martensitic phase transformation, which is known to occur in Ni-rich bond coat alloys. In order to quantify the coefficient of thermal expansion for a number of actual alloys extracted from contemporary thermal barrier coating systems, this work employs a noncontact high temperature digital image correlation technique to nearly 1100°C. The examined materials include: two commercial superalloys, two as-deposited commercial bond coat alloys, and three experimental bond coat alloys. The as-deposited specimens were created using a diffusion aluminizing and a low pressure plasma spray procedure to thicknesses on the order of 50 and 100 mum, respectively. For the plasma sprayed bond coat, a comparison with a bulk counterpart of identical composition indicated that deposition procedures have little effect on thermal expansion. An analytical model of oxide rumpling is used to show that the importance of thermal expansion mismatch between a commercial bond coat and its superalloy substrate is relatively small. Considerably higher expansion values are noted for a Ni-rich bond coat alloy, however, and modeling which includes this layer suggests that it may have a substantial influence on rumpling. Combinatorial methods based on diffusion multiples are also

  13. Microstructural aspects of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, T. E.; Suhr, D. S.; Keller, R. J.; Lanteri, V.; Heuer, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Various combination of plasma-sprayed bond coatings and zirconia ceramic coatings on a nickel-based superalloy substrate were tested by static thermal exposure at 1200 C and cyclic thermal exposure to 1000 C. The bond coats were based on Ni-Cr-Al alloys with additions of rare earth elements and Si. The ceramic coats were various ZrO2-Y2O3 compositions, of which the optimum was found to be ZrO2-8.9 wt percent Y2O3. Microstructural analysis showed that resistance to cracking during thermal exposure is strongly related to deleterious phase changes. Zones depleted of Al formed at the bond coat/ceramic coat interface due to oxidation and at the bond coat/substrate interface due to interdiffusion, leading eventually to breakdown of the bond coat. The 8.9 percent Y2O3 coating performed best because the as-sprayed metastable tetragonal phase converted slowly into the low-Y2O3 tetragonal plus high-Y2O3 cubic-phase mixture, so that the deleterious monoclinic phase was inhibited from forming. Failure appeared to start with the formation of circumferential cracks in the zirconia, probably due to compressive stresses during cooling, followed by the formation of radial cracks due to tensile stresses during heating. Cracks appeared to initiate at the Al2O3 scale/bond coat interface and propagate through the zirconia coating. Comparisons were made with the behavior of bulk ZrO2-Y2O3 and the relationship between the microstructure of the tetragonal phase and the phase diagram. A separate investigation was also made of the ZrO2-Al2O3 interface.

  14. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  15. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  16. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition of barrier coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    It is intended that the book will be a practical guide to provide any reader with the basic information to help them understand what is necessary in order to produce a good barrier coated web or to improve the quality of any existing barrier product. After providing an introduction, where the terminology is outlined and some of the science is given (keeping the mathematics to a minimum), including barrier testing methods, the vacuum deposition process will be described. In theory a thin layer of metal or glass-like material should be enough to convert any polymer film into a perfect barrier material. The reality is that all barrier coatings have their performance limited by the defects in the coating. This book looks at the whole process from the source materials through to the post deposition handling of the coated material. This holistic view of the vacuum coating process provides a description of the common sources of defects and includes the possible methods of limiting the defects. This enables readers...

  17. Evaluation of bond strength of isothermally aged plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Koo, Jae Mean; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung; Kim, Mun Young

    2008-01-01

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. For each aging condition, bond tests for three samples were conducted for evaluating degradation of adhesive or cohesive strength of thermal barrier coating system. For as-sprayed condition, the location of fracture in the bond test was in the middle of epoxy which have bond strength of 57 MPa. As specimens are degraded by thermal aging, bond strength gradually decreased and the location of failure was also changed from within top coat at the earlier stage of thermal aging to the interface between top coat and TGO at the later stage due to the delamination in the coating

  18. Evaluation of bond strength of isothermally aged plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Koo, Jae Mean; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mun Young [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Ltd., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. For each aging condition, bond tests for three samples were conducted for evaluating degradation of adhesive or cohesive strength of thermal barrier coating system. For as-sprayed condition, the location of fracture in the bond test was in the middle of epoxy which have bond strength of 57 MPa. As specimens are degraded by thermal aging, bond strength gradually decreased and the location of failure was also changed from within top coat at the earlier stage of thermal aging to the interface between top coat and TGO at the later stage due to the delamination in the coating.

  19. Environmental Stability and Oxidation Behavior of HfO2-Si and YbGd(O) Based Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Farmer, Serene; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, environmental durable environmental barrier coating systems. In this paper, the durability and performance of advanced Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) NASA HfO2-Si and YbGdSi(O) EBC bond coat top coat systems for SiCSiC CMC have been summarized. The high temperature thermomechanical creep, fatigue and oxidation resistance have been investigated in the laboratory simulated high-heat-flux environmental test conditions. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  20. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  1. Analytical Modeling of Unsteady Aluminum Depletion in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    YEŞİLATA, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in aircraft turbines is studied. A simple, unsteady and one-dimensional, diffusion model based on aluminum depletion from a bond-coat to form an oxide layer of Al2O3 is introduced. The model is employed for a case study with currently available experimental data. The diffusion coefficient of the depleted aluminum in the alloy, the concentration profiles at different oxidation times, and the thickness of Al-depleted region are...

  2. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Turbine Engines: A Design and Performance Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis; Smialek, James L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBC) for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating long-term durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature, strength and stability requirements in engine high heat-flux combustion environments, especially for highly-loaded rotating turbine components. Advanced TEBC systems, including nano-composite based HfO2-aluminosilicate and rare earth silicate coatings are being developed and tested for higher temperature capable SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade applications. This paper will emphasize coating composite and multilayer design approach and the resulting performance and durability in simulated engine high heat-flux, high stress and high pressure combustion environments. The advances in the environmental barrier coating development showed promise for future rotating CMC blade applications.

  3. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  4. The Development of Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in future turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is a key to enable the applications of the envisioned CMC components to help achieve next generation engine performance and durability goals. This paper will primarily address the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The emphasis is placed on current candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiCSiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. Major technical barriers in developing advanced environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMC turbine components having improved environmental stability, cyclic durability and system performance will be described. The development trends for turbine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be discussed.

  5. Evaluation on the delamination life of isothermally aged plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Chang Sung; Koo, Jae Mean; Kim, Dae Jin; Shin, In Hwan; Kim, Mun Young

    2008-01-01

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. The aging conditions that delamination occurs were determined by the extensive microscopic analyses and bond tests for each aging condition. The delamination map was drawn from the time-temperature matrix form which summarize the delamination conditions. Finally, a method to draw the delamination life diagram of a thermal barrier coating system by using the delamination map was suggested

  6. Evaluation on the Delamination Life of Isothermally Aged Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Jin; Shin, In Hwan; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok Chang Sung; Kim, Moon Young

    2009-01-01

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. The aging conditions that delamination occurs were determined by the extensive microscopic analyses and bond tests for each aging condition. The delamination map was drawn from the time-temperature matrix form which summarize the delamination conditions. Finally, a method to draw the delamination life diagram of a thermal barrier coating system by using the delamination map was suggested

  7. Evaluation on the Delamination Life of Isothermally Aged Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jin; Shin, In Hwan; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moon Young [Kepco Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. The aging conditions that delamination occurs were determined by the extensive microscopic analyses and bond tests for each aging condition. The delamination map was drawn from the time-temperature matrix form which summarize the delamination conditions. Finally, a method to draw the delamination life diagram of a thermal barrier coating system by using the delamination map was suggested.

  8. Evaluation on the delamination life of isothermally aged plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Chang Sung; Koo, Jae Mean; Kim, Dae Jin; Shin, In Hwan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mun Young [Korea Plant Service and Engineering, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. The aging conditions that delamination occurs were determined by the extensive microscopic analyses and bond tests for each aging condition. The delamination map was drawn from the time-temperature matrix form which summarize the delamination conditions. Finally, a method to draw the delamination life diagram of a thermal barrier coating system by using the delamination map was suggested.

  9. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  10. Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect different parts in compressors and turbines from heat. They are generally composed of two layers, one metallic layer providing resistance to heat corrosion and oxidation, and one thermally insulating ceramic layer. Two different techniques are industrially used. Plasma spray ...

  11. Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Energy Efficient Heat Engines Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katherine Faber

    2004-10-31

    This program aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of the microstructural, mechanical, and chemical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based coatings for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (AS800) substrates and optimize such coatings for environmental barriers. The program consisted of three tasks: processing of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings, phase and microstructural development, and life-limiting phenomena. Northwestern University formed a cross-functional team with Lehigh University, Honeywell Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major accomplishments are: (1) Conditions for the plasma spray of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and its alloys were optimized to provide maximum density and thickness. (2) Adherent small particle plasma spray coatings of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be routinely prepared. (3) Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be stabilized against its disruptive phase transformation to 1400 C by the addition of one or more oxides of Al, La, and/or Nb. (4) Residual stresses in the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were measured using X-rays and changed with thermal exposure. (5) Properly doped coatings are more resistant against thermal cycling than undoped coatings, and can be cycled many thousand times without spallation. (6) Water vapor testing in the ORNL Keiser Rig of adherent coatings showed that undoped Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is not an effective barrier at preventing chemical changes to the AS800. (7) Limited water vapor testing of doped and adherent coatings, which had successfully survived many thermal cycles, showed that in the water vapor environment, de-cohesion may occur.

  12. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  13. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  14. The oxidation behavior of classical thermal barrier coatings exposed to extreme temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina DRAGOMIRESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC are designed to protect metal surfaces from extreme temperatures and improve their resistance to oxidation during service. Currently, the most commonly used systems are those that have the TBC structure bond coat (BC / top coat (TC layers. The top coat layer is a ceramic layer. Oxidation tests are designed to identify the dynamics of the thermally oxide layer (TGO growth at the interface of bond coat / top coat layers, delamination mechanism and the TBC structural changes induced by thermal conditions. This paper is a short study on the evolution of aluminum oxide protective layer along with prolonged exposure to the testing temperature. There have been tested rectangular specimens of metal super alloy with four surfaces coated with a duplex thermal barrier coating system. The specimens were microscopically and EDAX analyzed before and after the tests. In order to determine the oxide type, the samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation are encouraging for future studies. The results show a direct relationship between the development of the oxide layer and long exposure to the test temperature. Future research will focus on changing the testing temperature to compare the results.

  15. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  16. High Solids Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    SITATEMENT rot tho ahatrai .nti,,ed in IfllorM 0, It diIIIorenl Itroft I.port) 15L %UPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19, KEY WORDS (Continiou on roveaou oido It...yji1 :𔃻ppeŽ r prt rni j Lr ,, [VQ I urt, her eL ve.Luprnent into high solids coating systems. The Acryloid AU-568 hns many of the desirable properties

  17. Evaluation of present thermal barrier coatings for potential service in electric utility gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, R. J.; Lau, S. K.; Lee, S. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The resistance of present-day thermal barrier coatings to combustion gases found in electric utility turbines was assessed. The plasma sprayed coatings, both duplex and graded types, were primarily zirconia-based, although a calcium silicate was also evaluated. Both atmospheric burner rig tests and high pressure tests (135 psig) showed that several present-day thermal barrier coatings have a high potential for service in gas turbines burning the relatively clean GT No. 2 fuel. However, coating improvements are needed for use in turbines burning lower grade fuel such as residual oil. The duplex ZrO2.8Y2O3/NiCrA1Y coating was ranked highest and selected for near-term field testing, with Ca2SiO4/NiCrA1Y ranked second. Graded coatings show potential for corrosive turbine operating conditions and warrant further development. The coating degradation mechanisms for each coating system subjected to the various environmental conditions are also described.

  18. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  19. New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

  20. Prolonging thermal barrier coated specimen life by thermal cycle management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Poolos, N. P.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings applied to the heated side of engine components such as seals, combustor, and blades of a gas turbine offer a potential increase in efficiency through the use of higher gas temperatures or less cooling air or benefits arising from extended component life by reducing component metal temperatures. The considered investigation has the objective to show that while a thermal barrier coated (TBC) specimen can be brought to a fixed temperature using various fuel-air ratio (F/A) values, lower calculated stresses are associated with lower (F/A) values. This implies that control of (F/A) values (i.e., rates of heat input) during the starting transient and to a lesser extent during shutdown and operation, offers a potential method of improving TBC lifetime through thermal cycle management.

  1. Computational design and experimental validation of new thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The focus of this project is on the development of a reliable and efficient ab initio based computational high temperature material design method which can be used to assist the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) bond-coat and top-coat design. Experimental evaluations on the new TBCs are conducted to confirm the new TBCs’ properties. Southern University is the subcontractor on this project with a focus on the computational simulation method development. We have performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics simulation on screening the top coats and bond coats for gas turbine thermal barrier coating design and validation applications. For experimental validations, our focus is on the hot corrosion performance of different TBC systems. For example, for one of the top coatings studied, we examined the thermal stability of TaZr2.75O8 and confirmed it’s hot corrosion performance.

  2. It takes more than a coating to get nanoparticles through the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Dajana; Ebmeyer, Johanna; Meyer, Thomas; Behr, Anne-Cathrin; Kästner, Claudia; Böhmert, Linda; Juling, Sabine; Niemann, Birgit; Fahrenson, Christoph; Selve, Sören; Thünemann, Andreas F; Meijer, Jan; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2017-09-01

    Size and shape are crucial parameters which have impact on the potential of nanoparticles to penetrate cell membranes and epithelial barriers. Current research in nanotoxicology additionally focuses on particle coating. To distinguish between core- and coating-related effects in nanoparticle uptake and translocation, two nanoparticles equal in size, coating and charge but different in core material were investigated. Silver and iron oxide nanoparticles coated with poly (acrylic acid) were chosen and extensively characterized by small-angle x-ray scattering, nanoparticle tracing analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Uptake and transport were studied in the intestinal Caco-2 model in a Transwell system with subsequent elemental analysis. TEM and ion beam microscopy were conducted for particle visualization. Although equal in size, charge and coating, the behavior of the two particles in Caco-2 cells was different: while the internalized amount was comparable, only iron oxide nanoparticles additionally passed the epithelium. Our findings suggest that the coating material influenced only the uptake of the nanoparticles whereas the translocation was determined by the core material. Knowledge about the different roles of the particle coating and core materials in crossing biological barriers will facilitate toxicological risk assessment of nanoparticles and contribute to the optimization of pharmacokinetic properties of nano-scaled pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Curry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying (SPS has become an interesting method for the production of thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine components. The development of the SPS process has led to structures with segmented vertical cracks or column-like structures that can imitate strain-tolerant air plasma spraying (APS or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD coatings. Additionally, SPS coatings can have lower thermal conductivity than EB-PVD coatings, while also being easier to produce. The combination of similar or improved properties with a potential for lower production costs makes SPS of great interest to the gas turbine industry. This study compares a number of SPS thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with vertical cracks or column-like structures with the reference of segmented APS coatings. The primary focus has been on lifetime testing of these new coating systems. Samples were tested in thermo-cyclic fatigue at temperatures of 1100 °C for 1 h cycles. Additional testing was performed to assess thermal shock performance and erosion resistance. Thermal conductivity was also assessed for samples in their as-sprayed state, and the microstructures were investigated using SEM.

  4. Thermal shock behavior of toughened gadolinium zirconate/YSZ double-ceramic-layered thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinghua; Zhao, Huayu; Zhou, Xiaming; Liu, Chenguang; Wang, Liang; Shao, Fang; Yang, Kai; Tao, Shunyan; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 /YSZ DCL thermal barrier coating was designed and fabricated. • The Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3YSZ. • Remarkable improvement in thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was achieved. - Abstract: Double-ceramic-layered (DCL) thermal barrier coating system comprising of toughened Gadolinium zirconate (Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 , GZ) as the top ceramic layer and 4.5 mol% Y 2 O 3 partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (4.5YSZ) as the bottom ceramic layer was fabricated by plasma spraying and thermal shock behavior of the DCL coating was investigated. The GZ top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (3YSZ) to improve fracture toughness of the matrix. The thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was enhanced significantly compared to that of single-ceramic-layered (SCL) GZ-3YSZ composite coating, which is believed to be primarily attributed to the two factors: (i) the increase in fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer by incorporating nanostructured YSZ particles and (ii) the improvement in strain tolerance through the utilization of 4.5YSZ as the bottom ceramic layer. In addition, the failure mechanisms are mainly attributed to the still low fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer and oxidation of the bond-coat

  5. Water Vapor Sorption and Diffusion in Secondary Dispersion Barrier Coatings: A Critical Comparison with Emulsion Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Soer, Willem-Jan; Scheerder, Jürgen; Satgurunathan, Guru; Keddie, Joseph L

    2015-06-10

    The conventional method for synthesizing waterborne polymer colloids is emulsion polymerization using surfactants. An emerging method is the use of secondary dispersions (SD) of polymers in water, which avoids the addition of any surfactant. Although there are numerous studies of the water barrier properties (sorption, diffusion, and permeability) of waterborne emulsion (Em) polymer coatings, the properties of SD coatings, in comparison, have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, dynamic water vapor sorption analysis is used to compare the equilibrium sorption isotherms of the two forms of styrene-acrylate copolymers (Em and SD) with the same monomer composition. From an analysis of the kinetics of vapor sorption, the diffusion coefficient of water in the polymer coatings is determined. The combined effects of particle boundaries and surfactant addition were investigated through a comparison of the properties of SD and Em coatings to those of (1) solvent-cast polymer coatings (of the same monomer composition), (2) Em polymers that underwent dialysis to partially remove the water-soluble species, and (3) SD polymers with added surfactants. The results reveal that both the particle boundaries and the surfactants increase vapor sorption. The diffusion coefficients of water are comparable in magnitude in all of the polymer systems but are inversely related to water activity because of molecular clustering. Compared to all of the other waterborne polymer systems, the SD barrier coatings show the lowest equilibrium vapor sorption and permeability coefficients at high relative humidities as well as the lowest water diffusion coefficient at low humidities. These barrier properties make SD coatings an attractive alternative to conventional emulsion polymer coatings.

  6. Development of Reliability Based Life Prediction Methods for Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2001-01-01

    Literature survey related to the EBC/TBC (environmental barrier coating/thermal barrier coating) fife models, failure mechanisms in EBC/TBC and the initial work plan for the proposed EBC/TBC life prediction methods development was developed as well as the finite element model for the thermal/stress analysis of the GRC-developed EBC system was prepared. Technical report for these activities is given in the subsequent sections.

  7. Failure of thermal barrier coatings under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading. Microstructural observations and modelling aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, Haakan

    2004-09-01

    Industrial and air-borne gas turbine hot components suffer from creep, oxidation, corrosion and microstructural degradation if not shielded from the hot and aggressive combustion gases. Two major strategies commercially available are adopted; film cooling by pressurised air and application of protective coatings. Protective coatings form a slow-growing oxide that protects from oxidation and corrosion. By application of a thermal insulator, a thermal barrier coating, the material will be protected from high temperature through good insulation properties of the coating system. If thermal barrier coatings are to be used in situations where capabilities and possibilities for inspections are limited, better knowledge of the fatigue properties of the coatings is also needed. Therefore development of a reliable fatigue life model is needed. The present work aims at serving as a basis from which a general physically founded thermal barrier coating life model can be formulated. The effects of exposure to high temperatures and mechanical loads on thermal barrier coatings under service like conditions have been investigated in the present thesis. Emphasis is put on the coupling between materials science and solid mechanics approaches in order to establish a better knowledge concerning degradation mechanisms and fatigue life issues than what is common if only one discipline is explored. Investigations of material exposed to isothermal oxidation and thermal cyclic fatigue were performed on plasma-sprayed systems with NiCoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coats and yttria partially stabilised zirconia top coats. It has been shown that the thermally grown oxide that will form upon high temperature exposure influences the failure behaviour. If the oxide is composed mainly of alumina, the fatigue properties are good since the adhesion between the ceramic top coat and the metallic bond coat is good. This is also shown in a comparison between different plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

  8. Performance and Durability of Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    This presentation highlights advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) and SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) systems for next generation turbine engines. The emphasis will be placed on fundamental coating and CMC property evaluations; and the integrated system performance and degradation mechanisms in simulated laboratory turbine engine testing environments. Long term durability tests in laser rig simulated high heat flux the rmomechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions will also be presented. The results can help improve the future EBC-CMC system designs, validating the advanced EBC-CMC technologies for hot section turbine engine applications.

  9. A modelling approach to designing microstructures in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.; Nylen, P.; Wigren, J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermomechanical properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) are strongly influenced by coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, thus making it essential to have a fundamental understanding of microstructure-property relationships in TBCs to produce a desired coating. Object-Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has been shown previously as an effective tool for evaluating thermal and mechanical material behaviour, as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as input to the model. In this work, OOF was used to predict the thermal conductivity and effective Young's modulus of TBC topcoats. A Design of Experiments (DoE) was conducted by varying selected parameters for spraying Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) topcoat. The microstructure was assessed with SEM, and image analysis was used to characterize the porosity content. The relationships between microstructural features and properties predicted by modelling are discussed. The microstructural features having the most beneficial effect on properties were sprayed with a different spray gun so as to verify the results obtained from modelling. Characterisation of the coatings included microstructure evaluation, thermal conductivity and lifetime measurements. The modelling approach in combination with experiments undertaken in this study was shown to be an effective way to achieve coatings with optimised thermo-mechanical properties.

  10. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Diffusion in Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Components (CMC) components for use in turbine engines offer a number of advantages compared with current practice. However, such components are subject to degradation through a variety of mechanisms. In particular, in the hot environment inside a turbine in operation a considerable amount of water vapor is present, and this can lead to corrosion and recession. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) systems that limit the amount of oxygen and water reaching the component are required to reduce this degradation and extend component life. A number of silicate-based materials are under consideration for use in such coating systems, including Yttterbium and Yttrium di- and monosilicates. In this work, we present results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen diffusion in Yttrium disilicate, and compare with previous work on Yttterbium disilicate. Coatings may also exhibit cracking, and the cracks can provide a direct path for oxygen to reach the component. There is typically a bond coat between the coating and component surface, but the bond coat material is generally chosen for properties other than low oxygen diffusivity. Nevertheless, the degree to which the bond coat can inhibit oxygen diffusion is of interest, as it may form the final defense against oxygen impingement on the component. We have therefore performed similar simulations of oxygen diffusion through HfSiO4, a proposed bond coat material.

  11. Tantalum oxide-based plasma-sprayed environmental barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Christopher M.

    Energy efficiency in gas turbine engines is linked to the high temperature capabilities of materials used in the hot section of the engine. To facilitate a significant increase in engine efficiency, tough structural ceramics have been developed that can handle the thermo-mechanical stresses that gas turbine components experience. Unfortunately, the high-temperature, high-pressure, and high-velocity combustion gases in a gas turbine contain water vapor and/or hydrogen which have been shown to volatilize the protective silica layer on silicon-based ceramics. This degradation leads to significant surface recession in ceramic gas turbine components. In order to maintain their structural integrity, an environmental barrier coating (EBC) could be used to protect ceramics from the harsh gas turbine environment. Due to its coefficient of thermal expansion and phase stability at elevated temperatures, tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) was examined as the base material for an air plasma-sprayed EBC on Si3N 4 ceramics. As-sprayed pure Ta2O5 was comprised of both low-temperature beta-Ta2O5 and high-temperature alpha-Ta 2O5 that was quenched into the structure. Residual stress measurements via X-ray diffraction determined the as-sprayed coating to be in tension and extensive vertical macrocracks were observed in the coating. Heat treatments of the pure coating led to conversion of alpha-Ta2 O5 to beta-Ta2O5, conversion of tensile stresses to compressive, localized buckling of the coating, and significant grain growth which caused microcracking in the coating. The pure coating was found to be an inadequate EBC. Al2O3 was investigated as a solid solution alloying addition designed to enhance the stability of beta-Ta2O 5, and reduce grain growth by slowing grain boundary diffusion. La 2O3 was investigated as an alloying addition designed to form second phase particles which would reduce grain growth through pinning. Al2O3 was successful at both stabilizing beta-Ta 2O5 and reducing grain

  12. Oscillatory shear response of moisture barrier coatings containing clay of different shape factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugge, C; Vanderhoek, N; Bousfield, D W

    2011-06-01

    Oscillatory shear rheology of barrier coatings based on dispersed styrene-butadiene latex and clay of various shape factors or aspect ratio has been explored. Barrier performance of these coatings when applied to paperboard has been assessed in terms of water vapour transmission rates and the results related to shape factor, dewatering and critical strain. It has been shown that a system based on clay with high shape factor gives a lower critical strain, dewatering and water vapour transmission rate compared with clays of lower shape factor. The dissipated energy, as calculated from an amplitude sweep, indicated no attractive interaction between clay and latex implying a critical strain that appears to be solely dependent on the shape factor at a constant volume fraction. Particle size distribution was shown to have no effect on the critical strain while coatings of high elasticity exhibited high yield strains as expected. The loss modulus demonstrated strain hardening before the elastic to viscous transition. The loss modulus peak was identified by a maximum strain which was significantly lower for a coating based on clay with a high shape factor. The characteristic elastic time was found to vary between 0.6 and 1.3s. The zero shear viscosity of barrier dispersion coatings were estimated from the characteristic elastic time and the characteristic modulus to be of the order of 25-100 Pa s. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  14. Graphene Oxide Bionanocomposite Coatings with High Oxygen Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilke Uysal Unalan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the development of bionanocomposite coatings on poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET with outstanding oxygen barrier properties. Pullulan and graphene oxide (GO were used as main polymer phase and nanobuilding block (NBB, respectively. The oxygen barrier performance was investigated at different filler volume fractions (ϕ and as a function of different relative humidity (RH values. Noticeably, the impermeable nature of GO was reflected under dry conditions, in which an oxygen transmission rate (OTR, mL·m−2·24 h−1 value below the detection limit of the instrument (0.01 mL·m−2·24 h−1 was recorded, even for ϕ as low as 0.0004. A dramatic increase of the OTR values occurred in humid conditions, such that the barrier performance was totally lost at 90% RH (the OTR of coated PET films was equal to the OTR of bare PET films. Modelling of the experimental OTR data by Cussler’s model suggested that the spatial ordering of GO sheets within the main pullulan phase was perturbed because of RH fluctuations. In spite of the presence of the filler, all the formulations allowed the obtainment of final materials with haze values below 3%, the only exception being the formulation with the highest loading of GO (ϕ ≈ 0.03. The mechanisms underlying the experimental observations are discussed.

  15. Environmental/Thermal Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites: Thermal Tradeoff Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. M.; Brewer, David; Shah, Ashwin R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent interest in environmental/thermal barrier coatings (EBC/TBCs) has prompted research to develop life-prediction methodologies for the coating systems of advanced high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Heat-transfer analysis of EBC/TBCs for CMCs is an essential part of the effort. It helps establish the resulting thermal profile through the thickness of the CMC that is protected by the EBC/TBC system. This report documents the results of a one-dimensional analysis of an advanced high-temperature CMC system protected with an EBC/TBC system. The one-dimensional analysis was used for tradeoff studies involving parametric variation of the conductivity; the thickness of the EBC/TBCs, bond coat, and CMC substrate; and the cooling requirements. The insight gained from the results will be used to configure a viable EBC/TBC system for CMC liners that meet the desired hot surface, cold surface, and substrate temperature requirements.

  16. The Development of 2700-3000 F Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in future turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is a key to enable the applications of the envisioned 2700-3000F EBC - CMC systems to help achieve next generation engine performance and durability goals. This paper will primarily address the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The emphasis is placed on current NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiCSiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, cyclic durability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term system performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be discussed.

  17. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  18. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  20. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  1. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  2. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  3. Coating-Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    layers of surface protection. For example, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating systems are applied to nickel-base single crystals...a-A1203 thermally grown oxide (TGO) and yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier layer. An example of a rumpling-induced failure in a standard

  4. INNOVATIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asamatdinov Marat Orynbaevich

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of monuments of architecture is a sphere of activity which places particularly high demands on technical specialists and experts. It is necessary, depending on the objectives of restoration and finishing of a monument of architecture and its damages and defects, to select appropriate technologies and materials. Mineral substances as fillers, and inorganic (mineral colouring pigments, along with liquid potassium glass form an ultrastrong combination of materials. It gives to paints made of these mineral substances, an extremely high weather resistance and durability.The functional concept of silicate paints is the ability to silicify with other mineral construction materials. Silicate paints are the only colouring system which enters into chemical compound with the base due to the liquid potassium silicate properties. Also, bonds between quartzitic elements in its fillers are formed. As a result, it provides yet greater wear resistance and resistance to chalking. In ICA MGSU bachelors-technologists are given the "Facade Materials in the Modern Architecture of Buildings” course, in which special attention is paid to decorative coatings of various types; also, scientific research for improvement of paintwork material application technologies is performed. Cooperation of the higher school entities with technical assistance centres of construction firms makes it possible to enhance the quality of training and competence of graduates, as well as create favorable conditions for development of modern domestic technologies including those in the sphere of execution of architectural facades using innovative systems.

  5. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Halbig, Michael Charles; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Costa, Gustavo; Mccue, Terry R.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation reviews the NASA advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustors particularly under the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation, Fundamental Aeronautics and Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Programs. The emphases have been placed on the current design challenges of the 2700-3000F capable environmental barrier coatings for low NOX emission combustors for next generation turbine engines by using advanced plasma spray based processes, and the coating processing and integration with SiC-SiC CMCs and component systems. The developments also have included candidate coating composition system designs, degradation mechanisms, performance evaluation and down-selects; the processing optimizations using TriplexPro Air Plasma Spray Low Pressure Plasma Spray (LPPS), Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition and demonstration of EBC-CMC systems. This presentation also highlights the EBC-CMC system temperature capability and durability improvements under the NASA development programs, as demonstrated in the simulated engine high heat flux, combustion environments, in conjunction with high heat flux, mechanical creep and fatigue loading testing conditions.

  6. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  7. Graded coatings for thermal, wear and corrosion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, U.; Peters, M.; Bach, Fr.-W.; Tegeder, G.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the main results generated in a German National Science Foundation (DFG) program on projects concerned with functionally graded materials applied to optimize the thermal, wear and corrosion properties of metallic and ceramic materials. Thermal barrier coatings deposited onto Cu substrates by pulsed laser deposition showed improved spallation behavior by a graded lamella microstructure with improved interface fracture toughness. A particle-hardened graded surface structure improved the wear resistance of plasma sprayed thermal barriers. By means of evaporation techniques a graded bonding area was manufactured with a high potential of lifetime improvement. For non-oxide ceramics graded coatings based on Si 3 N 4 and mullite led to improved oxidation resistance of the substrate material. Graded TiC-TiN thin films allowed to improve the wear resistance of cutting tool alloys with good adhesion to the substrate material. On light metal alloys, the limits of grading with respect to corrosion protection as well as wear were determined. Graded layers of arc-sprayed titanium with in situ produced particles or welded alloy gradients led to improved wear characteristics. Stress profiles in graded layers were analyzed with the help of a modified X-ray diffraction analysis

  8. Integrated Fluid and Materials Modeling of Environmental Barrier Coatings, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental barrier coatings (EBC) prevent oxidation of ceramic materials in reactive, high temperature environments such as the exhaust regions of gas turbine...

  9. Property Evaluation and Damage Evolution of Environmental Barrier Coatings and Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Sub-Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Jaskowiak, Martha; Hurst, Janet; Bhatt, Ram; Fox, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent development of environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. The creep and fatigue behavior at aggressive long-term high temperature conditions have been evaluated and highlighted. Thermal conductivity and high thermal gradient cyclic durability of environmental barrier coatings have been evaluated. The damage accumulation and complex stress-strain behavior environmental barrier coatings on SiCSiC ceramic matrix composite turbine airfoil subelements during the thermal cyclic and fatigue testing of have been also reported.

  10. Oxidation and fatigue behaviour of {gamma}-TiAl coated with HIPIMS CrAlYN/CrN nanoscale multilayer coatings and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Reinhold; Schulz, Uwe [DLR - German Aerospace Center, Koeln (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research; Leyens, Christoph [DLR - German Aerospace Center, Koeln (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research; Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Materials Science; Hovsepian, Papken E.; Ehiasarian, Arutiun P. [Sheffield Hallam Univ. (United Kingdom). Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research

    2010-05-15

    CrAlYN/CrN nanoscale multilayer coatings were deposited on {gamma}-TiAl substrate material using high power impulse magnetron sputtering technology. The nitride coating provided effective oxidation protection to {gamma}-TiAl at 850 C for exposure time periods exceeding 2000 cycles of 1 h dwell time at high temperature in air. High oxidation resistance was also observed at 900 C. After exposure to air at 850 C for 300 h, coated tension specimens exhibited a reduction in fatigue strength of about 70 MPa compared to the bare {gamma}-TiAl alloy. Zirconia topcoats produced by electron-beam physical vapour deposition were well adherent to the CrAlYN/CrN coating with an oxy-nitride overcoat. When thermally cycled at 900 C, the lifetime of this thermal barrier coating system on {gamma}-TiAl exceeded 1000 1 h cycles. Below cracks in the nitride coating, the substrate was oxidised and protrusions of an outer oxide scale with columnar structure formed. (orig.)

  11. Thermal Conductivity of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Evaluated by a Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Nagaraj, Ben A.; Bruce, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Zr02-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined by a steady-state heat flux laser technique. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of the EB-PVD ceramic coatings were also obtained in real time, at high temperatures, under the laser high heat flux, long term test conditions. The thermal conductivity increase due to micro-pore sintering and the decrease due to coating micro-delaminations in the EB-PVD coatings were evaluated for grooved and non-grooved EB-PVD coating systems under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions. The coating failure modes under the high heat flux test conditions were also investigated. The test technique provides a viable means for obtaining coating thermal conductivity data for use in design, development, and life prediction for engine applications.

  12. Thermochemical compatibility of ytterbia–(hafnia/silica) multilayers for environmental barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poerschke, D.L.; Van Sluytman, J.S.; Wong, K.B.; Levi, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems consisting of multiple layers tailored to address individual protection needs may offer improved performance relative to conventional architectures. If the requirements of thermochemical and thermomechanical compatibility are met, the deposition of a segmented thermal barrier coating on a dense rare earth silicate EBC could provide additional thermal protection and resistance to attack by molten deposits. The thermochemical compatibility between silicates in the YbO 1.5 –SiO 2 system and phases in the YbO 1.5 –HfO 2 system was investigated by equilibrating powder compacts of selected ternary compositions; diffusion couples were used to simulate interactions at the layer interfaces in the proposed architectures. The deduced 1500 °C ternary isothermal section reveals that the ordered δ-Yb 4 Hf 3 O 12 and H 3 –Yb 6 HfO 11 phases are only compatible with ytterbium monosilicate (Yb 2 SiO 5 ) EBC. Implementation of these hafnates in contact with ytterbium disilicate (Yb 2 Si 2 O 7 ) leads to interfacial reactions that facilitate layer debonding. The results provide criteria to guide the design of future thermal/environmental barrier coating architectures

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Ceramic Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal barrier and environmental barrier coatings (TBC's and EBC's) have been developed to protect metallic and Si-based ceramic components in gas turbine engines from high temperature attack. Zirconia-yttria based oxides and (Ba,Sr)Al2Si2O8(BSAS)/mullite based silicates have been used as the coating materials. In this study, thermal conductivity values of zirconia-yttria- and BSAS/mullite-based coating materials were determined at high temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. During the laser conductivity test, the specimen surface was heated by delivering uniformly distributed heat flux from a high power laser. One-dimensional steady-state heating was achieved by using thin disk specimen configuration (25.4 mm diam and 2 to 4 mm thickness) and the appropriate backside air-cooling. The temperature gradient across the specimen thickness was carefully measured by two surface and backside pyrometers. The thermal conductivity values were thus determined as a function of temperature based on the 1-D heat transfer equation. The radiation heat loss and laser absorption corrections of the materials were considered in the conductivity measurements. The effects of specimen porosity and sintering on measured conductivity values were also evaluated.

