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Sample records for barrido heidelberg retina

  1. Heidelberg Retina Tomography analysis in optic disks with anatomic particularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, A M; Alexandrescu, C; Pascu, R; Ilinca, R; Popescu, V; Ciuluvica, R; Voinea, L; Celea, C

    2010-01-01

    Due to its objectivity, reproducibility and predictive value confirmed by many large-scale statistical clinical studies, Heidelberg Retina Tomography has become one of the most used computerized image analysis of the optic disc in glaucoma. It has been signaled, though, that the diagnostic value of Moorfieds Regression Analyses and Glaucoma Probability Score decreases when analyzing optic discs with extreme sizes. The number of false positive results increases in cases of megalopapillae and the number of false negative results increases in cases of small size optic discs. The present paper is a review of the aspects one should take into account when analyzing a HRT result of an optic disc with anatomic particularities.

  2. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) in Population-based Epidemiology : Normative Values and Criteria for Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdas, Wishal D.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To establish normative values for Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) variables and to develop HRT3-based criteria for glaucomatous optic neuropathy for epidemiological research in a white population. Methods: Consecutive participants in the Rotterdam Study were examined with HRT and

  3. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) in population-based epidemiology: normative values and criteria for glaucomatous optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdas, Wishal D.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    2011-01-01

    To establish normative values for Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) variables and to develop HRT3-based criteria for glaucomatous optic neuropathy for epidemiological research in a white population. Consecutive participants in the Rotterdam Study were examined with HRT and simultaneous stereoscopic

  4. Analysis of retinal nerve fibre layer changes in anisometropic amblyopia by Heidelberg retina tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayyab, A.; Afzal, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify if anisometropic amblyopia is associated with changes in optic disk morphology. Methods: The study comprised a total of 80 eyes recruited from Shifa Foundation Community Health Centre and the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad between May and October 2012. Anisometropic amblyopia was the only cause of disability (visual acuity >6/12) in amblyopic eyes whereas normal eyes had a best corrected visual acuity of 6/6 and no morbidities. Patients with other causes of amblyopia, co-morbid ocular diseases, and in whom a good-quality image could not be obtained were excluded. Mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was analysed using Heidelberg retina tomograph. Analysis of frequency distribution, probability and regression were run on the data collected during the study using SPSS version 15.0. Results: The mean age of the patients was 23.85+-5.85 years. The retinal nerve fibre layer thickness ranged between 0.09mm and 0.35 mm (mean: 0.23mm+-0.07) in amblyopic eyes, and between 0.18mm and 0.36mm (mean: 0.25mm+-0.05) in normal eyes. The difference was not statistically significant (p=0.087). No association was found between the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness or the age and refractive error of patients. Conclusion: The optic disk does not appear to be the site of morphological changes in amblyopia. (author)

  5. Estimating normative limits of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph optic disc rim area with quantile regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artes, Paul H; Crabb, David P

    2010-01-01

    To investigate why the specificity of the Moorfields Regression Analysis (MRA) of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) varies with disc size, and to derive accurate normative limits for neuroretinal rim area to address this problem. Two datasets from healthy subjects (Manchester, UK, n = 88; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, n = 75) were used to investigate the physiological relationship between the optic disc and neuroretinal rim area. Normative limits for rim area were derived by quantile regression (QR) and compared with those of the MRA (derived by linear regression). Logistic regression analyses were performed to quantify the association between disc size and positive classifications with the MRA, as well as with the QR-derived normative limits. In both datasets, the specificity of the MRA depended on optic disc size. The odds of observing a borderline or outside-normal-limits classification increased by approximately 10% for each 0.1 mm(2) increase in disc area (P model the extremes of the rim area distribution (observations far from the mean). In comparison, the normative limits predicted by QR were larger for smaller discs (less specific, more sensitive), and smaller for larger discs, such that false-positive rates became independent of optic disc size. Normative limits derived by quantile regression appear to remove the size-dependence of specificity with the MRA. Because quantile regression does not rely on the restrictive assumptions of standard linear regression, it may be a more appropriate method for establishing normative limits in other clinical applications where the underlying distributions are nonnormal or have nonconstant variance.

  6. Agreement among graders on Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) topographic change analysis (TCA) glaucoma progression interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iester, Michele M; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A; Xu, Juan; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate agreement among experts of Heidelberg retina tomography's (HRT) topographic change analysis (TCA) printout interpretations of glaucoma progression and explore methods for improving agreement. 109 eyes of glaucoma, glaucoma suspect and healthy subjects with ≥5 visits and 2 good quality HRT scans acquired at each visit were enrolled. TCA printouts were graded as progression or non-progression. Each grader was presented with 2 sets of tests: a randomly selected single test from each visit and both tests from each visit. Furthermore, the TCA printouts were classified with grader's individual criteria and with predefined criteria (reproducible changes within the optic nerve head, disregarding changes along blood vessels or at steep rim locations and signs of image distortion). Agreement among graders was modelled using common latent factor measurement error structural equation models for ordinal data. Assessment of two scans per visit without using the predefined criteria reduced overall agreement, as indicated by a reduction in the slope, reflecting the correlation with the common factor, for all graders with no effect on reducing the range of the intercepts between the graders. Using the predefined criteria improved grader agreement, as indicated by the narrower range of intercepts among the graders compared with assessment using individual grader's criteria. A simple set of predefined common criteria improves agreement between graders in assessing TCA progression. The inclusion of additional scans from each visit does not improve the agreement. We, therefore, recommend setting standardised criteria for TCA progression evaluation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Avaliação da autofluorescência do fundo de olho nas distrofias de retina com o aparelho Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2 Evaluation of fundus autofluorescence in hereditary retinal diseases using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Côco

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Definir características do exame de autofluorescência, verificando sua utilidade no diagnóstico e acompanhamento de distrofias retinianas. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo, 28 pacientes, adultos, divididos igualmente em quatro grupos com diagnósticos de doença de Stargardt, distrofia de Cones, retinose pigmentar e voluntários saudáveis para estabelecimento do padrão de normalidade. Em média foram obtidas nove imagens com o filtro para angiofluoresceinografia para a formação da imagem autofluorescente no Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2. As imagens de cada grupo de pacientes foram analisadas para verificar características comuns. RESULTADOS: As imagens fundoscópicas autofluorescentes dos voluntários do grupo controle mostraram área foveal hipoautofluorescente em relação à retina do pólo posterior. As imagens dos portadores de doença de Stargardt, em geral, apresentaram lesão hipoautofluorescente, correspondendo à área macular. As principais alterações da autofluorescência em pacientes com distrofia de cones foram hipoautofluorescência macular com halo hiperautofluorescente. Nos portadores de retinose pigmentar, foram encontrados pigmentos periféricos causando hipoautofluorescência. Na região macular, hipoautofluorescência ou apenas desorganização do pigmento. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo mostrou a existência de padrões de autofluorescência de fundo nas distrofias de retina que permitem o diagnóstico e melhor interpretação da fisiopatogenia destas doenças.PURPOSE: To define characteristics of the fundus autofluorescence examination, verifying usefulness in the diagnosis and care of hereditary retinal diseases. METHODS: 28 patients, adults, divided equally into four groups with diagnoses of Stargardt macular dystrophy, cone dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa and healthy volunteers for the establishment of the normality pattern. An average of nine images with the filter for fluorescein angiography was obtained

  8. Influence of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy on the performance of Heidelberg retina tomography II for diagnosis of glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingfeng; Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Mitchell, Paul; He, Mingguang; Aung, Tin

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) affect the performance of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II (HRT II; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) algorithms for glaucoma detection. This population-based survey was conducted among Malays in Singapore who were a 40 to 80 years of age. Diabetes was defined as self-report of a physician's diagnosis, use of diabetic medication, or a random blood glucose level ≥11.1 mmol/L. Retinal photographs were graded for DR according to the modified Airlie House classification system. The diagnosis of glaucoma was based on International Society for Geographical and Epidemiologic Ophthalmology criteria. The sensitivity and the false-positive rates were calculated for the Moorfields regression analysis [MRA]; the linear discriminant functions (LDFs) by Mikelberg (Mikelberg-LDF), Burk (Burk-LDF), and Bathija (Bathija-LDF); and the support vector machine (SVM). A total of 1987 persons without diabetes (including 86 with glaucoma) and 524 with diabetes (including 26 with glaucoma) were analyzed. The presence of diabetes had no influence on both the sensitivities and false-positive rates for all HRT algorithms. In the multivariate analyses adjusting for optic disc size, the presence of DR was significantly associated with the higher false-positive rates for Burk-LDF and Bathija-LDF (P SVM. Diabetes does not affect the performance of HRT II for diagnosis of glaucoma, but the presence of DR may be a source of false-positive test results.

  9. Relationship between short-wavelength automatic perimetry and Heidelberg retina tomograph parameters in eyes with ocular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Pitsas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare and correlate optic nerve head parameters obtained byHeidelberg retina tomograph (HRT with short-wavelength automatic perimetry (SWAP indices in eyes with ocular hypertension (OHT.METHODS: One hundred and forty-six patients with OHT included in the present study. All subjects had reliable SWAP and HRT measurements performed within a 2wk period. The eyes were classified as normal/abnormal according to visual field criteria and Moorfields regression analysis (MRA. Correlations between visual field indices and HRT parameters were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient (r.RESULTS:Twenty-nine eyes (19.9% had SWAP defects. Twenty-nine eyes (19.9% were classified as abnormal according to global MRA. Six eyes (4.1% had abnormal global MRA and SWAP defects. The k statistic is 0.116 (P=0.12 indicating a very poor agreement between the methods. No statistical significant correlation between HRT and SWAP parameters was detected.CONCLUSION:SWAP defects may coexist with abnormalities of optic disc detected by HRT in eyes with OHT. In most eyes, however, the two methods detect different glaucoma properties.

  10. Accessory optical device for the Heidelberg retina angiograph ( HRA classic to perform angiography of the vitreous cavity and the anterior eye segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennel Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heidelberg retina angiograph ( HRA classic enables fluorescein angiography (FA and indocyanine green angiography (ICG-A of the retina and choroid. The goal of this study was to design an accessory device to adapt the HRA classic for application on structures anterior to the retina. The optical device consisted of a cylindrical two-piece plastic frame holding a magnifying lens commonly used with the indirect ophthalmoscope. A 60-diopters lens was inserted in this frame to enable the angiography of the anterior segment. A less strong lens of 30 diopters was used for the visualization of pathologic findings in the vitreous cavity. We designed an easy-to-use and low-cost device to adapt the HRA classic for angiography of the fundus, vitreous cavity and anterior segment in the same session and without delay. FA and ICG-A images of two patients with rubeosis iridis and of one patient with choroidal melanoma are described.

  11. [Comparison of optic nerve head between normal and glaucoma subjects with Heidelberg Retina Topograph: to introduce a new diagnostic pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanbo; Liu, Xing; Ling, Yunlan; Huang, Jingjing; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2004-12-01

    To compare the differences of optic disc topograph between normal and glaucomatous persons, and to establish the score classification pattern for glaucoma using Heidelberg Retina Topograph (HRT). One hundred and sixteen eyes from 116 normal controls, 99 eyes from 63 consecutive primary open angle glaucoma(POAG) patients, and 75 eyes from 42 patients with POAG in early stage were included. All subjects underwent HRT exams. The topograph parameters of optic nerve head obtained from HRT were compared between normal and glaucoma, according to the 50%,95%,and 99% distribution of each parameter defining as score -4, -3, -2, -1, 1, 2, 3, 4. The total value of all parameters in one eye were calculated as a diagnostic index. And the cut-off points were determined by specificity of 95% for certain glaucoma and certain normal, the others were classified into suspects. The differences of optic disc topograph between normals and glaucomatous patients were significant. When consecutive glaucoma data were analyzed by the new score classification pattern, miss-diagnosis ratio was 6.1%, mis-diagnosis was 5.2%, correctly diagnostic ratio was 57.6%, suspects ratio was 36.4%. When POAG in early stage data were analyzed, the miss-diagnosis ratio and mis-diagnosis ratio were 5.2%, 5.2%, respectively; correctly diagnosis ratio is 36%, suspects ratio is 53.3%. The differences of optic nerve head topograph between normals and glaucomatous patients are significant. The new diagnostic pattern which will classify subjects into normals, suspects, and glaucoma, may be useful to lower miss-and misdiagnosis rate clinically.

  12. Symmetry of optic nerve head parameters measured by the heidelberg retina tomograph 3 in healthy eyes: the Blue Mountains Eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Healey, Paul R; Tariq, Yasser M; Teber, Erdahl; Mitchell, Paul

    2013-03-01

    To assess the symmetry of optic nerve head parameters measured by the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (HRT 3) between fellow eyes in a normal elderly population. Cross-sectional population-based study. Participants of the Blue Mountains Eye Study 10-year follow-up who did not have optic disc disease, including glaucoma, were included. Optic nerve head parameters measured by HRT 3 were compared between fellow eyes. The normal range of interocular asymmetry (larger disc minus smaller disc) was determined by the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. A total of 1276 eligible participants had HRT scans of both eyes. HRT measurements in right eyes differed slightly in rim steepness and rim volume from those in left eyes (P measured by HRT 3. Interocular asymmetry greater than 0.2 for cup-to-disc area ratio was considered outside the normal range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of disc size and severity of disease on the diagnostic accuracy of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph Glaucoma Probability Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangwill, Linda M; Jain, Sonia; Racette, Lyne; Ernstrom, Karin B; Bowd, Christopher; Medeiros, Felipe A; Sample, Pamela A; Weinreb, Robert N

    2007-06-01

    To compare the effect of disc size and disease severity on the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) Glaucoma Probability Score (GPS) and the Moorfields Regression Analysis (MRA) for discriminating between glaucomatous and healthy eyes. Ninety-nine eyes with repeatable standard automated perimetry results showing glaucomatous damage and 62 normal eyes were included from the longitudinal Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS). The severity of glaucomatous visual field defects ranged from early to severe (average [95% CI] pattern standard deviation [PSD] was 5.7 [5.0-6.5] dB). The GPS (HRTII ver. 3.0; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) utilizes two measures of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer shape (horizontal and vertical retinal nerve fiber layer curvature) and three measures of optic nerve head shape (cup depth, rim steepness, and cup size) as input into a relevance vector machine learning classifier that estimates a probability of having glaucoma. The MRA compares measured rim area with predicted rim area adjusted for disc size to categorize eyes as outside normal limits, borderline, or within normal limits. The effect of disc size and severity of disease on the diagnostic accuracy of both GPS and MRA was evaluated using the generalized estimating equation marginal logistic regression analysis. Using the manufacturers' suggested cutoffs for GPS global classification (>64% as outside normal limits), the sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) were 71.7% (62.2%-79.7%) and 82.3% (71.0%-89.8%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of the MRA result were 66.7% (58.0%-76.1%) and 88.7% (78.5%-94.34%), respectively. Likelihood ratios for regional GPS and MRA results outside normal limits ranged from 4.0 to 10.0, and 6.0 to infinity, respectively. Disc size and severity of disease were significantly associated with the sensitivity of both GPS and MRA. GPS tended to have higher sensitivities and somewhat lower specificities and lower

  14. Comparison of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph with disc-macula distance to disc diameter ratio in diagnosing optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yi; Frantz, Kelly A

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate whether Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph (HRT) is a valid test for diagnosing congenital optic nerve hypoplasia (CONH) compared to the ratio of the distance between the centre of the optic disc and the centre of the macula and the mean optic disc diameter (DM:DD ratio). Furthermore, to determine the optimal cut-off value of HRT disc area to differentiate a hypoplastic disc from a normal optic disc. A total of 33 subjects with CONH (4-67 years old) and 160 normal subjects (5-65 years old) were recruited and underwent comprehensive eye examinations, fundus photography and HRT. Receiver operating characteristic curves for DM:DD ratio and HRT disc area were constructed based on data from the 46 CONH eyes and 160 control eyes. Mean (±S.D.) HRT disc area was 1.94 (±0.54) mm(2) for the control eyes and 0.84 (±0.35) mm(2) for the CONH eyes (p < 0.0001). The area under the curve (AUC) for DM:DD ratio was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.76-0.90). The AUC for HRT disc area was 0.96 (95% confidence interval: 0.94-0.99). A statistically significant difference was found between AUC for HRT disc area and that for DM:DD ratio (p = 0.0004). The optimal cut-off value for HRT disc area was 1.42 mm(2) with 95% sensitivity and 85% specificity. The optimal cut-off value for DM:DD ratio was 3.20 with 78% sensitivity and 78% specificity. Both HRT and the DM:DD ratio are valid tests to aid diagnosis of CONH. HRT is superior to DM:DD ratio in diagnosing CONH with higher sensitivity and specificity. We suggest the optimal cut-off value for HRT disc area as 1.42 mm(2) in order to discriminate a hypoplastic disc from a normal optic disc. © 2016 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2016 The College of Optometrists.

  15. Reeducation at Heidelberg University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Geoffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizes German archival records to illuminate crucial post-war events at Heidelberg University. The university became the focal point of attempts to define the theoretical and practical meaning of "geistige Umerziehung" (spiritual reeducation). Discusses the conflict between U.S. authorities and such esteemed German scholars as Karl…

  16. Heidelberg polarized alkali source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Steffens, E.; Jaensch, H.; Philipps Universitaet, Marburg, Germany)

    1984-01-01

    A new atomic beam type polarized alkali ion source has been installed at Heidelberg. In order to improve the beam polarization considerably optical pumping is applied in combination with an adiabatic medium field transition which results in beams in single hyperfine sublevels. The m state population is determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Highly polarized beams (P/sub s/ > 0.9, s = z, zz) with intensities of 30 to 130 μA can be extracted for Li + and Na + , respectively

  17. Retina Anatomisi

    OpenAIRE

    İNAN, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    Retina is the neuronal layer in which images of the objects focus on and reach the visual center of the brain, occipital cortex, via neurons emanating from photoreceptor layer of retina. Retina is consisting of neurosensory retina and retina pigment epithelium(RPE). Having most important duties for the retina functions, RPE is settle on Bruch membran that lye above the choriocapillaris and has weak regenerative capability. Each retinal layer may present a different importance for the patholog...

  18. Anabaptist Spirituality and the Heidelberg Catechism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Belt, Hendrik; Huijgen, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Although the Anabaptists are not explicitly mentioned in the Heidelberg Catechism, it is generally acknowledged that the catechism influenced by the debates with the so-called radical reformation. This paper assesses Zacharias Ursinus’ Commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism and the report of the

  19. The retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Reyk, David M; Gillies, Mark C; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A prominent and early feature of the retinopathy of diabetes mellitus is a diffuse increase in vascular permeability. As the disease develops, the development of frank macular oedema may result in vision loss. That reactive oxygen species production is likely to be elevated in the retina, and tha......A prominent and early feature of the retinopathy of diabetes mellitus is a diffuse increase in vascular permeability. As the disease develops, the development of frank macular oedema may result in vision loss. That reactive oxygen species production is likely to be elevated in the retina......, and that certain regions of the retina are enriched in substrates for lipid peroxidation, may create an environment susceptible to oxidative damage. This may be more so in the diabetic retina, where hyperglycaemia may lead to elevated oxidant production by a number of mechanisms, including the production...... of oxidants by vascular endothelium and leukocytes. There is substantial evidence from animal and clinical studies for both impaired antioxidant defences and increased oxidative damage in the retinae of diabetic subjects that have been, in the case of animal studies, reversible with antioxidant...

  20. learning theological ethics through the heidelberg catechism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LEARNING THEOLOGICAL ETHICS. THROUGH THE HEIDELBERG. CATECHISM .... does not begin with abstract principles or a technical and theoretical reflection. Instead, it proceeds from a piety or ..... aesthetic strand in Reformed theologies of creation resists the utilitarian reduction of the natural world to raw material ...

  1. SALVATION ACCORDING TO THE HEIDELBERG CATECHISM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Heidelberg Catechism has been part of the Reformed Confessional tradition for over 400 years. It has helped to shape and form generations of Reformed believers. The question however can be raised if the model of salvation that features in the. Catechism is still relevant today? In the light of different contexts this ...

  2. Infrared retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sanjay [Albuquerque, NM; Hayat, Majeed M [Albuquerque, NM; Tyo, J Scott [Tucson, AZ; Jang, Woo-Yong [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  3. SALVATION ACCORDING TO THE HEIDELBERG CATECHISM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salvation according to the Heidelberg Catechism. 106. I want to highlight certain words found in the above quotes: “accomplish”, “achieve” and “complete”. The question I want to ask in light of the use of these words is the following: Is the cross only “helpful”? Can the saving work of God in Christ be summed up with a word ...

  4. Memory culture in the making: the Heidelberg Catechism in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the Heidelberg Catechism in the memory of the Dutch Reformed Church (DRC) between 1862 and 1937, with specific focus on the events of 1862. By making the Heidelberg Catechism the point of focus the article's contribution is not by way of answering the “what happened”-questions related to the ...

  5. the heidelberg catechism: a hidden creedal text and catechetical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    place, with financial assistance from the Reformed League (GZB) of the. Netherlands in 2002, he and with the help of others translated the text of the Heidelberg Catechism into the Chichewa/Chinyanja. Until now the Heidelberg Catechism has not officially been endorsed as an official manual for instructing new converts ...

  6. Compatibilidad química del piracetam determinada por calorimetría diferencial de barrido

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez; Keila Mena Salabarría; Mirelys Céspedes Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: en la primera etapa de preformulación de un medicamento se seleccionan los excipientes y es importante la realización de los estudios de compatibilidad química entre el ingrediente activo farmacéutico (IFA) y excipientes. Una de las técnicas más rápidas para realizar dichos estudios es la Calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC), y como técnica complementaria la Termogravimetría (TG). Objetivo: empleando DSC y TG, se realiza un estudio de compatibilidad química entre IFA y exci...

  7. Infrared reflectance as a diagnostic adjunct for subclinical commotio retinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas H Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Commotio retinae (CR is an outer retinal disorder following blunt trauma to the eye. Histologically it is characterized by disruption of the photoreceptor outer segments (OS, typically without injury to other retinal layers. Using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT the condition is visible as hyper-reflectivity of the OS. Most cases of CR are associated with transient grey-white discoloration of the retina and are easily diagnosed clinically, but there have been reports of OCT-confirmed CR without retinal discoloration. It is likely that this subclinical variant of CR is under-recognized as the OCT features of CR are subtle. Here, we report a case of OCT-confirmed subclinical CR that demonstrated prominent infrared hypo-reflectance, using the infrared protocol of the SPECTRALIS® OCT, Heidelberg Engineering. This case suggests that infrared reflectance may have a role in diagnosing cases of subclinical CR.

