WorldWideScience

Sample records for barrier coating system

  1. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  2. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  3. Enhanced zirconia thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.; Levi, C.; Evans, A. [College of Engineering Santa Barbara (United States). University of California Materials Department

    2006-07-01

    The results of a research programme sponsored by the Department of Energy and directed at establishing some of the scientific issues underpinning the development of enhanced zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are reviewed. Our studies have established the stability ranges for both yttria stabilized and codoped zirconia coating materials and identified the mechanisms responsible for failure of current coating systems. These reveal that it is likely that present EB-PVD coatings systems are limited by the performance of current bond-coats and their oxidation behaviour, especially under thermal cycle conditions, rather than the zirconia coating material itself. These studies provide the scientific framework for the development of enhanced zirconia-based thermal barrier coating systems for advanced industrial gas turbine engine applications. (author)

  4. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  5. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  6. Investigation of thermal fatigue behavior of thermal barrier coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure under thermal loads that simulate those in diesel engines are investigated. Surface cracks initiate early and grow continuously under thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) stresses. It is found that, in the absence of interfacial oxidation, the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. Significant LCF and HCF interactions have been observed in the thermal fatigue tests. The fatigue crack growth rate in the ceramic coating strongly depends on the characteristic HCF cycle number, N*HCF which is defined as the number of HCF cycles per LCF cycle. The crack growth rate is increased from 0.36 μm/LCF cycle for a pure LCF test to 2.8 μm/LCF cycle for a combined LCF and HCF test at N*HCF about 20 000. A surface wedging model has been proposed to account for the HCF crack growth in the coating systems. This mechanism predicts that the HCF damage effect increases with heat flux and thus with increasing surface temperature swing, thermal expansion coefficient and elastic modulus of the ceramic coating, as well as with the HCF interacting depth. Good correlation has been found between the analysis and experimental evidence. (orig.)

  7. Monitoring Local Strain in a Thermal Barrier Coating System Under Thermal Mechanical Gas Turbine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manero, Albert; Sofronsky, Stephen; Knipe, Kevin; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Raghavan, Seetha; Bartsch, Marion

    2015-07-01

    Advances in aircraft and land-based turbine engines have been increasing the extreme loading conditions on traditional engine components and have incited the need for improved performance with the use of protective coatings. These protective coatings shield the load-bearing super alloy blades from the high-temperature combustion gases by creating a thermal gradient over their thickness. This addition extends the life and performance of blades. A more complete understanding of the behavior, failure mechanics, and life expectancy for turbine blades and their coatings is needed to enhance and validate simulation models. As new thermal-barrier-coated materials and deposition methods are developed, strides to effectively test, evaluate, and prepare the technology for industry deployment are of paramount interest. Coupling the experience and expertise of researchers at the University of Central Florida, The German Aerospace Center, and Cleveland State University with the world-class synchrotron x-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory, the synergistic collaboration has yielded previously unseen measurements to look inside the coating layer system for in situ strain measurements during representative service loading. These findings quantify the in situ strain response on multilayer thermal barrier coatings and shed light on the elastic and nonelastic properties of the layers and the role of mechanical load and internal cooling variations on the response. The article discusses the experimental configuration and development of equipment to perform in situ strain measurements on multilayer thin coatings and provides an overview of the achievements thus far.

  8. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  9. Thermal barrier coating materials

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, David R.; Simon R. Phillpot

    2005-01-01

    Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  10. Creep Behavior of Hafnia and Ytterbium Silicate Environmental Barrier Coating Systems on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Harder, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings will play a crucial role in future advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to significantly extend the temperature capability and stability of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) engine components, thus improving the engine performance. In order to develop high performance, robust coating systems for engine components, appropriate test approaches simulating operating temperature gradient and stress environments for evaluating the critical coating properties must be established. In this paper, thermal gradient mechanical testing approaches for evaluating creep and fatigue behavior of environmental barrier coated SiC/SiC CMC systems will be described. The creep and fatigue behavior of Hafnia and ytterbium silicate environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC CMC systems will be reported in simulated environmental exposure conditions. The coating failure mechanisms will also be discussed under the heat flux and stress conditions.

  11. Thermal High- and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Thick Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have received increasing attention for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications because of their ability to provide thermal insulation to engine components. However, the durability of these coatings under the severe thermal cycling conditions encountered in a diesel engine (ref. 1) still remains a major issue. In this research at the NASA Lewis Research Center, a high-power laser was used to investigate the thermal fatigue behavior of a yttria-stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated diesel engine conditions. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure under complex thermal low-cycle fatigue (LCF, representing stop/start cycles) and thermal high-cycle fatigue (HCF, representing operation at 1300 rpm) are described. Continuous wave and pulse laser modes were used to simulate pure LCF and combined LCF/HCF, respectively (ref. 2). The LCF mechanism was found to be closely related to the coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. These creep strains in the ceramic coating led to a tensile stress state during cooling, thus providing the major driving force for crack growth under LCF conditions. The combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation, and accelerated crack growth than did the pure LCF test. HCF thermal loads also facilitated lateral crack branching and ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations. HCF is associated with the cyclic stresses originating from the high-frequency temperature fluctuation at the ceramic coating surface. The HCF thermal loads act on the crack by a wedging mechanism (ref. 1), resulting in continuous crack growth at temperature. The HCF stress intensity factor amplitude increases with the interaction depth and temperature swing, and decreases with the crack depth. HCF damage also increases with the thermal expansion coefficient and the Young's modulus of the ceramic coating (refs. 1 and 3).

  12. The Development of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Environment Effects on the Creep and Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Topics covered include: Environmental barrier coating system development: needs, challenges and limitations; Advanced environmental barrier coating systems (EBCs) for CMC airfoils and combustors; NASA EBC systems and material system evolutions, Current turbine and combustor EBC coating emphases, Advanced development, processing, testing and modeling, EBC and EBC bond coats: recent advances; Design tool and life prediction of coated CMC components; Advanced CMC-EBC rig demonstrations; Summary and future directions.

  13. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  14. Experimental study of insulating properties and behaviour of thermal barrier coating systems in thermo cyclic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Three TBC systems deposited using atmospheric plasma spray process were tested. • Microhardness and temperature difference between the surfaces were measured. • Network of microcracks was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. • Correlation between the substrate temperature and coating quality is established. • Stabilizers have great influence on the insulating properties of the coatings. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to improve the resistance of turbo jet engine parts exposed to high temperatures and overheating and sudden changes in temperature. For this purpose, three thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems NiCrAlCoY2O3/ZrO2MgO, NiCrAlCoY2O3/ZrO2Y2O3 and NiCrAlCoY2O3/ZrO2CeO2Y2O3 were tested. They were deposited using the atmospheric plasma spray process (APS). In order to develop a TBC with the best thermal insulating properties and the highest reliability in relation to aging of materials under the influence of sudden changes in temperature, TBC systems that were deposited on cold and preheated substrates were tested. The network of microcracks on the surfaces of the ceramic layers in deposited condition was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Insulating characteristics of TBC systems were examined by measuring the temperature difference ΔT between the top and bottom surfaces of the samples at a temperature of 1200 °C. Testing of TBC for resistance to thermal cyclic behaviour was performed by exposing samples to alternate heating at 1200 °C and rapid cooling of the samples to 180 °C. Microhardnesses of the TBC system, after completion of thermal cycles, were compared with the values in deposited state. Analyses of thermal insulation properties and thermal cyclic behaviour have shown a correlation between the substrate temperature and quality of the TBC system in thermal cyclic conditions

  15. Thermal cycling behaviour of thermal barrier coating systems based on first- and fourth-generation Ni-based superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    Duhamel, Cécilie; Chieux, Marion; Molins, Régine; Rémy, Luc; Monceau, Daniel; Rouaix-Vande Put, Aurélie; Guédou, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with the cyclic oxidation behaviour of thermal barrier coating systems. The systems consist of an yttria-stabilised zircona ceramic top coat deposited by EB-PVD, a b-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat and a Ni-based superalloy. Two different superalloys are studied: a first-generation one and a fourthgeneration one containing Re, Ru and Hf. The aim of this work is to characterise the microstructural evolution of those systems and to correlate it to their resistance to spallation. Thermal cy...

  16. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  17. Development Status and Performance Comparisons of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft turbine engine systems, because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper presents current NASA EBC-CMC development emphases including: the coating composition and processing improvements, laser high heat flux-thermal gradient thermo-mechanical fatigue - environmental testing methodology development, and property evaluations for next generation EBC-CMC systems. EBCs processed with various deposition techniques including Plasma Spray, Electron Beam - Physical Vapor Deposition, and Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) will be particularly discussed. The testing results and demonstrations of advanced EBCs-CMCs in complex simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic fatigue, oxidizing-steam and CMAS environments will help provide insights into the coating development strategies to meet long-term engine component durability goals.

  18. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  19. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  20. Technical and Economical Aspects of Current Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Gas Turbine Engines by Thermal Spray and EBPVD: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Albert; Knapp, James; Taylor, Thomas; Ashary, Adil; Bolcavage, Ann; Hitchman, Neil

    2008-06-01

    The most advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for aircraft engine and power generation hot section components consist of electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) applied yttria-stabilized zirconia and platinum modified diffusion aluminide bond coating. Thermally sprayed ceramic and MCrAlY bond coatings, however, are still used extensively for combustors and power generation blades and vanes. This article highlights the key features of plasma spray and HVOF, diffusion aluminizing, and EBPVD coating processes. The coating characteristics of thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat as well as low density and dense vertically cracked (DVC) Zircoat TBC are described. Essential features of a typical EBPVD TBC coating system, consisting of a diffusion aluminide and a columnar TBC, are also presented. The major coating cost elements such as material, equipment and processing are explained for the different technologies, with a performance and cost comparison given for selected examples.

  1. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  2. Permeation Barrier Coatings for the Helical Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A permeation barrier coating was specified for the Helical Heat Exchanger (HHE) to minimize contamination through emissions and/or permeation into the nitrogen system for ALARA reasons. Due to the geometry of the HHE, a special coating practice was needed since the conventional method of high temperature pack aluminization was intractable. A survey of many coating companies was undertaken; their coating capabilities and technologies were assessed and compared to WSRC needs. The processes and limitations to coating the HHE are described. Slurry coating appears to be the most technically sound approach for coating the HHE

  3. Beneficial Effect of Pt and of Pre-Oxidation on the Oxidation Behaviour of an NiCoCrAlYTa Bond-Coating for Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Put, Aurélie; Oquab, Djar; Péré, Eve; Raffaitin, Aymeric; Monceau, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is a major concern as the growth of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer on the bondcoating creates stresses that greatly favour the thermal barrier spallation. To delay the loss of the thermal protection provided, research has focused on the bondcoating composition and microstructure as well as on the parameters required for a suitable pre-oxidation treatment before the deposition of the ceramic top coat. Platinum is known to...

  4. Evaluation of Titanium Nitride-Modified Bondcoat System Used in Thermal Barrier Coating in Corrosive Salts Environment at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Imran Nazir; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Durrani, Yaseer A.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were produced by air plasma spraying system on nickel base superalloy. These coatings were composed of a Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 topcoat and a CoNiCrAlY bondcoat and are known as standard TBC. In this paper, standard TBC samples were compared with TiN-modified bondcoat TBC samples. Titanium nitride was deposited by utilizing a physical vapor deposition technique. Both TBC systems were exposed to high temperature in the presence of corrosive salts, i.e. a mixture of V2O5 and Na2SO4 (50:50) for 50 h. It was observed that the TiN-modified samples showed better results in terms of oxidation resistance and delamination. The formation of Cr2Ti n-2O2 n-1 phases at the interface of the topcoat-bondcoat, in TiN-modified samples were found to enhance the thermal and oxidation properties of the TBC.

  5. Tantalum oxide coatings as candidate environmental barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Moldovan, Monica; Weyant, C. M.; Johnson, D. Lynn; Faber, K. T.

    2004-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) oxide, due to its high-temperature capabilities and thermal expansion coefficient similar to silicon nitride, is a promising candidate for environmental barriers for silicon (Si) nitride-based ceramics. This paper focuses on the development of plasma-sprayed Ta oxide as an environmental barrier coating for silicon nitride. Using a D-optimal design of experiments, plasma-spray processing variables were optimized to maximize coating density. The effect of processing variables on c...

  6. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for Si-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, R. Sung; Robinson, Raymond C.; Lee, Kang N.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating concepts based on multi-component HfO2 (ZrO2) and modified mullite systems are developed for monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) applications. Comprehensive testing approaches were established using the water vapor cyclic furnace, high pressure burner rig and laser heat flux steam rig to evaluate the coating water vapor stability, cyclic durability, radiation and erosion resistance under simulated engine environments. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the environmental barrier coating systems for 2700 to 3000 F monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC CMC component applications. The high-temperature-capable environmental barrier coating systems are being further developed and optimized in collaboration with engine companies for advanced turbine engine applications.

  7. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  8. Heat treatment of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with CoNiCrAlY bond-coat and 0.3 mm thick zirconia top-coat were air plasma sprayed (APS) onto a nickel-base super alloy, Hastelloy-X and 316L stainless substrates. The samples were heat treated at different temperatures. The resulting microstructural features and fracture surfaces of the zirconia top-coat were studied by optical and electron microscopies. Formation of spinels was observed close to the thermal grown oxide (TGO)/top-coat interface, and it was noticed that this layer became thicker during long heat treatments. Top-coat phase stability was assessed by X-ray diffraction, and it was observed that for long heat treatments the top-coat transformed up to 26% into monoclinic phase. Residual stresses and relative interfacial toughness are also important factors, which affect the life of the TBC. They were determined by the hole drill method and by Vickers indentation. The relative interfacial toughness between the top-coat and bond-coat increased with increasing temperature for nickel-base super alloy substrates whereas, for stainless steel based TBCs it increased only up to 650 deg. C and then decreased with increasing temperature. For long heat treatments, the nickel-base TBCs showed that the interface between top-coat and bond-coat deteriorated with extended exposure time

  9. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  10. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life

  11. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Development and Fatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. Durability of the coating systems remains a critical issue with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Thermal conductivity increase and coating degradation due to sintering and phase changes are known to be detrimental to coating performance. There is a need to characterize the coating thermal fatigue behavior and temperature limit, in order to potentially take full advantage of the current coating capability. In this study, thermal conductivity and cyclic fatigue behaviors of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings were evaluated under high temperature, large thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. The coating degradation and failure processes were assessed by real-time monitoring of the coating thermal conductivity under the test conditions. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces and failure modes under the cyclic thermal loads will be discussed in light of the high temperature mechanical fatigue and fracture testing results.

  13. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  14. Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, E. H.; Xie, L.; Gell, M.; Padture, N. P.; Cetegen, B.; Ozturk, A.; Ma, X.; Roth, J.; Xiao, T. D.; Bryant, P. E. C.

    2004-03-01

    A novel process, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS), is presented for depositing thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), in which aqueous chemical precursors are injected into a standard direct current plasma spray system. The resulting coatings microstructure has three unique features: (1) ultra fine splats (1 µm), (2) nanometer and micron-sized interconnected porosity, and (3) closely spaced, through-thickness cracks. Coatings over 3 mm thick can be readily deposited using the SPPS process. Coating durability is excellent, with SPPS coatings showing, in furnace cycling tests, 2.5 times the spallation life of air plasma coatings (APS) and 1.5 times the life of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coatings. The conductivity of SPPS coatings is lower than EB-PVD coatings and higher than the best APS coatings. Manufacturing cost is expected to be similar to APS coatings and much lower than EB-PVD coatings. The SPPS deposition process includes droplet break-up and material arriving at the deposition surface in various physical states ranging from aqueous solution, gel phase, to fully-molten ceramic. The relation between the arrival state of the material and the microstructure is described.

  15. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  16. Experimental evaluation of optimization method for developing ultraviolet barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) barrier coatings can be used to protect many industrial products from UV attack. This study introduces a method of optimizing UV barrier coatings using pigment particles. The radiative properties of the pigment particles were evaluated theoretically, and the optimum particle size was decided from the absorption efficiency and the back-scattering efficiency. UV barrier coatings were prepared with zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2). The transmittance of the UV barrier coating was calculated theoretically. The radiative transfer in the UV barrier coating was modeled using the radiation element method by ray emission model (REM2). In order to validate the calculated results, the transmittances of these coatings were measured by a spectrophotometer. A UV barrier coating with a low UV transmittance and high VIS transmittance could be achieved. The calculated transmittance showed a similar spectral tendency with the measured one. The use of appropriate particles with optimum size, coating thickness and volume fraction will result in effective UV barrier coatings. UV barrier coatings can be achieved by the application of optical engineering. -- Highlights: • This study introduces a method of optimizing UV barrier coatings theoretically using pigment particles. • The control of nano-scale radiation is applied to macro-scale phenomena. • UV barrier coatings can be achieved by the application of optical engineering and have never been done before

  17. Prospective barrier coatings for superconducting cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, Y.; Dolgosheev, P.; Sytnikov, V.

    1997-07-01

    Known and prospective types of chromium coatings, used in the production of superconducting `cable-in-conduit' conductors designed for the ITER and other projects, are considered. The influence of the technological conditions during the galvanic plating of hard, grey, black and combined chromium coatings in various electrolytes and the annealing conditions in air and in vacuum on the contact electrical resistance of copper and superconducting wire at room temperature and 4.2 K as well as on other physical properties, e.g. resistance to abrasion, elasticity and thickness of the coatings, is investigated. Black oxide - chromium coatings and combined chromium coatings, containing oxides of chromium and a number of other metals, ensure the possibility of a significant increase of contact resistance as well as its regulation in a broad range of values in comparison with hard chromium. The results of the present work and also an independent investigation of the cable containing the strand, manufactured in JSC `VNIIKP', allow us to propose the oxide - chromium coating as a barrier layer for multistrand superconducting cables.

  18. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  19. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  20. Creep, Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Environmental Barrier Coating and SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Systems: The Role of Environment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for low emission SiCSiC CMC combustors and turbine airfoils have been developed to meet next generation engine emission and performance goals. This presentation will highlight the developments of NASAs current EBC system technologies for SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, their performance evaluation and modeling progress towards improving the engine SiCSiC component temperature capability and long-term durability. Our emphasis has also been placed on the fundamental aspects of the EBC-CMC creep and fatigue behaviors, and their interactions with turbine engine oxidizing and moisture environments. The EBC-CMC environmental degradation and failure modes, under various simulated engine testing environments, in particular involving high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity combustion conditions, will be discussed aiming at quantifying the protective coating functions, performance and durability, and in conjunction with damage mechanics and fracture mechanics approaches.

  1. To Develop Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhao, Weixun; Wang, Ping; Wei, Zheng

    Advanced turbine engines require the application of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to provide still higher reliability, thermal insulation effect and longer lifetime under harsh operating conditions. TBCs with nanostructure proved to be promising to deliver the desired property and performance. To exploit full potentials of the current widely used yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), nano-sized YSZ powders were developed and used as the ceramic source material. By controlling the deposition processes, novel TBCs with outstanding nanostructure such as nano-sized grains and pores were produced by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), respectively. The incorporated nanostructure in TBCs resulted in substantial increase in thermal barrier effect and their lifetime. The long-term microstructure stability of the nanocoating was also investigated.

  2. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  3. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  4. Wavelet analysis of acoustic emission signals from thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; ZHOU Yi-chun

    2006-01-01

    The wavelet transform is applied to the analysis of acoustic emission signals collected during tensile test of the ZrO2-8% Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The acoustic emission signals are de-noised using the Daubechies discrete wavelets,and then decomposed into different wavelet levels using the programs developed by the authors. Each level is examined for its specific frequency range. The ratio of energy in different levels to the total energy gives information on the failure modes (coating micro-failures and substrate micro-failures) associated with TBCs system.

  5. Novel hybrid polymeric materials for barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlacky, Erin Christine

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites, described as the inclusion of nanometer-sized layered silicates into polymeric materials, have been widely researched due to significant enhancements in material properties with the incorporation of small levels of filler (1--5 wt.%) compared to conventional micro- and macro-composites (20--30 wt.%). One of the most promising applications for polymer-clay nanocomposites is in the field of barrier coatings. The development of UV-curable polymer-clay nanocomposite barrier coatings was explored by employing a novel in situ preparation technique. Unsaturated polyesters were synthesized in the presence of organomodified clays by in situ intercalative polymerization to create highly dispersed clays in a precursor resin. The resulting clay-containing polyesters were crosslinked via UV-irradiation using donor-acceptor chemistry to create polymer-clay nanocomposites which exhibited significantly enhanced barrier properties compared to alternative clay dispersion techniques. The impact of the quaternary alkylammonium organic modifiers, used to increase compatibility between the inorganic clay and organic polymer, was studied to explore influence of the organic modifier structure on the nanocomposite material properties. By incorporating just the organic modifiers, no layered silicates, into the polyester resins, reductions in film mechanical and thermal properties were observed, a strong indicator of film plasticization. An alternative in situ preparation method was explored to further increase the dispersion of organomodified clay within the precursor polyester resins. In stark contrast to traditional in situ polymerization methods, a novel "reverse" in situ preparation method was developed, where unmodified montmorillonite clay was added during polyesterification to a reaction mixture containing the alkylammonium organic modifier. The resulting nanocomposite films exhibited reduced water vapor permeability and increased mechanical properties

  6. Silicon oxide diffusion barrier coatings on polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the influence of process conditions for the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of SiOx diffusion barrier coatings on polypropylene (PP) is investigated and compared to results obtained on polyethylene terephthalate (PET). It was observed that the thermal load during deposition is much more crucial in the case of PP. If the thermal load is not the limiting factor, the composite parameter (CP) energy input per mass of precursor showed to be valuable to describe plasma conditions at constant oxygen to monomer ratio. Low oxygen transmission rates (OTRs) of 5.1 ± 3.6 and 0.3 ± 0.1 cm3/m2day/atm were achieved on PP and PET foil, respectively, for an optimal CP of 4.1 x 105 J/g. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that low carbon and silanol content is necessary for good barrier performance. Low RF power, necessary to reduce thermal load on PP, can be compensated by increasing the oxygen to monomer ratio. For favorable plasma conditions, the dependence of the OTR on the coating thickness follows a similar trend for both substrate materials with a critical thickness of approximately 12 nm. The residual permeation can be correlated to the defect density at each stage of film growth by means of a simple correlation. Further support for permeation through defects is found by the activated rate theory, since the apparent activation energy of oxygen permeation is below typical values of amorphous glasses and remains unchanged due to the deposition of SiOx on both substrates.

  7. Characterization of hydrogen barrier coatings for titanium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the barrier efficiency of a thick thermal spray deposit on the α-titanium alloy, Ti-5Al-2.4Sn against hydrogen penetration. Therefore, a duplex coating has been applied by plasma spraying using a Sulzer Metco F4 gun. The selected duplex coating system consisted of a 0.1-0.2 mm thick tantalum bond layer and a chromium oxide top layer doped with 3 wt% titanium oxide. The achieved thickness of the top layer was about 0.6 mm. The coated specimens have been characterized with regard to bond strength, hardness and microstructure. Hydrogen charging experiments were performed in a Sievert's apparatus

  8. Effect of Sintering on Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Barrier Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; PENG Hui; GUO Hongbo; GONG Shengkai

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are mostly applied to hot components of advanced turbine engines to insulate the components from hot gas.The effect of sintering on thermal conductivity and thermal barrier effects of conventional plasma sprayed and nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are investigated.Remarkable increase in thermal conductivity occurs to both typical coatings after heat treatment.The change of porosity is just the opposite.The grain size of the nanostructured zirconia coating increases more drastically with annealing time compared to that of the conventional plasma sprayed coating,which indicates that coating sintering makes more contributions to the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured coating than that of the conventional coating.Thermal barrier effect tests using temperature difference technique are performed on both coatings.The thermal barrier effects decrease with the increase of thermal conductivity after heat treatment and the decline seems more drastic in low thermal conductivity range.The decline in thermal barrier effects is about 80 ℃for nanostructured coating after 100 h heat treatment,while the conventional coating reduces by less than 60 ℃ compared to the as-sprayed coating.

  9. Development of metal based thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Il

    In this work, metal-based thermal barrier coatings (MBTBCs) have been produced, using high frequency induction plasma spraying (IPS) of iron-based nanostructured alloy powders. Important advances have been made over recent years to the development of ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for internal combustion engines application, but they are not yet applied in mass production situations. Besides the important economic considerations, the reliability of ceramic: TBCs is also an issue, being associated with the difficulty of predicting their "in-service" lifetime. Through engineering of the nano/amorphous structure of MBTBCs, their thermal conductivity can be made as low as those of ceramic-based TBCs, with reduced mean free paths of the electrons/phonons scattering. In this work, nano/amorphous structured coatings were deposited by IPS using the following spray parameters: spraying distance (210 ˜ 270 mm), plasma gas composition (Ar/N2), IPS torch power (24kW), and powder feed-rate (16g/min.). The structure and properties of the deposited layers were characterized through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) observations. The thermal diffusivity (alpha) properties of the MBTBCs were measured using a laser flash method. Density (rho) and specific heat (Cp) of the MBTBCs were also measured, and their thermal conductivity (k) calculated (k =alpharhoCp). The thermal conductivity of MBTBCs was found to be as low as 1.99 W/m/K. The heat treatment study showed that crystal structure changes, and grain size growth from a few nanometers to tenth of nanometers occurred at 550°C under static exposure conditions. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of MBTBCs was 13E-6/K, which is close to the TEC of cast iron and thus, closer to the TEC values of aluminium alloys than are conventional TBCs. Fracture toughness of MBTBCs has also been assessed by use of Vickers hardness tests, with a 500 g load for 15 s, and the results show that there are no measurable crack

  10. Development and Performance Evaluations of HfO2-Si and Rare Earth-Si Based Environmental Barrier Bond Coat Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si based EBC bond coat systems for SiCSiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. The coating design approach and stability requirements are specifically emphasized, with the development and implementation focusing on Plasma Sprayed (PS) and Electron Beam-Physic Vapor Deposited (EB-PVD) coating systems and the composition optimizations. High temperature properties of the HfO2-Si based bond coat systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1500 C. Thermal gradient heat flux low cycle fatigue and furnace cyclic oxidation durability tests were also performed at temperatures up to 1500 C. The coating strength improvements, degradation and failure modes of the environmental barrier coating bond coat systems on SiCSiC CMCs tested in simulated stress-environment interactions are briefly discussed and supported by modeling. The performance enhancements of the HfO2-Si bond coat systems with rare earth element dopants and rare earth-silicon based bond coats are also highlighted. The advanced bond coat systems, when

  11. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  12. Effect of Bond Coat Materials on Thermal Fatigue Failure of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Satoshi; Okazaki, Masakazu; Sakaguchi, Motoki; Matsubara, Hideaki

    Effect of MCrAlY bond coat alloy systems on thermal fatigue failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was investigated, where the TBC specimen consisted of Ni-based superalloy IN738LC substrate, bond coat, and 8 wt.% Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coat. The top coat was fabricated by EB-PVD method with 250 μm in thickness. Three kinds of MCrAlY alloys were studied as the bond coat material. Employing the originally developed test equipment, thermal fatigue tests were carried out, by applying thermal cycles between 400 and 950°C in air. Special attention was paid not only to the failure life of the TBC specimen, but also the underlying failure mechanisms. The experimental results clearly demonstrated that the effect of MCrAlY bond coat alloys on the thermal fatigue life was very significant. Some discussions were made on the experimental results based on the measurements of mechanical and metallurgical properties of the bond coat alloys: i.e., elastic stiffness, thermal expansion coefficient and high temperature oxidation resistance.

  13. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMAL SHOCK BEHAVIOR OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, A.; Ramachandran, S.

    2011-01-01

    High temperature thermal cycling fatigue causes the breakdown of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC)systems. This paper presents the development of thick TBCs, focusing attention on the microstructure of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) coating and Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ), in relation to its resistance to thermal cycling fatigue. Thick TBCs, were produced by means of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and Yttria Partially Stabilised Zirconia top coat or Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ), bo...

  14. Phase transformations and residual stresses in environmental barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan J.

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are promising materials for high-temperature structural applications in turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) were developed to protect the underlying substrate. In the case of silicon carbide (SiC), multilayer coating systems consist of a Ba1-xSrxAl2Si 2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite or mullite + SrAl2Si 2O8 (SAS) interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. In this work, biaxial strains were measured on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples to analyze the stress and phase evolution in the coating system as a function of depth and temperature. Models were used to compare the results with an ideal coating system. In the assprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 175 MPa were measured, and cracking was observed. After thermally cycling the samples, stresses were significantly reduced and cracks in the topcoat had closed. The addition of SAS to the interlayer increased the compressive stress in the BSAS topcoat in thermally-cycled samples, which was desirable for EBC applications. The BSAS topcoat transformed from the as-deposited hexacelsian state to the stable celsian above 1200°C. This phase transformation is accompanied by a CTE reduction. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation were quantified for freestanding plasma-sprayed BSAS. Activation energies for bulk bars and crushed powder were determined to be ˜340 kJ/mol and ˜500 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction were used to establish how microstructural constraints reduce the transformation energy. Barrier coating lifetime and stability are also influenced by exposure to reactive, low-melting point calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) deposits formed from dust and sand. Multilayer doped aluminosilicate coatings and bulk BSAS material were

  15. Influence of layer type and order on barrier properties of multilayer PECVD barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahroun, K.; Behm, H.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Dahlmann, R.; Hopmann, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Due to their macromolecular structure, plastics are limited in their scope of application whenever high barrier functionality against oxygen and water vapour permeation is required. One solution is the deposition of thin silicon oxide coatings in plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) processes. A way to improve performance of barrier coatings is the use of multilayer structures built from dyad layers, which combine an inorganic barrier layer and an organic intermediate layer. In order to investigate the influence of type and number of dyads on the barrier performance of coated 23 µm PET films, different dyad setups are chosen. The setups include SiOCH interlayers and SiOx-barrier layers deposited using the precursor hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO). A single reactor setup driven in pulsed microwave plasma (MW) mode as well as capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) mode is chosen. In this paper the effects of a variation in intermediate layer recipe and stacking order using dyad setups on the oxygen barrier properties of multilayer coatings are discussed with regard to the chemical structure, morphology and activation energy of the permeation process. Changes in surface nano-morphology of intermediate layers have a strong impact on the barrier properties of subsequent glass-like coatings. Even a complete failure of the barrier is observed. Therefore, when depositing multilayer barrier coatings, stacking order has to be considered.

  16. Influence of layer type and order on barrier properties of multilayer PECVD barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their macromolecular structure, plastics are limited in their scope of application whenever high barrier functionality against oxygen and water vapour permeation is required. One solution is the deposition of thin silicon oxide coatings in plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) processes. A way to improve performance of barrier coatings is the use of multilayer structures built from dyad layers, which combine an inorganic barrier layer and an organic intermediate layer. In order to investigate the influence of type and number of dyads on the barrier performance of coated 23 µm PET films, different dyad setups are chosen. The setups include SiOCH interlayers and SiOx-barrier layers deposited using the precursor hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO). A single reactor setup driven in pulsed microwave plasma (MW) mode as well as capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) mode is chosen. In this paper the effects of a variation in intermediate layer recipe and stacking order using dyad setups on the oxygen barrier properties of multilayer coatings are discussed with regard to the chemical structure, morphology and activation energy of the permeation process. Changes in surface nano-morphology of intermediate layers have a strong impact on the barrier properties of subsequent glass-like coatings. Even a complete failure of the barrier is observed. Therefore, when depositing multilayer barrier coatings, stacking order has to be considered. (paper)

  17. Aspects of fatigue life in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, H.

    2001-08-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are applied on hot components in airborne and land based gas turbines when higher turbine inlet temperature, meaning better thermal efficiency, is desired. The TBC is mainly applied to protect underlying material from high temperatures, but also serves as a protection from the aggressive corrosive environment. Plasma sprayed coatings are often duplex TBC's with an outer ceramic top coat (TC) made from partially stabilised zirconia - ZrO{sub 2} + 6-8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Below the top coat there is a metallic bond coat (BC). The BC is normally a MCrAlX coating (M=Ni, Co, Fe... and X=Y, Hf, Si ... ). In gas turbine components exposed to elevated temperatures nickel-based superalloys are commonly adopted as load carrying components. In the investigations performed here a commercial wrought Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 has been used as substrate for the TBC. As BC a NiCoCrAlY serves as a reference material and in all cases 7% Yttria PS zirconia has been used. Phase development and failure mechanisms in APS TBC during service-like conditions, have been evaluated in the present study. This is done by combinations of thermal cycling and low cycle fatigue tests. The aim is to achieve better knowledge regarding how, when and why thermal barrier coatings fail. As a final outcome of the project a model capable of predicting fatigue life of a given component will help engineers and designers of land based gas turbines for power generation to better optimise TBC's. In the investigations it is seen that TBC life is strongly influenced by oxidation of the BC and interdiffusion between BC and the substrate. The bond coat is known to oxidise with time at high temperature. The initial oxide found during testing is alumina. With increased time at high temperature Al is depleted from the bond coat due to inter-diffusion and oxidation. Oxides others than alumina start to form when the Al content is reduced below a critical limit. It is here believed

  18. Atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide barrier coatings for packaging materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi, E-mail: terhi.hirvikorpi@vtt.f [Oy Keskuslaboratorio - Centrallaboratorium Ab (KCL), P.O. Box 70, FI-02151 Espoo (Finland); Vaehae-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.f [Oy Keskuslaboratorio - Centrallaboratorium Ab (KCL), P.O. Box 70, FI-02151 Espoo (Finland); Mustonen, Tuomas, E-mail: tuomas.mustonen@vtt.f [Oy Keskuslaboratorio - Centrallaboratorium Ab (KCL), P.O. Box 70, FI-02151 Espoo (Finland); Iiskola, Eero, E-mail: eero.iiskola@kcl.f [Oy Keskuslaboratorio - Centrallaboratorium Ab (KCL), P.O. Box 70, FI-02151 Espoo (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: maarit.karppinen@tkk.f [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 6100, FI-02015 TKK (Finland)

    2010-03-01

    Thin aluminum oxide coatings have been deposited at a low temperature of 80 {sup o}C on various uncoated papers, polymer-coated papers and boards and plain polymer films using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The work demonstrates that such ALD-grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings efficiently enhance the gas-diffusion barrier performance of the studied porous and non-porous materials towards oxygen, water vapor and aromas.

  19. Polymer derived ceramic composites as environmental barrier coatings on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Jessica D.

    Polymer derived ceramics have shown promise as a novel way to process low-dimensional ceramics such as fibers and coatings. They offer advantages over traditional ceramic processing routes including lower pyrolysis temperatures and the ability to employ polymeric processing techniques. The main drawback to preceramic polymers is that they undergo a shrinkage during pyrolysis that can be greater than 50-volume%. One way to overcome this shrinkage is to add filler particles, usually elemental or binary metals, which will expand upon reaction with the pyrolysis atmosphere, thereby compensating for the shrinkage of the polymer. The aim of this study is to develop a polymer derived ceramic composite coating on steel as a barrier to oxidation and carburization, while concurrently gaining insight as to the fundamental mechanisms for compositional and microstructural evolution within the system. A systematic approach to selecting the preceramic polymer and expansion agents was taken. Six commercially available poly(silsesquioxane) polymers and a polysiloxane were studied. Several metals and an intermetallic were considered as potential expansion agents. The most desirable polymer/expansion agent combination was achieved with poly(hydridomethylsiloxane) as the matrix and titanium disilicide as the filler. Processing parameters have been optimized and a relationship derived to predict final coating thickness based on slurry viscosity and dip coating withdrawal speed. Microstructural analysis reveals an amorphous composite coating of oxidized filler particles in a silica matrix. A diffusion layer is visible at the coating-steel interface, indicating good bonding. The optimized coatings are ˜18mum thick, have some residual porosity and a density of 2.57g/cm3. A systematic study of the phase transformations and microstructural changes in the coating and its components during pyrolysis in air is also presented. The system evolves from a polymer filled with a binary metal at

  20. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  1. Failure mechanisms of thermal barrier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used in turbines for propulsion and power generation. The benefit results from their ability to sustain high thermal gradients in the presence of adequate backside cooling. Lowering the temperature of the metal substrate prolongs the life of the component: whether from environmental attack, creep rupture, or fatigue. Thermal barrier systems exhibit multiple failure mechanisms, depends on the deposition methods of the TBCs, chemical composition of the bond coats, and their working environments. Some of the most prevalent are studied in this thesis. There are two types of thermal barrier systems based on the chemical composition of the bond coats: Pt-aluminide and NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ratcheting happens the most in the systems with Pt-aluminide bond coats; while edge delamination is considered a possible failure mechanism for the systems with NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ratcheting is motivated by displacement instability in the thermally grown oxide (TGO). Interactions between cracks induced in TBCs upon thermal cycling have been calculated. Cracks that converge from neighboring imperfections exhibit a minimum energy release rate prior to coalescence. Equating this minimum to the toughness of the TBC provides a criterion for coalescence and failure. Imposing this criterion allows the change in crack length upon cycling and the number of cycles to failure to be ascertained. This simulation capability is used to explore various influences on durability. Samples with NiCoCrAlY bond coat are studied after subjected to thermal cycling in a burner rig. In each case, a dominant delamination has been identified, that extends primarily along the interface between the TGO and the bond coat. Calculations of the delamination energy release rate, upon comparison with the interface toughness, reveals a critical TGO thickness, (h tgo)c ≈ 3mum, comparable to that found experimentally.

  2. Experimental techniques for the characterization and development of thermal barrier coating bond coat alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert J.

    Thermal barrier coatings, commonly used in modern gas turbines and jet engines, are dynamic, multilayered structures consisting of a superalloy substrate, an Al-rich bond coat, a thermally grown oxide, and a ceramic top coat. Knowledge of the disparate material properties for each of the constituents of a thermal barrier coating is crucial to both better understanding and improving the performance of the system. The efforts of this dissertation quantify fundamental aspects of two intrinsic strain mechanisms that arise during thermal cycling. This includes measurement of the thermal expansion behavior for bond coats and superalloys as well as establishing specific ternary compositions associated with a strain-inducing martensitic phase transformation, which is known to occur in Ni-rich bond coat alloys. In order to quantify the coefficient of thermal expansion for a number of actual alloys extracted from contemporary thermal barrier coating systems, this work employs a noncontact high temperature digital image correlation technique to nearly 1100°C. The examined materials include: two commercial superalloys, two as-deposited commercial bond coat alloys, and three experimental bond coat alloys. The as-deposited specimens were created using a diffusion aluminizing and a low pressure plasma spray procedure to thicknesses on the order of 50 and 100 mum, respectively. For the plasma sprayed bond coat, a comparison with a bulk counterpart of identical composition indicated that deposition procedures have little effect on thermal expansion. An analytical model of oxide rumpling is used to show that the importance of thermal expansion mismatch between a commercial bond coat and its superalloy substrate is relatively small. Considerably higher expansion values are noted for a Ni-rich bond coat alloy, however, and modeling which includes this layer suggests that it may have a substantial influence on rumpling. Combinatorial methods based on diffusion multiples are also

  3. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  4. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition of barrier coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    It is intended that the book will be a practical guide to provide any reader with the basic information to help them understand what is necessary in order to produce a good barrier coated web or to improve the quality of any existing barrier product. After providing an introduction, where the terminology is outlined and some of the science is given (keeping the mathematics to a minimum), including barrier testing methods, the vacuum deposition process will be described. In theory a thin layer of metal or glass-like material should be enough to convert any polymer film into a perfect barrier material. The reality is that all barrier coatings have their performance limited by the defects in the coating. This book looks at the whole process from the source materials through to the post deposition handling of the coated material. This holistic view of the vacuum coating process provides a description of the common sources of defects and includes the possible methods of limiting the defects. This enables readers...

  5. Silicon oxide permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have displaced established materials in many areas of food and beverage packaging. Plastic packing materials offer are various advantages concerning production and handling. PET bottles for instance are non-breakable and lightweight compared to glass and metal containers. However, PET offers poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf live of packaged food is reduced. Permeation of gases can be reduced by depositing transparent plasma polymerized silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings. A microwave (2.45 GHz) driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna to treat PET foils or bottles. To increase the barrier properties of the coatings furthermore a RF substrate bias (13.56 MHz) is applied. The composition of the coatings is analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy regarding carbon and hydrogen content. Influence of gas phase composition and substrate bias on chemical composition of the coatings is discussed. A strong relation between barrier properties and film composition is found: good oxygen barriers are observed as carbon content is reduced and films become quartz-like. Regarding oxygen permeation a barrier improvement factor (BIF) of 70 is achieved.

  6. Progress in coating development for fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of effective and reliable coatings is a key to the viability of most, if not all, fusion blanket systems. The specific purpose and requirements of the coatings vary widely, depending on the blanket concept. The efforts on coating development to date have focused primarily on electrically insulating coatings for the self-cooled lithium concepts with a vanadium alloy structure, and the tritium barrier coatings for the water-cooled, Pb-Li (WCLL) breeder concepts with ferritic steel structures. Although other coating materials are under consideration, most of the effort on the electrically insulating coatings has focused on CaO and AlN coatings on V-4Cr-4Ti alloy structure. Most of the effort on the tritium barrier coating development is focused on Al2O3 coatings formed on aluminized ferritic steels. This paper presents an overview of the status of coating development for the various fusion concepts with emphasis on the materials interaction and chemistry control issues associated with the formation, stability and performance of the coatings

  7. Effects of Citric Acid on Starch-Based Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    With growing environmental concerns, efforts are made to replace petroleum based products with renewable alternatives. This is particularly evident in the packaging industry, where replacing synthetic polymers with renewable materials is of considerable interest. Materials for food packaging need to give protection, acting as a barrier against substances that can adversely affect the food quality such as water and oxygen. In this work, barrier dispersion coatings based on starch were used to ...

  8. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  9. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Turbine Engines: A Design and Performance Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis; Smialek, James L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBC) for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating long-term durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature, strength and stability requirements in engine high heat-flux combustion environments, especially for highly-loaded rotating turbine components. Advanced TEBC systems, including nano-composite based HfO2-aluminosilicate and rare earth silicate coatings are being developed and tested for higher temperature capable SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade applications. This paper will emphasize coating composite and multilayer design approach and the resulting performance and durability in simulated engine high heat-flux, high stress and high pressure combustion environments. The advances in the environmental barrier coating development showed promise for future rotating CMC blade applications.