  14. Air barrier systems: Construction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrault, J.C

    1989-01-01

    An examination is presented of how ordinary building materials can be used in an innovative manner to design, detail, and construct effective air barrier systems for common types of walls. For residential construction, the air drywall approach uses the interior gypsum board as the main component of the wall air barrier system. Joints between the gypsum board and adjacent materials or assemblies are sealed by gaskets. In commercial construction, two different techniques are employed for using gypsum board as air barrier material: the accessible drywall and non-accessible drywall approaches. The former is similar to the air drywall approach except that high performance sealants are used instead of gaskets. In the latter approach, exterior drywall sheathing is the main component of the air barrier system; joints between boards are taped and joints between boards and other components are sealed using elastomeric membrane strips. For various types of commercial and institutional buildings, metal air barrier systems are widely used and include pre-engineered curtain walls or sheet metal walls. Masonry wall systems are regarded as still the most durable, fireproof, and soundproof wall type available but an effective air barrier system has typically been difficult to implement. Factory-made elastomeric membranes offer the potential to provide airtightness to masonry walls. These membranes are applied on the entire masonry wall surface and are used to make airtight connections with other building components. Two types of product are available: thermofusible and peel-and-stick membranes. 5 figs.

  15. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  16. Mechanisms and Mitigation of CMAS Attack on Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Elisa Marie

    As gas turbine engines are driven to operate at higher temperatures to maximize efficiency, components become susceptible to attack by deposits of calcium magnesium alumino-silicate (CMAS) ingested with the intake air. Of particular interest to this work is the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by CMAS. Molten CMAS is known to interact with TBCs both thermochemically, by dissolving the ceramic and reprecipitating it as a new or modified phase, and thermomechanically, by infiltrating the porosity and degrading the strain tolerance. The thermochemical degradation of TBCs was investigated using primarily differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) by comparing the endotherms and exotherms recorded for pure, model silicates to those observed for silicates mixed with various TBC materials including YSZ and GZO. The five ternary silicates studied (CaO-AlO1.5-SiO2) began melting over a relatively narrow range (˜1125-1145°C). Introducing magnesium to the ternary results in higher melting temperatures and only minor changes to the crystallization behavior. Iron decreases the melting temperature, and markedly improves the crystallization kinetics of pure silicate systems, especially absent magnesium. Modification of the crystallization behavior of pure silicates has been proposed in the literature as a mitigation strategy for CMAS. This work utilizes DSC to look for characteristic changes as described above to probe potentially effective TBCs. The addition of YSZ to a quaternary CMAS results in little change to the melting or crystallization in the DSC, despite the dissolution of YSZ into the silicate. In stark contrast, GZO with CMAS generates a significant crystallization exotherm that appears in the DSC immediately after the silicate melts. As the fraction of GZO is increased, the melting endotherm begins to shrink due to the thermal overlap of the melting and crystallization processes. This signifies a rapid reaction, and a potentially useful TBC material for

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  18. Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBC) for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee,Kang

    2001-01-01

    The upper use temperature of current Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBC's) based on mullite and BSAS (EPM EBC's) is limited to -255 F due to silica volatility, chemical reactions, and high thermal conductivity. Therefore, new EBC s having low CTE, good chemical compatibility, and high melting point (greater than 2700 F ) are being investigated. Sinter-resistant, low thermal conductivity EBC s are strongly desired to achieve the UEET EBC goal of 270 F EBC surface temperature and 30 F AT over long exposures (greater than 1000 hr). Key areas affecting the upper temperature limit of current EBC s as well as the ongoing efforts to develop next generation EBC s in the UEET Program will be discussed.

  19. Design of a Nickel-Based Bond-Coat Alloy for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Fiedler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To increase the lifetime of rocket combustion chambers, thermal barrier coatings (TBC may be applied on the copper chamber wall. Since standard TBC systems used in gas turbines are not suitable for rocket-engine application and fail at the interface between the substrate and bond coat, a new bond-coat material has to be designed. This bond-coat material has to be chemically compatible to the copper substrate to improve the adhesion and needs a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of copper to reduce thermal stresses. One approach to achieve this is to modify the standard NiCrAlY alloy used in gas turbines by adding copper. In this work, the influence of copper on the microstructure of NiCrAlY-alloys is investigated with thermodynamical calculations, optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and calorimetry. Adding copper leads to the formation of a significant amount of \\(\\beta\\ and \\(\\alpha\\ Reducing the aluminum and chromium content leads furthermore to a two-phase fcc microstructure.

  20. Thermal barrier coatings for thermal insulation and corrosion resistance in industrial gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogan, J. W.; Hsu, L.; Stetson, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Four thermal barrier coatings were subjected to a 500-hour gas turbine engine test. The coatings were two yttria stabilized zirconias, calcium ortho silicate and calcium meta titanate. The calcium silicate coating exhibited significant spalling. Yttria stabilized zirconia and calcium titanate coatings showed little degradation except in blade leading edge areas. Post-test examination showed variations in the coating due to manual application techniques. Improved process control is required if engineering quality coatings are to be developed. The results indicate that some leading edge loss of the coating can be expected near the tip.

  1. Shear strength of a thermal barrier coating parallel to the bond coat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, T.A.; Dommarco, R.C.; Bastias, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The static and low cycle fatigue strength of an air plasma sprayed (APS) partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC) is experimentally evaluated. The shear testing utilized the Iosipescu shear test arrangement. Testing was performed parallel to the TBC-substrate interface. The TBC testing required an innovative use of steel extensions with the TBC bonded between the steel extensions to form the standard Iosipescu specimen shape. The test method appears to have been successful. Fracture of the TBC was initiated in shear, although unconstrained specimen fractures propagated at the TBC-bond coat interface. The use of side grooves on the TBC was successful in keeping the failure in the gage section and did not appear to affect the shear strength values that were measured. Low cycle fatigue failures were obtained at high stress levels approaching the ultimate strength of the TBC. The static and fatigue strengths do not appear to be markedly different from tensile properties for comparable TBC material

  2. Sintering and microstructure evolution in columnar thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ramanathan; Srolovitz, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Sintering of thermal barrier coatings changes their key properties, such as thermal conductivity and thermal shock resistance, thus adversely impacting their reliability. We present a novel modeling approach to study the evolution of coating structure during sintering. We model the sintering of individual columns using a thermodynamic principle, and incorporate the center-to-center approach rates for the columns calculated using this principle in a larger scale discrete dynamics model for the evolution of a large number of columns. Surface energies, grain boundary energies and strain energies associated with the deformation of the columns are all included in this framework, while sintering is assumed to occur by the concerted action of surface and grain boundary diffusion. Two sets of initial conditions corresponding to different extents of pre-sintering among neighboring columns are considered. When the extent of pre-sintering is small, we observe that small clusters containing 5-20 columns are formed. In contrast, where a larger amount of pre-sintering exists, we observe, especially at large column densities, that clusters containing 50-100 columns separated by large inter-cluster pores/channels that appear to organize themselves into a network are formed. These observations are in good agreement with recently published experimental observations. We also explain how these results can explain the development of a 'mud-crack'-like pattern

  3. Thermal conductivity issues of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, U.; Raetzer-Scheibe, H.J.; Saruhan, B. [DLR - German Aerospace Center, Institute of Materials Research, 51170 Cologne (Germany); Renteria, A.F. [BTU, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The thermal conductivity of electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was investigated by the Laser Flash technique. Sample type and methodology of data analyses as well as atmosphere during the measurement have some influence on the data. A large variation of the thermal conductivity was found by changes in TBC microstructure. Exposure at high temperature caused sintering of the porous microstructure that finally increased thermal conductivity up to 30 %. EB-PVD TBCs show a distinct thickness dependence of the thermal conductivity due to the anisotropic microstructure in thickness direction. Thin TBCs had a 20 % lower thermal conductivity than thick coatings. New compositions of the ceramic top layer offer the largest potential to lower thermal conductivity. Values down to 0.8W/(mK) have been already demonstrated with virgin coatings of pyrochlore compositions. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Die Waermeleitfaehigkeit von elektronenstrahl-aufgedampften (EB-PVD) Waermedaemmschichten (TBCs) wurde mittels Laser-Flash untersucht. Probentyp, Messmethodik und die Atmosphaere waehrend der Messung haben einen Einfluss auf die Ergebnisse. Aenderungen in der Mikrostruktur der TBC fuehrten zu grossen Unterschieden der Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Eine Hochtemperaturbelastung verursachte Sintervorgaenge in der poroesen Mikrostruktur, was die Waermeleitfaehigkeit um bis zu 30 % ansteigen liess. EB-PVD TBCs zeigen eine deutliche Dickenabhaengigkeit der Waermeleitfaehigkeit durch die Anisotropie der Mikrostruktur in dieser Richtung. Duenne TBCs haben eine um 20 % geringere Waermeleitfaehigkeit als dicke Schichten. Neue Zusammensetzungen der keramischen Deckschicht bieten die groessten Moeglichkeiten fuer eine Reduktion der Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Werte bis zu 0,8 W/(mK) wurden damit bereits erreicht. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Barrier properties and storage stability of edible coatings prepared with electrospraying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.K.I.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Schroen, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospraying is a novel technique for the application of coating to foods. In this study, thin lipid-based coatings were prepared by electrospraying on model surface and evaluated for their moisture barrier functionality. Sunflower oil and chocolate based coating materials were electrosprayed at

  5. Anti-browning and barrier properties of edible coatings prepared with electrospraying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.K.I.; Cakmak, I.; Tavman, S.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Schroen, C.G.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospraying is a novel technique for the application of coating to foods. In this study, thin lipid-based coatings were prepared by electrospraying on model surface and evaluated for their moisture barrier functionality. Sunflower oil and chocolate based coating materials were electrosprayed at

  6. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  7. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  9. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  10. Development of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Path Toward 2700 F Temperature Capability and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Good, Brian; Costa, Gustavo; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Fox, Dennis S.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant coating development challenges is to achieve prime-reliant environmental barrier coating systems to meet the future 2700F EBC-CMC temperature stability and environmental durability requirements. This presentation will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating system testing and down-selects, particularly the development path and properties towards 2700-3000F durability goals by using NASA hafnium-hafnia-rare earth-silicon-silicate composition EBC systems for the SiC-SiC CMC turbine component applications. Advanced hafnium-based compositions for enabling next generation EBC and CMCs capabilities towards ultra-high temperature ceramic coating systems will also be briefly mentioned.

  11. Oxidation and thermal shock behavior of thermal barrier coated 18/10CrNi alloy with coating modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guergen, Selim [Vocational School of Transportation, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan); Diltemiz, Seyid Fehmi [Turkish Air Force1st Air Supply and Maintenance Center Command, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan); Kushan, Melih Cemal [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, substrates of 18/10CrNi alloy plates were initially sprayed with a Ni-21Cr-10Al-1Y bond coat and then with an yttria stabilized zirconia top coat by plasma spraying. Subsequently, plasma-sprayed Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were treated with two different modification methods, namely, vacuum heat treatment and laser glazing. The effects of modifications on the oxidation and thermal shock behavior of the coatings were evaluated. The effect of coat thickness on the bond strength of the coats was also investigated. Results showed enhancement of the oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance of TBCs following modifications. Although vacuum heat treatment and laser glazing exhibited comparable results as per oxidation resistance, the former generated the best improvement in the thermal shock resistance of the TBCs. Bond strength also decreased as coat thickness increased.

  12. PLASMA THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WITH HIGH THERMAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization of  processes for obtaining maximum content of tetragonal phase in the initial material and thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide and hafnium oxide.  Results of the investigations on phase composition of oxide HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3  system have been given in the paper. The system represents  a microstructure which is similar to  zirconia dioxide and  transformed for its application at 1300 °C. The paper explains a mechanism of hafnium oxide influence on formation of the given microstructure. The research methodology has been based on complex metallography, X – ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of  structural elements of the composite plasma coating HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O system.In order to stabilize zirconium dioxide  dopant oxide should not only have an appropriate size of  metal ion, but also form a solid solution with the zirconia. This condition severely limits the number of possible stabilizers. In fact, such stabilization is possible only with the help of rare earth oxides (Y2O3, Yb2O3, CeO2, HfO2. Chemical purity of the applied materials plays a significant role for obtaining high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Hafnium oxide has been selected as powder for thermal barrier coatings instead of zirconium dioxide due to their similarities in structural modification, grating, chemical and physical properties and its high temperature structural transformations. It has been established that plasma thermal barrier HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3 coatings consist of  one tetragonal phase. This phase is equivalent to a non-equilibrium tetragonal t' phase in the “zirconium dioxide stabilized with yttrium oxide” system. Affinity of  Hf+4 and Zr+4 cations leads to the formation of identical metastable phases during rapid quenching.

  13. Microstructure Analysis of Laser Remelting for Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Surface of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the preparation and organization performance of thermal barrier coatings (TCBs on the surface of titanium were studied experimentally. Nanostructured 8 wt% yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying. The microstructure of nanostructured and the conventional coating was studied after laser remelting. It has shown that formed a network of micro-cracks and pits after laser remelting on nanostructured coatings. With the decrease of the laser scanning speed, mesh distribution of micro cracks was gradually thinning on nanostructured coatings. Compared with conventional ceramic layers, the mesh cracks of nanostructured coating is dense and the crack width is small.

  14. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  15. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  16. Factors Influencing Residual Stresses in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrann, Roy T. R.; Rybicki, Edmund F.; Shadley, John R.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    To improve gas turbine and diesel engine performance using thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) requires an understanding of the factors that influence the in-service behavior of thermal barrier coatings. One of the many factors related to coating performance is the state of stress in the coating. The total stress state is composed of the stresses due to the in-service loading history and the residual stresses. Residual stresses have been shown to affect TBC life, the bond strength of thermal spray coatings, and the fatigue life of tungsten carbide coatings. Residual stresses are first introduced in TBC's by the spraying process due to elevated temperatures during processing and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of the top coat, bond coat, and substrate. Later, the residual stresses can be changed by the in-service temperature history due to a number of time and temperature dependent mechanisms, such as oxidation, creep, and sintering. Silica content has also been shown to affect sintering and the cyclic life of thermal barrier coatings. Thus, it is important to understand how the spraying process, the in-service thermal cycles, and the silica content can create and alter residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings.

  17. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  18. Degradation of thermal barrier coatings with NiCoCrA1Y and NiAI bond coats by thermal cycling at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gil Moo; Koo, Seong Mo [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Meier, G. H.; Pettit, F. S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2004-10-01

    The effect of thermal cycling on the degradation of thermal barrier coatings has been studied. A Ni-based superalloy substrate was coated with an A1-rich NiA1 or NiCoCrA1Y bond coat and Yttria stabilized zirconia. These specimens were exposed to two types of thermal cyclings, namely, 10 minute thermal cycling and 1hour thermal cycling, at 1100 .deg. C in the air. The TBC system with NiCoCrA1Y bond coat showed a longer life time in 10 minute thermal cycling compared to that with NiA1, while the TBC system with NiA1 showed a longer life time in 1 hour thermal cycling compared to that with NiCoCrA1Y. These degradation behaviors will be discussed in detail.

  19. A review of the erosion of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, R G; Nicholls, J R

    2007-01-01

    The application of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to components with internal cooling in the hot gas stream of gas turbine engines has facilitated a steep increase in the turbine entry temperature and the associated increase in performance and efficiency of gas turbine engines. However, TBCs are susceptible to various life limiting issues associated with their operating environment including erosion, corrosion, oxidation, sintering and foreign object damage (FOD). This is a review paper that examines various degradation and erosion mechanisms of TBCs, especially those produced by electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD). The results from a number of laboratory tests under various impact conditions are discussed before the different erosion and FOD mechanisms are reviewed. The transitions between the various erosion mechanisms are discussed in terms of the D/d ratio (contact area diameter/column diameter), a relatively new concept that relates the impact size to the erosion mechanism. The effects of ageing, dopant additions and calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicates on the life of TBCs are examined. It is shown that while ageing increases the erosion rate of EB-PVD TBCs, ageing of plasma sprayed TBCs in fact lowers the erosion rate. Finally modelling of EB-PVD TBCs is briefly introduced. (topical review)

  20. Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicates (CMAS) Reaction Mechanisms and Resistance of Advanced Turbine Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Costa, Gustavo; Harder, Bryan J.; Wiesner, Valerie L.; Hurst, Janet B.; Puleo, Bernadette J.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in future turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is an essential requirement to enable the applications of the 2700-3000 F EBC - CMC systems. This presentation primarily focuses on the reaction mechanisms of advanced NASA environmental barrier coating systems, when in contact with Calcium-Magnesium Alumino-Silicates (CMAS) at high temperatures. Advanced oxide-silicate defect cluster environmental barrier coatings are being designed for ultimate balanced controls of the EBC temperature capability and CMAS reactivity, thus improving the CMAS resistance. Further CMAS mitigation strategies are also discussed.

  1. Environmental Barrier Coating Fracture, Fatigue and High-Heat-Flux Durability Modeling and Stochastic Progressive Damage Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Nemeth, Noel N.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to protect emerging light-weight SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) engine components, further raising engine operating temperatures and performance. Because the environmental barrier coating systems are critical to the performance, reliability and durability of these hot-section ceramic engine components, a prime-reliant coating system along with established life design methodology are required for the hot-section ceramic component insertion into engine service. In this paper, we have first summarized some observations of high temperature, high-heat-flux environmental degradation and failure mechanisms of environmental barrier coating systems in laboratory simulated engine environment tests. In particular, the coating surface cracking morphologies and associated subsequent delamination mechanisms under the engine level high-heat-flux, combustion steam, and mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions will be discussed. The EBC compostion and archtechture improvements based on advanced high heat flux environmental testing, and the modeling advances based on the integrated Finite Element Analysis Micromechanics Analysis Code/Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (FEAMAC/CARES) program will also be highlighted. The stochastic progressive damage simulation successfully predicts mud flat damage pattern in EBCs on coated 3-D specimens, and a 2-D model of through-the-thickness cross-section. A 2-parameter Weibull distribution was assumed in characterizing the coating layer stochastic strength response and the formation of damage was therefore modeled. The damage initiation and coalescence into progressively smaller mudflat crack cells was demonstrated. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the surface crack initiation and delamination propagation in conjunction with environmental

  2. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  3. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  4. Study of high temperature oxidation of duplex and functionally graded materials of thermal barrier coating (FGM TBC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedi, B.; Sabour, A. R.; Khodami, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Although the number and the severity of thermal barrier coatings applications on hot section components have dramatically increased in the past decade, premature spallation failure of thermal barrier coatings , due to mismatch of thermal expansion at the metal/ceramic interface of the two coating layers, during service is still an overriding concern. Therefore, functionally graded materials with a gradual compositional variation have been introduced. In this study, comparison of properties of two different types of thermal barrier coatings was made to improve the surface characteristics on high temperature components. These thermal barrier coatings consisted of a duplex thermal barrier coatings and a five layered functionally graded thermal barrier coatings . In both coatings, Yttria partially stabilized Zirconia topcoat was deposited by air plasma spraying and Ni Cr Al Y bond coat was deposited by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. In functionally graded materials coating, functionally graded layer was sprayed by air plasma process by varying the feeding ratio of YSZ/Ni Cr Al Y powders using two separate powder feeders. Then, isothermal oxidation was carried out at 950 d eg C in atmosphere to obtain the plot of mass change vs. time to study oxidation kinetic. Microstructural and compositional changes of coating, oxides formed during service were examined by optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy with EDS. functionally graded materials coating failed after 2100 h and duplex coating failed after 1700 h. Finally, it was found that functionally graded materials coating is more qualified than duplex thermal barrier coatings and stands for a longer time

  5. Thermal Conductivity Change Kinetics of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by the Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A steady-state laser heat flux technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to obtain critical thermal conductivity data of ceramic thermal barrier coatings under the temperature and thermal gradients that are realistically expected to be encountered in advanced engine systems. In this study, thermal conductivity change kinetics of a plasma-sprayed, 254-mm-thick ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic coating were obtained at high temperatures. During the testing, the temperature gradients across the coating system were carefully measured by the surface and back pyrometers and an embedded miniature thermocouple in the substrate. The actual heat flux passing through the coating system was determined from the metal substrate temperature drop (measured by the embedded miniature thermocouple and the back pyrometer) combined with one-dimensional heat transfer models.

  6. In-situ formation of multiphase electron beam physical vapor deposited barrier coatings for turbine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base columnar thermal barrier coating (20) on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide sheath material (32' or 34') covers the columns (28), and the sheath material is the reaction product of a precursor ceramic oxide sheath material and the base thermal barrier coating material.

  7. Evaluation of Degradation of Isothermally Aged Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung; Kang, Min Sung; Kim, Dae Jin [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Hoon [HYUNDAI STEEL CO., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mun Young [KPS Gas Turbine Technology Service Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The thermal barrier coating of a gas turbine blade was degraded by isothermal heating in a furnace and by varying the exposure time and temperature. Then, a micro-Vickers hardness test was conducted on the cross section of the bond coat and Ni-based superalloy substrate. Further, the thickness of TGO(Thermally Grown Oxide) was measured by using an image analyzer, and the changes in the microstructure and element contents in the coating were analyzed by using an optical microscope and by performing SEM-EDX analysis. No significant change was observed in the Vickers hardness of the bond coat when the coated specimen was degraded at a high temperature: delamination was observed between the top coat and the bond coat when the coating was degraded for 50 h at a temperature 1,151 .deg. C.

  8. Optimization of High Porosity Thermal Barrier Coatings Generated with a Porosity Former

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medřický, J.; Curry, N.; Pala, Zdeněk; Vilémová, Monika; Chráska, Tomáš; Johansson, J.; Markocsan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 4 (2015), s. 622-628 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : gas turbines * high temperature application * porosity of coatings * stabilized zirconia * thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2015

  9. Water vapour barrier performance of corn-zein coated polypropylene (PP) packaging films

    OpenAIRE

    Atik, İsa Doğan; Özen, Fatma Banu; Tıhmınlıoğlu, Funda

    2008-01-01

    The novel film structure of corn-zein coated on polypropylene (PP) synthetic film for packaging industry was developed to examine the feasibility of resulting coated films as an alternative water barrier performance for food packaging. The effects of coating formulation (solvent, corn-zein, plasticizer concentration and plasticizer type) on final properties of films were observed. Corn-zein is the most important protein of corn and has good film forming property. Composites structures of PP f...

  10. Defect Clustering and Nano-phase Structure Characterization of Multicomponent Rare Earth-Oxide-Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been developed by incorporating multicomponent rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings to promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nanophases within the coating systems. In this paper, the defect clusters, induced by Nd, Gd, and Yb rare earth dopants in the zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses demonstrated that the extensive nanoscale rare earth dopant segregation exists in the plasma-sprayed and electron-physical-vapor-deposited (EB PVD) thermal barrier coatings. The nanoscale concentration heterogeneity and the resulting large lattice distortion promoted the formation of parallel and rotational defective lattice clusters in the coating systems. The presence of the 5-to 100-nm-sized defect clusters and nanophases is believed to be responsible for the significant reduction of thermal conductivity, improved sintering resistance, and long-term high temperature stability of the advanced thermal barrier coating systems.

  11. Finite Element Model Characterization Of Nano-Composite Thermal And Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshiki; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings have been applied for protecting Si based ceramic matrix composite components from high temperature environment in advanced gas turbine engines. It has been found that the delamination and lifetime of T/EBC systems generally depend on the initiation and propagation of surface cracks induced by the axial mechanical load in addition to severe thermal loads. In order to prevent T/EBC systems from surface cracking and subsequent delamination due to mechanical and thermal stresses, T/EBC systems reinforced with nano-composite architectures have showed promise to improve mechanical properties and provide a potential crack shielding mechanism such as crack bridging. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) was established to understand the potential beneficial effects of nano-composites systems such as SiC nanotube-reinforced oxide T/EBC systems.

  12. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  13. Microstructure and durability of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhr, D.S.; Mitchell, T.E.; Keller, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Various combinations of plasma-sprayed bond coatings and zirconia ceramic coatings on a nickel-based superalloy substrate were tested by static thermal exposure at 1200 0 C and cyclic thermal exposure to 1000 0 C. The bond coats were based on Ni-Cr-Al alloys with additions of rare earth elements and Si. The ceramic coats were various ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 compositions, of which the optimum was found to be ZrO 2 -8.9 wt% Y 2 O 3 . Microstructural analysis showed that resistance to cracking during thermal exposure is strongly related to deleterious phase changes

  14. Effect of coating thickness on microstructure and low temperature cyclic thermal fatigue behavior of thermal barrier coating (Al2O3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vijay; Patel, Sachin; Swarnkar, Vikas; K, Rajput S.

    2018-03-01

    Effect of coating thickness on low temperature cyclic thermal fatigue behaviour of Al2O3 thermal barrier coating (TBC) was concluded through the cyclic furnace thermal fatigue test (CFTF). Detonation gun (Thermal Spray) process was used for bond coating of NiCr and top coating of Al2O3 on Aluminium Alloy 6061 substrate. Top coating was done at two level of thickness to investigate the effect of coating thickness on low temperature cyclic thermal fatigue. The top coat of thickness 100μm-150μm was considered as thin TBC while the top coat of thickness 250μm-300μm was considered as thick TBC. The thickness of bond coat was taken as 120μm constant for both level of Al2O3 top coating. During CFTF test appearance of any crack on coated surface was adapted as main criterion of coating failure. Crack initiation was observed at edges and corner of thin thermal barrier coating after 60 number of thermal fatigue cycles while in case of thick thermal barrier coating these crack initiation was observed after 72 cycles of cyclic thermal fatigue test. During the study, it was observed that thick thermal barrier coating survived for long duration in comparison of thin TBC. Hence it can be concluded that application of thick TBC is more favourable to improve thermal durability of any component.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 and Al2O3/TiO2 barrier coatings to reduce the water vapour permeability of polyetheretherketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadzada, Tamkin; McKenzie, David R.; James, Natalie L.; Yin, Yongbai; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate significantly enhanced barrier properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) against water vapour penetration by depositing Al 2 O 3 or Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 nanofilms grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation analysis revealed good adhesion strength of a bilayer Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 coating to PEEK, while the single layer Al 2 O 3 coating displayed flaking and delamination. We identified three critical design parameters for achieving the optimum barrier properties of ALD Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 coatings on PEEK. These are a minimum total thickness dependent on the required water vapour transmission rate, the use of an Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 bilayer coating and the application of the coating to both sides of the PEEK film. Using these design parameters, we achieved a reduction in moisture permeability of PEEK of over two orders of magnitude while maintaining good adhesion strength of the polymer–thin film system. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 coatings reduced water vapour permeability. • Bilayer coatings reduced the permeability more than single layer coatings. • Bilayer coatings displayed higher adhesion strength than the single layer coatings. • Double-sided coatings performed better than single-sided coatings. • Correlation was found between total thickness and reduced water vapour permeability.

  16. Beeswax–chitosan emulsion coated paper with enhanced water vapor barrier efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Xiao, Huining; Qian, Liying

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The water vapor barrier efficiency of paper was enhanced via green-based emulsion coating. • Extremely high lipid content in the emulsion coating layer was firstly utilized to reduce WVTR in emulsion-based film. • A controlled WVTR of beeswax–chitosan emulsion coating could be obtained by dying at specific temperature. - Abstract: For lipid–hydrocolloid emulsion based film, the increase of lipid amount would improve its water vapor barrier property, but also reduce the mechanical strength of the film in the meantime thus leading to a compromised lipid content in the film. However, when the emulsion is coated on paper surface, more lipid could be used for emulsion preparation to enhance the moisture resistance without considering the weakened strength of the film induced by lipid, because the mechanical properties of emulsion coated paper is mainly governed by the strength of base paper instead of the coating layer. In this study, beeswax–chitosan emulsion was first prepared and then coated on paper surface to improve paper's water vapor barrier and water resistance properties. The range and variance analysis of orthogonal test design showed that the order of priorities of the factors accordingly was beeswax solid content, drying temperature and chitosan concentration. The effect of drying temperature on water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) and water contact angle of coated paper was further investigated using 1.2 wt% chitosan and 96% beeswax solid content in the coating layer. The results indicated that water vapor barrier property was in accordance with the density of the coating layer. Atomic force microscope (AFM) was also used to characterize the surface morphology and explain the hydrophobicity of beeswax–chitosan coated paper. It was found that surface beeswax particles melted to wrinkle at high drying temperatures, while roughness values maintained at micro-scale over the temperature range investigated

  17. Low Conductive Thermal Barrier Coatings Produced by Ion Beam Assisted EB-PVD with Controlled Porosity, Microstructure Refinement and Alloying Additions for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Douglas E.; Singh, Jogender

    2005-01-01

    Various advanced Hafnia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were applied on nickel-based superalloy coupons by electron beam physical vapor deposition. In addition, microstructural modifications to the coating material were made in an effort to reduce the thermal conductivity of the coating materials. Various processing parameters and coating system modifications were made in order to deposit the alloyed TBC with the desired microstructure and thus coating performance, some of which include applying coatings at substrate temperatures of 1150 C on both PtAl and CoNiCrAlY bond coated samples, as well as using 8YSZ as a bond layer. In addition, various characterization techniques including thermal cyclic tests, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity measurements were performed. Although the coating microstructure was never fully optimized due to funding being cut short, significant reductions in thermal conductivity were accomplished through both chemistry changes (composition) and microstructural modifications.

  18. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  19. History of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines: Emphasizing NASA's Role from 1942 to 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has played a central role in the development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for gas turbine applications. This report discusses the history of TBCs emphasizing the role NASA has played beginning with (1) frit coatings in the 1940s and 1950s; (2) thermally sprayed coatings for rocket application in the 1960s and early 1970s; (3) the beginnings of the modern era of turbine section coatings in the mid 1970s; and (4) failure mechanism and life prediction studies in the 1980s and 1990s. More recent efforts are also briefly discussed.

  20. Polymer-Derived Ceramics as Innovative Oxidation Barrier Coatings for Mo-Si-B Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasemann, Georg; Baumann, Torben; Dieck, Sebastian; Rannabauer, Stefan; Krüger, Manja

    2015-04-01

    A preceramic polymer precursor, perhydropolysilazane, is used to investigate its function as a new type of oxidation barrier coating on Mo-Si-B alloys. After dip-coating and pyrolysis at 1073 K (800 °C), dense and well-adhering SiON ceramic coatings could be achieved, which were investigated by SEM and cyclic oxidation tests at 1073 K and 1373 K (800 °C and 1100 °C). The coating is promising in reducing the mass loss during the initial stage of oxidation exposure at 1373 K (1100 °C) significantly.

  1. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating and SA Tyrannohex SiC Composites Integration for Improved Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2018-01-01

    The development of 2700 degF capable environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems, particularly, the Rare Earth "Hafnium" Silicon bond coat systems, have significantly improved the temperature capability and environmental stability of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Systems. We have specifically developed the advanced 2700 degF EBC systems, integrating the EBC to the high temperature SA Tyrannohex SiC fiber composites, for comprehensive performance and durability evaluations for potential turbine engine airfoil component applications. The fundamental mechanical properties, environmental stability and thermal gradient cyclic durability performance of the EBC - SA Tyrannohex composites were investigated. The paper will particularly emphasize the high pressure combustion rig recession, cyclic thermal stress resistance and thermomechanical low cycle fatigue testing of uncoated and environmental barrier coated Tyrannohex SiC SA composites in these simulated turbine engine combustion water vapor, thermal gradients, and mechanical loading conditions. We have also investigated high heat flux and flexural fatigue degradation mechanisms, determined the upper limits of operating temperature conditions for the coated SA composite material systems in thermomechanical fatigue conditions. Recent progress has also been made by using the self-healing rare earth-silicon based EBCs, thus enhancing the SA composite hexagonal fiber columns bonding for improved thermomechanical and environmental durability in turbine engine operation environments. More advanced EBC- composite systems based on the new EBC-Fiber Interphases will also be discussed.

  2. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Eric [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Gell, Maurice [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm⁻¹K⁻¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al₂O₃ and TiO₂, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium

  3. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source....... This configuration enables a gentle treatment of sensitive materials like low-density polyethylene foils and biodegradable materials. SiOx coatings deposited in the novel setup were compared with other state of the art plasma coatings and were found to possess equally good or better barrier properties. The barrier...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  4. The Use of Feature Parameters to Asses Barrier Properties of ALD coatings for Flexible PV Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Liam; Robbins, David; Fleming, Leigh; Elrawemi, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the recent work carried out as part of the EU funded NanoMend project. The project seeks to develop integrated process inspection, cleaning, repair and control systems for nano-scale thin films on large area substrates. In the present study flexible photovoltaic films have been the substrate of interest. Flexible PV films are the subject of significant development at present and the latest films have efficiencies at or beyond the level of Si based rigid PV modules. These flexible devices are fabricated on polymer film by the repeated deposition, and patterning, of thin layer materials using roll-to-roll processes, where the whole film is approximately 3um thick prior to encapsulation. Whilst flexible films offer significant advantages in terms of mass and the possibility of building integration (BIPV) they are at present susceptible to long term environmental degradation as a result of water vapor transmission through the barrier layers to the CIGS (Copper Indium Gallium Selenide CuInxGa(1-x)Se2) PV cells thus causing electrical shorts and efficiency drops. Environmental protection of the GIGS cell is provided by a thin (40nm) barrier coating of Al2O3. The highly conformal aluminium oxide barrier layer is produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) where, the ultra-thin Al2O3 layer is deposited onto polymer thin films before these films encapsulate the PV cell. The surface of the starting polymer film must be of very high quality in order to avoid creating defects in the device layers. Since these defects reduce manufacturing yield, in order to prevent them, a further thin polymer coating (planarization layer) is generally applied to the polymer film prior to deposition. The presence of surface irregularities on the uncoated film can create defects within the nanometre-scale, aluminium oxide, barrier layer and these are measured and characterised. This paper begins by reporting the results of early stage measurements conducted to characterise

  5. Thermal barrier coatings for the space shuttle main engine turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, B. N.; Gilmore, H. L.; Holmes, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump turbine blades experience extremely severe thermal shocks during start-up and shut-down. For instance, the high pressure fuel turbopump turbine which burns liquid hydrogen operates at approximately 1500 F, but is shut down fuel rich with turbine blades quenced in liquid hydrogen. This thermal shock is a major contributor to blade cracking. The same thermal shock cause the protective ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings to spall or flake off, leaving only the NiCrAlY bond coating which provides only a minimum thermal protection. The turbine blades are therefore life limited to about 3000 sec for want of a good thermal barrier. A suitable thermal barrier coating (TBC) is being developed for the SSME turbine blades. Various TBCs developed for the gas turbine engines were tested in a specially built turbine blade tester. This tester subjects the coated blades to thermal and pressure cycles similar to those during actual operation of the turbine. The coatings were applied using a plasma spraying techniques both under atmospheric conditions and in vacuum. Results are presented. In general vacuum plasma sprayed coatings performed much better than those sprayed under atmospheric conditions. A 50 to 50 blend of Cr2O3 and NiCrAlY, vacuum plasma sprayed on SSME turbopump turbine blades appear to provide significant improvements in coating durability and thermal protection.