  8. Retina regeneration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jin; Goldman, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish are able to regenerate a damaged retina. Key to this regenerative response are Müller glia that respond to retinal injury by undergoing a reprogramming event that allows them to divide and generate a retinal progenitor that is multipotent and responsible for regenerating all major retinal neuron types. The fish and mammalian retina are composed of similar cell types with conserved function. Because of this it is anticipated that studies of retina regeneration in fish may suggest strategies for stimulating Müller glia reprogramming and retina regeneration in mammals. In this review we describe recent advances and future directions in retina regeneration research using zebrafish as a model system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diseño de multiplicador de 64 bits utilizando la técnica de barrido superpuesto

    OpenAIRE

    Montalvo Ramírez, Luis

    1987-01-01

    Se presenta el desarrollo del novel algoritmo de multiplicación por barrido superpuesto de 3-bits, así como también los aspectos importantes del diseño de la arquitectura, redes lógicas y layout de un multiplicador de 64-bits utilizando como caso de estudio.

  10. The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project — basin analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, David C.; Martini, Nicole; Buness, Hermann; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2010-05-01

    Within the context of the Heidelberg Basin Project (Gabriel et al. 2008), we present the first results of three-dimensional structural modelling of the basin, based on interpretation of reflection seismics and decompaction using porosity data measured from core material. Firstly, we interpreted six horizons (Base Quaternary, Internal and Base Pliocene, Base Upper Miocene, Internal and Base Mid Miocene Hydrobien beds) from all available industrial (ca. 100 km) and our own reflection seismic sections (ca. 15 km), which lie within a 8 km radius around the Heidelberg UniNord 1/2 boreholes. This data was used to construct a three-dimensional geometrical model of the Heidelberg Basin. Using 300 core samples, we determined the porosity of the Quaternary sediments and constructed an exponential porosity/depth relationship for these rocks, which were then attributed to the model. Lower strata were given values from the literature. The model shows that the Heidelberg basin has a N-S and E-W areal extent of only 10 × 6 km, directly abutting the eastern fault boundary of the Upper Rhine Graben. The strongest synsedimentary tectonic subsidence occurred during the Upper Miocene, Upper Pliocene, and Quarternary. Faults are not seen within the basin at this level, but a NW-SE striking strike-slip structure is recorded to the west of the basin. Furthermore, the sedimentary depocentre shifted 2 km northwards over time to the present location, directly below the city of Heidelberg. We determined that Quaternary sediments have porosities of over 60% at the surface, but at the Base Quaternary porosity is less than 35%. This strong decrease means that 740 m of sediments were compacted to produce the present ca. 500 m thickness of Quaternary strata. Gabriel, G., Ellwanger, D., Hoselmann, C. & Weidenfeller, M. (2008): The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project. -- Quaternary Science Journal, 57, 3-4, 253-260.

  11. CNTF AND RETINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Rong; Tao, Weng; Li, Yiwen; Sieving, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the most studied neurotrophic factors for neuroprotection of the retina. A large body of evidence demonstrates that CNTF promotes rod photoreceptor survival in almost all animal models. Recent studies indicate that CNTF also promotes cone photoreceptor survival and cone outer segment regeneration in the degenerating retina and improves cone function in dogs with congenital achromotopsia. In addition, CNTF is a neuroprotective factor and an axogenesis factor for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This review focuses on the effects of exogenous CNTF on photoreceptors and RGCs in the mammalian retina and the potential clinical application of CNTF for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:22182585

  12. Desprendimiento de retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jaime Claramunt, Dr.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available El desprendimiento de retina (DR consiste en la separación entre la retina neurosensorial y el epitelio pigmentario subyacente. Su forma más frecuente es el DR regmatógeno, causado por una rotura en la retina. Se manifiesta generalmente como un defecto en el campo visual o mala visión. Si se pesquisa y trata oportunamente tiene buenas posibilidades de éxito. No obstante, sigue siendo una causa importante de mala visión y ceguera, por lo que su prevención tiene un rol fundamental.

  13. A programmable artificial retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, T.M.; Zavidovique, B.Y.; Devos, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial retina is a device that intimately associates an imager with processing facilities on a monolithic circuit. Yet, except for simple environments and applications, analog hardware will not suffice to process and compact the raw image flow from the photosensitive array. To solve this output problem, an on-chip array of bare Boolean processors with halftoning facilities might be used, providing versatility from programmability. By setting the pixel memory size to 3 b, the authors have demonstrated both the technological practicality and the computational efficiency of this programmable Boolean retina concept. Using semi-static shifting structures together with some interaction circuitry, a minimal retina Boolean processor can be built with less than 30 transistors and controlled by as few as 6 global clock signals. The successful design, integration, and test of such a 65x76 Boolean retina on a 50-mm 2 CMOS 2-μm circuit are presented

  14. CNTF AND RETINA

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Rong; Tao, Weng; Li, Yiwen; Sieving, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the most studied neurotrophic factors for neuroprotection of the retina. A large body of evidence demonstrates that CNTF promotes rod photoreceptor survival in almost all animal models. Recent studies indicate that CNTF also promotes cone photoreceptor survival and cone outer segment regeneration in the degenerating retina and improves cone function in dogs with congenital achromotopsia. In addition, CNTF is a neuroprotective factor and an axogenes...

  15. Progress and upgrading of the Heidelberg high current injector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gap cavities was built for injection of high intensities of singly charged heavy ions into the Heidelberg heavy ion storage ring TSR. With different ion sources, this system now is used to deliver positive or negative, atomic and molecular ion beams ...

  16. The Heidelberg Catechism on human sin and misery | Baard | Acta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Heidelberg Catechism's section on Sin and Misery does not provide a moralistic or legalistic perspective on the human condition. Instead, it offers, in abbreviated format, a restatement of the doctrine of original sin, which points to sin as a condition and not just an act. As such, it invites us to think more deeply about the ...

  17. Progress and upgrading of the Heidelberg high current injector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The heavy ion storage ring 'TSR' [1], a ultra high vacuum, 55 m circumference magnetic synchrotron/storage ring for ions up to 1.6 Tm has become the dominant experimental fa- cility at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. This device, which is equipped with an electron cooler, laser cooling sections, ...

  18. Remembering the Heidelberg Catechism in South Africa today ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first part of the article argues that commemorations invite us to be conscious of the close link between memory and identity, as well as to the fact that our memories of the past are often highly contested memories. The second part of the paper comments on the status of the Heidelberg Catechism as a historical document, ...

  19. The Heidelberg Catechism: elements for a theology of care | de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article proposes a fresh reading of the Heidelberg Catechism from the perspective of an ethics of care, a new paradigm of doing ethics, strongly influenced by feminist philosophy. In its anthropology, this approach in ethics emphasizes human relationality, mutual dependency and vulnerability. Though there are strong ...

  20. ON THE HISTORICAL ORIGINS OF THE HEIDELBERG CATECHISM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petrus Dathenus, who came to the Electoral Palatinate in 1562, the year before the Heidelberg Catechism was drawn up.He arrived in Frankenthal in early June 1562 accompanied by some 70 families, who found a new home in the former Augustinian canons monastery in this city. Dathenus soon belonged to the circle of ...

  1. remembering the heidelberg catechism in south africa today?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between memory and identity, as well as to the fact that our memories of the past are often highly contested ... vandag (“Seven stories and a stock cube: The Heidelberg Catechism's comfort for today”) (Van Tonder et al ..... of the catechism is reduced to a certain understanding of sin that negates the wider meaning of misery ...

  2. the heidelberg catechism in the memory of the dutch reformed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    report on was the practice of preaching on the Heidelberg Catechism once a month, as was stipulated in the church order of the time. The issue was raised by members of the church ... 4 Both of these are well-known issues of the period according to DRC ..... armour of God and become invincible (Moorrees, 1937: 998).18.

  3. Fabricación reproducible de puntas de barrido para microscopios de efecto túnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bernal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available La fabricación reproducible de puntas de barrido para microscopios de efecto túnel es demostrada usando un método electroquímico. Las puntas son hechas a partir de alambre de tungsteno de 0.5 mm de diámetro. Controlando las condiciones de fabricación: la inmersión en la solución electrolítica, rangos de voltaje-corriente y duración del proceso se logra realizar puntas con relaciones de aspecto de 0.68 y radios de punta de 330 nm en el mejor caso./ Reproducible fabrication of Scanning Tunneling Microscope tips is carried out following an electrochemical procedure widely reported. Tips are made from 0.5 diameter tungsten wire. Controlling fabrication parameters (immersion in the electrochemical solution, current-voltage ranges, duration of the process, among others we achieve aspect ratios of 0.68 and tip radii of 330 nm in the best case.

  4. An induction accelerator for the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring TSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellert, C.; Habs, D.; Music, M.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Jaeschke, E.; Kambara, T.; Sigray, P.

    1992-01-01

    An induction accelerator has been installed in the heavy ion test storage ring TSR in Heidelberg. It allows for constant acceleration or deceleration of stored coasting ion beams without affecting their velocity profile and is well suited for ion beam manipulation in cooling experiments and for measurements of velocity dependent cooling forces. The design and operation of the device and first applications to laser cooling and to measurements of laser and electron cooling forces are described. (orig.)

  5. Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg. Research report 1997/1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (DKFZ, German Cancer Research Center) publishes alternating every year the 'Research Report' and the 'Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisbericht' (in German). Both volumes are reports on the present state of research activities of the DKFZ as a National Research Center to the funding federal and state authorities (Federal Republic of Germany, Land (state) Baden-Wuerttemberg). Furthermore they shall inform colleagues and the scientifically interested public. Both reports are structured according to the center's eight research programs. (orig.) [de

  6. A refuge for inorganic chemistry: Bunsen's Heidelberg laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Immediately after its opening in 1855, Bunsen's Heidelberg laboratory became iconic as the most modern and best equipped laboratory in Europe. Although comparatively modest in size, the laboratory's progressive equipment made it a role model for new construction projects in Germany and beyond. In retrospect, it represents an intermediate stage of development between early teaching facilities, such as Liebig's laboratory in Giessen, and the new 'chemistry palaces' that came into existence with Wöhler's Göttingen laboratory of 1860. As a 'transition laboratory,' Bunsen's Heidelberg edifice is of particular historical interest. This paper explores the allocation of spaces to specific procedures and audiences within the laboratory, and the hierarchies and professional rites of passage embedded within it. On this basis, it argues that the laboratory in Heidelberg was tailored to Bunsen's needs in inorganic and physical chemistry and never aimed at a broad-scale representation of chemistry as a whole. On the contrary, it is an example of early specialisation within a chemical laboratory preceding the process of differentiation into chemical sub-disciplines. Finally, it is shown that the relatively small size of this laboratory, and the fact that after ca. 1860 no significant changes were made within the building, are inseparably connected to Bunsen's views on chemistry teaching.

  7. VITREO-RETINA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... retinal vascular diseases following diabetic retinopathy.[1] They are associated with several ... A lid speculum. (Sauer Premature Infant Speculum Denville, New Jersey, USA) was used to part the lids. ... capture the image of the retina which was picked up by the camera system of the mobile phone [Figure 1] ...

  8. Mathematical models of human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tălu, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    To describe the human retina, due the absence of complete topographical data, mathematical models are required. The mathematical formula permits a relatively simple representation to explore the physical and optical characteristics of the retina, with particular parameters. Advanced mathematical models are applied for human vision studies, solid modelling and biomechanical behavior of the retina. The accurate modelling of the retina is important in the development of visual prostheses. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of researches for human retina modelling using mathematical models.

  9. Barrido de frecuencia en coordenadas de fase Frequency scan on phase-coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Pérez Abril

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de redes eléctricas ha transitado de modelos en componentes de secuencia a modelos en coordenadas de fase. La formulación del barrido de frecuencia en coordenadas de fase, además de facilitar la modelación más precisa de las redes desequilibradas, permite especificar inyecciones armónicas de cualquier tipo: monofásicas o trifásicas de la secuencia deseada. Por lo que puede estudiarse el efecto de las cargas no lineales de acuerdo a sus características y conexión al circuito. El presente trabajo desarrolla el modelo en coordenadas de fase de una red eléctrica, considerando la representación de bancos de transformadores monofásicos de tres o dos transformadores, así como otros tipos de asimetrías que pueden encontrarse en los sistemas eléctricos de instalaciones industriales, de edificios comerciales o de servicio. El modelo desarrollado se prueba con un ejemplo sencillo de un sistema delta a cuatro hilos que permite destacar las posibilidades del modelo.The electric networks analysis has upgraded from the sequence components frame models to the phase- coordinates frame models. The formulation of the frequency scan method in a phase- coordinates frame, besides allowing for a more accurate modeling of unbalanced networks, allows the specification of harmonic injections of any type: single-phase or three-phase of the desired sequence. Therefore, it is possible to study the effect of the non-linear loads according to its features and connection to the circuit. This paper develops the phase-coordinates model of a distribution power system, considering the representation of three-phase transformer banks of three or two single-phase transformers, as well as other asymmetries that can be found in the electrical systems of industrial plants, commercial or service facilities. The frequency scan based on the presented model is tested with a simple example of a four-wire delta system that highlights the possibilities of the model

  10. Compatibilidad química del piracetam determinada por calorimetría diferencial de barrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: en la primera etapa de preformulación de un medicamento se seleccionan los excipientes y es importante la realización de los estudios de compatibilidad química entre el ingrediente activo farmacéutico (IFA y excipientes. Una de las técnicas más rápidas para realizar dichos estudios es la Calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC, y como técnica complementaria la Termogravimetría (TG. Objetivo: empleando DSC y TG, se realiza un estudio de compatibilidad química entre IFA y excipientes preseleccionados, para comprobar la existencia o no de interacción química. Métodos: el equipo empleado fue el TA3000Mettler, aco­plado a la celda DSC20 y al horno TG50. El IFA utilizado fue Piracetam, y los excipientes: Kollidon VA 64, Estearato de magnesio, Celulosa microcristalina, Polietilenglicol 20 000 y Aerosil. Dichos excipientes se caracterizaron por DSC al igual que el IFA, al cual se le detectó la transición física de fusión. Para el estudio de compatibilidad se prepararon mezclas físicas binarias en una relación de concentración 1:1 Resultados: la figura 1 muestra la detección del punto de fusión por DSC del IFA. Se obtuvieron dos transiciones endotérmicas, comprobándose por TG cuál era la de fusión. La figura 2 muestra los termogramas de las mezclas formadas entre IFA y excipientes. Conclusiones: no se detectó aparición de nuevos picos, por lo que se infiere que no hay incompatibilidad química entre las sustancias estudiadas y se recomienda el uso de los excipientes para el desarrollo de la formulación farmacéutica.

  11. Barrido de frecuencia en coordenadas de fase; Frequency scan on phase-coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Pérez Abril

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de redes eléctricas ha transitado de modelos en componentes de secuencia a modelos en coordenadas de fase. La formulación del barrido de frecuencia en coordenadas de fase, además de facilitar la modelación más precisa de las redes desequilibradas, permite especificar inyecciones armónicas de cualquier tipo: monofásicas o trifásicas de la secuencia deseada. Por lo que puede estudiarse el efecto de las cargas no lineales de acuerdo a sus características y conexión al circuito. El presente trabajo desarrolla el modelo en coordenadas de fase de una red eléctrica, considerando la representación de bancos de transformadores monofásicos de tres o dos transformadores, así como otros tipos de asimetrías que pueden encontrarse en los sistemas eléctricos de instalaciones industriales, de edificios comerciales o de servicio. El modelo desarrollado se prueba con un ejemplo sencillo de un sistema delta a cuatro hilos que permite destacar las posibilidades del modelo.  The electric networks analysis has upgraded from the sequence components frame models to the phase- coordinates frame models. The formulation of the frequency scan method in a phase- coordinates frame, besides allowing for a more accurate modeling of unbalanced networks, allows the specification of harmonic injections of any type: single-phase or three-phase of the desired sequence. Therefore, it is possible to study the effect of the non-linear loads according to its features and connection to the circuit. This paper develops the phase-coordinates model of a distribution power system, considering the representation of three-phase transformer banks of three or two single-phase transformers, as well as other asymmetries that can be found in the electrical systems of industrial plants, commercial or service facilities. The frequency scan based on the presented model is tested with a simple example of a four-wire delta system that highlights the possibilities of the

  12. Selective retina therapy (SRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, R.; Birngruber, R.

    2007-01-01

    Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Luebeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the choroid. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced. (orig.)

  13. The infrared retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    As infrared imaging systems have evolved from the first generation of linear devices to the second generation of small format staring arrays to the present 'third-gen' systems, there is an increased emphasis on large area focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multicolour operation and higher operating temperature. In this paper, we discuss how one needs to develop an increased functionality at the pixel level for these next generation FPAs. This functionality could manifest itself as spectral, polarization, phase or dynamic range signatures that could extract more information from a given scene. This leads to the concept of an infrared retina, which is an array that works similarly to the human eye that has a 'single' FPA but multiple cones, which are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that enable the perception of colour. These cones are then coupled with powerful signal processing techniques that allow us to process colour information from a scene, even with a limited basis of colour cones. Unlike present day multi or hyperspectral systems, which are bulky and expensive, the idea would be to build a poor man's 'infrared colour' camera. We use examples such as plasmonic tailoring of the resonance or bias dependent dynamic tuning based on quantum confined Stark effect or incorporation of avalanche gain to achieve embodiments of the infrared retina.

  14. [Heidelberger study on psychoanalytic therapy of children and adolescents: methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrig, H

    1999-11-01

    In the representative studies published so far on the outcome of analytic child psychotherapy (Dührssen 1964; Fonagy and Target 1996) no techniques of treatment were mentioned. The following paper describes in detail the technique of treatment on which the Heidelberg Study "On the Therapeutic Outcome in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy" is based, as it developed from 1975 to 1993 at the Heidelberg Institute for Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. Starting from Piaget's findings that the cognitive faculties of a child up to the age of 11 completely differ from those of an adult and taking into consideration the cerebral information processing and "the intellect pervadet sensory" (Schopenhauer) it is demonstrated that children take their intrapsychic and interpersonal conflicts into analytic play therapy or into role play on analogous levels. Protected by a safe distance from being aware of their conflicts they will on the analogous levels understand, work through, partially solve their conflicts and make use of it in reality without conscious recognition. The term "analogous level" is defined and the manifold possibilities of therapeutic intervention on this level are demonstrated. The efficacy of therapeutic treatment on analogous levels is discussed.

  15. Corpus vitreum, retina og chorioidea biopsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherfig, Erik Christian Høegh

    2002-01-01

    oftalmology, biopsy, choroid, corpus vitreum, retina, malignant melanoma, biopsy technic, retinoblastoma......oftalmology, biopsy, choroid, corpus vitreum, retina, malignant melanoma, biopsy technic, retinoblastoma...

  16. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  17. Determinación de un polimorfo de la cimetidina mediante la calorimetría diferencial de barrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martínez Álvarez

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estableció la diferencia entre 2 sustancias de masa molecular similar -la cimetidina A y la B-, pero de estructuras internas distintas, mediante el empleo de la técnica de calorimetría diferencial de barrido donde solamente una de ellas, la cimetidina B, posee la actividad farmacológica requerida, es decir, cumple con las especificaciones de la farmacopea.The difference between two substances of similar mollecular mass but of different internal structuras -cimetidine A and B- was established by using the differential scanning calorimetry. It was proved that only one of them, cimetidine B, has the required pharmacological activity, which means that it fulfills the pharmacopoeia specifications.

  18. The Retina Algorithm

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; PUNZI, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Charge particle reconstruction is one of the most demanding computational tasks found in HEP, and it becomes increasingly important to perform it in real time. We envision that HEP would greatly benefit from achieving a long-term goal of making track reconstruction happen transparently as part of the detector readout ("detector-embedded tracking"). We describe here a track-reconstruction approach based on a massively parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, inspired by studies of the processing of visual images by the brain as it happens in nature ('RETINA algorithm'). It turns out that high-quality tracking in large HEP detectors is possible with very small latencies, when this algorithm is implemented in specialized processors, based on current state-of-the-art, high-speed/high-bandwidth digital devices.

  19. Effect of essential oil compound on shedding and colonization of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, W Q; Hofacre, C L; Mathis, G F; Faltys, G

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of an essential oil blend (EO; carvacrol, thymol, eucalyptol, lemon) administered in drinking water on the performance, mortality, water consumption, pH of crop and ceca, and Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg fecal shedding and colonization in broiler birds following Salmonella Heidelberg challenge and feed withdrawal. Chicks were randomly assigned to water treatments containing 0.05, 0.025, or 0.0125% EO or untreated controls. Treatments were administered in drinking water on 0 to 7 and 35 to 42 d. One-half of the chicks were challenged with Salmonella Heidelberg and placed in pens with unchallenged chicks on d 1. Performance, mortality, water consumption, and pH were determined during the 42-d study. Prevalence of Salmonella Heidelberg was determined on drag swabs (0, 14, and 42 d) and in the ceca and crops (42 d). The 0.05% EO administered in drinking water significantly (P water significantly lowered the feed conversion ratio and increased weight gain compared with controls, but did not significantly reduce Salmonella Heidelberg colonization in the crops. The EO in drinking water did not significantly reduce Salmonella Heidelberg colonization in ceca or fecal shedding in broilers. The EO used in the study may control Salmonella Heidelberg contamination in crops of broilers when administered in drinking water and therefore may reduce the potential for cross-contamination of the carcass when the birds are processed.