  10. Thermophysical properties of selected powders for thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drajewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings often have the problems of spallation and cracking in service owing to their poor bond strength and high residual stresses. Functionally graded thermal barrier coatings with a gradual compositional variation from heat resistant ceramics to fracture-resistant metals are proposed to mitigate these problems.Design/methodology/approach: The results of measurements of thermal diffusivity by using one of the most modern experimental sets LFA 427 (Laser Flash Apparatus produced by Netzsch Company. In order to measure the specific heat cp(T and density р(T, two methods of termogravimetry analysis were used STA 449 Jupiter F3 Netzsch Company and gas displacement density analyzer AccuPyc II 1340 Micromeritics Company.Research limitations/implications: This paper presents the results of measurements of thermal diffusivity coefficient as a function of temperature for Sulzer powders, AMDRY 997, AMDRY 365C, METCO 45C NS, METCO 202 NS, METCO 204 NS.Practical implications: Optimal technical and technological parameters of powders for thermal barrier coatings have been selected.Originality/value: The presented method undoubtedly develops new possibilities for thermal barrier coatings.

  11. Energy efficient engine, high pressure turbine thermal barrier coating. Support technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duderstadt, E. C.; Agarwal, P.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed on a thermal barrier coating support technology task of the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development Program. A thermal barrier coating (TBC) system consisting of a Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond cost layer and ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic layer was selected from eight candidate coating systems on the basis of laboratory tests. The selection was based on coating microstructure, crystallographic phase composition, tensile bond and bend test results, erosion and impact test results, furnace exposure, thermal cycle, and high velocity dynamic oxidation test results. Procedures were developed for applying the selected TBC to CF6-50, high pressure turbine blades and vanes. Coated HPT components were tested in three kinds of tests. Stage 1 blades were tested in a cascade cyclic test rig, Stage 2 blades were component high cycle fatigue tested to qualify thermal barrier coated blades for engine testing, and Stage 2 blades and Stage 1 and 2 vanes were run in factory engine tests. After completion of the 1000 cycle engine test, the TBC on the blades was in excellent condition over all of the platform and airfoil except at the leading edge above midspan on the suction side of the airfoil. The coating damage appeared to be caused by particle impingement; adjacent blades without TBC also showed evidence of particle impingement.

  12. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  13. Thermomechanical Behavior of Developmental Thermal Barrier Coating Bond Coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Amit; Tolpygo, Vladimir K.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2013-04-01

    Thermal expansion, microtensile, and stress relaxation experiments have been performed to contrast and compare the thermal and mechanical response of two experimental (L1 and H1) coatings provided by Honeywell Corporation (Morristown, NY). Thermal expansion experiments reveal that both coatings have coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) that vary with temperature and that the CTE mismatch between the coatings and superalloy substrate is significant in the case of L1 as compared to H1. Values of the 0.2% offset yield stress (YS), Young's modulus ( E), and hardening exponent ( n) are reported. Room-temperature microtensile experiments show higher strain hardening and a very low value of failure strain for L1 as compared to H1. At elevated temperatures, there is a significant decrease in the YS of as-received L1 for (924 MPa at room temperature to 85 MPa at 1000°C) as compared to H1. Finally, a power law creep description for high-temperature stress relaxation is developed and the measured values of the stress exponent ( n = 3) and activation energies ( Q creep = 200-250 kJ/mol) are shown to be consistent with power law creep.

  14. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  15. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  16. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMAL SHOCK BEHAVIOR OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDERSON.A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available High temperature thermal cycling fatigue causes the breakdown of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBCsystems. This paper presents the development of thick TBCs, focusing attention on the microstructure of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ coating and Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ, in relation to its resistance to thermal cycling fatigue. Thick TBCs, were produced by means of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and Yttria Partially Stabilised Zirconia top coat or Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ, both sprayed by AtmosphericPlasma Spray process. The thermal fatigue resistance of new TBC systems and the evolution of the coatings before and after thermal cycling were evaluated. The limit of thermal fatigue resistance increases in the Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ top coat.

  17. Thermal-barrier-coated turbine blade study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemers, P. A.; Hillig, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of coating TBC on a CF6-50 stage 2 high-pressure turbine blade were analyzed with respect to changes in the mean bulk temperature, cooling air requirements, and high-cycle fatigue. Localized spallation was found to have a possible deleterious effect on low-cycle fatigue life. New blade design concepts were developed to take optimum advantage of TBCs. Process and material development work and rig evaluations were undertaken which identified the most promising combination as ZrO2 containing 8 w/o Y2O3 applied by air plasma spray onto a Ni22Cr-10Al-1Y bond layer. The bond layer was applied by a low-pressure, high-velocity plasma spray process onto the base alloy. During the initial startup cycles the blades experienced localized leading edge spallation caused by foreign objects.

  18. Plasma spray for forming nanostructured thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of yttrium partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) are reprocessed into agglomerated feedstocks for plasma spraying thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), using the methods of ball milling, slurry dispersion, spray drying, and heat treatment. Atmospheric plasma is used to spray the agglomerated nanocrystalline particle feedstocks and coatings were deposited on the substrate of Ni-based superalloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to examine the morphology and cross-section of the agglomerated feedstocks and the free-section and cross-section of the nanostructured TBCs. Experimental results show that the agglomerated nanocrystalline particles are spherical and dense. Unlike conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, the micron/nano/micron sandwich structure can be found in the nanostructured YPSZ coatings deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying.

  19. Biodegradation and recycling potential of barrier coated paperboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazhad, M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Four commercial barrier coated boards (i.e., internally-sized uncoated board, one-side polyethylene coated board, double-side polyethylene coated board, and multilayer laminated board were examined for biodegradation using a soil burial approach on a laboratory scale. It was observed that the base-boards were fully biodegradable in a matter of weeks or months, and the degradation process could be accelerated either by sample size modification or enrichment of the soil microbial population. Freezing pretreatment of boards or the fiber directionality of boards had no influence on the rate of degradation. The boards were also found to be recyclable following a simple procedure of re-slushing and screening. The base-boards became almost fully separated from the polyethylene coated material without any special pretreatment.

  20. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of VC and Columnar Structured Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yang, Qi; Huang, Xiao; Tang, Zhaolin

    2015-08-01

    The effects of different thermal barrier coating (TBC) top coat structures and substrate alloys on the isothermal oxidation behaviors of TBC systems were investigated at 1080 °C in lab air. The tested TBC systems consisted of two nickel-based superalloy substrates (CMSX-4 and IN738LC), a platinum aluminide bond coat and two 8YSZ top coats (vertical cracked and columnar structured). Samples with IN738LC substrate demonstrated longer isothermal oxidation lives than the counterparts with CMSX-4 substrate. Outward refractory elemental diffusion in coating systems with CMSX-4 substrate and void formation at the interface between thermally grown oxide and bond coat was found to be responsible for the early failure of TBCs. Columnar structured YSZ top coat seemed to provide better protection of the bond coating and substrate, marginally delaying the failure of the both coating systems with IN738LC and CMSX-4.

  1. Computational design and experimental validation of new thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The focus of this project is on the development of a reliable and efficient ab initio based computational high temperature material design method which can be used to assist the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) bond-coat and top-coat design. Experimental evaluations on the new TBCs are conducted to confirm the new TBCs’ properties. Southern University is the subcontractor on this project with a focus on the computational simulation method development. We have performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics simulation on screening the top coats and bond coats for gas turbine thermal barrier coating design and validation applications. For experimental validations, our focus is on the hot corrosion performance of different TBC systems. For example, for one of the top coatings studied, we examined the thermal stability of TaZr2.75O8 and confirmed it’s hot corrosion performance.

  2. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  3. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  4. Ultrasonic Detection of Delamination and Material Characterization of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Liang Roger; Zhang, Binwei; Alvin, Mary Anne; Lin, Yun

    2012-12-01

    This article describes ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to detect the changes of material properties and provide early warning of delamination in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. NDE tests were performed on single-crystal René N5 superalloy coupons that were coated with a commercially available MCrAlY bond coat and an air plasma sprayed 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat deposited by Air Plasma Spray method, as well as Haynes 230 superalloy coupons coated with MCrA1Y bond coat, and an electron beam physical vapor deposit of 7% YSZ top coat. The TBC coupons were subjected to either cyclic or isothermal exposure for various lengths of time at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1100 °C. The ultrasonic measurements performed on the coupons had provided an early warning of delamination along the top coat/TGO interface before exposure time, when delamination occurred. The material's property (Young's modulus) of the top coat was estimated using the measured wave speeds. Finite element analysis (FEA) of the ultrasonic wave propagation was conducted on a simplified TBC system to verify experimental observations. The technique developed was also demonstrated on an as-manufactured turbine blade to estimate normalized top coat thickness measurements.

  5. Thermal shock behavior of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TBCs of (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and YSZ ceramic coating. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. • Ridges removed, cavities formation appeared and the damage initiation deteriorated. • Damage initiation and progression at interface lead to a buckling failure. - Abstract: Thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y2O3-stabilized-ZrO2 (YSZ) ceramic coating were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, thermal shock behaviors and residual stresses of the coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges still remain on the surface of bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating, which are shown to be the major sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. When these ridges are mostly removed, they appear some of cavities formation and then the damage initiation mode is deteriorated. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface during cooling. The suppressed cavities formation, the removed ridges at the grain boundaries, the relative high TGO to bond coat interface toughness, the uniform growth behavior of TGO thickening and the lower of the residual stress are the primary factors for prolonging the lifetime of TBCs

  6. Thermal shock behavior of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@163.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, Jianwei [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Niu, Jing [Shenyang Liming Aero-engine (Group) Corporation Ltd., Institute of Metallurgical Technology, Technical Center, Shengyang 110043 (China); Li, Na; Huang, Guanghong; He, Limin [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • TBCs of (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and YSZ ceramic coating. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. • Ridges removed, cavities formation appeared and the damage initiation deteriorated. • Damage initiation and progression at interface lead to a buckling failure. - Abstract: Thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, thermal shock behaviors and residual stresses of the coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges still remain on the surface of bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating, which are shown to be the major sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. When these ridges are mostly removed, they appear some of cavities formation and then the damage initiation mode is deteriorated. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface during cooling. The suppressed cavities formation, the removed ridges at the grain boundaries, the relative high TGO to bond coat interface toughness, the uniform growth behavior of TGO thickening and the lower of the residual stress are the primary factors for prolonging the lifetime of TBCs.

  7. Evolution of stress and morphology in thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Atkinson, Alan; Chirivi, Laura; Nicholls, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Residual stress in the thermally grown oxide (TGO) in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was measured by photoluminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS) and stress maps created to track local stress changes as a function of thermal cycling. The local stress images were observed to be correlated with morphological features on the metal surface that were purposely introduced during specimen preparation. Local stress relaxation and morphological evolution with thermal cycling were stud...

  8. Spalling failure of a thermal barrier coating associated with aluminum depletion in the bond-coat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are already being widely used in a variety of gas turbine and diesel engine applications, greater benefits are expected to accrue with TBCs that can be used in critical applications, namely those in which a loss of the coating would expose the underlying metal to a temperature in excess of its design specifications. A plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating is observed to spall after oxidation at 1121 C from a CoNiCrAlY bond-coated superalloy at the interface between the thermally grown oxide (TGO) and the Zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC). Phase characterization by photostimulated luminescence and X-ray diffraction, as well as microstructural characterization by scanning electron microscopy, indicates that the spalling is associated with the conversion of the initially formed α-alumina thermally grown oxide to α-chromia and a (CoNi)(CrAl) spinel. It is proposed that the phase conversion occurs after the alumina TGO has cracked on thermal cycling and the underlying bond-coat alloy is depleted of aluminum with concurrent enrichment of the oxide by Cr, Co and Ni. The observations suggest that monitoring the luminescence intensity as a function of oxidation time might form the basis of a nondestructive tool for detecting the onset of failure based on the disappearance of α-alumina

  9. Internal Radiation Effects in Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Using thermal barrier coatings on combustor liners, turbine vanes, and rotating blades is important for reducing metal temperatures in current and advanced aircraft engines. Zirconia is a common coating material, and it is partially transparent to thermal radiation. Radiation becomes more significant as temperatures are raised for higher efficiency in advanced engines. Calculations are often made with radiation effects neglected inside the coating. The effect of radiation is illustrated here, where an analytical procedure is provided by using the two-flux method for the radiative contribution. A detailed study was made of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for diesel engines, and a two-flux analysis was developed for radiation in semitransparent multilayer composites. These efforts provide the basis for the present analysis where illustrative solutions are obtained for typical conditions in an aircraft engine. The formulation and solution of the exact spectral radiative transfer equations including large scattering, as is characteristic of zirconia, are rather complicated. The two-flux method is used here to provide a simplified method.

  10. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1997-03-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas tur-bine engines are presented. Electron beam/physical vapor-deposited and plasma-sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: (1) metal oxidation at the ceramic/metal interface, (2) ceramic/metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and inter-face roughness, (3) material properties and mechanical behavior, (4) component design features, (5) tem-perature gradients, (6) ceramic/metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, and (7) object impact damage. Analytical models for TBC spalling life are proposed based on observations of TBC spall-ing and plausible failure theories. Spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic/metal interface). Knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimen-tal evidence and analytical understanding of TBC failure are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC spalling failure trends.

  11. Inelastic constitutive equation of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masayuki ARAI

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are a very important technology for protecting the hot parts of gas turbines (GTs) from a high-temperature environment. The coating stress generated in the operation of GTs brings cracking and peeling damage to the TBCs. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate precisely such coating stress in a TBC system. We have obtained a stress-strain curve for a freestanding ceramic coat specimen peeled from a TBC coated substrate by conducting the bending test. The test results have revealed that the ceramic coating deforms nonlinearly with the applied loading. In this study, an inelastic constitutive equation for the ceramic thermal barrier coatings deposited by APS is developed. The obtained results are as follows: (1) the micromechanics-based constitutive equation was formulated with micro crack density formed at splat boundary, and (2) it was shown that the numerical results for a nonlinearly deformed beam simulated by the developed constitutive equation agreed with the experimental results obtained by cantilever bending tests.

  12. Thermal shock behavior of toughened gadolinium zirconate/YSZ double-ceramic-layered thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Gd2Zr2O7/YSZ DCL thermal barrier coating was designed and fabricated. • The Gd2Zr2O7 top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3YSZ. • Remarkable improvement in thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was achieved. - Abstract: Double-ceramic-layered (DCL) thermal barrier coating system comprising of toughened Gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr2O7, GZ) as the top ceramic layer and 4.5 mol% Y2O3 partially-stabilized ZrO2 (4.5YSZ) as the bottom ceramic layer was fabricated by plasma spraying and thermal shock behavior of the DCL coating was investigated. The GZ top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3 mol% Y2O3 partially-stabilized ZrO2 (3YSZ) to improve fracture toughness of the matrix. The thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was enhanced significantly compared to that of single-ceramic-layered (SCL) GZ-3YSZ composite coating, which is believed to be primarily attributed to the two factors: (i) the increase in fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer by incorporating nanostructured YSZ particles and (ii) the improvement in strain tolerance through the utilization of 4.5YSZ as the bottom ceramic layer. In addition, the failure mechanisms are mainly attributed to the still low fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer and oxidation of the bond-coat

  13. Multilayer coatings for flexible high-barrier materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaško, Karol; Noller, Klaus; Mikula, Milan; Amberg-Schwab, Sabine; Weber, Ulrike

    2009-06-01

    A multilayer, flexible, and transparent high-barrier system based on flexible plastic foils, polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) and ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene-copolymer (ETFE), combined with vacuum-deposited, inorganic SiOx layers and hybrid ORMOCER® varnish layers were prepared in different orders on a semiproduction level. Barrier properties of prepared systems, as water vapour transmission (WVTR) and oxygen transmission (OTR), were measured and studied in connection with surface energy, surface topography, and water vapour adsorption properties. Correlations among layers sequence, barrier properties, and other parameters are presented, including some basic principles of permeation of substances through multilayer barrier systems. A combination of several inorganic and hybrid varnish layers is necessary to achieve the technological demands from a barrier standpoint. It is easier to suppress the oxygen transport than the water transport, due to the additional active penetration of water through hydrogen bonds and silanol creations at oxide interfaces, capillary condensation, and swelling with high internal pressure, leading to new defects.

  14. Bond coating issues in thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.G.; Pint, B.A.

    2005-02-15

    Thermal barrier coatings are intended to work in conjunction with internal cooling schemes to reduce the metal temperature of critical hot gas path components in gas turbine engines. The thermal resistance is typically provided by a 100-250 mm thick layer of ceramic (most usually zirconia stabilized with an addition of 7-8 wt% of yttria), and this is deposited on to an approximately 50 {mu}m thick, metallic bond coating that is intended to anchor the ceramic to the metallic surface, to provide some degree of mechanical compliance, and to act as a reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (Al) to protect the underlying superalloy from high-temperature corrosion. A feature of importance to the durability of thermal barrier coatings is the early establishment of a continuous, protective oxide layer (preferably alpha-alumina) at the bond coating-ceramic interface. Because zirconia is permeable to oxygen, this oxide layer continues to grow during service. Some superalloys are inherently resistant to high temperature oxidation, so a separate bond coating may not be needed in those cases. Thermal barrier coatings have been in service in aeroengines for a number of years, and the use of this technology for increasing the durability and/or efficiency of industrial gas turbines is currently of significant interest. The data presented were taken from an investigation of routes to optimize bond coating performance, and the focus of the paper is on the influences of reactive elements and Pt on the oxidation behaviour of NiAl-based alloys determined in studies using cast versions of bond coating compositions. (Author)

  15. Bond Coating Performance of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are intended to work in conjunction with internal cooling schemes to reduce the metal temperature of critical hot gas path components in gas turbine engines. The thermal resistance is typically provided by a 100--250 {mu}m thick layer of ceramic (most usually zirconia stabilized with an addition of 7--8 wt% of yttria), and this is deposited on to an approximately 50 {mu} thick, metallic bond coating that is intended to anchor the ceramic to the metallic surface, to provide some degree of mechanical compliance, and to act as a reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (Al) to protect the underlying superalloy from high-temperature corrosion. A feature of importance to the durability of thermal barrier coatings is the early establishment of a continuous, protective oxide layer (preferably {alpha}-alumina) at the bond coating-ceramic interface. Because zirconia is permeable to oxygen, this oxide layer continues to grow during service. Some superalloys are inherently resistant to high-temperature oxidation, so a separate bond coating may not be needed in those cases. Thermal barrier coatings have been in service in aeroengines for a number of years, and the use of this technology for increasing the durability and/or efficiency of industrial gas turbines is currently of significant interest. The data presented were taken from an investigation of routes to optimize bond coating performance, and the focus of the paper is on the influences of reactive elements and Pt on the oxidation behaviour of NiAl-based alloys determined in studies using cast versions of bond coating compositions.

  16. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal barrier coatings under bending

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Ray; N Roy; K M Godiwalla

    2001-04-01

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation behaviour of the coatings at room temperature in as received and oxidized conditions revealed a linear growth of the cracks on the coating till the yield point of the super alloy was reached. High threshold load at the interface between the ceramic layer and the bond coat was required to propagate the crack further into the bond coat. Once the threshold load was surpassed the crack propagated into the brittle bond coat without an appreciable increase in the load. At temperatures of 800°C the crack propagated only in the TBC (ceramic layer), as the ductile bond coat offered an attractive sink for the stress relaxation. Effects of bond coat oxidation on crack propagation in the interface region have been examined and are discussed.

  17. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  18. The Development of 2700-3000 F Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in future turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is a key to enable the applications of the envisioned 2700-3000F EBC - CMC systems to help achieve next generation engine performance and durability goals. This paper will primarily address the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The emphasis is placed on current NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiCSiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, cyclic durability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term system performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be discussed.

  19. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  20. Overview on the Development of Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have successfully been used in gas turbine engines for increasing operation temperature and improving engine efficiency. Over the past thirty years, a variety of TBC materials and TBC deposition techniques have been developed. Recently, nanostructured TBCs emerge with the potential of commercial applications in various industries. In this paper, TBC materials and TBC deposition techniques such as air plasma spray (APS), electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (LACVD) are briefly reviewed. Nanostructured 7-8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (7-8YSZ)TBC by air plasma spraying of powder and new TBC with novel structure deposited by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) are compared. Plasma spray conditions, coating forming mechanisms, microstructures,phase compositions, thermal conductivities, and thermal cycling lives of the APS nanostructured TBC and the SPPS nanostructured TBC are discussed. Research opportunities and challenges of nanostructured TBCs deposited by air plasma spray are prospected.

  1. Sand effects on thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael; Barnett, Blake; Ghoshal, Anindya; Murugan, Muthuvel; Swab, Jeffrey; Pepi, Marc; Hopkins, David; Gazonas, George; Kerner, Kevin

    Accumulation and infiltration of molten/ semi-molten sand and subsequent formation of calcia-magnesia-alumina-silicate (CMAS) deposits in gas turbine engines continues to be a significant problem for aviation assets. This complex problem is compounded by the large variations in the composition, size, and topology of natural sands, gas generator turbine temperatures, thermal barrier coating properties, and the incoming particulate's momentum. In order to simplify the materials testing process, significant time and resources have been spent in the development of synthetic sand mixtures. However, there is debate whether these mixtures accurately mimic the damage observed in field-returned engines. With this study, we provide a direct comparison of CMAS deposits from both natural and synthetic sands. Using spray deposition techniques, 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings are deposited onto bond-coated, Ni-superalloy discs. Each sample is coated with a sand slurry, either natural or synthetic, and exposed to a high temperature flame for 1 hour. Test samples are characterized before and after flame exposure. In addition, the test samples will be compared to field-returned equipment. This research was sponsored by the US Army Research Laboratory, and was accomplished under Cooperative Agreement # W911NF-12-2-0019.

  2. Laser Remelting of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang ZHANG; Yong LIANG; Yingna WU; Zhongchao FENG; Bingchun ZHANG; Fangjun LIU

    2001-01-01

    A CO2 continuous wave laser with defocused beam was used for remelting the surface of plasma sprayed ZrO2-8 wt pct Y2O3 (8YSZ)/Ni22Cr10AlY thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on GH536 superalloy substrate. Two main laser processing parameters, power and travel speed, were adopted to produce a completely remelted layer, and their effects on remelted appearance,remelting depth, density and diameter of depression, space of segment crack and remelted microstructure were evaluated. With energy of 4.0 to 8.0 J.mm-2, an appropriate laser processing for applicable remelted layer was suggested.

  3. TBCs for better engine efficiency. [thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    State-of-the-art thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) developed for aircraft engines can achieve both hot-section component operating temperature reductions and superior oxidation resistance. Such TBCs typically consist of two layers: a metallic, often NiCrAlY 'bond' inner layer in contact with the superalloy structural component, and an outer, insulating ceramic layer. A ceramic frequently used in this role due to its high durability is plasma-sprayed ZrO2, partially stabilized with 6-8 wt pct Y2O3. TBCs can also be useful in nonaircraft gas turbines, which frequently use highly contaminated fuels.

  4. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  5. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  6. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  7. Thermal Shock Property of Al/Ni-ZrO2 Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jin-juan; WANG Quan-sheng; ZHANG Wei-fang

    2004-01-01

    Al/Ni-ZrO2 gradient thermal barrier coatings are made on aluminum substrate using plasma spraying method and one direction thermal shock properties of the coatings are studied in this paper. The results show that pores in coatings link to form cracks vertical to coating surface. They go through the whole ZrO2 coating once vertical cracks form. When thermal shock cycles increase, horizontal cracks that result in coatings failure forms in the coatings and interface. And vertical cracks delay appearance of horizontal cracks and enhance thermal shock property of coatings. Failure mechanisms of coating thermal shock are discussed using experiments and finite element method.

  8. Thermal Shock Property of Al/Ni-ZrO2 Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANJin-juan; WANGQuan-sheng; ZHANGWei-fang

    2004-01-01

    Al/Ni-ZrO2 gradient thermal barrier coatings are made on aluminum substrate using plasma spraying method and one direction thermal shock properties of the coatings are studied in this paper. The results show that pores in coatings link to form cracks vertical to coating surface. They go through the whole ZrO2 coating once vertical cracks form. When thermal shock cycles increase, horizontal cracks that result in coatings failure forms in the coatings and interface. And vertical cracks delay appearance of horizontal cracks and enhance thermal shock property of coatings. Failure mechanisms of coating thermal shock are discussed using experiments and finite element method.

  9. Transport barriers in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are some publications with indications that the formation of transport barriers in toroidal devices could take place in the vicinity of low order rational surfaces (RS). It is necessary to note that the environs of RS have very important peculiarities. In particular, a stochastic layer of magnetic field lines forms instead of separaterix which must separate the island surfaces from the adjacent to them non-island surfaces in stellarator magnetic configurations. The attempt to realize the formation of transport barriers near RS and to study their influence on the RF discharge plasma confinement was undertaken in presented experiments on the U-3M torsatron. The presupposition was made that the radial electric field profile would have sharp change on the width of stochastic layer near RS in the case of collisionless longitudinal motion of electrons in this layer. Experimental data obtained on the U-3M torsatron during the formation of interior and edge transport barriers are in a good agreement with this presupposition. The results of experiments on the U-3M torsatron are discussed in comparison with data of other helical systems. It is shown that the number of dependences (the threshold power and density, the time of barrier formation, the localization of radial electric field shear layer) are in a good agreement for all these systems. In conclusion, the common features of formation of transport barriers in non- axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric systems are discussed. (author)

  10. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  11. Property Evaluation and Damage Evolution of Environmental Barrier Coatings and Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Sub-Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Jaskowiak, Martha; Hurst, Janet; Bhatt, Ram; Fox, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent development of environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. The creep and fatigue behavior at aggressive long-term high temperature conditions have been evaluated and highlighted. Thermal conductivity and high thermal gradient cyclic durability of environmental barrier coatings have been evaluated. The damage accumulation and complex stress-strain behavior environmental barrier coatings on SiCSiC ceramic matrix composite turbine airfoil subelements during the thermal cyclic and fatigue testing of have been also reported.

  12. Performances of air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Seraffon, Maud

    2012-01-01

    Future industrial gas turbines will be required to operate at higher temperatures to increase operating efficiencies and will be subjected to more frequent thermal cycles. The temperatures that the substrates of components exposed in the harshest environments experience can be reduced using air-cooling systems coupled with ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); however, few studies have been carried out at the substrate temperatures encountered in industrial gas turbines (e.g...

  13. Influence of substrate material on the life of atmospheric plasmas prayed thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Robert; Johansson, Sten; Brodin, Håkan; Broitman, Esteban; Östergren, Lars; Li, Xin-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used in gas turbines to prolong the life of the underlying substrates and to increase the efficiency of the turbines by enabling higher combustion temperatures. TBCs may fail during service due to thermal fatigue or through the formation of non-protective thermally grown oxides (TGOs). This study compares two atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBC systems comprising of two identical TBCs deposited on two different substrates (Haynes 230 and Hastelloy X). The ...

  14. Preparation and Properties of Polyester-Based Nanocomposite Gel Coat System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Balasubramanian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite gel coat system is prepared using unsaturated polyester resin with aerosil powder, CaCO3, and organoclay. The influence of organoclay addition on mechanical and water barrier properties of gel coat system is studied for different amount (1, 2, and 3 wt % of organoclay. The nanolevel incorporation of organoclay improves the mechanical and water barrier properties of nanocomposite gel coat system. The nanocomposite gel coat system exhibits 55% improvement in tensile modulus and 25% improvement in flexural modulus. There is a 30% improvement in impact property of nanocomposite gel coat system. The dynamic mechanical analysis shows a slight increase in glass transition temperature for nanocomposite gel coat system.

  15. Numerical Parametric Analysis of Bond Coat Thickness Effect on Residual Stresses in Zirconia-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Musharaf; Hasham, Hasan Junaid; Baig, Yasir

    2016-02-01

    Numerical-based finite element investigation has been conducted to explain the effect of bond coat thickness on stress distribution in traditional and nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Stress components have been determined to quantitatively analyze the mechanical response of both kinds of coatings under the thermal shock effect. It has been found that maximum radial tensile and compressive stresses that exist at thermally grown oxide (TGO)/bond coat interface and within TGO respectively decrease with an increase in bond coat thickness. Effect of bond coat thickness on axial tensile stresses is not significant. However, axial compressive stresses that exist at the edge of the specimen near bond coat/substrate interface decrease appreciably with the increase in bond coat thickness. Residual stress profile as a function of bond coat thickness is further explained for comparative analysis of both coatings to draw some useful conclusions helpful in failure studies of TBCs.

  16. Denatured globular protein and bile salt-coated nanoparticles for poorly water-soluble drugs: Penetration across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the circulation system and enhanced oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yang, Ke; Fan, Lifang; Lv, Yaqi; Jin, Zhu; Zhu, Shumin; Qin, Chao; Wang, Yiao; Yin, Lifang

    2015-11-10

    Oral drug delivery is the most preferred route for patients; however, the low solubility of drugs and the resultant poor absorption compromise the benefits of oral administration. On the other hand, for years, the overwhelmingly accepted mechanism for enhanced oral absorption using lipid nanocarriers was based on the process of lipid digestion and drug solubilization in the small intestine. Few reports indicated that other bypass pathways are involved in drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) for oral delivery of nanocarriers. Herein, we report a new nanoemulsion system with a denatured globular protein with a diameter of 30 nm, soybean protein isolates (SPI), and bile salt as emulsifiers, aiming to enhance the absorption of insoluble drugs and explore other pathways for absorption. A BCS class II drug, fenofibrate (FB), was used as the model drug. The SPI and bile salt-coated Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were prepared via a high-pressure homogenizing procedure. Interestingly, the present Ns could be converted to solid dosage form using fluid-bed coating technology, maintaining a nanoscale size. Most importantly, in a model of in situ rat intestinal perfusion, Ns could penetrate across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the systemic circulation and then obtain biodistribution into other tissues. In addition, Ns significantly improved FB oral absorption, exhibited as a greater than 2- and 2.5-fold increase in Cmax and AUC0-t, respectively, compared to the suspension formulation. Overall, the present Ns are promising nanocarriers for the oral delivery of insoluble drugs, and the penetration of intact Ns across the GIT barrier into systemic circulation may be a new strategy for improved drug absorption with the use of nanocarriers. PMID:26325310

  17. Microstructural features and properties of plasma sprayed YPSZ/NiCrAlY thermal barrier coating (TBC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大谦; 王文权; 宣兆志; 宫文彪

    2004-01-01

    The plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) consists of NiCrAlY bond coating and yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) top coating. NiCrAlY coating mainly contains Ni solid solution with face centered cubic lattice, Al2O3 oxides and pores. The most obvious feature of YPSZ coating with tetragonal zirconia is a lot of vertical microcracks in this coating. The thermal insulation capability of the TBC increased with an increase in YPSZ coating thickness, the temperature drop across the TBC increasing from 60℃ to 92℃ with increasing YPSZ coating thickness with increasing YPSZ coating thickness and cracks initiated mainly in original vertical microcrack tips of the YPSZ coating and propagated not only along YPSZ coating / NiCrAlY coating interface but also through into two stages: transient oxidation stage with rapid oxidation rate and steady oxidation stage with slow oxidation. Their transition time was favorable to increase YPSZ coating toughness and to decrease the pores and oxides of the TBC system for improving thermal shock resistance and oxidation resistance of the TBC.

  18. An investigation into moisture barrier film coating efficacy and its relevance to drug stability in solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwesigwa, Enosh; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-01-30

    Barrier coatings are frequently employed on solid oral dosage forms under the assumption that they prevent moisture sorption into tablet cores thereby averting premature degradation of moisture-sensitive active ingredients. However, the efficacy of moisture barrier coatings remains unproven and they may actually accelerate degradation. This study aimed to investigate the barrier performance of four coating systems following application onto a low hygroscopic tablet formulation containing aspirin as a model moisture sensitive drug. Tablets were prepared by direct compaction and coated with aqueous dispersions of Eudragit(®) L30 D-55, Eudragit(®) EPO, Opadry(®) AMB and Sepifilm(®) LP at the vendors' recommended weight gains. Moisture uptake was studied by dynamic vapor sorption at 0 and 75% RH (25°C). Accelerated stability studies were undertaken at 75% RH/25°C for 90 days and HPLC assay was used to determine aspirin content. Uncoated tablet cores equilibrated rapidly and took up very little water (0.09%). The mean water uptake for coated cores was higher than for the uncoated formulation and varied as follows: 0.19% (Eudragit(®) L30 D-55), 0.35% (Opadry(®) AMB), 0.49% (Sepifilm(®) LP) and 0.76% (Eudragit(®) EPO). The level of aspirin decreased in all the samples such that by the time the study was terminated, the mean aspirin recovered was as follows: uncoated cores 80.0%; Eudragit® L30 D-55 coated cores 78.8%; Opadry(®) AMB coated cores 76.2%, Sepifilm(®) LP coated cores 76.0% and Eudragit(®) EPO coated samples 66.5%. From these results, it is concluded that the efficacy of moisture barrier polymer coatings on low hygroscopic cores is limited, and application of these coatings can, instead, enhance drug degradation in solid dosage forms. PMID:26551674

  19. High-temperature stability of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating on niobium alloy—C-103

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Panwar; T Umasankar Patro; K Balasubramanian; B Venkataraman

    2016-02-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) of different thicknesses with an intermediate bond coat were deposited on C-103 Nb alloy using the air plasma spraying technique. The coatings were subjected to rapid infra-red (IR) heating ($\\sim$25°C s$^{−1}$) up to $\\sim$1250°C and exposed up to 100 s at this temperature with heat flux varying from 55 to 61 Wcm$^{−2}$. The TBCs were found to be stable and intact after the heat treatment. In contrast, at the same conditions, the uncoated C-103 alloy specimen showed extensive oxidation followed by weight loss due to spallation. A maximum temperature drop of $\\sim$200°C was observed on the opposite side of the coated alloy with 600 $\\mu$m YSZ coat; as against negligible temperature drop in case of bare alloy specimen. The temperature drop was found to increase with the coating thickness of YSZ. The coatings before and after IR heating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, microhardness and residual stress measurements in order to understand the effect of thermal shock on the properties of the TBC. On account of these high-temperature properties, YSZ coating along with the bond coat is expected to find potential thermal barrier coating system on niobium alloys for supersonic vehicles.

  20. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Silicon-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis S.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and monolithic silicon nitride (Si3N4), are prime candidates for hot section structural components of next generation gas turbine engines. Silicon-based ceramics, however, suffer from rapid surface recession in combustion environments due to volatilization of the silica scale via reaction with water vapor, a major product of combustion. Therefore, application of silicon-based ceramic components in the hot section of advanced gas turbine engines requires development of a reliable method to protect the ceramic from environmental attack. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is considered a logical approach to achieve protection and CP long-term stability. The first generation EBC consisted of two layers, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) bond coat and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ, ZrO2-8 Wt.% Y2O3) top coat. Second generation EBCs, with substantially improved performance compared with the first generation EBC, were developed in the NASA High Speed Research-Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR-EPM) Program. The first generation EBC consisted of two layers, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) bond coat and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ, ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3) top coat. Second generation EBCs, with substantially improved performance compared with the first generation EBC, were developed in the NASA High Speed Research-Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR-EPM) Program (5). They consist of three layers, a silicon first bond coat, a mullite or a mullite + BSAS (BaO(1-x)-SrO(x)-Al2O3-2SiO2) second bond coat, and a BSAS top coat. The EPM EBCs were applied on SiC/SiC CMC combustor liners in three Solar Turbines (San Diego, CA) Centaur 50s gas turbine engines. The combined operation of the three engines has accumulated over 24,000 hours without failure (approximately 1,250 C maximum combustor liner temperature), with the engine in Texaco, Bakersfield, CA, accumulating about 14,000 hours. As the

  1. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. High-growth rate YSZ thermal barrier coatings deposited by MOCVD demonstrate high thermal cycling lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Use of thermochemical analysis to optimize stoichiometric ratios prior to experiments. → Thermodynamic analysis included a YO1.5-ZrO2 phase diagram to better describe solid solutions of YSZ. → Experimental growth resulted in high growth rate coatings with a columnar microstructure. → Coatings endured 1000 1-h thermal cycles (comparable to the lifetime of commercially viable EBPVD YSZ coating) with a much lower cost of fabrication. - Abstract: Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using Y(OButn)3, Zr(OButn)4 precursors and O2 carrier gas. A thermodynamic analysis guided experiments by optimizing elemental molar (n) stoichiometric ratios for the (Zr-Y-O-C-H system). This analysis showed single-phase YSZ was favored at 950 deg. C, 1 kPa, nO/(nY + nZr) > 30, nY/(nY + nZr) = 0.06-0.10 (fixed nC, nH). Experimental YSZ growth had multiple phases (fcc, monoclinic), had a relatively high growth rate (43 μm/h, 1005 deg. C), had an Arrhenius dependence (845-950 deg. C, Ea = 53.8 ± 7.9 kJ/mol), had columnar grains (SEM analysis), and had a coating through-thickness nY/(nY + nZr) = 0.04 (EPMA analysis). Doubling the inlet yttrium precursor mole fraction resulted in fcc YSZ growth with a coating through-thickness nY/(nY + nZr) = 0.07. Hot-insertion thermal cycling of YSZ coatings on FeCrAlY bond coats showed >1000 h lifetime, matching current standards for EB-PVD YSZ coatings.

  3. Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Splat Bonding for CMAS and Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Yao, Shu-Wei; Wang, Li-Shuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of molten CMAS in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at high temperature is significantly affected by the microstructure of the ceramic coating. Enhancing the bonding ratio between splats can reduce the interconnected pores and suppress the infiltration of the molten CMAS into the coating. In this study, a dual-layered (DL) TBC with the dense 8YSZ on the top of the conventional porous 8YSZ was proposed to enhance CMAS corrosion of atmospheric plasma-sprayed YSZ. The dense YSZ coating with improved lamellar bonding was deposited at a higher deposition temperature. The microstructure of the coatings before and after CMAS attack test was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was clearly revealed that by adjusting the microstructure and applying a dense ceramic layer with the improved interface bonding on the top of porous TBC, the infiltration of CMAS into porous YSZ coating can be effectively suppressed. Moreover, by designing DL TBCs, the thermal conductivity of the TBC system exhibits a limited increase. Thus with the design of DL structure, the TBCs with high CMAS corrosion resistance and low thermal conductivity can be achieved.

  4. Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-01-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are critical technologies for future gas turbine engines of advanced coal based power generation systems. TBCs protect engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. In this work, nanostructured HfO{sub 2}-based coatings, namely Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (YSH), Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (GSH) and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} (YSZH) were investigated for potential TBC applications in hydrogen turbines. Experimental efforts are aimed at creating a fundamental understanding of these TBC materials. Nanostructured ceramic coatings of YSH, GSH and YSZH were grown by physical vapor deposition methods. The effects of processing parameters and ceramic composition on the microstructural evolution of YSH, GSH and YSZH nanostructured coatings was studied using combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron microscopy analyses. Efforts were directed to derive a detailed understanding of crystal-structure, morphology, and stability of the coatings. In addition, thermal conductivity as a function of composition in YSH, YSZH and GSH coatings was determined. Laboratory experiments using accelerated test environments were used to investigate the relative importance of various thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical failure modes of TBCs. Effects of thermal cycling, oxidation and their complex interactions were evaluated using a syngas combustor rig.

  5. Behavior of ZnO-coated alumina dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Meng; Tao, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    A complete investigation of the discharge behavior of dielectric barrier discharge device using ZnO-coated dielectric layer in atmospheric pressure is made. Highly conductive ZnO film was deposited on the dielectric surface. Discharge characteristic of the dielectric barrier discharge are examined in different aspects. Experimental result shows that discharge uniformity is improved definitely in the case of ZnO-coated dielectric barrier discharge. And relevant theoretical models and explanation are presented to describing its discharge physics.

  6. Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Barrier Applications Against Molten Uranium Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Pragatheeswaran, A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on engineering components for protecting them from large thermal load and hot corrosion. Choices of coating material for protection against hot corrosion by uranium are few, because of its high reactivity. Yttrium oxide has a high melting temperature and is inert towards uranium. Therefore, yttrium oxide coatings are effective as a barrier against hot corrosion by uranium and its alloys. This paper gives a summary of the developmental work on plasma-sprayed yttria coatings for corrosion barrier applications against molten uranium. Results show that plasma-sprayed yttria coatings offer a long-term solution to hot corrosion problems.

  7. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  8. Design of a Nickel-Based Bond-Coat Alloy for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Fiedler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To increase the lifetime of rocket combustion chambers, thermal barrier coatings (TBC may be applied on the copper chamber wall. Since standard TBC systems used in gas turbines are not suitable for rocket-engine application and fail at the interface between the substrate and bond coat, a new bond-coat material has to be designed. This bond-coat material has to be chemically compatible to the copper substrate to improve the adhesion and needs a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of copper to reduce thermal stresses. One approach to achieve this is to modify the standard NiCrAlY alloy used in gas turbines by adding copper. In this work, the influence of copper on the microstructure of NiCrAlY-alloys is investigated with thermodynamical calculations, optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and calorimetry. Adding copper leads to the formation of a significant amount of \\(\\beta\\ and \\(\\alpha\\ Reducing the aluminum and chromium content leads furthermore to a two-phase fcc microstructure.

  9. An experimental characterization of damping properties of thermal barrier coatings at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterday, Oliver T.

    Modern gas turbine engines have routinely utilized thermal barrier coatings for the past three decades to coax greater thermodynamic efficiency out of jet engines. In service, it has been noted that these ceramic materials are also effective at suppressing high cycle fatigue in the engine components, increasing their respective fatigue life. Recent efforts have been made to mechanically characterize these materials; this has been a challenge as they are thin coatings, prone to history effects, and are materially nonlinear. Refinement of the apparatus have occurred and it is now desired to characterize them across a range of likely service temperatures. A free-free beam apparatus has been adapted to accomplish this. Important to achieving viable results is the design, analysis, and experimental validation of the chamber in regards to the free-free specimen being heat-able, modally detuned and free-hanging, and the preservation of a non-contacting excitation method. Critical to success is ensuring a near-isothermal heated beam specimen. After successful validation and calibration of the chamber, a common thermal barrier coating, 8-YSZ, was tested, primarily using the free-decay, logarithmic decrement method, using the chamber from 70-900degF. Materially non-linear behavior was observed and findings of material storage modulus and loss coefficient that are consistent with previous studies were obtained. The chamber was also used to characterize the bare metal beam blanks and bond-coat only specimens. The apparatus was found to be sensitive when determining the storage modulus and damping, more so than the baseline configuration. This was due to changes in design to proof it against high temperature. Resulting, it clearly characterized the anisotropic modulus of titanium and determined that bond coating had a negligible contribution to the beam system. Design life criteria with the properties of the coating could now be adopted across a range of temperatures.