  6. Thermal analysis of the effect of thick thermal barrier coatings on diesel engine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoag, K.L.; Frisch, S.R.; Yonushonis, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    The reduction of heat rejection from the diesel engine combustion chamber has been the subject of a great deal of focus in recent years. In the pursuit of this goal, Cummins Engine Company has received a contract from the Department of Energy for the development of thick thermal barrier coatings for combustion chamber surfaces. This contract involves the analysis of the impact of coatings on diesel engine performance, bench test evaluation of various coating designs, and single cylinder engine tests. The efforts reported in this paper center on the analysis of the effects of coatings on engine performance and heat rejection. For this analysis the conventional water cooled engine was compared with an engine having limited oil cooling, and utilizing zirocnia coated cylinder had firedecks and piston crowns. The analysis showed little or no benefits of similarly coating the valves or cylinder liner

  7. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2012-10-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DEFOA- 0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed Durability Test Rig.

  8. Process and electrolyte for applying barrier layer anodic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.; Prevender, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    Various metals may be anodized, and preferably barrier anodized, by anodizing the metal in an electrolyte comprising quaternary ammonium compound having a complex metal anion in a solvent containing water and a polar, water soluble organic material. (U.S.)

  9. One Component Encapsulating Material Matrix as High Barrier Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for new flexible food packaging materials with effective high barrier against oxygen and moisture to protect food, minimize weight and...

  10. Assessment of variations in thermal cycle life data of thermal barrier coated rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1981-01-01

    The reported study had the purpose to examine variations in cyclic life and in adhesive/cohesive coating strength. Possible effects of heating rate, stress reversal, temperature level, and ceramic deposition methods on coating life were also investigated. Life cycle data for 22 thermal barrier coated rods were examined and found to be statistically modeled by normal or log-normal distributions. The sample mean was 1330 cycles with a standard deviation of 520 cycles. Adhesive/cohesive pulloff strength data for 20 thermal barrier coated flat head piston specimens were taken. The average pulloff stress was 9 MPa with a standard deviation of 4.2 MPa. It was found that variations in heating rate can produce significant variations in the life cycle data.

  11. A high performance ceria based interdiffusion barrier layer prepared by spin-coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plonczak, Pawel; Joost, Mario; Hjelm, Johan

    2011-01-01

    . The successive steps of dense layer production was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was employed to monitor the crystal structure of the CGO layer sintered at different temperatures. The described spin coated barrier layer was evaluated using an anode supported cell......A multiple spin-coating deposition procedure of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) for application in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) was developed. The thin and dense CGO layer can be employed as a barrier layer between yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and a (La, Sr)(Co, Fe)O3 based cathode....... The decomposition of the polymer precursor used in the spin-coating process was studied. The depositions were performed on anode supported half cells. By controlling the sintering temperature between each spin-coating process, dense and crack-free CGO films with a thickness of approximately 1 μm were obtained...

  12. Failure mechanisms of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Krishnakumar

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) allow operation of structural components, such as turbine blades and vanes in industrial and aircraft gas engines, at temperatures close to the substrate melting temperatures. They consist of four different layers; a high strength creep-resistant nickel-based superalloy substrate, an oxidation resistant bond coat (BC), a low thermal conductivity ceramic topcoat and a thermally grown oxide (TGO), that is predominantly alpha-Al 2O3, that forms between the BC and the TBC. Compressive stresses (3--5 GPa) that are generated in the thin TGO (0.25--8 mum) due to the mismatch in thermal coefficient of expansion between the TGO and BC play a critical role in the failure of these coatings. In this study, the failure mechanisms of a commercial yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coating on platinum aluminide (beta-(Ni,Pt)Al) bond coat have been identified. Two distinct mechanisms have been found responsible for the observed damage initiation and progression at the TGO/bond coat interface. The first mechanism leads to localized debonding at TGO/bond coat interface due to increased out-of-plane tensile stress, along bond coat features that manifest themselves as ridges. The second mechanism causes cavity formation at the TGO/bond coat interface, driven by cyclic plasticity of the bond coat. It has been found that the debonding at the TGO/bond coat interface due to the first mechanism is solely life determining. The final failure occurs by crack extension along either the TGO/bond coat interface or the TGO/YSZ interface or a combination of both, leading to large scale buckling. Based on these mechanisms, it is demonstrated that the bond coat grain size and the aspect ratio of the ridges have a profound influence on spallation lives of the coating. The removal of these ridges by fine polishing prior to TBC deposition led to a four-fold improvement in life. The failure mechanism identified for the

  13. Thermal stability of double-ceramic-layer thermal barrier coatings with various coating thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hui; Zhong Xinghua; Li Jiayan; Zhang Yanfei; Meng Jian; Cao Xueqiang

    2006-01-01

    Double-ceramic-layer (DCL) coatings with various thickness ratios composed of YSZ (6-8 wt.% Y 2 O 3 + ZrO 2 ) and lanthanum zirconate (LZ, La 2 Zr 2 O 7 ) were produced by the atmospheric plasma spraying. Chemical stability of LZ in contact with YSZ in DCL coatings was investigated by calcining powder blends at different temperatures. No obvious reaction was observed when the calcination temperature was lower than 1250 deg. C, implying that LZ and YSZ had good chemical applicability for producing DCL coating. The thermal cycling test indicate that the cycling lives of the DCL coatings are strongly dependent on the thickness ratio of LZ and YSZ, and the coatings with YSZ thickness between 150 and 200 μm have even longer lives than the single-layer YSZ coating. When the YSZ layer is thinner than 100 μm, the DCL coatings failed in the LZ layer close to the interface of YSZ layer and LZ layer. For the coatings with the YSZ thickness above 150 μm, the failure mainly occurs at the interface of the YSZ layer and the bond coat

  14. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  15. Sintering Characteristics of Multilayered Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Gradient and Isothermal High Temperature Annealing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amarendra K.; Schmitt, Michael P.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides have most of the relevant attributes for use as next generation thermal barrier coatings such as phase stability, low sintering kinetics and low thermal conductivity. One of the issues with the pyrochlore oxides is their lower toughness and therefore higher erosion rate compared to the current state-of-the-art TBC material, yttria (6 to 8 wt%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this work, sintering characteristics were investigated for novel multilayered coating consisted of alternating layers of pyrochlore oxide viz Gd2Zr2O7 and t' low k (rare earth oxide doped YSZ). Thermal gradient and isothermal high temperature (1316 C) annealing conditions were used to investigate sintering and cracking in these coatings. The results are then compared with that of relevant monolayered coatings and a baseline YSZ coating.

  16. Design of Thermal Barrier Coatings Thickness for Gas Turbine Blade Based on Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are deposited on the turbine blade to reduce the temperature of underlying substrate, as well as providing protection against the oxidation and hot corrosion from high temperature gas. Optimal ceramic top-coat thickness distribution on the blade can improve the performance and efficiency of the coatings. Design of the coatings thickness is a multiobjective optimization problem due to the conflicts among objectives of high thermal insulation performance, long operation durability, and low fabrication cost. This work developed a procedure for designing the TBCs thickness distribution for the gas turbine blade. Three-dimensional finite element models were built and analyzed, and weighted-sum approach was employed to solve the multiobjective optimization problem herein. Suitable multiregion top-coat thickness distribution scheme was designed with the considerations of manufacturing accuracy, productivity, and fabrication cost.

  17. The effect of biodegradable coatings on the barrier properties of papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rouzbeh asadi khansari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare barrier property of biodegradable coatings on two base papers. Two different paper grades differing in structure (Kraft liner and printing & writing papers were used. The papers are made in Mazandaran wood and paper industry. Coating materials with 30% solid content, included clay (100 parts and cationic starch (12 parts, and they were mixed with two binders (PLA 10 parts and PVA 10 parts for two formulations. The immersion method in both levels 1 and 2 minutes and two coating formulations were applied on papers. Then, the treated samples were dried in standard conditions of temperature (25◦C and 54% humidity in the room. For that purpose, air resistance or porosity, thickness, mass, and Cobb60 were determined. As expected, time of treatment, reduced porosity and increased coating weight, but in terms of barrier properties, combination containing PVA was more effective than PLA. In comparison to the control group, all the treated samples had higher air resistance and water absorption, which the increment of water absorption is due to increased capillary in texture paper. The analysis of results showed that the immersion coating factors had considerable effects on performance of air resistance improvement and coating weight of papers. Then, calculated values of the thickness and density of coating were evaluated, which confirmed the status of water absorption. The treatments greatly increased the wettability of the surface by water.

  18. Optimization of High Porosity Thermal Barrier Coatings Generated with a Porosity Former

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medřický, Jan; Curry, Nicholas; Pala, Zdenek; Vilemova, Monika; Chraska, Tomas; Johansson, Jimmy; Markocsan, Nicolaie

    2015-04-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings are extensively used in turbine industry; however, increasing performance requirements have begun to make conventional air plasma sprayed coatings insufficient for future needs. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk material cannot be lowered easily; the design of highly porous coatings may be the most efficient way to achieve coatings with low thermal conductivity. Thus the approach of fabrication of coatings with a high porosity level based on plasma spraying of ceramic particles of dysprosia-stabilized zirconia mixed with polymer particles, has been tested. Both polymer and ceramic particles melt in plasma and after impact onto a substrate they form a coating. When the coating is subjected to heat treatment, polymer burns out and a complex structure of pores and cracks is formed. In order to obtain desired porosity level and microstructural features in coatings; a design of experiments, based on changes in spray distance, powder feeding rate, and plasma-forming atmosphere, was performed. Acquired coatings were evaluated for thermal conductivity and thermo-cyclic fatigue, and their morphology was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that porosity level can be controlled by appropriate changes in spraying parameters.

  19. Delamination Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced ceramic thermal harrier coatings will play an increasingly important role In future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability issue remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. In this paper, thermal cyclic response and delamination failure modes of a ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS thermaVenvironmenta1 barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were investigated using a laser high-heat-flux technique. The coating degradation and delamination processes were monitored in real time by measuring coating apparent conductivity changes during the cyclic tests under realistic engine temperature and stress gradients, utilizing the fact that delamination cracking causes an apparent decrease in the measured thermal conductivity. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces under the cyclic thermal loads, in conjunction with the mechanical testing results, will be discussed.

  20. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  1. Test validation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability and damage tolerance modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Najafi, Ali; Abdi, Frank; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-03-01

    Protection of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) is rather an important element for the engine manufacturers and aerospace companies to help improve the durability of their hot engine components. The CMC's are typically porous materials which permits some desirable infiltration that lead to strength enhancements. However, they experience various durability issues such as degradation due to coating oxidation. These concerns are being addressed by introducing a high temperature protective system, Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) that can operate at temperature applications1, 3 In this paper, linear elastic progressive failure analyses are performed to evaluate conditions that would cause crack initiation in the EBC. The analysis is to determine the overall failure sequence under tensile loading conditions on different layers of material including the EBC and CMC in an attempt to develop a life/failure model. A 3D finite element model of a dogbone specimen is constructed for the analyses. Damage initiation, propagation and final failure is captured using a progressive failure model considering tensile loading conditions at room temperature. It is expected that this study will establish a process for using a computational approach, validated at a specimen level, to predict reliably in the future component level performance without resorting to extensive testing.

  2. Overview on Recent Developments of Bondcoats for Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, D.; Pillai, R.; Chyrkin, A.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The performance of MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) bondcoats for atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) is substantially affected by the contents of Co, Ni, Cr, and Al as well as minor additions of Y, Hf, Zr, etc., but also by manufacturing-related properties such as coating thickness, porosity, surface roughness, and oxygen content. The latter properties depend in turn on the exact technology and set of parameters used for bondcoat deposition. The well-established LPPS process competes nowadays with alternative technologies such as HVOF and APS. In addition, new technologies have been developed for bondcoats manufacturing such as high-velocity APS or a combination of HVOF and APS for application of a flashcoat. Future developments of the bondcoat systems will likely include optimization of thermal spraying methods for obtaining complex bondcoat roughness profiles required for extended APS-TBC lifetimes. Introduction of the newest generation single-crystal superalloys possessing low Cr and high Al and refractory metals (Re, Ru) contents will require definition of new bondcoat compositions and/or multilayered bondcoats to minimize interdiffusion issues. The developments of new bondcoat compositions may be substantially facilitated using thermodynamic-kinetic modeling, the vast potential of which has been demonstrated in recent years.

  3. Mechanistic Study on the Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings Induced by Volcanic Ash Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Thermal stress generated on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by volcanic ash (VA) deposition was assessed measuring the tip deflection of a multilayered beam structure as a function of temperature. The TBC in this study was deposited onto the surface of a blade utilized in a land-based gas turbine which is composed of 8 wt.%Y2O3-ZrO2/CoNiCrAlY on a Ni-based superalloy. The VA-deposited TBC sample was heated at 1453 K, and the effect of VA deposition on TBC delamination was examined in comparison with a TBC sample without VA deposition as a reference. On the basis of the VA attack damage mechanism which was investigated via the tip deflection measurement and a comprehensive microstructure examination, a damage-coupled constitutive model was proposed. The proposed model was based on the infiltration of the molten VA inside pores and phase transformations of yttria -tabilized zirconia in the TBC system. The numerical analysis results, which were simulated utilizing the finite element code installing the developed constitutive model, showed us that VA attack on the TBC sample induced near-interfacial cracks because of a significant increasing in the coating stress.

  4. Evaluation of Defects of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Thermal Shock Test Using Eddy Current Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Tae Hoon; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong Seok; Lee, Koo Hyun [KIMM, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Periodical thermal shock can introduce defects in thermal barrier coating made by layers of CoNiCrAlY bond coating(BC) and ZrO{sub 2}-8wt%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic top coating(TC) on Inconel-738 substrate using plasma spraying. Thermal shock test is performed by severe condition that is to heat until 1000 .deg. C and cool until 20 .deg. C. As the number of cycle is increased, the fatigue by thermal shock is also increased. After test, the micro-structures and mechanical characteristics of thermal barrier coating were investigated by SEM, XRD. The TGO layer of is Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed between BC and TC by periodical thermal shock test, and its change in thickness is inspected by eddy current test(ECT). By ECT test, it is shown that TGO and micro-crack can be detected and it is possible to predict the life of thermal barrier coating

  5. Loadings in thermal barrier coatings of jet engine turbine blades an experimental research and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses complex loadings of turbine blades and protective layer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC), under real working airplane jet conditions. They obey both multi-axial mechanical loading and sudden temperature variation during starting and landing of the airplanes. In particular, two types of blades are analyzed: stationary and rotating, which are widely applied in turbine engines produced by airplane factories.

  6. In situ SANS study of pore microstructure in YSZ thermal barrier coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strunz, Pavel; Schumacher, G.; Vassen, R.; Wiedenmann, A.

    Roč. 52, č. 11 ( 2004 ), s. 3305-3312 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0891 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : plasma spraying * thermal barrier coatings * ceramics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.490, year: 2004

  7. Evolution of pore microstructure in thermal barrier coatings studied by SANS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haug, J.; Wiedenmann, A.; Flores, A.; Saruhan-Brings, B.; Strunz, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 1 (2006), s. 617-619 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : thermal barrier coatings * electron beam physical vapor deposition * SANS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.872, year: 2006

  8. The Barrier Properties of PET Coated DLC Film Deposited by Microwave Surface-Wave PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lianhua; Chen, Qiang

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report the investigation of diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited by microwave surface-wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) web for the purpose of the barrier property improvement. In order to characterize the properties of DLC coatings, we used several substrates, silicon wafer, glass, and PET web and KBr tablet. The deposition rate was obtained by surface profiler based on the DLC deposited on glass substrates; Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) was carried out on KBr tablets to investigate chemical composition and bonding structure; the morphology of the DLC coating was analyzed by atomic force microscope (AFM) on Si substrates. For the barrier properties of PET webs, we measured the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) after coated with DLC films. We addressed the film barrier property related to process parameters, such as microwave power and pulse parameter in this work. The results show that the DLC coatings can greatly improve the barrier properties of PET webs.

  9. Experimental concrete coating application on the median barrier of I 65 in Louisville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to evaluate the experimental protective coating that was applied to approximately 1,200 linear feet of concrete median barrier along the paving project on a section of I 65 between mile points 131.289 and 136.421 ...

  10. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  11. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  12. Effect of thermal cycling on ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper studies the comparative life of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings on NiCrAlY bond coats on Rene 41 in short (4 min) and long (57 min) thermal cycles at 1040 C in a 0.3-Mach flame. Attention is given to determining the effect of short- and long-duration cycles on ZrO2-Y2O3 coatings, the cause of any cycle frequency effects, and methods to improve tolerance to thermal stress. Short cycles greatly reduced the life of the ceramic coating in terms of time at temperatures as compared to longer cycles, the failed coating indicating compressive failure. The experiments and stress calculations show that repeatedly subjecting a ceramic coating to high rates of initial heating has a more destructive influence on the coating than sustained operation at temperature. The effect of such thermal compressive stresses might be minimized through coating deposition and thickness control and by turbine cycle measurement to keep starting heating rates below critical values.

  13. Thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades: Chemical vapor deposition (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenov, I. K.; Aksenov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Schemes are presented for experimental setups (reactors) developed at leading scientific centers connected with the development of technologies for the deposition of coatings using the CVD method: at the Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany), the French Aerospace Research Center, the Materials Research Institute (Tohoku University, Japan) and the National Laboratory Oak Ridge (USA). Conditions and modes for obtaining the coatings with high operational parameters are considered. It is established that the formed thermal barrier coatings do not fundamentally differ in their properties (columnar microstructure, thermocyclic resistance, thermal conductivity coefficient) from standard electron-beam condensates, but the highest growth rates and the perfection of the crystal structure are achieved in the case of plasma-chemical processes and in reactors with additional laser or induction heating of a workpiece. It is shown that CVD reactors can serve as a basis for the development of rational and more advanced technologies for coating gas turbine blades that are not inferior to standard electron-beam plants in terms of the quality of produced coatings and have a much simpler and cheaper structure. The possibility of developing a new technology based on CVD processes for the formation of thermal barrier coatings with high operational parameters is discussed, including a set of requirements for industrial reactors, high-performance sources of vapor precursors, and promising new materials.

  14. Review of hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings of gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yongbao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The review was done in order to make clear the problem of the hot corrosion of the Thermal Barrier Coatings(TBCsduring gas turbine serving. This paper summarizes the factors resulting from the hot corrosion of TBCs during turbine service and classifies methods for enhancing the corrosive resistance of TBCs. A prospective methodology for improving corrosion resistance is also formulated. The main types of corrosion coating include phase reaction, oxidizing of the bond coating, salt-fog corrosion, CMAS corrosion and fuel impurity corrosion. So far, methods for improving the corrosion resistance of TBCs include developing new coating materials, anticorrosive treatment on the surface of TBCs, modifying the stacking configuration and improving the cleansing functions of the gas turbines. In the future, developing new materials with excellent performance will still be the main direction for boosting the improvement of the hot corrosion resistance of TBCs. Simultaneously, improving the tacking configuration and nanotechnology of TBC coatings are potential approaches for improving corrosion resistance. With the development of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC, the focus of the hot corrosion of TBCs may turn to that of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs.

  15. Expandable coating cocoon leak detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, R. L.; Kochansky, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Development of system and materials for detecting leaks in cocoon protective coatings are discussed. Method of applying materials for leak determination is presented. Pressurization of system following application of materials will cause formation of bubble if leak exists.

  16. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed

  17. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  18. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  19. Influence of Experimental Parameters Using the Dip-Coating Method on the Barrier Performance of Hybrid Sol-Gel Coatings in Strong Alkaline Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita B. Figueira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the barrier effect and the performance of organic-inorganic hybrid (OIH sol-gel coatings are highly dependent on the coating deposition method as well as on the processing conditions. However, studies on how the coating deposition method influences the barrier properties in alkaline environments are scarce. The aim of this experimental research was to study the influence of experimental parameters using the dip-coating method on the barrier performance of an OIH sol-gel coating in contact with simulated concrete pore solutions (SCPS. The influence of residence time (Rt, a curing step between each dip step and the number of layers of sol-gel OIH films deposited on hot-dip galvanized steel to prevent corrosion in highly alkaline environments was studied. The barrier performance of these OIH sol-gel coatings, named U(400, was assessed in the first instants of contact with SCPS, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic methods. The durability and stability of the OIH coatings in SCPS was monitored during eight days by macrocell current density. The morphological characterization of the surface was performed by Scanning Electronic Microscopy before and after exposure to SCPS. Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy was used to investigate the thickness of the U(400 sol-gel coatings as a function of the number of layers deposited with and without Rt in the coatings thickness.

  20. Large-scale, thick, self-assembled, nacre-mimetic brick-walls as fire barrier coatings on textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Paramita; Thomas, Helga; Moeller, Martin; Walther, Andreas

    2017-01-05

    Highly loaded polymer/clay nanocomposites with layered structures are emerging as robust fire retardant surface coatings. However, time-intensive sequential deposition processes, e.g. layer-by-layer strategies, hinders obtaining large coating thicknesses and complicates an implementation into existing technologies. Here, we demonstrate a single-step, water-borne approach to prepare thick, self-assembling, hybrid fire barrier coatings of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/montmorillonite (MTM) with well-defined, bioinspired brick-wall nanostructure, and showcase their application on textile. The coating thickness on the textile is tailored using different concentrations of CMC/MTM (1-5 wt%) in the coating bath. While lower concentrations impart conformal coatings of fibers, thicker continuous coatings are obtained on the textile surface from highest concentration. Comprehensive fire barrier and fire retardancy tests elucidate the increasing fire barrier and retardancy properties with increasing coating thickness. The materials are free of halogen and heavy metal atoms, and are sourced from sustainable and partly even renewable building blocks. We further introduce an amphiphobic surface modification on the coating to impart oil and water repellency, as well as self-cleaning features. Hence, our study presents a generic, environmentally friendly, scalable, and one-pot coating approach that can be introduced into existing technologies to prepare bioinspired, thick, fire barrier nanocomposite coatings on diverse surfaces.

  1. Large-scale, thick, self-assembled, nacre-mimetic brick-walls as fire barrier coatings on textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Paramita; Thomas, Helga; Moeller, Martin; Walther, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Highly loaded polymer/clay nanocomposites with layered structures are emerging as robust fire retardant surface coatings. However, time-intensive sequential deposition processes, e.g. layer-by-layer strategies, hinders obtaining large coating thicknesses and complicates an implementation into existing technologies. Here, we demonstrate a single-step, water-borne approach to prepare thick, self-assembling, hybrid fire barrier coatings of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/montmorillonite (MTM) with well-defined, bioinspired brick-wall nanostructure, and showcase their application on textile. The coating thickness on the textile is tailored using different concentrations of CMC/MTM (1-5 wt%) in the coating bath. While lower concentrations impart conformal coatings of fibers, thicker continuous coatings are obtained on the textile surface from highest concentration. Comprehensive fire barrier and fire retardancy tests elucidate the increasing fire barrier and retardancy properties with increasing coating thickness. The materials are free of halogen and heavy metal atoms, and are sourced from sustainable and partly even renewable building blocks. We further introduce an amphiphobic surface modification on the coating to impart oil and water repellency, as well as self-cleaning features. Hence, our study presents a generic, environmentally friendly, scalable, and one-pot coating approach that can be introduced into existing technologies to prepare bioinspired, thick, fire barrier nanocomposite coatings on diverse surfaces.

  2. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  3. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  4. Confectionery coating with an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthina, Kumala; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2012-01-01

    In the confectionery coating industry, hard butters are frequently used as cocoa butter replacers. An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) system, which forms fine droplets with a relatively narrow size distribution, may be beneficial in confectionery coating to produce more even coverage. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lecithin content and fat type on electrical resistivity and apparent viscosity, and the effect of these variables under EHD (25kV) and non-EHD coating on droplet size, width of coating area, thickness, and minimum flow rate to produce complete coverage. Total of 3 different types of fat were used: cocoa butter, cocoa butter equivalent, and lauric butter. As lecithin content increased, resistivity and apparent viscosity decreased, except all samples showed a local apparent viscosity minimum at 0.5% lecithin. EHD coating was more efficient than non-EHD as a smaller droplet size and thinner coating was formed. Due to repulsive forces between the like-charges on the droplets during EHD, it spread over wider areas which lead to a higher minimum flow rate to get complete coverage. Under EHD, increasing resistivity significantly increased the droplet size, but only at the highest resistivities. There was no correlation between resistivity and droplet size or width of coating under non-EHD. The width of coating under EHD decreased significantly as resistivity increased. Thickness and minimum flow rate to produce complete coverage, significantly correlated to resistivity, for EHD coating, and to apparent viscosity, for 2 of the 3 fat types during both EHD and non-EHD. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spraying offers great potential improvement to the food industry especially in the confectionery area. From the quality point of view, EHD offers greater and more complete coverage than non-EHD coating. From the economic point of view, lower cost can be achieved for coated food because during EHD, smaller droplet size and thinner coating is produced.

  5. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Durability Modeling; An Overview and Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, A.; Bhatt, R. T.; Grady, J. E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-01-01

    A study outlining a fracture mechanics based model that is being developed to investigate crack growth and spallation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) under thermal cycling conditions is presented. A description of the current plan and a model to estimate thermal residual stresses in the coating and preliminary fracture mechanics concepts for studying crack growth in the coating are also discussed. A road map for modeling life and durability of the EBC and the results of FEA model(s) developed for predicting thermal residual stresses and the cracking behavior of the coating are generated and described. Further initial assessment and preliminary results showed that developing a comprehensive EBC life prediction model incorporating EBC cracking, degradation and spalling mechanism under stress and temperature gradients typically seen in turbine components is difficult. This is basically due to mismatch in thermal expansion difference between sub-layers of EBC as well as between EBC and substrate, diffusion of moisture and oxygen though the coating, and densification of the coating during operating conditions as well as due to foreign object damage, the EBC can also crack and spall from the substrate causing oxidation and recession and reducing the design life of the EBC coated substrate.

  6. Stress controlled gas-barrier oxide coatings on semi-crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochat, G.; Leterrier, Y.; Fayet, P.; Manson, J.-A.E.

    2005-01-01

    Thin silicon oxide (SiO x ) barrier coatings formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates were subjected to post-deposition annealing treatments in the temperature range for orientation relaxation of the polymer. The resulting change in coating internal stress state was measured by means of thermo-mechanical analyses, and its effect on the coating cohesive properties and coating/polymer adhesion was determined from the analysis of uniaxial fragmentation tests in situ in a scanning electron microscope, assuming a Weibull-type probability of failure and a perfectly plastic stress transfer at the SiO x /PET interface. The strain to failure and intrinsic fracture toughness of the ultrathin oxide coating were found to be as high as 5.7% and 10 J/m 2 , respectively, and its interfacial shear strength with PET was found to be close to 100 MPa. Annealing for 10 min at 150 deg. C did not modify the oxygen permeation properties of the SiO x /PET film, which suggests that the defect population of the oxide was not affected by the thermal treatment. In contrast, the coating internal compressive stress resulting from annealing was shown to increase by 40% the apparent coating cohesive properties and adhesion to the polymer

  7. Mechanisms of oxygen permeation through plastic films and barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilski, Stefan; Wipperfürth, Jens; Jaritz, Montgomery; Kirchheim, Dennis; Mitschker, Felix; Awakowicz, Peter; Dahlmann, Rainer; Hopmann, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Oxygen and water vapour permeation through plastic films in food packaging or other applications with high demands on permeation are prevented by inorganic barrier films. Most of the permeation occurs through small defects (PET) are investigated and the mass transport through the polymer is simulated in a 3D approach. Calculations of single defects showed that there is no linear correlation between the defect area and the resulting permeability. The influence of adjacent defects in different distances was observed and led to flow reduction functions depending on the defect spacing and defect area. A critical defect spacing where no interaction between defects occurs was found and compared to other findings. According to the superposition principle, the permeability of single defects was added up and compared to experimentally determined oxygen permeation. The results showed the same trend of decreasing permeability with decreasing defect densities.

  8. Effect of thermal aging on the erosion resistance of air plasma sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, B.Z.; Lugscheider, E.; Remer, P.

    1999-01-01

    To increase the performance, efficiency and reliability of thermal barrier coatings, it is important to understand the influence of the microstructure on the erosion resistance. Therefore, the erosion behavior of air-plasma-sprayed 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) at elevated temperatures was investigated. The paper focuses on both the porosity of the coating as well as the thermal pre-treatment of the ceramic. To simulate operating conditions on the ceramic samples, high-temperature erosion experiments at 1093 C were carried out on as-sprayed samples as well as on samples, thermally aged at different temperatures up to 1482 C in air prior to erosion testing. A significant dependence of erosion rate on porosity and thermal pre-treatment was found. Finally, a technique was developed to predict the erosion rates of air-plasma-sprayed 7YSZ TBCs independent of aging conditions or porosity levels. Erosion rates seem to be highly correlated to the micro-hardness of the zirconia TBC. A power-law model was empirically derived to estimate erosion rates of plasma-sprayed 7YSZ ceramic thermal barrier coatings. (orig.)

  9. Infrared Radiative Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeff I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Street, Ken W.; Markham, Jim R.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared (IR) transmittance and reflectance of translucent thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have important implications for both the performance of these coatings as radiation barriers and emitters as well as affecting measurements of TBC thermal conductivity, especially as TBCs are being pushed to higher temperatures. In this paper, the infrared spectral directional-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) TBCs are reported. These measurements are compared to those for single crystal YSZ specimens to show the effects of the plasma-sprayed coating microstructure. It is shown that the coatings exhibit negligible absorption at wavelengths up to about 5 micrometers, and that internal scattering rather than surface reflections dominates the hemispherical reflectance. The translucent nature of the 8YSZ TBCs results in the absorptance/emittance and reflectance of TBC-coated substrates depending on the TBC thickness, microstructure, as well as the radiative properties of the underlying substrate. The effects of these properties on TBC measurements and performance are discussed.

  10. Performance evaluation of one coat systems for new steel bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In an effort to address cost issues associated with shop application of conventional three-coat systems, the Federal : Highway Administration completed a study to investigate the performance of eight one-coat systems and two control : coatings for co...

  11. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  12. A study of the barrier properties of polyethylene coated with a nanocellulose/magnetite composite film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological, thermal and barrier properties of low-density polyethylene/polycaprolactone-modified nanocellulose hybrid materials were investigated in this paper. Nanonocelulose/magnetite (NC-Fe3O4 nanocomposite and maleic acid functionalized NC/magnetite (NCMA-Fe3O4 nanocomposite were prepared and used as filler at various concentrations (5, 10 and 15 wt. % in polycaprolactone (PCL layer. PE was coated with PCL/NC/magnetite layer. The addition of the filler did not unfavorably affect the inherent properties of the polymer, especially its barrier properties. Oxygen permeation measurements show that the oxygen barrier properties of magnetite enriched PCL film were improved due to chemical activity of added material. The highest level of barrier capacity was observed for PE samples coated with PCL based composite with NCMA-Fe3O4 micro/-nanofiller, which implies the significant contribution of nanocellulose surface modification with maleic anhydride residue to improved barrier properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45019 i br. OI172013

  13. Key Durability Issues with Mullite-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2) and mullite/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) dual layer coatings have been developed to protect silicon -based ceramics from environmental attack. Mullite-based coating systems show excellent durability in air. However, in combustion environments, corrosive species such as molten salt or water vapor penetrate through cracks in the coating and attack the Si-based ceramics along the interface. Thus the modification of the coating system for enhanced crack-resistance is necessary for long-term durability in combustion environments. Other key durability issues include interfacial contamination and coating/substrate bonding. Interfacial contamination leads to enhanced oxidation and interfacial pore formation, while a weak coating/substrate bonding leads to rapid attack of the interface by corrosive species, both of which can cause a premature failure of the coating. Interfacial contamination can be minimized by limiting impurities in coating and substrate materials. The interface may be modified to improve the coating/substrate bond.

  14. Novel thermal barrier coatings based on La{sub 2}(Zr{sub 0.7}Ce{sub 0.3}){sub 2}O{sub 7}/8YSZ double-ceramic-layer systems deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@yahoo.com.cn [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); He Shimei; He Limin; Mu Rende; Huang Guanghong [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Cao Xueqiang [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2011-03-17

    Research highlights: > LZ7C3 and YSZ have good chemical compatibility for the formation of DCL coating. > DCL coating has a longer lifetime than that of single layer coating of LZ7C3 or YSZ. > Similar TECs of LZ7C3 with YSZ coatings and YSZ coating with TGO layer. > Unique growth modes of columns within DCL coating. > Outward diffusion of Cr element (bond coat) into LZ7C3 layer. - Abstract: Double-ceramic-layer (DCL) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of La{sub 2}(Zr{sub 0.7}Ce{sub 0.3}){sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZ7C3) and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were deposited by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The thermal cycling test at 1373 K in an air furnace indicates the DCL coating has a much longer lifetime than the single layer LZ7C3 coating, and even longer than that of the single layer YSZ coating. The superior sintering-resistance of LZ7C3 coating, the similar thermal expansion behaviors of YSZ interlayer with LZ7C3 coating and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer, and the unique growth modes of columns within DCL coating are all very helpful to the prolongation of thermal cycling life of DCL coating. The failure of DCL coating is mainly a result of the reduction-oxidation of cerium oxide, the crack initiation, propagation and extension, the abnormal oxidation of bond coat, the degradation of t'-phase in YSZ coating and the outward diffusion of Cr alloying element into LZ7C3 coating.

  15. Hybrid Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Powder and Solution Precursor Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. V.; Sivakumar, G.; Raghuveer, T.; Dusane, R. O.

    2014-04-01

    A novel approach of hybridizing the conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique with the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) route to achieve thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with tailored configurations is presented. Such a hybrid process can be conveniently adopted for forming composite, multi-layered and graded coatings employing simultaneous and/or sequential feeding of solution precursor as well as powder feedstock, yielding distinct TBC microstructures that bear promise to further extend coating durability. TBC specimens generated using conventional APS technique, the SPPS method and through APS-SPPS hybrid processing have been comprehensively characterized for microstructure, phase constitution, hardness and thermal cycling life, and the results were compared to demonstrate the advantages that can ensue from hybrid processing.

  16. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  17. Self-healing Coatings for an Anti-corrosion barrier in Damaged Parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Hyoun

    2009-01-01

    Polymer coatings are commonly applied to metal substrates to prevent corrosion in aggressive environments such as high humidity and under salt water. Once the polymer coating has been breached, for example due to cracking or scratches, it loses its effectiveness, and corrosion can rapidly propagate across the substrate. The self-healing system we will describe prevents corrosion by healing the damage through a healing reaction triggered by the actual damage event. This self-healing coating solution can be easily applied to most substrate materials, and our dual-capsule healing system provides a general approach to be compatible with most common polymer matrices. Specifically, we expect an excellent anti-corrosion property of the self-healing coatings in damaged parts coated on galvanized metal substrates.

  18. Effect of La2O3 addition on interface chemistry between 4YSZ top layer and Ni based alloy bond coat in thermal barrier coating by EB PVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Young; Yang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Seong-Won; Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Jang, Byung-Koog; Lim, Dae-Soon; Oh, Yoon-Suk

    2014-11-01

    The effect of a 5 mol% La2O3 addition on the forming behavior and compositional variation at interface between a 4 mol% Yttria (Y2O3) stabilized ZrO2 (4YSZ) top coat and bond coat (NiCrAlY) as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been investigated. Top coats were deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB PVD) onto a super alloy (Ni-Cr-Co-Al) substrate without pre-oxidation of the bond coat. Top coats are found to consist of dense columnar grains with a thin interdiffusion layer between metallic bond coats. In the as-received 4YSZ coating, a thin interdiffusion zone at the interface between the top and bond coats was found to consist of a Ni-Zr intermetallic compound with a reduced quantity of Y, Al or O elements. On the other hand, in the case of an interdiffusion area of 5 mol% La2O3-added 4YSZ coating, it was found that the complicated composition and structure with La-added YSZ and Ni-Al rich compounds separately. The thermal conductivity of 5 mol% La2O3-added 4YSZ coating (- 1.6 W/m x k at 1100 degrees C) was lower than a 4YSZ coating (- 3.2 W/m x k at 1100 degrees C) alone.