  20. Helical tomotherapy. Experiences of the first 150 patients in Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzing, F.; Schubert, K.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Kalz, J.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: helical tomotherapy was introduced into clinical routine at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Germany, in July 2006. This report is intended to describe the experience with the first 150 patients treated with helical tomotherapy. Patient selection, time effort, handling of daily image guidance with megavoltage (MV) CT, and quality of radiation plans shall be assessed. Patients and methods: between July 2006 and May 2007, 150 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy in the University Hospital of Heidelberg. Mean age was 60 years with a minimum of 30 years and a maximum of 85 years. 79 of these patients received radiotherapy as a part of multimodal treatment pre- or postoperatively, 17 patients received treatment as a combined radiochemotherapy. 76% were treated with curative intent. Radiotherapy sites were central nervous system (n = 7), head and neck (n = 28), thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 58) and skeletal system (n = 20). Most common tumor entities were prostate cancer (n = 28), breast cancer (n = 17), gastrointestinal tumors (n = 19), pharyngeal carcinoma (n = 14), lymphoma (n = 13), metastatic disease (bone n = 14, liver n = 6, lung n = 4, lymph node n = 2), sarcoma (n = 8), malignant pleural mesothelioma (n = 5), ovarian cancer treated with whole abdominal irradiation (n = 4), lung cancer (n = 3), skin malignancies (n = 3), chordoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 2), one ependymoma and one medulloblastoma treated with craniospinal axis irradiation (n = 2), and others (n = 4). Nine patients were treated with single-fraction radiosurgery, nine with image-guided spinal reirradiation, and twelve patients were treated at multiple targets simultaneously. A pretreatment MV-CT scan was performed in 98.2% of the 3,026 fractions applied. After matching with the kilovoltage planning CT, corrections for translations and rotation around longitudinal axis (roll) were done. Results: mean time on table was 24

  1. Helical tomotherapy. Experiences of the first 150 patients in Heidelberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzing, F.; Schubert, K.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Kalz, J.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: helical tomotherapy was introduced into clinical routine at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Germany, in July 2006. This report is intended to describe the experience with the first 150 patients treated with helical tomotherapy. Patient selection, time effort, handling of daily image guidance with megavoltage (MV) CT, and quality of radiation plans shall be assessed. Patients and methods: between July 2006 and May 2007, 150 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy in the University Hospital of Heidelberg. Mean age was 60 years with a minimum of 30 years and a maximum of 85 years. 79 of these patients received radiotherapy as a part of multimodal treatment pre- or postoperatively, 17 patients received treatment as a combined radiochemotherapy. 76% were treated with curative intent. Radiotherapy sites were central nervous system (n = 7), head and neck (n = 28), thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 58) and skeletal system (n = 20). Most common tumor entities were prostate cancer (n = 28), breast cancer (n = 17), gastrointestinal tumors (n = 19), pharyngeal carcinoma (n = 14), lymphoma (n = 13), metastatic disease (bone n = 14, liver n = 6, lung n = 4, lymph node n = 2), sarcoma (n = 8), malignant pleural mesothelioma (n 5), ovarian cancer treated with whole abdominal irradiation (n = 4), lung cancer (n = 3), skin malignancies (n = 3), chordoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 2), one ependymoma and one medulloblastoma treated with craniospinal axis irradiation (n = 2), and others (n = 4). Nine patients were treated with single-fraction radiosurgery, nine with image-guided spinal reirradiation, and twelve patients were treated at multiple targets simultaneously. A pretreatment MV-CT scan was performed in 98.2% of the 3,026 fractions applied. After matching with the kilovoltage planning CT, corrections for translations and rotation around longitudinal axis (roll) were done. Results: mean time on table was 24

  2. "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures" - Development of faculty-wide standards for physical examination techniques and clinical procedures in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Ganschow, P; Groener, J B; Huwendiek, S; Köchel, A; Köhl-Hackert, N; Pjontek, R; Rodrian, J; Scheibe, F; Stadler, A-K; Steiner, T; Stiepak, J; Tabatabai, J; Utz, A; Kadmon, M

    2016-01-01

    The competent physical examination of patients and the safe and professional implementation of clinical procedures constitute essential components of medical practice in nearly all areas of medicine. The central objective of the projects "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures", which were initiated by students, was to establish uniform interdisciplinary standards for physical examination and clinical procedures, and to distribute them in coordination with all clinical disciplines at the Heidelberg University Hospital. The presented project report illuminates the background of the initiative and its methodological implementation. Moreover, it describes the multimedia documentation in the form of pocketbooks and a multimedia internet-based platform, as well as the integration into the curriculum. The project presentation aims to provide orientation and action guidelines to facilitate similar processes in other faculties.

  3. Heidelberg University Library and its Special Subject Collection in Art History

    OpenAIRE

    Effinger, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The article provides a short survey of the history and the services of the Special Subject Collection "Medieval and Modern Art History (up to 1945)" / "Art Studies" at the Heidelberg University Library funded by the DFG (German Research Foundation).

  4. The Heidelberg Appendicitis Score Predicts Perforated Appendicitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Michael; Günther, Patrick; Breil, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    In the future, surgical management of pediatric appendicitis might become limited to nonperforating appendicitis. Thus, it becomes increasingly important to differentiate advanced from simple appendicitis and to predict perforated appendicitis among a group of children with right-sided abdominal pain, which was the aim of this study. An institutionally approved, single-center retrospective analysis of all patients with appendectomy from January 2009 to December 2010 was conducted. All diagnostic aspects were evaluated to identify predictors and differentiators of perforated appendicitis. In 2 years, 157 children suffered from appendicitis. Perforation occurred in 47 (29.9%) of the patients. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels higher than 20 mg/dL ( P = .037) and free abdominal fluid on ultrasonography ( P = .031) are the most important features to differentiate perforated from simple appendicitis. Moreover, all children with perforation had a positive Heidelberg Appendicitis Score (HAS). A negative HAS excludes perforation in all cases (negative predictive value = 100%). Perforated appendicitis can be ruled out by the HAS. In a cohort with right-sided abdominal pain, perforation should be considered in children with high CRP levels and free fluids or abscess formation on ultrasound.

  5. Library goes Anatomy. Anatomische Lehrmedien an der Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrlein, S

    2014-01-01

    Heidelberg University Library is following new paths to optimize the librarian services for medical studies. In close cooperation with the Institute for Anatomy and Cell Biology at Heidelberg University the library is profoundly expanding the anatomical teaching equipment: the virtual dissecting table Anatomage enables medical students to work on life-size, anatomical models in 3D, providing the possibility to prepare for and practice their anatomy lessons. The comprehensive collection of ana...

  6. ESTUDIO TERMOXIDATIVO NO ISOTERMICO POR CALORIMETRÍA DIFERENCIAL DE BARRIDO DE POLIETILENO DE BAJA DENSIDAD FORMULADO CON LIGNINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irama Piña-Saenz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la capacidad antioxidante de la lignina (LLN en el polietileno de baja densidad (PEBD a través de un método no isotérmico empleando calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC. Las muestras bajo estudio, obtenidas de la formulación de PEBD con LLN, se sometieron a tratamientos térmicos a diferentes velocidades de calentamiento (β = 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 ° C/min, en presencia de oxígeno para favorecer la termo-oxidación del material. Se empleó un modelo cinético de degradación termoxidativa isoconversional, ajustada a la ecuación de Arrhenius, para determinar el factor de protección (PF de la lignina en la resina polimérica. Los resultados indican que bajo las formulaciones estudiadas, la lignina presenta una baja capacidad antioxidante en comparación con el Irganox1010. Sin embargo, en las formulaciones que contiene una mezcla de Irganox 1010 y lignina se observó un efecto sinergético en la capacidad antioxidativa de la lignina sobre el aditivo comercial.

  7. Observación del sistema poroso de rocas carbonatadas al microscopio electrónico de barrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso, F.

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available The pore system of three carbonate rocks is studied through observation of resin and latex casts, under scanning electron microscope. The selected rocks -Hontoria and Seville limestones, and Boñar dolomite- have been broadly employed in the construction of outstanding monuments of the Spanish Historical Heritage. The degree of impregnation achieved by the epoxy resins, according to different procedures, is also checked by means of mercury injection porosimetry techniques. The observation of the pore casts displays, generally, the complexity of the pore systems of these rocks.Se estudia en este trabajo el sistema poroso de tres rocas carbonatadas, a partir de observaciones de moldes de resina y réplicas de látex al microscopio electrónico de barrido. Las rocas seleccionadas -calizas de Hontoria y Sevilla, y dolomía de Boñar- han sido ampliamente utilizadas en la construcción de importantes monumentos del Patrimonio Histórico Español. Se ha comprobado, asimismo, el grado de impregnación alcanzado por las resinas epoxídicas en diferentes procedimientos, a partir de técnicas de porosimetria de inyección de mercurio. Los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto, en general, la complejidad de la estructura porosa de dichas rocas.

  8. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez; Marlene Montes Pérez

    2011-01-01

    Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparació...

  9. Estudio de la superficie de limas de endodoncia sometidas a desinfección química mediante microscopia electrónica de barrido

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Majó, G.; Mateos, M.; Navarro, J.L.; Canalda Sahli, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    Se observaron al microscopio electró nico de barrido 40 limas de endodoncia de acero inoxidable después de ser sometidas a 10 ciclos de desinfección de 10 minutos cada ciclo, sumergidas en diferentes desinfectantes químicos. No se observó corrosión en la superficie de las limas en las circunstancias en que se realizó ese estudio.

  10. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn or ... Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Leer en Español: Síntomas de desgarramiento o ...

  11. Immunohistochemical characterization of the chick marginal retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Lima

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina is a highly differentiated tissue with a complex layered structure that has been extensively characterized. However, most of the previous studies focused on the histology of the central retina while little is known about the cellular composition, organization and function of the marginal retina. Recent research has identified a subpopulation of multipotential progenitor cells in the marginal regions of the retina, closest to the ciliary body ("ciliary marginal zone". These cells are capable of differentiation in response to an appropriate stimulus. Thus, it is possible that the structure and composition of the marginal retina are distinct from those of the central retina to accommodate the potential addition of newly formed neurons. To characterize the cellular profile of the chick marginal retina, we labeled it immunohistochemically for markers whose staining pattern is well established in the central retina: calbindin, calretinin, protein kinase C, and choline acetyltransferase. Calbindin was present at very low levels in the marginal retina putative photoreceptor layer. Calretinin-positive horizontal cells were also sparse close to the ciliary marginal zone. The bipolar cells in the marginal outer plexiform layer were positive for anti-protein kinase C antibodies, but the density of labeling was also decreased in relation to the central retina. In contrast, the marginal starburst cholinergic amacrine cell pattern was very similar to the central retina. From these data we conclude that the structure of the marginal retina is significantly different from that of the central retina. In particular, the expression of late retina markers in the marginal retina decreased in comparison to the central retina.

  12. A hierarchical artificial retina architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alice C.; Azar, Adi N.

    2009-05-01

    Connectivity in the human retina is complex. Over one hundred million photoreceptors transduce light into electrical signals. These electrical signals are sent to the ganglion cells through amacrine and bipolar cells. Lateral connections involving horizontal and amacrine cells span throughout the outer plexiform layer and inner plexiform layer respectively. Horizontal cells are important for photoreceptor regulation by depolarizing them after an illumination occurs. Horizontal cells themselves form an electrical network that communicates by gap junctions, and these cells exhibit plasticity (change in behavior and structure) with respect to glycine receptors. The bipolar and amacrine cells transfer electrical signals from photoreceptors to the ganglion cells. Furthermore, amacrine cells are responsible for further processing the retinal image. Finally, the ganglion cells receive electrical signals from the bipolar and amacrine cells and will spike at a faster rate if there is a change in the overall intensity for a group of photoreceptors, sending a signal to the brain. Dramatic progress is being made with respect to retinal prostheses, raising hope for an entire synthetic retina in the future. We propose a bio-inspired 3D hierarchical pyramidal architecture for a synthetic retina that mimics the overall structure of the human retina. We chose to use a 3D architecture to facilitate connectivity among retinal cells, maintaining a hierarchical structure similar to that of the biological retina. The first layer of the architecture contains electronic circuits that model photoreceptors and horizontal cells. The second layer contains amacrine and bipolar electronic cells, and the third layer contains ganglion cells. Layer I has the highest number of cells, and layer III has the lowest number of cells, resulting in a pyramidal architecture. In our proposed architecture we intend to use photodetectors to transduce light into electrical signals. We propose to employ

  13. Morphologic changes in the retina after selective retina therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Ho; Yu, Seung-Young; Kim, Tae Gi; Kim, Eung Suk; Kwak, Hyung Woo

    2016-06-01

    To investigate structural changes in the retina by histologic evaluation and in vivo spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) following selective retina therapy (SRT) controlled by optical feedback techniques (OFT). SRT was applied to 12 eyes of Dutch Belted rabbits. Retinal changes were assessed based on fundus photography, fluorescein angiography (FAG), SD-OCT, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at each of the following time points: 1 h, and 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after SRT. BrdU (5'-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine) incorporation assay was also conducted to evaluate potential proliferation of RPE cells. SRT lesions at1 h after SRT were ophthalmoscopically invisible. FAG showed leakage in areas corresponding to SRT lesions, and hyperfluorescence disappeared after 7 days. SD-OCT showed that decreased reflectivity corresponding to RPE damage was restored to normal over time in SRT lesions. Histologic analysis revealed that the damage in SRT lesions was primarily limited to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the outer segments of the photoreceptors. SEM and TEM showed RPE cell migration by day 3 after SRT, and restoration of the RPE monolayer with microvilli by 1 week after SRT. At 14 and 28 days, ultrastructures of the RPE, including the microvilli and tight junctions, were completely restored. The outer segments of the photoreceptors also recovered without sequelae. Interdigitation between the RPE and photoreceptors was observed. BrdU incorporation assay revealed proliferation of RPE on day 3 after SRT, and peak proliferation was observed on day 7 after SRT. Based on multimodal imaging and histologic assessment, our findings demonstrate that SRT with OFT could selectively target the RPE without damaging the neurosensory retina. Therefore, the use of SRT with OFT opens the door to the possibility of clinical trials of well-defined invisible and nondestructive retina therapy, especially

  14. Library goes Anatomy. Anatomische Lehrmedien an der Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehrlein, Sabine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] Heidelberg University Library is following new paths to optimize the librarian services for medical studies. In close cooperation with the Institute for Anatomy and Cell Biology at Heidelberg University the library is profoundly expanding the anatomical teaching equipment: the virtual dissecting table Anatomage enables medical students to work on life-size, anatomical models in 3D, providing the possibility to prepare for and practice their anatomy lessons. The comprehensive collection of anatomical models and plastinates supports students, in particular, in their preparation for the preliminary medical examination.

  15. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparación de mezclas físicas binarias entre el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Se detectó por ambos métodos que el principio activo tuvo una transición física de fusión, no reportada en la literatura, lo que permitió poder calcular su pureza por calorimetría diferencial de barrido. Mediante la técnica calorimétrica fue posible inferir la ausencia de incompatibilidad química entre el principio activo y los excipientes estudiados. Además, mediante el cálculo de la energía de activación se estableció el siguiente orden de estabilidad térmica: auranofin:PVP> auranofin:lactosa> auranofin:explotab> auranofin:estearato> auranofin:aerosil> auranofin:celulosa, por lo que se recomienda el uso de estos excipientes en la elaboración de la formulación farmacéutica.

  16. Compatibilidad química del piracetam determinada por calorimetría diferencial de barrido Chemical compatibility of piracetam determined by differential scanning calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez; Keila Mena Salabarría; Mirelys Céspedes Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: en la primera etapa de preformulación de un medicamento se seleccionan los excipientes y es importante la realización de los estudios de compatibilidad química entre el ingrediente activo farmacéutico (IFA) y excipientes. Una de las técnicas más rápidas para realizar dichos estudios es la Calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC), y como técnica complementaria la Termogravimetría (TG). Objetivo: empleando DSC y TG, se realiza un estudio de compatibilidad química entre IFA y exci...

  17. Redescripción de Lamanema chavezi por Microscopía Óptica y Microscopía Electrónica de Barrido

    OpenAIRE

    Angulo T., José; Laboratorio de Parasitología de Fauna Silvestre y Zoonosis, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Tantaleán-Vidaurre, Manuel; Laboratorio de Parasitología de Fauna Silvestre y Zoonosis, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Watanabe-Watanabe, Raquel; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Del Solar Velarde, Jonatan Mikhail; Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Universidade Federal da Bahia

    2015-01-01

    El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo redescribir morfo-anatómicamente a Lamanema chavezi en sus tres estadios parasitarios (huevo, larva de tercer estadío, adulto) utilizando la técnica de microscopía óptica y microscopía electrónica de barrido. Se trabajó con alpacas (Vicugna pacos) sacrificadas en el Camal Municipal de la provincia de Melgar, Puno, Perú. Los estadios adultos fueron colectados del intestino delgado aplicando el método de Travassos; los huevos fueron colectados de heces de ...

  18. Ellipsometry and electronic microscopy of ashes swept of the Popocatepetl volcano; Elipsometria y microscopia electronica de barrido de las cenizas del volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Aaron; Munoz, Rafel; Falcon, Nelson [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela); Chavira, Enrique [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, Puebla (Mexico)

    2001-12-01

    The ellipsometry and the scanning electronic microscopy is applied to the study of the optic properties of Popocatepetl volcano ash in connection with the form, ruggedness and elemental chemical composition of the microparticles, also to argue about the relation with atmospheric conditions. [Spanish] Se aplica la eliposometria y la microscopia electronica de barrido al estudio de las propiedades opticas de las cenizas de volcan Popocatepetl en relacion con la forma, rugosidad y composicion quimica elemental de las microparticulas, destacandose su vinculacion con las condiciones de visibilidad.

  19. Are humans by birth as wicked as the Heidelberg Catechism (3-11 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the introduction compares the Heidelberg Catechism's theologically framed concept of sin with similar and opposing secular views of the past (e.g., Plautus, Quintilian, Hobbes), the main part uses contemporary scientific studies to challenge the Catechism's view that (after alienation from God in the Fall) all human ...

  20. the heidelberg catechism on prayer: relevance of a 16th century ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    people with the life-affirming ethos of God's alternative kingdom be formed? In view of this challenge, the essay explores the potential of the third part of the Heidelberg. Catechism (on prayer) for moral formation in Christian households. ..... 7 In subsequent publications, Schüssler Fiorenza continues to remind professional.

  1. the heidelberg catechism on prayer: relevance of a 16th century ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a world characterized by power abuse and violence, where and how would people with the life-affirming ethos of God's alternative kingdom be formed? In view of this challenge, the essay explores the potential of the third part of the Heidelberg. Catechism (on prayer) for moral formation in Christian households.

  2. Proteome profiling of embryo chick retina

    OpenAIRE

    Mizukami, Mina; Kanamoto, Takashi; Souchelnytskyi, Nazariy; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known regarding the molecular pathways that underlie the process of retinal development. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins which may be involved in development of retina. We used a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are up- or down-regulated during the development of the embryo chick retina. Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed with the retina of embryo chicken, which was obtained from embryos of day 7 (ED7) ...

  3. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas.

  4. [Lattice degeneration of the retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, E V; Suetov, A A; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is a clinically important type of peripheral retinal dystrophies due to its participation in the pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In spite of extensive epidemiological, morphological, and clinical data, the question on causes of this particular type of retinal dystrophies currently remains debatable. Existing hypotheses on pathogenesis of retinal structural changes in lattice degeneration explain it to a certain extent. In clinical ophthalmology it is necessary to pay close attention to this kind of degenerations and distinguish between cases requiring preventive treatment and those requiring monitoring.

  5. Lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, N E

    1979-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is the most important of all clinically distinct entities that effect the peripheral fundus and are related to retinal detachment. The purpose of this review is to survey the extensive literature, to evaluate the many diverse opinions on this subject, and to correlate and summarize all the known facts regarding this disease entity. The disease is fully defined and described, both clinically and histologically. Some aspects of the disease are still poorly understood, and some remain controversial, especially in the area of management. For this reason, the indications for treatment are discussed under eight subsections, with a view toward providing practical guidelines for recommendations in management.

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn or ... Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Leer en Español: Diagnóstico de un desgarramiento ...

  7. The Functional Architecture of the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Examines research related to the retina's coding of visual input with emphasis on the organization of two kinds of ganglion cell receptive fields. Reviews current techniques for examining the shapes and arrangement in the retina of entire populations of nerve cells. (ML)

  8. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  9. SUMOylation Regulation of Retina Development and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Li, D W-C

    2016-01-01

    The structure and developmental mechanisms of vertebrate retina are highly conserved. One of the most distinctive events during retinogenesis is the temporally and spatially generation of seven types of retinal cells from the multipotent retinal progenitor cells. The importance and prevalence of SUMOylation in regulation of this process through modulation of gene expression and protein function diversity have been increasingly appreciated. Here, we review the biological significance of SUMOylation in retina development, examine how SUMOylation balances the proliferation and cell cycle exit of retinal progenitor cells, and finally discuss the molecular mechanisms mediating the specification of different retina neurons and photoreceptors through modulation of various transcription factors. The potential role of SUMOylation in normal retina function is illustrated by the abundant expression of key components of SUMOylation machinery in mouse retina, and is also exemplified by the highly conserved SUMOylation site on neurotransmission receptors in ganglion cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Estudio Ultraestructural de Leptospira Biflexa Serovar Andamana cepa JNS al Microscopio Electrónico de Transmisión y Barrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Macedo A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Investigar la ultraestructura de Leptospira biflexa serovar Andamana cepa JNS, por la técnica de réplica metálica, cortes ultrafinos y tinción negativa al microscopio electrónico de transmisión (MET y barrido (MEB en alta y ultraalta resolución. Materiales y métodos: Cultivos en fase logarítmica 12-15x106 cel/mL del serovar Andamana cepa JNS, aislada de un paciente. Se aplicaron los métodos de tinción negativa, cortes ultrafinos y réplica metálica para la microscopía electrónica de transmisión. Para la microscopía electrónica de barrido se usaron las técnicas en alta y ultraalta resolución de muestras cubiertas con oro y platino. Resultados: Con el método de réplica metálica se definió la estructura externa en células individuales de Leptospira biflexa serovar Andamana al MET. Mediante la técnica de tinción negativa se observó la membrana externa formada por tres capas, los filamentos axiales, la membrana citoplasmática, el citoplasma granular con inclusiones electronodensas, las formaciones «globosas», la «estructura terminal», «apéndices terminales», además de las inclusiones permeables para los electrones, claramente definidas. La morfología clásica del microorganismo fue observada en cortes finos, y al microscopio electrónico de barrido. Conclusiones: Se reporta por primera vez la técnica de réplica metálica para determinar la morfología externa en células individuales de Leptospira biflexa serovar Andamana JNS, la cual ofrece resultados ventajosos en comparación con otros métodos. La ultraestructura, y las inclusiones permeables para electrones dentro del citoplasma a una magnificación de 120000x 20KV fueron nítidamente observadas por tinción negativa. La estructura helicoidal del microorganismo se comprobó al MEB.

  11. Validation of cooking methods using shell eggs inoculated with Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis and Heidelberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A L; Curtis, P A; Conner, D E; McKee, S R; Kerth, L K

    2008-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has long been associated with eggs, and more recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg has also become associated with eggs. This study was undertaken to determine whether Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Heidelberg are effectively eliminated from eggs by various cooking methods. Seven cooking methods were chosen--hard and soft cooked, scrambled, over easy, sunny-side up, poached, and free poached--and a pan insert and the free-flowing method were used. Shell eggs, purchased from a grocery store, were inoculated with Salmonella and cooked. The cooked eggs were analyzed by USDA-approved methods for Salmonella recovery. Findings indicated that existing cooking methods for the hard-cooked, soft-cooked, and poaching methods were safe. However, the same was not true for the current sunny-side-up, over-easy, and scrambled egg cooking methods.

  12. Extended-spectrum cephalosporin- resistant Salmonella enterica serovar heidelberg strains, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Geurts, Yvon; Dierikx, Cindy M.; Brouwer, Mike; Kant, Arie; Wit, Ben; Heymans, Raymond; Pelt, Van Wilfrid; Mevius, Dik J.