  10. Thermal cycling of ZrO/sub 2/ based thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were deposited on two type of substrates i.e. nickel based superalloy Hastelloy- X and AISI 316L stainless steel coupons. CoNiCrAIY alloy and ZrO/sub 2/-7%Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/) were utilized as bond and top coats respectively. These two TBC systems were then thermally cycled at 1020 degree C with two different cooling media i.e. water and compressed air. The sustained number of cycles were then compared with the other authors achieved cyclic life for the same type of TBC systems. It was found that the TBC produced at the LASMIS Lab by the authors is better than most of the TBC systems available in published literature. (author)

  11. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  12. PLASMA THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WITH HIGH THERMAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization of  processes for obtaining maximum content of tetragonal phase in the initial material and thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide and hafnium oxide.  Results of the investigations on phase composition of oxide HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3  system have been given in the paper. The system represents  a microstructure which is similar to  zirconia dioxide and  transformed for its application at 1300 °C. The paper explains a mechanism of hafnium oxide influence on formation of the given microstructure. The research methodology has been based on complex metallography, X – ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of  structural elements of the composite plasma coating HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O system.In order to stabilize zirconium dioxide  dopant oxide should not only have an appropriate size of  metal ion, but also form a solid solution with the zirconia. This condition severely limits the number of possible stabilizers. In fact, such stabilization is possible only with the help of rare earth oxides (Y2O3, Yb2O3, CeO2, HfO2. Chemical purity of the applied materials plays a significant role for obtaining high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Hafnium oxide has been selected as powder for thermal barrier coatings instead of zirconium dioxide due to their similarities in structural modification, grating, chemical and physical properties and its high temperature structural transformations. It has been established that plasma thermal barrier HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3 coatings consist of  one tetragonal phase. This phase is equivalent to a non-equilibrium tetragonal t' phase in the “zirconium dioxide stabilized with yttrium oxide” system. Affinity of  Hf+4 and Zr+4 cations leads to the formation of identical metastable phases during rapid quenching.

  13. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  14. Behavior of nanoporous thermal barrier coatings under cyclic thermal loading. Computer-aided simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents the development of new algorithms for calculating the fraction of thermal energy dissipated during the irradiation on the inner surface of pores. On the basis of these algorithms, the simulation of heat transfer in three-layered systems was carried out taking into account the dissipation of thermal energy in specimens having different porosity. We have performed quantitative estimates of the portion of dissipating thermal energy and its influence on the distribution of thermal stresses in thermal barrier coating systems. It was demonstrated that the presence of pores with a large internal surface area in the intermediate layer material enables two-fold decrease of the internal thermal stresses

  15. Barrier properties of Al2O3 and alucone coatings and nanolaminates on flexible biopolymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 coatings are efficient barriers against gases and vapors. Al2O3 coatings are, however, brittle and straining them generates defects that impair barrier properties. Flexibility of ALD-grown Al2O3 coatings on biopolymer substrates can be improved by separating thinner Al2O3 layers with inorganic–organic alucone layers. The number and size of defects were smaller for these nanolaminates compared to the thick Al2O3 films after straining, and hence straining deteriorated the oxygen barrier properties less when applied to the laminates than when applied to the Al2O3 coatings. - Highlights: ► Al2O3, alucone and five-layer nanolaminates were deposited on biopolymers. ► Straining of Al2O3 coating generated defects that impaired barrier properties. ► Nanolaminates with thin Al2O3 layers and alucone were less sensitive to straining.

  16. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  17. Erosion, corrosion and erosion-corrosion of EB PVD thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Wellman, R. G.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Electron beam (EB) physical vapour deposited (PVD) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been used in gas turbine engines for a number of years. The primary mode of failure is attributed to oxidation of the bond coat and growth of the thermally grown oxide (TGO), the alumina scale that forms on the bond coat and to which the ceramic top coat adheres. Once the TGO reaches a critical thickness, the TBC tends to spall and expose the underlying substrate to the hot gases. Erosion...

  18. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  19. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Robinson, R. Craig; Bansal, Narottam

    2004-01-01

    One key factor that limits the performance of current gas turbine engines is the temperature capability of hot section structural components. Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC/SiC composites and monolithic Si3N4, are leading candidates to replace superalloy hot section components in the next generation gas turbine engines due to their excellent high temperature properties. A major stumbling block to realizing Si-based ceramic hot section components is the recession of Si-based ceramics in combustion environments due to the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is the most promising approach to preventing the recession. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3A12O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit the durability and temperature capability of current EBCs. Research is underway to develop EBCs with longer life and enhanced temperature capability. Understanding key issues affecting the performance of current EBCs is necessary for successful development of advanced EBCs. These issues include stress, chemical compatibility, adherence, and water vapor stability. Factors that affect stress are thermal expansion mismatch, phase stability, chemical stability, elastic modulus, etc. The current understanding on these issues will be discussed.

  20. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  1. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings

  2. A Numerical Procedure to Obtain the Creep Parameters of the Thermal Barrier Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Shifeng Wen; Xiaohu Zeng; Gongnan Xie

    2014-01-01

    Three-point bending creep test was used to understand the creep behavior of typical thin film/substrate systems—thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Firstly, a simplified model, which does not consider the local effect, has been set up to get an analytical relationship. The important result is that creep stress exponent of materials is equal to the creep load exponent of the steady-state deflection rate of BC specimens. Secondly, in order to consider the local effect of bending, the finite ...

  3. Thermal conductivity of zirconia-based ceramics for thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowering the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings used to protect blade and vane airfoils represents an important challenge for gas turbine designers and manufacturers. Dense zirconia-based materials have been prepared by solid state reaction methods to determine their thermal properties up to 1000 C. Partially stabilised zirconias having a thermal conductivity 40 % lower than the thermal conductivity of the most widely used system (ZrO2-8wt.%Y2O3) have been obtained. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Vapor deposition of cross-linked fluoropolymer barrier coatings onto pre-assembled microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Carson T; Marin, Brandon C; Malmstadt, Noah; Gupta, Malancha

    2011-09-21

    The interior surfaces of pre-assembled poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices were modified with a cross-linked fluoropolymer barrier coating that significantly increased the chemical compatibility of the devices. PMID:21850298

  5. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  6. Study of high temperature oxidation of duplex and functionally graded materials of thermal barrier coating (FGM TBC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the number and the severity of thermal barrier coatings applications on hot section components have dramatically increased in the past decade, premature spallation failure of thermal barrier coatings , due to mismatch of thermal expansion at the metal/ceramic interface of the two coating layers, during service is still an overriding concern. Therefore, functionally graded materials with a gradual compositional variation have been introduced. In this study, comparison of properties of two different types of thermal barrier coatings was made to improve the surface characteristics on high temperature components. These thermal barrier coatings consisted of a duplex thermal barrier coatings and a five layered functionally graded thermal barrier coatings . In both coatings, Yttria partially stabilized Zirconia topcoat was deposited by air plasma spraying and Ni Cr Al Y bond coat was deposited by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. In functionally graded materials coating, functionally graded layer was sprayed by air plasma process by varying the feeding ratio of YSZ/Ni Cr Al Y powders using two separate powder feeders. Then, isothermal oxidation was carried out at 950degC in atmosphere to obtain the plot of mass change vs. time to study oxidation kinetic. Microstructural and compositional changes of coating, oxides formed during service were examined by optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy with EDS. functionally graded materials coating failed after 2100 h and duplex coating failed after 1700 h. Finally, it was found that functionally graded materials coating is more qualified than duplex thermal barrier coatings and stands for a longer time

  7. Measurements of the interfacial fracture energy of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines for improved durability and performance for more than 15 years. In this study, chevron-notched sandwich specimens proposed recently by Shaw are chosen for the study of the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of several metal/oxide and metal/silicide interfaces. The main advantages of this test specimen are: (1) it provides a rigorous fracture mechanics quantification for the bimaterial interface; (2) the fracture energy obtained arises mainly from the chemical bonding at the interface; (3) the test specimen is easy to fabricate (either diffusion or adhesive bonding), and the test is easy to implement (e.g., neither fatigue precracking nor crack length monitoring is needed); (4) no special compliance calibration of specimens is necessary because previously developed compliance calibrations for homogeneous materials can be utilized directly; (5) the test specimen is suitable for the fracture energy measurement of a single interface as well as for interfacial regions composed of several discrete interfaces, which is often the case for TBCs; and (6) the test method allows the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs to be found independent of the poorly characterized TBCs' elastic modulus as to which there is great uncertainty (e.g., the modulus in tension may be different then in compression). As will be shown in this study, all the aforementioned advantages are maintained for TBCs. Furthermore, the failure location using the chevron notched sandwich specimen duplicates the service failure mode. Thus, the data obtained can be utilized directly for lifetime prediction modeling

  8. Unveiling Ultra-High Temperature Wear and Indentation Damage Mechanisms of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgardner, Clifton; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are necessary to protect turbine blades within jet engines from extreme environments that the substrate material may not be capable of withstanding. Therefore, failure of the coating due to wear during its operational lifecycle is a critical event. In order to understand the failure mechanisms of the coating layers, a zirconia-based coating on a nickel alloy substrate was subjected to wear testing to simulate pressure and temperature conditions within a jet engine. Using a Hertzian contact model, the maximum shear and its depth were determined and analyzed in conjunction with the coating material properties and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry images. The coupled imaging and contact model analyses made possible the identification of the location and time of delamination and its underlying causes. Our findings provide key insights for the development of more resilient thermal barrier coatings.

  9. Analysis of the response of a thermal barrier coating to sodium and vanadium doped combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Published data on the behavior of zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings exposed to combustion gases doped with sodium and vanadium were analyzed with respect to calculated condensate dew points and melting points. Coating temperatures, failure locations, and depths were reasonably well correlated.

  10. Optimization of High Porosity Thermal Barrier Coatings Generated with a Porosity Former

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medřický, J.; Curry, N.; Pala, Zdeněk; Vilémová, Monika; Chráska, Tomáš; Johansson, J.; Markocsan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 4 (2015), s. 622-628. ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : gas turbines * high temperature application * porosity of coatings * stabilized zirconia * thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2014

  11. Finite Element Model Characterization Of Nano-Composite Thermal And Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshiki; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings have been applied for protecting Si based ceramic matrix composite components from high temperature environment in advanced gas turbine engines. It has been found that the delamination and lifetime of T/EBC systems generally depend on the initiation and propagation of surface cracks induced by the axial mechanical load in addition to severe thermal loads. In order to prevent T/EBC systems from surface cracking and subsequent delamination due to mechanical and thermal stresses, T/EBC systems reinforced with nano-composite architectures have showed promise to improve mechanical properties and provide a potential crack shielding mechanism such as crack bridging. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) was established to understand the potential beneficial effects of nano-composites systems such as SiC nanotube-reinforced oxide T/EBC systems.

  12. Evaluation of Degradation of Isothermally Aged Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal barrier coating of a gas turbine blade was degraded by isothermal heating in a furnace and by varying the exposure time and temperature. Then, a micro-Vickers hardness test was conducted on the cross section of the bond coat and Ni-based superalloy substrate. Further, the thickness of TGO(Thermally Grown Oxide) was measured by using an image analyzer, and the changes in the microstructure and element contents in the coating were analyzed by using an optical microscope and by performing SEM-EDX analysis. No significant change was observed in the Vickers hardness of the bond coat when the coated specimen was degraded at a high temperature: delamination was observed between the top coat and the bond coat when the coating was degraded for 50 h at a temperature 1,151 .deg. C

  13. Micro and nanomecanical behavior of mullite-based environmental barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Botero Vega, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mullite coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been introduced and proven as excellent candidates to protect silicon carbide (SiC) from severe pitting corrosion and recession, becoming part of the new generation of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). In these coatings mullite columns nucleate from a thin vitreous silicon layer in contact with the substrate and can grow over a wide range of increasing Al/Si ratios in constant or graded compositions. This feature allows f...

  14. 10 Years-Activities at ONERA on Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Bacos, M. P; Dorvaux, J.M.; Landais, S.; Lavigne, O.; Mévrel, R.; M. Poulain; Rio, C; Vidal-Sétif, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Developing thermal barrier coatings operating at higher temperature and/or for very long durations (commercial aircraft applications) is one of the technological and economical challenges for engine manufacturers. This includes the search for (i) low thermal conductivity, high thermal stability and CMAS resistant ceramic top coat, and (ii) alternative low cost bond coat with improved oxidation resistance and chemical compatibility with the substrate. This paper reviews the rationale sustainin...

  15. Characteristics of thermal cycle damage of FGM thermal barrier coatings in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal cycle tests of thermal barrier coatings in vacuum were carried out to investigate the characteristics of thermal cycle damage and the effect of compositional gradient on thermal cycle damage. Surface cracks vertical to the coating surface were nucleated during thermal cycling, while no interlamellar crack along the interface between coating layers was found in vacuum. The compositional gradient significantly reduced the size and number of surface cracks nucleated during thermal cycle. This significant improvement in thermal cycle damage due to the compositional gradient results mainly from the improvement of material properties. No degradation of thermal barrier property during thermal cycling in vacuum was observed. (author)

  16. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  17. Study of barrier coats for application in immersion 193-nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, Francis; Kim, Wookyu; Sakamuri, Raj; Hamilton, Keino; Dimerli, Alla; Abdallah, David; Romano, Andrew; Dammel, Ralph R.; Pawlowski, Georg; Raub, Alex; Brueck, Steve

    2005-05-01

    We will describe our barrier coat approach for use in immersion 193 nm lithography. These barrier coats may act as either simple barriers providing protection against loss of resist components into water or in the case of one type of these formulations which have a refractive index at 193 nm which is the geometric mean between that of the resist and water provide, also top antireflective properties. Either type of barrier coat can be applied with a simple spinning process compatible with PGMEA based resin employing standard solvents such as alcohols and be removed during the usual resist development process with aqueous 0.26 N TMAH. We will discuss both imaging results with these materials on acrylate type 193 nm resists and also show some fundamental studies we have done to understand the function of the barrier coat and the role of differing spinning solvents and resins. We will show LS (55 nm) and Contact Hole (80 nm) resolved with a 193 nm resist exposed with the interferometric tool at the University of New Mexico (213 nm) with and without the use of a barrier coat.

  18. Microstructure and properties of sputtered thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao; Lun Xie; Feng Pan; Mengcheng Chen

    2004-01-01

    A 3 kW radio frequency (RF) magnetron-sputtering unit was used to produce zirconia ceramic coatings on hollow turbine blades and vanes, which had been deposited a NiCrAlY bond coat layer by cathodic arc deposition. The NiCrAlY coating surface was shot-peened, and the residual stress in the bond coat layer and the effects of heat treatment on the residual stress are presented.After shot peening porosities and microgaps disappear in the NiCrAlY bond coat, the whole depth profile is residual compressive stress. Coarseness tests show that the roughness value (Rz) decreases from 16.4 to 3.3 μm. The microstructure and phase composition of the coatings were investigated using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the NiCrAlY bond coat is composed of γ' and Cr phases, and the Al2O3 scales are formed near the interface between the ZrO2 ceramic layer and the NiCrAlY bond coat. No degradation occurred to RF sputtered ceramic coatings after oxidating at 1150℃ for 100 h,heating at 1150℃ for 5 min and then air-cooling for 500 thermal cycles.

  19. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  20. Beeswax–chitosan emulsion coated paper with enhanced water vapor barrier efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The water vapor barrier efficiency of paper was enhanced via green-based emulsion coating. • Extremely high lipid content in the emulsion coating layer was firstly utilized to reduce WVTR in emulsion-based film. • A controlled WVTR of beeswax–chitosan emulsion coating could be obtained by dying at specific temperature. - Abstract: For lipid–hydrocolloid emulsion based film, the increase of lipid amount would improve its water vapor barrier property, but also reduce the mechanical strength of the film in the meantime thus leading to a compromised lipid content in the film. However, when the emulsion is coated on paper surface, more lipid could be used for emulsion preparation to enhance the moisture resistance without considering the weakened strength of the film induced by lipid, because the mechanical properties of emulsion coated paper is mainly governed by the strength of base paper instead of the coating layer. In this study, beeswax–chitosan emulsion was first prepared and then coated on paper surface to improve paper's water vapor barrier and water resistance properties. The range and variance analysis of orthogonal test design showed that the order of priorities of the factors accordingly was beeswax solid content, drying temperature and chitosan concentration. The effect of drying temperature on water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) and water contact angle of coated paper was further investigated using 1.2 wt% chitosan and 96% beeswax solid content in the coating layer. The results indicated that water vapor barrier property was in accordance with the density of the coating layer. Atomic force microscope (AFM) was also used to characterize the surface morphology and explain the hydrophobicity of beeswax–chitosan coated paper. It was found that surface beeswax particles melted to wrinkle at high drying temperatures, while roughness values maintained at micro-scale over the temperature range investigated

  1. Adhesion Issues with Polymer/Oxide Barrier Coatings on Organic Displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hall, Michael G.; Mast, Eric S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Rutherford, Nicole M.; Moro, Lorenza; Rosenblum, Martin; Praino, Robert F.; Visser, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer polymer/oxide coatings are being developed to protect sensitive organic display devices, such as OLEDs, from oxygen and water vapor permeation. The coatings have permeation levels ~ 10-6 g/m2/d for water vapor and ~10-6 cc/m2/d for oxygen, and are deposited by vacuum polymer technology. The coatings consist of either a base Al2O3 or acrylate polymer adhesion layer followed by alternating Al2O3/polymer layers. The polymer is used to decouple the 30 nm-thick Al2O3 barrier layers. Adhesion of the barrier coating to the substrate and display device is critical for the operating lifetime of the device. The substrate material could be any transparent flexible plastic. The coating technology can also be used to encapsulate organic-based electronic devices to protect them from atmospheric degradation. Plasma pretreatment is also needed for good adhesion to the substrate, but if it is too aggressive, it will damage the organic display device. We report on the effects of plasma treatment on the adhesion of barrier coatings to plastic substrates and the performance of OLED devices after plasma treatment and barrier coating deposition. We find that initial OLED performance is not significantly affected by the deposition process and plasma treatment, as demonstrated by luminosity and I-V curves.

  2. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  3. Preparation and characterization of enamel coating on pure titanium as a hydrogen penetration barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Jie, E-mail: taojie@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Guo, Xunzhong [College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Huang, Zhendong [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, oshida-Nihonmatsu-Cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto shi 606-8501 (Japan); Liu, Hongbing [Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co,. Ltd, Shanghai 200436 (China); Wang, Tao [College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► The enamel coating was prepared by spin-coating and enameling method. ► The dense enamel coatings were chemically bonded with TA1 substrate. ► The coatings possessed better thermal shock resistance property. ► The coatings had excellent ball-dropping impact properties. ► The enamel coating exhibited a good barrier effect to hydrogen isotope penetration. -- Abstract: The enamel coating with a thickness of 90–110 × 10{sup −6} m was prepared on TA1 substrate by spin-coating and enameling to solve the problems of hydrogen isotope penetration for commercial pure titanium TA1. The microstructure and the interfacial morphology of the samples were characterized respectively by X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy. The profiles of main elements at the interface were analyzed by EDS line-scanning. The experimental results indicated that the dense enamel coatings were chemically bonded with TA1 substrate, and possessed better thermal shock resistance and ball-dropping impact properties. It was concluded from the results of hydrogen charging test with Vickers microhardness measurement and deuterium penetration experiments that the as-prepared dense enamel coating exhibited a good barrier effect to hydrogen isotope penetration.

  4. Polymer-Derived Ceramics as Innovative Oxidation Barrier Coatings for Mo-Si-B Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasemann, Georg; Baumann, Torben; Dieck, Sebastian; Rannabauer, Stefan; Krüger, Manja

    2015-04-01

    A preceramic polymer precursor, perhydropolysilazane, is used to investigate its function as a new type of oxidation barrier coating on Mo-Si-B alloys. After dip-coating and pyrolysis at 1073 K (800 °C), dense and well-adhering SiON ceramic coatings could be achieved, which were investigated by SEM and cyclic oxidation tests at 1073 K and 1373 K (800 °C and 1100 °C). The coating is promising in reducing the mass loss during the initial stage of oxidation exposure at 1373 K (1100 °C) significantly.

  5. History of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines: Emphasizing NASA's Role from 1942 to 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has played a central role in the development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for gas turbine applications. This report discusses the history of TBCs emphasizing the role NASA has played beginning with (1) frit coatings in the 1940s and 1950s; (2) thermally sprayed coatings for rocket application in the 1960s and early 1970s; (3) the beginnings of the modern era of turbine section coatings in the mid 1970s; and (4) failure mechanism and life prediction studies in the 1980s and 1990s. More recent efforts are also briefly discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Atomic Layer Deposition coating as gas barrier against hydrogen gas and humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: ALD coating can provide a continuous and conformal barrier between the substrate and ambient atmosphere. - Abstract: Effectiveness of HfO2 Atomic Layer Deposition coatings has been studied on ZnO varistors by I–V tests, impedance spectroscopy, and highly accelerated life test. Based on impedance spectroscopy analyses, the proton diffusion coefficient was measured to be 400 K times less in the coating. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that Atomic Layer Deposition films are continuous and conformal. After exposure to high temperature, partial crystallization was detected in the coating and increases proton diffusion coefficient by 150 times

  7. Bond strength, bond stress and spallation mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five production thermal barrier coatings were thermally cycled between room temperature and 1121 C (2050 F) to determine relative spallation life. Bond strength measurements were made using a modified ASTM direct pull-test. Bond stress measurements were made in the thermally grown oxide using a laser photoluminescence technique. Bond strength and bond stress measurements were conducted on two electron beam physical vapor deposition coatings as a function of thermal cycling. Each coating showed characteristic values of as-coated strength and stress and changes in strength and stress with thermal cycling. These variations in strength and stress with thermal cycling are related to oxidation and micro-debonding effects. (orig.)

  8. The Use of Feature Parameters to Asses Barrier Properties of ALD coatings for Flexible PV Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Liam; Robbins, David; Fleming, Leigh; Elrawemi, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the recent work carried out as part of the EU funded NanoMend project. The project seeks to develop integrated process inspection, cleaning, repair and control systems for nano-scale thin films on large area substrates. In the present study flexible photovoltaic films have been the substrate of interest. Flexible PV films are the subject of significant development at present and the latest films have efficiencies at or beyond the level of Si based rigid PV modules. These flexible devices are fabricated on polymer film by the repeated deposition, and patterning, of thin layer materials using roll-to-roll processes, where the whole film is approximately 3um thick prior to encapsulation. Whilst flexible films offer significant advantages in terms of mass and the possibility of building integration (BIPV) they are at present susceptible to long term environmental degradation as a result of water vapor transmission through the barrier layers to the CIGS (Copper Indium Gallium Selenide CuInxGa(1-x)Se2) PV cells thus causing electrical shorts and efficiency drops. Environmental protection of the GIGS cell is provided by a thin (40nm) barrier coating of Al2O3. The highly conformal aluminium oxide barrier layer is produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) where, the ultra-thin Al2O3 layer is deposited onto polymer thin films before these films encapsulate the PV cell. The surface of the starting polymer film must be of very high quality in order to avoid creating defects in the device layers. Since these defects reduce manufacturing yield, in order to prevent them, a further thin polymer coating (planarization layer) is generally applied to the polymer film prior to deposition. The presence of surface irregularities on the uncoated film can create defects within the nanometre-scale, aluminium oxide, barrier layer and these are measured and characterised. This paper begins by reporting the results of early stage measurements conducted to characterise

  9. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed

  10. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  11. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Eric [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Gell, Maurice [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm⁻¹K⁻¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al₂O₃ and TiO₂, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium

  12. Process and electrolyte for applying barrier layer anodic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various metals may be anodized, and preferably barrier anodized, by anodizing the metal in an electrolyte comprising quaternary ammonium compound having a complex metal anion in a solvent containing water and a polar, water soluble organic material. (U.S.)

  13. One Component Encapsulating Material Matrix as High Barrier Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for new flexible food packaging materials with effective high barrier against oxygen and moisture to protect food, minimize weight and...

  14. Thermal fatigue behavior of thermal barrier coatings by air plasma spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of top coat morphology and thickness on thermal fatigue behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) were investigated in this study. Thermal fatigue tests were conducted on three coating specimens with different top coat morphology and thickness, and then the test data were compared via microstructures, cycles to failure, and fracture surfaces. In the air plasma spray specimens (APS1, APS2), top coat were 200 and 300 μm respectively. The thickness of top coat was about 700 μm in the Perpendicular Cracked Specimen (PCS). Under thermal fatigue condition at 1,100 .deg. C, the cycles to top coat failure of APS1, APS2, and PCS were 350, 560 and 480 cycles, respectively. The cracks were initiated at the interface of top coat and Thermally Grown Oxide (TGO) and propagated into TGO or top coat as the number of thermal fatigue cycles increased. For the PCS specimen, additive cracks were initiated and propagated at the starting points of perpendicular cracks in the top coat. Also, the thickness of TGO and the decrease of aluminium concentration in bond coat do not affect the cycles to failure

  15. Influence of Microstructure on Thermal Properties of Axial Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Joshi, Shrikant; Vilemova, Monika; Pala, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Suspension plasma spraying is a relatively new thermal spaying technique to produce advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and enables production of coatings with a variety of structures—highly dense, highly porous, segmented, or columnar. This work investigates suspension plasma-sprayed TBCs produced using axial injection with different process parameters. The influence of coating microstructure on thermal properties was of specific interest. Tests carried out included microstructural analysis, phase analysis, determination of porosity, and pore size distribution, as well as thermal diffusivity/conductivity measurements. Results showed that axial suspension plasma spraying process makes it possible to produce various columnar-type coatings under different processing conditions. Significant influence of microstructural features on thermal properties of the coatings was noted. In particular, the process parameter-dependent microstructural attributes, such as porosity, column density, and crystallite size, were shown to govern the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating.

  16. Investigation of failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by EB-PVD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique owing to formation of micro cracks was investigated. The TBCs were deposited on the Ni-based super alloy IN-100 and the micro cracks were observed within the top ceramic coat of thermally cycled TBCs at 1050°C. It was observed that these cracks propagate in the ceramic coat in the direction normal to interface while no cracks were observed in the bond coat. SEM/EDS studies revealed that some non-uniform oxides were formed on the interface between ceramic top and metallic bond coat just below the cracks. Study proposed that the cracks were initiated due to stress owing to big difference in Pilling-Bed worth ratio of non-uniform oxides as well as thermal stress, which caused the formation of cracks in top ceramic coat leading to failure of TBCs

  17. Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

    2009-05-05

    A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

  18. Assessment of variations in thermal cycle life data of thermal barrier coated rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1981-01-01

    The reported study had the purpose to examine variations in cyclic life and in adhesive/cohesive coating strength. Possible effects of heating rate, stress reversal, temperature level, and ceramic deposition methods on coating life were also investigated. Life cycle data for 22 thermal barrier coated rods were examined and found to be statistically modeled by normal or log-normal distributions. The sample mean was 1330 cycles with a standard deviation of 520 cycles. Adhesive/cohesive pulloff strength data for 20 thermal barrier coated flat head piston specimens were taken. The average pulloff stress was 9 MPa with a standard deviation of 4.2 MPa. It was found that variations in heating rate can produce significant variations in the life cycle data.

  19. Development of barrier composite coating technology for low level radioactive waste disposal. Appendix 1: Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to research relating to the development of new thin film barrier coatings, the associated preparation technique, and their use for solving various scientific and engineering problems associated with the improvement of the performance of low level waste disposal facilities. The work presents the main results of zirconium dioxide thin film coatings preparation process by organometallic composite solutions on various substrates and bases with subsequent thermal treatment at 400-1000 deg. C. Experimental work on the formation of isolating corrosion-resistant ZrO2 (Y2O3) coatings over different substrates and bases, including microporous ones, indicate potential applications of the technology to coating barrier materials such as quartz, sand, concrete, alumina

  20. High quality plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon oxide gas barrier coatings on polyester films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon oxide barrier coatings fabricated by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition roll-to-roll process on polyester film have demonstrated impressive properties as a barrier to water vapour permeation. This study highlights the influence of the substrate on these coatings as we find that heat stabilised poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), with or without an additional acrylate primer layer, and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) produce superior composites than untreated PET film in terms of gas barrier. The barrier layers on PET and filled PET substrates, for which the barrier performance is within the detectable range of our measurement, have an activation energy to water permeation that increases with the thickness of the silica. For the thickest silica this is an increase of 26 kJ mol-1 over that from the uncoated substrate. We attribute this to the creation of highly tortuous, size-hindered pathways and the decoupling of defects as the coating is deposited in multiple passes. Using a more sensitive detection technique we measure a water vapour transmission rate value as low as 2 x 10-4 g m-2 day-1 for 1 μm thick coatings on PEN. Such a good barrier is observed for these thick coatings due to the high degree of carbon detected in the films that makes them less brittle than pure SiO2 layers. Substrate surface roughness is found to influence the morphology of the SiOx films but does not seem to adversely affect the barrier performance of the composites

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Thermal Stresses in Ceramic/Metal Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING Pingshun; XIAO Jinsheng; LIU Jie; ZHOU Xiaoqin

    2005-01-01

    This paper studied the thermal stresses of ceramic/metal gradient thermal barrier coating which combines the conceptions of ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and functionally gradient material (FGM). Thermal stresses and residual thermal stresses were calculated by an ANSYS finite element analysis software. Negative thermal expansion coefficient method was proposed and element birth and death method was applied to analyze the residual thermal stresses which have non-uniform initial temperature field. The numerical results show a good agreement with the analytical results and the experimental results.

  2. Mechanical properties of SiOx gas barrier coatings on polyester films

    OpenAIRE

    Howells, D. G.; Henry, B. M.; Leterrier, Y.; Månson, J.-A. E.; Madocks, J.; Assender, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the impressive mechanical properties of 1 μm thick carbon-containing SiOx gas barrier coatings, characterised using the uniaxial fragmentation test. Such coatings have been found to act as excellent barriers to water vapour permeation partly because they can be made so thick without stress induced cracking. The impressive mechanical properties are thought to be due in part to the high amount of carbon they contain, which gives them a more organic character, as well as the f...

  3. Nanocellulose in pigment coatings : Aspects of barrier properties and printability in offset

    OpenAIRE

    Nygårds, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    Papers are coated in order to improve the properties of the surface, to improve printability and to include new functionalities like barriers properties. Typical coating formulation contains a high number of components, some are made from minerals and others are manufactured from petroleum. The barrier properties of today's paper based packages are plastics and/or aluminum             foil. Environmentally friendly substitutie of these nonrenewable materials are needed.  Nanocellulose is a pr...

  4. Finite Element Simulations on Erosion and Crack Propagation in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z. S.; Fu, L. H.; Yang, L.; Zhou, Y. C.; Lu, C.

    2015-07-01

    Erosion of thermal barrier coatings occurs when atmospheric or carbon particles from the combustion chamber are ingested into aviation turbine engines. To understand the influence of erosion on the service life of thermal barrier coatings, we introduce the erosion and crack propagation models, and then by using finite element simulations, determine the relationship between the penetrating depth, the maximum principle stress and impingement variables such as velocity and angle. It is shown that cracks nucleate and extend during the erosion process and the length of a crack increases with the increase of the particle velocity and impact angle.

  5. Nanoparticulate sol-gel pretreatments as barrier coatings and adhesion promoters for metallic corrosion protection

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Morales, Antonia

    2008-01-01

    The Spanish University Carlos III de Madrid has developed sol-gel coatings for the corrosion protection of alloys. Sol-gel coatings represent a physical barrier between the metallic substrate and the aggressive environment of exposition and act as adhesion promoters through interfacial bonding. Optimization of the coating’s properties may be easily achivied by changing the processing parameters and formulation of the layer. Interest in licensing the applied patent or technical cooperation wit...

  6. Optimization of High Porosity Thermal Barrier Coatings Generated with a Porosity Former

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medřický, Jan; Vilémová, Monika; Chráska, Tomáš; Curry, N.; Markocsan, N.

    Düsseldorf : DVS Media GmbH, 2014, s. 680-685. ISBN 978-3-87155-574-9. - (DVS-Berichte. 302). [ITSC 2014 :Interational Thermal Spray Conference and Exposition. Barcelona (ES), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : thermal barrier coatings * stabilized zirconia * plasma spray ing * porosity of coatings Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  7. Microstructure of thermal barrier coatings deposited by APS method with application of new type ceramic powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Góral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents results of structural research into thermal barrier coatings obtained by the APS. For the base the Rene 80 alloy was used, whereas a MeCrAlY-type multicomponent alloy was used for an interlayer.Design/methodology/approach: Throughout the research an optic microscope as well as a scanning electron microscope were employed. Measurements of the formed structure’s porosity were taken.Findings: It has been observed that application of novelty ceramic powders allows for a possibility of forming thermal barrier coatings, which can be used for protecting of the combustion chamber’s surface as well as turbine’s blades in an aircraft engine.Research limitations/implications: Further research into resistance to oxidation of these coatings seems necessary for experimental determination of their actual work temperature.Practical implications: They can be successfully applied in automotive industry for coating of petrol or diesel engine’s components.Originality/value: Investigation into possible applications of two-layer and composite coatings, which may improve the work temperature of thermal barrier coatings, is feasible.

  8. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  9. Influence of isothermal and cyclic heat treatments on the adhesion of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Robert; Brodin, Håkan; Johansson, Sten; Östergren, Lars; Li, Xin-hai

    2011-01-01

    The adhesion of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been studied using the standard method described in ASTM C633, which makes use of a tensile test machine to measure the adhesion. The studied specimens consist of air plasma sprayed (APS) TBC deposited on disc-shaped substrate coupons of Ni-base alloy Hastelloy X. The bond coat (BC) is of a NiCoCrAlY type and the top coat (TC) consists of yttria–stabilised–zirconia. Before the adhesion test, the specimens were subjected to three different hea...

  10. Damage evolution and residual stresses in plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J. P.

    1999-02-03

    Air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings were subjected to thermal cycling and residual stress evolution in thermally grown oxide scale was studied by micro- and macro-ruby fluorescence spectroscopy. The macro approach reveals that compressive stress in the oxide scale increases with increasing number of thermal cycles (and thus increasing scale thickness), reaching a value of 1.8 GPa at a scale thickness of 3-4 {micro}m (80 cycles). Micro-ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that protrusions of the zirconia top coat into the bond coat act as localized areas of high stress concentration, leading to damage initiation during thermal cycling.

  11. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  12. Sintering Characteristics of Multilayered Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Gradient and Isothermal High Temperature Annealing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amarendra K.; Schmitt, Michael P.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides have most of the relevant attributes for use as next generation thermal barrier coatings such as phase stability, low sintering kinetics and low thermal conductivity. One of the issues with the pyrochlore oxides is their lower toughness and therefore higher erosion rate compared to the current state-of-the-art TBC material, yttria (6 to 8 wt%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this work, sintering characteristics were investigated for novel multilayered coating consisted of alternating layers of pyrochlore oxide viz Gd2Zr2O7 and t' low k (rare earth oxide doped YSZ). Thermal gradient and isothermal high temperature (1316 C) annealing conditions were used to investigate sintering and cracking in these coatings. The results are then compared with that of relevant monolayered coatings and a baseline YSZ coating.

  13. Electrosynthesis and analytical characterization of PMMA coatings on titanium substrates as barriers against ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giglio, E; Cometa, S; Sabbatini, L; Zambonin, P G; Spoto, G

    2005-02-01

    The performance of polyacrylic coatings as barrier films against corrosion of titanium-based orthopaedic implants was investigated. In particular, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was electrosynthesized on titanium substrates by electro-reductive processes from aqueous monomer solutions. The obtained PMMA coatings were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of an annealing treatment on the morphology of coatings with respect to uniformity and porosity of films was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique was used for ion concentration measurements in ion release tests performed on TiAlV sheets modified with PMMA coatings (annealed and unannealed). Results indicated that the annealing process produces coatings with considerable anticorrosion performances. PMID:15657712

  14. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  15. Evaluation of properties and thermal stress field for thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 齐红宇; 杨晓光; 李旭

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal stress field of the hot section with thermal barrier coating (TBCs), the thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of top-coat are the physical key properties. The porosity of top-coat was tested and evaluated under different high temperatures. The relationship between the microstructure (porosity of top-coat) and properties of TBCs were analyzed to predict the thermal properties of ceramic top-coat, such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The temperature and stress field of the vane with TBCs were simulated using two sets of thermal conductivity data and elastic modulus, which are from literatures and this work, respectively. The results show that the temperature and stress distributions change with thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The differences of maximum temperatures and stress are 6.5% and 8.0%, respectively.

  16. Inelastic deformation behavior of thermal barrier coatings exposed at a high-temperature environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are usually deposited onto the surface of the high-temperature component such as gas turbine, in order to protect it from a hightemperature environment. Coating stress generated by such a high-temperature brings serious damages in TBCs in service. For predicting numerically it, it is necessary to develop the constitutive equation suite to plasam-sprayed TBCs. Previous studies have made clear that the freestanding ceramic coat peeled from TBC coated substrate deforms nonlinearly with a mechanical loading, however the results there have been restricted to the test done using as-sprayed sample. In this study, effect of deposition parameter and high-temperature exposure condition on stress-strain curve of the freestanding ceramic coating sample was examined. The associated deformation process was discussed with the microstructure changes observed after performing a bending test for the exposed sample.

  17. Preparation of yttrium oxide coating by MOCVD as tritium permeation barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yunyi, E-mail: wuyunyi_80@163.com; He, Di; Zhang, Hua; Li, Shuai; Liu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Shumao; Jiang, Lijun

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Yttrium oxide coating was deposited on 316L substrate as hydrogen permeation barrier. • O:Y ratio of the 700 °C annealed coating corresponds well to the stoichiometric Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The original precursor completely decomposed within the coating annealed at 700 °C. • The 700 °C annealed coating offers efficient inhibition to deuterium permeation. • Deuterium permeation of the 700 °C annealed coating is controlled by a hybrid regime. - Abstract: Yttrium oxide coatings were deposited on 316L substrate using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique with yttrium β-diketonates organometallic Y(tmhd){sub 3} as precursor. The different microstructures were obtained by annealing coatings at 700 °C or as-deposited. The film was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hydrogen permeation inhibition performance of films was investigated by deuterium permeation experiment. The crystalline structure of the coatings depended on the post-anneal; the crystallite size of the coating increases and the surface exhibits compact surface morphology for the coatings post-annealed at 700 °C. The coating post-annealed at 700 °C has the correct oxygen/yttrium ratio corresponding well to the stoichiometric Y2O3, while some concentrations of carbon and hydrogen impurities were found in the as-deposited coating. The impurities are present in the form of unreacted or partially reacted precursor molecules due to the incomplete decomposition of the original precursor. The deuterium permeability of the coating improved obviously after post-anneal and was around 240–410 times less than that of the 316L stainless steel, which means efficient inhibition to deuterium permeation.

  18. Preparation of yttrium oxide coating by MOCVD as tritium permeation barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Yttrium oxide coating was deposited on 316L substrate as hydrogen permeation barrier. • O:Y ratio of the 700 °C annealed coating corresponds well to the stoichiometric Y2O3. • The original precursor completely decomposed within the coating annealed at 700 °C. • The 700 °C annealed coating offers efficient inhibition to deuterium permeation. • Deuterium permeation of the 700 °C annealed coating is controlled by a hybrid regime. - Abstract: Yttrium oxide coatings were deposited on 316L substrate using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique with yttrium β-diketonates organometallic Y(tmhd)3 as precursor. The different microstructures were obtained by annealing coatings at 700 °C or as-deposited. The film was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hydrogen permeation inhibition performance of films was investigated by deuterium permeation experiment. The crystalline structure of the coatings depended on the post-anneal; the crystallite size of the coating increases and the surface exhibits compact surface morphology for the coatings post-annealed at 700 °C. The coating post-annealed at 700 °C has the correct oxygen/yttrium ratio corresponding well to the stoichiometric Y2O3, while some concentrations of carbon and hydrogen impurities were found in the as-deposited coating. The impurities are present in the form of unreacted or partially reacted precursor molecules due to the incomplete decomposition of the original precursor. The deuterium permeability of the coating improved obviously after post-anneal and was around 240–410 times less than that of the 316L stainless steel, which means efficient inhibition to deuterium permeation

  19. Failure mechanisms of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Krishnakumar

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) allow operation of structural components, such as turbine blades and vanes in industrial and aircraft gas engines, at temperatures close to the substrate melting temperatures. They consist of four different layers; a high strength creep-resistant nickel-based superalloy substrate, an oxidation resistant bond coat (BC), a low thermal conductivity ceramic topcoat and a thermally grown oxide (TGO), that is predominantly alpha-Al 2O3, that forms between the BC and the TBC. Compressive stresses (3--5 GPa) that are generated in the thin TGO (0.25--8 mum) due to the mismatch in thermal coefficient of expansion between the TGO and BC play a critical role in the failure of these coatings. In this study, the failure mechanisms of a commercial yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coating on platinum aluminide (beta-(Ni,Pt)Al) bond coat have been identified. Two distinct mechanisms have been found responsible for the observed damage initiation and progression at the TGO/bond coat interface. The first mechanism leads to localized debonding at TGO/bond coat interface due to increased out-of-plane tensile stress, along bond coat features that manifest themselves as ridges. The second mechanism causes cavity formation at the TGO/bond coat interface, driven by cyclic plasticity of the bond coat. It has been found that the debonding at the TGO/bond coat interface due to the first mechanism is solely life determining. The final failure occurs by crack extension along either the TGO/bond coat interface or the TGO/YSZ interface or a combination of both, leading to large scale buckling. Based on these mechanisms, it is demonstrated that the bond coat grain size and the aspect ratio of the ridges have a profound influence on spallation lives of the coating. The removal of these ridges by fine polishing prior to TBC deposition led to a four-fold improvement in life. The failure mechanism identified for the

  20. A high performance ceria based interdiffusion barrier layer prepared by spin-coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plonczak, Pawel; Joost, Mario; Hjelm, Johan; Søgaard, Martin; Lundberg, Mats; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2011-01-01

    successive steps of dense layer production was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was employed to monitor the crystal structure of the CGO layer sintered at different temperatures. The described spin coated barrier layer was evaluated using an anode supported cell with a...