  19. A Numerical Procedure to Obtain the Creep Parameters of the Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-point bending creep test was used to understand the creep behavior of typical thin film/substrate systems—thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. Firstly, a simplified model, which does not consider the local effect, has been set up to get an analytical relationship. The important result is that creep stress exponent of materials is equal to the creep load exponent of the steady-state deflection rate of BC specimens. Secondly, in order to consider the local effect of bending, the finite element method (FEM has been carried out. FEM calculation shows that there is a steady stage of the creep deflection under a constant applied load. And the exponent of the steady-state creep deflection rate to the applied load is found to be equal to the creep stress exponent of materials. The creep constant of the materials can be obtained by a set of trials with assumed creep constants of materials and can be finally determined by the best fit method. Finally, the finite element results show that the influences of the friction, the thickness of TBCs, and the modulus ratio of TBC to the substrate on stress distribution are important.

  20. Aluminum oxide barrier coating on polyethersulfone substrate by atomic layer deposition for barrier property enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Kim, Sung Soo

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum oxide layers were deposited on flexible polyethersulfone (PES) substrates via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and oxygen as precursor and reactant materials. Several process parameters in PEALD process were investigated in terms of refractive index and layer thickness. Number of process cycle increased the thickness and refractive index of the layer to enhance the barrier properties. Non-physisorbed TMA and unreacted oxygen were purged before and after the plasma reaction, respectively. Identical purge time was applied to TMA and oxygen and it was optimized for 10 s. Thinner and denser layer was formed as substrate temperature increased. However, the PES substrate could be deformed above 120 o C. Aluminum oxide layer formed on PES at optimized conditions have 11.8 nm of thickness and reduced water vapor transmission rate and oxygen transmission rate to below 4 x 10 -3 g/m 2 day and 4 x 10 -3 cm 3 /m 2 day, respectively. Polycarbonate and polyethylene naphthalate films were also tested at optimized conditions, and they also showed quite appreciable barrier properties to be used as plastic substrates.

  1. Temperature measurement involving nanostructured thermal barrier coating using a multiwavelength pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported that erroneous results were obtained when a conventional pyrometer was used to measure the surface temperature of turbine engine components. Temperatures discrepancies were observed in components which were identical, except that one had its measured surface covered by a nanostructured thermal barrier coating (TBC) whereas the other component's surface was not so coated. These components were placed in an identical environment, receiving identical heat fluxes. A pyrometer measured the TBC covered surface hundreds degrees lower. These coatings were about 25 (mu)m thick, consisting of hundreds of layers of finer structures. The TBC's had very low thermal conductivity, heat flux calculations indicated that the temperatures of the coated surface should exhibit much higher temperature than the uncoated surface. Because these coatings were transparent to radiation from the visible to the infrared region, the temperatures measured by the pyrometer should be the temperature of the covered surface. Turbo components' performance and service life depend critically on the temperatures that it would experience; it is therefore important to know accurately and confidently the real surface temperature. Out of these concerns, an investigation into the measurement of nanostructured material surface temperature was carried out.

  2. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  3. Transparent Pullulan/Mica Nanocomposite Coatings with Outstanding Oxygen Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilke Uysal Unalan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new bionanocomposite coating on poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET made of pullulan and synthetic mica. Mica nanolayers have a very high aspect ratio (α, at levels much greater than that of conventional exfoliated clay layers (e.g., montmorillonite. A very small amount of mica (0.02 wt %, which is ϕ ≈ 0.00008 in pullulan coatings dramatically improved the oxygen barrier performance of the nanocomposite films under dry conditions, however, this performance was partly lost as the environmental relative humidity (RH increased. This outcome was explained in terms of the perturbation of the spatial ordering of mica sheets within the main pullulan phase, because of RH fluctuations. This was confirmed by modelling of the experimental oxygen transmission rate (OTR data according to Cussler’s model. The presence of the synthetic nanobuilding block (NBB led to a decrease in both static and kinetic coefficients of friction, compared with neat PET (≈12% and 23%, respectively and PET coated with unloaded pullulan (≈26% reduction in both coefficients. In spite of the presence of the filler, all of the coating formulations did not significantly impair the overall optical properties of the final material, which exhibited haze values below 3% and transmittance above 85%. The only exception to this was represented by the formulation with the highest loading of mica (1.5 wt %, which is ϕ ≈ 0.01. These findings revealed, for the first time, the potential of the NBB mica to produce nanocomposite coatings in combination with biopolymers for the generation of new functional features, such as transparent high oxygen barrier materials.

  4. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  5. The modeling of coating thickness, heat transfer, and fluid flow and its correlation with the thermal barrier coating microstructure for a plasma sprayed gas turbine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylén, P.; Wigren, J.; Pejryd, L.; Hansson, M.-O.

    1999-09-01

    The plasma sprya deposition of a zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC) on a gas turbine component was examined using analytical and experimental techniques. The coating thickness was simulated by the use of commercial off-line software. The impinging jet was modeled by means of a finite difference elliptic code using a simplified turbulence model. Powder particle velocity, temperature history, and trajectory were calculated using a stochastic discrete particle model. The heat transfer and fluid flow model were then used to calculate transient coating and substrate temperatures using the finite element method. The predicted thickness, temperature, and velocity of the particles and the coating temperatures were compared with these measurements, and good correlations were obtained. The coating microstructure was evaluated by optical and scanning microscopy techniques. Special attention was paid to the crack structures within the top coating. Finally, the correlation between the modeled parameters and the deposit microstructure was studied.

  6. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  7. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  8. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Peng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ-based thermal barrier coating (TBC has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm; a photo-multiplier tube (PMT and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  9. Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

  10. SiC fiber and yttria-stabilized zirconia composite thick thermal barrier coatings fabricated by plasma spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rongbin; Cheng, Xudong; Ye, Weiping

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 4 mm-thick SiC fiber/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spray (APS). The composite coatings have a 'reinforced concrete frame structure', which can protect the coating from failure caused by increasing thickness of coating. The SiC fiber plays an important role in reducing the residual stress level of the composite coatings. The thermal conductivity (TC) value of the composite coatings is 0.632 W/m K, which is about 50% reduction compared to that of typical APS YSZ TBCs. And the composite coatings have higher fracture toughness and better thermal shock resistance than the YSZ TBCs.

  11. Physical protection system using activated barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, R.E.; Zinneman, T.E.; Haumann, J.R.; Flaugher, H.A.; Reigle, D.L.

    1984-03-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory has recently installed an activated barrier, the Access Denial System, to upgrade its security. The technology of this system was developed in the late 70's by Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The Argonne National Laboratory is the first Department of Energy facility to use this device. Recent advancements in electronic components provide the total system support that makes the use of an activated barrier viable and desirable. The premise of an activated barrier is that it is deployed after a positive detection of an adversary is made and before the adversary can penetrate vital area. To accomplish this detection, sophisticated alarms, assessment, and communications must be integrated into a system that permits a security inspector to make a positive evaluation and to activate the barrier. The alarm sensor locations are selected to provide protection in depth. Closed circuit television is used with components that permit multiple video frames to be stored for automated, priority-based playback to the security inspector. Further, algorithms permit look-ahead surveillance of vital areas so that the security inspector can activate the access denial system in a timely manner and not be restricted to following the adversaries' penetration path(s)

  12. Stability of tritium permeation prevention barrier with TiC and TiN + TiC coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Changqi; Chen Qingwang; Dai Shaoxia; Jiang Weisheng

    1999-01-01

    The stability of tritium permeation prevention barrier of 316L stainless steel with coating TiC and TiN + TiC under the conditions of very large thermal gradient, thermal cycling and plasma irradiation is researched. The research includes two aspects: one is the study on the stability resisting H + plasma irradiation; another is on the ability of two coating materials when they are used in long term under the condition of very large thermal gradient and cycling. The results show that TiC and TiN + TiC composite coating materials, after chemical heat treatment and forming tritium permeation prevention barrier, can resist H + ion irradiation, and also can resist very large thermal gradient and thermal cycling. The long time experiments show that tritium permeation prevention barrier of those coating materials is stable when they are used in long term

  13. Facile approach in the development of icephobic hierarchically textured coatings as corrosion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, G.; Farzaneh, M.

    2014-04-01

    An anti-corrosion superhydrophobic film with water contact angle greater than 160° on aluminum alloy 6061 substrate was fabricated simply through the spin-coating method applied to Al2O3 nanoparticles doped in silicone rubber solution. The as-obtained sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and water contact angle/surface energy measurement. The corrosion behaviour of such coating in the NaCl solutions was investigated using the potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the developed superhydrophobic surface is improved greatly due to the composite wetting states or interfaces with numerous air pockets between its surface and the NaCl solution. This superhydrophobic coating could serve as an effective barrier against aggressive medium. Ice adhesion strength of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating was also evaluated by measuring its ice adhesion force which was found to have reduced by 4.8 times compared to that of aluminum substrate as reference test.

  14. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  15. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  16. Mueller matrix polarimetry on plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings for porosity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, David A; Barraza, Enrique T; Kudenov, Michael W

    2017-12-10

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the most widely used material for thermal plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used to protect gas turbine engine parts in demanding operation environments. The superior material properties of YSZ coatings are related to their internal porosity level. By quantifying the porosity level, tighter control on the spraying process can be achieved to produce reliable coatings. Currently, destructive measurement methods are widely used to measure the porosity level. In this paper, we describe a novel nondestructive approach that is applicable to classify the porosity level of plasma sprayed YSZ TBCs via Mueller matrix polarimetry. A rotating retarder Mueller matrix polarimeter was used to measure the polarization properties of the plasma sprayed YSZ coatings with different porosity levels. From these measurements, it was determined that a sample's measured depolarization ratio is dependent on the sample's surface roughness and porosity level. To this end, we correlate the depolarization ratio with the samples' surface roughness, as measured by a contact profilometer, as well as the total porosity level, in percentage measured using a micrograph and stereological analysis. With the use of this technique, a full-field and rapid measurement of porosity level can be achieved.

  17. Thermal cycling behaviour of lanthanum zirconate as EB-PVD thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Bagcivan, N.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal cycling tests with two different EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were performed in a furnace cycle test. The results of these tests showed an increase of endurable cycle number when pyrochloric La 2 Zr 2 O 7 was used as TBC. 1865 cycles were reached with La 2 Zr 2 O 7 and 1380 cycles with 7 weigth-% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) EB-PVD TBC. Additional investigation was made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to investigate morphology and to determine chemical composition by electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. X-Ray diffraction was performed to analyze structural constitution of deposited coatings. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  19. Novel Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings in Coal-Fired Power Plant Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing [Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This project presents a detailed investigation of a novel functionally graded coating material, pyrochlore oxide, for thermal barrier coating (TBC) in gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Thermal barrier coatings are refractory materials deposited on gas turbine components, which provide thermal protection for metallic components at operating conditions. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a manufacturing process to produce the novel low thermal conductivity and high thermal stability pyrochlore oxide based coatings with improved high-temperature durability. The current standard TBC, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), has service temperatures limited to <1200°C, due to sintering and phase transition at higher temperatures. In contrast, pyrochlore oxide, e.g., lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7, LZ), has demonstrated lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability, which are crucial to high temperature applications, such as gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) has collaborated with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST), and Changwon National University in South Korea to perform the proposed research. The research findings are critical to the extension of current TBCs to a broader range of high-temperature materials and applications. Several tasks were originally proposed and accomplished, with additional new opportunities identified during the course of the project. In this report, a description of the project tasks, the main findings and conclusions are given. A list of publications and presentations resulted from this research is listed in the Appendix at the end of the report.

  20. CrN-Ag nanocomposite coatings: Control of lubricant transport by diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papi, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Mulligan, C.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Benet Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189 (United States); Gall, D., E-mail: galld@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    1-{mu}m-thick self-lubricating CrN-Ag composite coatings containing 16 at.% Ag were deposited on Si substrates by reactive co-sputtering at T{sub s} = 400 Degree-Sign C, and were covered with CrN cap layers with a columnar microstructure and a thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Vacuum annealing at T{sub a} = 500 and 600 Degree-Sign C for 1 h causes Ag transport to the sample surface and the formation of Ag surface grains. Quantitative scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses show that increasing d from 0 to 10 to 100 nm for T{sub a} = 500 Degree-Sign C leads to a decrease in the areal density of Ag surface grains from 0.86 to 0.45 to 0.04 {mu}m{sup -2}, while their lateral size remains constant at 360 {+-} 60 nm. However, increasing T{sub a} to 600 Degree-Sign C causes a doubling of the Ag grain size, and a 4-30 times larger overall Ag transport. These results are explained by kinetic barriers for Ag diffusion through the porous cap layer with a porosity that decreases with increasing d, resulting in an effective activation barrier for Ag transport that increases from 0.78 eV in the absence of a cap layer to 0.89 eV for d = 10 nm and 1.07 eV for d = 30 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile analyses of annealed layers reveal no detectable Ag within the CrN cap layer and a uniform depletion of the Ag reservoir throughout the composite coating thickness, indicating unhindered Ag transport within the composite. The overall results show that a CrN diffusion barrier cap layer is an effective approach to control Ag lubricant transport to the surface of CrN-Ag composite coatings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CrN-Ag composite coatings are capped with CrN diffusion barriers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag diffuses to the surface during annealing at 500 or 600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ag transport is controlled by the cap thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The activation energy for Ag

  1. Robotic Laser Coating Removal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    cell, 0.0020  inch nominal foil, Al  alloy  3003‐H18 or H19 or optional  5052 ‐H38 or H‐39.  MH‐b  Aluminum  Honeycomb  24 inch x 18 inch  Face Sheets...Description  Al‐2a  Aluminum   alloy : 2024‐T3 (Bare)  24 inch x 18 inch x 0.025 inch.  Cleaned according to ASTM F22‐02, chromic  acid anodized, conforming to MIL...A‐8625, (Anodic Coatings for  Aluminum   and  Aluminum   Alloys , issued September 10, 1993), Type 1B.  Al‐2b  Aluminum   alloy : 2024‐T3 (Bare)  24 inch x 18

  2. Antibacterial and Barrier Properties of Gelatin Coated by Electrospun Polycaprolactone Ultrathin Fibers Containing Black Pepper Oleoresin of Interest in Active Food Biopackaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Johana Figueroa-Lopez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of using electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL as a barrier coating and black pepper oleoresin (OR as a natural extract on the morphology, thermal, mechanical, antimicrobial, oxygen, and water vapor barrier properties of solvent cast gelatin (GEL. The antimicrobial activity of the developed multilayer system obtained by the so-called electrospinning coating technique was also evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus strains for 10 days. The results showed that the multilayer system containing PCL and OR increased the thermal resistance, elongated the GEL film, and significantly diminished its permeance to water vapor. Active multilayer systems stored in hermetically closed bottles increased their antimicrobial activity after 10 days by inhibiting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. This study demonstrates that addition of electrospun PCL ultrathin fibers and OR improved the properties of GEL films, which promoted its potential use in active food packaging applications.

  3. Defect Clustering and Nano-Phase Structure Characterization of Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed by incorporating multi-component rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria to effectively promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nano-scale phases within the coating systems. The presence of these nano-sized defect clusters has found to significantly reduce the coating intrinsic thermal conductivity, improve sintering resistance, and maintain long-term high temperature stability. In this paper, the defect clusters and nano-structured phases, which were created by the addition of multi-component rare earth dopants to the plasma-sprayed and electron-beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The defect cluster size, distribution, crystallographic and compositional information were investigated using high-resolution TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis techniques. The results showed that substantial defect clusters were formed in the advanced multi-component rare earth oxide doped zirconia- yttria systems. The size of the oxide defect clusters and the cluster dopant segregation was typically ranging from 5 to 50 nm. These multi-component dopant induced defect clusters are an important factor for the coating long-term high temperature stability and excellent performance.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of Arc-PVD coatings and hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, K.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve a comprehensive protective effect against corrosion and wear stresses, coating systems are increasingly being developed, in which there is a separation of the tasks of the coating materials regarding the protective effect. On the one hand, pure PVD coating systems are used, on the other hand hybrid coatings are examined, where galvanic processes are combined with PVD technique. The results of experiments introduced in this article were determined on Arc-PVD coatings. By this process, titanium nitride and chromium nitride coatings are both deposited directly on the basic material and are also deposited as combination coatings of Ti/TiN and chemical nickel/TiN. (orig.) [de

  5. Properties of Whey-Protein-Coated Films and Laminates as Novel Recyclable Food Packaging Materials with Excellent Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of food packaging applications, high oxygen and water vapour barriers are the prerequisite conditions for preserving the quality of the products throughout their whole lifecycle. Currently available polymers and/or biopolymer films are mostly used in combination with barrier materials derived from oil based plastics or aluminium to enhance their low barrier properties. In order to replace these non-renewable materials, current research efforts are focused on the development of sustainable coatings, while maintaining the functional properties of the resulting packaging materials. This article provides an introduction to food packaging requirements, highlights prior art on the use of whey-based coatings for their barriers properties, and describes the key properties of an innovative packaging multilayer material that includes a whey-based layer. The developed whey protein formulations had excellent barrier properties almost comparable to the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH barrier layer conventionally used in food packaging composites, with an oxygen barrier (OTR of <2 [cm³(STP/(m²d bar] when normalized to a thickness of 100 μm. Further requirements of the barrier layer are good adhesion to the substrate and sufficient flexibility to withstand mechanical load while preventing delamination and/or brittle fracture. Whey-protein-based coatings have successfully met these functional and mechanical requirements.

  6. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  7. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  8. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarek, R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  9. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  10. Durability Modeling of Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC Using Finite Element Based Progressive Failure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdul-Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity for a protecting guard for the popular ceramic matrix composites (CMCs is getting a lot of attention from engine manufacturers and aerospace companies. The CMC has a weight advantage over standard metallic materials and more performance benefits. However, these materials undergo degradation that typically includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix which is generally seen at a higher temperature. Additionally, other factors such as residual stresses, coating process related flaws, and casting conditions may influence the degradation of their mechanical properties. These durability considerations are being addressed by introducing highly specialized form of environmental barrier coating (EBC that is being developed and explored in particular for high temperature applications greater than 1100°C. As a result, a novel computational simulation approach is presented to predict life for EBC/CMC specimen using the finite element method augmented with progressive failure analysis (PFA that included durability, damage tracking, and material degradation model. The life assessment is carried out using both micromechanics and macromechanics properties. The macromechanics properties yielded a more conservative life for the CMC specimen as compared to that obtained from the micromechanics with fiber and matrix properties as input.

  11. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  12. EB-PVD process management for highly productive zirconia thermal barrier coating of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhold, E.; Botzler, P.; Deus, C.

    1999-01-01

    Zirconia thermal barrier coatings are well used in the turbine manufacturing industry because they ensure extended lifetimes of turbine blades. Compared with other techniques, EB-PVD processes are best suited for the deposition on turbine blades with regard to the layer properties. Therefore EB-PVD coaters for turbine blades are becoming increasingly interesting. The coating costs per component are mainly dependent on a highly productive solution for the deposition task. Thus the EB-PVD process management has to be optimized in order to meet the productivity requirements of the manufacturers. This includes the requirement of high deposition rates, large deposition areas, long time stable production cycles as well as a matched duration of preheating, deposition and cooling down per charge. Modern EB-PVD solutions to be introduced allow deposition rates on blades up to 7 μm/min. The consequences for the technological process management and plant design concerning long time stable coating cycles with high productivity will be discussed. (orig.)

  13. Gas barrier properties of diamond-like carbon films coated on PTFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, K.; Nagashima, I.; Ohgoe, Y.; Hirakuri, K.K.; Mukaibayashi, H.; Masuzawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) using radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD). Before the DLC coating, the PTFE substrate was modified with a N 2 plasma pre-treatment to enhance the adhesive strength of the DLC to the substrate. The influences of the N 2 plasma pre-treatment and process pressure on the gas permeation properties of these DLC-coated PTFE samples were investigated. In the Raman spectra, the G peak position shifted to a lower wave number with increasing process pressure. With scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a network of microcracks was observed on the surface of the DLC film without N 2 plasma pre-treatment. The density of these cracks decreased with increasing process pressure. In the film subjected to a N 2 plasma pre-treatment, no cracks were observed at any process pressure. In the gas barrier test, the gas permeation decreased drastically with increasing film thickness and saturated at a thickness of 0.2 μm. The DLC-coated PTFE with the N 2 plasma pre-treatment exhibited a greater reduction in gas permeation than did the samples without pre-treatment. For both sample types, gas permeation decreased with increasing process pressure.

  14. Low-Thermal-Conductivity Pyrochlore Oxide Materials Developed for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    When turbine engines operate at higher temperatures, they consume less fuel, have higher efficiencies, and have lower emissions. The upper-use temperatures of the base materials (superalloys, silicon-based ceramics, etc.) used for the hot-section components of turbine engines are limited by the physical, mechanical, and corrosion characteristics of these materials. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied as thin layers on the surfaces of these materials to further increase the operating temperatures. The current state-of-the-art TBC material in commercial use is partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is applied on engine components by plasma spraying or by electron-beam physical vapor deposition. At temperatures higher than 1000 C, YSZ layers are prone to sintering, which increases thermal conductivity and makes them less effective. The sintered and densified coatings can also reduce thermal stress and strain tolerance, which can reduce the coating s durability significantly. Alternate TBC materials with lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance are needed to further increase the operating temperature of turbine engines.

  15. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs

  16. Dual function of novel pollen coat (surface proteins: IgE-binding capacity and proteolytic activity disrupting the airway epithelial barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elfatih H Bashir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pollen coat is the first structure of the pollen to encounter the mucosal immune system upon inhalation. Prior characterizations of pollen allergens have focused on water-soluble, cytoplasmic proteins, but have overlooked much of the extracellular pollen coat. Due to washing with organic solvents when prepared, these pollen coat proteins are typically absent from commercial standardized allergenic extracts (i.e., "de-fatted", and, as a result, their involvement in allergy has not been explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a unique approach to search for pollen allergenic proteins residing in the pollen coat, we employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM to assess the impact of organic solvents on the structural integrity of the pollen coat. TEM results indicated that de-fatting of Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass pollen (BGP by use of organic solvents altered the structural integrity of the pollen coat. The novel IgE-binding proteins of the BGP coat include a cysteine protease (CP and endoxylanase (EXY. The full-length cDNA that encodes the novel IgE-reactive CP was cloned from floral RNA. The EXY and CP were purified to homogeneity and tested for IgE reactivity. The CP from the BGP coat increased the permeability of human airway epithelial cells, caused a clear concentration-dependent detachment of cells, and damaged their barrier integrity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an immunoproteomics approach, novel allergenic proteins of the BGP coat were identified. These proteins represent a class of novel dual-function proteins residing on the coat of the pollen grain that have IgE-binding capacity and proteolytic activity, which disrupts the integrity of the airway epithelial barrier. The identification of pollen coat allergens might explain the IgE-negative response to available skin-prick-testing proteins in patients who have positive symptoms. Further study of the role of these pollen coat proteins in allergic

  17. FeS-coated sand for removal of arsenic(III) under anaerobic conditions in permeable reactive barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y.-S.; Gallegos, T.J.; Demond, A.H.; Hayes, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron sulfide (as mackinawite, FeS) has shown considerable promise as a material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions. However, as a nanoparticulate material, synthetic FeS is not suitable for use in conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). This study developed a methodology for coating a natural silica sand to produce a material of an appropriate diameter for a PRB. Aging time, pH, rinse time, and volume ratios were varied, with a maximum coating of 4.0 mg FeS/g sand achieved using a pH 5.5 solution at a 1:4 volume ratio (sand: 2 g/L FeS suspension), three days of aging and no rinsing. Comparing the mass deposited on the sand, which had a natural iron-oxide coating, with and without chemical washing showed that the iron-oxide coating was essential to the formation of a stable FeS coating. Scanning electron microscopy images of the FeS-coated sand showed a patchwise FeS surface coating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a partial oxidation of the Fe(II) to Fe(III) during the coating process, and some oxidation of S to polysulfides. Removal of As(III) by FeS-coated sand was 30% of that by nanoparticulate FeS at pH 5 and 7. At pH 9, the relative removal was 400%, perhaps due to the natural oxide coating of the sand or a secondary mineral phase from mackinawite oxidation. Although many studies have investigated the coating of sands with iron oxides, little prior work reports coating with iron sulfides. The results suggest that a suitable PRB material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions can be produced through the deposition of a coating of FeS onto natural silica sand with an iron-oxide coating. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  19. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  20. Laser surface modification of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on AISI H13 tool steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, M. S.; Aqida, S. N.; Ismail, I.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents laser surface modification of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating to seal porosity defect. Laser surface modification on plasma sprayed YSZ was conducted using 300W JK300HPS Nd: YAG laser at different operating parameters. Parameters varied were laser power and pulse frequency with constant residence time. The coating thickness was measured using IM7000 inverted optical microscope and surface roughness was analysed using two-dimensional Mitutoyo Surface Roughness Tester. Surface roughness of laser surface modification of YSZ H-13 tool steel decreased significantly with increasing laser power and decreasing pulse frequency. The re-melted YSZ coating showed higher hardness properties compared to as-sprayed coating surface. These findings were significant to enhance thermal barrier coating surface integrity for dies in semi-solid processing.

  1. Effect of thermal barrier coating with various blends of pumpkin seed oil methyl ester in DI diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthickeyan, V.; Balamurugan, P.

    2017-10-01

    The rise in oil prices, dependency on fossil fuels, degradation of non-renewable energy resources and global warming strives to find a low-carbon content alternative fuel to the conventional fuel. In the present work, Partially Stabilized Zirconia (PSZ) was used as a thermal barrier coating in piston head, cylinder head and intake and exhaust valves using plasma spray technique, which provided a rise in combustion chamber temperature. With the present study, the effects of thermal barrier coating on the blends of Pumpkin Seed Oil Methyl Ester (PSOME) were observed in both the coated and uncoated engine. Performance and emission characteristics of the PSOME in coated and uncoated engines were observed and compared. Increased thermal efficiency and reduced fuel consumption were observed for B25 and diesel in coated and uncoated engine. On comparing with the other biodiesel samples, B25 exhibited lower HC, NOx and smoke emissions in thermally coated engine than uncoated engine. After 100 h of operation, no anamolies were found in the thermally coated components except minor cracks were identified in the edges of the piston head.

  2. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n(+) emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  3. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-12-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n+ emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  4. Vibration behavior of the artificial barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikoshiba, Tadashi; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Izuru [National Research Inst. for Earth sceince and Disaster Prevention (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    This study aims at production of a mimic specimen of artificial barrier, experimental elucidation of influence of seismic motion due to a vibration experiment on the artificial barrier system, and establishment of an evaluating method on its long-term behavior. The study has been carried out under a cooperative study of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. In 1998 fiscal year, an artificial barrier specimen initiated by crosscut road was produced, and their random wave and actual seismic wave vibrations were carried out to acquire their fundamental data. As a result of the both vibrations, it was found that in a Case 2 specimen of which buffer material was swelled by poured water, the material was integrated with a mimic over-pack to vibrate under judgement of eigen-frequency, maximum acceleration ratio, and so forth on the test results. And, in a Case 1 specimen, it was thought that the mimic over-pack showed an extreme non-linear performance (soft spring) because of reducing eigen-frequency with increase of its vibration level. (G.K.)

  5. Roll-to-roll DBD plasma pretreated polyethylene web for enhancement of Al coating adhesion and barrier property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haibao; Li, Hua; Fang, Ming; Wang, Zhengduo; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Chen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The images of Al coating adhesion testes for (a) untreated and (b) roll-to-roll DBD plasma treated PE. - Highlights: • Over three-months ageing a high surface energy was still existed in roll-to-roll DBD plasma-treated PE surface. • The adhesion and barrier property of Al-coated PE web were greatly improved. • The mechanism of plasma grafting to improve the properties of Al-coated PE web was found. - Abstract: In this paper the roll-to-roll atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used to pre-treat polyethylene (PE) web surface before the conventional thermal evaporation aluminum (Al) was performed as a barrier layer. We emphasized the plasma environment effect based on the inlet three kinds of reactive monomers. The cross hatch test was employed to assess the Al coating adhesion; and the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was used to evaluate gas barrier property. The results showed that after roll-to-roll DBD plasma treatment all Al coatings adhered strongly on PE films and were free from pinhole defects with mirror morphology. The OTR was reduced from 2673 cm 3 /m 2 day for Al-coated original PE to 138 cm 3 /m 2 day for Al-coated allyamine (C 3 H 7 N) modified PE. To well understand the mechanism the chemical compositions of the untreated and DBD plasma pretreated PE films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface topography was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the property of surface energy the water contact angle measurement was also carried out in the DBD plasma treated samples with deionized water.

  6. Roll-to-roll DBD plasma pretreated polyethylene web for enhancement of Al coating adhesion and barrier property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibao; Li, Hua; Fang, Ming; Wang, Zhengduo; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Chen, Qiang, E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: The images of Al coating adhesion testes for (a) untreated and (b) roll-to-roll DBD plasma treated PE. - Highlights: • Over three-months ageing a high surface energy was still existed in roll-to-roll DBD plasma-treated PE surface. • The adhesion and barrier property of Al-coated PE web were greatly improved. • The mechanism of plasma grafting to improve the properties of Al-coated PE web was found. - Abstract: In this paper the roll-to-roll atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used to pre-treat polyethylene (PE) web surface before the conventional thermal evaporation aluminum (Al) was performed as a barrier layer. We emphasized the plasma environment effect based on the inlet three kinds of reactive monomers. The cross hatch test was employed to assess the Al coating adhesion; and the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was used to evaluate gas barrier property. The results showed that after roll-to-roll DBD plasma treatment all Al coatings adhered strongly on PE films and were free from pinhole defects with mirror morphology. The OTR was reduced from 2673 cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for Al-coated original PE to 138 cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for Al-coated allyamine (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}N) modified PE. To well understand the mechanism the chemical compositions of the untreated and DBD plasma pretreated PE films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface topography was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the property of surface energy the water contact angle measurement was also carried out in the DBD plasma treated samples with deionized water.

  7. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  8. Metallographic techniques for evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coatings produced by Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Matthew; Singh, Jogender; Todd, Judith; Copley, Steven; Wolfe, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) produced by Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) are primarily applied to critical hot section turbine components. EB-PVD TBC for turbine applications exhibit a complicated structure of porous ceramic columns separated by voids that offers mechanical compliance. Currently there are no standard evaluation methods for evaluating EB-PVD TBC structure quantitatively. This paper proposes a metallographic method for preparing samples and evaluating techniques to quantitatively measure structure. TBC samples were produced and evaluated with the proposed metallographic technique and digital image analysis for columnar grain size and relative intercolumnar porosity. Incorporation of the proposed evaluation technique will increase knowledge of the relation between processing parameters and material properties by incorporating a structural link. Application of this evaluation method will directly benefit areas of quality control, microstructural model development, and reduced development time for process scaling

  9. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  10. Coherent gradient sensing method for measuring thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coherent gradient sensing (CGS method can be used to measure the slope of a reflective surface, and has the merits of full-field, non-contact, and real-time measurement. In this study, the thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating (TBC structures is measured by CGS method. Two kinds of powders were sprayed onto Ni-based alloy using a plasma spraying method to obtain two groups of film–substrate specimens. The specimens were then heated with an oxy-acetylene flame. The resulting thermal mismatch between the film and substrate led to out-of-plane deformation of the specimen. The deformation was measured by the reflective CGS method and the thermal stress field of the structure was obtained through calibration with the help of finite element analysis. Both the experiment and numerical results showed that the thermal stress field of TBC structures can be successfully measured by CGS method.

  11. Bio-based coatings as potential barriers to chemical contaminants from recycled paper and board for food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzotti, V; Marti, A; Piergiovanni, L; Limbo, S

    2014-01-01

    Partition and diffusion experiments were carried out with paper and board samples coated with different biopolymers. The aim was to evaluate the physicochemical behaviour and barrier properties of bio-coatings against migration of typical contaminants from recycled paper packaging. Focus was directed towards water-based, renewable biopolymers, such as modified starches (cationic starch and cationic waxy starch), plant and animal proteins (gluten and gelatine), poured onto paper with an automatic applicator. Additionally, a comparison with polyethylene-laminated paper was performed. Microstructural observations of the bio-coated paper allowed the characterisation of samples. From the partitioning studies, considerable differences in the adsorption behaviour of the selected contaminants between bio-coated or uncoated paper and air were highlighted. For both the polar and non-polar compounds considered (benzophenone and diisobutyl phthalate, respectively), the lowest values of partition coefficients were found when paper was bio-coated, making it evident that biopolymers acted as chemical/physical barriers towards these contaminants. These findings are discussed considering the characteristics of the tested biopolymers. Diffusion studies into the solid food simulant poly 2,6-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide, also known as Tenax(®), confirmed that all the tested biopolymers slowed down migration. The Weibull kinetic model was fitted to the experimental data to compare migration from paper and bio-coated paper. Values found for β, an index determining the pattern of curvature, ranged from 1.1 to 1.7 for uncoated and polyethylene paper, whereas for bio-coated papers they ranged from 2.2 to 4.9, corresponding to the presence of an evident lag phase due to barrier properties of the tested bio-coatings.

  12. Reliability modeling of an engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananda, M.M.A.; Singh, A.K.; Flueck, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Weibull distribution is widely used in reliability literature as a distribution of time to failure, as it allows for both increasing failure rate (IFR) and decreasing failure rate (DFR) models. It has also been used to develop models for an engineered barrier system (EBS), which is known to be one of the key components in a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste (HLW). The EBS failure time can more realistically be modelled by an IFR distribution, since the failure rate for the EBS is not expected to decrease with time. In this paper, we use an IFR distribution to develop a reliability model for the EBS

  13. Mechanical properties of EB-PVD ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Carolin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the elastic properties of thermal barrier coatings which were produced by electron-beam enhanced physical vapour deposition were investigated, as well as the dependency of the properties on the sample microstructure, the thermal treatment and the test method. For this purpose, not only commercial coatings were characterized, but also special sample material was used which consists of a 1 mm thick layer of EB-PVD TBC. This material was isothermally heat treated for different times at 950 C, 1100 C and 1200 C and then tested in a specially developed miniaturized bend test and by dynamic mechanical analysis. The sample material was tested by nanoindentation in order to measure the Young's modulus on a local scale, and the porosity of the samples was determined by microstructure analysis and porosimetry. The decrease of porosity could be connected with sintering and subsequent stiffening of the material. The test results are dependent on the tested volume. A small test volume leads to larger measured Young's moduli, while a large test volume yields lower values. The test volume also has an influence on the increase of stiffness during thermal exposure. With a small tested volume, a quicker increase of the Young's modulus was registered, which could be associated to the sintering of local structures.

  14. Thermocyclic behaviour of microstructurally modified EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, U.; Fritscher, K.; Raetzer-Scheibe, H.-J.; Kaysser, W.A.; Peters, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on the combined effects of substrate temperature and rotation during electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) on the columnar microstructure of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) thermal barrier coatings. Diameter and degree of ordering of the columns and the density of the coatings are sensitive to the processing parameters. Results are discussed in the frame of common structural zone models for PVD processes. The models are extended to consider the rotational effect. EB-PVD YPSZ TBCs of different column diameters were deposited on top of an EB-PVD NiCoCrAlY bondcoat on IN 100 superalloy test bars. The performance of the TBCs was investigated in a cyclic oxidation furnace test rig between 1100 C and 130 C and in a burner rig under hot gas corrosion conditions at a maximum temperature of 900 C. Results showed a correlation between cyclic lifetime and the various microstructures of the TBCs. Samples having a non-regular arrangement of columns performed best in both tests. (orig.)