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strains (JF6X01.0022/XbaI.0251, JF6X01.0326/XbaI.1966, JF6X01.0258/XbaI.1968, and JF6X01.0045/XbaI.1970) have been identified in the United States with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our examination of isolates

  13. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  14. Quantum biology of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Paul Ikgan; Luiten, André N; Stace, Thomas M; Wood, John Pm; Casson, Robert J

    2014-08-01

    The emerging field of quantum biology has led to a greater understanding of biological processes at the microscopic level. There is recent evidence to suggest that non-trivial quantum features such as entanglement, tunnelling and coherence have evolved in living systems. These quantum features are particularly evident in supersensitive light-harvesting systems such as in photosynthesis and photoreceptors. A biomimetic strategy utilizing biological quantum phenomena might allow new advances in the field of quantum engineering, particularly in quantum information systems. In addition, a better understanding of quantum biological features may lead to novel medical diagnostic and therapeutic developments. In the present review, we discuss the role of quantum physics in biological systems with an emphasis on the retina. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  15. Molecular detection assay of five Salmonella serotypes of public interest: Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Newport, Heidelberg, and Hadar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarel, M; Tudor, A; Loneragan, G H; Nightingale, K K

    2017-03-01

    Foodborne illnesses due to Salmonella represent an important public-health concern worldwide. In the United States, a majority of Salmonella infections are associated with a small number of serotypes. Furthermore, some serotypes that are overrepresented among human disease are also associated with multi-drug resistance phenotypes. Rapid detection of serotypes of public-health concern might help reduce the burden of salmonellosis cases and limit exposure to multi-drug resistant Salmonella. We developed a two-step real-time PCR-based rapid method for the identification and detection of five Salmonella serotypes that are either overrepresented in human disease or frequently associated with multi-drug resistance, including serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Newport, Hadar, and Heidelberg. Two sets of four markers were developed to detect and differentiate the five serotypes. The first set of markers was developed as a screening step to detect the five serotypes; whereas, the second set was used to further distinguish serotypes Heidelberg, Newport and Hadar. The utilization of these markers on a two-step investigation strategy provides a diagnostic specificity of 97% for the detection of Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Infantis, Newport and Hadar. The diagnostic sensitivity of the detection makers is >96%. The availability of this two-step rapid method will facilitate specific detection of Salmonella serotypes that contribute to a significant proportion of human disease and carry antimicrobial resistance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [Evaluation of traditional German undergraduate surgical training. An analysis at Heidelberg University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürer, S; Schellberg, D; Schmidt, J; Kallinowski, F; Mehrabi, A; Herfarth, Ch; Büchler, M W; Kadmon, M

    2006-04-01

    The medical faculty of Heidelberg University implemented a new problem-based clinical curriculum (Heidelberg Curriculum Medicinale, or Heicumed) in 2001. The present study analyses the evaluation data of two student cohorts prior to the introduction of Heicumed. Its aim was to specify problems of the traditional training and to draw conclusions for implementation of a new curriculum. The evaluation instrument was the Heidelberg Inventory for the Evaluation of Teaching (HILVE-I). The data were analysed calculating differences in the means between defined groups, with the 13 primary scales of the HILVE I-instrument as dependent variables. Teaching method and subject had no systematic influence on evaluation results. Thus, didactic lecture in orthopedic surgery achieved better results than small group tutorials, while the data on vascular and general surgery showed opposite results. Major factors for success were continuity and didactic training of lecturers and tutors. This is convincingly reflected by the results of the lecture course "Differential diagnosis in general surgery". The good evaluation data on small group tutorials resulted largely from the "participation" and "discussion" scales, which represent interactivity in learning. The results of the present study suggest the importance of two major pedagogic ideas: continuity and didactic training of lecturers and tutors. These principles were widely implemented in Heicumed and have contributed to the success of the new curriculum.

  17. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P.

    1991-01-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin

  18. Efecto del pH del agua de piscina en esmalte de dientes deciduos humanos. Estudio con microscopía electrónica de barrido

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Matta, Ailín R.; Facultad de Estomatología, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,; Kanashiro Irakawa, Carmen R.; Facultad de Estomatología, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar in vitro el efecto de los niveles de pH ácidos del agua depiscina en la morfología de la superficie del esmalte de piezas deciduas. Se utilizaron 10 piezasdeciduas extraídas divididas en dos grupos. Un grupo fue expuesto al agua de piscina de pH 5.5 yel otro a pH 7, ambos por 20 horas. Se realizó una evaluación macroscópica y luego se metalizaronlas muestras para la evaluación con microscopía electrónica de barrido. Al aplicar la pruebaexacta de Fisher,...

  19. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid.

  20. Complex computation in the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  1. Proteome profiling of embryo chick retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souchelnytskyi Nazariy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the molecular pathways that underlie the process of retinal development. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins which may be involved in development of retina. We used a proteomics-based approach to identify proteins that are up- or down-regulated during the development of the embryo chick retina. Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed with the retina of embryo chicken, which was obtained from embryos of day 7 (ED7 and of day 11 (ED11. The protein spots showing significant differences were selected for identification by MALDI mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were differentially expressed; seven proteins were up-regulated in embryo retina of chicken at ED 11 and six proteins were down-regulated. Significant proteins were also evaluated in embryo day 15 (ED15. Some of identified proteins were known to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, transport, metabolism, organization and extracellular matrix, and others also included novel proteins. Conclusion We identified thirteen proteins which differentially expressed in embryonal retina of chicken at day 7, as compared to the retina of embryo of day 11. They were various regulatory proteins for cellular signaling.

  2. Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin-Resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg Strains, the Netherlands1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Yvon; Dierikx, Cindy M.; Brouwer, Michael S.M.; Kant, Arie; Wit, Ben; Heymans, Raymond; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Mevius, Dik J.

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strains (JF6X01.0022/XbaI.0251, JF6X01.0326/XbaI.1966, JF6X01.0258/XbaI.1968, and JF6X01.0045/XbaI.1970) have been identified in the United States with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our examination of isolates showed introduction of these strains in the Netherlands and highlight the need for active surveillance and intervention strategies by public health organizations. PMID:27314180

  3. Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin-Resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg Strains, the Netherlands(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Geurts, Yvon; Dierikx, Cindy M; Brouwer, Michael S M; Kant, Arie; Wit, Ben; Heymans, Raymond; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Mevius, Dik J

    2016-07-01

    Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strains (JF6X01.0022/XbaI.0251, JF6X01.0326/XbaI.1966, JF6X01.0258/XbaI.1968, and JF6X01.0045/XbaI.1970) have been identified in the United States with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our examination of isolates showed introduction of these strains in the Netherlands and highlight the need for active surveillance and intervention strategies by public health organizations.

  4. [Nomenclature and classification of complications. Standard procedure at the Heidelberg University Orthopedic Clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, K L; Clauss, M

    1999-03-01

    In order to get a better data management of complications in orthopedic surgery and in order to get comparable statistics a standardisation of nomenclature and classification of complications is demanded since 1.1.1997. The Orthopedic University Clinic of Heidelberg started with a register of all early complications of all inpatients. According to a standardized nomenclature all occurred complications the doctors put in the data of complications in a database. These data were controlled, complemented and classified by members of the quality management group. This guideline consists of five parts: catalogue of diagnoses, general and special definitions, classification and an allocation table of diagnoses to grades of severity.

  5. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  6. Stereometric parameters change vs. Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) agreement in Heidelberg Retina Tomography III (HRT-3) early detection of clinical significant glaucoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, A M; Cherecheanu, A P; Stana, D; Voinea, L; Ciuluvica, R; Savlovschi, C; Serban, D

    2014-01-01

    to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of the stereometric parameters change analysis vs. Topographic Change Analysis in early detection of glaucoma progression. 81 patients with POAG were monitored for 4 years (GAT monthly, SAP at every 6 months, optic disc photographs and HRT3 yearly). The exclusion criteria were other optic disc or retinal pathology; topographic standard deviation (TSD>30; inter-test variation of reference height>25 μm. The criterion for structural progression was the following: at least 20 adjacent super-pixels with a clinically significant decrease in height (>5%). 16 patients of the total 81 presented structural progression on TCA. The most useful stereometric parameters for the early detection of glaucoma progression were the following: Rim Area change (sensitivity 100%, specificity 74.2% for a "cut-off " value of -0.05), C/D Area change (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 71.5% for a "cut off " value of 0.02), C/D linear change (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 71.5% for a "cut-off " value of 0.02), Rim Volume change (sensitivity 71.4%, specificity 88.8% for a "cut-off " value of -0.04). RNFL Thickness change (<0) was highly sensitive (82%), but less specific for glaucoma progression (45,2%). Changes of the other stereometric parameters have a limited diagnostic value for the early detection of glaucoma progression. TCA is a valuable tool for the assessment of the structural progression in glaucoma patients and its inter-test variability is low. On long-term, the quantitative analysis according to stereometric parameters change is also very important. The most relevant parameters to detect progression are RA, C/D Area, Linear C/D and RV.

  7. Dimensions of the foveal avascular zone using the Heidelberg retinal angiogram-2 in normal eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Deepa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose was to study the dimensions of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ using Heidelberg Retinal Angiogram-2 (HRA-2; Heidelberg Engineering GmBH, Dossenheim, Germany. Materials and Methods: An observational study of the FAZ area and circumference was done with fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA using HRA-2 in 31 normal individuals. The FAZ was studied using both contrast-adjusted and nonadjusted methods. Contrast adjustment was done to obtain better visualization of the finer capillaries around the fovea enabling more precise measurements of the FAZ in normal eyes. Results: The mean area of the FAZ calculated by the contrast-adjusted method was 0.2753 mm 2 (±0.074 and the mean circumference was 2.22 mm (±0.048. By the conventional method, the area and circumference of the FAZ were 0.6241 mm 2 (±0.177 and 3.23 mm (±0.454, respectively. Conclusion: The measurements of area and circumference of FAZ using contrast-adjusted methods were significantly smaller than the conventional method.

  8. Retinal nerve fibre layer imaging: comparison of Cirrus optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retinal tomograph 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Assaf; Lim, Ridia; Rush, Ryan; Sheth, Saumil; Goldberg, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Hospital setting. One hundred seventy-three subjects (85 glaucoma and 88 normal subjects). One eye from each individual was selected randomly for imaging by the spectral domain Cirrus optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retinal tomograph 3. Global thickness and measurements at the four quadrants around the optic disc. Measurements as determined by Heidelberg retinal tomograph 3 were significantly larger than measurements done by Cirrus optical coherence tomography (respectively in mm, for global thickness: 200.0 ± 87.2 and 80.7 ± 14.7; for temporal quadrant: 75.3 ± 31.9 and 59.1 ± 13.8; for superior quadrant: 223.2 ± 128.4 and 97.7 ± 20.9; for nasal quadrant: 208.0 ± 102.9 and 66.8 ± 11.8; and for inferior quadrant: 224.4 ± 116.9 and 99.1 ± 26.6, for all P fibre layer thickness. The normative diagnostic classification of the two technologies may not agree. The results preclude interchangeable use of these measurements in clinical practice. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologistss.

  9. Challenges in the evolution of the medical informatics program at heidelberg/heilbronn (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, P; Haag, M; Leven, F J; Dickhaus, H

    2009-01-01

    Health and medical informatics (HMI) is an evolving discipline. Therefore, evolving educational programs in HMI have to take a variety of requirements into account. The aim of this paper is to analyze these requirements and to compare them with the medical informatics program Heidelberg/Heilbronn, Germany. Systematic analysis of the IMIA recommendations on educating HMI, the Bologna declaration, current technological and health care developments and the results of graduates surveys. The latest revision of the Heidelberg/Heilbronn medical informatics program not only takes current developments into account but also realizes the IMIA recommendations, the Bologna declaration and graduates' data and feedback obtained in structured surveys. The topics bioinformatics, IT security and telemedicine were strengthened, taking major research and application trends into account. The program has been transformed into a consecutive bachelor/master program. It qualifies its graduates to work in the field of medical informatics as well as in informatics. Medical informatics is a very broad field. Programs have to make concessions to scope: It is not possible to provide profound knowledge and skills in computer science and also teach a variety of application areas like bioinformatics, public health informatics and clinical informatics in depth within one medical informatics program. Many graduate programs in various nations concentrate on providing HMI skills to health care professionals.

  10. Retina image–based optic disc segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The change of optic disc can be used to diagnose many eye diseases, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. Moreover, retinal blood vessel pattern is unique for human beings even for identical twins. It is a highly stable pattern in biometric identification. Since optic disc is the beginning of the optic nerve and main blood vessels in retina, it can be used as a reference point of identification. Therefore, optic disc segmentation is an important technique for developing a human identity recognition system and eye disease diagnostic system. This article hence presents an optic disc segmentation method to extract the optic disc from a retina image. The experimental results show that the optic disc segmentation method can give impressive results in segmenting the optic disc from a retina image.

  11. Molecular Anatomy of the Developing Human Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Akina; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Brooks, Matthew J; Chaitankar, Vijender; Wilken, Matthew S; Zhang, Chi; Starostik, Margaret R; Gieser, Linn; La Torre, Anna; Nishio, Mario; Bates, Olivia; Walton, Ashley; Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia; Glass, Ian A; Wong, Rachel O L; Swaroop, Anand; Reh, Thomas A

    2017-12-18

    Clinical and genetic heterogeneity associated with retinal diseases makes stem-cell-based therapies an attractive strategy for personalized medicine. However, we have limited understanding of the timing of key events in the developing human retina, and in particular the factors critical for generating the unique architecture of the fovea and surrounding macula. Here we define three key epochs in the transcriptome dynamics of human retina from fetal day (D) 52 to 136. Coincident histological analyses confirmed the cellular basis of transcriptional changes and highlighted the dramatic acceleration of development in the fovea compared with peripheral retina. Human and mouse retinal transcriptomes show remarkable similarity in developmental stages, although morphogenesis was greatly expanded in humans. Integration of DNA accessibility data allowed us to reconstruct transcriptional networks controlling photoreceptor differentiation. Our studies provide insights into human retinal development and serve as a resource for molecular staging of human stem-cell-derived retinal organoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for 3 H-glycine, 3 H-dopamine, and 3 H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these 3 H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of 3 H-glutamate and 3 H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally

  13. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg Chemical compatibility of 3 mg Auranofin tablets demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez; Marlene Montes Pérez

    2011-01-01

    Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparació...

  14. Operational Transition from the First-Generation Heidelberg Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography [OCT("OCT1")] to the Second-Generation Heidelberg Spectralis OCT("OCT2")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, S.; Brunstetter, T.; Young, M.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W.; Derrick, R.; Wells, J.; Dey, B.; Todd, K.; Smith, B.; hide

    2018-01-01

    The Heidelberg Spectralis "OCT2", which recently became commercially available, is going to be implemented at the Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic and on board the International Space Station. Due to the increased scan rate of the "OCT2", this upgrade will allow for significant reduction in valuable crew testing time and also allow for additional capabilities, like OCT Angiography and Multi-Color Fundus Imaging. Due to the custom scans used to monitor Space Flight-Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (SANS) in our crewmembers, an evaluation to assess the impacts of transitioning from "OCT1" to "OCT2" was performed. An engineering assessment (N=1) was performed to identify any potential impacts of maintaining an "OCT1" on board ISS while implementing an "OCT2" in the JSC Clinic. "OCT2" implementation will lag JSC FMC clinical implementation due to the flight certification/manifestation process. The clinical assessment was performed (n=12) to identify any impacts due to the replacement of the "OCT1" with the "OCT2" to the longitudinal OCT data across a crewmember's mission/lifetime. The qualitative results from the engineering and clinical evaluation will be reported, as well as the quantitative assessment of the clinical variables

  15. [Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Baron, D; Berrod, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina are present from teenage years onwards and increase with age. These abnormabilities are frequent, some of them being benign while others predispose to retinal tears and detachment. In the latter case, the lesions are rhegmatogenous and may justify prophylactic treatment by laser photocoagulation. We distinguish congenital lesions of the peripheral retina and intraretinal, chorioretinal and vitreoretinal degenerations. The holes and tears observed in 2% of the population consist of round atrophic holes, "horseshoe" tears, oral dialyses and giant tears. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics of lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, F; Ohba, N

    1982-01-01

    First-degree relatives of proband patients with lattice degeneration of the retina revealed a significantly higher prevalence of the disease than the prevalence in the general population: the former had the disease about three times as frequently as the latter. The observed data were analyzed in terms of their accordance with recognized genetic models. The inheritance pattern did not fit well to a monogenic mode of inheritance, and it was hypothesized that a polygenic or multifactorial mode of inheritance is the most likely for lattice degeneration of the retina.

  17. Characterization of a multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg outbreak strain in commercial turkeys: Colonization, transmission, and host transcriptional response

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg has been associated with numerous human foodborne illness outbreaks due to consumption of poultry. For example, in 2011, an MDR S. Heidelberg outbreak associated with ground turkey sickened 136 individuals and resulted...

  18. Identification of an early damage of the retina by laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, G.; Hochgesand, P.; Stockhausen, M.; Valeske, W.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation has been to find out the retinal threshold energy for a Q-switched Ruby-Laser with an impulse duration of 50 ns. A commercial Laser-Type (Fa. Eltrughs, Heidelberg, West Germany, Type CE 602) was used. For the test rabbits were used general anesthesia: the threshold energy was first determined ophthalmoscopically-enzyme-histochemically. In the first series the coagulation energy accounted between 7 x 10 -4 J and 9 x 10 -7 J, in the second between 10 -6 J and 1.5 x 10 -5 J. Clinically the threshold energy was found at a level of 3 - 5 x 10 -6 J, clinical-enzyme-histochemically at 1 - 2 x 10 -6 J. A theoretical and physical calculation leaded to 0.3 - 3 x 10 -6 J. Since the energy measurement varies and due to the different resorption qualities of the human and the rabbit's retina the threshold energy accounts 10 -7 J. Labour safety protection should prescribe a threshold energy less than 10 -8 J for a Q-switched Ruby-Laser of an impulse duration of 50 ns. (orig.) [de

  19. Estimation of gastric residence time of the Heidelberg capsule in humans: effect of varying food composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojaverian, P.; Ferguson, R.K.; Vlasses, P.H.; Rocci, M.L. Jr.; Oren, A.; Fix, J.A.; Caldwell, L.J.; Gardner, C.

    1985-01-01

    In animal and human studies, the gastric emptying of large (greater than 1 mm) indigestible solids is due to the activity of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex. The gastric residence time (GRT) of an orally administered, nondigestible, pH-sensitive, radiotelemetric device (Heidelberg capsule) was evaluated in three studies in healthy volunteers. In 6 subjects, the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule was compared with the half-emptying time (t1/2) of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with technetium 99m after a 4-ml/kg liquid fatty meal. The mean (+/-SD) GRT (4.3 +/- 1.4 h) was significantly (p less than 0.001) longer than the mean t1/2 (1.1 +/- 0.3 h); the GRT was prolonged compared with the t1/2 in each subject. In a randomized, crossover trial in 10 subjects, frequent feeding caused a dramatic prolongation in mean GRT of the capsule compared with the fasting state (greater than 14.5 vs. 0.5 h, p less than 0.005). In another crossover study in 6 subjects, the GRT of the capsule was evaluated after an overnight fast, a standard breakfast including solid food, and a liquid meal (i.e., 200 ml of diluted light cream). The mean GRT was 2.6 +/- 0.9 h after the liquid meal vs. 1.2 +/- 0.8 h after fasting (p less than 0.025). The mean GRT after the breakfast was 4.8 +/- 1.5 h, which was significantly greater than that after fasting (p less than 0.001) and after the liquid meal (p less than 0.01). These data suggest that the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule is a marker of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in humans, the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex can be markedly delayed by frequent feedings with solids, and the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex is delayed by both liquid and solid meals

  20. Estimation of gastric residence time of the Heidelberg capsule in humans: effect of varying food composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojaverian, P.; Ferguson, R.K.; Vlasses, P.H.; Rocci, M.L. Jr.; Oren, A.; Fix, J.A.; Caldwell, L.J.; Gardner, C.

    1985-08-01

    In animal and human studies, the gastric emptying of large (greater than 1 mm) indigestible solids is due to the activity of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex. The gastric residence time (GRT) of an orally administered, nondigestible, pH-sensitive, radiotelemetric device (Heidelberg capsule) was evaluated in three studies in healthy volunteers. In 6 subjects, the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule was compared with the half-emptying time (t1/2) of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with technetium 99m after a 4-ml/kg liquid fatty meal. The mean (+/-SD) GRT (4.3 +/- 1.4 h) was significantly (p less than 0.001) longer than the mean t1/2 (1.1 +/- 0.3 h); the GRT was prolonged compared with the t1/2 in each subject. In a randomized, crossover trial in 10 subjects, frequent feeding caused a dramatic prolongation in mean GRT of the capsule compared with the fasting state (greater than 14.5 vs. 0.5 h, p less than 0.005). In another crossover study in 6 subjects, the GRT of the capsule was evaluated after an overnight fast, a standard breakfast including solid food, and a liquid meal (i.e., 200 ml of diluted light cream). The mean GRT was 2.6 +/- 0.9 h after the liquid meal vs. 1.2 +/- 0.8 h after fasting (p less than 0.025). The mean GRT after the breakfast was 4.8 +/- 1.5 h, which was significantly greater than that after fasting (p less than 0.001) and after the liquid meal (p less than 0.01). These data suggest that the GRT of the Heidelberg capsule is a marker of the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in humans, the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex can be markedly delayed by frequent feedings with solids, and the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex is delayed by both liquid and solid meals.

  1. Information processing in the outer retina of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, D.

    2017-01-01

    The retina translates light into neuronal activity. Thus, it renders visual information of the external environment. The retina can only send a limited amount of information to the brain within a given period. To use this amount optimally, light stimuli are strongly processed in the retina. This

  2. Ephaptic communication in the vertebrate retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Kamermans, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, cones project to the horizontal cells (HCs) and bipolar cells (BCs). The communication between cones and HCs uses both chemical and ephaptic mechanisms. Cones release glutamate in a Ca2+-dependent manner, while HCs feed back to cones via an ephaptic mechanism.