  1. Loadings in thermal barrier coatings of jet engine turbine blades an experimental research and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses complex loadings of turbine blades and protective layer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC), under real working airplane jet conditions. They obey both multi-axial mechanical loading and sudden temperature variation during starting and landing of the airplanes. In particular, two types of blades are analyzed: stationary and rotating, which are widely applied in turbine engines produced by airplane factories.

  2. Modeling of coating process, phase changes, and damage of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings on Ni-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Tilmann; Bialas, Marcin; Bednarz, Piotr; Singheiser, Lorenz; Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Parkot, Daniel; Kashko, Tatyana; Petkovicc, Jvica [Surface Engineering Institute, University Aachen (Germany); Hallstedt, Bengt; Nemna, Sergey; Schneider, Jochen M. [Materials Chemistry, University Aachen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The paper gives an overview on the modeling activities on plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating in the frame of TFB 63. In the first part, through-process modeling of the APS deposition of a ZrO{sub 2} based TBC is described. Starting from simulation of the plasma jet, heat transfer into the powder particles, particle melting, particle impact on the substrate surface, and solidification is simulated. A homogenization method is introduced to describe the mechanical properties of the resulting TBC. The second part shows simulation of interdiffusion and phase transformations of MCrAlY and intermetallic oxidation protection coatings on several cast Ni-base alloy substrates. Finally, FEM-based damage simulation of oxidation protection coatings by transversal fatigue cracks during thermomechanical fatigue loading as well as by delamination of the TBC during thermocyclic loading is discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2014-04-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

  4. Interlamellar cracking of thermal barrier coatings with TGOs by non-standard four-point bending tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A non-standard modified four-point bending specimen is adopted for delamination test. → Typical failure mode of the TBC system with TGO layer is demonstrated. → Fracture toughness of 8YSZ on a cold-sprayed MCrAlY coating is evaluated theoretically. - Abstract: This work concerns the failure mode and fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) deposited on a cold-sprayed MCrAlY bond coat (BC) after thermal oxidation. Upon high-temperature exposure, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was formed along the interface between the BC layer and YSZ ceramic coating layer through oxidation of the bond coat. By utilizing a non-standard modified four-point bending specimen, in conjunction with fractured surface examinations by scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscope, the failure mode of this thermal barrier coating (TBC) system has been checked experimentally. It is shown that delamination cracks firstly initiate at the YSZ/BC interface edge, and then propagate along a wavy path near the interface, not only through the TBC but also within the TGO and along the interlamellar interfaces. Through a theoretical analysis of the bending specimen, the fracture toughness of this TBC system, in terms of strain energy release rate, has been determined from the load-displacement curves which were recorded during the tests.

  5. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  6. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  7. Microstructural studies and residual stress evolution in zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick thermal barrier coatings consisting of NiCrAlY bond coating and a 1.4 mm thick Zirconia-based top coating were air plasma sprayed onto grit blasted nickel-base substrates, Hastelloy X. Different amounts of external cooling were utilized during the spraying of the top coatings, which resulted in different specimen temperature histories. A finite element model was developed to simulate the heat flux from the spraying process and the resulting thermal stresses in the specimen. The modelled stresses after the spraying of the bond coating and the top coating were compared to measured residual stresses. The measurements were performed with a layer removal technique, allowing the residual stresses to be determined as a function of depth in the specimen. Further, the microstructure of the top coatings was studied by electron microscopy techniques. In the bond coating, high tensile stresses were predicted. These stresses remained after the spraying of the top coating, where low compressive stresses were predicted as a result from stress relaxation by microcracking. Good agreement between modelled and measured residual stress was found, except from a measured compressive zone in the substrate. The compressive stresses were found to have originated during the grit blasting process, which was not incorporated in the model. The top coating microstructure contained high densities of vertical microcracks and horizontal delaminations. Both defect densities decreased when the substrate temperature during spraying was high. A correlation between modelled inelastic strain in the top coating and point counted densities of vertical microcracks was obtained. 33 refs, 8 figs,

  8. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  9. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  10. Oxidation and Hot Corrosion of Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings Prepared by EB-PVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The performances of gradient thermal barrier coatings (GTBCs) produced by EB-PVD were evaluated by isothermaloxidation and cyclic hot corrosion (HTHC) tests. Compared with conventional two-layered TBCs, the GTBCs exhibitebetter resistance to not only oxidation but also hot-corrosion. A dense Al2O3 layer in the GTBCs effectively prohibitesinward diffusion of O and S and outward diffusion of Al and Cr during the tests. On the other hand, an "inlaid"interface, resulting from oxidation of the Al along the columnar grains of the bond coat, enhances the adherence ofAl2O3 layer. Failure of the GTBC finally occurred by cracking at the interface between the bond coat and Al2O3layer, due to the combined effect of sulfidation of the bond coat and thermal cycling.

  11. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  12. Oxygen permeation, mechanical and structural properties of multilayer diffusion barrier coatings on polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve temperature durability for autoclaving of SiOx diffusion barrier coatings on polypropylene, plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (pp-HMDSO) is applied by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition as interlayer material and compared with results obtained with amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen (a-C : N : H) and a-Si : C : O : N : H interlayers. The influence of the O2/HMDSO ratio on the chemical structure and related mechanical and oxygen barrier properties is investigated by fragmentation tests, dilatometry, oxygen transmission rate, internal stress and mass density measurements as well as Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Carbon-rich, polymer-like coatings with low density, low internal stress and excellent adhesive and cohesive properties are found for pp-HMDSO at the expense of barrier performance. In the SiOx/pp-HMDSO coating a broad transition in chemical composition was observed, explaining improved mechanical properties responsible for good barrier performance after thermal cycling or autoclaving.

  13. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  14. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  15. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  16. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  17. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  18. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  19. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Durability Modeling; An Overview and Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, A.; Bhatt, R. T.; Grady, J. E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-01-01

    A study outlining a fracture mechanics based model that is being developed to investigate crack growth and spallation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) under thermal cycling conditions is presented. A description of the current plan and a model to estimate thermal residual stresses in the coating and preliminary fracture mechanics concepts for studying crack growth in the coating are also discussed. A road map for modeling life and durability of the EBC and the results of FEA model(s) developed for predicting thermal residual stresses and the cracking behavior of the coating are generated and described. Further initial assessment and preliminary results showed that developing a comprehensive EBC life prediction model incorporating EBC cracking, degradation and spalling mechanism under stress and temperature gradients typically seen in turbine components is difficult. This is basically due to mismatch in thermal expansion difference between sub-layers of EBC as well as between EBC and substrate, diffusion of moisture and oxygen though the coating, and densification of the coating during operating conditions as well as due to foreign object damage, the EBC can also crack and spall from the substrate causing oxidation and recession and reducing the design life of the EBC coated substrate.

  20. Stress controlled gas-barrier oxide coatings on semi-crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates were subjected to post-deposition annealing treatments in the temperature range for orientation relaxation of the polymer. The resulting change in coating internal stress state was measured by means of thermo-mechanical analyses, and its effect on the coating cohesive properties and coating/polymer adhesion was determined from the analysis of uniaxial fragmentation tests in situ in a scanning electron microscope, assuming a Weibull-type probability of failure and a perfectly plastic stress transfer at the SiOx/PET interface. The strain to failure and intrinsic fracture toughness of the ultrathin oxide coating were found to be as high as 5.7% and 10 J/m2, respectively, and its interfacial shear strength with PET was found to be close to 100 MPa. Annealing for 10 min at 150 deg. C did not modify the oxygen permeation properties of the SiOx/PET film, which suggests that the defect population of the oxide was not affected by the thermal treatment. In contrast, the coating internal compressive stress resulting from annealing was shown to increase by 40% the apparent coating cohesive properties and adhesion to the polymer

  1. Microstructural evolution of plasma sprayed submicron-/nano-zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Liu, K.; Wang, J. W.; Kang, Y. X.; Li, J. R.; Chen, H. Y.; Li, B. Q.

    2016-02-01

    Two types of agglomerates powder with grain sizes in the submicron- /nano-range were used as the feedstock to deposit yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The dual-modal submicron-coating and multi-modal nano-coating were fabricated. The results from thermal shock test indicated that, due to the weak bond and higher densification rate of unmelted nano-particles in the nano-coating, the interface between recrystallization zone and unmelted nano-particles linked up, which resulted in the decrease of content of unmelted nano-particles from 13% to 7%. The weak bond and higher shrinking rate of nano-particles led to the formation of coarse cracks that ran along the recrystallization zone/unmelted nano-particles interfaces. These cracks caused the premature failure of nano-coating. The submicron-coating can overcome the inherent deficiencies of nano-coating at high temperatures and show a higher thermal shock resistance, it is expected to become a candidate for high-performance TBCs.

  2. The effect of porosity on the hot corrosion failure of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhamid Abubakar, Abba; Sohail Akhtar, Syed; Arif, Abul Fazal M.; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2015-10-01

    It has been found that the use of low-grade fuels in land-based turbines results in the hot corrosion (Type-I) degradation of turbine blades in Saudi Arabia. Due to the diffusion of a molten salt, V2O5, into the top coat of thermal barrier coatings, volumetric expansion of the coating occurs as a result of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation of zirconia. The top coat material is usually made porous due to the need for higher thermal resistance in the coatings. In the present study, a phase field model that estimates the kinetics of microstructure evolution during the corrosion process is estimated at 900 °C. The transformation-induced stresses are predicted by coupling the phase transformation with elasticity. The governing equations are implemented numerically using the finite element method. The effect of pore size, shape, orientation, and dispersion is also investigated. The result shows that very high compressive stresses are developed within the coating cross-section, which eventually causes the spallation failure of the coating.

  3. Vulnerability of multiple-barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Vulnerability' is defined as the ratio of the probability of failure of a damaged system to the probability of failure of the undamaged system. This definition applies to all engineered systems and can be specialized to particular system types. Some disastrous failures (e.g., Chernobyl) have shown that systems can be highly vulnerable. open-quotes Defense in depthclose quotes is a powerful design principle, reducing vulnerability when the consequences of failure can be catastrophic. In the nuclear industry, defense in depth is widely used in radiation protection, reactor control, and shutdown systems. A multiple-barrier system is a simple example of a system that has defense in depth. The idea is that the system is not vulnerable. It cannot fail if one barrier fails because there is another to take its place. This idea is untenable in waste management, but a quantified vulnerability of a system can help owners, designers, and regulators decide how much defense in depth is desirable or enough. Many multiple-barrier systems can be modeled as systems of components physically in a series, each individually able to prevent failure. Components typically have bimodal distributions of the service time to failure, as illustrated by an example of application to a hypothetical nuclear fuel waste repository

  4. A study of the barrier properties of polyethylene coated with a nanocellulose/magnetite composite film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological, thermal and barrier properties of low-density polyethylene/polycaprolactone-modified nanocellulose hybrid materials were investigated in this paper. Nanonocelulose/magnetite (NC-Fe3O4 nanocomposite and maleic acid functionalized NC/magnetite (NCMA-Fe3O4 nanocomposite were prepared and used as filler at various concentrations (5, 10 and 15 wt. % in polycaprolactone (PCL layer. PE was coated with PCL/NC/magnetite layer. The addition of the filler did not unfavorably affect the inherent properties of the polymer, especially its barrier properties. Oxygen permeation measurements show that the oxygen barrier properties of magnetite enriched PCL film were improved due to chemical activity of added material. The highest level of barrier capacity was observed for PE samples coated with PCL based composite with NCMA-Fe3O4 micro/-nanofiller, which implies the significant contribution of nanocellulose surface modification with maleic anhydride residue to improved barrier properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45019 i br. OI172013

  5. Three-dimensional investigation of thermal barrier coatings by synchrotron-radiation computed laminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of the microstructure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is essential for assessing coating lifetime and for understanding the damage mechanisms leading to ceramic layer spallation. Recent progress in synchrotron-radiation computed laminography (SRCL) enables imaging of samples that are thin but extended in two dimensions. This study reports on the first results of the 3-D characterization of electron beam–physical vapour deposition TBCs by SRCL. Image analysis was very helpful in investigating the 3-D microstructure obtained and is also described.

  6. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  7. Determination of mechanical properties of NiCoCrAlY and (Ni, Pt)-Al based bond coats used in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Mondragón Rodríguez, G.C.; Mora García, Alma Gabriela; Lau, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments include the use of thermal barrier coatings to increase the efficiency of the modern gas turbines. The temperature inside the combustion chamber limits their efficiency. For this reason EB-PVD partial stabilized zirconium oxide coatings are employed for thermal protection of turbine blades. In previous experimental research activities carried out at the Materials Research Institute of DLR, thermal barrier ceramic (TBCs) layers, ca. 200 µm of Partially stabilized zircon...

  8. Microstructure and thermal properties of nanostructured lanthana-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings by air plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured lanthana-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings were developed using the air plasma spraying technique. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the coatings are characterized by a bimodal microstructure consisting of melted zones, nano-zones, splats, nano-pores and micro-cracks, which are typical features of nanostructured plasma-sprayed coatings. These coatings are tetragonal in phase, with a grain size of 30–60 nm. The thermal conductivity achieved by these coatings is lower than that of nanostructured and traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings.

  9. Environmental degradation of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings for fuel-flexible gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Prabhakar

    The development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been undoubtedly the most critical advancement in materials technology for modern gas turbine engines. TBCs are widely used in gas turbine engines for both power-generation and propulsion applications. Metallic oxidation-resistant coatings (ORCs) are also widely employed as a stand-alone protective coating or bond coat for TBCs in many high-temperature applications. Among the widely studied durability issues in these high-temperature protective coatings, one critical challenge that received greater attention in recent years is their resistance to high-temperature degradation due to corrosive deposits arising from fuel impurities and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate) sand deposits from air ingestion. The presence of vanadium, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium and calcium impurities in alternative fuels warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature materials degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbine engines. Degradation due to CMAS is a critical problem for gas turbine components operating in a dust-laden environment. In this study, high-temperature degradation due to aggressive deposits such as V2O5, P2O 5, Na2SO4, NaVO3, CaSO4 and a laboratory-synthesized CMAS sand for free-standing air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the topcoat of the TBC system, and APS CoNiCrAlY, the bond coat of the TBC system or a stand-alone ORC, is examined. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This study demonstrated that the V2O5 melt degrades the APS YSZ through the formation of ZrV2O7 and YVO 4 at temperatures below 747°C and above 747°C, respectively. Formation of YVO4 leads to the depletion of the Y2O 3 stabilizer and the deleterious transformation of the YSZ to the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. The investigation on the YSZ degradation by Na 2SO4 and a Na2SO4 + V2

  10. Apparatus for determining past-service conditions and remaining life of thermal barrier coatings and components having such coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Devitt, John William (Clifton Park, NY); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Brewer, Luke Nathaniel (Rexford, NY)

    2004-05-04

    An apparatus for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC to excite a photoluminescent ("PL") material contained therein, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of an emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of a crystalline phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component or the TBC.

  11. Phase Transformation on Interface between NiCoCrAlY Bond Coat and Substrate and Study of Thermal Barrier Coating as High Temperature Material

    OpenAIRE

    H Purwaningsih; L. Noerochim; R. Fajarain; J.A. Hakim; Sulistijono Sulistijono

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coating material consists of Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a top coat and bond coat NiCoCrAlY. It is used to protect NiCoCrAlY super alloys for high temperature applications due to its corrosion resistant properties and resistance to thermal fatigue. In the present study, top coat and bond coat were deposited on the substrate using plasma spraying process, followed by thermal fatigue treatment, by heating up to 900 oC for 5 hours and cooling down to 25 oC for 15 minutes,...

  12. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ceramic/Metal Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jin-sheng; JIANG Bing; LIU Jie; HUANG Shi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The ceramic/metal gradient thermal barrier coatings (CMGTBCs) which combined the conceptions of thermal barrier coatings ( TBG ) and functional gradient materials ( FGMs ) are investigated. The structure model studied in this paper is a general model which includes four different layers: pure ceramic layer , ceramic/metal gradient layer, pure metal layer, and substrate layer. The microstructures of gradient layer have different ceramics and metal volume fraction profile along with the direction of thickness. The profile function used to describe the gradient microstructures can be expressed in power-law or polynomial expression. The mechanical properties of CMGTBCs are obtained by means of microscopic mechanics. As special cases, the interactive solutions are given by Mori- Tanaka method, and the non- interactive solutions by dilute solution. The Young's modulus calculated by these methods are compared with those by other methods , e g, the rule of mixtures.

  13. Improving anti-corrosion property of thermal barrier coatings by intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S., E-mail: syan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shang, Y.J., E-mail: shangyijun@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, X.F., E-mail: reandy123@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yi, X., E-mail: xyle@buaa.edu.com [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Le, X.Y., E-mail: xyle@buaa.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-02-01

    Anticorrosion behavior is an important factor for the reliability and durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Intense pulsed ion beam (ion species: 70% H{sup +} + 30% C{sup +}; current density: 150 A/cm{sup 2} and 250 A/cm{sup 2}; accelerate voltage: 300 kV; pulse duration: 65 ns) irradiation were used to improve the anticorrosion behavior of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) /NiCoCrAlY thermal barrier coating. The anticorrosion property of the TBCs was evaluated with polarization curves method. A quite good result was obtained. Further analysis show that IPIB irradiation can seal the pores in YSZ layer, and block the penetration channels of corrosive fluid, therefore, improves the anticorrosion behavior.

  14. Improving anti-corrosion property of thermal barrier coatings by intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S.; Shang, Y. J.; Xu, X. F.; Yi, X.; Le, X. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Anticorrosion behavior is an important factor for the reliability and durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Intense pulsed ion beam (ion species: 70% H + + 30% C +; current density: 150 A/cm 2 and 250 A/cm 2; accelerate voltage: 300 kV; pulse duration: 65 ns) irradiation were used to improve the anticorrosion behavior of the Y 2O 3-stabilized ZrO 2 (YSZ) /NiCoCrAlY thermal barrier coating. The anticorrosion property of the TBCs was evaluated with polarization curves method. A quite good result was obtained. Further analysis show that IPIB irradiation can seal the pores in YSZ layer, and block the penetration channels of corrosive fluid, therefore, improves the anticorrosion behavior.

  15. Improving anti-corrosion property of thermal barrier coatings by intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anticorrosion behavior is an important factor for the reliability and durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Intense pulsed ion beam (ion species: 70% H+ + 30% C+; current density: 150 A/cm2 and 250 A/cm2; accelerate voltage: 300 kV; pulse duration: 65 ns) irradiation were used to improve the anticorrosion behavior of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) /NiCoCrAlY thermal barrier coating. The anticorrosion property of the TBCs was evaluated with polarization curves method. A quite good result was obtained. Further analysis show that IPIB irradiation can seal the pores in YSZ layer, and block the penetration channels of corrosive fluid, therefore, improves the anticorrosion behavior.

  16. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines : morphology, processing and properties

    OpenAIRE

    GrÜnling, H.; Mannsmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings out of fully or partially stabilized zirconia offer a unique chance in gas turbines to increase the gas inlet temperature significantly while keeping the temperature of the structural material of the component within conventional limits. The protection of combustor parts and transition pieces as well as of some stationary gas turbine parts however is state of the art. As a consequence of still insufficient reliability, the application for hot rotating parts is very li...

  17. A study of the barrier properties of polyethylene coated with a nanocellulose/magnetite composite film

    OpenAIRE

    Đorđević Nenad 1; Marinković Aleksandar D.; Nikolić Jasmina B.; Drmanić Saša Ž.; Rančić Milica; Brković Danijela V.; Uskoković Petar S.

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, thermal and barrier properties of low-density polyethylene/polycaprolactone-modified nanocellulose hybrid materials were investigated in this paper. Nanonocelulose/magnetite (NC-Fe3O4) nanocomposite and maleic acid functionalized NC/magnetite (NCMA-Fe3O4) nanocomposite were prepared and used as filler at various concentrations (5, 10 and 15 wt. %) in polycaprolactone (PCL) layer. PE was coated with PCL/NC/magnetite layer. The addition of ...

  18. Environmental and Mechanical Stability of Environmental Barrier Coated SA Tyrannohex SiC Composites Under Simulated Turbine Engine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael Charles; Sing, Mrityunjay

    2014-01-01

    The environmental stability and thermal gradient cyclic durability performance of SA Tyrannohex composites were investigated for turbine engine component applications. The work has been focused on investigating the combustion rig recession, cyclic thermal stress resistance and thermomechanical low cycle fatigue of uncoated and environmental barrier coated Tyrannohex SiC SA composites in simulated turbine engine combustion water vapor, thermal gradients, and mechanical loading conditions. Flexural strength degradations have been evaluated, and the upper limits of operating temperature conditions for the SA composite material systems are discussed based on the experimental results.

  19. Ultrasound-assisted pullulan/montmorillonite bionanocomposite coating with high oxygen barrier properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introzzi, Laura; Blomfeldt, Thomas O J; Trabattoni, Silvia; Tavazzi, Silvia; Santo, Nadia; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano; Farris, Stefano

    2012-07-31

    In this paper, the preparation and characterization of oxygen barrier pullulan sodium montmorillonite (Na(+)-MMT) nanocomposite coatings are presented for the first time. Full exfoliation of platelets during preparation of the coating water dispersions was mediated by ultrasonic treatment, which turned out to be a pivotal factor in the oxygen barrier performance of the final material even at high relative humidity (RH) conditions [oxygen permeability coefficients ~1.43 ± 0.39 and 258.05 ± 13.78 mL·μm·m(-2)·(24 h)(-1)·atm(-1) at 23 °C and 0% RH and 70% RH, respectively]. At the micro- and nanoscale, the reasons are discussed. The final morphology of the coatings revealed that clay lamellae were stacked on top of one another, probably due to the forced confinement of the platelets within the coating thickness after solvent evaporation. This was also confirmed by modeling the experimental oxygen permeability data with the well-known Nielsen and Cussler permeation theoretical models, which suggested a reasonable aspect ratio (α) of ~100. Electron microscopic analyses also disclosed a peculiar cell-like arrangement of the platelets. The stacking of the clay lamellae and the cell-like arrangement create the excellent oxygen barrier properties. Finally, we demonstrated that the slight haze increase in the bionanocomposite coating materials arising from the addition of the clays depends on the clay concentration but not so much on the sonication time, due to the balance of opposite effects after sonication (an increase in the number of scattering centers but a reduction in their size). PMID:22765289

  20. Effect of laser remelting on the tribological performance of thermal barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, A; Sevillano, F; Múnez, C J; López, M D; Utrilla, V; Rodríguez, J; Poza, P

    2012-06-01

    Gas turbine's efficiency improves as operating temperature is increased. For this reason, metallic components used in turbine engines, for propulsion and power generation, are protected by thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Laser glazing has been used to enhance the oxidation and corrosion resistance of thermally sprayed TBC, but there is no information about the effect of this treatment on the tribological performance. ZrO2(CaO) top coat and NiAIMo bond coating were flame sprayed onto an AlSI 1045 carbon steel. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. Both, the as sprayed and the laser remelted top coatings, were formed by cubic ZrO2 with some tetragonal precipitates. The grain size was reduced by the laser treatment. The mechanical properties and the local wear rate were evaluated by depth sensing indentation and scratch tests respectively. The nanoscale wear behaviour was always improved by the laser treatment. PMID:22905563

  1. An Experimental Study of Microstructure-Property Relationships in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Dwivedi, G.; Nylén, P.; Vackel, A.; Sampath, S.

    2013-06-01

    The thermal-mechanical properties of thermal barrier coatings are highly influenced by the defects present in coating microstructure. The aim of this study was to meet the future needs of the gas turbine industry by further development of zirconia coatings through the assessment of microstructure-property relationships. A design of experiments was conducted for this purpose with current, spray distance, and powder feed rate as the varied parameters. Microstructure was assessed with SEM and image analysis was used to characterize porosity content. Evaluations were carried out using laser flash technique to measure thermal properties. A bi-layer beam curvature technique in conjunction with controlled thermal cycling was used to assess the mechanical properties, in particular their nonlinear elastic response. Coating lifetime was evaluated by thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Relationships between microstructure and coating properties are discussed. Dense vertically cracked microstructure and highly porous microstructure with large globular pores were also fabricated. Correlations between parameters obtained from nonlinear measurements and lifetime based on a priori established microstructural analysis were attempted in an effort to develop and identify a simplified strategy to assess coating durability following sustained long-term exposure to high temperature thermal cycling.

  2. Interface fracture toughness in thermal barrier coatings by cross-sectional indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interface fracture toughness of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on high-pressure turbine blades manufactured by electron beam physical vapour deposition was measured by a cross-sectional indentation (CSI) method. Scanning electron microscopy and luminescence mapping were employed to reveal that coating delamination induced by CSI was predominantly along the thermally grown oxide–bond coat interface and the shape of the delaminated area was approximately semicircular. The critical energy release rate (Gc) for delamination was calculated based on a clamped circular plate model. Analysis of the stored energy release revealed that the residual stresses in the coating do not contribute to the total energy release rate provided that the delaminated area of the coating does not buckle. Therefore, for this method, detailed information of residual stresses is not necessary for the determination of interface fracture toughness. However, intercolumnar microfracture and shear displacement in the YSZ top coat can lead to significant overestimation of the interface fracture toughness in some situations. A method of specimen preparation is described to inhibit these effects. The interface fracture resistance of the TBCs was found to be 29 ± 9 J m−2 after between 35 and 100 thermal cycles (from room temperature to 1150 °C with 1 h duration).

  3. Facile approach in the development of icephobic hierarchically textured coatings as corrosion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momen, G., E-mail: gmomen@uqac.ca; Farzaneh, M.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A superhydrophobic coating is developed via a simple environmental-friendly method. • This coating can be used on the surface of various metals such as copper, magnesium. • The superhydrophobic aluminum surface showed the excellent corrosion resistance. • The fabricated surface revealed a drastically reduction of ice adhesion strength. • Such surfaces can advantageously be used in cold climate regions. - Abstract: An anti-corrosion superhydrophobic film with water contact angle greater than 160° on aluminum alloy 6061 substrate was fabricated simply through the spin-coating method applied to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles doped in silicone rubber solution. The as-obtained sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and water contact angle/surface energy measurement. The corrosion behaviour of such coating in the NaCl solutions was investigated using the potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the developed superhydrophobic surface is improved greatly due to the composite wetting states or interfaces with numerous air pockets between its surface and the NaCl solution. This superhydrophobic coating could serve as an effective barrier against aggressive medium. Ice adhesion strength of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating was also evaluated by measuring its ice adhesion force which was found to have reduced by 4.8 times compared to that of aluminum substrate as reference test.

  4. Comparison of thermal shock behaviors between plasma-sprayed nanostructured and conventional zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-bo; ZHANG Zhi-min; JIANG Xian-liang; LIU Min; ZHU Zhao-hui

    2009-01-01

    NiCoCrAlTaY bond coat was deposited on pure nickel substrate by low pressure plasma spraying(LPPS), and ZrO2-8%Y2O3 (mass fraction) nanostructured and ZrO2-7%Y2O3 (mass fraction) conventional thermal barrier coatings(TBCs) were deposited by air plasma spraying(APS). The thermal shock behaviors of the nanostructured and conventional TBCs were investigated by quenching the coating samples in cold water from 1 150, 1 200 and 1 250 ℃, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was used to examine the microstructures of the samples after thermal shock testing. Energy dispersive analysis of X-ray(EDAX) was used to analyze the interface diffusion behavior of the bond coat elements. X-ray diffractometry(XRD) was used to analyze the constituent phases of the samples. Experimental results indicate that the nanostructured TBC is superior to the conventional TBC in thermal shock performance. Both the nanostructured and conventional TBCs fail along the bond coat/substrate interface. The constituent phase of the as-sprayed conventional TBC is diffusionless-transformed tetragonal(t′). However, the constituent phase of the as-sprayed nanostructured TBC is cubic(c). There is a difference in the crystal size at the spalled surfaces of the nanostructured and conventional TBCs. The constituent phases of the spalled surfaces are mainly composed of Ni2.88Cr1.12 and oxides of bond coat elements.

  5. Facile approach in the development of icephobic hierarchically textured coatings as corrosion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A superhydrophobic coating is developed via a simple environmental-friendly method. • This coating can be used on the surface of various metals such as copper, magnesium. • The superhydrophobic aluminum surface showed the excellent corrosion resistance. • The fabricated surface revealed a drastically reduction of ice adhesion strength. • Such surfaces can advantageously be used in cold climate regions. - Abstract: An anti-corrosion superhydrophobic film with water contact angle greater than 160° on aluminum alloy 6061 substrate was fabricated simply through the spin-coating method applied to Al2O3 nanoparticles doped in silicone rubber solution. The as-obtained sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and water contact angle/surface energy measurement. The corrosion behaviour of such coating in the NaCl solutions was investigated using the potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the developed superhydrophobic surface is improved greatly due to the composite wetting states or interfaces with numerous air pockets between its surface and the NaCl solution. This superhydrophobic coating could serve as an effective barrier against aggressive medium. Ice adhesion strength of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating was also evaluated by measuring its ice adhesion force which was found to have reduced by 4.8 times compared to that of aluminum substrate as reference test

  6. A feasibility study of a diffusion barrier between Ni-Cr-Al coatings and nickel-based eutectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems have been proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines. In a study to prevent the deterioration of such systems by diffusion, a tungsten sheet 25 microns thick was placed between eutectic alloys and an Ni-Cr-Al layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as 500 h. Without the tungsten barrier the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of niobium into the Ni-Cr-Al. Insertion of the tungsten barrier stopped the diffusion of niobium from the delta phase. Chromium diffusion from the Ni-Cr-Al into the gamma/gamma-prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time, and tungsten diffused into both the Ni-Cr-Al and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were aligned parallel rather than perpendicular to the Ni-Cr-Al layer, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  7. Effect of Young's modulus evolution on residual stress measurement of thermal barrier coatings by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subjected to thermal cycling, the apparent Young's modulus of air plasma-sprayed (APS) 8 wt.% Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was measured by nanoindentation. Owing to the effects of sintering and porous microstructure, the apparent Young's modulus follows a Weibull distribution and changes from 50 to 93 GPa with an increase of thermal cycling. The evolution of residual stresses in the top coating of an 8YSZ TBC system was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The residual stresses derived from the XRD data are well consistent with that obtained by the Vickers indention. It is shown that the evolution of Young's modulus plays an important role in improving the measurement precision of residual stresses in TBCs by XRD.

  8. Substrate Effects on the High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limin He; Zhenhua Xu; Jianping Li; Rende Mu; Shimei He; Guanghong Huang

    2009-01-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behaviors of the NiCrAIYSi/P-YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) pro-duced by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) on directionally solidified (DS) and single crys-talline (SC) Ni-based superalloy substrates were investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure investigation, isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests were conducted for the comparison of oxidation behaviors of TBCs on different substrates. Although TBC on DS substrate has a relatively higher oxidation rate, it has a longer thermal cycling lifetime than that on SC substrate. The primary factor for TBC spallation is the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of the bond coat and substrate. The morphological feature of thermally grown oxide (TGO) has a strong influence on the TBC performance. By optimizing the elemental interdiffusion between bond coat and substrate, a high quality TGO layer is formed on the DS substrate, and therefore the TBC oxidation behavior is improved.

  9. Cellulose-nanofiber/polygalacturonic acid coatings with high oxygen barrier and targeted release properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Susanne L.; Henriksson, Marielle; Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Svagan, Anna J.

    2014-01-01

    , respectively. The coating was able to survive the exposure of a simulated gastric fluid, but was partially degraded upon exposure to pectinase enzyme, which simulate the action of the microbial symbionts present in the human colon. Prior to exposure, the oxygen permeability coefficient of the coating (0.033ml......(STP)mmm(-2)day(-1)atm(-1) at 23°C and 20% RH) was in the same order of magnitude as for ethylene vinyl alcohol films (0.001-0.01ml(STP)mmm(-2)day(-1)atm(-1)). However, after exposure to the mimicked gastrointestinal (GI) tract conditions, the contribution of coating to the overall barrier properties was not...

  10. Permeation barrier coating and plasma sterilization of PET bottles and foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) offer various advantages over glass or metal containers. Beside this they only offer poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf-live of packaged food is reduced. Additionally, common sterilization methods like heat, hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid may not be applicable due to reduced heat or chemical resistance of the plastic packaging material. For the plasma sterilization and permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils, a microwave driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna. The dependencies of important plasma parameters, such as gas mixture, process pressure, power and pulse conditions on oxygen permeation through packaging foil are investigated. A residual permeation as low as J = 1.0 ±0.3 cm^3m-2day-1bar-1 for 60 nm thick silicon oxide (SiOx) coated PET foils is achieved. To discuss this residual permeation, coating defects are visualized by capacitively coupled atomic oxygen plasma etching of coated substrate. A defect density of 3000 mm-2 is revealed responsible for permeation. For plasma sterilization, optimized plasma parameters based on fundamental research of plasma sterilization mechanisms permit short treatment times of a few seconds.

  11. Status of R&D on Tritium Permeation Barrier Coatings for Tritium Breeding Blanket of Fusion Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The paper overviewed the recent progress in the application of several typical tritium permeation barrier (TPB) coatings and their corresponding fabrication technologies for tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor. According to the design requirements of

  12. Key Durability Issues with Mullite-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2) and mullite/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) dual layer coatings have been developed to protect silicon -based ceramics from environmental attack. Mullite-based coating systems show excellent durability in air. However, in combustion environments, corrosive species such as molten salt or water vapor penetrate through cracks in the coating and attack the Si-based ceramics along the interface. Thus the modification of the coating system for enhanced crack-resistance is necessary for long-term durability in combustion environments. Other key durability issues include interfacial contamination and coating/substrate bonding. Interfacial contamination leads to enhanced oxidation and interfacial pore formation, while a weak coating/substrate bonding leads to rapid attack of the interface by corrosive species, both of which can cause a premature failure of the coating. Interfacial contamination can be minimized by limiting impurities in coating and substrate materials. The interface may be modified to improve the coating/substrate bond.

  13. Nondestructive characterization of thermal barrier coating by noncontact laser ultrasonic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Chen, Jianwei; Zhang, Zhenzhen

    2015-09-01

    We present the application of a laser ultrasonic technique in nondestructive characterization of the bonding layer (BL) in a thermal barrier coating (TBC). A physical mode of a multilayered medium is established to describe the propagation of a longitudinal wave generated by a laser in a TBC system. Furthermore, the theoretical analysis on the ultrasonic transmission in TBC is carried out in order to derive the expression of the BL transmission coefficient spectrum (TCS) which is used to determine the velocity of the longitudinal wave in the BL. We employ the inversion method combined with TCS to ascertain the attenuation coefficient of the BL. The experimental validations are performed with TBC specimens produced by an electron-beam physical vapor deposition method. In those experiments, a pulsed laser with a width of 10 ns is used to generate an ultrasonic signal while a two-wave mixing interferometer is created to receive the ultrasonic signals. By introducing the wavelet soft-threshold method that improves the signal-to-noise ratio, the laser ultrasonic testing results of TBC with an oxidation of 1 cycle, 10 cycles, and 100 cycles show that the attenuation coefficients of the BL become larger with an increase in the oxidation time, which is evident for the scanning electron microscopy observations, in which the thickness of the thermally grown oxide increases with oxidation time.

  14. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  15. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  16. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  17. Investigation on Coating Uniformity of High-Temperature Alloy with SiC Thermal Barrier Coating Using Pulsed Infrared Thermographic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Y.; Tang, Q. J.; Wang, Y.; Gong, J. L.; Qin, L.

    2015-06-01

    The SiC thermal barrier coating thickness uniformity of a high-temperature alloy was investigated using a pulsed infrared thermographic image. A thermal quadrupole method is used to solve a one-dimensional thermal conduction model. The temperature of the high-temperature alloy with SiC coating is directly affected by the pulse intensity of optical excitation; furthermore, the relation between the SiC thermal barrier coating thickness and temperature difference is obtained. Pulsed phase thermography and principal component analysis are applied to extract the characteristic information from thermal image sequences, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the thermal wave signal is clearly improved. The thermal contrast of the SiC thermal barrier coating thickness is related to the optical pulse intensity and infrared camera frame rate. Furthermore, a relatively simple quantitative method is developed to estimate the SiC thermal barrier coating thickness uniformity of the high-temperature alloy, and the coating thickness measurement using pulsed thermographic imaging is in very good agreement with the actual coating thickness value.

  18. Optimizing an SEM-based 3D surface imaging technique for recording bond coat surface geometry in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creation of three-dimensional representations of surfaces from images taken at two or more view angles is a well-established technique applied to optical images and is frequently used in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The present work describes specific steps taken to optimize and enhance the repeatability of three-dimensional surfaces reconstructed from SEM images. The presented steps result in an approximately tenfold improvement in the repeatability of the surface reconstruction compared to more standard techniques. The enhanced techniques presented can be used with any SEM friendly samples. In this work the modified technique was developed in order to accurately quantify surface geometry changes in metallic bond coats used with thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to provide improved turbine hot part durability. Bond coat surfaces are quite rough, and accurate determination of surface geometry change (rumpling) requires excellent repeatability. Rumpling is an important contributor to TBC failure, and accurate quantification of rumpling is important to better understanding of the failure behavior of TBCs. (paper)

  19. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  20. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  1. Self-healing Coatings for an Anti-corrosion barrier in Damaged Parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymer coatings are commonly applied to metal substrates to prevent corrosion in aggressive environments such as high humidity and under salt water. Once the polymer coating has been breached, for example due to cracking or scratches, it loses its effectiveness, and corrosion can rapidly propagate across the substrate. The self-healing system we will describe prevents corrosion by healing the damage through a healing reaction triggered by the actual damage event. This self-healing coating solution can be easily applied to most substrate materials, and our dual-capsule healing system provides a general approach to be compatible with most common polymer matrices. Specifically, we expect an excellent anti-corrosion property of the self-healing coatings in damaged parts coated on galvanized metal substrates.

  2. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  3. Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coatings Exposed to Hot Corrosion Environment by Impedance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chao; HUANG Hui; NI Liyong; ZHOU Chungen

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation,impedance spectroscopy(IS) is used,as a non-destructive tool,to examine the hot corrosion behavior of thermal barrier coatings(TBCs) exposed to a mixture of 25wt% NaC1 and 75wt% Na2SO4.The results show that the thermally grown oxide(TGO) formed along the top coat/bond coat interface is a mixed oxide layer,i.e.Cr2O3,(Ni,Co)(Cr,Al)2O4 spinel and NiO.The growth of TGO layer appears to follow the parabolic law.The resistance of TGO increases due to the increase of thickness when the number of cycles is less than 110.While for more than 110 cycles,the resistance of TGO decreases with the increase of porosity of TGO layer,even though the thickness of TGO layer increases.The nucleation and propagation of cracks within top coat increase the electrical resistance of top coat.The parameters in equivalent circuit could be used to characterize the degradation of TBCs.

  4. 14 CFR 23.691 - Artificial stall barrier system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Artificial stall barrier system. 23.691... Construction Control Systems § 23.691 Artificial stall barrier system. If the function of an artificial stall barrier, for example, stick pusher, is used to show compliance with § 23.201(c), the system must...

  5. Effect of particle in-flight behavior on the composition of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Bai, Y., E-mail: byxjtu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Tang, J.J.; Liu, K. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ding, C.H. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yang, J.F. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Han, Z.H., E-mail: zhhan1955@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-12-01

    In this work, 6 to 11 mol% YO{sub 1.5}-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited by supersonic and conventional atmospheric plasma spraying. During spraying, the surface temperature and velocity of in-flight particles were monitored by Spray Watch 2i on-line system. The phase composition of as-sprayed coatings was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Lattice parameters, tetragonality and the content of YO{sub 1.5} (mol%) of as-sprayed coatings were calculated according to the position of (0 0 4) and (4 0 0) diffraction peaks. It was found that the as-sprayed coatings were composed of metastable non-transformable tetragonal phase (t′). However, the amount of YO{sub 1.5} (mol%) in the as-sprayed coatings decreased with the increase of melting index of in-flight particles due to the partial evaporation of YO{sub 1.5} during spraying.

  6. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  7. Method for applying a diffusion barrier interlayer for high temperature components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ronghua; Cheruvu, Narayana S.

    2016-03-08

    A coated substrate and a method of forming a diffusion barrier coating system between a substrate and a MCrAl coating, including a diffusion barrier coating deposited onto at least a portion of a substrate surface, wherein the diffusion barrier coating comprises a nitride, oxide or carbide of one or more transition metals and/or metalloids and a MCrAl coating, wherein M includes a transition metal or a metalloid, deposited on at least a portion of the diffusion barrier coating, wherein the diffusion barrier coating restricts the inward diffusion of aluminum of the MCrAl coating into the substrate.