  15. Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-01-01

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam-physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  16. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  17. Crack Driving Forces in a Multilayered Coating System for Ceramic Matrix Composite Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the top coating thickness, modulus and shrinkage strains on the crack driving forces for a baseline multilayer Yttria-Stabilized-Zirconia/Mullite/Si thermal and environment barrier coating (TEBC) system for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite substrates are determined for gas turbine applications. The crack driving forces increase with increasing modulus, and a low modulus thermal barrier coating material (below 10 GPa) will have no cracking issues under the thermal gradient condition analyzed. Since top coating sintering increases the crack driving forces with time, highly sintering resistant coatings are desirable to maintain a low tensile modulus and maintain a low crack driving force with time. Finite element results demonstrated that an advanced TEBC system, such as ZrO2/HfO2, which possesses improved sintering resistance and high temperature stability, exhibited excellent durability. A multi-vertical cracked structure with fine columnar spacing is an ideal strain tolerant coating capable of reducing the crack driving forces to an acceptable level even with a high modulus of 50 GPa.

  18. Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S.

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass

  19. Development of barrier coatings for cellulosic-based materials by cold plasma methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Agnes Reka

    Cellulose-based materials are ideal candidates for future industries that need to be based on environmentally safe technologies and renewable resources. Wood represents an important raw material and its application as construction material is well established. Cellophane is one of the most important cellulosic material and it is widely used as packaging material in the food industry. Outdoor exposure of wood causes a combination of physical and chemical degradation processes due to the combined effects of sunlight, moisture, fungi, and bacteria. Cold-plasma-induced surface modifications are an attractive way for tailoring the characteristics of lignocellulosic substrates to prevent weathering degradation. Plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) was deposited onto wood surfaces to create water repellent characteristics. The presence of a crosslinked macromolecular structure was detected. The plasma coated samples exhibited very high water contact angle values indicating the existence of hydrophobic surfaces. Reflective and electromagnetic radiation-absorbent substances were incorporated with a high-molecular-weight polydimethylsiloxane polymer in liquid phase and deposited as thin layers on wood surfaces. The macromolecular films, containing the dispersed materials, were then converted into a three dimensional solid state network by exposure to a oxygen-plasma. It was demonstrated that both UV-absorbent and reflectant components incorporated into the plasma-generated PDMSO matrix protected the wood from weathering degradation. Reduced oxidation and less degradation was observed after simulated weathering. High water contact angle values indicated a strong hydrophobic character of the oxygen plasma-treated PDMSO-coated samples. Plasma-enhanced surface modifications and coatings were employed to create water-vapor barrier layers on cellophane substrate surfaces. HMDSO was selected as a plasma gas and oxygen was used to ablate amorphous regions. Oxygen plasma

  20. Thermal barrier coating by electron beam-physical vapor deposition of zirconia co-doped with yttria and niobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Soares de Almeida

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The most usual ceramic material for coating turbine blades is yttria doped zirconia. Addition of niobia, as a co-dopant in the Y2O3-ZrO2 system, can reduce the thermal conductivity and improve mechanical properties of the coating. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of the addition of niobia on the microstructure and thermal properties of the ceramic coatings. SEM on coatings fractured cross-section shows a columnar structure and the results of XRD show only zirconia tetragonal phase in the ceramic coating for the chemical composition range studied. As the difference NbO2,5-YO1,5 mol percent increases, the tetragonality increases. A significant reduction of the thermal conductivity, measured by laser flash technique in the zirconia coating co-doped with yttria and niobia when compared with zirconia-yttria coating was observed.

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Jarek

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  2. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  3. Investigation of the effect of FeCl3 on combustion and emission of diesel engine with thermal barrier coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakti P. Jena

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, the engine performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder diesel engine with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ coating on piston crown and valves were studied. The 0.2 g L−1 of ferric chloride (FeCl3 as catalyst was added into the diesel fuel in both coated and uncoated engines. The results indicated that FeCl3 with diesel in a YSZ coated engine increased the brake thermal efficiency by 2.7%, and reduced brake specific fuel consumption by 8.3% as compared to standard diesel mode in uncoated engine. The selected thermal barrier coating improved the combustion in afterburning stage leading to effective use of intake air. Emissions such as carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and smoke opacity were reduced with an increase in emissions of nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide.

  4. Lu2O3-SiO2-ZrO2 Coatings for Environmental Barrier Application by Solution Precursor Plasma Spraying and Influence of Precursor Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Quet, Aurélie; Braidy, Nadi; Gitzhofer, François

    2014-02-01

    As environmental barrier coatings are subjected to thermal stress in gas turbine engines, the introduction of a secondary phase as zircon (ZrSiO4) is likely to increase the stress resistance of Lu2Si2O7 coatings generated by induction plasma spraying using liquid precursors. In a first step, precursor chemistry effect is investigated by the synthesis of ZrO2-SiO2 nanopowders by induction plasma nanopowder synthesis technique. Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as silicon precursor and zirconium oxynitrate and zirconium ethoxide as zirconium precursors are mixed in ethanol and produce a mixture of tetragonal zirconia and amorphous silica nanoparticles. The use of zirconium ethoxide precursor results in zirconia particles with diameter below 50 nm because of exothermic thermal decomposition of the ethoxide and its high boiling point with respect to solvent, while larger particles are formed when zirconium oxynitrate is employed. The formation temperature of zircon from zirconia and silica oxides is found at 1425 °C. Second, coatings are synthesized in Lu2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 system. After heat treatment, the doping effect of lutetium on zirconia grains totally inhibits the zircon formation. Dense coatings are obtained with the use of zirconium ethoxide because denser particles with a homogeneous diameter distribution constitute the coating.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} barrier coatings to reduce the water vapour permeability of polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzada, Tamkin, E-mail: tahm4852@uni.sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKenzie, David R.; James, Natalie L.; Yin, Yongbai [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Li, Qing [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-09-30

    We demonstrate significantly enhanced barrier properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) against water vapour penetration by depositing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} nanofilms grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation analysis revealed good adhesion strength of a bilayer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} coating to PEEK, while the single layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating displayed flaking and delamination. We identified three critical design parameters for achieving the optimum barrier properties of ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} coatings on PEEK. These are a minimum total thickness dependent on the required water vapour transmission rate, the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} bilayer coating and the application of the coating to both sides of the PEEK film. Using these design parameters, we achieved a reduction in moisture permeability of PEEK of over two orders of magnitude while maintaining good adhesion strength of the polymer–thin film system. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} coatings reduced water vapour permeability. • Bilayer coatings reduced the permeability more than single layer coatings. • Bilayer coatings displayed higher adhesion strength than the single layer coatings. • Double-sided coatings performed better than single-sided coatings. • Correlation was found between total thickness and reduced water vapour permeability.

  6. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma polymerization in argon/n-hexane gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Kylián, Ondřej, E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com; Petr, Martin; Choukourov, Andrei; Hanuš, Jan; Biederman, Hynek

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films were deposited by RF plasma polymerization in argon/n-hexane gas mixture on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils. It was found that such deposited films may significantly improve the barrier properties of PET. It was demonstrated that the principal parameter that influences barrier properties of such deposited films towards oxygen and water vapor is the density of the coatings. Moreover, it was shown that for achieving good barrier properties it is advantageous to deposit coatings with very low thickness. According to the presented results, optimal thickness of the coating should not be higher than several tens of nm. - Highlights: • a-C:H films were prepared by plasma polymerization in Ar/n-hexane atmosphere. • Barrier properties of coatings are dependent on their density and thickness. • Highest barrier properties were observed for films with thickness 15 nm.

  7. Diffraction grating strain gauge method: error analysis and its application for the residual stress measurement in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuanjie; Fan, Bozhao; He, Wei; Dai, Xianglu; Guo, Baoqiao; Xie, Huimin

    2018-03-01

    Diffraction grating strain gauge (DGSG) is an optical strain measurement method. Based on this method, a six-spot diffraction grating strain gauge (S-DGSG) system has been developed with the advantages of high and adjustable sensitivity, compact structure, and non-contact measurement. In this study, this system is applied for the residual stress measurement in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) combining the hole-drilling method. During the experiment, the specimen’s location is supposed to be reset accurately before and after the hole-drilling, however, it is found that the rigid body displacements from the resetting process could seriously influence the measurement accuracy. In order to understand and eliminate the effects from the rigid body displacements, such as the three-dimensional (3D) rotations and the out-of-plane displacement of the grating, the measurement error of this system is systematically analyzed, and an optimized method is proposed. Moreover, a numerical experiment and a verified tensile test are conducted, and the results verify the applicability of this optimized method successfully. Finally, combining this optimized method, a residual stress measurement experiment is conducted, and the results show that this method can be applied to measure the residual stress in TBCs.

  8. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  9. International Collaboration Activities on Engineered Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program has been engaging in international collaborations between repository R&D programs for high-level waste (HLW) disposal to leverage on gathered knowledge and laboratory/field data of near- and far-field processes from experiments at underground research laboratories (URL). Heater test experiments at URLs provide a unique opportunity to mimetically study the thermal effects of heat-generating nuclear waste in subsurface repository environments. Various configurations of these experiments have been carried out at various URLs according to the disposal design concepts of the hosting country repository program. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier Experiment in Crystalline Host Rock) project is a large-scale heater test experiment originated by the Spanish radioactive waste management agency (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. – ENRESA) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) URL in Switzerland. The project was subsequently managed by CIEMAT. FEBEX-DP is a concerted effort of various international partners working on the evaluation of sensor data and characterization of samples obtained during the course of this field test and subsequent dismantling. The main purpose of these field-scale experiments is to evaluate feasibility for creation of an engineered barrier system (EBS) with a horizontal configuration according to the Spanish concept of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock. Another key aspect of this project is to improve the knowledge of coupled processes such as thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermal-hydro-chemical (THC) operating in the near-field environment. The focus of these is on model development and validation of predictions through model implementation in computational tools to simulate coupled THM and THC processes.

  10. Synthesis of alumina ceramic encapsulation for self-healing materials on thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golim, O. P.; Prastomo, N.; Izzudin, H.; Hastuty, S.; Sundawa, R.; Sugiarti, E.; Thosin, K. A. Z.

    2018-03-01

    Durability of Thermal Barrier Coating or TBC can be optimized by inducing Self-Healing capabilities with intermetallic materials MoSi2. Nevertheless, high temperature operation causes the self-healing materials to become oxidized and lose its healing capabilities. Therefore, a method to introduce ceramic encapsulation for MoSi2 is needed to protect it from early oxidation. The encapsulation process is synthesized through a simple precipitation method with colloidal aluminum hydroxide as precursor and variations on calcination process. Semi-quantitative analysis on the synthesized sample is done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. Meanwhile, qualitative analysis on the morphology of the encapsulation was carried out by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) equipped with dual Focus Ion Beam (FIB). The result of the experiment shows that calcination process significantly affects the final characteristic of encapsulation. The optimum encapsulation process was synthesized by colloidal aluminum hydroxide as a precursor, with a double step calcination process in low pressure until 900 °C.

  11. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  12. Failure Analysis of Multilayered Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Rocchio-Heller, R.; Liu, J.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-02-01

    Improvement in the performance of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the key objectives for further development of gas turbine applications. The material most commonly used as TBC topcoat is yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). However, the usage of YSZ is limited by the operating temperature range which in turn restricts the engine efficiency. Materials such as pyrochlores, perovskites, rare earth garnets are suitable candidates which could replace YSZ as they exhibit lower thermal conductivity and higher phase stability at elevated temperatures. The objective of this work was to investigate different multilayered TBCs consisting of advanced topcoat materials fabricated by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The investigated topcoat materials were YSZ, dysprosia-stabilized zirconia, gadolinium zirconate, and ceria-yttria-stabilized zirconia. All topcoats were deposited by TriplexPro-210TM plasma spray gun and radial injection of suspension. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue and thermal shock testing. Microstructure analysis of as-sprayed and failed specimens was performed with scanning electron microscope. The failure mechanisms in each case have been discussed in this article. The results show that SPS could be a promising route to produce multilayered TBCs for high-temperature applications.

  13. Manufacturing and testing of fuel cans with barrier coating for LWR type reactors in USA and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Papers on manufacturing methods for fuel cans of zircalloy with barrier coating of zirconium prepared by pressing an internal tube into external one as well as by pressing of two-layer tubes with further rolling are reviewed. Heat treatment based on creation of the assigned gradient of temperature over tube wall cross section in order to change the structure of a thin layer of the outside surfce when conserving the initial structure of the rest cross section is developed to increase corrosion resistance. Eddy current and ultrasound methods for control of quality and thickness of the barrier layer of zirconium are used

  14. Coated armor system and process for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S.; Lillo, Thomas M.; McHugh, Kevin M.

    2010-11-23

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  15. Intermetallic Al-, Fe-, Co- and Ni-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Prepared by Cold Spray for Applications on Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchinsky, E.; Sobiesiak, A.; Maev, R.

    2018-02-01

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat insulating topcoat. They possess the desired low thermal conductivity, but at the same time they are very brittle and sensitive to thermal shock and thermal cycling due to the inherently low coefficient of thermal expansion. Recent research activities are focused on the developing of multilayer TBC structures obtained using cold spraying and following annealing. Aluminum intermetallics have demonstrated thermal and mechanical properties that allow them to be used as the alternative TBC materials, while the intermetallic layers can be additionally optimized to achieve superior thermal physical properties. One example is the six layer TBC structure in which cold sprayed Al-based intermetallics are synthesized by annealing in nitrogen atmosphere. These multilayer coating systems demonstrated an improved thermal fatigue capability as compared to conventional ceramic TBC. The microstructures and properties of the coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS and mechanical tests to define the TBC material properties and intermetallic formation mechanisms.

  16. Internal Transport Barrier Physics in Helical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Maassberg, H.; Ida, K.; Estrada, T.; Castejon, F.; Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Yamagishi, O.; Shats, M. G.; Dinklage, A.; Tribaldos, V.; Beidler, C. D.; Shimozuma, T.; Takeiri, Y.; Herranz, J.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) in helical systems are reviewed. The common features are highly peaked Te profile with strongly positive Er in the core region. The transition nature of Er based on neoclassical (NC) ambipolarity, with the clear threshold feature such as ECH power and Ohmic current, is the common mechanism for the eITB formation. The electron heat confinement improvement has been revealed within the eITB region. The ECH power threshold can be lowered in the presence of ripple-trapped electrons-induced convective flux, and rational surfaces at the core region. The gyrokinetic calculations, for example eITB in LHD, have shown that the ETG mode is unstable in eITB region due to the large Te gradient. A larger zonal flow amplitude has been observed in eITB phase in CHS. The geodesic transfer of energy from stationary zonal flow to oscillatory modes (GAMs) recognized in H-1 implies that the stationary zonal flows can be maintained at a higher level by reducing the geodesic curvature in helical systems. This is the first report of the eITB branch in the framework of the International Stellarator Profile DataBase (ISPDB). (Author)

  17. Microfibrillated cellulose and borax as mechanical, O₂-barrier, and surface-modulating agents of pullulan biocomposite coatings on BOPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Carlo A; Campanella, Gaetano; Türe, Hasan; Olsson, Richard T; Farris, Stefano

    2016-06-05

    Multifunctional composite coatings on bi-oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films were obtained using borax and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) added to the main pullulan coating polymer. Spectroscopy analyses suggested that a first type of interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between the C6OH group of pullulan and the hydroxyl groups of boric acid, while monodiol and didiol complexation represented a second mechanism. The deposition of the coatings yielded an increase in the elastic modulus of the entire plastic substrate (from ∼2GPa of the neat BOPP to ∼3.1GPa of the P/B+/MFC-coated BOPP). The addition of MFC yielded a decrease of both static and kinetic coefficients of friction of approximately 22% and 25%, respectively, as compared to the neat BOPP. All composite coatings dramatically increased the oxygen barrier performance of BOPP, especially under dry conditions. The deposition of the high hydrophilic coatings allowed to obtain highly wettable surfaces (water contact angle of ∼18°). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Yb2Si2O7 Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited by Various Thermal Spray Techniques: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Marcano, Diana; Zhou, Dapeng; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Dense, crack-free, uniform, and well-adhered environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are required to enhance the environmental durability of silicon (Si)-based ceramic matrix composites in high pressure, high gas velocity combustion atmospheres. This paper represents an assessment of different thermal spray techniques for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 EBCs. The Yb2Si2O7 coatings were deposited by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), suspension plasma spraying (SPS), and very low-pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) techniques. The initial feedstock, as well as the deposited coatings, were characterized and compared in terms of their phase composition. The as-sprayed amorphous content, microstructure, and porosity of the coatings were further analyzed. Based on this preliminary investigation, the HVOF process stood out from the other techniques as it enabled the production of vertical crack-free coatings with higher crystallinity in comparison with the APS and SPS techniques in atmospheric conditions. Nevertheless, VLPPS was found to be the preferred process for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 coatings with desired characteristics in a controlled-atmosphere chamber.

  19. Humidity-Induced Phase Transitions of Surfactants Embedded in Latex Coatings Can Drastically Alter Their Water Barrier and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Gonzalez-Martinez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Latex coatings are environmentally friendly i.e., they are formed from aqueous polymer dispersions, are cheap to produce and provide exceptional mechanical properties. Therefore, they are ubiquitous and can be found in a wide range of different applications such as paints and varnishes, pressure-sensitive adhesives, textiles, construction materials, paper coatings and inks. However, they also have weaknesses and their surfactant content is among them. Surfactants are often needed to stabilize polymer particles in the aqueous latex dispersions. These surfactants also form part of the coatings formed from these dispersions, and it is well-known that they can lower their performance. This work further explores this aspect and focuses on the role that embedded surfactant domains play in the response of latex coatings to humid environments. For this purpose, we made use of several experimental techniques where humidity control was implemented: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. By means of this multimethodological approach, we report that surfactants embedded in latex coatings can undergo humidity-induced transitions towards more hydrated and softer phases, and that this results in a drastic decrease of the mechanical and water barrier properties of the whole coatings. Subsequently, this work highlights the potential of taking into account the phase behavior of surfactants when choosing which ones to use in the synthesis of latex dispersions as this would help in predicting their performance under different environmental conditions.

  20. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied.

  1. Processing and Deposition of Nanocrystalline Oxide Composites for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ying, Jackie

    2000-01-01

    .... Electrophoretic deposition was used to coat the nanocomposite powders onto nickel substrates. The effect of alumina content, powder calcination temperature, and film thickness on the thermal stability of zirconia-based coatings was examined...

  2. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Wilder, D.G.

    1991-02-01

    This progress report presents the interpretation of data obtained (up to November 1, 1988) from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test site. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for the field tests for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities, at a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site in Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the tests is to provide the basis for determining whether tests planned for Yucca Mountain have the potential to be successful. Thirteen chapters discuss the following: mapping the electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate of the rock mass; changes in moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe; characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the heater borehole; electrical resistance heater installed in a 30-cm borehole; relative humidity measurements; the operation, design, construction, calibration, and installation of a microwave circuit that might provide partial pressure information at temperatures in excess of 200 degree C (392 degree F); pressure and temperature measurements in the G-Tunnel; the moisture collection system, which attempts to collect steam that migrates into the heater borehole; The borehole television and borescope surveys that were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes; preliminary scoping calculations of the hydrothermal conditions expected for this prototype test; the Data Acquisition System; and the results of the PEBSFT, preliminary interpretations of these results, and plans for the remainder of the test. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  3. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

    1991-08-01

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT

  4. Diamondlike carbon coating as a galvanic corrosion barrier between dental implant abutments and nickel-chromium superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkomur, Ahmet; Erbil, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy, to investigate the effect of diamondlike carbon (DLC) coating over titanium on galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and Ni-Cr alloy, and to evaluate the effect of DLC coating over titanium abutments on the fit and integrity of prosthetic assemblies by scanning electron microcopy (SEM). Five Ni-Cr and 10 titanium disks with a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 3 mm were prepared. DLC coating was applied to five titanium disks. Electrode samples were prepared, and open circuit potential measurements, galvanic current measurements over platinum electrodes, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out. For the SEM evaluation, 20 Ni-Cr alloy and 10 gold alloy superstructures were cast and prepared over 30 abutments. DLC coating was applied to 10 of the abutments. Following the fixation of prosthetic assemblies, the samples were embedded in acrylic resin and cross sectioned longitudinally. Internal fit evaluations were carried out through examination of the SEM images. Titanium showed more noble and electrochemically stable properties than Ni-Cr alloy. DLC coating over the cathode electrode served as an insulating film layer over the surface and prevented galvanic coupling. Results of the SEM evaluations indicated that the DLC-coated and titanium abutments showed no statistically significant difference in fit. Hence, no adverse effects on the adaptation of prosthetic components were found with the application of DLC coating over abutment surfaces. DLC coating might serve as a galvanic corrosion barrier between titanium abutments and Ni-Cr superstructures.

  5. Deployment Efficiency and Barrier Effectiveness Testing of a Temporary Anti-Personnel (TAP) Barrier System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, David James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hedrick, Charles D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Ruben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report documents tests conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on behalf of the U.S. Department of State to evaluate a temporary anti-personnel (TAP) barrier system developed by Mitigation Technologies. For this, the SNL Denial and Structural Assessment department developed a test protocol for the evaluation of the TAP barrier system on the basis of deployment efficiency and barrier effectiveness against a riotous/mob attack threat. The test protocol was then executed by SNL personnel and the results of the testing are documented.

  6. Combined Effects of JP-8 Fuel and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Performance and Emissions of a DI Diesel Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klett, David

    1999-01-01

    .... The experiments were conducted on a Ricardo Hydra single-cylinder DI diesel engine. Thin ceramic thermal barrier coatings were applied to various combustion chamber surfaces including the piston crown, cylinder head, and cylinder liner...

  7. Combined Effects of JP-8 Fuel and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Performance and Emissions of a DI Diesel Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klett, David

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the combined effects of using JP-8 Fuel in conjunction with thin thermal barrier coatings on the specific fuel consumption and emissions of UHC, NO, and smoke of a DI diesel engine...

  8. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction deconvolution method for the measurement of residual stress in thermal barrier coatings as a function of depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Jacques, S D M; Chen, Y; Daisenberger, D; Xiao, P; Markocsan, N; Nylen, P; Cernik, R J

    2016-12-01

    The average residual stress distribution as a function of depth in an air plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia top coat used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems was measured using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on station I15 at Diamond Light Source, UK, employing a series of incidence angles. The stress values were calculated from data deconvoluted from diffraction patterns collected at increasing depths. The stress was found to be compressive through the thickness of the TBC and a fluctuation in the trend of the stress profile was indicated in some samples. Typically this fluctuation was observed to increase from the surface to the middle of the coating, decrease a little and then increase again towards the interface. The stress at the interface region was observed to be around 300 MPa, which agrees well with the reported values. The trend of the observed residual stress was found to be related to the crack distribution in the samples, in particular a large crack propagating from the middle of the coating. The method shows promise for the development of a nondestructive test for as-manufactured samples.

  9. An elevated-temperature depth-sensing instrumented indentation apparatus for investigating thermo-mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhaoliang; Yu, Miao; Liu, Yanchao; Xu, Baosheng; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Zhao, Hongwei; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    In our study, an elevated-temperature depth-sensing instrumented indentation apparatus was designed and developed to investigate thermo-mechanical response of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A furnace was used to heat the test region up to 1600 °C and a heat protection design was proposed to protect electronic devices from high temperature environment. Load was applied by a precise loading motor and a piezoelectric actuator in high (0-440 N) and low (0-40 N) load ranges, respectively. A loading shielding scheme was designed to protect the low load sensor during the high loading process. In order to obtain reliable test data, the as-developed apparatus was calibrated at room and elevated temperatures. It is found that the developed apparatus was suitable to obtain the intended data. After that, two typical TBCs were tested from 600 to 1500 °C, and the load-depth curves were presented to show the main functions and usability of the measuring system.

  10. The influence of the structures and compounds of DLC coatings on the barrier properties of PET bottles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yang; Zhen-Duo, Wang; Shou-Ye, Zhang; Li-Zhen, Yang; Qiang, Chen

    2009-01-01

    To reduce the oxygen transmission rate through a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle (an organic plastic) diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on the inner surface of the PET bottle were deposited by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology with C 2 H 2 as the source of carbon and Ar as the diluted gas. As the barrier layer to humidity and gas permeation, this paper analyses the DLC film structure, composition, morphology and barrier properties by Fourier transform infrared, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and oxygen transmission rate in detail. From the spectrum, it is found that the DLC film mainly consists of sp 3 bonds. The barrier property of the films is significantly relevant to the sp 3 bond concentration in the coating, the film thickness and morphology. Additionally, it is found that DLC film deposited in an inductively coupled plasma enhanced capacitively coupled plasma source shows a compact, homogeneous and crack-free surface, which is beneficial for a good gas barrier property in PET bottles. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  11. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  12. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  13. Field repair of coated columbium Thermal Protection System (TPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for field repair of coated columbian panels were studied, and the probable cause of damage were identified. The following types of repair methods were developed, and are ready for use on an operational system: replacement of fused slurrey silicide coating by a short processing cycle using a focused radiant spot heater; repair of the coating by a glassy matrix ceramic composition which is painted or sprayed over the defective area; and repair of the protective coating by plasma spraying molybdenum disilicide over the damaged area employing portable equipment.

  14. Characterization and Application of a Planar Radio - Inductively-Coupled Plasma Source for the Production of Barrier Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Leonard Joseph

    A planar radio-frequency (rf) inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) source is used to produce fluorocarbon discharges (CF_4/Ar) to fluorinate the surface of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Using this system, concurrent studies of discharge characteristics, permeation properties of treated polymers and polymer surface characteristics are conducted to advance the use of plasma-fluorinated polymer surfaces as a barrier layer for automotive applications. Langmuir probes are used to determine spatial distribution of charged-particle and space-potential characteristics in Ar and CF_4/Ar discharges and to show the influence of the spatial distribution of the heating regions and the reactor boundaries on the discharge uniformity. Langmuir probes are also used to identify rf anisotropic drift motion of electrons in the heating regions of the source and transient high-energy electron features in pulsed discharges. These latter features allow pulsed ICP sources to be operated at low time-averaged powers that are necessary to treat thermally sensitive polymers. Fourier Transform Infrared (FITR) spectroscopy is used to measure the dissociation of fluorocarbon gases and to explore differences between pulsed- and continuous -power operation. Dissociation levels of CF_4 (50-85%) using pulsed-power operation are as high as that for continuous operation, even though the net time -averaged power is far less with pulsed operation. The result suggests that pulsed fluorocarbon discharges possess high concentrations of chemically-active species needed for rapid surface fluorination. A gravimetric permeation cup method is used to measure the permeation rate of test fuels through HDPE membranes, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) studies are performed to determine the stoichiometry and thickness of the barrier layer. From these studies we find that a 50-70 A thick, polar, fluoro-hydrocarbon over layer reduces the permeation of isooctane/toluene/methanol mixtures by a

  15. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Diosdado [Departamento de Física, Universidad Central “Marta Abreu” de Las Villas, CP 54830, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); León-Pérez, Fernando de [Centro Universitario de la Defensa de Zaragoza, Ctra. de Huesca s/n, E-50090 Zaragoza (Spain); Pérez-Álvarez, R. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209 Cuernavaca (Mexico); Arriaga, J., E-mail: arriaga@ifuap.buap.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit–Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices.

  16. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas, Diosdado; León-Pérez, Fernando de; Pérez-Álvarez, R.; Arriaga, J.

    2015-01-01

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit–Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices

  17. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  18. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 hr. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  19. Furnace Cyclic Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia-Yttria and Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Nesbitt, James A.; McCue, Terry R.; Barrett, Charles A.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to enable further increases in engine temperatures. However, the coating performance and durability become a major concern under the increasingly harsh thermal cycling conditions. Advanced zirconia- and hafnia-based cluster oxide thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity and improved thermal stability are being developed using a high-heat-flux laser-rig based test approach. Although the new composition coatings were not yet optimized for cyclic durability, an initial durability screening of numerous candidate coating materials was carried out using conventional furnace cyclic tests. In this paper, furnace thermal cyclic behavior of the advanced plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings that were co-doped with multi-component rare earth oxides was investigated at 1163 C using 45 min hot cycles. The ceramic coating failure mechanisms were studied by using scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray diffraction phase analysis after the furnace tests. The coating cyclic lifetime will be discussed in relation to coating phase structures, total dopant concentrations, and other properties.

  20. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project

  2. Degradation Mechanisms of Military Coating Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keene, L. T; Halada, G. P; Clayton, C. R; Kosik, W. E; McKnight, S. H

    2004-01-01

    ... States Department of Defense (DOD). Traditional methods for studying automotive and architectural coatings cannot easily probe the structural and chemical changes associated with the unique formulations used by DOD...

  3. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System For Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Joseph; Curran, Jerome; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem facing Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other Government Agencies, and the general public. These problems include KSC launch support structures, highway bridge infrastructure, and building structures such as condominium balconies. Due to these problems, the development of a Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System would be a breakthrough technology having great commercial value for the following industries: Transportation, Infrastructure, Marine Infrastructure, Civil Engineering, and the Construction Industry. This sacrificial coating system consists of a paint matrix that may include metallic components, conducting agents, and moisture attractors. Similar systems have been used in the past with varying degrees of success. These systems have no proven history of effectiveness over the long term. In addition, these types of systems have had limited success overcoming the initial resistance between the concrete/coating interface. The coating developed at KSC incorporates methods proven to overcome the barriers that previous systems could not achieve. Successful development and continued optimization of this breakthrough system would produce great interest in NASA/KSC for corrosion engineering technology and problem solutions. Commercial patents on this technology would enhance KSC's ability to attract industry partners for similar corrosion control applications.

  4. Cellulose-nanofiber/polygalacturonic acid coatings with high oxygen barrier and targeted release properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Susanne L.; Henriksson, Marielle; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    , respectively. The coating was able to survive the exposure of a simulated gastric fluid, but was partially degraded upon exposure to pectinase enzyme, which simulate the action of the microbial symbionts present in the human colon. Prior to exposure, the oxygen permeability coefficient of the coating (0.033ml...

  5. Application of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF Spraying to the Fabrication of Yb-Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Bakan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available From the literature, it is known that due to their glass formation tendency, it is not possible to deposit fully-crystalline silicate coatings when the conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS process is employed. In APS, rapid quenching of the sprayed material on the substrate facilitates the amorphous deposit formation, which shrinks when exposed to heat and forms pores and/or cracks. This paper explores the feasibility of using a high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF process for the cost-effective fabrication of dense, stoichiometric, and crystalline Yb2Si2O7 environmental barrier coatings. We report our findings on the HVOF process optimization and its resultant influence on the microstructure development and crystallinity of the Yb2Si2O7 coatings. The results reveal that partially crystalline, dense, and vertical crack-free EBCs can be produced by the HVOF technique. However, the furnace thermal cycling results revealed that the bonding of the Yb2Si2O7 layer to the Silicon bond coat needs to be improved.

  6. Theoretical prediction of energy release rate for interface crack initiation by thermal stress in environmental barrier coatings for ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, E.; Umeno, Y.

    2017-05-01

    As weight reduction of turbines for aircraft engines is demanded to improve fuel consumption and curb emission of carbon dioxide, silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) are drawing enormous attention as high-pressure turbine materials. For preventing degradation of SiC/SiC, environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for ceramics are deposited on the composites. The purpose of this study is to establish theoretical guidelines for structural design which ensures the mechanical reliability of EBC. We conducted finite element method (FEM) analysis to calculate energy release rates (ERRs) for interface crack initiation due to thermal stress in EBC consisting of Si-based bond coat, Mullite and Ytterbium (Yb)-silicate layers on a SiC/SiC substrate. In the FEM analysis, the thickness of one EBC layer was changed from 25 μm to 200 μm while the thicknesses of the other layers were fixed at 25 μm, 50 μm and 100 μm. We compared ERRs obtained by the FEM analysis and a simple theory for interface crack in a single-layered structure where ERR is estimated as nominal strain energy in the coating layers multiplied by a constant factor (independent of layer thicknesses). We found that, unlike the case of single-layered structures, the multiplication factor is no longer a constant but is determined by the combination of consisting coating layer thicknesses.

  7. Effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi; Vaehae-Nissi, Mika; Harlin, Ali; Marles, Jaana; Miikkulainen, Ville; Karppinen, Maarit

    2010-01-01

    The effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboards was studied. Both polyethylene and polylactide coated paperboards were corona treated prior to ALD. Corona treatment increased surface energies of the paperboard substrates, and this effect was still observed after several days. Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 films were grown on top of the polymer coatings at temperature of 100 deg. C using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. For SiO 2 depositions a new precursor, bis(diethylamido) silane, was used. The positive effect of the corona pre-treatment on the barrier properties of the polymer-coated paperboards with the ALD-grown layers was more significant with polyethylene coated paperboard and with thin deposited layers (shorter ALD process). SiO 2 performed similarly to Al 2 O 3 with the PE coated board when it comes to the oxygen barrier, while the performance of SiO 2 with the biopolymer-coated board was more moderate. The effect of corona pre-treatment was negligible or even negative with the biopolymer-coated board. The ALD film growth and the effect of corona treatment on different substrates require further investigation.

  8. Pegasus International, Inc. coating removal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Pegasus Coating Removal System (PCRS) was demonstrated at Florida International University (FIU) where it was being evaluated for efficiency and cost. In conjunction with the FIU testing demonstration, a human factors assessment was conducted to assess the hazards and associated safety and health issues of concern for workers utilizing this technology. The PCRS is a chemical paste that is applied to the surface using a brush, roller, or airless sprayer. After the type of PCRS, thickness, and dwell time have been determined, a laminated backed material is placed on top of the chemical paste to slow down the drying process and to provide a mechanism to strip-off the chemical. After the dwell time is reached, the chemical substrate can be removed. Scrapers may be used to break-loose the layers as necessary or to break-loose the layers that are not removed when the laminated paper is picked up. Residue may also be cleaned off of the surface with a damp sponge with an agitating motion, absorbent sponges, or a vacuum, as needed. The paint and removal agent is then placed in drums for disposal at a later time. During the assessment sampling was conducted for organic vapors and general observational techniques were conducted for ergonomics. Recommendations for improved worker safety and health during application and removal of the PCRS include: (1) work practices that reflect avoidance of exposure or reducing the risk of exposure; (2) assuring all PPE and equipment are compatible with the chemicals being used; (3) work practices that reduce the worker`s need to walk on the slippery surface caused by the chemical or the use of special anti-slip soles; (4) careful control of overspray (if a spray application is used); and (5) the use of ergonomically designed long-handled tools to apply and remove the chemical (to alleviate some of the ergonomic concerns).

  9. Study on vibration behaviors of engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikoshiba, Tadashi; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Minowa, Chikahiro

    1998-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes have been buried underground by packing into a strong sealed container made from carbon steel (over-pack) with buffer material (bentonite). The engineered barrier system constructed with an overpack and buffer materials must be resistant to earthquakes as well as invasion of groundwater for a long period. Therefore, seismic evaluation of barrier system for earthquakes is indispensable especially in Japan to keep its structural safety. Here, the effects of earthquake vibration on the engineered barrier systems were investigated experimentally. Random-wave vibration and practical seismic wave one were loaded for the systems and fundamental data were obtained. For the former vibration the response characteristics of both engineered barrier models constructed with overpack and bentonite were non-linear. For the latter one, the stress in bentonite was increased in proportion to the vibration level. (M.N.)