  3. [From stand-alone solution to longitudinal communication curriculum--development and implementation at the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sator, Marlene; Jünger, Jana

    2015-05-01

    At the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg, implementation of an interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum was started in 2001 with the goal of achieving sustained promotion of communicative and clinical competences. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of Heidelberg's longitudinal communication curriculum. Furthermore, innovative aspects and strategies are discussed. The methodological approaches for development and implementation were Kern's "Six-step Approach" and a SWOT analysis. The process resulted in an innovative communication curriculum that starts with an integrated curriculum for developing clinical and communicative competence in the pre-clinical phase and continues in the clinical phase with medical communication and interactive training. Satisfaction with the communication curriculum and its effectiveness were rated highly by students. Residents who had graduated from Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg rated the extent to which they had communicative competencies at the time of their graduation at their disposal significantly higher than residents who had graduated from the other 4 medical faculties in Baden-Württemberg. The experiences gained in Heidelberg can be applied by other faculties. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Poultry litter environment selects for the development of antibiotic resistance (AR) in Salmonella Heidelberg via conjugative IncX plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fitness of S. Heidelberg in poultry litter (PL) was determined following growth preconditioning in either Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth or poultry litter extracts (PLE, a centrifuged and filter sterilized PL slurry). Isolates were monitored by direct culture count for up to 9 days. The concen...

  5. Genotypic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from chickens and turkeys in the midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Kassem, Issmat I; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Goyal, Sagar M; Lauer, Dale; Voss, Shauna; Nagaraja, Kakambi V

    2017-05-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common causes of foodborne illnesses in humans in the United States, and domestic poultry is considered an important source of this pathogen. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg is the fourth most commonly reported Salmonella from retail meats and food animals in the United States. We assessed the genotypes and antimicrobial resistance phenotypes of Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from various chicken and turkey hatcheries and breeder farms in the Midwest. The genotypes of 33 S. Heidelberg isolates from chickens ( n = 19) and turkeys ( n = 14) were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Cluster analysis of the fingerprints showed that the majority of the chicken isolates grouped together with 87% similarity; those from turkeys clustered with 88% similarity. Similarity between chicken and turkey isolates was also high (86%). Isolates from turkeys were generally more genetically diverse than those from chickens. Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis detected resistance to sulfisoxazole (36% of the isolates), streptomycin (33%), gentamicin (27%), tetracycline (24%), ampicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (15%), cefoxitin (12%), ceftriaxone and ceftiofur (12%), and chloramphenicol (9%). None of the isolates was resistant to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or nalidixic acid. Although the number of the isolates was limited in our study, we conclude that S. Heidelberg isolates from the same host generally clustered together and that a considerable number of the isolates were resistant to a number of antimicrobial agents.

  6. The Heidelberg High Current Injector A Versatile Injector for Storage Ring Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hahn, R; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Welsch, C P

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Injector (HCI) was designed and built as a dedicated injector for the Test Storage Ring in Heidelberg to deliver mainly singly charged Li- and Be-ions. After start for routine operation in 1999 the HCI delivered stable beams during the following years for about 50 % of the experiments with very high reliability. Due to the requirements from the experiment the HCI changed during that period from a machine for singly charged positive ions to an injector for a large variety of molecules as well as positively or negatively charged light ions. After successful commissioning of the custom built 18 GHz high power ECR-source at its present test location various modifications and additions were made in preparation of a possible conversion into an injector for highly charged heavy ions as a second phase. This paper gives an overview of the experience gained in the passed 5 years and presents the status of the upgrade of the HCI.

  7. The Heidelberg POLYP - a flexible and fault-tolerant poly-processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenner, R.; Deluigi, B.

    1981-01-01

    The Heidelberg poly-processor system POLYP is described. It is intended to be used in nuclear physics for reprocessing of experimental data, in high energy physics as second-stage trigger processor, and generally in other applications requiring high-computing power. The POLYP system consists of any number of I/O-processors, processor modules (eventually of different types), global memory segments, and a host processor. All modules (up to several hundred) are connected by a multiple common-data-bus system; all processors, additionally, by a multiple sync bus system for processor/task-scheduling. All hard- and software is designed to be decentralized and free of bottle-necks. Most hardware-faults like single-bit errors in memory or multi-bit errors during transfers are automatically corrected. Defective modules, buses, etc., can be removed with only a graceful degradation of the system-throughput. (orig.)

  8. e+e- → hadrons: results from the DESY-Heidelberg-collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintze, J.

    1975-09-01

    Inclusive photon spectra and photon spectra for events with 4 prongs and 1 γ-ray which result from the decay of the (3.1) and (3.7) resonances are presented. The decay (3.7) → (3.1) + γγ is observed confirming earlier results of the DASP collaboration. In an investigation of 3γ final states, the decay modes (3.1) → etaγ and (3.1) → eta'γ are detected. In addition, the data indicate the existence of a new heavy mass particle at 2.75 GeV which decays into two photons. This conclusion is based on an analysis of the 3γ events from (3.1) decays combining results of the DASP and of the DESY Heidelberg collaboration. (orig.) [de

  9. Commissioning of the Cryogenic Plant for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at Heidelberg

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, R; Grieser, M; Haberstroh, C; Kaiser, D; Lange, M; Laux, F; Menk, S; Orlov, D A; Repnow, R; Sieber, T; Quack, H; Varju, J; Wolf A

    2009-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for low velocity atomic and molecular ion beams is under construction. In contrast to existing electrostatic storage rings, the Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR will be cooled down to temperatures below 2 K. Thus acting as a large cryopump it will provide long storage times and, in addition, open a new field of quantum state controlled molecular physics due to a low heat radiation background from space-like environment. A concept for cooling the storage ring has been developed and is presently tested by means of a linear trap as a prototype with a length of 1/10 of the planned ring. A commercial refrigerator with 21 W at 2 K has been successfully commissioned and was connected to the prototype. This paper presents the status of the cryogenic plant after the commissioning and one year of operation.

  10. International outbreak investigation of Salmonella Heidelberg associated with in-flight catering.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rebolledo, J

    2013-07-26

    SUMMARY Rapid and wide dispersal of passengers after flights makes investigation of flight-related outbreaks challenging. An outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg was identified in a group of Irish travellers returning from Tanzania. Additional international cases sharing the same flight were identified. Our aim was to determine the source and potential vehicles of infection. Case-finding utilized information exchange using experts\\' communication networks and national surveillance systems. Demographic, clinical and food history information was collected. Twenty-five additional cases were identified from Ireland, The Netherlands, Norway, USA and Canada. We conducted a case-control study which indicated a significant association between illness and consumption of milk tart (OR 10·2) and an egg dish (OR 6) served on-board the flight. No food consumed before the flight was associated with illness. Cases from countries other than Ireland provided supplementary information that facilitated the identification of likely vehicles of infection. Timely, committed international collaboration is vital in such investigations.

  11. Cortical reorganization in recent-onset tinnitus patients by the Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Christoph M.; Grapp, Miriam; Daneshvar-Talebi, Jonas; Reith, Wolfgang; Plinkert, Peter K.; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology and treatment of tinnitus still are fields of intensive research. The neuroscientifically motivated Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy, previously developed by the German Center for Music Therapy Research, Heidelberg, Germany, was applied to explore its effects on individual distress and on brain structures. This therapy is a compact and fast application of nine consecutive 50-min sessions of individualized therapy implemented over 1 week. Clinical improvement and long-term effects over several years have previously been published. However, the underlying neural basis of the therapy's success has not yet been explored. In the current study, the therapy was applied to acute tinnitus patients (TG) and healthy active controls (AC). Non-treated patients were also included as passive controls (PTC). As predicted, the therapeutic intervention led to a significant decrease of tinnitus-related distress in TG compared to PTC. Before and after the study week, high-resolution MRT scans were obtained for each subject. Assessment by repeated measures design for several groups (Two-Way ANOVA) revealed structural gray matter (GM) increase in TG compared to PTC, comprising clusters in precuneus, medial superior frontal areas, and in the auditory cortex. This pattern was further applied as mask for general GM changes as induced by the therapy week. The therapy-like procedure in AC also elicited similar GM increases in precuneus and frontal regions. Comparison between structural effects in TG vs. AC was calculated within the mask for general GM changes to obtain specific effects in tinnitus patients, yielding GM increase in right Heschl's gyrus, right Rolandic operculum, and medial superior frontal regions. In line with recent findings on the crucial role of the auditory cortex in maintaining tinnitus-related distress, a causative relation between the therapy-related GM alterations in auditory areas and the long-lasting therapy effects can be assumed. PMID:25745385

  12. Cortical reorganization in recent-onset tinnitus patients by the Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Maria Krick

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathophysiology and treatment of tinnitus still are fields of intensive research. The neuroscientifically motivated Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy, previously developed by the German Center for Music Therapy Research, Heidelberg, Germany, was applied to explore its effects on individual distress and on brain structures. This therapy is a compact and fast application of nine consecutive 50-minutes sessions of individualized therapy implemented over one week. Clinical improvement and long-term effects over several years have previously been published. However the underlying neural basis of the therapy’s success has not yet been explored. In the current study, the therapy was applied to acute tinnitus patients (TG and healthy active controls (AC. Non-treated patients were also included as passive controls (PTC. As predicted, the therapeutic intervention led to a significant decrease of tinnitus-related distress in TG compared to PTC. Before and after the study week, high-resolution MRT scans were obtained for each subject. Assessment by repeated measures design for several groups (two-way ANOVA revealed structural gray matter (GM increase in TG compared to PTC, comprising clusters in precuneus, medial superior frontal areas, and in the auditory cortex. This pattern was further applied as mask for general GM changes as induced by the therapy week. The therapy-like procedure in AC also elicited similar GM increases in precuneus and frontal regions. Comparison between structural effects in TG versus AC was calculated within the mask for general GM changes to obtain specific effects in tinnitus patients, yielding GM increase in right Heschl's gyrus, right Rolandic operculum, and medial superior frontal regions. In line with recent findings on the crucial role of the auditory cortex in maintaining tinnitus-related distress, a causative relation between the therapy-related GM alterations in auditory areas and the long-lasting therapy effects can be

  13. Differences in Pre and Post Vascular Patterning of Retinas from ISS Crew Members and HDT Subjects by VESGEN Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M. C.; Vizzeri, G.; Taibbi, G.; Mason, S. S.; Young, M. H.; Zanello, S. B.; Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    Accelerated research by NASA [1] has investigated the significant risks for visual and ocular impairments Spaceflight Associated Neuro-Ocular Syndrome /Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (SANS/VIIP) incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Our study investigates the role of blood vessels in the incidence and etiology of SANS/VIIP within the retinas of Astronaut crewmembers pre-and post-flight to the International Space Station (ISS) by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN). The response of retinal vessels in crewmembers to microgravity was compared to that of retinal vessels to Head-Down Tilt (HDT) in subjects undergoing 70-Day Bed Rest. The study tests the proposed hypothesis that cephalad fluid shifts missions, resulting in ocular and visual impairments, are necessarily mediated in part by retinal blood vessels, and are therefore accompanied by significant remodeling of retinal vasculature.Vascular patterns in the retinas of crew members and HDTBR subjects extracted from 30° infrared (IR) Heidelberg Spectralis® images collected pre/postflight and pre/post HDTBR, respectively, were analyzed by VESGEN (patent pending). a mature, automated software developed as a research discovery tool for progressive vascular diseases in the retina and other tissues [2]. The weighted, multi-parametric VESGEN analysis generates maps of branching arterial and venous trees and quantification by parameters such as the fractal dimension (Df, a modern measure of vascular space-filling capacity), vessel diameters, and densities of vessel length and number classified into specific branching generations by vascular physiological branching rules [2,3]. The retrospective study approved by NASA’s Institutional Review Board included six HDT subjects (NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit [FARU] Campaign 11; for example, [4]) and eight ISS crewmembers monitored by routine occupational surveillance who provided their study consents to NASA’s Lifetime

  14. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Jens Ulrik Lütken

    2016-01-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also...... known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions...... reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect...

  15. Silicon retina for optical tracking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohbehn, K.; Jenkins, R. E.; Sun, X.; Andreou, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    There are a host of position sensors, such as quadcells and CCD's, which are candidates for detecting optical position errors and providing error signals for a mirror positioning loop. We are developing a novel, very high bandwidth, biologically inspired position sensor for optical position tracking systems. We present recent test results and design issues for the use of biologically inspired silicon retinas for spaceborne optical position tracking systems.

  16. TRPM3 expression in mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Lane Brown

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP channels constitute a large family of cation permeable ion channels that serve crucial functions in sensory systems by transducing environmental changes into cellular voltage and calcium signals. Within the retina, two closely related members of the melastatin TRP family, TRPM1 and TRPM3, are highly expressed. TRPM1 has been shown to be required for the depolarizing response to light of ON-bipolar cells, but the role of TRPM3 in the retina is unknown. Immunohistochemical staining of mouse retina with an antibody directed against the C-terminus of TRPM3 labeled the inner plexiform layer (IPL and a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer. Within the IPL, TRPM3 immunofluorescence was markedly stronger in the OFF sublamina than in the ON sublamina. Electroretinogram recordings showed that the scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves of TRPM3(-/- mice are normal indicating that TRPM3 does not play a major role in visual processing in the outer retina. TRPM3 activity was measured by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recording of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells. Application of the TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS, stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in ~40% of cells from wild type and TRPM1(‑/‑ mice, and the PS-stimulated increases in calcium were blocked by co-application of mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 antagonist. No PS-stimulated changes in fluorescence were observed in ganglion cells from TRPM3(-/- mice. Similarly, PS-stimulated currents that could be blocked by mefenamic acid were recorded from wild type retinal ganglion cells but were absent in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice.

  17. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Mouse Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Arbogast

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone is a crucial regulator of gene expression in the developing and adult retina. Here we sought to map sites of thyroid hormone signaling at the cellular level using the transgenic FINDT3 reporter mouse model in which neurons express β-galactosidase (β-gal under the control of a hybrid Gal4-TRα receptor when triiodothyronine (T3 and cofactors of thyroid receptor signaling are present. In the adult retina, nearly all neurons of the ganglion cell layer (GCL, ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells showed strong β-gal labeling. In the inner nuclear layer (INL, a minority of glycineric and GABAergic amacrine cells showed β-gal labeling, whereas the majority of amacrine cells were unlabeled. At the level of amacrine types, β-gal labeling was found in a large proportion of the glycinergic AII amacrines, but only in a small proportion of the cholinergic/GABAergic 'starburst' amacrines. At postnatal day 10, there also was a high density of strongly β-gal-labeled neurons in the GCL, but only few amacrine cells were labeled in the INL. There was no labeling of bipolar cells, horizontal cells and Müller glia cells at both stages. Most surprisingly, the photoreceptor somata in the outer nuclear layer also showed no β-gal label, although thyroid hormone is known to control cone opsin expression. This is the first record of thyroid hormone signaling in the inner retina of an adult mammal. We hypothesize that T3 levels in photoreceptors are below the detection threshold of the reporter system. The topographical distribution of β-gal-positive cells in the GCL follows the overall neuron distribution in that layer, with more T3-signaling cells in the ventral than the dorsal half-retina.

  18. The mammalian retina as a clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  19. The Neural Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D.; Fulton, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a neurovascular disease that affects prematurely born infants and is known to have significant long term effects on vision. We conducted the studies described herein not only to learn more about vision but also about the pathogenesis of ROP. The coincidence of ROP onset and rapid developmental elongation of the rod photoreceptor outer segments motivated us to consider the role of the rods in this disease. We used noninvasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and retinal imaging procedures to study the function and structure of the neurosensory retina. Rod photoreceptor and post-receptor responses are significantly altered years after the preterm days during which ROP is an active disease. The alterations include persistent rod dysfunction, and evidence of compensatory remodeling of the post-receptor retina is found in ERG responses to full-field stimuli and in psychophysical thresholds that probe small retinal regions. In the central retina, both Mild and Severe ROP delay maturation of parafoveal scotopic thresholds and are associated with attenuation of cone mediated multifocal ERG responses, significant thickening of post-receptor retinal laminae, and dysmorphic cone photoreceptors. These results have implications for vision and control of eye growth and refractive development and suggest future research directions. These results also lead to a proposal for noninvasive management using light that may add to the currently invasive therapeutic armamentarium against ROP. PMID:27671171

  20. Connecting the Retina to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  1. The neural retina in retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ronald M; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D; Fulton, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a neurovascular disease that affects prematurely born infants and is known to have significant long term effects on vision. We conducted the studies described herein not only to learn more about vision but also about the pathogenesis of ROP. The coincidence of ROP onset and rapid developmental elongation of the rod photoreceptor outer segments motivated us to consider the role of the rods in this disease. We used noninvasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and retinal imaging procedures to study the function and structure of the neurosensory retina. Rod photoreceptor and post-receptor responses are significantly altered years after the preterm days during which ROP is an active disease. The alterations include persistent rod dysfunction, and evidence of compensatory remodeling of the post-receptor retina is found in ERG responses to full-field stimuli and in psychophysical thresholds that probe small retinal regions. In the central retina, both Mild and Severe ROP delay maturation of parafoveal scotopic thresholds and are associated with attenuation of cone mediated multifocal ERG responses, significant thickening of post-receptor retinal laminae, and dysmorphic cone photoreceptors. These results have implications for vision and control of eye growth and refractive development and suggest future research directions. These results also lead to a proposal for noninvasive management using light that may add to the currently invasive therapeutic armamentarium against ROP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Connecting the Retina to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Erskine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed.

  3. Proteomic interactions in the mouse vitreous-retina complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Skeie

    Full Text Available Human vitreoretinal diseases are due to presumed abnormal mechanical interactions between the vitreous and retina, and translational models are limited. This study determined whether nonstructural proteins and potential retinal biomarkers were expressed by the normal mouse vitreous and retina.Vitreous and retina samples from mice were collected by evisceration and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Identified proteins were further analyzed for differential expression and functional interactions using bioinformatic software.We identified 1,680 unique proteins in the retina and 675 unique proteins in the vitreous. Unbiased clustering identified protein pathways that distinguish retina from vitreous including oxidative phosphorylation and neurofilament cytoskeletal remodeling, whereas the vitreous expressed oxidative stress and innate immunology pathways. Some intracellular protein pathways were found in both retina and vitreous, such as glycolysis and gluconeogenesis and neuronal signaling, suggesting proteins might be shuttled between the retina and vitreous. We also identified human disease biomarkers represented in the mouse vitreous and retina, including carbonic anhydrase-2 and 3, crystallins, macrophage inhibitory factor, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxins, S100 precursors, and von Willebrand factor.Our analysis suggests the vitreous expresses nonstructural proteins that functionally interact with the retina to manage oxidative stress, immune reactions, and intracellular proteins may be exchanged between the retina and vitreous. This novel proteomic dataset can be used for investigating human vitreoretinopathies in mouse models. Validation of vitreoretinal biomarkers for human ocular diseases will provide a critical tool for diagnostics and an avenue for therapeutics.

  4. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation.

  5. A Whole-Genome Sequencing Approach To Study Cefoxitin-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Isolates from Various Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirmanasinghe, Romaine; Finley, Rita; Parmley, E Jane; Avery, Brent P; Carson, Carolee; Bekal, Sadjia; Golding, George; Mulvey, Michael R

    2017-04-01

    This study characterized cefoxitin-resistant and -susceptible Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strains from humans, abattoir poultry, and retail poultry to assess the molecular relationships of isolates from these sources in Québec in 2012. Isolates were collected as part of the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS). All isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, PCR for CMY-2, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). A total of 113 S Heidelberg isolates from humans ( n = 51), abattoir poultry ( n = 18), and retail poultry ( n = 44) were studied. All cefoxitin-resistant isolates ( n = 65) were also resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, ceftiofur, and ceftriaxone, and all contained the CMY-2 gene. PFGE analysis showed that 111/113 (98.2%) isolates clustered together with ≥90% similarity. Core genome analysis using WGS identified 13 small clusters of isolates with 0 to 4 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), consisting of cefoxitin-resistant and -susceptible human, abattoir poultry, and retail poultry isolates. CMY-2 plasmids from cefoxitin-resistant isolates all belonged to incompatibility group I1. Analysis of IncI1 plasmid sequences revealed high identity (95 to 99%) to a previously described plasmid (pCVM29188_101) found in Salmonella Kentucky. When compared to pCVM29188_101, all sequenced cefoxitin-resistant isolates were found to carry 1 of 10 possible variant plasmids. Transmission of S Heidelberg may be occurring between human, abattoir poultry, and retail poultry sources, and transmission of a common CMY-2 plasmid may be occurring among S Heidelberg strains with variable genetic backgrounds. © Crown copyright 2017.

  6. Low Energy Electron Cooling and Accelerator Physics for the Heidelberg CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadil, H.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, R. von; Orlov, D.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently under construction at MPI-K in Heidelberg. The CSR is an electrostatic ring with a total circumference of about 34 m, straight section length of 2.5 m and will store ions in the 20 ∼ 300 keV energy range (E/Q). The cryogenic system in the CSR is expected to cool the inner vacuum chamber down to 2 K. The CSR will be equipped with an electron cooler which has also to serve as an electron target for high resolution recombination experiments. In this paper we present the results of numerical investigations of the CSR lattice with finite element calculations of the deflection and focusing elements of the ring. We also present a layout of the CSR electron cooler which will have to operate in low energy mode to cool 20 keV protons in the CSR, as well as numerical estimations of the cooling times to be expected with this device

  7. Kinematic differences between normal and low arched feet in children using the Heidelberg foot measurement method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, D; McIntosh, A S; Simon, J; Lowe, K; Wolf, S I

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinematics of normal arched and low arched feet in children and use this data to quantify the differences between the two foot types during walking gait. Multi-segment foot motion was measured, using the Heidelberg foot measurement method (HFMM), for 25 normal arched feet and 27 low arched feet in 9-12-year-old children. The kinematic differences in the foot between the two groups during walking were relatively small, except for the medial arch and forefoot supination angles. The magnitude of the medial arch angle was approximately 10 degrees greater in the low arched group than the normal arched group throughout the gait cycle. There was a significant difference found in the forefoot supination angle (ptypes. The results of this study provide normative values for children's feet and highlight the mechanical differences in flexible flat feet in this age group. This data contributes to knowledge on foot kinematics in children and will be valuable for future research on the structure, function and potential treatment of the flexible flat foot. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The joy at the Last Judgement according to the Heidelberg Catechism Question 52

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    Eberhard Busch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, the author reflects on Question 52 of the Heidelberg Catechism where it asks: ‘What comfort is it to you that Christ “shall come to judge the living and the dead”?’ The author points out possible sources from which this formulation stems, that is, Articles 86 and 87 in John Calvin’s Catechism from 1545. God is described as a compassionate judge. Even more: the One who is the last judge, was also judged and had paid for our sins. In a dialectical fashion we discover a God who is just, but also merciful. The Reformed tradition did not follow a dead-end where it is taught that God shows us grace instead of righteousness. Had God proceeded in this way, he would only mean things well, but he would not make them well. The realisation of God being just and merciful leads to joy and repentance. The contribution ends with a discussion of the final separation of the just and evil.