  8. SUBSURFACE BARRIER VALIDATION WITH THE SEAFACE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn

    1997-11-30

    The overall objective of the effort was to develop and demonstrate an integrated methodology and field system to evaluate the integrity of in situ, impermeable barriers constructed in the vadose zone. An autonomous, remotely accessible, automatic monitoring and analysis system was designed and fabricated. It was thoroughly tested under field conditions, and was able to function as designed throughout the test period. Data inversion software was developed with enhanced capabilities over the previous prototype version, and integrated with the monitoring system for real time operation. Analytical simulations were performed to determine the inversion code's sensitivity to model parameters. Numerical simulations were performed to better understand how typical field conditions differ from the ideal model(s) which are used (or have been developed for use) in the inversion code and to further validate the flux limited forward model developed for use with the system. Results from the analytical and numerical assessment of the inversion code showed that the SEAtrace{trademark} approach could locate leaks within 0.4 to 1.2 m. Leak size determination was less accurate, but produced results within a factor of 3 to 8 for leaks in the 2.5 to 10 cm diameter range. The smallest engineered leak in the test 1.1 cm diameter, could be located but its size estimate was high by a factor of 30. Data analysis was performed automatically after each gas scan was completed, yielding results in less than thirty minutes, although the bulk of the results reported required post test data analysis to remove effects of high background concentrations. The field test of the integrated system was problematic, primarily due to unanticipated, unintentional leaks formed in the impermeable liner. The test facility constructed to proof the system was ambitious, initially having 11 engineered leaks of various dimensions that could be independently operated. While a great deal of care went into the

  9. Stability of tritium permeation prevention barrier with TiC and TiN + TiC coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of tritium permeation prevention barrier of 316L stainless steel with coating TiC and TiN + TiC under the conditions of very large thermal gradient, thermal cycling and plasma irradiation is researched. The research includes two aspects: one is the study on the stability resisting H+ plasma irradiation; another is on the ability of two coating materials when they are used in long term under the condition of very large thermal gradient and cycling. The results show that TiC and TiN + TiC composite coating materials, after chemical heat treatment and forming tritium permeation prevention barrier, can resist H+ ion irradiation, and also can resist very large thermal gradient and thermal cycling. The long time experiments show that tritium permeation prevention barrier of those coating materials is stable when they are used in long term

  10. Stabilize Consequences of Y/sub 2/ O/sub 3/ in Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of cubic stabilizing oxides is a pre-requisite for the use of Zirconia as a main voter in thermal barrier coating. These can be added in ample amounts to form a partially stabilized Zirconia or to form a fully stabilized Zirconia. Zirconia yttria (ZrO/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/ O/sub 3/) coating deposited by plasma spray method is widely used in industry as a thermal barrier coating (TBC). Development of narrative and innovative ceramic materials, which have brought about significant hi-tech change, predominately by Y/sub 2/ O/sub 3/ for the accumulation of varying amounts of cubic stabilizing oxide. This paper is a study on the effect of stabilizer on performance of ZrO/sub 2/ thermal barrier coatings. For experimentation, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ complete characterization was done with ZrO/sub 2/ , Y/sub 2/ O/sub 3/ coated samples to optimize the micro structural, mechanical properties and characterization, using the latest techniques. It was observed that porosity content in all the coated samples was not very high. However the porosity content was uniformly distributed and pore size was small. It has been revealed that, in case of small porosity content, hardness values of thermal barrier coating with stabilizing effect of yttria were not very high. (author)

  11. Development of advanced Al coating processes for future application as anti-corrosion and T-permeation barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced ferritic-martensitic steels (e.g. Eurofer 97) are foreseen in future fusion technology as structural material in the HCLL concept, however, they show strong dissolution attack in Pb-15.7Li. Corrosion testing in Picolo loop revealed dramatically values of about 400 μm/year at flow rates of 0.22 m/s at 550 oC. This large amount of corrosion products is transported and will be deposited as precipitates at cooler positions with the risk of line blockages as found in Picolo testing. Thus, reliable TBM function claims anti-corrosion barriers. Previous studies (e.g. Hot-Dip Aluminization) showed that Al-based coatings have such anti-corrosion and also T-permeation reduction behavior. However, industrially relevant coating technologies are missing and Hot-Dip cannot fulfill low activation criteria. Electro-chemical deposition promises such features, however water-based systems are unqualified. The investigation of Al coating methods from non-aqueous systems succeeded in deposition of Al-scales in high reproducible and controllable thickness from two different types of electrolytes. The first one is based on organic aromates as electrolyte and the second variant uses organic salt melts (ionic liquids). The specific characteristics and advantages will be discussed as well as the formation of the protective scales after heat treatment and their behavior in Pb-15.7Li.

  12. Thermal cycling behaviour of lanthanum zirconate as EB-PVD thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal cycling tests with two different EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were performed in a furnace cycle test. The results of these tests showed an increase of endurable cycle number when pyrochloric La2Zr2O7 was used as TBC. 1865 cycles were reached with La2Zr2O7 and 1380 cycles with 7 weigth-% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) EB-PVD TBC. Additional investigation was made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to investigate morphology and to determine chemical composition by electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. X-Ray diffraction was performed to analyze structural constitution of deposited coatings. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Spontaneously intermixed Al-Mg barriers enable corrosion-resistant Mg/SiC multilayer coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufli, Regina; Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Baker, Sherry L.; Robinson, Jeff C.; Alameda, Jennifer; Walton, Christopher C.

    2012-07-01

    Magnesium/silicon carbide (Mg/SiC) has the potential to be the best-performing reflective multilayer coating in the 25-80 nm wavelength region but suffers from Mg-related corrosion, an insidious problem which completely degrades reflectance. We have elucidated the origins and mechanisms of corrosion propagation within Mg/SiC multilayers. Based on our findings, we have demonstrated an efficient and simple-to-implement corrosion barrier for Mg/SiC multilayers. The barrier consists of nanometer-scale Mg and Al layers that intermix spontaneously to form a partially amorphous Al-Mg layer and is shown to prevent atmospheric corrosion while maintaining the unique combination of favorable Mg/SiC reflective properties.

  14. Upper Temperature Limit of Environmental Barrier Coatings Based on Mullite and BSAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis S.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) for Si-based ceramics consist of three layers: a silicon bond coat, an intermediate mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) or mullite + BSAS (1-xBaO-xSrO-Al2O3-2SiO2) layer, and a BSAS top coat. Areas of concern for long-term durability are environmental durability, chemical compatibility, silica volatility, phase stability, and thermal conductivity. Variants of this family of EBCs were applied to monolithic SiC and melt infiltrated SiC/SiC composites. Reaction between BSAS and silica results in low melting (approx. 1300 C) glasses at T > 1400 C, which can cause the spallation of the EBC. At temperatures greater than 1400 C, the BSAS top coat also degrades by formation of a porous structure, and it suffers significant recession via silica volatilization in water vapor-containing atmospheres. All of these degradation mechanisms can be EBC life-limiting factors. BSAS undergoes a very sluggish phase transformation (hexagonal celsian to monoclinic celsian), the implications of which are not fully understood at this point. There was evidence of rapid sintering at temperatures as low as 1300 C, as inferred from the sharp increase in thermal conductivity.

  15. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  16. A method for in situ measurement of the elastic behavior of a columnar thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Novel experimental method providing mechanical properties for TBCs as input for lifetime models. → 3-point bending beams are cut by micro EDM from cross sections and loaded by custom setup. → Free digital image correlation Matlab functions are used in concert with FE simulations. → 7YSZ EB-PVD on NiCoCrAlY bond coat has in-plane modulus of 15-30GPa, no strain dependence. → TBC underwent brittle fracture at strains of 3.5-5.10-3. - Abstract: The mechanical behavior of a ceramic coating and the evolution of this behavior in-service play crucial roles in governing the performance and lifetime of these materials. A protocol is presented that allows for characterization of the in-plane elastic modulus and strain to failure of fragile ceramic coatings. The protocol employs digital image correlation (DIC) to measure time-resolved, full-field strain maps of bilayer microbeams, and material properties are extracted through direct comparison with finite element simulations of microbending experiments. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the measurement of the in-plane Young's modulus (ETBC = 15-30 GPa) and the strain to fracture (3.5-5 x 10-3) of electron beam physical vapor deposited 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The results from this study also indicate that the in-plane TBC modulus has no strain dependence when measured in tension.

  17. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  18. Facile approach in the development of icephobic hierarchically textured coatings as corrosion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, G.; Farzaneh, M.

    2014-04-01

    An anti-corrosion superhydrophobic film with water contact angle greater than 160° on aluminum alloy 6061 substrate was fabricated simply through the spin-coating method applied to Al2O3 nanoparticles doped in silicone rubber solution. The as-obtained sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and water contact angle/surface energy measurement. The corrosion behaviour of such coating in the NaCl solutions was investigated using the potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the developed superhydrophobic surface is improved greatly due to the composite wetting states or interfaces with numerous air pockets between its surface and the NaCl solution. This superhydrophobic coating could serve as an effective barrier against aggressive medium. Ice adhesion strength of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating was also evaluated by measuring its ice adhesion force which was found to have reduced by 4.8 times compared to that of aluminum substrate as reference test.

  19. CrN–Ag nanocomposite coatings: Control of lubricant transport by diffusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1-μm-thick self-lubricating CrN–Ag composite coatings containing 16 at.% Ag were deposited on Si substrates by reactive co-sputtering at Ts = 400 °C, and were covered with CrN cap layers with a columnar microstructure and a thickness d = 0–1000 nm. Vacuum annealing at Ta = 500 and 600 °C for 1 h causes Ag transport to the sample surface and the formation of Ag surface grains. Quantitative scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses show that increasing d from 0 to 10 to 100 nm for Ta = 500 °C leads to a decrease in the areal density of Ag surface grains from 0.86 to 0.45 to 0.04 μm−2, while their lateral size remains constant at 360 ± 60 nm. However, increasing Ta to 600 °C causes a doubling of the Ag grain size, and a 4–30 times larger overall Ag transport. These results are explained by kinetic barriers for Ag diffusion through the porous cap layer with a porosity that decreases with increasing d, resulting in an effective activation barrier for Ag transport that increases from 0.78 eV in the absence of a cap layer to 0.89 eV for d = 10 nm and 1.07 eV for d = 30 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile analyses of annealed layers reveal no detectable Ag within the CrN cap layer and a uniform depletion of the Ag reservoir throughout the composite coating thickness, indicating unhindered Ag transport within the composite. The overall results show that a CrN diffusion barrier cap layer is an effective approach to control Ag lubricant transport to the surface of CrN–Ag composite coatings. - Highlights: ► CrN–Ag composite coatings are capped with CrN diffusion barriers. ► Ag diffuses to the surface during annealing at 500 or 600 °C. ► The Ag transport is controlled by the cap thickness d = 0–1000 nm. ► The activation energy for Ag transport increases with increasing d.

  20. CrN-Ag nanocomposite coatings: Control of lubricant transport by diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papi, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Mulligan, C.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Benet Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189 (United States); Gall, D., E-mail: galld@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    1-{mu}m-thick self-lubricating CrN-Ag composite coatings containing 16 at.% Ag were deposited on Si substrates by reactive co-sputtering at T{sub s} = 400 Degree-Sign C, and were covered with CrN cap layers with a columnar microstructure and a thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Vacuum annealing at T{sub a} = 500 and 600 Degree-Sign C for 1 h causes Ag transport to the sample surface and the formation of Ag surface grains. Quantitative scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses show that increasing d from 0 to 10 to 100 nm for T{sub a} = 500 Degree-Sign C leads to a decrease in the areal density of Ag surface grains from 0.86 to 0.45 to 0.04 {mu}m{sup -2}, while their lateral size remains constant at 360 {+-} 60 nm. However, increasing T{sub a} to 600 Degree-Sign C causes a doubling of the Ag grain size, and a 4-30 times larger overall Ag transport. These results are explained by kinetic barriers for Ag diffusion through the porous cap layer with a porosity that decreases with increasing d, resulting in an effective activation barrier for Ag transport that increases from 0.78 eV in the absence of a cap layer to 0.89 eV for d = 10 nm and 1.07 eV for d = 30 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile analyses of annealed layers reveal no detectable Ag within the CrN cap layer and a uniform depletion of the Ag reservoir throughout the composite coating thickness, indicating unhindered Ag transport within the composite. The overall results show that a CrN diffusion barrier cap layer is an effective approach to control Ag lubricant transport to the surface of CrN-Ag composite coatings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CrN-Ag composite coatings are capped with CrN diffusion barriers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag diffuses to the surface during annealing at 500 or 600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ag transport is controlled by the cap thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The activation energy for Ag

  1. Process and performance of hot dip zinc coatings containing ZnO and Ni-P under layers as barrier protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new coating system of under layer for hot dip zinc coating was explored as an effective coating for steel especially for application in relatively high aggressive environments. The influence of different barrier layers formed prior to hot dip galvanization was investigated to optimize high performance protective galvanic coatings. The deposition of ZnO and Ni-P inner layers and characteristics of hotdip zinc coatings were explored in this study. The coating morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The hot dip zinc coatings containing under layer showed substantial improvement in their properties such as good adhesion, and high hardness. In addition, a decrease in the thickness of the coating layer and an enhancement of the corrosion resistance were found. Open circuit potential (OCP) of different galvanized layers in different corrosive media viz. 5% NaCl and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions at 25 ± 1 deg. C was measured as a function of time. A nobler OCP was exhibited for samples treated with ZnO and Ni than sample of pure Zn; this indicates a dissolution process followed by passivation due to the surface oxide formation. The high negative OCP can be attributed to the better alloying reaction between Zn and Fe and to the sacrificial nature of the top pure zinc layer.

  2. Properties of Whey-Protein-Coated Films and Laminates as Novel Recyclable Food Packaging Materials with Excellent Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of food packaging applications, high oxygen and water vapour barriers are the prerequisite conditions for preserving the quality of the products throughout their whole lifecycle. Currently available polymers and/or biopolymer films are mostly used in combination with barrier materials derived from oil based plastics or aluminium to enhance their low barrier properties. In order to replace these non-renewable materials, current research efforts are focused on the development of sustainable coatings, while maintaining the functional properties of the resulting packaging materials. This article provides an introduction to food packaging requirements, highlights prior art on the use of whey-based coatings for their barriers properties, and describes the key properties of an innovative packaging multilayer material that includes a whey-based layer. The developed whey protein formulations had excellent barrier properties almost comparable to the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH barrier layer conventionally used in food packaging composites, with an oxygen barrier (OTR of <2 [cm³(STP/(m²d bar] when normalized to a thickness of 100 μm. Further requirements of the barrier layer are good adhesion to the substrate and sufficient flexibility to withstand mechanical load while preventing delamination and/or brittle fracture. Whey-protein-based coatings have successfully met these functional and mechanical requirements.

  3. Environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability modeling using a progressive failure analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, Galib; Troha, William; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are getting the attention of most engine manufacturers and aerospace firms for turbine engine and other related applications. This is because of their potential weight advantage and performance benefits. As a protecting guard for these materials, a highly specialized form of environmental barrier coating (EBC) is being developed and explored for high temperature applications that are greater than 1100 °C1,2. The EBCs are typically a multilayer of coatings and are on the order of hundreds of microns thick. CMCs are generally porous materials and this feature is somewhat beneficial since it allows some desirable infiltration of the EBC. Their degradation usually includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix degradation which is generally seen at a higher temperature. A variety of factors such as residual stresses, coating process related flaws, and casting conditions may influence the strength of degradation. The cause of such defects which cause cracking and other damage is that not much energy is absorbed during fracture of these materials. Therefore, an understanding of the issues that control crack deflection and propagation along interfaces is needed to maximize the energy dissipation capabilities of layered ceramics. Thus, evaluating components and subcomponents made out of CMCs under gas turbine engine conditions is suggested to demonstrate that these material will perform as expected and required under these aggressive environmental circumstances. Progressive failure analysis (PFA) is applied to assess the damage growth of the coating under combined thermal and mechanical loading conditions. The PFA evaluation is carried out using a full-scale finite element model to account for the average material failure at the microscopic or macroscopic levels. The PFA life prediction evaluation identified the root cause for damage initiation and propagation. It indicated that delamination type damage

  4. Gas barrier properties of diamond-like carbon films coated on PTFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) using radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD). Before the DLC coating, the PTFE substrate was modified with a N2 plasma pre-treatment to enhance the adhesive strength of the DLC to the substrate. The influences of the N2 plasma pre-treatment and process pressure on the gas permeation properties of these DLC-coated PTFE samples were investigated. In the Raman spectra, the G peak position shifted to a lower wave number with increasing process pressure. With scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a network of microcracks was observed on the surface of the DLC film without N2 plasma pre-treatment. The density of these cracks decreased with increasing process pressure. In the film subjected to a N2 plasma pre-treatment, no cracks were observed at any process pressure. In the gas barrier test, the gas permeation decreased drastically with increasing film thickness and saturated at a thickness of 0.2 μm. The DLC-coated PTFE with the N2 plasma pre-treatment exhibited a greater reduction in gas permeation than did the samples without pre-treatment. For both sample types, gas permeation decreased with increasing process pressure.

  5. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  6. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  7. Energy Dependence of the Fusion Barrier for Heavy Nuclear Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZhu-xia; WUXi-zhen; TIANJun-long; WANGNing

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the fusion potential barrier for heavy nuclear systems is studied by means of the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. It is found that the fusion potential barrier experienced in a realistic fusion process (the dynamic fusion potential barrier) reduces with decrease of incident energies.

  8. Dual function of novel pollen coat (surface proteins: IgE-binding capacity and proteolytic activity disrupting the airway epithelial barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elfatih H Bashir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pollen coat is the first structure of the pollen to encounter the mucosal immune system upon inhalation. Prior characterizations of pollen allergens have focused on water-soluble, cytoplasmic proteins, but have overlooked much of the extracellular pollen coat. Due to washing with organic solvents when prepared, these pollen coat proteins are typically absent from commercial standardized allergenic extracts (i.e., "de-fatted", and, as a result, their involvement in allergy has not been explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a unique approach to search for pollen allergenic proteins residing in the pollen coat, we employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM to assess the impact of organic solvents on the structural integrity of the pollen coat. TEM results indicated that de-fatting of Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass pollen (BGP by use of organic solvents altered the structural integrity of the pollen coat. The novel IgE-binding proteins of the BGP coat include a cysteine protease (CP and endoxylanase (EXY. The full-length cDNA that encodes the novel IgE-reactive CP was cloned from floral RNA. The EXY and CP were purified to homogeneity and tested for IgE reactivity. The CP from the BGP coat increased the permeability of human airway epithelial cells, caused a clear concentration-dependent detachment of cells, and damaged their barrier integrity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an immunoproteomics approach, novel allergenic proteins of the BGP coat were identified. These proteins represent a class of novel dual-function proteins residing on the coat of the pollen grain that have IgE-binding capacity and proteolytic activity, which disrupts the integrity of the airway epithelial barrier. The identification of pollen coat allergens might explain the IgE-negative response to available skin-prick-testing proteins in patients who have positive symptoms. Further study of the role of these pollen coat proteins in allergic

  9. Compositionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coating by Hybrid Thermal Spraying Route and its Non-isothermal Oxidation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Subhasisa; Manna, Indranil; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna

    2013-08-01

    The present study concerns a detailed investigation of the characteristics and oxidation resistance property of a duplex and compositionally graded thermal barrier coating on Inconel 718. The duplex coating consists of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat layer sprayed on to sand-blasted Inconel 718 substrate (by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying) followed by deposition of a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat by plasma spraying. The compositionally graded coating consists of several layers deposited by plasma spraying of pre-mixed CoNiCrAlY and YSZ powders in the weight ratios of 70:30, 50:50, 30:70, and 0:100 varying from the bond coat to the top surface, respectively. A detailed investigation of the microstructure, composition, and phases in the coating and its non-isothermal oxidation behavior from room temperature to 1250°C was performed. Oxidation proceeds by three stages in the as-received Inconel 718 and the compositionally graded coating, but by two stages in the duplex coating with a maximum activation energy for oxidation in the compositionally graded coating at high temperature (stage III). The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation were established.

  10. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  11. Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

  12. The role of crosslinkers in epoxy-amine crosslinked silicon sol-gel barrier protection coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for chromate replacements in corrosion prevention materials has identified the use of hybrid sol-gel coatings as one, very promising approach. Appropriately functionalized hybrid sol-gel materials can be crosslinked to enhance their chemical durability and mechanical strength. In this work, we evaluate three crosslinkers used in a tetramethoxysilane-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane binary sol-gel system in order to identify the role of the crosslinkers in corrosion protection. The crosslinkers examined were ethylenediamine, N-aminethylepiperazine, and diethylenetriamine. The sol-gel coatings were examined by contact angle, atomic force microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Circuit modeling of the EIS results yielded valuable insights into the significant differences between the durabilities of the variously crosslinked coatings. Crosslinker hydrophobicity was identified as not playing a significant role whereas the number of reactive sites per crosslinker and the resulting morphology of the material may be an important parameter

  13. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  14. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  15. Luminescence-Based Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coating Health and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments in both air- and land-based turbine engines. For advanced turbine engines designed for higher temperature operation, a diagnostic capability for the health and performance of TBCs will be essential to indicate when a mitigating action needs to be taken before premature TBC failure threatens engine performance or safety. In particular, it is shown that rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers can be integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence emission that can be monitored to assess TBC erosion and delamination progression, and to map surface and subsurface temperatures as a measure of TBC performance. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers are presented.

  16. Optimization of the follow-up of thermal barriers coatings production obtained by plasma arc spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal barriers coatings are produced in series in a lot of industrial sectors: aeronautics, automobile or energetics. Each production requires a fast quality control at a reduced cost. The metallographic control on a polished section is an efficient mean to characterize deposits obtained by thermal spraying. As a control mean of production, it has to be at one and the same time easy, fast and reproducible. As a consequence, the organization of a control laboratory is of primary importance in order to minimize the costs and to produce with a good quality. In this work is presenting the organization of a control post after an optimization of each step following a user approach in terms of cost and ergonomics. (O.M.)

  17. Interface delamination of the thermal barrier coating subjected to local heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the possible failure modes of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) used to protect the scramjet combustion chamber, the local heating via laser beam irradiation was utilized to simulate the service condition of high thermal flux and high temperature gradient. Firstly, the experimental method and process were described and the typical fracture morphology of the TBC under test were provided. Then, the theoretical and finite element modeling were carried out to study the temperature, deformation and stresses of the specimen when the top ceramic coat was subjected to local heating, and to demonstrate the mechanism on the failure of the TBC. It is revealed that the interface delamination shall appear and ultimately lead to the failure of the TBC under such thermal loading of local quick heating. According to the outcome of this study, the driving force of the interface delamination is influenced greatly by the key structural parameters and performance matching. Moreover, by utilizing the rules of the effects of these parameters on the fracture driving force, there is some possibility for the designer to optimize the performances of the TBC.

  18. Depth-Penetrating Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J..; Allison, Stephen W.; Beshears, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors have been previously demonstrated to provide effective non-contact, emissivity-independent surface temperature measurements. Because of the translucent nature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), thermographic phosphor-based temperature measurements can be extended beyond the surface to provide depth-selective temperature measurements by incorporating the thermographic phosphor layer at the depth where the temperature measurement is desired. In this paper, thermographic phosphor (Y2O3:Eu) fluorescence decay time measurements are demonstrated to provide through-the-coating thickness temperature readings up to 1100 C with the phosphor layer residing beneath a 100 micron thick TBC (plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia). With an appropriately chosen excitation wavelength and detection configuration, it is shown that sufficient phosphor emission is generated to provide effective temperature measurements, despite the attenuation of both the excitation and emission intensities by the overlying TBC. This depth-penetrating temperature measurement capability should prove particularly useful for TBC diagnostics where a large thermal gradient is typically present across the TBC thickness. The fluorescence decay from the Y2O3:Eu layer exhibited both an initial short-term exponential rise and a longer-term exponential decay. The rise time constant was demonstrated to provide better temperature indication below 500 C while the decay time constant was a better indicator at higher temperatures.

  19. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  20. Thermal Radiation Effects Analyzed in Translucent Composite and Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic parts and coatings are needed to withstand high temperatures in advanced aircraft engines. In hot environments, such as in the combustion chambers of these engines, infrared and visible radiation can penetrate into some ceramics and heat them internally. The internal temperatures depend on radiative effects combined with heat conduction, and on convection and radiation at the material boundaries. Since engine temperatures are high, radiant emission can be large from within translucent parts and coatings, and this must be included in the analysis. Transient and steady-state behavior are both important. During a transient, radiant penetration provides more rapid internal heating than conduction alone, and the temperature distributions are usually considerably different than for steady-state conditions; this can produce transient thermal stresses. Analytical and numerical methods are being used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to predict transient temperatures and heat flows in translucent materials. A transient analysis was done for a composite of two translucent layers. The layer refractive indices were larger than 1, producing internal reflections at the boundaries and at the internal interface. In addition, steady-state results were computed for a two-layer composite with one layer opaque. The results were used to assess the importance of internal radiation in a zirconia thermal barrier coating on a cooled metal wall. Since the radiative transfer equations are rather complex, especially when internal scattering is included, approximate methods are being investigated that might be convenient for computer design programs. An approximate two-flux method was used and verified by comparisons with solutions that used exact radiative transfer relations. The two-flux equations include scattering without increasing solution difficulty.

  1. 热障涂层研究进展%RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学娇; 张骋; 张娜

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is a kind of high temperature protection coatings which has been widely used in the gas turbines and aviation engines to protect nickel-based blades, due to its excellences in thermal insulation property, heat-resistance, anti-oxidation and corrosion resistance as well as abrasion resistance. In this paper, the most recent research progresses and development tendency of TBCs were reviewed, by focusing on exploring and analyzing the main preparation techniques such as plasma spraying, electron beam physical vapor deposition, high velocity oxygen fuel method and high frequency pulse detonation method, etc. In addition, the failure mechanisms of the TBCs were also examined from the views of preparation procedure, phase transformation, coating structure and oxidation features.%热障涂层由于具有优良的隔热、耐高温、抗氧化腐蚀以及抗磨损等性能,已应用于燃气轮机、航空发动机的高温镍基金属叶片的隔热保护.对热障涂层最新研究进展及发展趋势进行了论述,着重探讨了有关热障涂层的几种主要制备工艺,包括等离子喷涂、电子束物理气相沉积、高速火焰喷涂以及高频脉冲爆炸喷涂,对比分析了各自特点;并从制备工艺、相变、结构、抗氧化性能等方面对热障涂层的失效机制进行了分析.

  2. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  3. Formation of Cr2O3 Diffusion Barrier Between Cr-Contained Stainless Steel and Cold-Sprayed Ni Coatings at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ya-Xin; Luo, Xiao-Tao; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach to prepare a coating system containing an in situ grown Cr2O3 diffusion barrier between a nickel top layer and 310SS was reported. Cold spraying was employed to deposit Ni(O) interlayer and top nickel coating on the Cr-contained stainless steel substrate. Ni(O) feedstock was prepared by mechanical alloying of pure nickel powders in ambient atmosphere, acting as an oxygen provider. The post-spray annealing was adopted to grow in situ Cr2O3 layer between the substrate and nickel coating. The results revealed that the diffusible oxygen can be introduced into nickel powders by mechanical alloying. The oxygen content increases to 3.25 wt.% with the increase of the ball milling duration to 8 h, while Ni(O) powders maintain a single phase of Ni. By annealing the sample in Ar atmosphere at 900 °C, a continuous Cr2O3 layer of 1-2 μm thick at the interface between 310SS and cold-sprayed Ni coating is formed. The diffusion barrier effect evaluation by thermal exposure at 750 °C shows that the Cr2O3 oxide layer effectively suppresses the outward diffusion of Fe and Cr in the substrate effectively.

  4. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  5. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report presents the interpretation of data obtained (up to November 1, 1988) from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test site. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for the field tests for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities, at a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site in Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the tests is to provide the basis for determining whether tests planned for Yucca Mountain have the potential to be successful. Thirteen chapters discuss the following: mapping the electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate of the rock mass; changes in moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe; characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the heater borehole; electrical resistance heater installed in a 30-cm borehole; relative humidity measurements; the operation, design, construction, calibration, and installation of a microwave circuit that might provide partial pressure information at temperatures in excess of 200 degree C (392 degree F); pressure and temperature measurements in the G-Tunnel; the moisture collection system, which attempts to collect steam that migrates into the heater borehole; The borehole television and borescope surveys that were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes; preliminary scoping calculations of the hydrothermal conditions expected for this prototype test; the Data Acquisition System; and the results of the PEBSFT, preliminary interpretations of these results, and plans for the remainder of the test. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  6. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT

  7. Fluctuating Potential Barrier System with Correlated Spatial Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study a fluctuating potential barrier system with correlated spatial noises. Study shows that for this system, there is the resonant activation over the fluctuating potential barrier, and that the correlation between the different spatial noises can enhance (or weaken) the resonant activation.

  8. Brain barrier systems: a new frontier in metal neurotoxicological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of brain barriers or a brain barrier system embraces the blood-brain interface, referred to as the blood-brain barrier, and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interface, referred to as the blood-CSF barrier. These brain barriers protect the CNS against chemical insults, by different complementary mechanisms. Toxic metal molecules can either bypass these mechanisms or be sequestered in and therefore potentially deleterious to brain barriers. Supportive evidence suggests that damage to blood-brain interfaces can lead to chemical-induced neurotoxicities. This review article examines the unique structure, specialization, and function of the brain barrier system, with particular emphasis on its toxicological implications. Typical examples of metal transport and toxicity at the barriers, such as lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn), are discussed in detail with a special focus on the relevance to their toxic neurological consequences. Based on these discussions, the emerging research needs, such as construction of the new concept of blood-brain regional barriers, understanding of chemical effect on aged or immature barriers, and elucidation of the susceptibility of tight junctions to toxicants, are identified and addressed in this newly evolving field of neurotoxicology. They represent both clear challenges and fruitful research domains not only in neurotoxicology, but also in neurophysiology and pharmacology

  9. MnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel chromium barrier coatings for SOFC interconnect by HVOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerbom, J.; Varis, T.; Pihlatie, M.; Himanen, O.; Saarinen, V.; Kiviaho, J.; Turunen, E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Puranen, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Inst. of Materials Science

    2010-07-01

    Chromia released from steel parts used for interconnect plates by evaporation and condensation can quickly degrade the cell (cathode) performance in solid oxide fuel cell SOFC. Coatings on top of the IC plate can work as a chromium evaporation barrier. The coating material should have good electrical conductivity, high temperature stability and nearly the same coefficient of thermal expansion as the cell materials. One candidate for the coating material is MnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel because of its suitable properties. High velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) spraying was used for the coating application on Crofer 22 APU steel samples. Using commercial and self made spray dried powders together with an HV2000 spray gun it was possible to successfully manufacture, well adhering, dense and reasonably uniform coatings. The samples were tested in oxidation exposure tests in air followed by post analysis in SEM. Powders and coatings microstructures are presented here, both before and after exposure. It was found out that together with spraying parameters the powder characteristics used influence clearly to the coating quality. Especially as very thin coatings was aimed with dense structure fine powders was found to be essential. (orig.)

  10. Relationship Between Lamellar Structure and Elastic Modulus of Thermally Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Intra-splat Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Rong; Lv, Bo-Wen; Yang, Guan-Jun; Zhang, Wei-Xu; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-12-01

    The elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed top coating plays an important role in thermal cyclic lifetime of thermally sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), since the thermal stress is determined by the substrate/coating thermal mismatch and the elastic modulus of top coating. Consequently, much attention had been paid to understanding the relationship between elastic modulus and lamellar structure of top coating. However, neglecting the intra-splat cracks connected with inter-splat pores often leads to poor prediction in in-plane modulus. In this study, a modified model taking account of intra-splat cracks and other main structural characteristics of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was proposed. Based on establishing the relationship between elastic modulus and structural parameters of basic unit, effects of structural parameters on the elastic modulus of coatings were discussed. The predicted results are well consistent with experimental data on coating elastic modulus in both out-plane direction and in-plane direction. This study would benefit the further comprehensive understanding of failure mechanism of TBCs in thermal cyclic condition.

  11. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER reg-sign, and VAC-PAC reg-sign. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER reg-sign uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC reg-sign vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout

  12. In-situ defect detection systems for R2R flexible PV barrier films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Muhamedsalih, H.; Tang, D.; Elrawemi, M.; Blunt, L.; Jiang, X.; Edge, S.; Bird, D.; Hollis, P.

    2015-08-01

    Film processing procedures by means of Roll-to-Roll (R2R) for barrier coatings can often result in PV barrier films being manufactured with significant quantities of defects, which results in lower efficiency and a short life span. In order to improve the process yield and product efficiency, it is desirable to develop an inspection system that can detect transparent barrier film defects in the production line during film processing. Off-line detection of defects in transparent PV barrier films is difficult and time consuming. Consequently, implementing an accurate in-situ defects inspection system in the production environment is even more challenging, since the requirements on positioning, fast measurement, long term stability and robustness against environmental disturbance are demanding. This paper reports on the development and deployment of two in-situ PV barrier films defect detection systems, one based on wavelength scanning interferometry (WSI) and the other on White Light Channeled Spectral Interferometry (WLCSI), and the integration into an R2R film processing line at the Centre for Process Innovation (CPI). The paper outlines the environmental vibration strategy for both systems, and the developed auto-focusing methodology for WSI. The systems have been tested and characterised and initial results compared to laboratory-based instrumentation are presented.

  13. Engineered barrier systems and the safety of deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate the waste from the biosphere. This multi-barrier system typically comprises the natural geological barrier provided by the repository host rock and an engineered barrier system (EBS). The EBS project being conducted by the NEA Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) seeks to clarify the role that an EBS can play in the overall safety case for a deep geological repository. It is in this context that the European Commission and the NEA have prepared the present report, which describes the state of the art for engineered barrier systems and provides a common basis of understanding from which to plan future programmes. It is based on answers to a questionnaire received from 13 countries and 17 organisations. (author)

  14. Novel coating systems based on PVD for steel sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhmacher, B. [Dortmunder Oberflaechenzentrum GmbH (DOC) von Thyssen Krupp Stahl (Germany); Ehlers, K.D. [Salzgitter AG, Stahl und Technologie (Germany); Flossdorf, F.J. [Verein Deutscher Eisenhuettenwerke (VDEh) (Germany). Fachbereich Werkstofftechnik; Hagler, J. [Vereinigte Oesterreichische Eisen- und Stahlwerke AG (VOeST)-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau GmbH, Linz (Austria); Metzner, C.; Scheffel, B. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik (FEP), Dresden (Germany); Steffen, R. [Stahlwerke Bremen GmbH (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Physical vapour deposition (PVD) in combination with conventional coating processes such as hot-dip coating or electrolytic deposition offers interesting development approaches for novel steel strip coating systems. In joint-research projects of several German and Austrian steel companies with the Fraunhofer-Institute for Electron-beam and Plasma technology (FEP) different promising approaches for new PVD-coated steel sheet products, in particular in combination with conventional coating processes have been investigated. For an industrial application challenges particularly remain in terms of process development, i.e. to integrate PVD coating-processes into conventional steel strip coating lines. (orig.)

  15. Phase Transformation on Interface between NiCoCrAlY Bond Coat and Substrate and Study of Thermal Barrier Coating as High Temperature Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Purwaningsih

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal Barrier Coating material consists of Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ as a top coat and bond coat NiCoCrAlY. It is used to protect NiCoCrAlY super alloys for high temperature applications due to its corrosion resistant properties and resistance to thermal fatigue. In the present study, top coat and bond coat were deposited on the substrate using plasma spraying process, followed by thermal fatigue treatment, by heating up to 900 oC for 5 hours and cooling down to 25 oC for 15 minutes, this process called one cycle. Thermal fatigue was conducted until the material failure. Electron microscope was used to analysis microstructure of the sample after thermal fatigue and x-ray diffraction to analysis phase changed on the interface between bond coat and substrate. The result showed that the specimens failed at 42 cycles (210 hours. A new phase identified as Ni3Al was formed.

  16. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Diosdado [Departamento de Física, Universidad Central “Marta Abreu” de Las Villas, CP 54830, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); León-Pérez, Fernando de [Centro Universitario de la Defensa de Zaragoza, Ctra. de Huesca s/n, E-50090 Zaragoza (Spain); Pérez-Álvarez, R. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209 Cuernavaca (Mexico); Arriaga, J., E-mail: arriaga@ifuap.buap.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit–Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices.

  17. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma polymerization in argon/n-hexane gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films were deposited by RF plasma polymerization in argon/n-hexane gas mixture on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils. It was found that such deposited films may significantly improve the barrier properties of PET. It was demonstrated that the principal parameter that influences barrier properties of such deposited films towards oxygen and water vapor is the density of the coatings. Moreover, it was shown that for achieving good barrier properties it is advantageous to deposit coatings with very low thickness. According to the presented results, optimal thickness of the coating should not be higher than several tens of nm. - Highlights: • a-C:H films were prepared by plasma polymerization in Ar/n-hexane atmosphere. • Barrier properties of coatings are dependent on their density and thickness. • Highest barrier properties were observed for films with thickness 15 nm

  18. Comparison of coating processes in the development of aluminum-based barriers for blanket applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, Sven-Erik, E-mail: sven-erik.wulf@kit.edu; Krauss, Wolfgang; Konys, Jürgen

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Electrochemical processes ECA and ECX are suitable for Al deposition on RAFM steels. •ECA and ECX are able to produce thin Al layers with adjustable thicknesses. •All aluminization processes need a subsequent heat treatment. •Scales made by ECA or ECX exhibit reduced thicknesses compared to HDA. •ECX provides higher flexibility compared to ECA to produce scales on RAFM steels. -- Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFM), e.g. Eurofer 97, are envisaged in future fusion technology as structural material, which will be in direct contact with a flowing liquid lead–lithium melt serving as breeder material. Aluminum-based barrier layers had proven their ability to protect the structural material from corrosion attack in flowing Pb–15.7Li and to reduce tritium permeation into the coolant. Coming from scales produced by hot dipping aluminization (HDA), the development of processes based on electrochemical methods to produce defined aluminum-based scales on RAFM steels gained attention in research during the last years. Two different electrochemical processes are proposed: The first one, referred to as ECA process, is based on the electrodeposition of aluminum from volatile, metal-organic electrolytes. The other process called ECX is based on ionic liquids. All three processes exhibit specific characteristics, for example in the field of processability, control of coating thicknesses (low activation criteria) and heat treatment behavior. The aim of this article is to compare these different coating processes critically, whereby the focus is on the comparison of ECA and ECX processes. New results for ECX-process will be presented and occurring development needs for the future will be discussed.

  19. Comparison of coating processes in the development of aluminum-based barriers for blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Electrochemical processes ECA and ECX are suitable for Al deposition on RAFM steels. •ECA and ECX are able to produce thin Al layers with adjustable thicknesses. •All aluminization processes need a subsequent heat treatment. •Scales made by ECA or ECX exhibit reduced thicknesses compared to HDA. •ECX provides higher flexibility compared to ECA to produce scales on RAFM steels. -- Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFM), e.g. Eurofer 97, are envisaged in future fusion technology as structural material, which will be in direct contact with a flowing liquid lead–lithium melt serving as breeder material. Aluminum-based barrier layers had proven their ability to protect the structural material from corrosion attack in flowing Pb–15.7Li and to reduce tritium permeation into the coolant. Coming from scales produced by hot dipping aluminization (HDA), the development of processes based on electrochemical methods to produce defined aluminum-based scales on RAFM steels gained attention in research during the last years. Two different electrochemical processes are proposed: The first one, referred to as ECA process, is based on the electrodeposition of aluminum from volatile, metal-organic electrolytes. The other process called ECX is based on ionic liquids. All three processes exhibit specific characteristics, for example in the field of processability, control of coating thicknesses (low activation criteria) and heat treatment behavior. The aim of this article is to compare these different coating processes critically, whereby the focus is on the comparison of ECA and ECX processes. New results for ECX-process will be presented and occurring development needs for the future will be discussed

  20. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they

  1. Internal transport barrier physics in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron internal transport barrier (eITB) has been observed in wide range of helical systems, such as CHS [eg.,1], LHD [eg., 2], TJ-II [eg., 3] and W7-AS [eg., 4]. The eITB isA defined as highly peaked electron temperature (Te) profile with strongly positive radial electric field (Er) in the central region. These observations are reviewed in this paper to understand the device-independent common findings and also to draw the main differences. This is the first report from the International Stellarator Profile Database Activity. The formation of the strong central positive Er has been understood mainly as a result of the ambipolarity of neoclassical electron and ion fluxes, although some additional convective electron flux such as driven by ECRH is required in some situations. This 'neoclassical' physics peculiar to low collisional regime of helical plasmas provides the commonly observed existence of the ECRH power threshold (which is also depending on the density). This is contrastive characteristics to the ITB observed in tokamaks. The dependence of the ECRH power threshold on the magnetic configuration and on the heating scenario among these devices are currently being examined by taking the effective ripple and the trapped particle fraction as parameters to achieve the comprehensive understanding. The roles of low order rational surfaces on the onset of eITB formation and also on its radial size (location of the footpoint of the eITB) have been indicated in inward shifted configurations in LHD (depending on the relative locations of heating position and 2/1 island) and TJ-II (eITB becomes possible at higher density when 3/2 rational is introduced in the plasma core region). It is speculated that, for the latter case, the resonance causes an extra electron flux to trigger the positive Er. The interplay between low order rational surfaces and the formation of eITB still waits for the systematic experiment and theoretical analysis. The external controllability

  2. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project

  3. Novel Oxygen Scavenger Systems for Functional Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Demicheva, Mariia

    2015-01-01

    This thesis work was aimed at developing a novel oxygen scavenging material suitable for being used in functional coatings. It provided an overview of existing oxygen scavenging systems and technologies, and defined the restriction in using them for food applications. The major objective of this study was creating, optimizing and testing oxygen scavenging substances based on polybutadiene. The study was conducted in October 2014 – January 2015 at Evonik Industries AG situated in Hanau, German...

  4. Manufacturing and testing of fuel cans with barrier coating for LWR type reactors in USA and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers on manufacturing methods for fuel cans of zircalloy with barrier coating of zirconium prepared by pressing an internal tube into external one as well as by pressing of two-layer tubes with further rolling are reviewed. Heat treatment based on creation of the assigned gradient of temperature over tube wall cross section in order to change the structure of a thin layer of the outside surfce when conserving the initial structure of the rest cross section is developed to increase corrosion resistance. Eddy current and ultrasound methods for control of quality and thickness of the barrier layer of zirconium are used

  5. Seismic impact on engineered barrier system of geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seismic impacts on the engineered barrier system of the geological disposal were examined by means of the three-dimensional elastic-plastic seismic response analysis based on effective stress method. In this study, it was evaluated against the largest ground motions recorded in Japan. The numerical analysis results showed that the engineered barrier system and the surrounding bedrock were shaken together and it had sufficient robustness for the failure state. Thus we confirmed the low possibility of a reduction in the mechanical stability of the engineered barrier system due to the ground motion. (author)

  6. Chemical and mechanical consequences of environmental barrier coating exposure to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, B.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Almer, J. D.; Kang, L.; Faber, K. (X-Ray Science Division); (NASA Glenn Research Center); (Univ. of Seville); (Rolls-Royce Corp.); (Northwestern Univ.)