  10. The Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Diesel Engine Performance and Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D.; Majumdar, G.; Sen, R. S.; Ghosh, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of coating thickness on performance and emission of a diesel engine including comparisons with results from an uncoated piston diesel engine. Primarily three piston crowns were coated with Al2O3 (bond coat) of 100 μm thickness each by using Plasma spray coating technique. Then these piston crowns were coated with partially stabilized zirconia with a thickness of 250, 350, 450 μm respectively by using the same technique over the bond coat. These pistons inserted into the cylinder of a diesel engine one by one to collect the combustion and emission data. Then these data were compared with standard diesel engine. It was observed that the thermal efficiency increased with increasing load levels, whereas specific fuel consumption reduced with increasing load. However, it was observed that harmful gases and particulates like CO, smoke and HC were reduced in case of all types of coated piston engine with the increase of load. Increased amount of NOX emission was reported during the experimentation.

  11. Application of thermal barrier coating for improving the suitability of Annona biodiesel in a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Senthil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annona biodiesel was produced from Annona oil through transesterification process. The aim of the present study is to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, direct injection, compression ignition engine using a annona methyl ester as a fuel. They are blended together with the Neat diesel fuel such as 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and Neat biodiesel. The performance, emission and combustion characteristics are evaluated by operating the engine at different loads. The performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption. The emission constituents such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and smoke were recorded. Then the piston and both exhaust and intake valves of the test engine were coated with 100 µm of NiCrAl as lining layer. Later the same parts were coated with 400 µm material of coating that was the mixture of 88% of ZrO2, 4% of MgO, and 8% of Al2O3. After the engine coating process, the same fuels is tested in the engine at the same engine operation. The same performance and emission parameters were evaluated. Finally, these parameters are compared with uncoated engine in order to find out the changes in the performance and emission parameters of the coated engine. It is concluded that the coating engine resulting in better performance, especially in considerably lower brake specific fuel consumption values. The engine emissions are lowered both through coating and annona methyl ester biodiesel expect the nitrogen oxides emission.

  12. High Temperature Degradation of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings (TEBCs) by CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Zhu, Dongming

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the degradation studies of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) of gas turbines by molten CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS). CMAS minerals are usually referred as silica-containing sand dust and volcano ash materials that are carried by the intake air into gas turbines, e.g. aircraft engines. The low-melting deposits react at high temperatures (1000C) with the coating materials. This causes degradation and accelerated coating failure of the static and rotating components of the turbine engines. We discuss some preliminary results of the reactions between CMAS and Rare-Earth (RE Y, Yb, Dy, Gd, Nd and Sm) oxide stabilized ZrO2 or HfO2 systems, and the stability of the resulting oxides and silicates. Plasma sprayed hollow tube samples (outer diameter 4.7 mm, wall thickness 0.76 mm and 26 mm height) were half filled with CMAS powder, wrapped and sealed with platinum foil, and heat- treated at 1310 C for 5h. Samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and cross section electron microscopy analysis.

  13. High-resolution reconstruction of a coastal barrier system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a detailed reconstruction of the sedimentary effects of Holocene sea-level rise on a modern coastal barrier system (CBS). Increasing concern over the evolution of CBSs due to future accelerated rates of sea-level rise calls for a better understanding of coastal barriers response.......5 ka ago. Back-barrier shoreline erosion due to sediment starvation in the back-barrier basin, was pronounced from 4.5 to 2.5 ka ago but the last 2.5 kyr barrier sedimentation has kept up with and outpaced sea-level. The last 0.4 kyr the CBS has been episodically prograding. Sediment accumulation shows...... considerable variation with periods of rapid sediment deposition and periods of non-deposition or erosion resulting in a highly punctuated sediment record....

  14. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-03-30

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

  15. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance

  16. Demonstration and Validation of Two Coat High Performance Coating System for Steel Structures in Corrosive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Corrosion and anti-corrosives, Storage tanks, Steel —Corrosion, Military bases, Fort Bragg (N.C.) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...System for Steel Structures in Corrosive Environments Final Report on Project F12-AR06 Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra...Prevention and Control Program ERDC/CERL TR-16-27 December 2016 Demonstration and Validation of Two-Coat High- Performance Coating System for Steel

  17. Effect of thermally growth oxides (TGO) on adhesion strength for high purity yitria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) and rare - Earth lanthanum zirconates (LZ) multilayer thermal barrier coating before and after isothermal heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Salmi Mohd; Johari, Azril Dahari; Husin, Shuib

    2017-12-01

    Investigation on the effect of Thermally Growth Oxides (TGO) on the adhesion strength for thermal barrier coating (TBC) was carried out. The TBC under studied was the multilayer systems which consist of NiCrAlY bond coat and YSZ/LZ ceramic coating deposited on Ni-based superalloy substrates. The development of thermally growth oxides (TGO) for both TBC systems after isothermal heat treatment was measured. Isothermal heat treatment was carried out at 1100 ˚C for 100 hours to age the samples. ASTM D4541: Standard Test Method for Pull-off Strength of Coatings using Portable Adhesion Tester was used to measure the adhesion strength of both TBC systems before and after heat treatment. The effect of the developed TGO on the measured adhesion strength was examined and correlation between them was established individually for both TBC systems. The failure mechanism of the both system was also identified; either cohesive or adhesive or the combination of both. The results showed that TGO has more than 50% from the bond coat layer for rare-earth LZ system compared to the typical YSZ system, which was less than 10 % from the bond coat layer. This leads to the lower adhesion strength of rare-earth LZ coating system compared to typical YSZ system. Failure mechanism during the pull-off test also was found to be different for both TBC systems. The typical YSZ system experienced cohesive failure whereas the rare-earth LZ system experienced the combination of cohesive and adhesive failure.

  18. FGM (Functionally Graded Material) Thermal Barrier Coatings for Hypersonic Structures - Design and Thermal Structural Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Sook-Ying; Kotousov, Andrei; Nguyen, Phuc; Harding, Steven; Codrington, John; Tsukamoto, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    .... It utilizes a pressurized spray gun to spray a slurry mixture of the powdered coating material suspended in a liquid solution directly onto a substrate surface followed by sintering using an oxyacetylene torch...

  19. Assessment of NDE methods for detecting cracks and damage in environmental barrier coated CMC tested under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Gorican, Daniel; Rauser, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    For validating physics based analytical models predicting spallation life of environmental barrier coating (EBC) on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and kinetics of crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under engine operating conditions. In this study, a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS) based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC) specimen was tensile tested at room temperature. Multiple tests were performed on a single specimen with increasing predetermined stress levels until final failure. During loading, the damage occurring in the EBC was monitored by digital image correlation (DIC). After unloading from the predetermined stress levels, the specimen was examined by optical microscopy and computed tomography (CT). Results indicate both optical microscopy and CT could not resolve the primary or secondary cracks developed during tensile loading until failure. On the other hand, DIC did show formation of a primary crack at ~ 50% of the ultimate tensile strength and this crack grew with increasing stress and eventually led to final failure of the specimen. Although some secondary cracks were seen in the DIC strain plots prior to final failure, the existence of these cracks were not confirmed by other methods. By using a higher resolution camera, it is possible to improve the capability of DIC in resolving secondary cracks and damage in coated specimen tested at room temperature, but use of DIC at high temperature requires significant development. Based on the current data, it appears that both optical microscopy and CT do not offer any hope for detecting crack initiation or determining crack growth in EBC coated CMC tested at room or high temperatures after the specimen has been unloaded. Other methods such as, thermography and optical/SEM of the polished cross section of EBC coated CMC specimens stressed to

  20. Nanostructured superhydrophobic polysiloxane coating for high barrier and anticorrosion applications in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arukalam, Innocent O; Oguzie, Emeka E; Li, Ying

    2018-02-15

    The use of epoxy and polyurethane coatings as marine topcoats, have been influenced by their inherent high surface energy property which increases their affinity to water and microorganisms. Thus, their susceptibility to degradation is enhanced. Because of this defect, recently, nanostructured hydrophobic and superhydrophobic polysiloxane coatings are being preferred as topcoats. But the appropriate nanoparticle size and matrix:filler ratio which provide guide for the design of desired topcoats are scarcely available. In view of this, a series of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic coatings were prepared by sol-gel process based on perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS), different nanoZnO particles and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS):nanoZnO ratios. The liquid repellency, surface morphology and roughness of the coatings were conducted by use of contact angle goniometer, field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Additionally, the electrochemical and salt spray corrosion tests were conducted. According to the results, modifications of the coatings showed that anticorrosion performance was considerably influenced by the surface properties which were dependent on nanoZnO size and PDMS:nanoZnO ratio. Remarkably, the optimum effect was observed on the superhydrophobic coating based on 30 nm ZnO and 1:1 ratio. This displayed highest anticorrosion performance, and is therefore recommended as a guide for the design of marine topcoats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karthikeya Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE. This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied.

  2. Addressing stress corrosion cracking on multi layer pipeline coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Scott B.; Marr, James E. [Tuboscope Pipeline Services, Houston, TX (United States); Willmot, Martyn [Jotun Group (Norway); Norman, David [David Norman Corrosion Control, Cornwall (United Kingdom); Khera, Ashish [Allied Engineering, Portland, ME (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is now recognized by operators worldwide as a significant threat to the safe operation of their pipeline systems. Gas, oil, and refined products lines have all been susceptible to this form of environmentally assisted cracking. As a result, operators and regulators have been incorporating data related to the development and prevalence of SCC into their risk management systems in order that they may effectively address this time-dependant threat. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) published the first structured methodology for stress corrosion cracking direct assessment (SCCDA) in 2004 (RP0204-2004). Operators are now beginning to apply the methods outlined in the standard to assess their systems. Research and industry experience have shown that various pipeline coating systems can be more or less effective in preventing the formation and growth of SCC. Newer pipeline coatings, such as multi layer epoxy/extruded polyolefin systems have been widely regarded as effective coating systems to address the threat posed by SCC when they are properly applied. New field studies performed on a pipeline coated with a three layer epoxy/polyethylene system have raised the possibility that operators utilizing these types of coatings may need to reassess how they manage the SCC threat. (author)

  3. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  4. One Component Encapsulating Material Matrix as High Barrier Coating, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for new flexible food packaging materials with effective high barrier against oxygen and moisture to protect food, minimize weight and...

  5. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Waugh, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion

  6. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Waugh, W.J. [UNC Chem-Nuclear Geotech, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion.

  7. Subsurface barrier validation with the SEAtrace{trademark} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn; William Lowry; Veraun Chipman

    1999-09-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, Science and Engineering Associates has completed development and testing of a subsurface barrier verification and monitoring system. This system, called SEAtrace{trademark}, is able to locate and size leaks with a high degree of accuracy in subsurface barriers that are emplaced in an unsaturated medium. It uses gaseous tracer injection, in-field real-time monitoring, and real time data analysis to evaluate barrier integrity. The approach is: Conservative as it measures vapor leaks in a containment system whose greatest risk is posed by liquid leaks; Applicable to any impermeable type of barrier emplacement technology in the unsaturated zone; Inexpensive as it uses readily available, non-toxic, nonhazardous gaseous tracers, does not require an inordinately large number of sampling points, and injection and sampling points can be emplaced by direct push techniques; Capable of assessing not only a barrier's initial integrity, but can also provide long-term monitoring. To date, six demonstrations of the system have been completed. Results from two of the demonstrations are detailed in this report. They include the final developmental demonstration of the SEAtrace system and a comparison demonstration of two tracer based verification technologies. The final developmental demonstration of SEAtrace was completed at a naval facility in Brunswick, Maine. The demonstration was funded solely by the DOE and was performed in cooperation with the US Navy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

  8. Phase of Photothermal Emission Analysis as a Diagnostic Tool for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Serviceable Engine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Tyler

    Power generation and aircraft companies are continuously improving the efficiency of gas turbines to meet economic and environmental goals. The trend towards higher efficiency has been achieved in part by raising the operating temperature of engines. At elevated temperatures, engine components are subject to many forms of degradation including oxidation, creep deformation and thermal cycle fatigue. To minimize these harmful effects, ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are routinely used to insulate metal components from excessive heat loads. Efforts to make realistic performance assessments of current and candidate coating materials has led to a diverse battery of creative measurement techniques. While it is unrealistic to envision a single measurement that would provide all conceivable information about the TBC, it is arguable that the capability for the single most important measurement is still lacking. A quantitative and nondestructive measurement of the thermal protection offered by a coating is not currently among the measurements one can employ on a serviceable engine part (or even many experimental specimens). In this contribution, phase of photothermal emission analysis (PopTea) is presented as a viable thermal property measurement for serviceable engine components. As it will be shown, PopTea has the versatility to make measurements on gas turbine parts in situ, with the goal of monitoring TBCs over the lifetime of the engine. The main challenges toward this goal are dealing with changes that occur to the TBC during service. Several of the main degradations seen on engine equipment include: aging, surface contamination and infiltration of foreign deposits. Measuring coatings under these conditions, is the impetus of this work. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that PopTea can be used on real engine equipment with measurements made on an actual turbine blade.

  9. Slurry Coating System Statement of Work and Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The Slurry Coating System will be used to coat crystals with a polymer to support Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) research and development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The crystals will be suspended in water in a kettle. A polymer solution is added, temperature of the kettle is raised and aggregates of the crystals and polymer form. The slurry is heated under vacuum to drive off the solvents and slowly cooled while mixing to room temperature. The resulting aggregates are then filtered and dried. The performance characteristics and fielding constraints define a unique set of requirements for a new system. This document presents the specifications and requirements for the system.

  10. Analysis of the energetic/environmental performances of gas turbine plant: Effect of thermal barrier coatings and mass of cooling air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ion V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 is the most common material to be applied in thermal barrier coatings owing to its excellent properties: low thermal conductivity, high toughness and thermal expansion coefficient as ceramic material. Calculation has been made to evaluate the gains of thermal barrier coatings applied on gas turbine blades. The study considers a top ceramic coating Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 on a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and Inconel 738LC as substrate. For different thickness and different cooling air flow rates, a thermodynamic analysis has been performed and pollutants emissions (CO, NOx have been estimated to analyze the effect of rising the gas inlet temperature. The effect of thickness and thermal conductivity of top coating and the mass flow rate of cooling air have been analyzed. The model for heat transfer analysis gives the temperature reduction through the wall blade for the considered conditions and the results presented in this contribution are restricted to a two considered limits: (1 maximum allowable temperature for top layer (1200ºC and (2 for blade material (1000ºC. The model can be used to analyze other materials that support higher temperatures helping in the development of new materials for thermal barrier coatings.

  11. Anisotropic TGO rumpling in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings under in-phase thermomechanical loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, D.S., E-mail: d.balint@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kim, S.-S.; Liu Yufu; Kitazawa, R.; Kagawa, Y. [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8409 (Japan); Evans, A.G. [College of Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier system has been tested under in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions with thermal gradient in the through-thickness direction. Undulations in the thermally grown oxide (TGO) were observed to have clear anisotropic behavior with respect to the directions parallel and perpendicular to the loading axis. It was found that undulation wavelengths were nearly the same in both directions but the amplitude in the perpendicular direction was much larger than in the parallel direction. A recent model of TGO rumpling was adapted and used to analyze and explain the origins of the observed rumpling behavior under TMF conditions. Methods for deducing variation in the coefficient of thermal expansion with temperature and in the creep properties of the substrate from the experimental strain data are also presented in the course of the derivations. Model results show that tensile stress applied in the loading direction can overcome the compression occurring from lateral expansion during oxide formation, causing undulations to flatten; undulations perpendicular to the loading axis are unaffected. However, ratcheting in the strain cycle experienced by the substrate, which occurs naturally by substrate creep, is necessary for anisotropic rumpling under cyclic stress conditions. Model predictions for constant applied stress are also presented, demonstrating a reversal in the direction of undulation alignment under compression. A threshold stress is identified, in both tension and compression, sufficient to produce appreciable anisotropic rumpling. The model predictions provide a clear mechanism for the anisotropy and further evidence that the lateral expansion strain in the oxide is the driving force for oxide rumpling.

  12. Prioritizing barriers to successful implementation of hospital information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Leila; Khajouei, Reza; Nejad, Simin Salehi; Ebrahimzadeh, Maryam; Nikkar, Somayeh Ezhari

    2014-12-01

    Hospital information systems (HIS) are often implemented to enhance the quality of care, as well as to improve the efficiency and safety of health care services. However, there are various barriers for their successful implementation. The aim of this paper is to prioritize these barriers. This research is a cross sectional analytic-descriptive study. The study populations were hospital managers, IT department administrators, and clinical supervisors at the academic and non-academic hospitals of two cities in Iran. The data was collected by a questionnaire that its content validity was confirmed by three specialists. Its reliability was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha (α = 0.78). Questionnaire contained five dimensions and 39 implementation barriers. The collected data was analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics using the Kendall Rank Correlation Coefficient and Chi2 tests. The findings of the study revealed that lack of powerful information networks, error in data entry, technical problems related to system design, lack of organizational training, lack of users' knowledge about system and working with it, and negative attitudes of providers and patients toward systems are the most important barriers of HIS implementation. Prioritizing of these barriers helps policy makers to decide what to do when planning for HIS utilization.

  13. Integrated control of the wastewater system – potentials and barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Ane Loft; Grum, Morten; Muschalla, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Applying integrated control to a sewer system and wastewater treatment plant often leads to additional benefits for both systems when compared to controlling them independently. However, barriers such as a lack of incentive for utilities to put this type of control in place mean that in practice...

  14. Overcoming barriers to evaluation of terminological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Arts, Daniëlle G. T.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of terminological systems has been demonstrated to be a complicated task. This is due to the broad range of terminological systems, their application, and the clinical contexts in which they can be applied. We propose an evaluation framework that explicitly distinguishes an

  15. Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balady, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken

  16. Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balady, M.A.

    1997-01-14

    This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken.

  17. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  18. The effect of thermal barrier coated piston crown on engine characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S.H.; Khor, K.A.

    2000-02-01

    While there have been numerous research papers in recent years describing the theoretical benefits obtained from the use of ceramic components in reciprocating engines, the amount of literature that describes practical results is very limited. Although successes have been reported and ceramic components are now in service in production engines, mainly for reduced in-cylinder heat rejection, many researchers have experienced failures or a drop in engine performance. This article presents the work completed on a low heat rejection engine. Extensive experiments were conducted on a three-cylinder SI Daihatsu engine with piston crowns coated with a layer of ceramic, which consisted of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Measurement and comparison of engine performance, in particular fuel consumption, were made before and after the application of YSZ coatings deposited onto the piston crowns. The details of the cylinder pressures during the combustion process were also investigated.

  19. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D. M.; Jarek, R.; Mariner, P.

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  20. An evaluation of the fire barrier system thermo-lag 330-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowlen, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the results of three fire endurance tests and one ampacity derating test set of the fire barrier system Thermo-Lag 330-1 Subliming Coating. Each test was performed using cable tray specimens protected by a nominal three-hour fire barrier envelope comprised of two layers of nominal 1/2 inch thick material. The fire barrier systems for two of the three fire endurance test articles and for the ampacity derating test article were installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installations procedures. The barrier system for the third fire endurance test article was a full reproduction of one of the original manufacturer's qualification test articles. This final test article included certain installation enhancements not considered typical of current nuclear power plant installations. The primary criteria for fire endurance performance evaluation was based on cable circuit integrity testing. Secondary consideration was also given to the temperature rise limits set forth in the ASTM E119 standard fire barrier test procedure. All three of the fire endurance specimens failed prematurely. Circuit integrity failures for the two fire endurance test articles with procedures-based installations were recorded at approximately 76 and 59 minutes into the exposures for a 6 inch wide and 12 inch wide cable tray respectively. Temperature excursion failures (single point) for these two test articles were noted at approximately 65 and 56 minutes respectively. The first circuit integrity failure for the full reproduction test article was recorded approximately 119 minutes into the exposure, and the first temperature excursion failure for this test article was recorded approximately 110 minutes into the exposure

  1. Durability Modeling of Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Using Finite Element Based Progressive Failure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Abdul-Aziz; Frank Abdi; Ramakrishna T. Bhatt; Joseph E. Grady

    2014-01-01

    The necessity for a protecting guard for the popular ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is getting a lot of attention from engine manufacturers and aerospace companies. The CMC has a weight advantage over standard metallic materials and more performance benefits. However, these materials undergo degradation that typically includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix which is generally seen at a higher temperature. Additionally, other factors such as residual stress...

  2. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-01

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm −1 to 68 cm −1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  3. Durability Analysis and Experimental Validation of Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC Performance Using Combined Digital Image Correlation and NDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdul-Aziz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand the failure mechanism or to predict the spallation life of environmental barrier coatings (EBC on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and the process of the crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under standard or simulated engine operating conditions. The current work considers a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS-based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC specimen that was tensile tested at room temperature. Numerous tests were performed under tensile loading conditions, and the specimen was loaded until failure under pre-determined stress levels. The specimen was examined with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, computed tomography (CT scan, and digital image correlation (DIC camera. Observation from the computed tomography scanning, the SEM, and the optical microscopy did not offer conclusive information concerning the cracks that spawned during the tests. However, inspection with the DIC camera offered some indication that cracks had developed and allowed their detection and the location of their initiation site. Thus, this study provides detailed discussion of the results obtained from the experimental investigation and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE, and it also includes assessment of the stress response predicted by analytical modeling and their impact on EBC durability and crack growth formation under complex loading settings.

  4. Delamination evaluation of thermal barrier coating on turbine blade owing to isothermal degradation using ultrasonic C-scan image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Girl; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung

    2016-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) is an essential element consisting of a super-alloy base and ceramic coating designed to achieve long operational time under a high temperature and pressure environment. However, the top coat of TBC can be delaminated at certain temperatures with long operation time. As the delamination of TBC is directly related to the blade damage, the coupling status of the TBC should be assured for reliable operation. Conventional studies of nondestructive evaluation have been made for detecting generation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) or qualitatively evaluating delamination in TBC. In this study, the ultrasonic C-scan method was developed to obtain the damage map inside TBC by estimating the delamination in a quantitative way. All specimens were isothermally degraded at 1,100°C with different time, having different partial delamination area. To detect partial delamination in TBC, the C-scan was performed by a single transducer using pulse-echo method with normal incidence. Partial delamination coefficients of 1 mm to 6 mm were derived by the proportion of the surface reflection signal and flaw signal which were theoretical signals using Rogers-Van Buren and Kim's equations. Using the partial delamination coefficients, the partial delamination maps were obtained. Regardless of the partial delamination coefficient, partial delamination area was increased when degradation time was increased in TBC. In addition, a decrease in partial delamination area in each TBC specimen was observed when the partial delamination coefficient was increased. From the portion of the partial delamination maps, the criterion for delamination was derived

  5. Delamination evaluation of thermal barrier coating on turbine blade owing to isothermal degradation using ultrasonic C-scan image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Girl; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) is an essential element consisting of a super-alloy base and ceramic coating designed to achieve long operational time under a high temperature and pressure environment. However, the top coat of TBC can be delaminated at certain temperatures with long operation time. As the delamination of TBC is directly related to the blade damage, the coupling status of the TBC should be assured for reliable operation. Conventional studies of nondestructive evaluation have been made for detecting generation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) or qualitatively evaluating delamination in TBC. In this study, the ultrasonic C-scan method was developed to obtain the damage map inside TBC by estimating the delamination in a quantitative way. All specimens were isothermally degraded at 1,100°C with different time, having different partial delamination area. To detect partial delamination in TBC, the C-scan was performed by a single transducer using pulse-echo method with normal incidence. Partial delamination coefficients of 1 mm to 6 mm were derived by the proportion of the surface reflection signal and flaw signal which were theoretical signals using Rogers-Van Buren and Kim's equations. Using the partial delamination coefficients, the partial delamination maps were obtained. Regardless of the partial delamination coefficient, partial delamination area was increased when degradation time was increased in TBC. In addition, a decrease in partial delamination area in each TBC specimen was observed when the partial delamination coefficient was increased. From the portion of the partial delamination maps, the criterion for delamination was derived.

  6. The combined use of enamel matrix proteins and a tetracycline-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene barrier membrane in the treatment of intra-osseous defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipos, PM; Loos, BG; Abbas, F; Timmerman, MF; van der Velden, U

    Objectives: The purpose of this split-mouth study was to evaluate the clinical response of enamel matrix proteins (EMPs, Emdogain Gel((R))) in intra-osseous defects with or without a combined application of a tetracycline-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene barrier membrane (e-PTFE,

  7. Engineered barrier experiment. Power control and data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J.M.; Gamero, E.; Martin, P.L.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.J.; Yuste, C.

    1997-01-01

    The engineered barrier concept for the storage of radioactive wastes is being tested at almost full scale at CIEMAT facilities. A data acquisition and control is an element of this experiment. This system would be operating for next three years. (Author)

  8. Alternative approaches to reliability modeling of a multiple engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananda, M.M.A.; Singh, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    The lifetime of the engineered barrier system used for containment of high-level radioactive waste will significantly impact the total performance of a geological repository facility. Currently two types of designs are under consideration for an engineered barrier system, single engineered barrier system and multiple engineered barrier system. Multiple engineered barrier system consists of several metal barriers and the waste form (cladding). Some recent work show that a significant improvement of performance can be achieved by utilizing multiple engineered barrier systems. Considering sequential failures for each barrier, we model the reliability of the multiple engineered barrier system. Weibull and exponential lifetime distributions are used through out the analysis. Furthermore, the number of failed engineered barrier systems in a repository at a given time is modeled using a poisson approximation

  9. Barriers and Opportunities for Sustainable Food Systems in Northeastern Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda Janke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Survey responses of producers and institutional buyers in northeastern Kansas (United States were analyzed to understand barriers and opportunities for sustainable food systems in the region where their emergence has been limited. Producers and buyers identified barriers previously noted regarding mismatches of available quantities and prices. Producers’ enthusiasm to supply locally exceeded buyers’ interest to source locally. Transportation was identified as one of the major concerns by producers, and their responses to choice tasks revealed producers’ preferences to sell locally while pricing their products to secure sales revenue and to cover their logistics expenses at least partially.

  10. Characterization and durability testing of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria and hafnia-yttria thermal barrier coatings. Part 2: Effect of spray parameters on the performance of several hafnia-yttria and zirconia-yttria coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second of two reports which discuss initial experiments on thermal barrier coatings prepared and tested in newly upgraded plasma spray and burner rig test facilities at LeRC. The first report, part 1, describes experiments designed to establish the spray parameters for the baseline zirconia-yttria coating. Coating quality was judged primarily by the response to burner rig exposure, together with a variety of other characterization approaches including thermal diffusivity measurements. That portion of the study showed that the performance of the baseline NASA coating was not strongly sensitive to processing parameters. In this second part of the study, new hafnia-yttria coatings were evaluated with respect to both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria and the alternate zirconia-yttria coatings were very sensitive to plasma-spray parameters in that high-quality coatings were obtained only when specific parameters were used. The reasons for this important observation are not understood.

  11. Suberin fatty acids isolated from outer birch bark improve moisture barrier properties of cellulose ether films intended for tablet coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinämäki, Jyrki; Halenius, Anna; Paavo, Maaja; Alakurtti, Sami; Pitkänen, Pauliina; Pirttimaa, Minni; Paaver, Urve; Kirsimäe, Kalle; Kogermann, Karin; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2015-07-15

    We showed that the addition of suberin fatty acids (SFAs) even at small concentrations significantly improves the water vapor barrier properties of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) films. SFAs were isolated from the outer birch bark using extractive hydrolysis. The effects of SFAs on the film formation of aqueous HPMC were investigated with free films plasticized with polyethylene glycol (PEG 400). Special attention was paid on the physical solid-state, moisture barrier and mechanical stress-strain properties of films intended for tablet film coatings. Topography and surface morphology, glass transition temperature (Tg), tensile strength, Young's modulus, and water vapor permeation (WVP) of films were studied. The addition of SFAs lowered the Tg of films suggesting partial enhancement in film plasticization. The WVP of films decreased with increasing SFAs concentration up to 15% (calculated as a % w/w from a polymer weight). The WVP value for a non-suberized reference film and suberized film plasticized with PEG 400 was 2.13×10(-6) and 0.69[×10(-6) g/(mm(2)×h)×mm/Pa], respectively. The addition of SFAs impaired the mechanical stress-strain properties of HPMC films by reducing the deformation capacity of film. In conclusion, the film properties and performance of aqueous HPMC can be modified by including SFAs in the films. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1 - 1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1 - 1). The objective of this analysis was to develop the BDCFs for the

  13. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    na

    2005-05-30

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1 - 1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1 - 1). The

  14. Origin of Small Barriers in Jahn–Teller Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barriuso, M. T.; Ortiz-Sevilla, B.; Aramburu, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its relevance, the microscopic origin of the energy barrier, B, between the compressed and elongated geometries of Jahn–Teller (JT) systems is not well understood yet because of a lack of quantitative data about its various contributions. Seeking to clear up this matter, we have carried out...... both periodic and cluster ab initio calculations on the model system NaCl:Ni+. This system is particularly puzzling because, according to experimental data, its barrier is much smaller than that for other d9 and d7 ions in similar lattices. All calculations performed on the model system lead, in fact......, contrary to cases where the complex formed by d9 or d7 ions is elastically decoupled from the host lattice. Although the magnitude of B for NaCl:Ni+ is particularly small, the tunneling splitting, 3Γ, is estimated to be below 9 cm–1, thus explaining why the coherence is easily destroyed by random strains...

  15. A new physical barrier system for seawater intrusion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoulhalik, Antoifi; Ahmed, Ashraf; Hamill, G. A.

    2017-06-01

    The construction of subsurface physical barriers is one of various methods used to control seawater intrusion (SWI) in coastal aquifers. This study proposes the mixed physical barrier (MPB) as a new barrier system for seawater intrusion control, which combines an impermeable cutoff wall and a semi-permeable subsurface dam. The effect of the traditionally-used physical barriers on transient saltwater wedge dynamics was first explored for various hydraulic gradients, and the workability of the MPB was thereafter thoroughly analysed. A newly developed automated image analysis based on light-concentration conversion was used in the experiments, which were completed in a porous media tank. The numerical code SEAWAT was used to assess the consistency of the experimental data and examine the sensitivity of the performance of the barriers to various key parameters. The results show that the MPB induced a visible lifting of the dense saline flux upward towards the outlet by the light freshwater. This saltwater lifting mechanism, observed for the first time, induced significant reduction to the saline water intrusion length. The use of the MPB yielded up to 62% and 42% more reduction of the saltwater intrusion length than the semi-permeable dam and the cutoff wall, respectively. The performance achieved by the MPB with a wall depth of 40% of the aquifer thickness was greater than that of a single cutoff wall with a penetration depth of 90% of the aquifer thickness (about 13% extra reduction). This means that the MPB could produce better seawater intrusion reduction than the traditionally used barriers at even lower cost.

  16. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  17. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  18. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  19. Hot corrosion behavior of nanostructured Gd2O3 doped YSZ thermal barrier coating in presence of Na2SO4 + V2O5 molten salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiong Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based superalloy DZ125 was first sprayed with a NiCrAlY bond coat and followed with a nanostructured 2 mol% Gd2O3−4.5 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (2GdYSZ topcoat using air plasma spraying (APS. Hot corrosion behavior of the as-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs were investigated in the presence of 50 wt% Na2SO4 + 50 wt% V2O5 as the corrosive molten salt at 900 °C for 100 h. The analysis results indicate that Gd doped YVO4 and m-ZrO2 crystals were formed as corrosion products due to the reaction of the corrosive salts with stabilizers (Y2O3, Gd2O3 of zirconia. Cross-section morphology shows that a thin layer called TGO was formed at the bond coat/topcoat interface. After hot corrosion test, the proportion of m-ZrO2 phase in nanostructured 2GdYSZ coating is lower than that of nano-YSZ coating. The result reveals that nanostructured 2GdYSZ coating exhibits a better hot corrosion resistance than nano-YSZ coating.

  20. Highly efficient catalytic systems based on Pd-coated microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Ahyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bumkyo; Kang, Dong Woo; Koo, Chong Min; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of two prototype catalysis systems using palladium (Pd)-coated microparticles was investigated with regard to the recovery and recyclability of the catalytic particles. One such system was the interface-adsorption method, in which polymer particles coated with Pd nanoparticles strongly and irreversibly attach to the oil-water interface. Due to the irreversible adsorption of the catalytic particles to the interface, particle loss was completely prevented while mixing the aqueous solution and while collecting the products. The other system was based on the magnetic field-associated particle recovery method. The use of polymeric microparticles containing Pd nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles accelerated the sedimentation of the particles in the aqueous phase by applying a strong magnetic field, consequently suppressing drainage of the particles from the reactor along the product stream. Upon multiple runs of the catalytic reactions, it was found that conversion does not change significantly, demonstrating the excellent recyclability and performance efficiency in the catalytic processes.

  1. Processing and Validation of Whey-Protein-Coated Films and Laminates at Semi-Industrial Scale as Novel Recyclable Food Packaging Materials with Excellent Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bugnicourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A biopolymer coating for plastic films was formulated based on whey protein, and its potential to replace current synthetic oxygen barrier layers used in food packaging such as ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH was tested. The whey-coating application was performed at semi-industrial scale. High barrier to oxygen with transmission rate down to ranges of 1 cm3 (STP m−2 d−1 bar−1 at and 50% relative humidity (r.h. but interesting humidity barrier down to ranges of 3 g m−2 d−1 (both normalized to 100 μm thickness were reached, outperforming most existing biopolymers. Coated films were validated for storing various food products showing that the shelf life and sensory attributes were maintained similar to reference packaging films while complying with food safety regulations. The developed whey coating could be enzymatically removed within 2 hours and is therefore compatible with plastic recycling operations to allow multilayer films to become recyclable by separating the other combined layers. A life cycle assessment was performed showing a significant reduction in the environmental impact of the packaging thanks in particular to the possibility of recycling materials as opposed to incinerating those containing EVOH or polyamide (PA, but due to the use of biosourced raw materials.

  2. Emergent Behavior of Coupled Barrier Island - Resort Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    Barrier islands are attractive sites for resorts. Natural barrier islands experience beach erosion and island overwash during storms, beach accretion and dune building during inter-storm periods, and migration up the continental shelf as sea level rises. Beach replenishment, artificial dune building, seawalls, jetties and groins have been somewhat effective in protecting resorts against erosion and overwash during storms, but it is unknown how the coupled system will respond to long-term sea level rise. We investigate coupled barrier island - resort systems using an agent-based model with three components: natural barrier islands divided into a series of alongshore cells; resorts controlled by markets for tourism and hotel purchases; and coupling via storm damage to resorts and resort protection by government agents. Modeled barrier islands change by beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms. In the resort hotel market, developer agents build hotels and hotel owning agents purchase them using predictions of future revenue and property appreciation, with the goal of maximizing discounted utility. In the tourism market, hotel owning agents set room rental prices to maximize profit and tourist agents choose vacation destinations maximizing a utility based on beach width, price and word-of-mouth. Government agents build seawalls, groins and jetties, and widen the beach and build up dunes by adding sand to protect resorts from storms, enhance beach quality, and maximize resort revenue. Results indicate that barrier islands and resorts evolve in a coupled manner to resort size saturation, with resorts protected against small-to-intermediate-scale storms under fairly stable sea level. Under extended, rapidly rising sea level, protection measures enhance the effect of large storms, leading to emergent behavior in the form of limit cycles or barrier submergence

  3. Experimental Approach of Fault Movement on an Engineered Barrier System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minsoo; Choi, Heuijoo; Kim, Heuna

    2012-01-01

    Safety evaluation of an engineered barrier system against fault movement at underground disposal region for high level waste (HLW) is tried using a miniature bore-shear apparatus. For the purpose, a miniature bore-shear apparatus simulating an EBS (engineered barrier system) was manufactured in 1/30 scale. And using the developed apparatus, bore-shear tests were performed twice. During the tests, pressure variations were checked at 6 points around buffer zone, and then a rotational angle of the test vessel was checked. The achieved pressure data were compared with those from analytical modeling, which is based on Drucker-Prager model. At initial shearing step, high pressure was recorded at some point but it decreased rapidly. For the better understanding of fault movement, the modification of an analytical model and the accumulation of experimental experience were required

  4. Experimental Approach of Fault Movement on an Engineered Barrier System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsoo; Choi, Heuijoo; Kim, Heuna [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Safety evaluation of an engineered barrier system against fault movement at underground disposal region for high level waste (HLW) is tried using a miniature bore-shear apparatus. For the purpose, a miniature bore-shear apparatus simulating an EBS (engineered barrier system) was manufactured in 1/30 scale. And using the developed apparatus, bore-shear tests were performed twice. During the tests, pressure variations were checked at 6 points around buffer zone, and then a rotational angle of the test vessel was checked. The achieved pressure data were compared with those from analytical modeling, which is based on Drucker-Prager model. At initial shearing step, high pressure was recorded at some point but it decreased rapidly. For the better understanding of fault movement, the modification of an analytical model and the accumulation of experimental experience were required.