  9. A vertebrate retina with segregated colour and polarization sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novales Flamarique, Iñigo

    2017-09-13

    Besides colour and intensity, some invertebrates are able to independently detect the polarization of light. Among vertebrates, such separation of visual modalities has only been hypothesized for some species of anchovies whose cone photoreceptors have unusual ultrastructure that varies with retinal location. Here, I tested this hypothesis by performing physiological experiments of colour and polarization discrimination using the northern anchovy, Engraulis mordax Optic nerve recordings showed that the ventro-temporal (VT), but not the ventro-nasal (VN), retina was polarization sensitive, and this coincided with the exclusive presence of polarization-sensitive photoreceptors in the VT retina. Spectral (colour) sensitivity recordings from the VN retina indicated the contribution of two spectral cone mechanisms to the optic nerve response, whereas only one contributed to the VT retina. This was supported by the presence of only one visual pigment in the VT retina and two in the VN retina, suggesting that only the VN retina was associated with colour sensitivity. Behavioural tests further demonstrated that anchovies could discriminate colour and the polarization of light using the ventral retina. Thus, in analogy with the visual system of some invertebrates, the northern anchovy has a retina with segregated retinal pathways for colour and polarization vision. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Insulin-like activity in the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.

    1986-01-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that insulin or a homologous peptide may be synthesized outside the pancreas also. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin-like activity exists in the retina, and if it exists, whether it is due to local synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide in the retina. To determine whether the insulin-like immunoreactivity in retinal glial cells is due to binding and uptake or local synthesis of insulin, a combined approach of immunocytochemistry and in situ DNA-RNA hybridization techniques was used on cultured rat retinal glial cells. Insulin-like immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasma of these cells. In situ hybridization studies using labeled rat insulin cDNA indicated that these cells contain the mRNA necessary for de novo synthesis of insulin or a closely homologous peptide. Since human retinal cells have, as yet, not been conveniently grown in culture, an ocular tumor cell line, human Y79 retinoblastoma was used as a model to extend these investigations. The presence of insulin-like immunoreactivity as well as insulin-specific mRNA was demonstrated in this cell line. Light microscopic autoradiography following incubation of isolated rat retinal cells with 125 I-insulin showed the presence of insulin binding sites on the photoreceptors and amarcine cells. On the basis of these observations that rat retina glial cells, including Muller cells are sites of synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide, a model for the pathogenesis of dabetic retinopathy is proposed

  11. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    This dissertation presents recent progress in several areas related to modeling laser damage to the retina. In Chapter 3, we consider the consequences of using the Arrhenius damage model to predict the damage thresholds of multiple pulse, or repetitive pulse, exposures. We have identified a few fundamental trends associated with the multiple pulse damage predictions made by the Arrhenius model. These trends differ from what would be expected by non-thermal mechanisms, and could prove useful in differentiating thermal and non-thermal damage. Chapter 4 presents a new rate equation damage model hypothesized to describe photochemical damage. The model adds a temperature dependent term to the simple rate equation implied by the principle of reciprocity that is characteristic of photochemical damage thresholds. A recent damage threshold study, conducted in-vitro, has revealed a very sharp transition between thermal and photochemical damage threshold trends. For the wavelength used in the experiment (413 nm), thermal damage thresholds were observed at exposure levels that were twice the expected photochemical damage threshold, based on the traditional understanding of photochemical damage. Our model accounts for this observed trend by introducing a temperature dependent quenching, or repair, rate to the photochemical damage rate. For long exposures that give a very small temperature rise, the model reduces to the principle of reciprocity. Near the transition region between thermal and photochemical damage, the model allows the damage threshold to be set by thermal mechanisms, even at exposure above the reciprocity exposure. In Chapter 5, we describe a retina damage model that includes thermal lensing in the eye by coupling beam propagation and heat transfer models together. Thermal lensing has recently been suggested as a contributing factor to the large increase in measured retinal damage thresholds in the near infrared. The transmission of the vitreous decreases

  12. Estudio de los pigmentos de la cerámica ceremonial Moche con ayuda de un microscopio electrónico de barrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available ÉTUDE DES PIGMENTS DE LA POTERIE CEREMONIELLE MOCHE A L’AIDE D’UN MICROSCOPE ELECTRONIQUE À BALAYAGE. Une collection de 22 tessons de céramique appartenant à autant de vases peints à l’aide d’une combinaison d’engobes rouges et blanches a été soumise à un examen au microscope électronique à balayage. L’objectif principal de cette étude consiste à déterminer la composition chimique des pigments constituant la couleur appliquée sur des vases cérémoniels ayant été trouvés près de la tombe Nº 5 située sur la Huaca de la Luna, l’une des deux plus importantes structures monumentales du site Moche de la côte nord du Pérou. Les résultats confirment l’utilisation d’oxides de fer, probablement de l’hématite, pour obtenir l’engobe rouge tandis que la calcite serait à la base de la production de l’engobe blanche. Les possibilités et les limites de cette méthode font l’objet d’une discussion. Una muestra de 22 fragmentos de cerámica, pertenecientes a una misma cantidad de vasos pintados con engobe blanco y rojo fue sometida a examen, empleando un microscopio electrónico de barrido. El objetivo central de este estudio fue el de determinar la composición química de los pigmentos que conforman los colores aplicados sobre las vasijas ceremoniales. Estas fueron halladas cerca de la tumba N° 5, localizada encima de la Huaca de la Luna, una de las dos estructuras monumentales del sitio de Moche en la costa norte del Perú. Los resultados confirman la utilización de óxidos de fierro, probablemente de hematita, para obtener el engobe rojo, mientras que la calcita sería la base para la producción del engobe blanco. Las posibilidades y los límites de este método son el objeto de discusión en este trabajo. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF MOCHE CEREMONIAL POTTERY SLIPS. A study of 22 sherds selected from distinct vessels painted with red and white slips has been conducted with a scanning electron microscope

  13. Compatibilidad química del piracetam determinada por calorimetría diferencial de barrido Chemical compatibility of piracetam determined by differential scanning calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: en la primera etapa de preformulación de un medicamento se seleccionan los excipientes y es importante la realización de los estudios de compatibilidad química entre el ingrediente activo farmacéutico (IFA y excipientes. Una de las técnicas más rápidas para realizar dichos estudios es la Calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC, y como técnica complementaria la Termogravimetría (TG. Objetivo: empleando DSC y TG, se realiza un estudio de compatibilidad química entre IFA y excipientes preseleccionados, para comprobar la existencia o no de interacción química. Métodos: el equipo empleado fue el TA3000Mettler, aco­plado a la celda DSC20 y al horno TG50. El IFA utilizado fue Piracetam, y los excipientes: Kollidon VA 64, Estearato de magnesio, Celulosa microcristalina, Polietilenglicol 20 000 y Aerosil. Dichos excipientes se caracterizaron por DSC al igual que el IFA, al cual se le detectó la transición física de fusión. Para el estudio de compatibilidad se prepararon mezclas físicas binarias en una relación de concentración 1:1 Resultados: la figura 1 muestra la detección del punto de fusión por DSC del IFA. Se obtuvieron dos transiciones endotérmicas, comprobándose por TG cuál era la de fusión. La figura 2 muestra los termogramas de las mezclas formadas entre IFA y excipientes. Conclusiones: no se detectó aparición de nuevos picos, por lo que se infiere que no hay incompatibilidad química entre las sustancias estudiadas y se recomienda el uso de los excipientes para el desarrollo de la formulación farmacéutica.Introduction: the first phase of the drug preformulation comprises the selection of excipients and the conduction of studies on chemical compatibility between pharmacologically active ingredient and the excipients. One of the quickest techniques is the differential scanning calorimetry and the supplementary technique called thermogravimetic analysis. Objective: to conduct a chemical compatibility

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Lutein in the Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yoko; Sasaki, Mariko; Takahashi, Noriko; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Miyake, Seiji; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Although a large variety of pharmaceutical therapies for treating disease have been developed in recent years, there has been little progress in disease prevention. In particular, the protection of neural tissue is essential, because it is hardly regenerated. The use of nutraceuticals for maintaining the health has been supported by several clinical studies, including cross-sectional and interventional studies for age-related macular disease. However, mechanistic evidence for their effects at the molecular level has been very limited. In this review, we focus on lutein, which is a xanthophyll type of carotenoid. Lutein is not synthesized in mammals, and must be obtained from the diet. It is delivered to the retina, and in humans, it is concentrated in the macula. Here, we describe the neuroprotective effects of lutein and their underlying molecular mechanisms in animal models of vision-threatening diseases, such as innate retinal inflammation, diabetic retinopathy, and light-induced retinal degeneration. In lutein-treated mouse ocular disease models, oxidative stress in the retina is reduced, and its downstream pathological signals are inhibited. Furthermore, degradation of the functional proteins, rhodopsin (a visual substance) and synaptophysin (a synaptic vesicle protein also influenced in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease), the depletion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and DNA damage are prevented by lutein, which preserves visual function. We discuss the possibility of using lutein, an antioxidant, as a neuroprotective treatment for humans. PMID:22211688

  15. Retina findings in intracranial aneurysm patients

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    Sung Il Kang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate fundus findings in patients with intracranial aneurysm(ICAto determine the relation between ICA and distinguishable retinal features.METHODS: We analyzed the medical records and ocular images of 46 patients with previously diagnosed ICA referred from the Neurosurgical Department. All patients underwent ophthalmologic evaluation including fluorescein angiography(FAG. Furthermore, the presence of drusen, macular degeneration, cotton wool spot, hard exudates, retinal hemorrhage, arteriolar attenuation, A-V crossing signs, arm-to-retina time, and A-V transit time were evaluated. The results of ICA patients(Group 1were compared with those of 22 idiopathic epiretinal membrane patients with unaffected eyes(Group 2.RESULTS: Mean ages were 60.02y(Group 1and 60.68y(Group 2respectively(P=0.70. The prevalence of hypertension was similar in both groups. No case with retinal macroaneurysm was found in either group. The presence of drusen, macular degeneration, cotton wool spot, hard exudates, retinal hemorrhage, arteriolar attenuation, and A-V crossing sign was not significantly different between the two groups. Mean arm-to-retina time was not significantly different in two groups, either.CONCLUSION: We cannot find any evidence that the patients with ICA shows specific changes in the FAG and fundus.

  16. Glycinergic pathways in the goldfish retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marc, R.E.; Lam, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Autoradiographic localization of high affinity [3H]glycine uptake in the retina of the goldfish has been used to study some anatomical and physiological properties of potentially glycinergic neurons. There are two classes of retinal cells exhibiting high affinity glycine uptake: Aa amacrine cells and I2 interplexiform cells. Aa amacrine cells constitute about 20% of the somas in the amacrine cell layer and send their dendrites to the middle of the inner plexiform layer. There they are both pre- and postsynaptic primarily to other amacrine cells. Photic modulation of glycine uptake indicates that they are probably red-hyperpolarizing/green-depolarizing neurons. I2 interplexiform cells are a newly discovered type of interplexiform cell; in the outer plexiform layer, they receive direct synaptic input from the somas of red-dominated GABAergic H1 horizontal cells and are apparently presynaptic to dendrites of unidentified types of horizontal cells. The connections of I2 interplexiform cells have not been successfully characterized in the inner plexiform layer. These findings extend our knowledge of neurochemically specific pathways in the cyprinid retina and indicate that glycine, like GABA, is a neurotransmitter primarily involved with circuits coding ''red'' information

  17. Imagen de retina de campo ultra-amplio

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    Gerardo García-Aguirre

    2017-11-01

    Conclusión: Las imágenes de campo ultra-amplio han revolucionado la forma en la que estudiamos y entendemos la enfermedad de la retina. A medida que la tecnología para obtenerlas se haga más accesible, formará parte del armamentario de rutina para estudiar las enfermedades de la retina.

  18. Glucose, Lactate, and Shuttling of Metabolites in Vertebrate Retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, James B.; Lindsay, Kenneth J.; Du, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina has specific functions and structures that give it a unique set of constraints on the way in which it can produce and use metabolic energy. The retina’s response to illumination influences its energy requirements, and the retina’s laminated structure influences the extent to which neurons and glia can access metabolic fuels. There are fundamental differences between energy metabolism in retina and that in brain. The retina relies on aerobic glycolysis much more than the brain does, and morphological differences between retina and brain limit the types of metabolic relationships that are possible between neurons and glia. This Mini-Review summarizes the unique metabolic features of the retina with a focus on the role of lactate shuttling. PMID:25801286

  19. OCT-Angiography for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Neuronal and Vascular Structure in Mouse Retina: Implication for Characterization of Retinal Neurovascular Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Luisi, Jonathan; Liu, Hua; Motamedi, Massoud; Zhang, Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) is a newly developed technique to visualize retinal vasculature non-invasively based on interferometry. Although OCT-A has been used clinically, its applications in small animal studies have been limited. This study is designed to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a protocol for the use of an en-face OCT-based method to visualize and quantify retinal microvasculature in mice that can be used for in vivo assessment of retina ischemia. A customized algorithm was developed to extract angiographic profiles of the mouse retina from en-face OCT using an unmodified Bioptigen Envisu R-Class OCT imaging system. En-face OCT images were collected in living animals and then compared to images acquired following termination of blood flow to the retina. The images were processed with ImageJ using the raw file importer. The vessel enhancement algorithm was developed based on a combination of local contrast enhancement, Laplacian of Gaussian peak detection and background subtraction methods. For comparison, fluorescein angiography (FA) was performed using Heidelberg Spectralis ® HRA+OCT imaging system. By vessel enhancement algorithm, we successfully extracted retinal vasculature and quantified retinal vessel branch points, vascular area and vessel lengths with AngioTool. While the retinal neuronal structure could be simultaneously identified and quantified using B-scan and volumetric OCT run in the annular scanning model, the retinal vasculature in OCT-A was dramatically diminished after the animals were sacrificed, indicating en-face OCT-A signal is a measure of the blood flow. These studies indicate that a novel approach to extract angiographs from en-face OCT images by utilizing local structure enhancement can be used to provide depth-resolved retinal vasculature distributions. Simultaneous non-invasive analysis of retinal vessels and neurons by OCT-A and OCT may provide a novel approach to characterize retinal

  20. Image, eye, and retina (invited review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J.

    2007-05-01

    Advances in understanding the initial stages of the visual process have been made over the centuries. This heritage will be reviewed with respect to the passage of light through the eye, as well as its gross anatomy and microscopic structure. The links between image formation in the camera and the eye were integrated with the anatomy of the eye in the seventeenth century. They drew attention to the problem of accommodation and to corrections for errors of refraction. Investigations of the structure of the retina were to await the invention of achromatic microscopes in the early nineteenth century. An armory of devices for examining vision and the eye were to follow later in the century. These transformed the study of vision from an observational to an experimental discipline.

  1. Numerical optimization for Artificial Retina Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyak, M.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Derkach, D.; Belous, M.

    2017-10-01

    High-energy physics experiments rely on reconstruction of the trajectories of particles produced at the interaction point. This is a challenging task, especially in the high track multiplicity environment generated by p-p collisions at the LHC energies. A typical event includes hundreds of signal examples (interesting decays) and a significant amount of noise (uninteresting examples). This work describes a modification of the Artificial Retina algorithm for fast track finding: numerical optimization methods were adopted for fast local track search. This approach allows for considerable reduction of the total computational time per event. Test results on simplified simulated model of LHCb VELO (VErtex LOcator) detector are presented. Also this approach is well-suited for implementation of paralleled computations as GPGPU which look very attractive in the context of upcoming detector upgrades.

  2. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

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    Rajani Battu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  3. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Enhances Task-Negative Activity in Tinnitus Patients

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    Christoph M. Krick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suffering from tinnitus causes mental distress in most patients. Recent findings point toward a diminished activity of the brain's default-mode network (DMN in subjects with mental disorders including depression or anxiety and also recently in subjects with tinnitus-related distress. We recently developed a therapeutic intervention, namely the Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT, which shows an effective reduction of tinnitus-related distress following a 1-week short-term treatment. This approach offers the possibility to evaluate the neural changes associated with the improvements in tinnitus distress. We previously reported gray matter (GM reorganization in DMN regions and in primary auditory areas following HNMT in cases of recent-onset tinnitus. Here we evaluate on the same patient group, using functional MRI (fMRI, the activity of the DMN following the improvements tinnitus-related distress related to the HNMT intervention.Methods: The DMN activity was estimated by the task-negative activation (TNA during long inter-trial intervals in a word recognition task. The level of TNA was evaluated twice, before and after the 1-week study period, in 18 treated tinnitus patients (“treatment group,” TG, 21 passive tinnitus controls (PTC, and 22 active healthy controls (AC. During the study, the participants in TG and AC groups were treated with HNMT, whereas PTC patients did not receive any tinnitus-specific treatment. Therapy-related effects on DMN activity were assessed by comparing the pairs of fMRI records from the TG and PTC groups.Results: Treatment of the TG group with HNMT resulted in an augmented DMN activity in the PCC by 2.5% whereas no change was found in AC and PTC groups. This enhancement of PCC activity correlated with a reduction in tinnitus distress (Spearman Rho: −0.5; p < 0.005.Conclusion: Our findings show that an increased DMN activity, especially in the PCC, underlies the improvements in tinnitus

  4. Salmonella Heidelberg: Genetic profile of its antimicrobial resistance related to extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuriatti, Jéssica; Stefani, Lenita Moura; Brisola, Maiara Cristina; Crecencio, Regiane Boaretto; Bitner, Dinael Simão; Faria, Gláucia Amorim

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the phenotypic and genotypic profile of antimicrobial susceptibility and the possible involvement of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in the resistance profile of Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) isolated from chicken meat. We used 18 SH isolates from chicken meat produced in 2013 in the state of Paraná, Southern Brazil. The isolates were submitted to disk-diffusion tests and from these results it was possible to determine the number of isolates considered multiresistant and the index of multiple antimicrobial resistance (IRMA) against ten antimicrobials routinely used in human and veterinary medicine. It was considered multidrug resistant the isolate that showed resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics. Another test performed was the disc-approximation in order to investigate interposed zones of inhibition, indicative of ESBLs production. In the isolates that presented multidrug resistance (18/18), a search of resistance genes involved in the production of ESBLs was performed using PCR: blaCMY-2, blaSHV-1, blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M2, blaOXA-1, blaPSE-1 and AmpC. The overall antimicrobial resistance was 80.55%. The highest levels of resistance were observed for nalidixic acid and ceftiofur (100%). The most commonly resistance pattern found (42.1%) was A (penicillin-cephalosporin-quinolone-tetracycline). The results were negative for ghost zone formation, indicative of ESBLs. However, PCR technique was able to detect resistance genes via ESBLs where the blaTEM-1 gene showed the highest amplification (83.33%), and the second most prevalent genes were blaCMY-2 (38.88%) and AmpC gene (38.88%). The blaOXA-1 and blaPSE-1 genes were not detected. These results are certainly of concern since SH is becoming more prevalent in the South of Brazil and able to cause severe disease in immune compromised individuals, showing high antimicrobial resistance to those drugs routinely used in the treatment and control of human and

  5. Risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in commercial poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Morales-Barrera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Exp 1 consisted of 2 trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Exp 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighted and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of FITC-D to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics and SH infection. In both trials of Exp 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05. In Exp 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. In contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but lowest Proteobacteria. The results of the present study

  6. Lateral interactions in the outer retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Mangel, Stuart C.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (ICa) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones. PMID:22580106

  7. Isolevuglandins and Mitochondrial Enzymes in the Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Casey; Liao, Wei-Li; Heo, Gun-Young; Laird, James; Salomon, Robert G.; Turko, Illarion V.; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first peptide mapping and sequencing of an in vivo isolevuglandin-modified protein. Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) is a ubiquitous multifunctional sterol C27-hydroxylase that eliminates cholesterol and likely 7-ketocholesterol from the retina and many other tissues. We investigated the post-translational modification of this protein with isolevuglandins, arachidonate oxidation products. Treatment of purified recombinant CYP27A1 with authentic iso[4]levuglandin E2 (iso[4]LGE2) in vitro diminished enzyme activity in a time- and phospholipid-dependent manner. A multiple reaction monitoring protocol was then developed to identify the sites and extent of iso[4]LGE2 adduction. CYP27A1 exhibited only three Lys residues, Lys134, Lys358, and Lys476, that readily interact with iso[4]LGE2 in vitro. Such selective modification enabled the generation of an internal standard, 15N-labeled CYP27A1 modified with iso[4]LGE2, for the subsequent analysis of a human retinal sample. Two multiple reaction monitoring transitions arising from the peptide AVLK358(-C20H26O3)ETLR in the retinal sample were observed that co-eluted with the corresponding two 15N transitions from the supplemented standard. These data demonstrate that modified CYP27A1 is present in the retina. We suggest that such protein modification impairs sterol elimination and likely has other pathological sequelae. We also propose that the post-translational modifications identified in CYP27A1 exemplify a general mechanism whereby oxidative stress and inflammation deleteriously affect protein function, contributing, for example, to cholesterol-rich lesions associated with age-related macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease. The proteomic protocols developed in this study are generally applicable to characterization of lipid-derived oxidative protein modifications occurring in vivo, including proteins bound to membranes. PMID:21498512

  8. Impact of the choice of reference genome on the ability of the core genome SNV methodology to distinguish strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Usongo

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. The core genome single nucleotide variant pipeline (cgSNV is one of several whole genome based sequence typing methods used for the laboratory investigation of foodborne pathogens. SNV detection using this method requires a reference genome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the choice of the reference genome on the cgSNV-informed phylogenetic clustering and inferred isolate relationships. We found that using a draft or closed genome of S. Heidelberg as reference did not impact the ability of the cgSNV methodology to differentiate among 145 S. Heidelberg isolates involved in foodborne outbreaks. We also found that using a distantly related genome such as S. Dublin as choice of reference led to a loss in resolution since some sporadic isolates were found to cluster together with outbreak isolates. In addition, the genetic distances between outbreak isolates as well as between outbreak and sporadic isolates were overall reduced when S. Dublin was used as the reference genome as opposed to S. Heidelberg.

  9. Impact of the choice of reference genome on the ability of the core genome SNV methodology to distinguish strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Berry, Chrystal; Yousfi, Khadidja; Doualla-Bell, Florence; Labbé, Genevieve; Johnson, Roger; Fournier, Eric; Nadon, Celine; Goodridge, Lawrence; Bekal, Sadjia

    2018-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. The core genome single nucleotide variant pipeline (cgSNV) is one of several whole genome based sequence typing methods used for the laboratory investigation of foodborne pathogens. SNV detection using this method requires a reference genome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the choice of the reference genome on the cgSNV-informed phylogenetic clustering and inferred isolate relationships. We found that using a draft or closed genome of S. Heidelberg as reference did not impact the ability of the cgSNV methodology to differentiate among 145 S. Heidelberg isolates involved in foodborne outbreaks. We also found that using a distantly related genome such as S. Dublin as choice of reference led to a loss in resolution since some sporadic isolates were found to cluster together with outbreak isolates. In addition, the genetic distances between outbreak isolates as well as between outbreak and sporadic isolates were overall reduced when S. Dublin was used as the reference genome as opposed to S. Heidelberg.