    2011-06-01

    The success of Si-based ceramics as high-temperature structural materials for gas turbine applications relies on the use of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with low silica activity, such as Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BSAS), which protect the underlying components from oxidation and corrosion in combustion environments containing water vapor. One of the current challenges concerning EBC lifetime is the effect of sandy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass that melt during engine operation and react with the EBC, changing both its composition and stress state. In this work, we study the effect of CMAS exposure at 1300 C on the residual stress state and composition in BSAS-mullite-Si-SiC multilayers. Residual stresses were measured in BSAS multilayers exposed to CMAS for different times using high-energy X-ray diffraction. Their microstructure was studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Our results show that CMAS dissolves the BSAS topcoat preferentially through the grain boundaries, dislodging the grains and changing the residual stress state in the topcoat to a nonuniform and increasingly compressive stress state with increasing exposure time. The presence of CMAS accelerates the hexacelsian-to-celsian phase transformation kinetics in BSAS, which reacts with the glass by a solution-reprecipitation mechanism. Precipitates have crystallographic structures consistent with Ca-doped celsian and Ba-doped anorthite.

  7. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  8. Influence of Topcoat-Bondcoat Interface Roughness on Stresses and Lifetime in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Skogsberg, K.; Nylén, P.

    2014-01-01

    Failure in Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is associated with the thermo-mechanical stresses developing due to the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer growth and thermal expansion mismatch during thermal cycling. The interface roughness has been shown to play a major role in the development of these induced stresses and lifetime of TBCs. Modeling has been shown as an effective tool to understand the effect of interface roughness on induced stresses. In the previous work done by our research group, it was observed that APS bondcoats performed better than the bondcoats sprayed with High Velocity Oxy-Fuel process which is contrary to the present literature data. The objective of this work was to understand this observed difference in lifetime with the help of finite element modeling by using real surface topographies. Different TGO layer thicknesses were evaluated. The modeling results were also compared with existing theories established on simplified sinusoidal profiles published in earlier works. It was shown that modeling can be used as an effective tool to understand the stress behavior in TBCs with different roughness profiles.

  9. Depth-Selective Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bencic, T. J.; Allison, S. W.; Beshears, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors have been previously demonstrated to provide effective non- contact, emissivity-independent surface temperature measurements. Because of the translucent nature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), thermographic-phosphor-based temperature measurements can be extended beyond the surface to provide depth-selective temperature measurements by incorporating the thermographic phosphor layer at the depth where the temperature measurement is desired. In this paper, the use of thermographic phosphor (Y2O3:Eu) luminescence decay time measurements is demonstrated for the first time for through-the-thickness temperature readings up to 1000 C with the phosphor placed beneath a 100-micron-thick TBC (plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia). With an appropriately chosen excitation wavelength and detection configuration, it is shown that sufficient phosphor emission is generated to provide effective temperature measurements, despite the attenuation of both the excitation and emission intensities by the overlying TBC. This depth-selective temperature measurement capability should prove particularly useful for TBC diagnostics, where a large thermal gradient is typically present across the TBC thickness.

  10. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  11. Hot corrosion behavior of Yttria and ceria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal Barrier Coating(TBC) is generally applied to turbine engines in order to protect metallic components from high temperatures, and thus, to increase the combustion efficiency. Most widely used Yttria Stabilized Zirconia(YSZ; ZrO2-8 wt.%Y2O3) have the poor resistance to hot corrosion under the operating conditions of low quality fuel and sea or desert environments. In order to overcome this problem, Ceria Stabilized Zirconia (CSZ; ZrO2-25 wt.%CeO2-2.5 wt.%Y2O3) has been suggested as a new protective materials for the TBC. In this study, duplex type YSZ-and CSZ-TBCs with similar microstructure were fabricated by detonation gun spraying. High temperature corrosion tests of the TBC specimens, on which NaVO3 salt were pasted, were performed at 900 .deg. C. Results showed that CSZ TBCs is more resistant to NaVO3 salt than YSZ TBCs in terms of phase stability and overall damage by salt. Studies in effects of microstructure indicate that YSZ and CSZ TBCs are degraded by different behavior of stabilizer during the tests and microstructure of TBCs, such as pores, micro cracks and splat boundaries, plays an important role in hot corrosion. From the results stepwise microscopic degradation mechanism of zirconia based TBCs by hot corrosion was discussed

  12. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  13. Heat Transfer Through Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings in Gas Turbines: A Review of Recent Work

    OpenAIRE

    Golosnoy, I.O.; Cipitria, A; Clyne, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    A review is presented of how heat transfer takes place in plasma-sprayed (zirconia-based) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during operation of gas turbines. These characteristics of TBCs are naturally of central importance to their function. Current state-of-the-art TBCs have relatively high levels of porosity (~15%) and the pore architecture (i.e., its morphology, connectivity, and scale) has a strong influence on the heat flow. Contributions from convective, conductive, and radiative heat tr...

  14. Micromechanical Simulation of Thermal Cyclic Behavior of ZrO2/Ti Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Hideaki Tsukamoto

    2015-01-01

    This study numerically investigates cyclic thermal shock behavior of ZrO2/Ti functionally graded thermal barrier coatings (FG TBCs) based on a nonlinear mean-field micromechanical approach, which takes into account the time-independent and dependent inelastic deformation, such as plasticity of metals, creep of metals and ceramics, and diffusional mass flow at the ceramic/metal interface. The fabrication processes for the FG TBCs have been also considered in the simulation. The effect of creep...

  15. John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System Approximate Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS) data set, produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), contains areas designated as undeveloped coastal...

  16. Microfibrillated cellulose and borax as mechanical, O2-barrier, and surface-modulating agents of pullulan biocomposite coatings on BOPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Carlo A; Campanella, Gaetano; Türe, Hasan; Olsson, Richard T; Farris, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional composite coatings on bi-oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films were obtained using borax and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) added to the main pullulan coating polymer. Spectroscopy analyses suggested that a first type of interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between the C6OH group of pullulan and the hydroxyl groups of boric acid, while monodiol and didiol complexation represented a second mechanism. The deposition of the coatings yielded an increase in the elastic modulus of the entire plastic substrate (from ∼2GPa of the neat BOPP to ∼3.1GPa of the P/B+/MFC-coated BOPP). The addition of MFC yielded a decrease of both static and kinetic coefficients of friction of approximately 22% and 25%, respectively, as compared to the neat BOPP. All composite coatings dramatically increased the oxygen barrier performance of BOPP, especially under dry conditions. The deposition of the high hydrophilic coatings allowed to obtain highly wettable surfaces (water contact angle of ∼18°). PMID:27083358

  17. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polymers by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas barrier characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin films coated on polymer sheets using the large-area surface-wave plasma (SWP) were studied. With SWP in He and CH4 gas mixture, a-C:H films were deposited over about 100 mm in diameter on high density polyethylene or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets at temperature less than 70 deg. C. Experimental results show that gas permeation in the case of a-C:H film coating on PET sheet was reduced by a factor of more than 150 (0.27 cm3/m2 day atm), compared with that before coating. Plasma characteristics of SWP, such as electron density and electron energy distribution functions, and other film characteristics measured with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope are presented and discussed

  18. Status of R and D on tritium permeation barrier coatings for tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper overviews the recent progress in the application of several typical tritium permeation barrier (TPB) coatings and their corresponding fabrication technologies for tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor. According to the design requirements of CN HCCB-TBM and DFLL-TBM. China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) and cooperation u nits have made great progresses in TPB coatings on the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel substrate. Some typical TPB coatings, such as FeAl/Al2O3, Er2O3, Y2O3 and Al2O3, have been prepared by pack aluminizing plus pre-oxidizing, Sol-Gel and MOCVD processes. The results showed that all major properties, including micro- properties, gas permeation reduction factor, electrical insulation properties etc., meet basically the requirements. (authors)

  19. Thermal barrier coatings on laser surface modified AISI H13 tool steel using atmospheric plasma spray technique

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, M. S.; Aqida, S. N.; Mohd Toff, Mohd Razi; Brabazon, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating deposition on laser surface modified H13 tool steel using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) technique. A Praxair Plasma Spray System with SG-100 gun was used to deposit coating materials on laser-modified H13 tool steel substrate surface. A bond coat layer material was NiCrAlY alloy while the top coat was yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with powder size distribution range of -106 μm to +45 μm. A 23 design of experiment (DOE) was used ...

  20. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  1. The influence of the structures and compounds of DLC coatings on the barrier properties of PET bottles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reduce the oxygen transmission rate through a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle (an organic plastic) diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on the inner surface of the PET bottle were deposited by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology with C2H2 as the source of carbon and Ar as the diluted gas. As the barrier layer to humidity and gas permeation, this paper analyses the DLC film structure, composition, morphology and barrier properties by Fourier transform infrared, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and oxygen transmission rate in detail. From the spectrum, it is found that the DLC film mainly consists of sp3 bonds. The barrier property of the films is significantly relevant to the sp3 bond concentration in the coating, the film thickness and morphology. Additionally, it is found that DLC film deposited in an inductively coupled plasma enhanced capacitively coupled plasma source shows a compact, homogeneous and crack-free surface, which is beneficial for a good gas barrier property in PET bottles. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  2. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  3. Adhesion strength of sputter deposited diffusion barrier layer coatings for the use in U–Mo nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Schmid@Areva.com; Dirndorfer, S.; Juranowitsch, H.; Kress, M.; Petry, W.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Pull-off tests are used to assess the adhesion strength of nuclear fuel diffusion barriers. • Co-rolled, sputter deposited and C2TWP barriers are tested and compared. • Sputter deposited barriers show similar adhesion strength compared to other types. - Abstract: Advanced designs for high-density U–Mo/Al nuclear fuel feature an interfacial barrier layer between the U–Mo fuel bulk and the Al cladding, which is intended to avoid the formation of an irradiation induced diffusion layer (IDL). Sputter deposition was suggested as a method to apply such interfacial barriers to the U–Mo/Al fuel system. We investigated the adhesion strength of sputter deposited Ti, Zr, Zry-4, Nb and Ta barrier layers of 15–20 μm thickness in the U–Mo/Al system by pull-off tests. The adhesion strength is a measure for the robustness of a diffusion barrier layer against delaminating due to inner stresses. We found, that the adhesion strength of sputter deposited diffusion barrier layers is at least similar or even better compared to both the adhesion strength of barrier layers produced by the INL co-rolling process and the fuel-to-cladding adhesion strength achieved by the AREVA-CERCA C2TWP process.

  4. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres

  5. Influence of deposition conditions on the microstructure of Al-based coatings for applications as corrosion and anti-permeation barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electrochemical Al deposition is industrially relevant for barrier formation. • Al coatings have to be converted into protective layers by heat treatments. • Morphology of Al coatings made by ECX process depends on deposition parameters. • Heat treatment behavior depends on the morphology of the coating produced by ECX. • ECX is proven to produce layer sequences on Eurofer similar to HDA and ECA process. -- Abstract: Previous research revealed that the application of aluminum-based barriers is suitable to minimize corrosion rates of Eurofer steel in Pb–15.7Li and tritium-permeation from the liquid breeder into the cooling system (HCLL) in an envisaged future fusion reactor. Besides the former developed hot-dip-aluminization process (HDA), electrodeposition techniques based on water-free electrolytes, such as toluene-based electrolytes (ECA) and ionic liquids (ECX), showed promising results for the production of suitable aluminum layers. These processes allow electrodeposition of Al-layers on Eurofer steel with adjustable layer thicknesses, but a heat treatment procedure is needed afterwards to form the desired Fe–Al/Alumina scale. To investigate the deposition and treatment process in more detail, a new series of aluminum electroplating was performed by using the ECX process. The variation of deposition parameters (direct and pulsed current) showed clear impact on the morphology of deposited Al-layers. Heat treatments revealed that the formation of Fe–Al barriers is significantly influenced by the morphology of deposits, beyond other parameters like layer thickness. Presented metallographic and SEM/EDX analyses underline the occurred dependencies between deposition conditions and morphology and on the other hand Al-layer morphology and heat treatment behavior

  6. Influence of deposition conditions on the microstructure of Al-based coatings for applications as corrosion and anti-permeation barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, Sven-Erik, E-mail: sven-erik.wulf@kit.edu; Holstein, Nils; Krauss, Wolfgang; Konys, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Electrochemical Al deposition is industrially relevant for barrier formation. • Al coatings have to be converted into protective layers by heat treatments. • Morphology of Al coatings made by ECX process depends on deposition parameters. • Heat treatment behavior depends on the morphology of the coating produced by ECX. • ECX is proven to produce layer sequences on Eurofer similar to HDA and ECA process. -- Abstract: Previous research revealed that the application of aluminum-based barriers is suitable to minimize corrosion rates of Eurofer steel in Pb–15.7Li and tritium-permeation from the liquid breeder into the cooling system (HCLL) in an envisaged future fusion reactor. Besides the former developed hot-dip-aluminization process (HDA), electrodeposition techniques based on water-free electrolytes, such as toluene-based electrolytes (ECA) and ionic liquids (ECX), showed promising results for the production of suitable aluminum layers. These processes allow electrodeposition of Al-layers on Eurofer steel with adjustable layer thicknesses, but a heat treatment procedure is needed afterwards to form the desired Fe–Al/Alumina scale. To investigate the deposition and treatment process in more detail, a new series of aluminum electroplating was performed by using the ECX process. The variation of deposition parameters (direct and pulsed current) showed clear impact on the morphology of deposited Al-layers. Heat treatments revealed that the formation of Fe–Al barriers is significantly influenced by the morphology of deposits, beyond other parameters like layer thickness. Presented metallographic and SEM/EDX analyses underline the occurred dependencies between deposition conditions and morphology and on the other hand Al-layer morphology and heat treatment behavior.

  7. Effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang-liang; Meng, Hui-min; Liang, Li-kang; Li, Sen; Shi, Jin-hui

    2015-10-01

    LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were applied to carbon steels with a NiCoCrAlY bond coat by plasma spraying. The effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 TBCs were investigated in 3.5wt% NaCl solution using polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that a large number of cracks are found in the LaMgAl11O19 TBCs after the samples are heat-treated, including some through-thickness cracks. The corrosion forms of the as-sprayed and heat-treated TBCs are uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion, respectively. The as-sprayed TBCs exhibit three EIS time constants after being immersed for less than 7 d, and then a new time constant appears because of steel substrate corrosion. When the immersion time is increased to 56 d, a Warburg impedance ( W) component appears in the EIS data. The EIS data for the heat-treated TBCs exhibit only two time constants after the samples are immersed for less than 14 d, and a new time constant appears when the immersion time is increased further. The heat treatment reduces the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 TBCs. The corrosion products are primarily γ-FeOOH and Fe3O4.

  8. Detection of segmentation cracks in top coat of thermal barrier coatings during plasma spraying by non-contact acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous cracks can be observed in the top coat of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) method. These cracks can be classified into vertical and horizontal ones and they have opposite impact on the properties of TBCs. Vertical cracks reduce the residual stress in the top coat and provide strain tolerance. On the contrary, horizontal cracks trigger delamination of the top coat. However, monitoring methods of cracks generation during APS are rare even though they are strongly desired. Therefore, an in situ, non-contact and non-destructive evaluation method for this objective was developed in this study with the laser acoustic emission (AE) technique by using laser interferometers as a sensor. More AE events could be detected by introducing an improved noise reduction filter and AE event detection procedures with multiple thresholds. Generation of vertical cracks was successfully separated from horizontal cracks by a newly introduced scanning pattern of a plasma torch. Thus, generation of vertical cracks was detected with certainty by this monitoring method because AE events were detected only during spraying and a positive correlation was observed between the development degree of vertical cracks and the total AE energy in one experiment. (paper)

  9. High-resolution reconstruction of a coastal barrier system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a detailed reconstruction of the sedimentary effects of Holocene sea-level rise on a modern coastal barrier system (CBS). Increasing concern over the evolution of CBSs due to future accelerated rates of sea-level rise calls for a better understanding of coastal barriers respon...... accumulation shows considerable variation with periods of rapid sediment deposition and periods of non-deposition or erosion resulting in a highly punctuated sediment record....

  10. Thermal barrier coating of lanthanum-zirconium-cerium composite oxide made by electron beam-physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthanum-zirconium-cerium composite oxide (La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7, LZ7C3) as a candidate material for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was prepared by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The composition, crystal structure, thermophysical properties, surface and cross-sectional morphologies and cyclic oxidation behavior of the LZ7C3 coating were studied. The results indicated that LZ7C3 has a high phase stability between 298 K and 1573 K, and its linear thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) is similar to that of zirconia containing 8 wt% yttria (8YSZ). The thermal conductivity of LZ7C3 is 0.87 W m-1 K-1 at 1273 K, which is almost 60% lower than that of 8YSZ. The deviation of coating composition from the ingot can be overcome by the addition of excess CeO2 and ZrO2 during ingot preparation or by adjusting the process parameters. The failure of the LZ7C3 coating is mainly a result of the occurrence of micro-cracks inside ceramic topcoat, which cause the abnormal oxidation of bond coat.

  11. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion

  12. Effect of thermal treatment on nano-crystallites and phase transformation of CaZrO/sub 3/ thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are multilayered coatings having the complex structure. In thermal spray coatings characteristic features of deposited molten particle and its microstructure is very important in defining coating properties. In this work stainless steel (AISI 316) was used as substrate material on which bond coat of Ni-20Cr and top coat of CaZrO/sub 3/ were deposited by air plasma spraying method. Effect of isothermal treatment on the internal microstructure structure of lamella (splat) and phase changes in CaZrO/sub 3/ coating was studied. The fractured surface of coatings was investigated to observe the splat morphology. It was observed that the nano crystallites present within the splat grew with increase in temperature. Further, the monoclinic phase was formed as function of temperature and time. (author)

  13. Subsurface barrier validation with the SEAtrace{trademark} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn; William Lowry; Veraun Chipman

    1999-09-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, Science and Engineering Associates has completed development and testing of a subsurface barrier verification and monitoring system. This system, called SEAtrace{trademark}, is able to locate and size leaks with a high degree of accuracy in subsurface barriers that are emplaced in an unsaturated medium. It uses gaseous tracer injection, in-field real-time monitoring, and real time data analysis to evaluate barrier integrity. The approach is: Conservative as it measures vapor leaks in a containment system whose greatest risk is posed by liquid leaks; Applicable to any impermeable type of barrier emplacement technology in the unsaturated zone; Inexpensive as it uses readily available, non-toxic, nonhazardous gaseous tracers, does not require an inordinately large number of sampling points, and injection and sampling points can be emplaced by direct push techniques; Capable of assessing not only a barrier's initial integrity, but can also provide long-term monitoring. To date, six demonstrations of the system have been completed. Results from two of the demonstrations are detailed in this report. They include the final developmental demonstration of the SEAtrace system and a comparison demonstration of two tracer based verification technologies. The final developmental demonstration of SEAtrace was completed at a naval facility in Brunswick, Maine. The demonstration was funded solely by the DOE and was performed in cooperation with the US Navy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

  14. Polylactide/Montmorillonite Hybrid Latex as a Barrier Coating for Paper Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Bandera; Meyer, Veronika R.; David Prevost; Tanja Zimmermann; Boesel, Luciano F.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a paper coating for the potential application in food packaging based on polylactide and montmorillonite. It is applied to the paper in the form of a stable, water-based latex with a solid content of 25–28 wt %. The latex is prepared from a commercially available polylactide, surfactants, montmorillonite, a plasticizer, chloroform (to be removed later) and water by an emulsion/solvent evaporation procedure. This coating formulation is applied to the paper substrate by bar-coating...

  15. Influence of Annealing on the Grain Growth and Thermal Diffusivity of Nanostructured YSZ Thermal Barrier Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na WANG; Chungen ZHOU; Shengkai GONG; Huibin XU

    2006-01-01

    The nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited by atmospherically plasma spraying. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the microstructure of the zirconia coatings. Thermal diffusivity values at normal temperatures have been evaluated by laser flash technique. Effect of annealing on the microstructure evolution of the zirconia coating has been performed. The grains and thermal diffusivity are increased with increasing annealing time and temperature.The grain growth is according to the GRIGC (the grain rotation induced grain coalescence) mechanism. The increase in thermal diffusivity is attributed to the grain growth and the decrease in porosity of nanostructured zirconia coatings.

  16. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  17. Integrated control of the wastewater system – potentials and barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Ane Loft; Grum, Morten; Muschalla, Dirk;

    2013-01-01

    Applying integrated control to a sewer system and wastewater treatment plant often leads to additional benefits for both systems when compared to controlling them independently. However, barriers such as a lack of incentive for utilities to put this type of control in place mean that in practice...

  18. Microstructural Evolution and interfacial motion in systems with diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry H. Leo

    2009-03-05

    This research program was designed to model and simulate phase transformations in systems containing diffusion barriers. The modeling work included mass flow, phase formation, and microstructural evolution in interdiffusing systems. Simulation work was done by developing Cahn-Hilliard and phase field equations governing both the temporal and spatial evolution of the composition and deformation fields and other important phase variables.

  19. Thin film deposition at atmospheric pressure using dielectric barrier discharges: Advances on three-dimensional porous substrates and functional coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Fiorenza; Bosso, Piera; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Fracassi, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Surface processing of materials by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) has experienced significant growth in recent years. Considerable research efforts have been directed for instance to develop a large variety of processes which exploit different DBD electrode geometries for the direct and remote deposition of thin films from precursors in gas, vapor and aerosol form. This article briefly reviews our recent progress in thin film deposition by DBDs with particular focus on process optimization. The following examples are provided: (i) the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin films on an open-cell foam accomplished by igniting the DBD throughout the entire three-dimensional (3D) porous structure of the substrate, (ii) the preparation of hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposite coatings using an aerosol-assisted process, (iii) the DBD jet deposition of coatings containing carboxylic acid groups and the improvement of their chemical and morphological stability upon immersion in water.

  20. Interfacial stability and diffusion barrier ability of Ti1−xZrxN coatings by pulsed laser thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TiZrN coatings were prepared using TiZr targets with different Zr ratios. • Thermal shock test was conducted to TiZrN coatings by a Nd-YAG pulsed laser ablation system. • Lattice parameter and hardness of coatings increased as Zr ratio increased. • Degradation of coatings by laser ablation decreased according to increase of Zr ratio. • Atomic diffusion at interface by laser ablation was suppressed by solid solution effects. - Abstract: Interfacial characteristics and diffusion behavior of Ti1−xZrxN coatings under thermomechanical stress were investigated, in terms of morphologies and depth profiles, after pulsed laser ablation. TiZrN coatings were deposited on SUS304 substrates, using TiZr compound targets with Ti:Zr wt.% ratio of 90:10, 70:30, and 50:50. XRD patterns showed the same growth orientations of TiN and ZrN as (1 1 1), (2 0 0), and (2 2 0) in all coating specimens. The lattice parameters and the microhardness increased through solid solution with the substitutions of Zr to the Ti sites. Spalling of the coating layer was observed in the specimen of 10% wt.% Zr ratio after laser ablation. Delamination was suppressed as the substitution of Zr increased, and it could be attributed to the formation of ZrN which can promote heat transfer in the coating layer faster than TiN. SIMS depth profiles revealed that the diffusion distance of the coating (Ti, Zr) and the substrate (Cr, Fe) atoms decreased, due to diffusion path reduction by the solid solution effects

  1. Preparation of hydrophobic coating on glass surface by dielectric barrier discharge using a 16 kHz power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 16 kHz power supply was used to investigate the preparation of hydrophobic film on glass surface by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Air nonthermal plasma was induced between the two parallel electrodes with a glass plate as dielectric barrier. The process for hydrophobic film includes two parts: one is plasma pretreatment to produce active layer on glass surface, another is to form hydrophobic film on glass surface by means of the interaction between air plasma and polydimethylsiloxane oil. The surface changes were observed using contact angle measurement and atomic force microscope. The results show DBD can increase surface roughness, and effectively improve glass surface activation and form a hydrophobic coating on glass surface, and it is possibility to prepare hydrophobic glass with middle frequency power supply

  2. Optimization of the follow-up of thermal barriers coatings production obtained by plasma arc spraying; Optimisation du suivi de production de barrieres thermiques obtenues par projection plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begon, V.; Dugne, O. [CEA/Pierrelatte, Dept. des Technologies de l' Enrichissement, DTE/Lab. de Metallographie et d' Analyses Chimiques, 26 (France)

    2001-02-01

    Thermal barriers coatings are produced in series in a lot of industrial sectors: aeronautics, automobile or energetics. Each production requires a fast quality control at a reduced cost. The metallographic control on a polished section is an efficient mean to characterize deposits obtained by thermal spraying. As a control mean of production, it has to be at one and the same time easy, fast and reproducible. As a consequence, the organization of a control laboratory is of primary importance in order to minimize the costs and to produce with a good quality. In this work is presenting the organization of a control post after an optimization of each step following a user approach in terms of cost and ergonomics. (O.M.)

  3. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF 1,4 DIOXANE-ETHANOL-DIESEL BLENDS ON DIESEL ENGINES WITH AND WITHOUT THERMAL BARRIER COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chockalingam Sundar Raj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,4 dioxane, a new additive allows the splash blending of ethanol in diesel in a clear solution. The objective of this investigation is to first create a stable ethanol-diesel blended fuel with 10% 1,4 dioxane additive, and then to generate performance, combustion and emissions data for evaluation of different ethanol content on a single cylinder diesel engine with and without thermal barrier coating. Results show improved performance with blends compared to neat fuel for all conditions of the engine. Drastic reduction in smoke density is found with the blends as compared to neat diesel and the reduction is still better for coated engine. NOx emissions were found to be high for coated engines than the normal engine for the blends. The oxygen enriched fuel increases the peak pressure and rate of pressure rise with increase in ethanol ratio and is still superior for coated engine. Heat release pattern shows higher premixed combustion rate with the blends. Longer ignition delay and shorter combustion duration are found with all blends than neat diesel fuel.

  4. Influence of the multilayer coating obtained by the HVOF method on behavior of the steel barrier at dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, Pavel; Radchenko, Andrey; Batuev, Stanislav

    2013-06-01

    The high velocity (supersonic) oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray technology is a rather recent addition to family of thermal spray processes. This technique is considered most modern of technologies of spraying. The increase in velocity of the particles at lower temperatures allowed reducing level of oxidation of the particles and to increase the density of a powder coating. In HVOF dry dusting applicators of the first and second generations was used the cylindrical nozzle, whereas in the third generation expanding Laval nozzles are used. This method allows the velocity of a gas flow to exceed to 2000 m/sec, and the velocities of the powder particles 800 m/sec. Recently many results on elastic and strength properties of the multilayer coatings obtained by supersonic flame spraying method are received. But the main part of works on research of the coating obtained by the HVOF method is devoted to research of their stress-strain state at static loadings. In this work the behavior of the steel barrier with the multilayer coating applied by HVOF is researched, at dynamic loading of projectile structure at different velocities of interaction. The problem was solved numerically within Lagrangian approach, a finite element method with the use of the explicit finite difference scheme of G. Johnson.

  5. Composition, structure and properties of gradient thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) produced by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradient thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) along with the bond coat were produced by one and the same technological cycle using electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) of an MCrAlY ingot, then of an Al-Al2O3-ZrO2(Y2O3) tablet (pressed multicomponent powder mixture) and finally of a ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 ceramic ingot. At the evaporation temperature used, vapor pressures of the tablet components decrease in the direction: AlapproachesAl2O3approachesZrO2(Y2O3). The evaporation of these constituents also proceeds in the same order. As a result, a transition zone [with composition and structure gradients - transition gradient zone (TGZ)] - forms between the bond coat and outer ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 ceramic layer during deposition. The TGZ constitution and structure are primarily determined by the aluminum, Al2O3 and ZrO2 contents of the tablet. As a consequence of liquid aluminum participation in the coating deposition process, a thin layer of β-phase (NiAl), smoothly transitions to an Al2O3 layer and then to ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Investigation on the preparation of Si/mullite/Yb_2Si_2O_7 environmental barrier coatings onto silicon carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许越; 闫钊通

    2010-01-01

    With the development of aero-engine,gas import temperatures of hot section structural materials are increasingly higher.Metal alloy materials due to the rapidly decreased mechanical properties at relative high temperature are gradually replaced with silicon-based non-oxide silicon carbide ceramics.However,silicon carbide ceramic materials tend to spall and deform in engine combustion environment,need environmental barrier coatings for the protection of the matrix.The preparation of Si/mullite/Yb2Si2O7 envir...

  7. Migration and diffusion of radionuclides in engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present status of the multibarrier system performance tests to provide a preliminary assessment of nuclide migration in the engineered barriers for shallow land burial of the low-level radioactive waste. Migration of radionuclides with seeped water through backfill and in subsequent diffusion in concrete pit are considered in this study. The results of laboratory investigations of unsaturated flow in backfill and radionuclides migration / diffusion in engineered barrier system are described and the calculated distribution of the radionuclides in backfill is presented

  8. High temperature oxidation interfacial growth kinetics in YSZ thermal barrier coatings with bond coatings of NiCoCrAlY with 0.25% Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Isothermal oxidation of standard (STD) and vertically cracked (VC) TBCs has been investigated. → The temporal TGO growth kinetics is parabolic in the temperature range between 900 and 1100 deg. C. → Activation energies correspond to growth kinetics controlled by the diffusion of O2 in Al2O3. → Variation in oxidation of TBCs is attributed to its microstructure and in-situ oxygen ingression. → Doping TBC bond coat with Hf appears to have potential for enhancing the development of robust TBCs. - Abstract: The results of an experimental study of the high-temperature isothermal oxidation behavior and microstructural evolution in two variations of air plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are discussed in the paper. Two types of TBC specimens were produced for testing. These include a standard and vertically cracked APS. High temperature oxidation was carried out at 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg. C. The experiments were performed in air under isothermal conditions. At each temperature, the specimens were exposed for 25, 50, 75 and 100 h. The corresponding microstructures and microchemistries of the TBC layers were examined using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Changes in the dimensions of the thermally grown oxide layer were determined as functions of time and temperature. The evolution of bond coat microstructures/interdiffusion zones and thermally grown oxide layers were compared in the TBC specimens with standard and vertically cracked microstructures.

  9. Micro-chemical and -morphological features of heat treated plasma sprayed zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconia-based plasma-sprayed coatings are extensively used in jet and land-based engines as thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for protecting and insulating gas turbine metal components from the extreme temperature in the hot gas extending the engine life capabilities and service performances as well as reducing fuel consumption. Zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings stabilized with yttria and ceria were prepared by means of atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and thermal treated at different temperatures. The resulting fractured heated surfaces have been studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) combined with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in order to study the surface micro-chemical composition and morphology. The results disclose the variation of the stabilizing oxide amount, the occurrence of valence state modifications of cerium, impurity segregation phenomena and sintering. High temperature sintering influenced the porous microstructure leading to structural changes of the surface. This information confirmed that chemical and morphological aspects in plasma sprayed TBCs must be known in order to understand and predict relationships between the parameters of plasma spray process and TBC features, properties and performances for a better design of reliable TBCs. - Highlights: • Yttria and Ceria stabilized zirconia-based TBCs were prepared by means of atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and thermal treated at different temperatures. • The chemical and morphological structure of the fractured materials were analysed. • Morphology and structural changes of the coatings depended on the nucleation and temperature treatments. • Ceria stabilized TBCs showed higher phase stability than Yttria’s

  10. Effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of Al2O3 and SiO2 gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboards was studied. Both polyethylene and polylactide coated paperboards were corona treated prior to ALD. Corona treatment increased surface energies of the paperboard substrates, and this effect was still observed after several days. Al2O3 and SiO2 films were grown on top of the polymer coatings at temperature of 100 deg. C using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. For SiO2 depositions a new precursor, bis(diethylamido) silane, was used. The positive effect of the corona pre-treatment on the barrier properties of the polymer-coated paperboards with the ALD-grown layers was more significant with polyethylene coated paperboard and with thin deposited layers (shorter ALD process). SiO2 performed similarly to Al2O3 with the PE coated board when it comes to the oxygen barrier, while the performance of SiO2 with the biopolymer-coated board was more moderate. The effect of corona pre-treatment was negligible or even negative with the biopolymer-coated board. The ALD film growth and the effect of corona treatment on different substrates require further investigation.

  11. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  12. Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken

  13. Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balady, M.A.

    1997-01-14

    This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken.

  14. Effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-liang Huang; Hui-min Meng; Li-kang Liang; Sen Li; Jin-hui Shi

    2015-01-01

    LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were applied to carbon steels with a NiCoCrAlY bond coat by plasma spraying. The effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 TBCs were investigated in 3.5wt% NaCl solution using polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD). The results show that a large number of cracks are found in the LaMgAl11O19 TBCs after the samples are heat-treated, including some through-thickness cracks. The corrosion forms of the as-sprayed and heat-treated TBCs are uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion, respectively. The as-sprayed TBCs exhibit three EIS time constants after being immersed for less than 7 d, and then a new time constant ap-pears because of steel substrate corrosion. When the immersion time is increased to 56 d, a Warburg impedance (W) component appears in the EIS data. The EIS data for the heat-treated TBCs exhibit only two time constants after the samples are immersed for less than 14 d, and a new time constant appears when the immersion time is increased further. The heat treatment reduces the corrosion resistance of carbon steel coated with LaMgAl11O19 TBCs. The corrosion products are primarilyγ-FeOOH and Fe3O4.

  15. An evaluation of the fire barrier system thermo-lag 330-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of three fire endurance tests and one ampacity derating test set of the fire barrier system Thermo-Lag 330-1 Subliming Coating. Each test was performed using cable tray specimens protected by a nominal three-hour fire barrier envelope comprised of two layers of nominal 1/2 inch thick material. The fire barrier systems for two of the three fire endurance test articles and for the ampacity derating test article were installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installations procedures. The barrier system for the third fire endurance test article was a full reproduction of one of the original manufacturer's qualification test articles. This final test article included certain installation enhancements not considered typical of current nuclear power plant installations. The primary criteria for fire endurance performance evaluation was based on cable circuit integrity testing. Secondary consideration was also given to the temperature rise limits set forth in the ASTM E119 standard fire barrier test procedure. All three of the fire endurance specimens failed prematurely. Circuit integrity failures for the two fire endurance test articles with procedures-based installations were recorded at approximately 76 and 59 minutes into the exposures for a 6 inch wide and 12 inch wide cable tray respectively. Temperature excursion failures (single point) for these two test articles were noted at approximately 65 and 56 minutes respectively. The first circuit integrity failure for the full reproduction test article was recorded approximately 119 minutes into the exposure, and the first temperature excursion failure for this test article was recorded approximately 110 minutes into the exposure

  16. Finite element modeling of engineered thin film/coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finite element modeling is becoming an increasingly important tool used in the design methodology and in the analysis of engineered functional thin film/coating systems. In contrast with many analytical modeling methods, modem finite element analysis can readily model non-linear static and transient thermo-mechanical behavior of engineered coating systems. Non-linear finite element analysis can be applied to multi-layered coating systems to predict the stresses and deformations generated during the processing of the coating system and under operating conditions. For example thermo-mechanical finite element analysis can be used to determine the composition and layer geometry of a coating system such that the stresses generated under operating conditions are minimized. In this paper we demonstrate the use of non-linear finite element analysis in the following situations: a) the prediction of contact stresses and film surface crack propagation within the coating system developed during the normal indentation of a hard wear-resistant coating on a soft substrate, and b) the determination of stresses generated in a multi-layered non-wetting, wear-resistant and oxidation resistant glass molding coating system during repeated thermal shot cycling. (author)

  17. Origin of Small Barriers in Jahn–Teller Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barriuso, M. T.; Ortiz-Sevilla, B.; Aramburu, J. A.;

    2013-01-01

    Despite its relevance, the microscopic origin of the energy barrier, B, between the compressed and elongated geometries of Jahn–Teller (JT) systems is not well understood yet because of a lack of quantitative data about its various contributions. Seeking to clear up this matter, we have carried o...

  18. Morphodynamics of the Wadden Sea and its barrier island system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.B.; Hoekstra, P.; Burchard, H.; Ridderinkhof, H.; Swart, H.E. de; Stive, M.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    The Wadden Sea and its associated barrier island system exhibit highly dynamic behaviour. Of major concern is the movement of water and air and the transport, erosion and deposition of sand and mud. These processes result in an ever-changing morphology (topography/bathymetry) of the islands, tidal c

  19. Experimental Study on Spiral Patterns in Dielectric Barrier Discharge System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Hua; DONG Li-Fang; LIU Fu-Cheng; LI Shu-Feng; LI Xue-Chen; WANG Hong-Fang

    2006-01-01

    Spiral patterns are obtained in a dielectric barrier discharge system with water electrodes. The dynamics of spiral formation and transition is investigated. Wavelength characteristic of spiral patterns is also studied. Correlation measurements indicate that the wavelength of spiral pattern increases with the increasing gas gap width and oscillates with the increasing drive frequency.

  20. Engineered barrier experiment. Power control and data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The engineered barrier concept for the storage of radioactive wastes is being tested at almost full scale at CIEMAT facilities. A data acquisition and control is an element of this experiment. This system would be operating for next three years. (Author)

  1. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10-6 cm2/s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables

  2. Depth-Penetrating Measurements Developed for Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The insulating properties of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide highly beneficial thermal protection to turbine engine components by reducing the temperature sustained by those components. Therefore, measuring the temperature beneath the TBC is critical for determining whether the TBC is performing its insulating function. Currently, noncontact temperature measurements are performed by infrared pyrometry, which unfortunately measures the TBC surface temperature rather than the temperature of the underlying component. To remedy this problem, the NASA Glenn Research Center, under the Information Rich Test Instrumentation Project, developed a technique to measure the temperature beneath the TBC by incorporating a thin phosphor layer beneath the TBC. By performing fluorescence decay-time measurements on light emission from this phosphor layer, Glenn successfully measured temperatures from the phosphor layer up to 1100 C. This is the first successful demonstration of temperature measurements that penetrate beneath the TBC. Thermographic phosphors have a history of providing noncontact surface temperature measurements. Conventionally, a thermographic phosphor is applied to the material surface and temperature measurements are performed by exciting the phosphor with ultraviolet light and then measuring the temperature-dependent decay time of the phosphor emission at a longer wavelength. The innovative feature of the new approach is to take advantage of the relative transparency of the TBC (composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia) in order to excite and measure the phosphor emission beneath the TBC. The primary obstacle to achieving depth-penetrating temperature measurements is that the TBCs are completely opaque to the ultraviolet light usually employed to excite the phosphor. The strategy that Glenn pursued was to select a thermographic phosphor that could be excited and emit at wavelengths that could be transmitted through the TBC. The phosphor that was selected was

  3. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karthikeya Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE. This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied.

  4. Electrochemical investigations of magnesium in DMEM with biodegradable polycaprolactone coating as corrosion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degner, Julia; Singer, Ferdinand; Cordero, Luis; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are being increasingly investigated as biodegradable metallic implant materials. However, the high corrosion rate and accumulation of hydrogen gas upon degradation prevent the clinical application of many magnesium based materials. Applying polymer or ceramic coatings is a popular approach to improve the corrosion behaviour of magnesium and its alloys. In the current research, a biodegradable polymer film of polycaprolactone (PCL) is prepared in different concentrations by spin coating, in order to influence the corrosion behaviour of 99.9% pure magnesium. The resulting polymer coating was qualified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tape-test according to ASTM D3359-09 to measure the adhesion strength of the coating on the substrate. Furthermore, coated and uncoated specimens were stored up to 30 days at 37 ̊C in DMEM. The corrosion behaviour was investigated by polarization curves. The PCL-films were found to be uniform and without pores, but they show a low adhesion strength on the substrate. Nevertheless, remarkable improvement of the corrosion resistance of magnesium substrate can be obtained by the polymer films, depending on the film thickness and exposition time. In summary, coating magnesium with PCL is a promising method to tailor the degradation behaviour for biomedical applications.

  5. Electrochemical investigations of magnesium in DMEM with biodegradable polycaprolactone coating as corrosion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degner, Julia; Singer, Ferdinand [Department of Materials Science, WW4-LKO, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martenstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Cordero, Luis; Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Department of Materials Science, WW7-BioMat, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Virtanen, Sannakaisa, E-mail: Virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Materials Science, WW4-LKO, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martenstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are being increasingly investigated as biodegradable metallic implant materials. However, the high corrosion rate and accumulation of hydrogen gas upon degradation prevent the clinical application of many magnesium based materials. Applying polymer or ceramic coatings is a popular approach to improve the corrosion behaviour of magnesium and its alloys. In the current research, a biodegradable polymer film of polycaprolactone (PCL) is prepared in different concentrations by spin coating, in order to influence the corrosion behaviour of 99.9% pure magnesium. The resulting polymer coating was qualified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tape-test according to (ASTM D3359-09) to measure the adhesion strength of the coating on the substrate. Furthermore, coated and uncoated specimens were stored up to 30 days at 37 {sup o}C in DMEM. The corrosion behaviour was investigated by polarization curves. The PCL-films were found to be uniform and without pores, but they show a low adhesion strength on the substrate. Nevertheless, remarkable improvement of the corrosion resistance of magnesium substrate can be obtained by the polymer films, depending on the film thickness and exposition time. In summary, coating magnesium with PCL is a promising method to tailor the degradation behaviour for biomedical applications.

  6. Electrochemical investigations of magnesium in DMEM with biodegradable polycaprolactone coating as corrosion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium and its alloys are being increasingly investigated as biodegradable metallic implant materials. However, the high corrosion rate and accumulation of hydrogen gas upon degradation prevent the clinical application of many magnesium based materials. Applying polymer or ceramic coatings is a popular approach to improve the corrosion behaviour of magnesium and its alloys. In the current research, a biodegradable polymer film of polycaprolactone (PCL) is prepared in different concentrations by spin coating, in order to influence the corrosion behaviour of 99.9% pure magnesium. The resulting polymer coating was qualified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tape-test according to (ASTM D3359-09) to measure the adhesion strength of the coating on the substrate. Furthermore, coated and uncoated specimens were stored up to 30 days at 37 oC in DMEM. The corrosion behaviour was investigated by polarization curves. The PCL-films were found to be uniform and without pores, but they show a low adhesion strength on the substrate. Nevertheless, remarkable improvement of the corrosion resistance of magnesium substrate can be obtained by the polymer films, depending on the film thickness and exposition time. In summary, coating magnesium with PCL is a promising method to tailor the degradation behaviour for biomedical applications.