  5. Organo-Aluminate Polymeric Materials as Advanced Erosion/Corrosion Resistant Thin Film Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ...) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The coating system is based on the development of carboxylato- alumoxane precursors for fabrication of corrosion resistant oxide barrier layers and alumoxane-epoxy based primer coats...

  6. Impact of impurity content on the sintering resistance and phase stability of dysprosia- and yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Curry, N.; Janikowski, W.; Pala, Zdeněk; Vilémová, Monika; Markocsan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, 1-2 (2014), s. 160-169 ISSN 1059-9630. [International Thermal Spray Conference (ITSC2013). Busan, 13.05.2013-15.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : atmospheric plasma spray ( APS ) * thermal and phase stability of coatings * thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) * thermal conductivity * zirconia Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11666-013-0014-9/fulltext.html

  7. A silver-coated antimicrobial barrier dressing used postoperatively on meshed autografts: a dressing comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Geoffrey M; Robertson, Symanthia W; Halerz, Marcia M; Conrad, Peggie; Supple, Kathy G; Gamelli, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to optimize the management of freshly grafted burn wounds, a silver-coated, low-adherence dressing, Acticoat (Smith & Nephew Inc., Largo, FL), was compared with 5% sulfamylon-soaked Exu-Dry burn wound dressings. Twenty subjects admitted to the Loyola University Medical Center were randomized to either Acticoat dressings or 5% sulfamylon-soaked burn wound dressings. Dressings were applied immediately after grafting in the operating room. Acticoat dressings were left in place for 3 days and then changed every 3 days thereafter. Sulfamylon-soaked dressings were changed at 48 hours and then every day. Subjects continued to have dressing changes on a twice-daily basis to wounds that were not grafted managed. Subjects were assessed for graft take, time to wound healing, and the number of dressings required until healing. Hospital charges and labor costs were retrospectively tabulated, yielding an expense estimate for each group. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to age, %TBSA, %TBSA of the grafted test sites, graft take, time to graft healing, or infectious complications. The median number of dressing changes to the test site was significantly less in the Acticoat group (P dressing change was not significantly different between the two groups; however, the average total expense per patient was significantly lower for the Acticoat group because of the reduced number of dressing changes. Acticoat and 5% sulfamylon-soaked burn wound dressings were equivalent with respect to wound healing and infectious complications. The use of Acticoat was found to be a safe alternative to the use of 5% sulfamylon as a postsurgical dressing in this group of subjects. Because of the reduced number of dressing changes, the use of Acticoat was a less expensive alternative to 5% sulfamylon dressing changes in this study.

  8. Load management for refrigeration systems: Potentials and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grein, Arne; Pehnt, Martin

    2011-01-01

    As a strategy to deal with the increasing intermittent input of renewable energy sources in Germany, the adaptation of power consumption is complementary to power-plant regulation, grid expansion and physical energy storage. One demand sector that promises strong returns for load management efforts is cooling and refrigeration. In these processes, thermal inertia provides a temporal buffer for shifting and adjusting the power consumption of cooling systems. We have conducted an empirical investigation to obtain a detailed and time-resolved bottom-up analysis of load management for refrigeration systems in the city of Mannheim, Germany. We have extrapolated our results to general conditions in Germany. Several barriers inhibit the rapid adoption of load management strategies for cooling systems, including informational barriers, strict compliance with legal cooling requirements, liability issues, lack of technical experience, an inadequate rate of return and organizational barriers. Small commercial applications of refrigeration in the food-retailing and cold storage in hotels and restaurants are particularly promising starting points for intelligent load management. When our results are applied to Germany, suitable sectors for load management have theoretical and achievable potential values of 4.2 and 2.8 GW, respectively, amounting to about 4-6% of the maximum power demand in Germany. - Highlights: → Potential and barriers for implementation of load shifting for refrigeration. → Empirical investigation for time-resolved bottom-up analysis in Mannheim, Germany. → Suitable sectors and further recommendations for introducing load management.→ Extrapolation of results from local to national level.

  9. Coatings and Surface Treatments for Reusable Entry Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2016-01-01

    This talk outlines work in coatings for TPS done at NASA Ames. coatings and surface treatments on reusable TPS are critical for controlling the behavior of the materials. coatings discussed include RCG, TUFI and HETC. TUFROc is also discussed.

  10. Buckling of Graded Coatings. A Continuum Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiu, Tz-Cheng

    2000-01-01

    Requirements for the protection of hot section components in many high temperature applications such as earth-to-orbit winged planes and advanced turbine systems have led to the application of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs...

  11. Higher Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings with the Combined Use of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet and the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Maurice; Wang, Jiwen; Kumar, Rishi; Roth, Jeffery; Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.

    2018-02-01

    Gas-turbine engines are widely used in transportation, energy and defense industries. The increasing demand for more efficient gas turbines requires higher turbine operating temperatures. For more than 40 years, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been the dominant thermal barrier coating (TBC) due to its outstanding material properties. However, the practical use of YSZ-based TBCs is limited to approximately 1200 °C. Developing new, higher temperature TBCs has proven challenging to satisfy the multiple property requirements of a durable TBC. In this study, an advanced TBC has been developed by using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process that generates unique engineered microstructures with the higher temperature yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) to produce a TBC that can meet and exceed the major performance standards of state-of-the-art air plasma sprayed YSZ, including: phase stability, sintering resistance, CMAS resistance, thermal cycle durability, thermal conductivity and erosion resistance. The temperature improvement for hot section gas turbine materials (superalloys & TBCs) has been at the rate of about 50 °C per decade over the last 50 years. In contrast, SPPS YAG TBCs offer the near-term potential of a > 200 °C improvement in temperature capability.

  12. Numerical Study of the Effects of Thermal Barrier Coating and Turbulence Intensity on Cooling Performances of a Nozzle Guide Vane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasert Prapamonthon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical investigation of the combined effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC with mainstream turbulence intensity (Tu on a modified vane of the real film-cooled nozzle guide vane (NGV reported by Timko (NASA CR-168289. Using a 3D conjugate heat transfer (CHT analysis, the NGVs with and without TBC are simulated at three Tus (Tu = 3.3%, 10% and 20%. The overall cooling effectiveness, TBC effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate the following three interesting phenomena: (1 TBC on the pressure side (PS is more effective than that on the suction side (SS due to a fewer number of film holes on the SS; (2 for all three Tus, the variation trends of the overall cooling effectiveness are similar, and TBC plays the positive and negative roles in heat flux at the same time, and significantly increases the overall cooling effectiveness in regions cooled ineffectively by cooling air; (3 when Tu increases, the TBC effect is more significant, for example, at the highest Tu (Tu = 20% the overall cooling effectiveness can increase as much as 24% in the film cooling ineffective regions, but near the trailing edge (TE and the exits and downstream of film holes on the SS, this phenomenon is slight.

  13. Development of Anti-Insect Microencapsulated Polypropylene Films Using a Large Scale Film Coating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ah Young; Choi, Ha Young; Lee, Eun Song; Han, Jaejoon; Min, Sea C

    2018-04-01

    Films containing microencapsulated cinnamon oil (CO) were developed using a large-scale production system to protect against the Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella). CO at concentrations of 0%, 0.8%, or 1.7% (w/w ink mixture) was microencapsulated with polyvinyl alcohol. The microencapsulated CO emulsion was mixed with ink (47% or 59%, w/w) and thinner (20% or 25%, w/w) and coated on polypropylene (PP) films. The PP film was then laminated with a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film on the coated side. The film with microencapsulated CO at 1.7% repelled P. interpunctella most effectively. Microencapsulation did not negatively affect insect repelling activity. The release rate of cinnamaldehyde, an active repellent, was lower when CO was microencapsulated than that in the absence of microencapsulation. Thermogravimetric analysis exhibited that microencapsulation prevented the volatilization of CO. The tensile strength, percentage elongation at break, elastic modulus, and water vapor permeability of the films indicated that microencapsulation did not affect the tensile and moisture barrier properties (P > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that effective films for the prevention of Indian meal moth invasion can be produced by the microencapsulation of CO using a large-scale film production system. Low-density polyethylene-laminated polypropylene films printed with ink incorporating microencapsulated cinnamon oil using a large-scale film production system effectively repelled Indian meal moth larvae. Without altering the tensile and moisture barrier properties of the film, microencapsulation resulted in the release of an active repellent for extended periods with a high thermal stability of cinnamon oil, enabling commercial film production at high temperatures. This anti-insect film system may have applications to other food-packaging films that use the same ink-printing platform. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Development of control system of coating of rod hydraulic cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizhambaeva, S. Zh; Maximova, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, requirements to materials of hydraulic cylinders and methods of eliminating the main factors affecting the quality of the applied coatings rod hydraulic cylinders. The chromium plating process - one of ways of increase of anti-friction properties of coatings rods, stability to the wear and corrosion. The article gives description of differences of the stand-speed chromium plating process from other types of chromium plating that determines a conclusion about cutting time of chromium plating process. Conducting the analysis of technological equipment suggested addressing the modernization of high-speed chromium plating processes by automation and mechanization. Control system developed by design of schematic block diagram of a modernized and stand-speed chromium plating process.

  15. Case history: Vertical barrier wall system for Superfund Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelling, M.A.; Kovac, C.P.; Norris, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Design considerations and construction aspects are presented for the installation of a vertical barrier wall system for the Boeing Company at a Superfund Site near Seattle, WA. The construction was performed during 1996. The vertical barrier wall system included: (1) a soil-bentonite (SB) slurry wall, approximately 670 meters (2200 feet) in length, ranging from 12 to 21 meters (40 to 70 feet) in depth; (2) expansion of a cover system over the area enclosed by the SB wall; and (3) surface drainage improvements. Design and construction of the system addressed requirements of a Consent Decree for the site issued in 1993. The paper discusses the development of the design to meet remedial performance goals of preventing migration of contaminants in the soil/groundwater system and aiding aquifer restoration. Secondly, the paper details installation of the SB wall, highlighting the more significant construction issues, which included excavation of the wall through glacially deposited cobbles/boulders/till as well as addressing the severe elevation changes along the wall alignment. Thirdly, the paper presents Quality Assurance (QA) monitoring and testing performed during the construction phase

  16. Influence of bondcoat composition and manufacturing parameters on the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings under cyclic temperature loading; Einfluss der Bondcoatzusammensetzung und Herstellungsparameter auf die Lebensdauer von Waermedaemmschichten bei zyklischer Temperaturbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subanovic, Marko

    2008-08-21

    cracks. The potential to improve lifetimes of APS-TBC's should arise from an adjustment of optimal interface roughness between TBC and bond coat, a TBC morphology with defect perpendicular to the crack propagation direction, formation of oxide scales with a low defect density and growth rate, ''strong'' interface between bond coat and oxide. Additionally the influence of water vapour-containing and reducing, water vapour/hydrogenatmospheres, as may prevail in power generation systems with CO2 separation, on the oxidation behaviour of MCrAlY alloys was investigated. In water vapour containing atmospheres the hydrogen increases the weight gain by increasing the solubility and diffusivity of oxygen in the alloy. Similar observations were made in strongly reducing atmospheres (e.g. Ar-4%H{sub 2}-2%H{sub 2}O). In this case the alumina growth rate was decreased, but the internal oxidation of yttrium due to hydrogen effect was even more pronounced. Another important observation was the tendency of freestanding MCrAlY coatings to blister when exposed in water vapour containing atmospheres with hydrogen additions. It seems that recombination of solute hydrogen at defects in the material interior is responsible for a pressure build-up in the blisters. Suitable measures to prevent hydrogen-induced damage would be a choice of material with low hydrogen solubility, high mechanical strength or application of a coating technology, which introduces fewer defects in the coating. An alternative measure would be a reduction of the yttrium reservoir in the coating because barrier properties of alumina scales against hydrogen are deteriorated by precipitation of yttrium-rich oxide phases in the TGO. (orig.)

  17. A CFD-Based Study of the Feasibility of Adapting an Erosion Burner Rig for Examining the Effect of CMAS Deposition Corrosion on Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic and computational fluid dynamics modeling has been conducted to examine the feasibility of adapting the NASA-Glenn erosion burner rigs for use in studies of corrosion of environmental barrier coatings by the deposition of molten CMAS. The effect of burner temperature, Mach number, particle preheat, duct heating, particle size, and particle phase (crystalline vs. glass) were analyzed. Detailed strategies for achieving complete melting of CMAS particles were developed, thereby greatly improving the probability of future successful experimental outcomes.

  18. Hot corrosion behavior of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7 and YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 thermal barrier coatings exposed to molten sulfate and vanadate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurluk, Yasin; Doleker, Kadir Mert; Karaoglanli, Abdullah Cahit

    2018-04-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are mostly used in critical components of aircraft gas turbine engines. Hot corrosion is among the main deteriorating factors in TBCs which results from the effect of molten salt on the coating-gas interface. This type of corrosion is observed as a result of contamination accumulated during combustion processes. Fuels used in aviation industry generally contain impurities such as vanadium oxide (V2O5) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). These impurities damage turbines' inlet at elevated temperatures because of chemical reaction. Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a conventional top coating material for TBCs while Gd2Zr2O7 is a new promising top coating material for TBCs. In this study, CoNiCrAlY metallic bond coat was deposited on Inconel 718 nickel based superalloy substrate material with a thickness about 100 μm using cold gas dynamic spray (CGDS) method. Production of TBCs were done with deposition of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7, YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 ceramic top coating materials using EB-PVD method, having a total thickness of 300 μm. Hot corrosion behavior of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7, YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 TBC systems were exposed to 45 wt.% Na2SO4 and 55 wt.% V2O5 molten salt mixtures at 1000 °C temperature. TBC samples were investigated and compared using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The hot corrosion failure mechanisms of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7 and YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 TBCs in the molten salts were evaluated.

  19. Towards a barrier height benchmark set for biologically relevant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy C. Kromann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have collected computed barrier heights and reaction energies (and associated model structures for five enzymes from studies published by Himo and co-workers. Using this data, obtained at the B3LYP/6- 311+G(2d,2p[LANL2DZ]//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, we then benchmark PM6, PM7, PM7-TS, and DFTB3 and discuss the influence of system size, bulk solvation, and geometry re-optimization on the error. The mean absolute differences (MADs observed for these five enzyme model systems are similar to those observed for PM6 and PM7 for smaller systems (10–15 kcal/mol, while DFTB results in a MAD that is significantly lower (6 kcal/mol. The MADs for PMx and DFTB3 are each dominated by large errors for a single system and if the system is disregarded the MADs fall to 4–5 kcal/mol. Overall, results for the condensed phase are neither more or less accurate relative to B3LYP than those in the gas phase. With the exception of PM7-TS, the MAD for small and large structural models are very similar, with a maximum deviation of 3 kcal/mol for PM6. Geometry optimization with PM6 shows that for one system this method predicts a different mechanism compared to B3LYP/6-31G(d,p. For the remaining systems, geometry optimization of the large structural model increases the MAD relative to single points, by 2.5 and 1.8 kcal/mol for barriers and reaction energies. For the small structural model, the corresponding MADs decrease by 0.4 and 1.2 kcal/mol, respectively. However, despite these small changes, significant changes in the structures are observed for some systems, such as proton transfer and hydrogen bonding rearrangements. The paper represents the first step in the process of creating a benchmark set of barriers computed for systems that are relatively large and representative of enzymatic reactions, a considerable challenge for any one research group but possible through a concerted effort by the community. We end by outlining steps needed to expand and

  20. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  1. Enhanced TEX biodegradation in nutrient briquet-peat barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, C.M.; Borden, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A two-layer barrier system has been developed to remediate gasoline-contaminated ground water. This system consists of a nutrient briquet layer to continuously supply nitrate as the electron acceptor for contaminant biodegradation and a peat layer to remove residual nitrate via biological denitrification and residual contaminants by sorption. Nitrate release rates from three different sizes of concrete briquets were used to estimate parameters for modeling solute diffusion in aggregated porous media with mobile and stagnant porewater regions. Toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (TEX) biodegradation rates in denitrifying microcosms at pH 8 and 9 were lower than in microcosms at pH 7.4. No degradation was observed at pH 10 under denitrifying conditions. A laboratory-scale, permeable barrier system was developed to evaluate TEX removal and to identify any operational problems. Average removal efficiencies were 86% for toluene, 71% for ethylbenzene, 43% for m-xylene, and 28% for o-xylene in the nutrient briquet and downstream soil column over a 45-day operating period. There was no evidence of benzene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions in the batch microcosms or continuous-flow columns

  2. Sub-barrier fusion of Si+Si systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colucci G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The near- and sub-barrier fusion excitation function has been measured for the system 30Si+30Si at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of INFN, using the 30Si beam of the XTU Tandem accelerator in the energy range 47 - 90 MeV. A set-up based on a beam electrostatic deflector was used for detecting fusion evaporation residues. The measured cross sections have been compared to previous data on 28Si+28Si and Coupled Channels (CC calculations have been performed using M3Y+repulsion and Woods-Saxon potentials, where the lowlying 2+ and 3− excitations have been included. A weak imaginary potential was found to be necessary to reproduce the low energy 28Si+28Si data. This probably simulates the effect of the oblate deformation of this nucleus. On the contrary, 30Si is a spherical nucleus, 30Si+30Si is nicely fit by CC calculations and no imaginary potential is needed. For this system, no maximum shows up for the astrophysical S-factor so that we have no evidence for hindrance, as confirmed by the comparison with CC calculations. The logarithmic derivative of the two symmetric systems highlights their different low energy trend. A difference can also be noted in the two barrier distributions, where the high-energy peak present in 28Si+28Si is not observed for 30Si+30Si, probably due to the weaker couplings in last case.

  3. Sub-barrier fusion of Si+Si systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, G.; Montagnoli, G.; Stefanini, A. M.; Bourgin, D.; Čolović, P.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Faggian, M.; Fioretto, E.; Galtarossa, F.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Mazzocco, M.; Scarlassara, F.; Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Urbani, M.; Szilner, S.; Zhang, G. L.

    2017-11-01

    The near- and sub-barrier fusion excitation function has been measured for the system 30Si+30Si at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of INFN, using the 30Si beam of the XTU Tandem accelerator in the energy range 47 - 90 MeV. A set-up based on a beam electrostatic deflector was used for detecting fusion evaporation residues. The measured cross sections have been compared to previous data on 28Si+28Si and Coupled Channels (CC) calculations have been performed using M3Y+repulsion and Woods-Saxon potentials, where the lowlying 2+ and 3- excitations have been included. A weak imaginary potential was found to be necessary to reproduce the low energy 28Si+28Si data. This probably simulates the effect of the oblate deformation of this nucleus. On the contrary, 30Si is a spherical nucleus, 30Si+30Si is nicely fit by CC calculations and no imaginary potential is needed. For this system, no maximum shows up for the astrophysical S-factor so that we have no evidence for hindrance, as confirmed by the comparison with CC calculations. The logarithmic derivative of the two symmetric systems highlights their different low energy trend. A difference can also be noted in the two barrier distributions, where the high-energy peak present in 28Si+28Si is not observed for 30Si+30Si, probably due to the weaker couplings in last case.

  4. Influence of Food with High Moisture Content on Oxygen Barrier Property of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA)/Vermiculite Nanocomposite Coated Multilayer Packaging Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Min Hyeock; Ko, Jung A; Kang, Dong Ho; Bae, Hojae; Park, Hyun Jin

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the potential complications in applying nanoclay-based waterborne coating to packaging films for food with high moisture content. Multilayer packaging films were prepared by dry laminating commercially available polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/vermiculite nanocomposite coating films and linear low-density polyethylene film, and the changes in oxygen barrier properties were investigated according to different relative humidity using 3 types of food simulants. When the relative humidity was above 60%, the oxygen permeability increased sharply, but this was reversible. Deionized water and 3% acetic acid did not cause any large structural change in the PVA/vermiculite nanocomposite but caused a reversible deterioration of the oxygen barrier properties. In contrast, 50% ethanol, a simulant for the semifatty food, induced irreversible structural changes with deterioration of the oxygen barrier property. These changes are due to the characteristics of PVA rather than vermiculite. We believe this manuscript would be of interest to the wide group of researchers, organizations, and companies in the field of developing nanoclay-based gas barrier packaging for foods with high moisture content. Hence, we wish to diffuse our knowledge to the scientific community. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  5. The effect of coatings and coating weight by two types of PCC on barrier and optical properties and roughness of paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rouzbeh asadi khansari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to investigate the use of PCC, and the impact of its coating weight on paper coating. In this study, two base papers from Mazandaran Wood and Paper Industries (APC and NS, and two coating compositions with the solid content of 25% containing PCC filler (100 parts, PVA binder (14 parts and dispersant (1 part were used. The first composition included PCC B102 for opacity increment, and the second one PCC 9020 for the improvement of brightness. Two rod RDS14 and RDS30 were used for different coating weights. After coating, the treated samples were dried in room conditions at air temperature of 25◦C and relative humidity of 54%. Physical and optical properties of control and treated samples such as air resistance, thickness, Cobb60, brightness, yellowness, opacity and roughness were determined. In comparison to the control group, all the treated samples showed improvement in brightness, opacity, yellowness and air resistance. By the two different formulations and two rods, paper roughness was increased, and the increment of water absorption was due to capillary development in coating texture. The analysis of variances showed that the usage of PCC 9020 had considerable effect on roughness of papers. In NS papers, change of PCC caused significant difference in brightness and roughness, but in APC papers did not. The change of coating rod in APC papers had significant effect on water absorption, brightness and opacity but did not show in NS.

  6. Management-retrieval code system of fission barrier parameter sub-library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Limin; Su Zongdi; Ge Zhigang

    1995-01-01

    The fission barrier parameter (FBP) library, which is a sub-library of Chinese Evaluated Nuclear Parameter library (CENPL), stores various popular used fission barrier parameters from different historical period, and could retrieve the required fission barrier parameters by using the management retrieval code system of the FBP sub-library. The function, feature and operation instruction of the code system are described briefly

  7. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  8. Effects of argon and oxygen flow rate on water vapor barrier properties of silicon oxide coatings deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Ryong; Choudhury, Moinul Haque; Kim, Won-Ho; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Plasma polymer coatings were deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates while varying the operating conditions, such as the Ar and O 2 flow rates, at a fixed radio frequency power of 300 W. The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of the untreated PET was 54.56 g/m 2 /day and was decreased after depositing the silicon oxide (SiO x ) coatings. The minimum WVTR, 0.47 g/m 2 /day, was observed at Ar and O 2 flow rates of 4 and 20 sccm, respectively, with a coating thickness of 415.44 nm. The intensity of the peaks for the Si-O-Si bending at 800-820 cm -1 and Si-O-Si stretching at 1000-1150 cm -1 varied depending on the Ar and O 2 flow rates. The contact angle of the SiO x coated PET increased as the Ar flow rate was increased from 2 to 8 sccm at a fixed O 2 flow rate of 20 sccm. It decreased gradually as the oxygen flow rate increased from 12 to 28 sccm at a fixed Ar carrier gas flow rate. The examination by atomic force microscopy revealed a correlation of the SiO x morphology and the water vapor barrier performance with the Ar and O 2 flow rates. The roughness of the deposited coatings increased when either the O 2 or Ar flow rate was increased.

  9. Advanced anticorrosive coatings prepared from electroactive polyimide/graphene nanocomposites with synergistic effects of redox catalytic capability and gas barrier properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Yeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, electroactive polyimide (EPI/graphene nanocomposite (EPGN coatings were prepared by thermal imidization and then characterized by Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The redox behavior of the as-prepared EPGN materials was identified by in situ monitoring for cyclic voltammetry (CV studies. Demonstrating that EPGN coatings provided advanced corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel (CRS electrodes as compared to that of neat EPI coating. The superior corrosion protection of EPGN coatings over EPI coatings on CRS electrodes could be explained by the following two reasons. First, the redox catalytic capabilities of amino-capped aniline trimer (ACAT units existing in the EPGN may induce the formation of passive metal oxide layers on the CRS electrode, as indicated by scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA studies. Moreover, the well-dispersed carboxyl-graphene nanosheets embedded in the EPGN matrix hinder gas migration exponentially. This would explain enhanced oxygen barrier properties of EPGN, as indicated by gas permeability analysis (GPA studies.

  10. Effects of Laser Remelting and Oxidation on NiCrAlY/8Y2O3-ZrO2 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S. Q.; Zhu, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, three groups of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) samples were remelted by CO2 laser with different laser energy densities (1, 5 and 10 J/mm2) to seal the surface of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings. Microscopic observations showed that the cracks size and the remelted depth in YSZ coatings increased. A 50-μm-thick dense layer was formed on the surface of YSZ coating in samples with 1 J/mm2 energy density. Microindentation tests showed that the Vickers hardness of YSZ coatings increases with the increase in laser energy density. After isothermal oxidation at 1200 °C for 200 h, thinner thermally growth oxides were found in laser remelted YSZ samples under energy density of 1 J/mm2 (6.32 ± 0.28 μm). Cyclic oxidation results showed that the weight gain per unit area of low energy density laser remelted TBCs was smaller than that of the high energy density laser remelted and as-sprayed TBCs.

  11. Design and performance of differential pumping system of coating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmakar, P; Maiti, N; Bapat, A V

    2008-01-01

    A box type coating unit has been developed in view of dual purpose of optical and reactive coating. The system is divided in two parts namely, substrate chamber (800mm x 800 mm x 100 mm) and gun chamber (800mm x 800 mm x 100 mm). Coating material is evaporated in the substrate chamber by traverse (270 deg.) electron beams. Reactive gas is injected in the substrate chamber by up-stream pressure controller to reach set pressures in the range of 1x10 -3 mbar to 1x10 -4 mbar for gas flow rate in the range of 0-30 sccm. Traverse EB guns (10 kV, 15 kW, 2 No) are mounted inside gun chamber. The gun chamber vacuum should be better than 1x10 -5 mbar for the operation of EB guns. Both these chambers are connected by the apertures provided on the intermediate bifurcation plate for the passage of electron beams. Through the apertures the reactive gas leaks from the substrate chamber to the gun chamber due to differential pressure. The differential pumping system consists of individual pumping modules for the substrate chamber and the gun chamber. The paper focuses upon the design of differential pumping system in view of determination of steady state differential pressures for different flow rates of reactive gas. It has been noticed that on introduction of reactive gas in the substrate chamber, the pressures in the substrate chamber and the gun chamber oscillates before converging to steady state values. Theoretically calculated values have been compared with the experimental values as design validation

  12. Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunan Lin.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test

  13. Anticipated Barriers to Open Schooling System in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminu Aliyu Wushishi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to develop plans for making Education for All a reality, four agencies of the United Nations brought together over 150 governments in 1990 to Jomtien, Thailand, and also in 2000 in Dakar, Senegal, with the aim of making education equally accessible to all. Nigeria is one of the countries that signed the Jomtien declaration in 1990, and one of those with the highest number of out-of-school children in the world with about 10.5 million out-of-school children in 2010. This figure represents 42% of its primary age population and 3.6 million more children out of school than ten years ago. Nigeria is now committed towards bridging the gap especially with the attempt towards establishing open schools, but considering the numerous problems confronting the existing public primary and secondary schools and other educational programmes, there are certain barriers that may hinder the successful implementation and smooth running of the proposed open schooling system. This paper examines the anticipated barriers that includes; corruption, lack of consistency in programmes, problem of electricity, lack of access to Internet, lack of fund, inadequate manpower and problem of recognition. For open schooling system to see the light of the day, some recommendations were suggested which, if taken into consideration will be useful to policy makers towards the successful launching and smooth running of the open schools and other laudable educational programmes in Nigeria.

  14. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  15. Environmental barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Vartabedian, Ara; Collins, William T.; Woolley, David; Bateman, Charles

    2012-12-18

    The present invention relates generally to a multi-layered article suitable for service in severe environments. The article may be formed of a substrate, such as silicon carbide and/or silicon nitride. The substrate may have a first layer of a mixture of a rare earth silicate and Cordierite. The substrate may also have a second layer of a rare earth silicate or a mixture of a rare earth silicate and cordierite.

  16. Barrier properties of plastic films coated with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by roll-to-toll atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi, E-mail: Terhi.Hirvikorpi@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Laine, Risto, E-mail: Risto.Laine@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: Mika.Vaha-Nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kilpi, Väinö, E-mail: Vaino.Kilpi@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Salo, Erkki, E-mail: Erkki.Salo@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Li, Wei-Min, E-mail: Wei-Min.Li@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Lindfors, Sven, E-mail: Sven.Lindfors@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Vartiainen, Jari, E-mail: Jari.Vartiainen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kenttä, Eija, E-mail: Eija.Kentta@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Nikkola, Juha, E-mail: Juha.Nikkola@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Harlin, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Harlin@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kostamo, Juhana, E-mail: Juhana.Kostamo@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-01-01

    Thin (30–40 nm) and highly uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings have been deposited at relatively low temperature of 100 °C onto various polymeric materials employing the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, both batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) mode. The applications for ALD have long been limited those feasible for batch processing. The work demonstrates that R2R ALD can deposit thin films with properties that are comparable to the film properties fabricated by in batch. This accelerates considerably the commercialization of many products, such as flexible, printed electronics, organic light-emitting diode lighting, third generation thin film photovoltaic devices, high energy density thin film batteries, smart textiles, organic sensors, organic/recyclable packaging materials, and flexible displays, to name a few. - Highlights: • Thin and uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings have been deposited onto polymers materials. • Batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been employed. • Deposition with either process improved the barrier properties. • Sensitivity of coated films to defects affects barrier obtained with R2R ALD.

  17. Surface analysis of DLC coating on cam-tappet system

    OpenAIRE

    FOUVRY, Siegfried; PAGNOUX, Geoffrey; PEIGNEY, Michael; DELATTRE, Benoit; MERMAT-ROLLET, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Tribomechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings make them particularly interesting for numerous applications, like automotive ones. But although DLC coatings show a generally high wear resistance, they sometimes can exhibit severe multiple wear. In this study, a surface analysis of worn coated tappets is performed, leading to a complete coupled wear scenario.

  18. Influence of viscoelastic property on laser-generated surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi; Xu Baiqiang

    2011-01-01

    Taking account of the viscoelasticity of materials, the pulsed laser generation of surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems has been investigated quantitatively by using the finite element method. The displacement spectra of the surface acoustic waves have been calculated in frequency domain for different coating-substrate systems, in which the viscoelastic properties of the coatings and substrates are considered separately. Meanwhile, the temporal displacement waveforms have been obtained by applying inverse fast Fourier transforms. The numerical results of the normal surface displacements are presented for different configurations: a single plate, a slow coating on a fast substrate, and a fast coating on a slow substrate. The influences of the viscoelastic properties of the coating and the substrate on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves have been studied. In addition, the influence of the coating thickness on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves has been also investigated in detail.

  19. Protective Coatings for Space System Components Fabricated Using Ionic Self Assembled Monolayer Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miler, Mike

    1997-01-01

    Self-assembled multilayer thin film fabrication methods offer unique opportunities to incorporate multiple functionalities into coatings for space system materials and structures as well as consumer products...

  20. Edge transport barrier formation in compact helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S; Minami, T; Oishi, T; Suzuki, C; Ida, K; Isobe, M; Yoshimura, Y; Nagaoka, K; Toi, K; Fujisawa, A; Akiyama, T; Iguchi, H; Ikeda, R; Kado, S; Matsuoka, K; Matsushita, H; Nakamura, K; Nakano, H; Nishimura, S; Nishiura, M; Ohshima, S; Shimizu, A; Takagi, S; Takahashi, C; Takeuchi, M; Yoshinuma, M

    2004-01-01

    The edge transport barrier (ETB) for particle transport is formed in the neutral beam (NB) heated hydrogen discharges in compact helical system (CHS). The transition to the ETB formation and the back transition are controlled by the heating power. The existence of the heating power threshold is confirmed and it is roughly proportional to the density. The Hα emission signal shows a clear drop at the transition (the timescale of signal decrease is ∼1 ms for the high heating power case). The ETB formation continues for the full duration of NB injection (100 ms) with a moderate level of radiation power loss. Local density profile measurement shows increase of the edge density and the movement of the density gradient region towards the edge

  1. PEBS. Long-term performance of engineered barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieczorek, Klaus; Czaikowski, Oliver; Miehe, Ruediger

    2014-12-15

    The evolution of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of geological repositories for radioactive waste has been the subject of many national and international research programmes. The emphasis of the research activities was on the elaboration of a detailed understanding of the complex THMC processes, which are expected to evolve in the early post closure period in the near field. From the perspective of radiological long-term safety, an in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is of great significance, because the evolution of the EBS during the early post-closure phase may have a non-negligible impact on the radiological safety functions at the time when the canisters breach. Unexpected process interactions during the resaturation phase could impair the safety-relevant parameters in the EBS (e. g. swelling pressure, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity).

  2. Interpretation of quasi-elastic barrier distributions for weakly bound systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, D.S.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We verify that quasi-elastic (elastic + inelastic) backscattering barrier distributions for weakly bound systems do not strictly correspond to fusion barrier distributions, but rather to reaction threshold distribution, as proposed by Zagrebaev in a recent paper concerning very heavy systems. In this work, we investigate whether Zagrebaevs interpretation is valid by comparing experimental results obtained in two very recent works with the 6 Li + 144 Sm system. Monteiro et al derived the quasi-elastic barrier distribution (or reaction threshold distribution, following Zagrebaevs interpretation) by adding elastic and inelastic backscattering for this system. Rath et al obtained fusion barrier distribution for the same system from the measured complete fusion cross section for the same system. We conclude that the quasi-elastic barrier distributions can be associated with fusion barrier distributions only in situations where there are no relevant reaction channels apart from fusion. This is not the situation for very heavy nor for weakly bound systems. (author)

  3. Performance of RTV silicone rubber coatings installed in coastal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siderakis, K.; Agoris, D. [High Voltage Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Patras, Rio, Patras 26500 (Greece)

    2008-02-15

    RTV SIR coatings can improve the performance of ceramic insulators, in cases where pollution problems are experienced and the use of composite housings is not technically or financially in profit for the electrical utility. In this paper the performance of coatings installed in a coastal high voltage substation is investigated by measurements of leakage current. The measurements indicated the importance of the wetting mechanism, for the specific environmental conditions. In the case of condensation the surface activity on the coated insulators has been remarkably suppressed. On the other hand, in the case of light rain the same levels of activity have been recorded for both coated and non-coated insulators. The overall performance of the coated insulators, for the specific conditions, is superior in comparison to the non-coated insulators. (author)

  4. Dynamical characterization of transport barriers in nontwist Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaine, M.; Mathias, A. C.; Santos, M. S.; Batista, A. M.; Szezech, J. D.; Viana, R. L.