  10. Staff review of 'Radioecological assessment of the Wyhl nuclear power plant': Analysis of the report prepared by the University of Heidelberg, West Germany. Draft summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congel, F.J.; Cardile, F.P.; Zalcman, B.; Pasciak, W.J.; Chu, A.

    1980-06-01

    The Heidelberg Report presents an assessment of the environmental radiological impact of a proposed pressurized-water reactor to be built near Wyhl, West Germany. The assessment is based largely on mathematical models that are used to calculate doses to humans in the area surrounding a reactor site and describe the movement of radioactive materials in the environment. These are the same mathematical models that are used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in licensing reactors in the United States. The NRC uses these models to make sure that any radiation exposure due to a reactor is far below national and international recommended 'safe' levels, as well as below natural radiation levels. The NRC staff reviewed certain parts of the Heidelberg Report because the report implied that the NRC may be substantially underestimating doses to individuals living near nuclear power plants by using incorrect values for parameters in the mathematical models. Although the Heidelberg Report assessment is based largely on environmental models described in four NRC Regulatory Guides, the NRC staff's review of the Heidelberg Report indicates that the Heidelberg authors used values for some model parameters that are too high

  11. Topography of ganglion cell production in the cat's retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Polley, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ganglion cells of the cat's retina form several classes distinguishable in terms of soma size, axon diameter, dendritic morphology, physiological properties, and central connections. Labeling with [ 3 H]thymidine shows that the ganglion cells which survive in the adult are produced as several temporally shifted, overlapping waves: medium-sized cells are produced before large cells, whereas the smallest ganglion cells are produced throughout the period of ganglion cell generation. Large cells and medium-sized cells show the same distinctive pattern of production, forming rough spirals around the area centralis. The oldest cells tend to lie superior and nasal to the area centralis, whereas cells in the inferior nasal retina and inferior temporal retina are, in general, progressively younger. Within each retinal quadrant, cells nearer the area centralis tend to be older than cells in the periphery, but there is substantial overlap. The retinal raphe divides the superior temporal quadrant into two zones with different patterns of cell addition. Superior temporal retina near the vertical meridian adds cells only slightly later than superior nasal retina, whereas superior temporal retina near the horizontal meridian adds cells very late, contemporaneously with inferior temporal retina. The broader wave of production of smaller ganglion cells seems to follow this same spiral pattern at its beginning and end. The presence of the area centralis as a nodal point about which ganglion cell production in the retinal quadrants pivots suggests that the area centralis is already an important retinal landmark even at the earliest stages of retinal development

  12. Glycine receptor subunits expression in the developing rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) consists of two α (1-4) and three β subunits. Considerable evidence indicates that the adult retina expresses the four types of α subunits; however, the proportion of these subunits in adult and immature retina is almost unknown. In this report we have studied mRNA and the protein expression of GlyR subunits in the retina during postnatal rat development by Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blot. mRNA and protein expression indicated a gradual increase of the α1, α3, α4 and β GlyR subunits during postnatal ages tested. The mRNA β subunit showed higher expression levels (∼3 fold) than those observed for the α1 and α3 subunits. Very interestingly, the α2 GlyR subunit had the highest expression in the retina, even in the adult. These results revealed the expression of GlyR at early postnatal ages, supporting its role in retina development. In addition, our results indicated that the adult retina expressed a high proportion of the α2 subunit, suggesting the expression of monomeric and/or heteromeric receptors. A variety of studies are needed to further characterize the role of the specific subunits in both adult and immature retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of diabetes-induced acidosis in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Andrey V; Henderson, Desmond; Linsenmeier, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that the retina of diabetic animals would be unusually acidic due to increased glycolytic metabolism. Acidosis in tumors and isolated retina has been shown to lead to increased VEGF. To test the hypothesis we have measured the transretinal distribution of extracellular H(+) concentration (H(+)-profiles) in retinae of control and diabetic dark-adapted intact Long-Evans rats with ion-selective electrodes. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Intact rat retinae are normally more acidic than blood with a peak of [H(+)]o in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) that averages 30 nM higher than H(+) in the choroid. Profiles in diabetic animals were similar in shape, but diabetic retinae began to be considerably more acidic after 5 weeks of diabetes. In retinae of 1-3 month diabetics the difference between the ONL and choroid was almost twice as great as in controls. At later times, up to 6 months, some diabetics still demonstrated abnormally high levels of [H(+)]o, but others were even less acidic than controls, so that the average level of acidosis was not different. Greater variability in H(+)-profiles (both between animals and between profiles recorded in one animal) distinguished the diabetic retinae from controls. Within animals, this variability was not random, but exhibited regions of higher and lower H(+). We conclude that retinal acidosis begins to develop at an early stage of diabetes (1-3 months) in rats. However, it does not progress, and the acidity of diabetic rat retina was diminished at later stages (3-6 months). Also the diabetes-induced acidosis has a strongly expressed local character. As result, the diabetic retinas show much wider variability in [H(+)] distribution than controls. pH influences metabolic and neural processes, and these results suggest that local acidosis could play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estudio de la reacción de curado del sistema éter diglicidílico del bisfenol-A (DGEBA) y la dietilentriamina (DETA) por calorimetría diferencial de barrido

    OpenAIRE

    González Garcia Filiberto; Galego Fernández Norma

    2000-01-01

    La reacción de curado del sistema compuesto por el éter diglicidílico del bisfenol-A (DGEBA) y la dietilentriamina (DETA) fue estudiada por calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC). Diferentes expresiones cinéticas fueron encontradas por experimentos isotérmicos y dinámicos las que justifican cambios mecanísticos con la temperatura de cura. La cinética de la reacción cumple un segundo orden cinético con una energía de activación de 90 kJ mol-1 a altas temperaturas (mecanismo no catalítico). ...

  15. Estudio comparativo con microscopio electrónico de barrido de la degradación de una lámina impermeable de cloruro de polivinilo plastificado en diferentes condiciones

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrosa, A.; Del Río, M.

    2017-01-01

    Este estudio discute el análisis de varias muestras de una membrana impermeable de cloruro de polivinilo plastificado (PVC-P). Las muestras fueron extraídas de diferentes áreas de la misma cubierta plana, que estuvo en servicio durante más de 12 años. Una muestra original de idéntica membrana de PVC-P que no estuvo instalada en la cubierta fue también analizada. El análisis de los materiales se llevó a cabo utilizando un microscopio electrónico de barrido (MEB). Además se realizó un análisis ...

  16. A hermeneutical reflection on the resurrection of Jesus Christ in question and answer 45 of the Heidelberg Catechism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobus Labuschagne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is an attempt to elaborate hermeneutically on the different historical contexts, related the one to the other and to the centre point of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, in question and answer 45 of the Heidelberg Catechism. The aim is not only to find the true meaning that the Heidelberg Catechism intends to convey in the mentioned question and answer, but also to explain the underlying hermeneutical thinking as well as to bring to the surface and explain alternative assumptions that ordinary church-going Christians experience as the unusual outcome of an unknown and different kind of approach. Different hermeneutical processes lead to different outcomes of understanding − sometimes worlds apart. Vanuit die sentrale punt van die opstanding van Jesus Christus in vraag en antwoord 45 van die Heidelbergse Kategismus, wil hierdie artikel in ’n hermeneutiese besinning oor die verskillende verbandhoudende historiese kontekste uitbrei. Die doel is nie slegs om die ware betekenis te vind van wat die Heidelbergse Kategismus in genoemde vraag en antwoord poog om weer te gee nie, maar ook om die onderliggende hermeneutiese denke te verduidelik en alternatiewe aannames, wat gewone Christen-kerkgangers as ’n vreemde en verskillende benaderings ervaar, na die oppervlakte te bring en te verduidelik. Verskillende hermeneutiese prosesse lei tot verskillende uitkomste van verstaan – soms wêrelde van mekaar verwyderd.

  17. Risk of retina damage from high intensity light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollak, V.A.; Romanchuk, K.G.

    1980-05-01

    The risk of thermal damage to the retina of the eye by exposure to excesive light intensities from continuous and pulsed man-made sources is discussed. The probability of injury increases, the larger the radiant power absorbed by the retina and the smaller the size of the retinal image of the source. A method of estimating the temperature increase of the immediately affected area of the retina is presented. The time constants involved are also briefly considered. Using numerical values from literature for the relevant parameters of the eye, threshold values for a variety of conditions can be established. Below these values little risk of retina damage should exist. The degree of hazard when these values are exceeded depends upon the circumstances. A case study of a welding accident showed good agreement between the conclusions of the theoretical analysis and clinical findings.

  18. Simple Experiments on the Physics of Vision: The Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortel, Adolf

    2005-01-01

    Many simple experiments can be performed in the classroom to explore the physics of vision. Students can learn of the two types of receptive cells (rods and cones), their distribution on the retina and the existence of the blind spot.

  19. Simulating the Effects of Laser Damage to the Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    This Phase II SBIR brought vision and signal processing researchers from the Air Force, academia and the public sector together to develop a visualization tool for modeling laser damage to the retina...

  20. Teilchenkollisionen am CERN : Heidelberger Wissenschaftler forschen mit am Large Hadron Collider (LHC) des CERN in Genf; sie lassen Wasserstoffkerne ineinander rasen

    OpenAIRE

    Schweda, Kai

    2010-01-01

    "Campus-Report" heißt die Radiosendung der Universitäten Heidelberg, Mannheim, Karlsruhe und Freiburg. Die Reportagen über aktuelle Themen aus Forschung und Wissenschaft werden montags bis freitags jeweils um ca. 19.10h im Programm von Radio Regenbogen gesendet. (Empfang in Nordbaden: UKW 102,8. In Mittelbaden: 100,4 und in Südbaden: 101,1) Uni-Radio Baden: ein gemeinsames Projekt der Universitäten Freiburg, Heidelberg, Karlsruhe und Mannheim in Zusammenarbeit mit Radio Regenbogen – unterstüt...

  1. Light-evoked S-nitrosylation in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Ryan E; Vigh, Jozsef

    2015-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the retina is triggered by light stimulation. NO has been shown to modulate visual signal processing at multiple sites in the vertebrate retina, via activation of the most sensitive target of NO signaling, soluble guanylate cyclase. NO can also alter protein structure and function and exert biological effects directly by binding to free thiol groups of cysteine residues in a chemical reaction called S-nitrosylation. However, in the central nervous system, including the retina, this reaction has not been considered to be significant under physiological conditions. Here we provide immunohistochemical evidence for extensive S-nitrosylation that takes place in the goldfish and mouse retinas under physiologically relevant light intensities, in an intensity-dependent manner, with a strikingly similar pattern in both species. Pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which occludes S-nitrosylation, or with 1-(2-trifluromethylphenyl)imidazole (TRIM), an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, eliminated the light-evoked increase in S-nitrosylated protein immunofluorescence (SNI) in the retinas of both species. Similarly, light did not increase SNI, above basal levels, in retinas of transgenic mice lacking neuronal NO synthase. Qualitative analysis of the light-adapted mouse retina with mass spectrometry revealed more than 300 proteins that were S-nitrosylated upon illumination, many of which are known to participate directly in retinal signal processing. Our data strongly suggest that in the retina light-evoked NO production leads to extensive S-nitrosylation and that this process is a significant posttranslational modification affecting a wide range of proteins under physiological conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of cholinergic amacrine cells in the bat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Bee; Gu, Ya-Nan; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to localize the cholinergic amacrine cells, one of the key elements of a functional retina, in the retina of a microbat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. The presence and localization of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive (ChAT-IR) cells in the microbat retina were investigated using immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, and quantitative analysis. These ChAT-IR cells were present in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner part of the inner nuclear layer (INL), as previously reported in various animals. However, the bat retina also contained some ChAT-IR cells in the outer part of the INL. The dendrites of these cells extended into the outer plexiform layer, and those of the cells in the inner INL extended within the outer part of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). The dendrites of the ChAT-IR cells in the GCL extended into the middle of the IPL and some fibers ramified up to the outer IPL. The average densities of ChAT-IR cells in the GCL, inner INL, and outer INL were 259±31cells/mm 2 , 469±48cells/mm 2 , and 59±8cells/mm 2 , respectively. The average total density of the ChAT-IR cells was 788±58cells/mm 2 (mean±S.D.; n=3; 2799±182 cells/retina). We also found that the cholinergic amacrine cells in the bat retina contained calbindin, one of the calcium-binding proteins, but not calretinin or parvalbumin. As the cholinergic amacrine cells play key roles in the direction selectivity and optokinetic eye reflex in the other mammalian retinas, the present study might provide better information of the cytoarchitecture of bat retina and the basic sources for further physiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Light-evoked S-nitrosylation in the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Ryan E; Vigh, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the retina is triggered by light stimulation. NO has been shown to modulate visual signal processing at multiple sites in the vertebrate retina, via activation of the most sensitive target of NO signaling, soluble guanylate cyclase. NO can also alter protein structure and function and exert biological effects directly by binding to free thiol groups of cysteine residues in a chemical reaction called S-nitrosylation. However, in the central nervous system, including the retina, this reaction has not been considered to be significant under physiological conditions. Here we provide immunohistochemical evidence for extensive S-nitrosylation that takes place in the goldfish and mouse retinas under physiologically relevant light intensities, in an intensity-dependent manner, with a strikingly similar pattern in both species. Pre-treatment with NEM, which occludes S-nitrosylation, or with TRIM, an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, eliminated the light-evoked increase in S-nitrosylated protein immunofluorescence (SNI) in the retinas of both species. Similarly, light did not increase SNI, above basal levels, in retinas of transgenic mice lacking neuronal NO synthase. Qualitative analysis of the light-adapted mouse retina with mass spectrometry revealed more than 300 proteins that were S-nitrosylated upon illumination, many of which are known to participate directly in retinal signal processing. Our data strongly suggest that in the retina, light-evoked NO production leads to extensive S-nitrosylation and that this process is a significant post-translational modification affecting a wide range of proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:25823749

  4. Effect of accelerated iron ions on the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, W.; Krebs, I.; Worgul, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    The eyes of rats were exposed to doses of 0.1 and 2.5 Gy of 450-MeV/amu 56Fe particles (LET approximately 195 keV/microns). The beam axes were oriented perpendicular to the central retina of the animals. Retinas were harvested immediately (less than 10 min), 24 h, 15 days, 136 days, and 186 days after the experiment. The retinas of animals of equivalent ages were sampled at the same intervals. By Day 15, the spatial densities of the pigment epithelial, photoreceptor, and bipolar cells in retinas irradiated with 2.5 Gy were 15 to 20% lower than those of the controls. The cellular density of the pigment epithelium returned to the control level by Day 186 while photoreceptor and bipolar cell numbers remained depressed. One and fifteen days after irradiation, the choroidal vessels showed signs of radiation damage. Exposure to 0.1 Gy did not affect the cellular density within the retina at the interval examined (186 days). None of the retinas showed evidence of track-specific injury that could be interpreted as microlesions or tunnel lesions

  5. Mesozeaxanthin Protects Retina from Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Cemal; Akdemir, Fatih; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Yilmaz, Ismet; Deshpande, Jayant; Juturu, Vijaya; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-11-01

    Mesozeaxanthin (MZ) is able to protect against chronic and cumulative eye damage and neutralize free radicals produced by oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective potential of MZ against retinal oxidative damage and growth and transcription factors of the retina in rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Twenty-eight Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following 4 groups: (1) Control, (2) MZ (100 mg/kg bw/d), (3) HFD (42% of calories as fat), and (4) HFD+MZ (100 mg/kg bw/d) group rats were administered daily as supplement for 12 weeks. Consumption of HFD was associated with hyperglycemia and oxidative stress as reflected by increased serum MDA concentration (P retina of rats fed with HFD had increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) levels and decreased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme-oxygenase 1(HO-1) levels compared to the healthy rat retina (P retina of rats fed (P retina and the ability to modulate oxidative stress of retina in rats fed an HFD by suppressing retinal lipid peroxidation and regulating growth and transcription factors.

  6. Nerve growth factor helps protect retina in experimental retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Xu, Xun; Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Xi; Ho, Patrick C P; Liu, Haiyang; Qian, Jin; Yu, Zhang; Lu, Hongfen; Xu, Weiqi

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor TrkA on the retina at different time points after retinal detachment (RD) and the protection effect of NGF in experimental RD. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as an RD animal model by injection of 0.1% sodium hyaluronate under the neurosensory retina. The expression of endogenous NGF and its receptor TrkA in the rat retina was detected using immunohistochemistry. The NGF (5 mug/eye) or phosphate-buffered saline were injected separately into vitreous every 4 days after the RD. The rat eyes were then observed at various time points. Morphologic changes were investigated by light microscopy. Retinal gliosis was detected by glial fibrillary acidic protein labeling. The expression of endogenous NGF and TrkA was upregulated during RD procedure. Most of the NGF-treated retina had a well-organized structure. In NGF-treated RD eyes, the cells were still significantly more numerous than in phosphate-buffered-saline-treated retina. Glial fibrillary acidic protein labeling increased quickly after RD; the NGF-treated retina had less reactive gliosis than the control groups. Intravitreal injection of exogenous NGF can protect retinal cells from degeneration in experimental RD. It may exert its protective action by preventing the apoptosis of retinal cells after RD. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence in the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lane, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulation of autofluorescence in the retina to determine that noninvasive detection of nutritional iron deficiency is possible. Nutritional iron deficiency (which leads to iron deficiency anemia) affects more than 2 billion people worldwide, and there is an urgent need for a simple, noninvasive diagnostic test. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) is a fluorescent compound that accumulates in red blood cells and is used as a biomarker for nutritional iron deficiency. We developed a computational model of the eye, using parameters that were identified either by literature search, or by direct experimental measurement to test the possibility of detecting ZPP non-invasively in retina. By incorporating fluorescence into Steven Jacques' original code for multi-layered tissue, we performed Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence in the retina and determined that if the beam is not focused on a blood vessel in a neural retina layer or if part of light is hitting the vessel, ZPP fluorescence will be 10-200 times higher than background lipofuscin fluorescence coming from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer directly below. In addition we found that if the light can be focused entirely onto a blood vessel in the neural retina layer, the fluorescence signal comes only from ZPP. The fluorescence from layers below in this second situation does not contribute to the signal. Therefore, the possibility that a device could potentially be built and detect ZPP fluorescence in retina looks very promising.

  8. Transformation of stimulus correlations by the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Jason; Simmons, Kristina; Tkacik, Gasper; Homann, Jan; Yee, Heather; Palmer, Stephanie; Nelson, Phillip; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2014-03-01

    Correlations in the responses of sensory neurons seem to waste neural resources, but can carry cues about structured stimuli and help the brain correct for response errors. To assess how the retina negotiates this tradeoff, we measured simultaneous responses from many retinal ganglion cells presented with natural and artificial stimuli that varied in correlation structure. Responding to spatio-temporally structured stimuli such as natural movies, pairs of ganglion cells were more correlated than in response to white noise checkerboards, but were much less correlated than predicted by a non-adapting functional model of retinal response. Meanwhile, responding to stimuli with purely spatial correlations, pairs of ganglion cells showed increased correlations consistent with a static, non-adapting receptive field and nonlinearity. We found that in response to spatio- temporally correlated stimuli, ganglion cells had faster temporal kernels and tended to have stronger surrounds. These properties of individual cells, along with gain changes that opposed changes in effective contrast at the ganglion cell input, largely explained the pattern of correlations across stimuli.

  9. Vitreous in lattice degeneration of retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foos, R Y; Simons, K B

    1984-05-01

    A localized pocket of missing vitreous invariably overlies lattice degeneration of the retina. Subjects with lattice also have a higher rate of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, which is usually a complication of retinal tears. The latter are in turn a result of alterations in the central vitreous--that is, synchysis senilis leading to posterior vitreous detachment. In order to determine if there is either an association or a deleterious interaction between the local and central lesions of the vitreous in eyes with lattice, a comparison was made in autopsy eyes with and without lattice the degree of synchysis and rate of vitreous detachment. Results show no association between the local and central vitreous lesions, indicating that a higher rate of vitreous detachment is not the basis for the higher rate of retinal detachment in eyes with lattice. Also, there was no suggestion of deleterious interaction between the local and central vitreous lesions, either through vitreodonesis as a basis for precocious vitreous detachment, or through a greater degree of synchysis as a basis for interconnection of local and central lacunae (which could extend the localized retinal detachment in eyes with holes in lattice degeneration).

  10. The emerging roles of clusterin on reduction of both blood retina barrier breakdown and neural retina damage in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Conghui; Nie, Jing; Feng, Le; Luo, Wentao; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fang; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Previous proteomic studies revealed that intravitreous clusterin was decreased in diabetic retinopathy (DR) patients. We explored the role of clusterin in reduction of both blood retina barrier (BRB) breakdown and neural retina damage in early DR. Immunofluorescent staining of proliferated diabetic retinopathy (PDR) membranes was performed to detect endogenous clusterin, and intravitreous injection of clusterin (CLU group) or PBS (DR group) to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was conducted. Both qPCR and immunofluorescent staining were employed to investigate tight junction (TJ) protein. Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and electroretinogram (ERG) were examined. Finally, HE and TUNEL stainings were used for neural retina assessment. Clusterin was expressed in the endothelial cells of PDR membranes. The expressions of several TJ protein genes were decreased in the retina of DR group (pretina showed that both dropouts and apoptotic death of neural retina cells in diabetic rats were attenuated in CLU group. Clusterin had a promising role in reducing both BRB breakdown and neural retina damage under high glucose; the mechanism might be keeping TJ protein integrated and maintaining anti-apoptosis in early diabetic rats.