  7. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System For Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Joseph; Curran, Jerome; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem facing Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other Government Agencies, and the general public. These problems include KSC launch support structures, highway bridge infrastructure, and building structures such as condominium balconies. Due to these problems, the development of a Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System would be a breakthrough technology having great commercial value for the following industries: Transportation, Infrastructure, Marine Infrastructure, Civil Engineering, and the Construction Industry. This sacrificial coating system consists of a paint matrix that may include metallic components, conducting agents, and moisture attractors. Similar systems have been used in the past with varying degrees of success. These systems have no proven history of effectiveness over the long term. In addition, these types of systems have had limited success overcoming the initial resistance between the concrete/coating interface. The coating developed at KSC incorporates methods proven to overcome the barriers that previous systems could not achieve. Successful development and continued optimization of this breakthrough system would produce great interest in NASA/KSC for corrosion engineering technology and problem solutions. Commercial patents on this technology would enhance KSC's ability to attract industry partners for similar corrosion control applications.

  8. Load management for refrigeration systems: Potentials and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grein, Arne, E-mail: a.grein@tu-berlin.de [University of Technology Berlin, Institute for Energy Technology, Department of Energy Systems, Einsteinufer 25 (TA8), 10587 Berlin (Germany); Pehnt, Martin [Institute for Energy and Environmental Research Heidelberg (ifeu), Wilckensstr. 3, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    As a strategy to deal with the increasing intermittent input of renewable energy sources in Germany, the adaptation of power consumption is complementary to power-plant regulation, grid expansion and physical energy storage. One demand sector that promises strong returns for load management efforts is cooling and refrigeration. In these processes, thermal inertia provides a temporal buffer for shifting and adjusting the power consumption of cooling systems. We have conducted an empirical investigation to obtain a detailed and time-resolved bottom-up analysis of load management for refrigeration systems in the city of Mannheim, Germany. We have extrapolated our results to general conditions in Germany. Several barriers inhibit the rapid adoption of load management strategies for cooling systems, including informational barriers, strict compliance with legal cooling requirements, liability issues, lack of technical experience, an inadequate rate of return and organizational barriers. Small commercial applications of refrigeration in the food-retailing and cold storage in hotels and restaurants are particularly promising starting points for intelligent load management. When our results are applied to Germany, suitable sectors for load management have theoretical and achievable potential values of 4.2 and 2.8 GW, respectively, amounting to about 4-6% of the maximum power demand in Germany. - Highlights: > Potential and barriers for implementation of load shifting for refrigeration. > Empirical investigation for time-resolved bottom-up analysis in Mannheim, Germany. > Suitable sectors and further recommendations for introducing load management.> Extrapolation of results from local to national level.

  9. Process engineering of ceramic composite coatings for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Kim, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Q.; Troczynski, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Researchers at UBCeram at the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia have developed a technology to chemically bond composite sol-gel (CB-CSG) coating onto metallic surfaces of complex or concave shapes. The process has been optimized for electrically resistive coatings and corrosion-resistant coatings. The CSG is sprayed onto metallic surfaces and is heat-treated at 300 degrees C to partially dehydrate the hydroxides. The CSG film is then chemically bonded through reaction of active alumina with metal phosphates, such as aluminium phosphate. A new chromate-free process is being developed to address the issue of coatings porosity. The electrodeposition technique involves polymer particles mixed with suspended fine alumina particles which are co-deposited by electrophoretic means or by electrocoagulation. The composite e-coatings have excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as a protective coating for various components of fuel cell systems. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  10. The measurement of strains within the bulk of aged and as-sprayed thermal barrier coatings using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.; Pescott, E. [DSTO, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia); Cookson, D. [Australian Synchrotron Research Project (Australia)

    1999-11-01

    Typical thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consist of a 0.3 mm layer of zirconia over a 0.2 mm layer of NiCoCrAlY. They are often used in gas turbine engines to thermally insulate components. The insulation reduces the temperature of the components and thereby increases their durability. Coating lifetimes are unpredictable due to an incomplete understanding of how the zirconia layer delaminates, although the compressive stresses inflicted upon the layer during cooling of the components are believed to play an important role. In this work, coated superalloy (Hastelloy-X) tokens were held at 1150 C for 20 h and then rapidly cooled. The residual stresses were measured using 0.0729 nm synchrotron X-rays at the Australian National Beamline Facility (Photon Factory, Japan). The maximum compressive stress was found to be 450{+-}50 MPa, which compared well to the predicted value of 440 MPa. The stress in an unheated TBC sample was found to be comparatively small (-100{+-}70 MPa). (orig.)

  11. The measurement of strains within the bulk of aged and as-sprayed thermal barrier coatings using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consist of a 0.3 mm layer of zirconia over a 0.2 mm layer of NiCoCrAlY. They are often used in gas turbine engines to thermally insulate components. The insulation reduces the temperature of the components and thereby increases their durability. Coating lifetimes are unpredictable due to an incomplete understanding of how the zirconia layer delaminates, although the compressive stresses inflicted upon the layer during cooling of the components are believed to play an important role. In this work, coated superalloy (Hastelloy-X) tokens were held at 1150 C for 20 h and then rapidly cooled. The residual stresses were measured using 0.0729 nm synchrotron X-rays at the Australian National Beamline Facility (Photon Factory, Japan). The maximum compressive stress was found to be 450±50 MPa, which compared well to the predicted value of 440 MPa. The stress in an unheated TBC sample was found to be comparatively small (-100±70 MPa). (orig.)

  12. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  13. Water Repellence and Oxygen and Water Vapor Barrier of PVOH-Coated Substrates before and after Surface Esterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates chemical grafting with fatty acid chlorides as a method for the surface modification of hydrophilic web materials. The resulting changes in the water repellence and barrier properties were studied. For this purpose, different grades of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH were coated on regenerated cellulose films (“cellophane” and paper and then grafted with fatty acid chlorides. The PVOH grades varied in their degree of hydrolysis and average molecular weight. The surface was esterified with two fatty acid chlorides, palmitoyl (C16 and stearoyl chloride (C18, by chemical grafting. The chemical grafting resulted in water-repellent surfaces and reduced water vapor transmission rates by a factor of almost 19. The impact of the surface modification was greater for a higher degree of hydrolysis of the polyvinyl alcohol and for shorter fatty acid chains. Although the water vapor barrier for palmitoyl-grafted PVOH was higher than for stearoyl-grafted PVOH, the contact angle with water was lower. Additionally, it was shown that a higher degree of hydrolysis led to higher water vapor barrier improvement factors after grafting. Furthermore, the oxygen permeability decreased after grafting significantly, due to the fact that the grafting protects the PVOH against humidity when the humidity is applied on the grafted side. It can be concluded that the carbon chain length of the fatty acid chlorides is the limiting factor for water vapor adsorption, but the grafting density is the bottleneck for water diffusing in the polymer.

  14. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    na

    2005-05-30

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1 - 1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1 - 1). The

  15. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  16. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel

  17. Graphene as a diffusion barrier for isomorphous systems: Cu-Ni system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Apurba; Punith Kumar, M. K.; Srivastava, Chandan

    2016-02-01

    Electrochemical exfoliation technique using the pyrophosphate anion derived from tetra sodium pyrophosphate was employed to produce graphene. As-synthesized graphene was then drop dried over a cold rolled Cu sheet. Ni coating was then electrodeposited over bare Cu and graphene-Cu substrates. Both substrates were then isothermally annealed at 800 °C for 3 h. WDS analysis showed substantial atomic diffusion in annealed Ni-Cu sample. Cu-graphene-Ni sample, on the other hand, showed negligible diffusion illustrating the diffusion barrier property of the graphene coating.

  18. Enhanced water vapor barrier properties for biopolymer films by polyelectrolyte multilayer and atomic layer deposited Al2O3 double-coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial polylactide (PLA) films are coated with a thin (20 nm) non-toxic polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film made from sodium alginate and chitosan and additionally with a 25-nm thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 layer. The double-coating of PEM + Al2O3 is found to significantly enhance the water vapor barrier properties of the PLA film. The improvement is essentially larger compared with the case the PLA film being just coated with an ALD-grown Al2O3 layer. The enhanced water vapor barrier characteristics of the PEM + Al2O3 double-coated PLA films are attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the surface of these films.

  19. Enhanced water vapor barrier properties for biopolymer films by polyelectrolyte multilayer and atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 double-coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi; Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Harlin, Ali; Salomäki, Mikko; Areva, Sami; Korhonen, Juuso T.; Karppinen, Maarit

    2011-09-01

    Commercial polylactide (PLA) films are coated with a thin (20 nm) non-toxic polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film made from sodium alginate and chitosan and additionally with a 25-nm thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al 2O 3 layer. The double-coating of PEM + Al 2O 3 is found to significantly enhance the water vapor barrier properties of the PLA film. The improvement is essentially larger compared with the case the PLA film being just coated with an ALD-grown Al 2O 3 layer. The enhanced water vapor barrier characteristics of the PEM + Al 2O 3 double-coated PLA films are attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the surface of these films.

  20. Modelling water vapour permeability through atomic layer deposition coated photovoltaic barrier defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrawemi, Mohamed, E-mail: Mohamed.elrawemi@hud.ac.uk [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Bird, David, E-mail: David.Bird@uk-cpi.com [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Robbins, David [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Sweeney, Francis [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-03

    Transparent barrier films such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} used for prevention of oxygen and/or water vapour permeation are the subject of increasing research interest when used for the encapsulation of flexible photovoltaic modules. However, the existence of micro-scale defects in the barrier surface topography has been shown to have the potential to facilitate water vapour ingress, thereby reducing cell efficiency and causing internal electrical shorts. Previous work has shown that small defects (≤ 3 μm lateral dimension) were less significant in determining water vapour ingress. In contrast, larger defects (≥ 3 μm lateral dimension) seem to be more detrimental to the barrier functionality. Experimental results based on surface topography segmentation analysis and a model presented in this paper will be used to test the hypothesis that the major contributing defects to water vapour transmission rate are small numbers of large defects. The model highlighted in this study has the potential to be used for gaining a better understanding of photovoltaic module efficiency and performance. - Highlights: • A model of water vapour permeation through barrier defects is presented. • The effect of the defects on the water vapour permeability is investigated. • Defect density correlates with water vapour permeability. • Large defects may dominate the permeation properties of the barrier film.

  1. Anisotropic TGO rumpling in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings under in-phase thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Y2O3-ZrO2 thermal barrier system has been tested under in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions with thermal gradient in the through-thickness direction. Undulations in the thermally grown oxide (TGO) were observed to have clear anisotropic behavior with respect to the directions parallel and perpendicular to the loading axis. It was found that undulation wavelengths were nearly the same in both directions but the amplitude in the perpendicular direction was much larger than in the parallel direction. A recent model of TGO rumpling was adapted and used to analyze and explain the origins of the observed rumpling behavior under TMF conditions. Methods for deducing variation in the coefficient of thermal expansion with temperature and in the creep properties of the substrate from the experimental strain data are also presented in the course of the derivations. Model results show that tensile stress applied in the loading direction can overcome the compression occurring from lateral expansion during oxide formation, causing undulations to flatten; undulations perpendicular to the loading axis are unaffected. However, ratcheting in the strain cycle experienced by the substrate, which occurs naturally by substrate creep, is necessary for anisotropic rumpling under cyclic stress conditions. Model predictions for constant applied stress are also presented, demonstrating a reversal in the direction of undulation alignment under compression. A threshold stress is identified, in both tension and compression, sufficient to produce appreciable anisotropic rumpling. The model predictions provide a clear mechanism for the anisotropy and further evidence that the lateral expansion strain in the oxide is the driving force for oxide rumpling.

  2. Evaluation of Performance and Emission characteristics of Turbocharged Diesel Engine with Mullite as Thermal Barrier Coating

    OpenAIRE

    P. N. Shrirao; A. N. Pawar

    2011-01-01

    Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al2O3 .2SiO2 (mullite) (Al2O3= 60%, SiO2= 40%) over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. Tests were carried out on standard engine (uncoated) and low heatrejection (LHR) engine with and without turbocharger. This paper is intended to emphasis on energy balance and emission characteristic for standard engine (uncoated) ...

  3. Properties of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Barrier Coatings and Encapsulated Polymer Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report silicon oxide coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology (PECVD) on 125 μm polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces for the purpose of the shelf lifetime extension of sealed polymer solar cells. After optimization of the processing parameters, we achieved a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ca. 10−3 g/m2/day with the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) less than 0.05 cc/m2/day, and succeeded in extending the shelf lifetime to about 400 h in encapsulated solar cells. And then the chemical structure of coatings related to the properties of encapsulated cell was investigated in detail. (plasma technology)

  4. Tailored CVD graphene coating as a transparent and flexible gas barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Cho, Hyunjin; Chandramohan, S.; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Heon Sang; Bae, Su Kang; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Min; Lee, Jae Kwan; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-04-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to obtain tailored graphene as a transparent and flexible gas barrier has been developed. By separating nucleation step from growth, we could reduce early graphene nucleation density and thus induce better stitching between domain boundaries in the second growth step. Furthermore, two step growth in conjunction with electrochemical polishing of Cu foils achieved large graphene domains and improved graphene quality with minimized defects. The performance of resulting graphene as a gas barrier was superior to the graphene obtained by one-step growth on polished or unpolished Cu foils. The CVD graphene reported here could open up the possibility for exploring graphene-based gas barrier due to the minimized density of defect area.

  5. Tailored CVD graphene coating as a transparent and flexible gas barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Cho, Hyunjin; Chandramohan, S.; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Heon Sang; Bae, Su Kang; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Min; Lee, Jae Kwan; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to obtain tailored graphene as a transparent and flexible gas barrier has been developed. By separating nucleation step from growth, we could reduce early graphene nucleation density and thus induce better stitching between domain boundaries in the second growth step. Furthermore, two step growth in conjunction with electrochemical polishing of Cu foils achieved large graphene domains and improved graphene quality with minimized defects. The performance of resulting graphene as a gas barrier was superior to the graphene obtained by one-step growth on polished or unpolished Cu foils. The CVD graphene reported here could open up the possibility for exploring graphene-based gas barrier due to the minimized density of defect area. PMID:27063180

  6. DTR, Taut Wire System: An alarm barrier with experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Taut Wire Fence Alarm System concept was developed and introduced more that fifteen years ago in Israel. A sudden expansion of the nations's border lines, the difficulty to monitor intrusions along those elongated lines and the need for timely as well as accurate armed response to an intrusion attempt dictated the need for an alarming barrier. Traditionally, protection of perimeters was accomplished by the installation of a fence or other type obstacles (man made or natural) and surveillance by manned patrols, fixed observation posts, and/or electronic devices. Defense planners recognized therefore the need for an alarming barrier. A concentrated effort by scientists solved the problem by developing the first Taut Wire Fence Alarm System in a configuration of an alarm barrier. The system was specified to have an extremely low false alarm rate (FAR/NAR), high probability of detection, the capability to follow various terrains, operability in a wide range of environmental conditions, a capability to delay an intruder, ease of installation by unskilled labor, and low maintenance requirements. The authors try here to explain the various constraints and considerations given during the design stages of the Taut Wire Alarm System so as to bring the present magnitude of users to a better understanding of the system's operation

  7. Analysis of developed transition road safety barrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mehrtash; Moghaddam, Taher Baghaee; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Sulong, N H Ramli

    2013-10-01

    Road safety barriers protect vehicles from roadside hazards by redirecting errant vehicles in a safe manner as well as providing high levels of safety during and after impact. This paper focused on transition safety barrier systems which were located at the point of attachment between a bridge and roadside barriers. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the behavior of transition systems located at upstream bridge rail with different designs and performance levels. Design factors such as occupant risk and vehicle trajectory for different systems were collected and compared. To achieve this aim a comprehensive database was developed using previous studies. The comparison showed that Test 3-21, which is conducted by impacting a pickup truck with speed of 100 km/h and angle of 25° to transition system, was the most severe test. Occupant impact velocity and ridedown acceleration for heavy vehicles were lower than the amounts for passenger cars and pickup trucks, and in most cases higher occupant lateral impact ridedown acceleration was observed on vehicles subjected to higher levels of damage. The best transition system was selected to give optimum performance which reduced occupant risk factors using the similar crashes in accordance with Test 3-21. PMID:23820073

  8. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  9. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  10. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  11. Corrosion resistance of plasma sprayed NiCrAl + (ZrO2 + Y2O3 ) thermal barrier coating on 18 -8 steel surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fei; L(U) Tao; DING Hua-dong; ZHOU Hai; LIU Kai

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of NiCrAl +(ZrO2 + Y2 O3 )thermal barrier coating, formed with the plasma spraying technique, on the 18 - 8 steel surface was investigated. The phase structure and morphology of the coating were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coating in 1.0 mol/L H2 SO4 solution was studied by using electrochemical measurement methods. The results show that the gradient plasma spraying coating is composed of the NiCrAlY primer coating and the (ZrO2 + Y2O3 ) top coating, and the coating thickness is 360 μm. The microhardness of coating reaches 1 100 HV. The corrosion resistance of the plasma sprayed coating of the 18 - 8 steel surface is about 5 times as great as that of the original pattern. The corrosion resistance of the coating is enhanced notably.

  12. Emergent Behavior of Coupled Barrier Island - Resort Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    Barrier islands are attractive sites for resorts. Natural barrier islands experience beach erosion and island overwash during storms, beach accretion and dune building during inter-storm periods, and migration up the continental shelf as sea level rises. Beach replenishment, artificial dune building, seawalls, jetties and groins have been somewhat effective in protecting resorts against erosion and overwash during storms, but it is unknown how the coupled system will respond to long-term sea level rise. We investigate coupled barrier island - resort systems using an agent-based model with three components: natural barrier islands divided into a series of alongshore cells; resorts controlled by markets for tourism and hotel purchases; and coupling via storm damage to resorts and resort protection by government agents. Modeled barrier islands change by beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms. In the resort hotel market, developer agents build hotels and hotel owning agents purchase them using predictions of future revenue and property appreciation, with the goal of maximizing discounted utility. In the tourism market, hotel owning agents set room rental prices to maximize profit and tourist agents choose vacation destinations maximizing a utility based on beach width, price and word-of-mouth. Government agents build seawalls, groins and jetties, and widen the beach and build up dunes by adding sand to protect resorts from storms, enhance beach quality, and maximize resort revenue. Results indicate that barrier islands and resorts evolve in a coupled manner to resort size saturation, with resorts protected against small-to-intermediate-scale storms under fairly stable sea level. Under extended, rapidly rising sea level, protection measures enhance the effect of large storms, leading to emergent behavior in the form of limit cycles or barrier submergence

  13. Residual stresses and structure of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings exposed at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The substrate material was nickel based superalloy (In738LC), CoNiCrAlY was pressureless plasma-sprayed on the substrate as the bond coating. As the top coating, zirconia with 4 mol% yittria was made by a electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) with a rotation. The thickness of the bond coating was about 0.18 mm, and the thickness of the top coating was about 0.12 mm. The rotation speeds of specimens in the EB-PVD process were 5 rpm, 10 rpm and 20 rpm. The specimens were exposed at 1273 K for 200 h. The in-plane residual stress was measured by a conventional X-ray method, and the out-of-plane residual strain was measured by a strain scanning method with hard synchrotron X-rays. For the specimens with 5 rpm and 10 rpm, the in-plane compressive residual stresses were released by the high temperature exposure. For the specimen with 20 rpm, the in-plane residual stress did not change by the high temperature exposure, because it was very small before the exposure. The in-plane residual stresses were large compression near the interface. For the specimens with 5 rpm and 10 rpm, the out-of plane stresses were small from the coating surface but became a compression near the interface. Both in-plane and out-of-plane residual stresses of the specimen with 20 rpm were very small. In the effect of decreasing the residual stress, the rotation speed of 20 rpm was the excellent condition. According to the observation with a scanning electron microscope, the feather-like columnar structure decreased the high temperature exposure. This volume decrease caused the release of the in-plane residual stresses. (author)

  14. Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  15. Safety Verification of Interconnected Hybrid Systems Using Barrier Certificates

    OpenAIRE

    Guobin Wang; Jifeng He; Jing Liu; Haiying Sun; Zuohua Ding; Miaomiao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Safety verification determines whether any trajectory starting from admissible initial states would intersect with a set of unsafe states. In this paper, we propose a numerical method for verifying safety of a network of interconnected hybrid dynamical systems with a state constraint based on bilinear sum-of-squares programming. The safety verification is conducted by the construction of a function of states called barrier certificate. We consider a finite number of interconnected hybrid syst...

  16. Capacity Of Automated Highway Systems: Effect Of Platooning And Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, H. S. Jacob; Hall, Randolph; Hongola, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the authors study the capacity of key Automated Highway Systems (AHS) operating scenarios. The effect of the lane-flow rule, platooning or free-agent, as well as the lane barriers, on AHS capacity are studied. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the lane-flow rule and the lane change requirement. The paper consists of two major components, analytical models and AHS simulation. After a brief introduction of AHS operating strategies, analytical models are develop...

  17. Development of EQ coating for a new TBC coating system in Ni-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagishi, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Harada, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki (Japan); Sato, A. [National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ang, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[The Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Ni-base single crystal (SC) superalloys containing high concentrations of refractory elements prone to generate a diffusion layer called Secondary Reaction Zone (SRZ) beneath their bond coating during exposure at high temperatures. SRZ cause a reduction of the load bearing cross section and it is detrimental to the creep properties of thin-wall turbine airfoils. In this study, a new bond coat system, ''EQ coating'' which is stable and suppressing SRZ is proposed. The characteristic of EQ system is that the coating stays in equilibrium state and never reacts with the substrate. Diffusion couples of coating materials and substrate alloys were made and were heat treated at 1100 C for 300 h and 1000 h. The concentration profiles of alloying elements in these diffusion couples were analyzed by EPMA to investigate the existence of the diffusion zone. Cyclic oxidation examinations were carried out at 1100 C in air and the oxidation properties of EQ coating materials were discussed. (orig.)

  18. Effect of oxygen barrier coatings on oxidation and embrittlement of Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo foil in heat shield applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.; Wiedemann, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the loss of ductility with exposure to oxidizing conditions, long time applications of titanium alloys have been limited to temperatures below 700 K and short time applications have been limited to temperatures below 815 K. Oxygen barrier coatings for shielding Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo alloy from oxidation during exposure to high temperatures were studied using foil gage specimens. The coatings included micrometer-thick sputtered SiO2 and chemical-vapor-deposited silicate layers both with and without an aluminum basecoat. The oxidation rates and resistance to embrittlement of the coated specimens were significantly better than those of the uncoated specimens.

  19. Thermal cycling behavior of EBPVD TBC systems deposited on doped Pt-rich γ–γ′ bond coatings made by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Selezneff, Serge; Boidot, Mathieu; Hugot, J.; Oquab, Djar; Estournès, Claude; Monceau, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing interest was given to Pt-rich γ–γ′ alloys and coatings as they have shown good oxidation and corrosion properties. In our previous work, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) has been proved to be a fast and efficient tool to fabricate coatings on superalloys including entire thermal barrier coating systems (TBC). In the present study, this technique was used to fabricate doped Pt-rich γ–γ′ bond coatings on AM1® superalloy substrate. The doping elements were reactive ...

  20. Load management for refrigeration systems: Potentials and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a strategy to deal with the increasing intermittent input of renewable energy sources in Germany, the adaptation of power consumption is complementary to power-plant regulation, grid expansion and physical energy storage. One demand sector that promises strong returns for load management efforts is cooling and refrigeration. In these processes, thermal inertia provides a temporal buffer for shifting and adjusting the power consumption of cooling systems. We have conducted an empirical investigation to obtain a detailed and time-resolved bottom-up analysis of load management for refrigeration systems in the city of Mannheim, Germany. We have extrapolated our results to general conditions in Germany. Several barriers inhibit the rapid adoption of load management strategies for cooling systems, including informational barriers, strict compliance with legal cooling requirements, liability issues, lack of technical experience, an inadequate rate of return and organizational barriers. Small commercial applications of refrigeration in the food-retailing and cold storage in hotels and restaurants are particularly promising starting points for intelligent load management. When our results are applied to Germany, suitable sectors for load management have theoretical and achievable potential values of 4.2 and 2.8 GW, respectively, amounting to about 4-6% of the maximum power demand in Germany. - Highlights: → Potential and barriers for implementation of load shifting for refrigeration. → Empirical investigation for time-resolved bottom-up analysis in Mannheim, Germany. → Suitable sectors and further recommendations for introducing load management.→ Extrapolation of results from local to national level.

  1. EDDY CURRENT INVERSION AND ESTIMATION METRICS FOR EVALUATING THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, sophisticated eddy-current techniques incorporating model-based inverse methods were successfully demonstrated to measure the thickness and remaining-life of high-temperature coatings. To further assure the performance of these inverse methods, several estimation metrics including Fisher Information, Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), covariance, and singular value decomposition (SVD) are introduced. The connections and utility of these metrics are illustrated in the design of eddy current methods for estimating layer thickness, conductivity and probe liftoff.

  2. Durability Modeling of Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Using Finite Element Based Progressive Failure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Abdul-Aziz; Frank Abdi; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The necessity for a protecting guard for the popular ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is getting a lot of attention from engine manufacturers and aerospace companies. The CMC has a weight advantage over standard metallic materials and more performance benefits. However, these materials undergo degradation that typically includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix which is generally seen at a higher temperature. Additionally, other factors such as residual stress...

  3. Novel Gas Barrier SiOC Coating to PET Bottles through a Hot Wire CVD Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nakaya, Masaki; Kodama, Kenji; Yasuhara, Shigeo; Hotta, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to enhance the gas barrier enhancement of plastic containers such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) bottles, a novel method was found using a hot wire CVD technique, where tantalum wire is heated and exposed to a gas flow of vinyl silane. The resultant SiOC thin film was confirmed to characteristically contain Si-Si bonds in its surface and demonstrate a remarkably and highly practical decrease of the permeation of various gas through poly(ethylene terephthalate) bottles.

  4. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef;

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi...... increased the barrier property of the modified low-density polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polylactide by 96.48%, 99.69%, and 99.25%, respectively....

  5. TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

    2008-07-17

    Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

  6. Real-Time Thermographic-Phosphor-Based Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coating Surfaces Subjected to a High-Velocity Combustor Burner Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Allison, Stephen W.; Cruzen, Scott; Condevaux, J. J.; Senk, J. R.; Paul, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements were conducted on metallic specimens coated with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) with a YAG:Dy phosphor layer that were subjected to an aggressive high-velocity combustor burner environment. Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements of the same TBC system have previously been demonstrated for specimens subjected to static furnace or laser heating. Surface temperatures were determined from the decay time of the luminescence signal of the YAG:Dy phosphor layer that was excited by a pulsed laser source. However, the furnace and laser heating provides a much more benign environment than that which exists in a turbine engine, where there are additional challenges of a highly radiant background and high velocity gases. As the next step in validating the suitability of luminescence-based temperature measurements for turbine engine environments, new testing was performed where heating was provided by a high-velocity combustor burner rig at Williams International. Real-time surface temperature measurements during burner rig heating were obtained from the decay of the luminescence from the YAG:Dy surface layer. The robustness of several temperature probe designs in the sonic velocity, high radiance flame environment was evaluated. In addition, analysis was performed to show whether the luminescence decay could be satisfactorily extracted from the high radiance background.

  7. Influence of isothermal exposure on microstructural changes resulting in delamination of eutectic Al2O3+ZrO2+SiO2 thermal barrier coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jech, D.; Čelko, L.; Chráska, Tomáš; Slámečka, K.; Klakurková, L.; Dubský, Jiří; Švejcar, J.

    Ostrava : Tanger Ltd, 2014, s. 885-889. ISBN 978-80-87294-54-3. [Metal 2014. International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials /23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Electron microscopy-scanning * Heat treatment * Image analysis * Thermal barrier coatings * Thermal plasma spraying Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  8. Detecting Thermal Barrier Coating Delamination Using Visible and Near-Infrared Luminescence from Erbium-Doped Sublayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bencic, T. J.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive diagnostic tools are needed to monitor early stages of delamination progression in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) because the risk of delamination induced coating failure will compromise engine performance and safety. Previous work has demonstrated that for TBCs composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), luminescence from a buried europium-doped sublayer can be utilized to identify the location of TBC delamination from the substantially higher luminescence intensity observed from the delaminated regions of the TBC. Luminescence measurements from buried europium-doped layers depend on sufficient transmittance of the 532 nm excitation and 606 nm emission wavelengths through the attenuating undoped YSZ overlayer to produce easily detected luminescence. In the present work, improved delamination indication is demonstrated using erbium-doped YSZ sublayers. For visible-wavelength luminescence, the erbium-doped sublayer offers the advantage of a very strong excitation peak at 517 nm that can be conveniently excited a 514 nm Ar ion laser. More importantly, the erbium-doped sublayer also produces near-infrared luminescence at 1550 nm that is effectively excited by a 980 nm laser diode. Both the 980 nm excitation and the 1550 nm emission are transmitted through the TBC with much less attenuation than visible wavelengths and therefore show great promise for delamination monitoring through thicker or more highly scattering TBCs. The application of this approach for both electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma-sprayed TBCs is discussed.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm−1 to 68 cm−1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  10. Stability of tritium permeation barriers and the self-healing capability of aluminide coatings in liquid Pb-17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic stabilities of various barrier materials and the self-healing of aluminide coatings in oxygen saturated Pb-17Li have been evaluated. Binary nitrides and carbides are stable, but binary oxides display diverse behaviour; Al2O3 and MgO are stable, Cr2O3 is unstable to reduction to chromium metal and SiO2 exhibits intermediate properties. Ternary oxides behave similarly, but are intrinsically more stable, their stabilities increasing with Li2O content. Self-healing of aluminide barriers should occur to form either Al2O3 or LiAlO2, the latter being favoured. For Fe-rich Fe-Al solid solutions, self-healing is dependent on their aluminum content; at 723 K, Al2O3 or LiAlO2 formation only occurs for xAl>1.69 mol% Al or xAl>0.20 mol% Al, respectively. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Nanometer-thick amorphous-SnO2 layer as an oxygen barrier coated on a transparent AZO electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Sang; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2016-07-01

    It is necessary for transparent conducting electrodes used in dye-sensitized or perovskite solar cells to have high thermal stability which is required when TiO2 is coated on the electrode. AZO films with their low-cost and good TCO properties are unfortunately unstable above 300 °C in air because of adsorbed oxygen. In this paper, the thermal stability of AZO films is enhanced by depositing an oxygen barrier on AZO films to block the oxygen. As the barrier material, SnO2 is used due to its high heat stability, electrical conductivity, and transmittance. Moreover, when the SnO2 is grown as amorphous phase, the protective effect become greater than the crystalline phase. The thermal stability of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films varies depending on the thickness of the amorphous SnO2 layer. Because of the outstanding oxygen blocking properties of amorphous SnO2, its optimal thickness is very thin and it results in only a slight decrease in transmittance. The sheet resistance of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO film is 5.4 Ω sq-1 after heat treatment at 500 °C for 30 min in air and the average transmittance in the visible region is 83.4%. The results show that the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films have thermal stability with excellent electrical and optical properties. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Suberin fatty acids isolated from outer birch bark improve moisture barrier properties of cellulose ether films intended for tablet coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinämäki, Jyrki; Halenius, Anna; Paavo, Maaja; Alakurtti, Sami; Pitkänen, Pauliina; Pirttimaa, Minni; Paaver, Urve; Kirsimäe, Kalle; Kogermann, Karin; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2015-07-15

    We showed that the addition of suberin fatty acids (SFAs) even at small concentrations significantly improves the water vapor barrier properties of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) films. SFAs were isolated from the outer birch bark using extractive hydrolysis. The effects of SFAs on the film formation of aqueous HPMC were investigated with free films plasticized with polyethylene glycol (PEG 400). Special attention was paid on the physical solid-state, moisture barrier and mechanical stress-strain properties of films intended for tablet film coatings. Topography and surface morphology, glass transition temperature (Tg), tensile strength, Young's modulus, and water vapor permeation (WVP) of films were studied. The addition of SFAs lowered the Tg of films suggesting partial enhancement in film plasticization. The WVP of films decreased with increasing SFAs concentration up to 15% (calculated as a % w/w from a polymer weight). The WVP value for a non-suberized reference film and suberized film plasticized with PEG 400 was 2.13×10(-6) and 0.69[×10(-6) g/(mm(2)×h)×mm/Pa], respectively. The addition of SFAs impaired the mechanical stress-strain properties of HPMC films by reducing the deformation capacity of film. In conclusion, the film properties and performance of aqueous HPMC can be modified by including SFAs in the films. PMID:25936623

  13. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance

  14. Effectiveness of Diffusion Barrier Coatings for Mo-Re Embedded in C/SiC and C/C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Shenoy, Ravi N.; Wang, Zeng-Mei; Halbig, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced high-temperature cooling applications may often require the elevated-temperature capability of carbon/silicon carbide or carbon/carbon composites in combination with the hermetic capability of metallic tubes. In this paper, the effects of C/SiC and C/C on tubes fabricated from several different refractory metals were evaluated. Though Mo, Nb, and Re were evaluated in the present study, the primary effort was directed toward two alloys of Mo-Re, namely, arc cast Mo-41Re and powder metallurgy Mo-47.5Re. Samples of these refractory metals were subjected to either the PyC/SiC deposition or embedding in C/C. MoSi2(Ge), R512E, and TiB2 coatings were included on several of the samples as potential diffusion barriers. The effects of the processing and thermal exposure on the samples were evaluated by conducting burst tests, microhardness surveys, and scanning electron microscopic examination (using either secondary electron or back scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy). The results showed that a layer of brittle Mo-carbide formed on the substrates of both the uncoated Mo-41Re and the uncoated Mo-47.5Re, subsequent to the C/C or the PyC/SiC processing. Both the R512E and the MoSi2(Ge) coatings were effective in preventing not only the diffusion of C into the Mo-Re substrate, but also the formation of the Mo-carbides. However, none of the coatings were effective at preventing both C and Si diffusion without some degradation of the substrate.

  15. Studies with anti fouling coating on seawater intake system screens of MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling has been a concern for cooling water systems of coastal power plants and the same is being experienced in Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Macro fouling organisms cause major problems for smooth operation and maintenance of the cooling water system. The cooling water intake structures particularly the screens, which act as the barrier for marine organisms to enter into the cooling water system, gets fouled severely in a short period of time. Though chlorination is being done to control biofouling, it is ineffective due to the inward flow of seawater. Severely fouled gates necessitate frequent cleaning and maintenance which involves lifting of heavy structures, laborious manual cleaning and maintenance. In order to find remedial measures for the said concern, studies have been taken up for identification of simple but effective methods in controlling bio fouling. Accordingly studies with Anti Fouling Coating (AFC) applications have been identified and field studies were carried out to review its effectiveness in meeting the given requirement. One of the gates was coated with Anti Fouling Coating (AFC) and exposed to sea water and the bio fouling tendency was regularly monitored. It was noted that the AFC coated gate was observed to have less bio fouling compared to the in-practice coal tar epoxy coatings. The small quantity of fouling deposits was generally observed to be on the side opposite to the sea water current. The area exposed to sea water currents had relatively less biogrowth. The dislodgement or removal of bio growth could be achieved by gentle pressure or scrapping thus demonstrating its effectiveness in controlling the bio fouling. Studies are also in progress to with Foul release coatings (FRC) to study its effectiveness. (author)

  16. Case history: Vertical barrier wall system for Superfund Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design considerations and construction aspects are presented for the installation of a vertical barrier wall system for the Boeing Company at a Superfund Site near Seattle, WA. The construction was performed during 1996. The vertical barrier wall system included: (1) a soil-bentonite (SB) slurry wall, approximately 670 meters (2200 feet) in length, ranging from 12 to 21 meters (40 to 70 feet) in depth; (2) expansion of a cover system over the area enclosed by the SB wall; and (3) surface drainage improvements. Design and construction of the system addressed requirements of a Consent Decree for the site issued in 1993. The paper discusses the development of the design to meet remedial performance goals of preventing migration of contaminants in the soil/groundwater system and aiding aquifer restoration. Secondly, the paper details installation of the SB wall, highlighting the more significant construction issues, which included excavation of the wall through glacially deposited cobbles/boulders/till as well as addressing the severe elevation changes along the wall alignment. Thirdly, the paper presents Quality Assurance (QA) monitoring and testing performed during the construction phase

  17. Novel Gas Barrier SiOC Coating to PET Bottles through a Hot Wire CVD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Nakaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to enhance the gas barrier enhancement of plastic containers such as poly(ethylene terephthalate bottles, a novel method was found using a hot wire CVD technique, where tantalum wire is heated and exposed to a gas flow of vinyl silane. The resultant SiOC thin film was confirmed to characteristically contain Si-Si bonds in its surface and demonstrate a remarkably and highly practical decrease of the permeation of various gas through poly(ethylene terephthalate bottles.

  18. Evaluation of Performance and Emission characteristics of Turbocharged Diesel Engine with Mullite as Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Shrirao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al2O3 .2SiO2 (mullite (Al2O3= 60%, SiO2= 40% over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. Tests were carried out on standard engine (uncoated and low heatrejection (LHR engine with and without turbocharger. This paper is intended to emphasis on energy balance and emission characteristic for standard engine (uncoated and low heat rejection (LHR engine with and without turbocharger. Tests were carried out at different engine load and engine speed conditions for standard and low heatrejection engine with and without turbocharger. The results showed that there was 2.18% decreasing on specific fuel consumption value of low heat rejection (LHR engine with turbocharger compared to standard engine at full load. There was as much as 12% increasing on exhaust gas temperature of LHR engine with turbocharger compared tostandard engine at full load. There was as much as 20.64% increasing on NOx emission of exhaust gas, 22.05% decreasing on CO emission of exhaust gas and 28.20% decreasing on HC emission of exhaust gas of LHR engine with turbocharger compared to standard engine at full load.

  19. Emission reduction in SI engine using ethanol – gasoline blends on thermal barrier coated pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Ananda Srinivasan and C.G.Saravanan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of ethanol and unleaded gasoline with Isoheptanol blends on multi- cylinder SI engine were investigated. The test fuels were prepared using 99.9% pure ethanol and unleaded gasoline with Isoheptanol blend, in the ratio of E 60 + 2.0 Isoheptanol, E 50 + 1.0 Isoheptanol. In this work the performance, emission and combustion tests were conducted in multi-cylinder petrol engine. The experimental results reveal an increase in brake thermal efficiency on the use of test fuel. In the emission test, CO is found slightly decreased, while HC increased moderately and CO2 and NOx are appreciably reduced, when compared to the sole fuel. The second part of the investigation is carried out in the same engine with Alumina Titania coated crown of the pistons, to gain more inside improvement of engine performance and in-cylinder pressure for coated pistons. The experiment is repeated along with fuel additives and ethanol blends in the same blended ratio to analyse the performance and combustion characteristics of the engine. The results show marginal increase in brake thermal efficiency and reduction in CO, NOx, HC and CO2 emissions. In this study, combustion analyses are made with the help of AVL combustion analyzer, in which cylinder pressure, heat release rate and cumulative heat release are performed.

  20. Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings to Improve the Durability of a Combustor Under a Pulse Detonation Engine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2008-01-01

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) concepts are receiving increasing attention for future aeronautic propulsion applications, due to their potential thermodynamic cycle efficiency and higher thrust to density ratio that lead to the decrease in fuel consumption. But the resulting high gas temperature and pressure fluctuation distributions at high frequency generated with every detonation are viewed to be detrimental to the combustor liner material. Experimental studies on a typical metal combustion material exposed to a laser simulated pulse heating showed extensive surface cracking. Coating of the combustor materials with low thermal conductivity ceramics is shown to protect the metal substrate, reduce the thermal stresses, and hence increase the durability of the PDE combustor liner material. Furthermore, the temperature fluctuation and depth of penetration is observed to decrease with increasing the detonation frequency. A crack propagation rate in the coating is deduced by monitoring the variation of the coating apparent thermal conductivity with time that can be utilized as a health monitoring technique for the coating system under a rapid fluctuating heat flux.

  1. Addressing stress corrosion cracking on multi layer pipeline coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Scott B.; Marr, James E. [Tuboscope Pipeline Services, Houston, TX (United States); Willmot, Martyn [Jotun Group (Norway); Norman, David [David Norman Corrosion Control, Cornwall (United Kingdom); Khera, Ashish [Allied Engineering, Portland, ME (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is now recognized by operators worldwide as a significant threat to the safe operation of their pipeline systems. Gas, oil, and refined products lines have all been susceptible to this form of environmentally assisted cracking. As a result, operators and regulators have been incorporating data related to the development and prevalence of SCC into their risk management systems in order that they may effectively address this time-dependant threat. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) published the first structured methodology for stress corrosion cracking direct assessment (SCCDA) in 2004 (RP0204-2004). Operators are now beginning to apply the methods outlined in the standard to assess their systems. Research and industry experience have shown that various pipeline coating systems can be more or less effective in preventing the formation and growth of SCC. Newer pipeline coatings, such as multi layer epoxy/extruded polyolefin systems have been widely regarded as effective coating systems to address the threat posed by SCC when they are properly applied. New field studies performed on a pipeline coated with a three layer epoxy/polyethylene system have raised the possibility that operators utilizing these types of coatings may need to reassess how they manage the SCC threat. (author)

  2. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  3. Integrated modelling of near field and engineered barrier system processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Integrating Model (YMIM) is an integrated model of the Engineered Barrier System. It has been developed to assist project managers at LLNL in identifying areas where research emphasis should be placed. The model was designed to be highly modular so that a model of an individual process could be easily modified or replaced without interfering with the models of other processes. The modules modelling container failure and the dissolution of nuclides include particularly detailed, temperature dependent models of their corresponding processes

  4. Performance of Dy2Zr2O7 Thermal Barrier Coating in Thermal-Shock Test%等离子喷涂锆酸镝涂层抗热震性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玄; 马壮; 柳彦博; 杜仲; 郑康楠

    2013-01-01

    通过大气等离子喷涂(APS)制备了一种基于锆酸镝(Dy2Zr2O7)的新型热障涂层,该涂层具有更低的热导率及与镍基高温合金更匹配的热膨胀系数.对涂层的结构、相组成以及抗热震性能进行了研究.此外,对涂层在热震循环过程中的失效过程进行了讨论.结果表明,在6~8次热震循环后,涂层从基体表面脱落.陶瓷层中的微裂纹在热震过程中生长并导致粘结层界面附近的陶瓷层被压碎,从而最终导致陶瓷层的脱落.%A new thermal barrier coating system based on Dy2Zr2O7,which had a lower thermal conductivity and closer thermal expansion coefficient to nickel-based superalloys,was prepared by the air plasma spraying (APS).The microstructure,phase composition and thermal-shock resistance of the as-sprayed coatings were studied.Besides,the failure process of the coating during thermal cycles was also discussed.After 6~8 thermal-shock cycles,coatings spalled from the specimens.Micro cracks in the top coat grew and crushed the ceramic top coat in the vicinity of bond coat interface into pieces,and then led to the spallation of the top coat.