    2018-01-01

    The turnstile provides us a useful tool to describe the flux in twist Hamiltonian systems. Thus, its determination allows us to find the areas where the trajectories flux through barriers. We show that the mechanism of the turnstile can increase the flux in nontwist Hamiltonian systems. A model which captures the essence of these systems is the standard nontwist map, introduced by del Castillo-Negrete and Morrison. For selected parameters of this map, we show that chaotic trajectories entering in resonances zones can be explained by turnstiles formed by a set of homoclinic points. We argue that for nontwist systems, if the heteroclinic points are sufficiently close, they can connect twin-islands chains. This provides us a scenario where the trajectories can cross the resonance zones and increase the flux. For these cases the escape basin boundaries are nontrivial, which demands the use of an appropriate characterization. We applied the uncertainty exponent and the entropies of the escape basin boundary in order to quantify the degree of unpredictability of the asymptotic trajectories.

  5. Connectivity and systemic resilience of the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Hock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia's iconic Great Barrier Reef (GBR continues to suffer from repeated impacts of cyclones, coral bleaching, and outbreaks of the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS, losing much of its coral cover in the process. This raises the question of the ecosystem's systemic resilience and its ability to rebound after large-scale population loss. Here, we reveal that around 100 reefs of the GBR, or around 3%, have the ideal properties to facilitate recovery of disturbed areas, thereby imparting a level of systemic resilience and aiding its continued recovery. These reefs (1 are highly connected by ocean currents to the wider reef network, (2 have a relatively low risk of exposure to disturbances so that they are likely to provide replenishment when other reefs are depleted, and (3 have an ability to promote recovery of desirable species but are unlikely to either experience or spread COTS outbreaks. The great replenishment potential of these 'robust source reefs', which may supply 47% of the ecosystem in a single dispersal event, emerges from the interaction between oceanographic conditions and geographic location, a process that is likely to be repeated in other reef systems. Such natural resilience of reef systems will become increasingly important as the frequency of disturbances accelerates under climate change.

  6. Connectivity and systemic resilience of the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Karlo; Wolff, Nicholas H; Ortiz, Juan C; Condie, Scott A; Anthony, Kenneth R N; Blackwell, Paul G; Mumby, Peter J

    2017-11-01

    Australia's iconic Great Barrier Reef (GBR) continues to suffer from repeated impacts of cyclones, coral bleaching, and outbreaks of the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), losing much of its coral cover in the process. This raises the question of the ecosystem's systemic resilience and its ability to rebound after large-scale population loss. Here, we reveal that around 100 reefs of the GBR, or around 3%, have the ideal properties to facilitate recovery of disturbed areas, thereby imparting a level of systemic resilience and aiding its continued recovery. These reefs (1) are highly connected by ocean currents to the wider reef network, (2) have a relatively low risk of exposure to disturbances so that they are likely to provide replenishment when other reefs are depleted, and (3) have an ability to promote recovery of desirable species but are unlikely to either experience or spread COTS outbreaks. The great replenishment potential of these 'robust source reefs', which may supply 47% of the ecosystem in a single dispersal event, emerges from the interaction between oceanographic conditions and geographic location, a process that is likely to be repeated in other reef systems. Such natural resilience of reef systems will become increasingly important as the frequency of disturbances accelerates under climate change.

  7. Numerical investigation of damage protective oxide mechanisms in thermal barrier system for aeronautical turbine blade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khelifa hocine

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a material for a given application requires insuring a good durability in its conditions of employment, in particular environmental. It is especially true for the systems destined to work in corrosive hot atmospheres. For it, the knowledge and the understanding of the corrosion phenomena, oxidization, ageing and damage are indispensable in order to anticipate the life period of the structures and to propose the adapted protective solutions. The study of the corrosion in high temperature is therefore a greatly interdisciplinary topic, into the interface of the physico-chemistry, metallic and ceramic materials and mechanics. We propose in this work a finite element method for the simulation of EBPVD TBCs spallation. Our studies concern one of several systems that we call thermal barrier coatings, which are a Composite materials deposited in layers on the hot components to isolate them chemically and thermally at high temperatures. This is the last operational technology adapted on aircraft engines but it is still studied and not fully exploited.This comprehensive article describes the systems currently used and the problem of interaction between mechanical and environment in the turbine.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Real-Time Damage Evaluations of Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC CMCs Subjected to Tensile Loading Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require new state-of-the art environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to withstand increased temperature requirements and high velocity combustion corrosive combustion gasses. The present work compares the response of coated and uncoated SiC/SiC CMC substrates subjected to simulated engine environments followed by high temperature mechanical testing to asses retained properties and damage mechanisms. Our focus is to explore the capabilities of electrical resistance (ER) measurements as an NDE technique for testing of retained properties under combined high heat-flux and mechanical loading conditions. Furthermore, Acoustic Emission (AE) measurements and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) were performed to determine material damage onset and accumulation.

  9. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Phosphor Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the high luminescence intensity from a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor enables non-rastered full-field temperature mapping of thermal barrier coating (TBC) surfaces to temperatures above 1000C. In this presentation, temperature mapping by Cr:GdAlO3 based phosphor thermometry of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces is demonstrated for both scaled-up cooling hole geometries as well as for actual components in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  10. Investigations on the Suitability of Coated Steel Piping System for High Pressure Seawater Reverse Osmosis Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobin, Mohammad

    2010-03-01

    This study deals with the investigations concerning with the suitability of coated steel piping system as an economically viable alternative to costly stainless steel piping for high pressure seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) application. The piping system selected for investigation is a carbon steel piping coated internally and externally with thermoplastic coating (coating powder Plascoat PPA 571). The performance of thermoplastic coating was investigated by conducting SWRO pilot plant test, salt spray test, mechanical tests and testing of the coating under crevices (both in pilot plant and laboratory), and for leachable organics and inorganics (both in laboratory and pilot plant test). The testing of coating in the pilot plant resulted in the formation of some blisters on the internal surface of the pipes. The blisters were broken causing the corrosion of underneath steel. The coating showed a poor resistance to salt fog test. In general, the coating performed satisfactorily under the crevices but showed blistering on either side of the test panels. The adhesive strength of the coating was found to be poor; however, it showed good flexibility. The results of chemical analysis did not show the leaching of organic or inorganic pollutants from the coating.

  11. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  12. Influence of average ion energy and atomic oxygen flux per Si atom on the formation of silicon oxide permeation barrier coatings on PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschker, F.; Wißing, J.; Hoppe, Ch; de los Arcos, T.; Grundmeier, G.; Awakowicz, P.

    2018-04-01

    The respective effect of average incorporated ion energy and impinging atomic oxygen flux on the deposition of silicon oxide (SiO x ) barrier coatings for polymers is studied in a microwave driven low pressure discharge with additional variable RF bias. Under consideration of plasma parameters, bias voltage, film density, chemical composition and particle fluxes, both are determined relative to the effective flux of Si atoms contributing to film growth. Subsequently, a correlation with barrier performance and chemical structure is achieved by measuring the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) and by performing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that an increase in incorporated energy to 160 eV per deposited Si atom result in an enhanced cross-linking of the SiO x network and, therefore, an improved barrier performance by almost two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, independently increasing the number of oxygen atoms to 10 500 per deposited Si atom also lead to a comparable barrier improvement by an enhanced cross-linking.

  13. Performance of two-layer thermal barrier systems on directionally solidified Ni-Al-Mo and comparative effects of alloy thermal expansion on system life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A promising two-layer thermal barrier coating system (TBS), Ni-16.4Cr-5.1A1-0.15Y/ZrO2-6.1Y2O3 (all in weight percent), was identified for directionally solidified Ni-Al-Mo (gamma/gamma' alpha). In cyclic furnace tests at 1095 C this system on gamma/gamma' alpha was better than Ni-16. 4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y/ZrO2-7.8Y2O3 by about 50 percent. In natural gas - oxygen torch rig tests at 1250 C the ZrO2-6.1Y2O3 coating was better than the ZrO2-7.8Y2O3 coating by 95 percent, on MAR-M509 substrates and by 60 percent on gamma/gamma' alpha substrates. Decreasing the coefficient of thermal expansion of the substrate material from 17-18x10 to the -6 power/C (MAR-M200 + Hf and MAR-M509) to 11x10 to the -6 power/C (gamma/gamma' alpha) also resulted in improved TBS life. For example, in natural gas - oxygen torch rig tests at 1250 C, the life of Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y/ZrO26.1Y2O3 was about 30 percent better on gamma/gamma' alpha than on MAR-M509 substrates. Thus compositional changes in the bond and thermal barrier coatings were shown to have a greater effect on TBS life than does the coefficient of thermal expansion.

  14. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A NO-VOC/NO-HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the development and demonstration of a no-VOC (volatile organic compound)/no-HAP (hazardous air pollutant) wood furniture coating system. The performance characteristics of the new coating system are excellent in terms of adhesion, drying time, gloss, ...

  16. Double-ceramic-layer thermal barrier coatings of La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/YSZ deposited by electron beam-physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhenhua [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); He Limin; Mu Rende [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Zhong Xinghua; Zhang Yanfei; Zhang Jiangfeng [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Cao Xueqiang [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)], E-mail: xcao@ciac.jl.cn

    2009-04-03

    Double-ceramic-layer (DCL) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZ) and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were deposited by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The composition, crystal structure, surface and cross-sectional morphologies and cyclic oxidation behavior of the DCL coating were studied. Both the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) prove that LZ and YSZ have good chemical applicability to form a DCL coating. The thermal cycling test at 1373 K in an air furnace indicates the DCL coating has a much longer lifetime than the single layer LZ coating, and even longer than that of the single layer YSZ coating. The failure of the DCL coating is a result of both the bond coat oxidation and the thermal strain between bond coat and ceramic layer generated by the thermal expansion mismatch. Additionally, the compressive stress initiated during cooling is also an important factor to control the cleavage of the interface between the LZ and YSZ coatings. Since no single material that has been studied so far satisfies all the requirements for high temperature TBCs, DCL coating is an important development direction of TBCs.

  17. Cost of radon-barrier systems for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    This report deals specifically with the cost of three types of radon barrier systems, earthen covers, asphalt emulsion covers, and multilayer covers, which could meet standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency to stabilize uranium mill tailings located primarily in the western US. In addition, the report includes a sensitivity analysis of various factors which significantly effect the overall cost of the three systems. These analyses were based on a generic disposal site. Four different 3m thick earthen covers were tested and cost an average of $27/m 2 . The least expensive earthen cover cost was about $21/m 2 . The asphalt cover system (6 to 7 cm of asphalt topped with 0.6m of overburden) cost about $28/m 2 . The four multilayer covers averaged $57/m 2 , but materials handling problems encountered during the test inflated this cost above what was anticipated and significant cost reductions should be possible. The least expensive multilayer cover cost $43/m 2 . Based on the results of the Grand Junction field test we estimated the cost of covering the tailings from three high priority sites, Durango, Shiprock, and Salt Lake City (Vitro). The cost of a 3m earthen cover ranged from $18 to 33/m 2 for the seven disposal sites (two or three at each location) studied. The cost of asphalt cover systems were $23 to 28/m 2 and the multilayer cover costs were between $31 to 36/m 2 . The earthen cover costs are less than the Grand Junction field test cost primarily because cover material is available at or near most of the disposal sites selected. Earthen material was imported from 6 to 10 miles for the field test. Assuming more efficienct utilization of materials significantly reduced the cost of the multilayer covers

  18. Failure of aluminium metal spray/organic duplex coating systems on structural steel

    OpenAIRE

    Sumon, T. A.; Scantlebury, J. D.; Lyon, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Individually, aluminium metal spray (AMS) and organic paints are well established as effective protective coatings for steel substrates. These coatings are also frequently used together as duplex systems where their combination should produce a synergistic effect. However in certain, mainly marine, environments premature failure of such coatings, involving early blistering of the paint, has been observed in service after 3-5 years. This work aims to understand the mechanisms associated with t...

  19. A systemic study on key parameters affecting nanocomposite coatings on magnesium substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ian; Wang, Sebo Michelle; Silken, Christine; Liu, Huinan

    2016-05-01

    . This study elucidated the key parameters for optimizing nanocomposite coatings on Mg-based substrates for skeletal implant applications, and provided rational design guidelines for the nanocomposite coatings on Mg alloys for potential clinical translation of biodegradable Mg-based implants. This manuscript describes the systemic optimization of nanocomposite coatings to control the degradation and bioactivity of magnesium for skeletal implant applications. The key parameters influencing the integrity and functions of the nanocomposite coatings on magnesium were identified, guidelines for the optimization of the coatings were established, and the benefits of coating optimization were demonstrated through reduced magnesium degradation and increased bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) adhesion in vitro. The guidelines developed in this manuscript are valuable for the biometal field to improve the design of bioresorbable implants and devices, which will advance the clinical translation of magnesium-based implants. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of thiolterminated prepolymers for electron beam curing coating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seko, Kenji; Isozaki, Osamu; Iwasawa, Naozumi

    1988-01-01

    It has been known that the mixture of an unsaturated prepolymer and a thiolated prepolymer can be cured by the relatively low dose of electron beam irradiation. As a thiolated prepolymer, polyether-polythiol prepolymer has been in the market. However, the coating films derived from the composition comprising the thiolated prepolymer do not have enough mechanical strength for practical use. In this study, the synthesis of thiolterminated urethane prepolymer and the coating composition comprising this prepolymer for obtaining the coating films having good mechanical properties were investigated. The raw materials used for the synthesis of thiolterminated urethane prepolymer are shown. Its synthesis and the measurement of thiol content, coating formation, the electron beam curing of the coatings and the testing method of coated film performance are explained. The results of the synthesis of the thiolterminated urethane prepolymer, the thermal stability, curability, physical properties and adhesion strength of the coatings are reported. The coatings can be applied to steel and PVC films, and used as the adhesive for steel-PVC film laminates. (Kako, I.)

  1. Refractory metal carbide coatings for LMFBR applications: a systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotschall, H.L.; Ople, F.S.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The selection, testing and improvement of high density, tightly bonded plasma and detonation gun coatings designed to meet LMFBR core component criteria are described. The process descriptions include a review of the important developments in substrate surface preparation which were required to ensure strong bonding and to minimize interface contamination. Coating finishing techniques which were developed to optimize friction behavior are also described

  2. Sedimentary architecture and depositional controls of a Holocene wave-dominated barrier-island system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2018-01-01

    control. This study investigates the relative role of forcing conditions, such as antecedent topography, sea-level rise, sediment supply, storms and climate changes, on the evolution of a Holocene wave-dominated barrier-island system. This article presents temporal reconstruction of the depositional...... history of the barrier-island system of Rømø in the Wadden Sea in unprecedented detail, based on ground-penetration radar profiles, sediment cores, high-resolution dating and palynological investigations, and shows that ca 8000 years ago the barrier island formed on a Pleistocene topographic high. During...... the initial phase of barrier evolution the long-term sea-level rise was relatively rapid (ca 9 mm/yr) and the barrier was narrow and frequently overwashed. Sediment supply kept pace with sea-level rise and the barrier-island system mainly aggraded through the deposition of a ca 7 m thick stack of overwash...

  3. Development of guidelines for cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  4. Performance evaluation of cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  5. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. Fracture toughness of esthetic dental coating systems by nanoindentation and FIB sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecnik, Christina Martina; Courty, Diana; Muff, Daniel; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-07-01

    Improving the esthetics of Ti-based dental implants is the last challenge remaining in the optimization process. The optical issues were recently solved by the application of highly and selectively reflective coatings on Ti implants. This work focuses on the mechanical durability of these esthetic ceramic based coating systems (with and without adhesion layers). The coating systems (Ti-ZrO2, Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Bragg and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) were subjected to nanoindentation experiments and examined using scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross sectional analysis. Three coating systems contained adhesion layers (10nm of Ti or 60nm of TiO2 layers). The fracture toughness of selected samples was assessed applying two different models from literature, a classical for bulk materials and an energy-based model, which was further developed and adjusted. The ZrO2 based coating systems (total film thicknesstoughness between 2.70 and 3.70MPam(1/2) was calculated using an energy-based model. The classical model was applied to Bragg coated samples and their fracture toughness ranged between 0.70 and 0.80MPam(1/2). Furthermore, coating systems containing an additional layer (Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2 and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) showed an improved adhesion between the substrate and the coating. The addition of a Ti or TiO2 layer improved the adhesion between substrate and coating. The validity of the models for the assessment of the fracture toughness depended on the layer structure and fracture profile of the samples investigated here (classical model for thick coatings and energy-based model for thin coatings). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of novel plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-bond coat bioceramic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, R. B.

    1999-12-01

    Bond coats based on bioinert ceramic materials such as titania and zirconia were developed to increase the adhesion strength of the coating system hydroxyapatite-bond coat to Ti-6Al-4V alloy surfaces used for hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. The bond coats improved the adhesion strength, measured by a modified ASTM D 3167-76 peel test, by up to 100% and also the resorption resistance as determined by in vitro leaching in simulated protein-free body fluid for up to 28 days.

  8. Zeolite Coating System for Corrosion Control to Eliminate Hexavalent Chromium from DoD Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    images of ZSM-5 coatings on aluminum alloys (a)AA-2024-T3, (b)AA- 5052 -H32, (c)AA-6061-T4, and (d)AA-7075-T6. SERDP PP1342: Zeolite Coating System...application of Generation - 3 zeolite coatings was successfully expanded to other DoD aluminum alloys (AA- 5052 -H32, AA-6061-T6, and 7075-T6) and to several...7.5 um thick) on other aluminum alloys (AA- 5052 -H32, AA- 6061-T6, AA-7075-T6) and zeolite coatings (4-5 um thick) on 3 different steels (S1008, S4130

  9. Volumetric analysis of a New England barrier system using ground-penetrating-radar and coring techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heteren, S.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Barber, D.C.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-penetrating-radar (GPR) profiles calibrated with core data allow accurate assessments of coastal barrier volumes. We applied this procedure successfully to the barrier system along Saco Bay, Maine (USA), as part of a sediment-budget study that focused on present-day sand volumes in various coastal, shoreface, and inner-shelf lith-osomes, and on sand fluxes that have affected the volume or distribution of sand in these sediment bodies through time. On GPR profiles, the components of the barrier lithosome are readily differentiated from other facies, except where the radar signal is attenuated by brackish or salty groundwater. Significant differences between dielectric properties of the barrier lithosome and other units commonly result in strong boundary reflectors. The mostly sandy barrier sediments allow deep penetration of GPR waves, in contrast to finer-grained strata and till-covered bedrock. Within the Saco Bay barrier system, 22 ??3 x 106 m3 of sediment are unevenly distributed. Two-thirds of the total barrier volume is contained within the northern and southern ends of the study area, in the Pine Point spit and the Ferry Beach/Goosefare complex, respectively. The central area around Old Orchard Beach is locally covered by only a thin veneer of barrier sand, averaging <3 m, that unconformably overlies shallow pre-Holocene facies. The prominence of barrier-spit facies and the distribution pattern of back-barrier sediments indicate that a high degree of segmentation, governed by antecedent topography, has affected the development of the Saco Bay barrier system. The present-day configuration of the barrier and back-barrier region along Saco Bay, however, conceals much of its early compartmentalized character.

  10. Approaches to investigate delamination and interfacial toughness in coated systems: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jinju; Bull, S J

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental property which often dictates the performance of a coating is its adhesion to the substrate and thus there are many techniques to measure adhesion. The choice of methods is dependent on many factors such as the mechanical properties of the coating and substrate, the interface properties, the microstructure of the coating/substrate system, residual stress, coating thickness and the intended application. Most tests aim to introduce a stable interfacial crack and make it propagate under controlled conditions and model this process to determine adhesion. The corresponding models are either stress analysis-based or energy-based. With the advent of miniature systems and very thin functional coatings, there is a need for characterization of adhesion at small length scales and some specific tests have been developed which are not appropriate for thicker coatings. Among these, indentation and scratch methods have the widest range of applicability but it is necessary to analyse the failure mechanisms before choosing an appropriate model to extract adhesion parameters. This paper reviews the main quantitative adhesion tests for coatings and highlights the tests which can be used to assess submicrometre coatings and thin films. The paper also highlights the modelling and analysis methods necessary to extract reliable adhesion properties illustrating this with examples for submicrometre coatings on silicon and architectural glass.

  11. Oil Impregnated Pressboard Barrier Systems Based on Ester Fluids for an Application in HVDC Insulation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Rumpelt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ester-based insulation fluids are being increasingly used in high-voltage insulation systems. The reasons are the advantages in the area of ecological compatibility and resource-saving provision. The intention to use ester-based insulation fluids in high voltage direct current (HVDC equipment is new. The major challenge in designing the HVDC insulation system is, that the systems do not only experience an alternating voltage, but also a direct voltage Offset. This presents a challenge to predict the electric field distribution. For this purpose, basic investigations are carried out in the form of conductivity investigations for various insulation barrier systems. In addition, a mineral oil serves as a reference oil for estimating existing insights. The results show the influence of the ester-based insulating liquids on the direct current (DC conductivity for basic arrangements, consisting of pressboard barriers and mixed insulations.

  12. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, M.; Milosevic, B.; Lazarevic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating system, which are used for painting of military equipment. Samples for testing are painted aluminum plates contaminated with liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60 Co, 133 Ba, 152 Eu and 241 Am. The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. Comparison of the results is done in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the effectiveness of decontamination. Samples with alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. (author) [sr

  13. Development of Nanostructured Antireflection Coatings for Infrared and Electro-Optical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal G. Pethuraja

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electro-optic infrared technologies and systems operating from ultraviolet (UV to long-wave infrared (LWIR spectra are being developed for a variety of defense and commercial systems applications. Loss of a significant portion of the incident signal due to reflection limits the performance of electro-optic infrared (IR sensing systems. A critical technology being developed to overcome this limitation and enhance the performance of sensing systems is advanced antireflection (AR coatings. Magnolia is actively involved in the development and advancement of nanostructured AR coatings for a wide variety of defense and commercial applications. Ultrahigh AR performance has been demonstrated for UV to LWIR spectral bands on various substrates. The AR coatings enhance the optical transmission through optical components and devices by significantly minimizing reflection losses, a substantial improvement over conventional thin-film AR coating technologies. Nanostructured AR coatings have been fabricated using a nanomanufacturable self-assembly process on substrates that are transparent for a given spectrum of interest ranging from UV to LWIR. The nanostructured multilayer structures have been designed, developed and optimized for various optoelectronic applications. The optical properties of optical components and sensor substrates coated with AR structures have been measured and the process parameters fine-tuned to achieve a predicted high level of performance. In this paper, we review our latest work on high quality nanostructure-based AR coatings, including recent efforts on the development of nanostructured AR coatings on IR substrates.

  14. Mathematical modeling of the gas and powder flow in the (HVOF) systems to optimize their coatings quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Hazem H.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings have been extensively used to enhance materials properties and provide surface protection against their working environments in a number of industrial applications. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used to reduce the thermal conductivity of aerospace turbine blades and improve the turbine overall thermal efficiency. TBC allows higher gas operating temperatures and lower blade material temperatures due to the thermal insulation provided by these ceramic coatings. In the automotive industry, coatings are currently applied to a number of moving parts that are subjected to friction and wear inside the engine such as pistons, cylinder liners, valves and crankshafts to enhance their wear resistance and prolong their useful operation and lifetime.

  15. Efficient Rooting System for Apple “M.9” Rootstock Using Rice Seed Coat and Smocked Rice Seed Coat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matiullah Akbari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “M.9” rootstock is considered as one of the most useful apple (Malus x domestica Borkh. rootstocks; it produces dwarfing trees efficiently. As “M.9” rootstock shows a poor, brittle, and shallow roots system, we grafted “M.9” rootstocks onto “Marubakaidou” (M. prunifolia Borkh. var. ringo Asami Mo 84-A. We then propagated them by mound layering to establish a high-density root system. It was found that covering the roots with rice seed coat (RSC, RSC + smoked rice seed coat (SRSC, and vermiculite during mound layering was effective for the initiation of rooting. Utilizing RSC and SRSC seemed especially effective for producing “M.9” roots efficiently.

  16. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    The importance of foundry coating in improving the surface quality of castings cannot be over emphasized. The appli-cation of mould and core washes creates a high thermal integrity barrier between the metal and the mould resulting in the reduction of the thermal shock experienced by the sand system....... These thermal shock leads to series of surface de-fects such as veining/finning, metal penetration, burn-on/in, scab, rat tail, erosion etc. The use of coatings reduces the tendency of occurrence of these defects. However, the understanding of the coating, its components, characteristics and mechanism of action...... is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  17. Improvement of adhesion and barrier properties of biomedical stainless steel by deposition of YSZ coatings using RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Z.E. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CICATA-Altamira, Grupo CIAMS, Km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps, México (Mexico); CICATA—Altamira, IPN. Grupo CIAMS, Km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps, México (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CICATA-Altamira, Grupo CIAMS, Km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps, México (Mexico); Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Onofre-Bustamante, E. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CICATA-Altamira, Grupo CIAMS, Km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps, México (Mexico); Andraca Adame, J. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Nanociencias Micro y Nanotecnologías, Departamento de DRX, C. P. 07300, Mexico, DF, México (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Metalurgia, C. P. 07300 Mexico, DF, México (Mexico)

    2014-05-01

    The AISI 316L stainless steel (SS) has been widely used in both artificial knee and hip joints in biomedical applications. In the present study, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, ZrO{sub 2} + 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films were deposited on AISI 316L SS by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using different power densities (50–250 W) and deposition times (30–120 min) from a YSZ target. The crystallographic orientation and surface morphology were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the surface modification on the corrosion performance of AISI 316L SS were evaluated in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution using an electrochemical test on both the virgin and coated samples. The YSZ coatings have a (111) preferred orientation during crystal growth along the c-axis for short deposition times (30–60 min), whereas a polycrystalline structure forms during deposition times from 90 to 120 min. The corrosion protective character of the YSZ coatings depends on the crystal size and film thickness. A significant increase in adhesion and corrosion resistance by at least a factor of 46 and a higher breakdown potential were obtained for the deposited coatings at 200 W (120 min). - Highlights: • Well-formed and protective YSZ coatings were achieved on AISI 316L SS substrates. • Films grown at high power and long deposition time have polycrystalline structures. • The crystal size varies from ∼ 5 to 30 nm as both power and deposition time increased. • The differences of corrosion resistance are attributed to internal film structure.

  18. Improvement of adhesion and barrier properties of biomedical stainless steel by deposition of YSZ coatings using RF magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Z.E.; Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Onofre-Bustamante, E.; Andraca Adame, J.; Dorantes-Rosales, H.

    2014-01-01

    The AISI 316L stainless steel (SS) has been widely used in both artificial knee and hip joints in biomedical applications. In the present study, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, ZrO 2 + 8% Y 2 O 3 ) films were deposited on AISI 316L SS by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using different power densities (50–250 W) and deposition times (30–120 min) from a YSZ target. The crystallographic orientation and surface morphology were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the surface modification on the corrosion performance of AISI 316L SS were evaluated in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution using an electrochemical test on both the virgin and coated samples. The YSZ coatings have a (111) preferred orientation during crystal growth along the c-axis for short deposition times (30–60 min), whereas a polycrystalline structure forms during deposition times from 90 to 120 min. The corrosion protective character of the YSZ coatings depends on the crystal size and film thickness. A significant increase in adhesion and corrosion resistance by at least a factor of 46 and a higher breakdown potential were obtained for the deposited coatings at 200 W (120 min). - Highlights: • Well-formed and protective YSZ coatings were achieved on AISI 316L SS substrates. • Films grown at high power and long deposition time have polycrystalline structures. • The crystal size varies from ∼ 5 to 30 nm as both power and deposition time increased. • The differences of corrosion resistance are attributed to internal film structure

  19. Corrosion Degradation of Coated Aluminum Alloy Systems through Galvanic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    CLASSIFICATION ... steel  316  fasteners  when  coated  with  either  a  chromated  (chromate  conversion  coating,   chromate-­‐rich  primer...aluminum  alloy   substrates   and   stainless   steel   fasteners   in   the  presence  of  an   intentional

  20. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.; Cantrell, K.; Stewart, W.

    1996-10-01

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by placing a reactant material (in this experiment, metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  1. Microfibrillated cellulose coatings as new release systems for active packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Desloges, Isabelle; Bras, Julien

    2014-03-15

    In this work, a new use of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is highlighted for high-added-value applications. For the first time, a nanoporous network formed by MFC coated on paper is used for a controlled release of molecules. The release study was carried out in water with caffeine as a model molecule. The release process was studied by means of (i) continuous, and (ii) intermittent diffusion experiments (with renewal of the medium every 10 min). The effect of the MFC was first observed for the samples impregnated in the caffeine solution. These samples, coated with MFC (coat weight of about 7 g/m(2)), released the caffeine over a longer period (29 washings compared with 16), even if the continuous diffusions were similar for both samples (without and with MFC coating). The slowest release of caffeine was observed for samples coated with the mixture (MFC+caffeine). Moreover, the caffeine was only fully released 9h after the release from the other samples was completed. This study compared two techniques for the introduction of model molecules in MFC-coated papers. The latter offers a more controlled and gradual release. This new approach creates many opportunities especially in the food-packaging field. A similar study could be carried out with an active species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Overcoming energy efficiency barriers through systems approach—A conceptual framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Kah-Hin; Yeo, Catrina

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a framework which categorizes energy efficiency barriers based on the stage at which the barriers exist. Barriers to energy efficiency have been widely studied but to our knowledge, except for a few studies, we found inadequate consideration for barrier–barrier interactions when proposing policy measures for improving energy efficiency. Leveraging systems thinking's power as a problem solver which identifies underlying structure that explains (similar) patterns of behavior in a variety of different situations, we attempted to identify patterns of barriers to adoption of energy efficiency measures in industrial companies. Inspired by systems thinking, the proposed framework has four stages, namely, Motivation, Capability, Implementation and Results, as well as a feedback loop. Using a case study, we show that following the four stages will lead to positive feedback for future energy efficiency implementations. The framework highlights the interconnected nature of the barriers and a need for policymakers to address these barriers in a holistic manner. We argue that the overall effectiveness of energy efficiency policies is only as strong as the weakest link in the four-stage framework. This differs from most prior research that addressed barriers in isolation, where a solution is proposed for each of the barriers without considering the relationship between the barriers. Our framework also offers a way to understand the roles and responsibilities of major stakeholders such as governments and energy service companies (ESCOs) in driving energy efficiency. This allows the assessment and identification of weak links in energy efficiency policies. - Highlights: ► We propose a systems approach to overcome energy efficiency barriers. ► Barriers are grouped into Motivation, Capability, Implementation and Results. ► Case study shows that there is a feedback loop from Results to Motivation. ► Current Results will affect future Motivation.

  3. Flip flops, dress clothes, and no coat: clothing barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers identified from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saelens Brian E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-quarters of 3-6 year-old children in the U.S. spend time in childcare; many spend most of their waking hours in these settings. Daily physical activity offers numerous health benefits, but activity levels vary widely across centers. This study was undertaken to explore reasons why physical activity levels may vary. The purpose of this paper is to summarize an unexpected finding that child-care providers cited was a key barrier to children's physical activity. Methods Nine focus groups with 49 child-care providers (55% black from 34 centers (including inner-city, suburban, Head Start and Montessori were conducted in Cincinnati, OH. Three independent raters analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Several techniques were used to increase credibility of findings, including interviews with 13 caregivers. Results Two major themes about clothing were: 1 children's clothing was a barrier to children's physical activity in child-care, and 2 clothing choices were a significant source of conflict between parents and child-care providers. Inappropriate clothing items included: no coat/hat/gloves in the wintertime, flip flops or sandals, dress/expensive clothes, jewelry, and clothes that were either too loose or too tight. Child-care providers explained that unless there were enough extra coats at the center, a single child without a coat could prevent the entire class from going outside. Caregivers suggested several reasons why parents may dress their child inappropriately, including forgetfulness, a rushed morning routine, limited income to buy clothes, a child's preference for a favorite item, and parents not understanding the importance of outdoor play. Several child-care providers favored specific policies prohibiting inappropriate clothing, as many reported limited success with verbal or written reminders to bring appropriate clothing. Conclusion Inappropriate clothing may be an important barrier to children's physical

  4. Flip flops, dress clothes, and no coat: clothing barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers identified from a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Three-quarters of 3-6 year-old children in the U.S. spend time in childcare; many spend most of their waking hours in these settings. Daily physical activity offers numerous health benefits, but activity levels vary widely across centers. This study was undertaken to explore reasons why physical activity levels may vary. The purpose of this paper is to summarize an unexpected finding that child-care providers cited was a key barrier to children's physical activity. Methods Nine focus groups with 49 child-care providers (55% black) from 34 centers (including inner-city, suburban, Head Start and Montessori) were conducted in Cincinnati, OH. Three independent raters analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Several techniques were used to increase credibility of findings, including interviews with 13 caregivers. Results Two major themes about clothing were: 1) children's clothing was a barrier to children's physical activity in child-care, and 2) clothing choices were a significant source of conflict between parents and child-care providers. Inappropriate clothing items included: no coat/hat/gloves in the wintertime, flip flops or sandals, dress/expensive clothes, jewelry, and clothes that were either too loose or too tight. Child-care providers explained that unless there were enough extra coats at the center, a single child without a coat could prevent the entire class from going outside. Caregivers suggested several reasons why parents may dress their child inappropriately, including forgetfulness, a rushed morning routine, limited income to buy clothes, a child's preference for a favorite item, and parents not understanding the importance of outdoor play. Several child-care providers favored specific policies prohibiting inappropriate clothing, as many reported limited success with verbal or written reminders to bring appropriate clothing. Conclusion Inappropriate clothing may be an important barrier to children's physical activity in child

  5. Barrier efficiency of sponge-like La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers for YBCO-coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Leopoldo; Tan, Haiyan; Biermans, Ellen; Verbeeck, Jo; Bals, Sara; Tendeloo, Gustaaf Van [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, BE-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Batenburg, Kees J, E-mail: leopoldo.molina-luna@ua.ac.be [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-2020 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Solution derived La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} films have drawn much attention for potential applications as thermal barriers or low-cost buffer layers for coated conductor technology. Annealing and coating parameters strongly affect the microstructure of La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, but different film processing methods can yield similar microstructural features such as nanovoids and nanometer-sized La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} grains. Nanoporosity is a typical feature found in such films and the implications for the functionality of the films are investigated by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and quantitative electron tomography. Chemical solution based La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} films deposited on flexible Ni-5 at.%W substrates with a {l_brace}100{r_brace}(001) biaxial texture were prepared for an in-depth characterization. A sponge-like structure composed of nanometer-sized voids is revealed by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with electron tomography. A three-dimensional quantification of nanovoids in the La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} film is obtained on a local scale. Mostly non-interconnected highly faceted nanovoids compromise more than one-fifth of the investigated sample volume. The diffusion barrier efficiency of a 170 nm thick La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} film is investigated by STEM-EELS, yielding a 1.8 {+-} 0.2 nm oxide layer beyond which no significant nickel diffusion can be detected and intermixing is observed. This is of particular significance for the functionality of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} coated conductor architectures based on solution derived La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} films as diffusion barriers.

  6. Microstructures and properties of double-ceramic-layer thermal barrier coatings of La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7/8YSZ made by atmospheric plasma spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhai; Xiang, Jianying; Huang, Jihua; Zhao, Xingke

    2015-06-01

    A double-ceramic-layer (DCL) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) of La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7/8YSZ (LZ7C3/8YSZ) was prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The phase structure, composition, thermal conductivity, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, adhesion strength and thermal shock behavior of the LZ7C3/8YSZ coat