  5. Processing and Validation of Whey-Protein-Coated Films and Laminates at Semi-Industrial Scale as Novel Recyclable Food Packaging Materials with Excellent Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bugnicourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A biopolymer coating for plastic films was formulated based on whey protein, and its potential to replace current synthetic oxygen barrier layers used in food packaging such as ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH was tested. The whey-coating application was performed at semi-industrial scale. High barrier to oxygen with transmission rate down to ranges of 1 cm3 (STP m−2 d−1 bar−1 at and 50% relative humidity (r.h. but interesting humidity barrier down to ranges of 3 g m−2 d−1 (both normalized to 100 μm thickness were reached, outperforming most existing biopolymers. Coated films were validated for storing various food products showing that the shelf life and sensory attributes were maintained similar to reference packaging films while complying with food safety regulations. The developed whey coating could be enzymatically removed within 2 hours and is therefore compatible with plastic recycling operations to allow multilayer films to become recyclable by separating the other combined layers. A life cycle assessment was performed showing a significant reduction in the environmental impact of the packaging thanks in particular to the possibility of recycling materials as opposed to incinerating those containing EVOH or polyamide (PA, but due to the use of biosourced raw materials.

  6. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Angel Sanjurjo

    2004-05-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. A review of the literature indicated that the Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers. We selected diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, and surface coatings of Si and Ti for the preliminary testing. These coatings will be applied using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition technique developed at SRI which is rapid and relatively inexpensive. We have procured coupons of typical alloys used in a gasifier. These coupons will be coated with Cr, Al, Si, and Ti. The samples will be tested in a bench-scale reactor using simulated coal gas compositions. In addition, we will be sending coated samples for insertion in the gas stream of the coal gasifier.

  7. Impact of impurity content on the sintering resistance and phase stability of dysprosia- and yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Curry, N.; Janikowski, W.; Pala, Zdeněk; Vilémová, Monika; Markocsan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, 1-2 (2014), s. 160-169. ISSN 1059-9630. [International Thermal Spray Conference (ITSC2013). Busan, 13.05.2013-15.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : atmospheric plasma spray (APS) * thermal and phase stability of coatings * thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) * thermal conductivity * zirconia Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11666-013-0014-9/fulltext.html

  8. Process Optimization of a Novel Immediate Release Film Coating System using QbD Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Teckoe, Jason; Mascaro, Tracey; Farrell, Thomas P.; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a quality-by-design (QbD) approach to determine the optimal coating process conditions and robust process operating space for an immediate release aqueous film coating system (Opadry® 200). Critical quality attributes (CQAs) or associated performance indicators of the coated tablets were measured while coating process parameters such as percent solids of the coating dispersion, coating spray rate, inlet air temperature, airflow rate and pan speed were varied, using a desig...

  9. Micromechanical Simulation of Thermal Cyclic Behavior of ZrO2/Ti Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Tsukamoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates cyclic thermal shock behavior of ZrO2/Ti functionally graded thermal barrier coatings (FG TBCs based on a nonlinear mean-field micromechanical approach, which takes into account the time-independent and dependent inelastic deformation, such as plasticity of metals, creep of metals and ceramics, and diffusional mass flow at the ceramic/metal interface. The fabrication processes for the FG TBCs have been also considered in the simulation. The effect of creep and compositional gradation patterns on micro-stress states in the FG TBCs during thermal cycling has been examined in terms of the amplitudes, ratios, maximum and mean values of thermal stresses. The compositional gradation patterns highly affect thermal stress states in case of high creep rates of ZrO2. In comparison with experimental data, maximum thermal stresses, amplitudes and ratios of thermal stresses can be effective parameters for design of such FG TBCs subject to cyclic thermal shock loadings.

  10. Evolution of photo-stimulated luminescence of EB-PVD/(Ni, Pt)Al thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are described which were designed to assess the suitability of photo-stimulated luminescence piezo-spectroscopy (PLPS) measurements as a basis for non-destructive inspection (NDI) and determination of life remaining of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Thermal cyclic tests were conducted on 7 wt.% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD)/(Ni, Pt)Al/CMSX-4 TBCs at two temperatures 1151 and 1121 deg. C. The evolution of PLPS spectral characteristics (peak frequency shift, peak width and area ratio of peaks) was studied as a function of thermal cycles. It was observed that the average thermally grown oxide (TGO) stress and its standard deviation, and the area ratio of peaks show systematic change with thermal cycling, indicating that these characteristics can be used for NDI and determination of life remaining. The average TGO stress increases initially and then decreases monotonically with thermal cycling. The rate of change in the stress can be related to specimen life: the shallower the slope, the higher the life. The peak area ratio also decreases monotonically with cycling. The average TGO stress changes in a systematic manner versus remaining life fraction independent of temperature. Remaining life predictions were made based on average stress versus life fraction, which resulted in life assessments within ±13% of actual values excluding one specimen with abnormal behavior

  11. System evaluation for the volume change of the engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the emplaced waste in TRU waste disposal facility, it may have the void for waste bodies it. And, generating void which accompanies those component elution in concrete pit and filler in which the cement material becomes the candidate material is assumed. It is considered that the security of the diffusion control in the bentonite is not done when these voids collapsed, and when it generated the volume change inside the buffer material (bentonite). The imperfect blockage of the void by not obtaining, the sufficient swelling permeability swelling bentonite is a cause on this. Then, volume change of the bentonite inside is analyzed in this study under the conservative estimation. And the following are tested: Self-sealing, maximum swelling rate, density distribution change of the bentonite. Evaluation of the engineered barrier system for volume change from the result was carried out. Prior to the evaluation, generating void was calculated based on the conservative estimation. The density of the buffer material as it assumed the blocking by buffer material uniformly swelling using this calculated data, was obtained. By the permeability got from existing research result which shows the relationship between density and permeability of the bentonite, it was confirmed to become diffusion control in the buffer material inside, in existing engineered barrier specification. Next, it was tested, when the conservative void of the superscription was assumed, in order to confirm whether it does the security, as permeability necessary for maintaining diffusion control, puts it for the swelling of actual bentonite. As the result, it was possible to confirm sufficient swelling performance in order to do the security of the diffusion control in Na-bentonite. However, the swelling performance greatly lowered by comparing Na-bentonite in Ca-bentonite with under 1/6. The increase of the permeability not do the security of the diffusion control, when it was based on void quantity

  12. Deformation And Fracture Analysis Of Coating-Substrate Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kot M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the deformation and fracture analysis of coating-substrate systems during spherical indentation. CrN and TiN ceramic coatings with a thickness of 1-5 μm were tested using 10 to 200 μm tip radius spherical indenters. The typical results of indentation tests i.e. force-penetration depth curves were transformed into stress-strain curves using an algorithm developed by the author. The test results are compared with the results of numerical analysis conducted using FEM modelling. Such a complex analysis allows users to determine the level of tensile stress leading to the formation of cracks observed using SEM and TEM microscopy, and to define the failure maps for the coating substrate-systems.

  13. Corrosion of NiCoCrAlY Coatings and TBC Systems Subjected to Water Vapor and Sodium Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Yuan, Kang; Li, Xin-Hai; Lin Peng, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are commonly used in gas turbines for protection against high-temperature degradation. Penetration of the ceramic top coat by corrosive species may cause corrosion damage on the underlying NiCoCrAlY bond coat and cause failure of the TBC system. In the current study, four oxidation/corrosion conditions were tried: (i) lab air, (ii) water vapor, (iii) sodium sulfate deposited on the specimens, and (iv) water vapor + sodium sulfate. The test was done at 750 °C in a cyclic test rig with 48 h cycles. The corrosion damage was studied on NiCoCrAlY-coated specimens, thin APS TBC specimens, and thick APS TBC specimens. Water vapor was found to have very minor influence on the oxidation, while sodium sulfate increased the TGO thickness both for NiCoCrAlY specimens and TBC-coated specimens; the influence of the TBC thickness was found to be very small. Sodium sulfate promoted thicker TGO; more Cr-rich TGO; the formation of Y oxides, and internally, Y sulfides; pore formation in the coating as well as in the substrate; and the formation of a Cr-depleted zone in the substrate.

  14. A CFD-Based Study of the Feasibility of Adapting an Erosion Burner Rig for Examining the Effect of CMAS Deposition Corrosion on Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic and computational fluid dynamics modeling has been conducted to examine the feasibility of adapting the NASA-Glenn erosion burner rigs for use in studies of corrosion of environmental barrier coatings by the deposition of molten CMAS. The effect of burner temperature, Mach number, particle preheat, duct heating, particle size, and particle phase (crystalline vs. glass) were analyzed. Detailed strategies for achieving complete melting of CMAS particles were developed, thereby greatly improving the probability of future successful experimental outcomes.

  15. DEGRADATION OF SM2ZR2O7 THERMAL BARRIER COATING CAUSED BY CALCIUM-MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON OXIDE (CMAS) DEPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Honglong; Sheng, Zhizhi; Tarwater, Emily; Zhang, Xingxing; Dasgupta, Sudip; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2015-03-16

    Rare earth zirconates are promising materials for use as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engines. Among the lanthanide zirconate materials, Sm2Zr2O7 with the pyrochlore structure has lower thermal conductivity and better corrosion resistance against calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicon oxide (CMAS). In this work, after reaction with CMAS, the pyrochlore structure transforms to the cubic fluorite structure and Ca2Sm8(SiO4)6O2 forms in elongated grain.

  16. PEBS. Long-term performance of engineered barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieczorek, Klaus; Czaikowski, Oliver; Miehe, Ruediger

    2014-12-15

    The evolution of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of geological repositories for radioactive waste has been the subject of many national and international research programmes. The emphasis of the research activities was on the elaboration of a detailed understanding of the complex THMC processes, which are expected to evolve in the early post closure period in the near field. From the perspective of radiological long-term safety, an in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is of great significance, because the evolution of the EBS during the early post-closure phase may have a non-negligible impact on the radiological safety functions at the time when the canisters breach. Unexpected process interactions during the resaturation phase could impair the safety-relevant parameters in the EBS (e. g. swelling pressure, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity).

  17. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  18. Unique coatings produced by water based plasma system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chráska, Pavel

    New York : Stony Brook University, 2014. [Center for Thermal Spray Research, Spring 2014 Consortium Meeting. New York (US), 04.06.2014-05.06.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma spraying * water/hybrid systems * coatings * natural materils * FGM Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://www.ctsr-sunysb.org/PublicationsLogIn.aspx

  19. FLUIDS, PLASMAS AND ELECTRIC DISCHARGES: The influence of the structures and compounds of DLC coatings on the barrier properties of PET bottles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wang, Zhen-Duo; Zhang, Shou-Ye; Yang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Qiang

    2009-12-01

    To reduce the oxygen transmission rate through a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle (an organic plastic) diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on the inner surface of the PET bottle were deposited by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology with C2H2 as the source of carbon and Ar as the diluted gas. As the barrier layer to humidity and gas permeation, this paper analyses the DLC film structure, composition, morphology and barrier properties by Fourier transform infrared, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and oxygen transmission rate in detail. From the spectrum, it is found that the DLC film mainly consists of sp3 bonds. The barrier property of the films is significantly relevant to the sp3 bond concentration in the coating, the film thickness and morphology. Additionally, it is found that DLC film deposited in an inductively coupled plasma enhanced capacitively coupled plasma source shows a compact, homogeneous and crack-free surface, which is beneficial for a good gas barrier property in PET bottles.

  20. Evolution of microstructure during the growth of thermal barrier coatings by electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Scott Gregory

    2001-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the formation of porosity and crystallographic orientation (texture) in the microstructure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) grown by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) are investigated. A matrix of 7 wt.% Y2O3-ZrO2 TBC specimens was generated by independently varying two processing parameters: substrate temperature (Ts) and pattern of vapor incidence. TBCs deposited on stationary substrates oriented normal to the vapor source yielded columnar microstructures possessing fiber textures. Growth directions changed from to + to + as Ts increased from 900-1100°C. Increasing the angle of vapor incidence to 45° favored biaxially aligned columnar growth in the direction, while rotating the substrates produced biaxially aligned columns. The texture orientation is correlated with the observed column tip morphologies by considering the growth directions defined by symmetric arrangements of {111} preferred growth planes about a column axis. The change in texture orientation with increasing Ts under normal incidence on stationary substrates is linked to changes in the mechanism of crystal growth. The pattern of vapor incidence on stationary oblique and rotated substrates has a stronger influence on texture than Ts. Here, the requirement that faces composing a column tip receive equal amounts of vapor flux determines the outcome of a competitive growth process yielding the observed biaxial orientations. The formation of porosity is in general attributed to shadowing of the incident vapor by geometric features of the TBC surface. These features are crystallographic in nature such that the formation of porosity is intimately tied to the crystallographic texture of the coating. Intercolumnar gaps are generated by the interaction between the pattern of vapor incidence and the column tip morphology, whereas the feather-like shape of the open intracolumnar porosity evolves from shadows cast by steps on the column tip faces. Closed

  1. Influence of bondcoat composition and manufacturing parameters on the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings under cyclic temperature loading; Einfluss der Bondcoatzusammensetzung und Herstellungsparameter auf die Lebensdauer von Waermedaemmschichten bei zyklischer Temperaturbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subanovic, Marko

    2008-08-21

    cracks. The potential to improve lifetimes of APS-TBC's should arise from an adjustment of optimal interface roughness between TBC and bond coat, a TBC morphology with defect perpendicular to the crack propagation direction, formation of oxide scales with a low defect density and growth rate, ''strong'' interface between bond coat and oxide. Additionally the influence of water vapour-containing and reducing, water vapour/hydrogenatmospheres, as may prevail in power generation systems with CO2 separation, on the oxidation behaviour of MCrAlY alloys was investigated. In water vapour containing atmospheres the hydrogen increases the weight gain by increasing the solubility and diffusivity of oxygen in the alloy. Similar observations were made in strongly reducing atmospheres (e.g. Ar-4%H{sub 2}-2%H{sub 2}O). In this case the alumina growth rate was decreased, but the internal oxidation of yttrium due to hydrogen effect was even more pronounced. Another important observation was the tendency of freestanding MCrAlY coatings to blister when exposed in water vapour containing atmospheres with hydrogen additions. It seems that recombination of solute hydrogen at defects in the material interior is responsible for a pressure build-up in the blisters. Suitable measures to prevent hydrogen-induced damage would be a choice of material with low hydrogen solubility, high mechanical strength or application of a coating technology, which introduces fewer defects in the coating. An alternative measure would be a reduction of the yttrium reservoir in the coating because barrier properties of alumina scales against hydrogen are deteriorated by precipitation of yttrium-rich oxide phases in the TGO. (orig.)

  2. Effect of carbon on microstructure of CrAlCχN1-χ coatings by hybrid coating system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Kyu AHN; Se-Hun KWON; Kwang-Ho KIM

    2011-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the microstructure of CrAICχN1-χ coatings as a function of carbon contents was conducted.Quaternary CrAICχN1-χ coatings were deposited on Si wafers by a hybrid coating system combining an arc-ion plating technique and a DC reactive magnetron sputtering technique using Cr and Al targets in the Ar/N2/CH4 gaseous mixture. The effect of carbon content on microstructure of CrAICχN1-χ coatings was investigated with instrumental analyses of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the carbon content of CrAICχN1-χ coatings linearly increases with increasing CH4/(CH4/N2) gas flow rate ratio. The surface roughness of the CrAICχN 1-χ coating layer decreases with the increase of carbon content.

  3. High performance coated board inspection system based on commercial components

    CERN Document Server

    Barjaktarovic, M; Radunovic, J

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a vision system for defect (fault) detection on a coated board developed using three industrial firewire cameras and a PC. Application for image processing and system control was realized with the LabView software package. Software for defect detection is based on a variation of the image segmentation algorithm. Standard steps in image segmentation are modified to match the characteristics of defects. Software optimization was accomplished using SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) technology available in the Intel Pentium 4 processors that provided real time inspection capability. System provides benefits such as: improvement in production process, higher quality of delivered coated board and reduction of waste. This was proven during successful exploitation of the system for more than a year.

  4. Investigation about thermal conductivities of La2Ce2O7 doped with calcium or magnesium for thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► These ceramic materials with fluorite structure were synthesized. ► Oxygen vacancies lead to their lower thermal conductivities. ► These ceramics can be explored as novel candidate ceramic materials for TBCs. - Abstract: The La2Ce2O7 powders doped with Ca and Mg were synthesized by sol–gel method in this paper and their dense bulk samples were also prepared by pressure-less sintering at 1600 °C for 10 h. Their phase compositions, microstructures and thermal conductivities were investigated, respectively. XRD results reveal that single-phase (La0.95Ca0.05)2Ce2O6.95 and (La0.95Mg0.05)2Ce2O6.95 ceramics with fluorite structure are successfully synthesized. SEM and EDS results show that their microstructures are very dense and no other unreacted oxides or interphases exist in the interfaces between grains. Their thermal conductivities are lower than that of YSZ, which can be attributed to the phonon scattering caused by vacancies in their crystal lattices. The larger differences in atomic weight and ionic radius between Mg and La lead to the lower thermal conductivity of (La0.95Mg0.05)2Ce2O6.95 than that of (La0.95Ca0.05)2Ce2O6.95. The synthesized rare earth cerium oxides have potentials to be used as novel candidate materials for thermal barrier coatings in the future.

  5. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  6. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER reg-sign, and VAC-PAC reg-sign. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER reg-sign uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC reg-sign vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout

  7. Phase evolution, interdiffusion and failure of La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7/YSZ thermal barrier coatings prepared by electron beam–physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No interruption of column morphology from YSZ to LZ7C3 layer in TBCs. • A fluorite to pyrochlore ordering occurs for LZ7C3 during thermal shocking. • Some diffusion of Y from YSZ to LZ7C3 layer is occurred after thermal shocking. • Outward diffusion of Cr takes place due to the chemical reaction of LZ7C3 and Cr. • The delaminations occur at interface of LZ7C3/YSZ and inside the LZ7C3 coating. - Abstract: La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7 (LZ7C3) has attracted great interest for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) because it presents extremely low thermal conductivity, high thermal stability and is more resistant to sintering than yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In the present study, an LZ7C3/YSZ double-ceramic-layer (DCL) TBC was deposited by electron beam–physical vapor deposition (EB–PVD) and the TBC system was investigated for its phase evolution, interdiffusion and failure pattern though thermal shock test at 1373 K. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra results indicate that the as-deposited LZ7C3 coating transforms from fluorite to pyrochlore structure upon thermal shocking between 373 K and 1373 K. It seems that this phase change may have affected the durability of the DCL TBCs. The EDS mapping analysis indicates that some diffusion of Y from YSZ to LZ7C3 layer is occurred after thermal shock test. Additionally, an obvious outward diffusion of Cr from bond coat into LZ7C3 layer takes place due to the chemical reaction of LZ7C3 and Cr. The phase transformation of LZ7C3, the abnormal oxidation of bond coat, and the outward diffusion of Y and Cr alloying element into LZ7C3 coating would be the primary factors for the spallation of LZ7C3/YSZ thermal barrier coating

  8. Negative Resistance in a Two-Dimensional System with Entropic Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Peng; BAO Jing-Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ A phenomenon of negative resistance is found in two-dimensional bistable and periodic potentials via Langevin simulation, where output quantities for noise and signal driven system, such as the power-spectrum density modulus and the signal power amplification, can become minima at finite temperatures. In such a system, the curvature of the potential along non-transport degree of freedom at the barrier is larger than that at the local minima. The temperature-dependent effective barrier, i.e. entropic barrier, is introduced via integration over the non-transport variables. The system shows the negative resistance because of the competence between the signal and the entropic barrier.

  9. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Protective Liner Systems, Inc., Epoxy Mastic, PLS-614

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Protective Liner Systems International, Inc. Epoxy Mastic PLS-614 coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and T...

  10. Effects of argon and oxygen flow rate on water vapor barrier properties of silicon oxide coatings deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma polymer coatings were deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates while varying the operating conditions, such as the Ar and O2 flow rates, at a fixed radio frequency power of 300 W. The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of the untreated PET was 54.56 g/m2/day and was decreased after depositing the silicon oxide (SiOx) coatings. The minimum WVTR, 0.47 g/m2/day, was observed at Ar and O2 flow rates of 4 and 20 sccm, respectively, with a coating thickness of 415.44 nm. The intensity of the peaks for the Si-O-Si bending at 800-820 cm-1 and Si-O-Si stretching at 1000-1150 cm-1 varied depending on the Ar and O2 flow rates. The contact angle of the SiOx coated PET increased as the Ar flow rate was increased from 2 to 8 sccm at a fixed O2 flow rate of 20 sccm. It decreased gradually as the oxygen flow rate increased from 12 to 28 sccm at a fixed Ar carrier gas flow rate. The examination by atomic force microscopy revealed a correlation of the SiOx morphology and the water vapor barrier performance with the Ar and O2 flow rates. The roughness of the deposited coatings increased when either the O2 or Ar flow rate was increased.

  11. Preparation Process and Characteristics Analysis of Ni-Al System Intermetallic Compound Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNHong-fei; WANGCan-ming; WANDian-mao; JINTao; SONGQiang

    2004-01-01

    Ni-Al system intermetallic compound coatings were acquired on the substrates of Nickel base superalloy by thermal spray accompanied with metallurgy and diffusion process. The main phases in the coatings are NiA1 and Ni3Al and the microstructure of the coatings are dense. The coatings bond well with the substrates and show excellent characteristics of oxidation-resistance at temperature as high as 1300~C. The coatings have been applied successfully in industry.

  12. Preparation Process and Characteristics Analysis of Ni-Al System Intermetallic Compound Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-fei; WANG Can-ming; WAN Dian-mao; JIN Tao; SONG Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Ni-Al system intermetallic compound coatings were acquired on the substrates of Nickel base superalloy by thermal spray accompanied with metallurgy and diffusion process. The main phases in the coatings are NiAl and Ni3Al and the microstructure of the coatings are dense. The coatings bond well with the substrates and show excellent characteristics of oxidation-resistance at temperature as high as 1300℃. The coatings have been applied successfully in industry.

  13. Synthesis and mechanical properties of CrMoCxN1-x coatings deposited by a hybrid coating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaternary CrMoCxN1-x coatings were deposited on steel substrates (AISI D2) and Si wafers by a hybrid coating system combining an arc-ion plating technique and a dc reactive magnetron sputtering technique using Cr and Mo targets in an Ar/N2/CH4 gaseous mixture. The carbon content of CrMoCxN1-x coatings was linearly increased with increasing CH4/(CH4+N2) gas flow rate ratio. The maximum hardness of 44 GPa was obtained from the CrMoCxN1-x coatings containing a carbon content of x=0.33 with a residual stress of -4.4 GPa. The average friction coefficient of Cr-Mo-N coatings was 0.42, and it is decreased to 0.31 after applying CrMoCxN1-x coatings. This result was caused by the formation of a carbon-rich transfer layer that acted as a solid lubricant to reduce contact between the coating surface and steel ball. The microstructure of the coatings was investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this work, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the CrMoCxN1-x coatings were systematically investigated with the instrumental analyses

  14. The role of nano-sized manganese coatings on bone char in removing arsenic(V) from solution: Implications for permeable reactive barrier technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; He, Lile; Dong, Faqin; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A

    2016-06-01

    Although the removal of arsenic(V) (As(V)) from solution can be improved by forming metal-bearing coatings on solid media, there has been no research to date examining the relationship between the coating and As(V) sorption performance. Manganese-coated bone char samples with varying concentrations of Mn were created to investigate the adsorption and desorption of As(V) using batch and column experiments. Breakthrough curves were obtained by fitting the Convection-Diffusion Equation (CDE), and retardation factors were used to quantify the effects of the Mn coatings on the retention of As(V). Uncoated bone char has a higher retention factor (44.7) than bone char with 0.465 mg/g of Mn (22.0), but bone char samples with between 5.02 mg/g and 14.5 mg/g Mn have significantly higher retention factors (56.8-246). The relationship between retardation factor (Y) and Mn concentration (X) is Y = 15.1 X + 19.8. Between 0.2% and 0.6% of the sorbed As is desorbed from the Mn-coated bone char at an initial pH value of 4, compared to 30% from the uncoated bone char. The ability of the Mn-coated bone char to neutralize solutions increases with increased amounts of Mn on the char. The results suggest that using Mn-coated bone char in Permeable Reactive Barriers would be an effective method for remediating As(V)-bearing solutions such as acid mine drainage. PMID:27016809

  15. Thermal Management Coating As Thermal Protection System for Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Raj; Stuckey, C. Irvin

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the development of a non-ablative thermal management coating used as the thermal protection system material for space shuttle rocket boosters and other launch vehicles. The topics include: 1) Coating Study; 2) Aerothermal Testing; 3) Preconditioning Environments; 4) Test Observations; 5) Lightning Strike Test Panel; 6) Test Panel After Impact Testing; 7) Thermal Testing; and 8) Mechanical Testing.

  16. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  17. Engineered Barrier System Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01

  18. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  19. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER SYSTEM - SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tec...

  20. Environmental barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Vartabedian, Ara; Collins, William T.; Woolley, David; Bateman, Charles

    2012-12-18

    The present invention relates generally to a multi-layered article suitable for service in severe environments. The article may be formed of a substrate, such as silicon carbide and/or silicon nitride. The substrate may have a first layer of a mixture of a rare earth silicate and Cordierite. The substrate may also have a second layer of a rare earth silicate or a mixture of a rare earth silicate and cordierite.

  1. Barrier properties of plastic films coated with an Al2O3 layer by roll-to-toll atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin (30–40 nm) and highly uniform Al2O3 coatings have been deposited at relatively low temperature of 100 °C onto various polymeric materials employing the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, both batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) mode. The applications for ALD have long been limited those feasible for batch processing. The work demonstrates that R2R ALD can deposit thin films with properties that are comparable to the film properties fabricated by in batch. This accelerates considerably the commercialization of many products, such as flexible, printed electronics, organic light-emitting diode lighting, third generation thin film photovoltaic devices, high energy density thin film batteries, smart textiles, organic sensors, organic/recyclable packaging materials, and flexible displays, to name a few. - Highlights: • Thin and uniform Al2O3 coatings have been deposited onto polymers materials. • Batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been employed. • Deposition with either process improved the barrier properties. • Sensitivity of coated films to defects affects barrier obtained with R2R ALD

  2. Barrier properties of plastic films coated with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by roll-to-toll atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi, E-mail: Terhi.Hirvikorpi@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Laine, Risto, E-mail: Risto.Laine@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: Mika.Vaha-Nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kilpi, Väinö, E-mail: Vaino.Kilpi@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Salo, Erkki, E-mail: Erkki.Salo@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Li, Wei-Min, E-mail: Wei-Min.Li@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Lindfors, Sven, E-mail: Sven.Lindfors@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Vartiainen, Jari, E-mail: Jari.Vartiainen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kenttä, Eija, E-mail: Eija.Kentta@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Nikkola, Juha, E-mail: Juha.Nikkola@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Harlin, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Harlin@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kostamo, Juhana, E-mail: Juhana.Kostamo@picosun.com [Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-01-01

    Thin (30–40 nm) and highly uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings have been deposited at relatively low temperature of 100 °C onto various polymeric materials employing the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, both batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) mode. The applications for ALD have long been limited those feasible for batch processing. The work demonstrates that R2R ALD can deposit thin films with properties that are comparable to the film properties fabricated by in batch. This accelerates considerably the commercialization of many products, such as flexible, printed electronics, organic light-emitting diode lighting, third generation thin film photovoltaic devices, high energy density thin film batteries, smart textiles, organic sensors, organic/recyclable packaging materials, and flexible displays, to name a few. - Highlights: • Thin and uniform Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings have been deposited onto polymers materials. • Batch and roll-to-roll (R2R) atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been employed. • Deposition with either process improved the barrier properties. • Sensitivity of coated films to defects affects barrier obtained with R2R ALD.

  3. Gas-Barrier Hybrid Coatings by the Assembly of Novel Poly(vinyl alcohol) and Reduced Graphene Oxide Layers through Cross-Linking with Zirconium Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Capezzuto, Filomena; Buonocore, Giovanna G; Lavorgna, Marino; Xia, Hesheng; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-14

    Gas-barrier materials obtained by coating poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates have already been studied in the recent literature. However, because of the benefits of using cheaper, biodegradable, and nonpolar polymers, multilayered hybrid coatings consisting of alternate layers of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets and a novel high amorphous vinyl alcohol (HAVOH) with zirconium (Zr) adducts as binders were successfully fabricated through a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that rGO nanoplatelets were uniformly dispersed over the HAVOH polymer substrate. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies revealed that multilayer (HAVOH/Zr/rGO)n hybrid coatings exhibited a brick-wall structure with HAVOH and rGO as buildings blocks. It has been shown that 40 layers of HAVOH/Zr/rGO ultrathin films deposited on PET substrates lead to a decrease of 1 order of magnitude of oxygen permeability with respect to the pristine PET substrate. This is attributed to the effect of zirconium polymeric adducts, which enhance the assembling efficiency of rGO and compact the layers, as confirmed by NMR characterization, resulting in a significant increment of the oxygen-transport pathways. Because of their high barrier properties and high flexibility, these films are promising candidates in a variety of applications such as packaging, selective gas films, and protection of flexible electronics. PMID:26406566

  4. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) must ensure that the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) or safety-related containment spray system (CSS) remains capable of performing its design safety function throughout the life of the plant. This requires ensuring that long-term core cooling can be maintained following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Adequate safety operation can be impaired if the protective coatings which have been applied to the concrete and steel structures within the primary containment fail, producing transportable debris which could then accumulate on BWR ECCS suction strainers or PWR ECCS sump debris screens located within the containment. This document will present the data collected during the investigation of coating specimens from plants

  5. The Effects of information barrier requirements on the trilateral initiative attribute measurement system (AVNG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the detection techniques used for measuring classified materials are very similar to those used in unclassified measurements, the surrounding packaging is generally very different. If iZ classified item is to be measured, an information barrier is required to protect any classified data acquired. This information barrier must protect the classified information while giving the inspector confidence that the unclassified outputs accurately reflect the classified inputs, Both information barrier and authentication considerations must be considered during all phases of system design and fabrication. One example of such a measurement system is the attribute measurement system (termed the AVNG) designed for the: Trilateral Initiative. We will discuss the integration of information barrier components into this system as well as the effects of an information barrier (including authentication) concerns on the implementation of the detector systems.

  6. Health Monitoring for Coated Steel Belts in an Elevator System

    OpenAIRE

    Yimei Mao; Zuoying Huang; Guiyun Tian; Hui Zhao; Huaming Lei

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method of health monitoring for coated steel belts in an elevator system by measuring the electrical resistance of the ropes embedded in the belt. A model on resistance change caused by fretting wear and stress fatigue has been established. Temperature and reciprocating cycles are also taken into consideration when determining the potential strength degradation of the belts. It is proved by experiments that the method could effectively estimate the health degradation of ...

  7. Effects of nuclear breakup channel on fusion of 6Li+64Zn system around barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the effects of breakup, occurring due to the nuclear interaction between weakly bound 6Li and tightly bound 64Zn isotopes, on the fusion reaction at near barrier energies within the framework of dynamic polarization potential (DPP) approach. When the nuclear induced dynamic polarization potential is taken into account sub barrier enhancement and above barrier suppression have been found which improves the matching between the fusion excitation function data and predictions for 6Li+64Zn system significantly. (author)

  8. Coatings and Surface Treatments for Reusable Entry Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2016-01-01

    This talk outlines work in coatings for TPS done at NASA Ames. coatings and surface treatments on reusable TPS are critical for controlling the behavior of the materials. coatings discussed include RCG, TUFI and HETC. TUFROc is also discussed.

  9. Overcoming energy efficiency barriers through systems approach—A conceptual framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we propose a framework which categorizes energy efficiency barriers based on the stage at which the barriers exist. Barriers to energy efficiency have been widely studied but to our knowledge, except for a few studies, we found inadequate consideration for barrier–barrier interactions when proposing policy measures for improving energy efficiency. Leveraging systems thinking's power as a problem solver which identifies underlying structure that explains (similar) patterns of behavior in a variety of different situations, we attempted to identify patterns of barriers to adoption of energy efficiency measures in industrial companies. Inspired by systems thinking, the proposed framework has four stages, namely, Motivation, Capability, Implementation and Results, as well as a feedback loop. Using a case study, we show that following the four stages will lead to positive feedback for future energy efficiency implementations. The framework highlights the interconnected nature of the barriers and a need for policymakers to address these barriers in a holistic manner. We argue that the overall effectiveness of energy efficiency policies is only as strong as the weakest link in the four-stage framework. This differs from most prior research that addressed barriers in isolation, where a solution is proposed for each of the barriers without considering the relationship between the barriers. Our framework also offers a way to understand the roles and responsibilities of major stakeholders such as governments and energy service companies (ESCOs) in driving energy efficiency. This allows the assessment and identification of weak links in energy efficiency policies. - Highlights: ► We propose a systems approach to overcome energy efficiency barriers. ► Barriers are grouped into Motivation, Capability, Implementation and Results. ► Case study shows that there is a feedback loop from Results to Motivation. ► Current Results will affect future Motivation.

  10. Diffusion and phase transformation on interface between substrate and NiCrAlY in Y-PSZ thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Jin, Z.; Liu, C.; Zhou, K.

    2004-12-01

    NiCrAlY/Y2O3-Y-PSZ (yttria-partially stabilized zirconia) thermal barrier coatings were developed on a superalloy (Ni-10Co-9Cr-7W-5Al, wt.%) surface. The superalloys were first coated with a bond coat of Ni-19Cr-8Al-0.5Y (wt.%) alloy that was deposited by low-pressure plasma spraying and then covered with a top coat of ZrO2-8wt.%Y2O3 by air plasma spraying. The microstructure near the interface was analyzed using an optical microscope, a scanning electron microscope, microhardness measurements, and x-ray diffraction, and the phases of composition were measured using an electron probe microanalyzer after exposure at 1100°C for different times in air or a vacuum. The reaction processes also were simulated using diffusion-controlled transformation (DICTRA) software in which diffusion was considered as being only the γ phase, and the γ‧ phase was treated as spheroidal particles in γ. From the authors’ results, it can be concluded that a γ‧-phase layer is observed at the interface between substrate and bond coat, and its thickness increases with increasing exposure times in air at 1100 °C. This layer showed good cohesion with the substrate and bond coat. It can also be concluded that the formation of the γ‧-phase layer can be predicted from DICTRA simulation. The simulation also shows the same trend of the composition profiles as experimental data.

  11. Apolipoprotein A-I coating of protamine–oligonucleotide nanoparticles increases particle uptake and transcytosis in an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Ingrid; Wernig, Karin; Panzenboeck, Ute; Bernhart, Eva; Reicher, Helga; Wronski, Robert; Windisch, Manfred; Hammer, Astrid; Malle, Ernst; Zimmer, Andreas; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is severely restricted by formation of tight junctions between adjacent brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC). In the present study we have evaluated the effects of protamine–oligonucleotide nanoparticles (proticles) on the functional properties of primary porcine BCEC and characterized uptake and transcytosis of proticles by these cells. Proticles had no adverse effects on BCEC properties relevant to blood–brain barrier (BBB) function. Transcytosis of 125I-labeled proticles across polarized BCEC cultures occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. As apolipoproteins were suggested to enhance cellular proticle uptake, proticle coating was performed with apoA-I, the major apolipoprotein component of high density lipoproteins. Adsorption of apoA-I on the surface of proticles resulted in significantly improved uptake and transcytosis properties as compared to uncoated proticles. ApoA-I coating enhanced proticle delivery to astrocytes in an in vitro model of the BBB almost twofold. Blocking of scavenger receptor class B, type I (the prime receptor for high density lipoprotein/apoA-I that is expressed on BCEC) reduced transcytosis of apoA-I-coated proticles to levels observed for uncoated proticles. Our data indicate that apoA-I-coating of proticles could be a feasible targeting technology to improve delivery across the BBB. PMID:17239472

  12. High-temperature resistant, thermally sprayed diffusion barrier coatings on CFC lightweight materials; Hochtemperaturbestaendige, thermisch gespritzte Diffusionsbarriereschichten auf CFC-Leichtbauchargiergestellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drehmann, Rico; Rupprecht, Christian; Wielage, Bernhard; Lampke, Thomas [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnik (IWW); Gilbert, Maria; Uhlig, Volker; Trimis, Dimosthenis [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Waermetechnik und Thermodynamik (IWTT); Heuer, Volker [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Hanau (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    In heat treating processes as well as in high temperature brazing processes, charge carriers enable the positioning and transport of work pieces. Recently, charge carriers consisting of graphite or carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) are used. The main disadvantage of charge carriers based on CFC is the undesirable carburization of the overlying components due to diffusion processes. Under this aspect, thermally sprayed coatings are applied on CFC and tested with respect to their suitability as a high-temperature diffusion barrier. The ceramic powders aluminium oxide, aluminium oxide/chromium oxide, aluminium oxide/titanium oxide and zirconium oxide/yttrium oxide are used as a coating material which is processed by means of the powder flame spraying as well as atmospheric plasma spraying. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are used as an adhesive layer. The coating materials aluminium oxide and aluminium oxide/chromium oxide on siliconized CFC presented excellent results. This supplies a large potential of application for thermally sprayed ceramic coatings on carbon-based lightweight materials.

  13. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  14. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by placing a reactant material (in this experiment, metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  15. Escape for System with Non-Fluctuating Potential Barrier Only Driven by Three-State Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui

    2007-01-01

    We study the escape for the mean first passage time (MFPT) over a potential barrier for a system with non-fluctuating potential barrier and only driven by a three-state noise. It is shown that in some circumstances, the three-state noise can induce the resonant activation for the MFPT over the potential barrier; but in other circumstances, it can not. There are three resonant activations for the MFPT over the potential barrier, which are respectively as the functions of the transition rates of the three-state noise.

  16. Preliminary engineering specifications for a test demonstration multilayer protective barrier cover system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents preliminary engineering specifications for a test protective barrier cover system and support radiohydrology facility to be constructed at the Hanford Protective Barrier Test Facility (PBTF). Construction of this test barrier and related radiohydrology facility is part of a continuing effort to provide construction experience and performance evaluation of alternative barrier designs used for long-term isolation of disposed radioactive waste materials. Design specifications given in this report are tentative, based on interim engineering and computer simulation design efforts. Final definitive design specifications and engineering prints will be produced in FY 1986. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  17. Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Jordi Perez; Marc Hornbostel; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2007-05-31

    Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in the IGCC system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy will improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. The Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers. In this study, the use of corrosion-resistant coatings on low alloy steels was investigated for use as high-temperature components in IGCC systems. The coatings were deposited using SRI's fluidized-bed reactor chemical vapor deposition technique. Diffusion coatings of Cr and Al were deposited by this method on to dense and porous, low alloy stainless steel substrates. Bench-scale exposure tests at 900 C with a simulated coal gas stream containing 1.7% H{sub 2}S showed that the low alloy steels such SS405 and SS409 coated with

  18. The effect of silicon on the oxidation behavior of NiAlHf coating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Pengchao; Wu, Qiong; Ma, Yue; Li, Shusuo; Gong, Shengkai

    2013-04-01

    Two types of NiAlHf coatings doped with different content of Si (1 at.% and 2 at.%) were deposited on a Ni3Al based single crystal superalloy IC32 by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) method, respectively. For comparison, NiAlHf coating with 0 at.% Si was also prepared. The oxidation tests were carried out at 1423 K in air. At the initial stage of oxidation, large amount of flake-like θ-Al2O3 was found on NiAlHf coating surface. However, no θ-Al2O3 was observed in 2 at.% Si doped NiAlHf coating except α-Al2O3. It revealed that the Si additions could contribute to the transformation from θ-Al2O3 to α-Al2O3. When oxidation time prolonged to 100 h, it was found that the degradation of NiAlHf coating was very severe with no residual β-phase, which was due to the serious inter-diffusion between the coating and substrate. In contrast, the inter-diffusion in Si-doped coating was reduced with some residual β-phase and R-Ni(Mo, Re) precipitates. The presence of Si could retard the inter-diffusion of elements between coating and substrate, indicating a barrier diffusion effect. As a result, the oxidation resistance of NiAlHf coating was improved significantly.

  19. The effect of silicon on the oxidation behavior of NiAlHf coating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of NiAlHf coatings doped with different content of Si (1 at.% and 2 at.%) were deposited on a Ni3Al based single crystal superalloy IC32 by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) method, respectively. For comparison, NiAlHf coating with 0 at.% Si was also prepared. The oxidation tests were carried out at 1423 K in air. At the initial stage of oxidation, large amount of flake-like θ-Al2O3 was found on NiAlHf coating surface. However, no θ-Al2O3 was observed in 2 at.% Si doped NiAlHf coating except α-Al2O3. It revealed that the Si additions could contribute to the transformation from θ-Al2O3 to α-Al2O3. When oxidation time prolonged to 100 h, it was found that the degradation of NiAlHf coating was very severe with no residual β-phase, which was due to the serious inter-diffusion between the coating and substrate. In contrast, the inter-diffusion in Si-doped coating was reduced with some residual β-phase and R-Ni(Mo, Re) precipitates. The presence of Si could retard the inter-diffusion of elements between coating and substrate, indicating a barrier diffusion effect. As a result, the oxidation resistance of NiAlHf coating was improved significantly.

  20. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...