  11. Comparison of advanced whole genome sequence-based methods to distinguish strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg involved in foodborne outbreaks in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Caroline; Usongo, Valentine; Berry, Chrystal; Tremblay, Denise M; Moineau, Sylvain; Yousfi, Khadidja; Doualla-Bell, Florence; Fournier, Eric; Nadon, Céline; Goodridge, Lawrence; Bekal, Sadjia

    2018-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. This serovar ranks second and third among serovars that cause human infections in Québec and Canada, respectively, and has been associated with severe infections. Traditional typing methods such as PFGE do not display adequate discrimination required to resolve outbreak investigations due to the low level of genetic diversity of isolates belonging to this serovar. This study evaluates the ability of four whole genome sequence (WGS)-based typing methods to differentiate among 145 S. Heidelberg strains involved in four distinct outbreak events and sporadic cases of salmonellosis that occurred in Québec between 2007 and 2016. Isolates from all outbreaks were indistinguishable by PFGE. The core genome single nucleotide variant (SNV), core genome multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and whole genome MLST approaches were highly discriminatory and separated outbreak strains into four distinct phylogenetic clusters that were concordant with the epidemiological data. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) typing method was less discriminatory. However, CRISPR typing may be used as a secondary method to differentiate isolates of S. Heidelberg that are genetically similar but epidemiologically unrelated to outbreak events. WGS-based typing methods provide a highly discriminatory alternative to PFGE for the laboratory investigation of foodborne outbreaks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular characterization of Salmonella paratyphi B dT+ and Salmonella Heidelberg from poultry and retail chicken meat in Colombia by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Byrne, Barbara A; Hume, Michael; León, Maribel; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Enriqué; Vives Flores, Martha J; Clavijo, Viviana; Holguin, Ángela; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan J; Castellanos, Ricardo; Tafur, McAllister; Smith, Woutrina A

    2015-04-01

    Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ variant (also termed Salmonella Java) and Salmonella Heidelberg are pathogens of public health importance that are frequently isolated from poultry. As a step toward implementing the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistant Surveillance, this study characterized molecular patterns of Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ and Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from poultry farms, fecal samples, and retail chicken meat using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relationship among isolates and to determine potential geographically predominant genotypes. Based on PFGE analysis, both serovars exhibited high heterogeneity: the chromosomal DNA fingerprints of 82 Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ isolates revealed 42 PFGE patterns, whereas the 21 isolates of Salmonella Heidelberg revealed 10 patterns. Similar genotypes of both serovars were demonstrated to be present on farms and in retail outlets. For Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+, closely genetically related strains were found among isolates coming from different farms and different integrated poultry companies within two departments (Santander and Cundinamarca) and also from farms located in the two geographically distant departments. For Salmonella Heidelberg, there were fewer farms with genetically related isolates than for Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+. A possible dissemination of similar genotypes of both serovars along the poultry production chain is hypothesized, and some facilitating factors existing in Colombia are reviewed.

  13. Diabetes Impairs the Aldehyde Detoxifying Capacity of the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Rosemary E; McGahon, Mary K; Augustine, Josy; Chen, Mei; McGeown, J Graham; Curtis, Tim M

    2016-09-01

    We studied whether the accumulation of advanced lipoxidation end-products (ALEs) in the diabetic retina is linked to the impairment of lipid aldehyde detoxification mechanisms. Retinas were collected from nondiabetic and diabetic rats and processed for conventional and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity assays. The effect of the ALDH1a1 inhibitor, NCT-501, on ALE accumulation and cell viability in cultured Müller glia also was investigated. The rat retina expressed a range of lipid aldehyde detoxifying ALDH and aldo-keto reductase (AKR) genes. In diabetes, mRNA levels were reduced for 5 of 9 transcripts tested. These findings contrasted with those in the lens and cornea where many of these enzymes were upregulated. We have reported previously accumulation of the acrolein (ACR)-derived ALE, FDP-lysine, in retinal Müller glia during diabetes. In the present study, we show that the main ACR-detoxifying ALDH and AKR genes expressed in the retina, namely, ALDH1a1, ALDH2, and AKR1b1, are principally localized to Müller glia. Diabetes-induced FDP-lysine accumulation in Müller glia was associated with a reduction in ALDH1a1 mRNA and protein expression in whole retina and a decrease in ALDH1a1-immunoreactivity specifically within these cells. No such changes were detected for ALDH2 or AKR1b1. Activity of ALDH was suppressed in the diabetic retina and blockade of ALDH1a1 in cultured Müller glia triggered FDP-lysine accumulation and reduced cell viability. These findings suggest that downregulation of ALDH and AKR enzymes, particularly ALDH1a1, may contribute ALE accumulation in the diabetic retina.

  14. Fluorescein angiography of the canine retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaepdrijver, L. de; Simoens, P.; Lauwers, H.

    1996-01-01

    The retinal vascular bed was examined in 37 canine eyes by studying 50 retinal fluorangiograms. All angiographic phases could distinctly be visualized by the use of a small intravenous bolus of 10 mg/kg fluorescein. The choroidal phase is characterized by spot-like and lobular filling of the choriocapillaris. By coalescence of the choroidal lobules, this uneven filling progressively disappears in the subsequent phases. The retinal arterial phase is characterized by a hyperfluorescence of the retinal arterioles at the level of the optic disc border. The time interval between the start of the choroidal phase and the retinal arterial phase is very short due to the common origin of the choroidal and retinal arteries from the choroidoretinal arteries. The retinal arterio-venous phase is characterized by a complete filling of the smaller arterioles, capillaries, and venules. During this phase the branching pattern of the retinal blood vessels at the area centralis region can be most easily studied. This also applies to the periarteriolar capillary-free zones and the radial peripapillary capillaries. The retinal early venous phase is characterized by the onset of laminar flow in the larger retinal venules. A homogeneous and complete filling of the larger venules is characteristic for the onset of the late venous phase. During the retinal venous phase the border venule can be observed just posterior to the ora ciliaris retinae. Fluorescein angiography of the canine retinal microvasculature shows that the dog is less suitable as an experimental animal model in ophthalmology, due to the presence of the choroidal tapetum which reflects fluorescent light and thus diminishes the contrast between the retinal blood vessels and the background

  15. Glycinergic transmission in the mammalian retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Wässle

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA are the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the retina. Approximately half of the amacrine cells release glycine at their synapses with bipolar, other amacrine, and ganglion cells. Glycinergic amacrine cells are small-field amacrine cells with vertically oriented dendrites and comprise more than ten different morphological types. The retinal distributions of glycine receptor (GlyR α1, α2, α3 and α4 subtypes have been mapped with subunit-specific antibodies. GlyRs were clustered at postsynaptic hot spots which showed selective distributions for the different subunits. As a rule, only one α subunit was expressed at a given postsynaptic site. The kinetic properties of GlyRs were measured by recording spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs from identified retinal neurons in wild-type, Glra1spd-ot, Glra2 and Glra3 knockout mice. From observed differences of sIPSCs in wild-type and mutant mice, the cell-type specific subunit composition of GlyRs could be defined. OFF-cone bipolar cells and A-type ganglion cells receive prominent glycinergic input with fast kinetics that is mainly mediated by α1β GlyRs (decay time constant tau ~ 5 ms. By contrast, AII amacrine cells express α3β GlyRs with medium fast kinetics (tau ~ 11 ms. Narrow-field (NF and wide-field amacrine cells contain predominantly α2β GlyRs with slow kinetics (tau ~ 27 ms. Lastly, ON-starburst, narrow-field and wide-field amacrine cells in Glra2 knockout mice express α4β GlyRs with very slow kinetics (tau ~ 70 ms.

  16. Long-term effects of the “Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy” in patients with chronic tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Hutter, Elisabeth; Plinkert, Peter; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2012-01-01

    Objective The “Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy for Chronic Tinnitus” is a manualized short term treatment (nine 50-minutes sessions of individualized therapy on five consecutive days). It has proven to be efficient in reducing tinnitus symptoms in the short run. Now the long-term impact of the treatment after up to 5.4 years should be explored. Materials and methods 206 patients who had attended the neuro-music therapy were addressed in a structured follow-up questionnaire survey. 107 complete questionnaires entered analysis. Follow-up time was 2.65 (SD 1.1) years. Results 76% of the patients achieved a reliable reduction in their tinnitus scores, the overall tinnitus distress as measured by the Mini-TQ diminished from 11.9 (SD = 4.9) to 7.4 (SD = 5.2) points, 87% of the patients were satisfied by the way they were treated during therapy, and 71% of the patients did not undergo any further treatment after. Evaluation of therapeutic elements displays, that only music therapy specific interventions were rated helpful by the patients. Tinnitus related factors (such as tinnitus pitch or loudness, time since onset) did not influence therapy outcome but female gender, positive therapeutic relationship, and higher initial Mini-TQ scores became apparent as factors predicting better chances for greater therapy success. Discussion The “Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy for Chronic Tinnitus” seems to be effective in the long run. The outcome effect size of d’ = 0.89, can be accounted for as “large” effect and falls into the upper range value compared to established treatments. PMID:22993646

  17. Evaluation of a Probiotic and a Competitive Exclusion Product Inoculated In Ovo on Broiler Chickens Challenged with Salmonella Heidelberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGO Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated a probiotic and a competitive exclusion product injected in ovo on day 18 of incubation together with Marek's disease vaccine in eggs of 56-week-old broiler breeders. Three experiments were carried out. The first trial evaluated the effect of treatments on hatchability, cecal colonization of Salmonella Heidelberg (SH, and intestinal mucosa immunity (immunoglobulin A levels in the intestinal fluid. The second trial evaluated the viability of the microorganisms in the products inoculated in a solution containing diluent and Marek's disease vaccine. The third trial evaluated the colonization of the cecal microbiota in non-challenged chickens during first four days of life by culturing cecal samples under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Hatchability was not affected by the treatments. SH cecal counts were reduced in three-day-old broilers inoculated in ovo with the competitive exclusion product. Liver and spleen pool SH counts were not different among treatments. Broilers inoculated in ovo presented higher intestinal IgA titers 24 hours after SH challenge compared with the controls. When birds were not challenged, lower cecal microbial counts in aerobic culture were determined in the control group than in the probiotic group on day 3, and in the competitive exclusion group on day 2 when cultured in anaerobiosis. The products inoculated and diluted in the vaccine solution were viable at all analyzed periods when cultured in anaerobiosis. The results of this study suggest in-ovo inoculation is an effective route for the administration of the evaluated products, which effectively enhanced the broilers' immune response to a SH challenge, as shown by the increase in IgA titers, and the reduction in cecal Salmonella Heidelberg colonization with the in-ovo inoculation with the competitive exclusion product.

  18. The Stuttgart-Heidelberg Model of Active Feedback Driven Quality Management: Means for the Optimization of Psychotherapy Provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Kordy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La gestión de la calidad busca la evaluación del tratamiento psicoterapéutico. Un aspecto central se relaciona con el desarrollo de baterías de evaluación y criterios de evaluación adecuados. El modelo Stuttgart-Heidelberg (S-H representa un sistema que proporciona conceptos, instrumentos psicométricos y un programa informático desarrollado para la gestión de la calidad basada en el feedback activo. La información central del modelo Stuttgart-Heidelberg es el resultado individual del tratamiento. El planteamiento es que la psicoterapia puede mejorarse si proporcionamos información sobre los resultados terapéuticos (en especial los negativos, pues los procesos de solución de problemas se estimularán por el feedback recibido. El presente trabajo presenta un inventario de evaluación, la evaluación estandarizada de los resultados y las diversas herramientas de feedback del modelo SH. Un estudio sistemático incluyendo 1715 pacientes de un hospital especializado en trastornos psicosomáticos documenta la validez de este abordaje. Los resultados empíricos refuerzan una estrategia de transparencia acerca de lo que acontece en la práctica clínica – por ejemplo, acerca de los tratamientos administrados, sus resultados y costos. Implicaciones para la posterior optimización de los servicios de salud son discutidos.

  19. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg Chemical compatibility of 3 mg Auranofin tablets demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparación de mezclas físicas binarias entre el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Se detectó por ambos métodos que el principio activo tuvo una transición física de fusión, no reportada en la literatura, lo que permitió poder calcular su pureza por calorimetría diferencial de barrido. Mediante la técnica calorimétrica fue posible inferir la ausencia de incompatibilidad química entre el principio activo y los excipientes estudiados. Además, mediante el cálculo de la energía de activación se estableció el siguiente orden de estabilidad térmica: auranofin:PVP> auranofin:lactosa> auranofin:explotab> auranofin:estearato> auranofin:aerosil> auranofin:celulosa, por lo que se recomienda el uso de estos excipientes en la elaboración de la formulación farmacéutica.As part of the pre-stability study of the Auranofin tablet pre-formulation, a chemical compatibility study was conducted using thermal analysis techniques such as the differential scanning calorimetry and the thermogravimetry. Prior to these studies, the active principle and each of the excipients were thermally characterized with the aid of the differential scanning calorimetry. Then, there proceeded to carry out the chemical compatibility study by preparing binary physical mixtures between the active principle and each of the excipients. Both methods showed that the active principle had a melting physical transition, not reported in the literature, which allowed

  20. Food Grade Pimenta Leaf Essential Oil Reduces the Attachment of Salmonella enterica Heidelberg (2011 Ground Turkey Outbreak Isolate on to Turkey Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divek V. T. Nair

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella attached to the poultry skin is a major source of carcass contamination during processing. Once attached to the poultry skin, it is difficult to detach and inactivate Salmonella by commonly used antimicrobial agents since the pathogen is entrapped deeply in the feather follicles and the crevices on the skin. Essential oils could be natural, safe, and effective alternatives to synthetic antimicrobial agents during commercial and organic processing setup. The present study evaluated the efficacy of pimenta (Pimenta officinalis Lindl. leaf essential oil (PEO, and its nanoemulsion in reducing Salmonella Heidelberg attachment on to turkey (Meleagris gallopavo skin during simulated scalding (65°C and chilling (4°C steps in poultry processing. A multidrug resistant S. Heidelberg isolate from the 2011 ground turkey outbreak in the United States was used in the study. Results showed that PEO and the nanoemulsion resulted in significant reduction of S. Heidelberg attachment on turkey skin. Turkey skin samples treated with 1.0% PEO for 5 min resulted in >2 log10 CFU/sq. inch reduction of S. Heidelberg at 65 and 4°C, respectively (n = 6; P < 0.05. Similarly, skin samples treated with 1.0% pimenta nanoemulsion (PNE for 5 min resulted in 1.5- and 1.8- log10 CFU/sq. inch reduction of S. Heidelberg at 65 and 4°C, respectively (n = 6; P < 0.05. In addition, PEO and PNE were effective in reducing S. Heidelberg on skin during short-term storage at 4 and 10°C (temperature abuse (n = 6; P < 0.05. No Salmonella was detected in the dipping solution containing 0.5 or 1.0% PEO or PNE, whereas a substantial population of the pathogen survived in the control dipping solution. The results were validated using scanning electron -, and confocal - microscopy techniques. PEO or PNE could be utilized as an effective antimicrobial agent to reduce S. Heidelberg attachment to turkey skin during poultry processing.

  1. Differences in Pre and Post Vascular Patterning Within Retinas from ISS Crew Members and Head-Down Tilt (HDT) Subjects by VESGEN Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M. C.; Vizzeri, G.; Taibbi, G.; Mason, S. S.; Young, M.; Zanello, S. B.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.

    2018-01-01

    Accelerated research by NASA has investigated the significant risks incurred during long-duration missions in microgravity for Space Flight-Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (SANS, formerly known as Visual Impairments associated with Increased Intracranial Pressure, VIIP) [1]. For our study, NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) was used to investigate the role of retinal blood vessels in the etiology of SANS/VIIP. The response of retinal vessels to microgravity was evaluated in astronaut crew members pre and post flight to the International Space Station (ISS), and compared to the response of retinal vessels in healthy volunteers to 6deg head-down tilt during 70 days of bed rest (HDTBR). For the study, we are testing the hypothesis that long-term cephalad fluid shifts resulting in ocular and visual impairments are necessarily mediated in part by retinal blood vessels, and therefore are accompanied by structural adaptations of the vessels. METHODS: Vascular patterns in the retinas of crew members and HDTBR subjects extracted from 30deg infrared (IR) Heidelberg Spectralis images collected pre/postflight and pre/post HDTBR, respectively, were analyzed by VESGEN (patent pending). VESGEN is a mature, automated software developed as a research discovery tool for progressive vascular diseases in the retina and other tissues. The multi-parametric VESGEN analysis generates maps of branching arterial and venous trees quantified by parameters such as the fractal dimension (Df, a modern measure of vascular space-filling capacity), vessel diameters, and densities of vessel length and number classified into specific branching generations according to vascular physiological branching rules. The retrospective study approved by NASA's Institutional Review Board included the analysis of bilateral retinas in eight ISS crew members monitored by routine occupational surveillance and six HDTBR subjects (NASA FARU Campaign 11, for example). The VESGEN analysis was conducted in a

  2. Starburst cholinergic amacrine cells in the tree shrew retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, D; Engelmann, R; Peichl, L

    1997-12-08

    In all mammalian retinae studied to date, starburst cholinergic amacrine cells are a consistently occurring cell type. Here, we show that the cone-dominated retina of the tree shrew also has starburst cells with the characteristic radially symmetric branching pattern known from other species. Dendritic field sizes increase from 150 microm in the central retina to 300 microm in the retinal periphery. The characteristic morphology is established early during postnatal development. Labelling the starburst cholinergic cells with an antibody against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) reveals two dendritic strata in the inner plexiform layer and two corresponding soma populations in the inner nuclear layer (orthotopic) and ganglion cell layer (displaced). These features are present in the adult and in early postnatal stages. In the adult, the density of the orthotopic population as well as the displaced population peaks in the central retina at about 2,200 cells/mm2 and has a peripheral minimum of 400 cells/mm2. These properties are qualitatively similar to those of starburst cells in rod-dominated retinae. In contrast to findings in other mammals, we did not see gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65) immunoreactivity in tree shrew starburst cells. These cells also appear to lack synaptophysin, a ubiquitous synaptic vesicle protein detected in the starburst cells of some other mammals. However, synaptoporin, a homologous synaptic vesicle protein, appears to be present in tree shrew starburst cells.

  3. Analysis of expression of transcription factors in early human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ma, Lixiang; Wang, Songtao; Wang, Xiaobing; Sun, Yan; Gao, Lu; Li, Jin; Zhou, Guomin

    2017-08-01

    The retina originates in the central nervous system. Due to its accessibility and simplicity, the retina has become an invaluable model for studying the basic mechanisms involved in development. To date, considerable knowledge regarding the interactions among genes that coordinate retinal development has been gained from extensive research in model animals. However, our understanding of retinal development in humans remains undeveloped. Here, we analyze the expression of transcription factors that are involved in the early development of the retina in human embryos at 6-12 weeks post-conception. Our work demonstrates that early developing neural retinas can be divided into two layers, the outer and inner neuroblast layers. Eye-field transcription factors and those related to the early development of the retina have distinct expression patterns in the two layers. Cell-type-specific transcription factors emerge at 8 weeks. These data provide clear and systemic structures for early retinal development in human. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropeptide Y system in the retina: From localization to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Carvalho, Ana; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-07-01

    The retina is a highly complex structure where several types of cells communicate through countless different molecules to codify visual information. Each type of cells plays unique roles in the retina, presenting a singular expression of neurotransmitters. Some neurotransmitter systems in the retina are well understood, while others need to be better explored to unravel the intricate signaling system involved. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a 36 amino acid peptide, is one of the most common peptide neurotransmitter in the CNS and a highly conserved peptide among species. We review the localization of NPY and NPY receptors (mainly NPY Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5) in retinal cells. Common features of the expression of NPY and NPY receptors in mammalian and non-mammalian species indicate universal roles of this system in the retina. In the present review, we highlight the putative roles of NPY receptor activation in the retina, discussing, in particular, their involvement in retinal development, neurotransmitter release modulation, neuroprotection, microglia and Muller cells function, retinal pigmented epithelium changes, retinal endothelial physiology and proliferation of retinal progenitor cells. Further studies are needed to confirm that targeting the NPY system might be a potential therapeutic strategy for retinal degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of arteriovenous identity in the developing neonate mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Angela M; Young, Chandler; Meadows, Stryder M

    2017-01-01

    The murine retina has become an ideal model to study blood vessel formation. Blood vessels in the retina undergo various processes, including remodeling and differentiation, to form a stereotypical network that consists of precisely patterned arteries and veins. This model presents a powerful tool for understanding many different aspects of angiogenesis including artery and vein (AV) cell fate acquisition and differentiation. However, characterization of AV differentiation has been largely unexplored in the mouse retinal model. In this study, we describe the expression of previously established AV markers and assess arteriovenous acquisition and identity in the murine neonatal retina. Using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent antibody staining techniques, we analyzed numerous AV differentiation markers such as EphB4-EphrinB2 and members of the Notch pathway. We find that at postnatal day 3 (P3), when blood vessels are beginning to populate the retina, AV identity is not immediately established. However, by P5 expression of many molecular identifiers of arteries and veins become restricted to their respective vessel types. This molecular distinction is more obvious at P7 and remains unchanged through P9. Overall, these studies indicate that, similar to the embryo, acquisition of AV identity occurs in a step-wise process and is largely established by P7 during retina development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of accelerated argon ions on the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, W.; Krebs, I.; Merriam, G.R. Jr.; Worgul, B.V.

    1988-01-01

    It has been postulated that high energy heavy ions cause a unique form of damage in living tissue, which results from the high linear energy transfer of accelerated single particles. We have searched for these single-particle effects, so-called microlesions, in composite electron micrographs of retinas of rats which had been irradiated with a dose of 1 Gy of 570 MeV/amu argon ions. The calculated rate of energy deposition of the radiation in the retina was about 100 keV/micron and the influence was four particles per 100 micron 2. Different areas of the irradiated retinas which combined would have been expected to be traversed by approximately 2400 particles were examined. We were unable to detect ultrastructural changes in the irradiated retinas distinct from those of controls. The spatial cellular densities of pigment epithelial and photoreceptor cells remained within the normal range when examined at 24 h and at 6 months after irradiation. These findings suggest that the retina is relatively resistant to heavy-ion irradiation and that under the experimental conditions the passage of high energy argon ions does not cause retinal microlesions that can be detected by ultrastructural analysis

  7. Distribution and structure of efferent synapses in the chicken retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, SH; Nacsa, N; Blankenship, T; Fitzgerald, PG; Weller, C; Vaney, DI; Wilson, M

    2012-01-01

    The visual system of birds includes an efferent projection from a visual area, the isthmooptic nucleus in the midbrain, back to the retina. Using a combination of anterograde labeling of efferent fibers, reconstruction of dye-filled neurons, NADPH-diaphorase staining, and transmission electron microscopy we have examined the distribution of efferent fibers and their synaptic structures in the chicken retina. We show that efferent fibers terminate strictly within the ventral retina. In 2 completely mapped retinas, only 2 fibers from a total of 15,359 terminated in the dorsal retina. The major synapse made by each efferent fiber is with a single Efferent Target Amacrine Cell (TC). This synapse consists of 5-25 boutons of 2μm diameter, each with multiple active zones, pressed into the TC soma or synapsing with a basketwork of rudimentary TC dendrites in the inner nuclear layer (INL). This basketwork, which is sheathed by Muller cells processes, defines a private neuropil in the INL within which TCs were also seen to receive input from retinal neurons. In addition to the major synapse, efferent fibers typically produce several very thin processes that terminate nearby in single small boutons and for which the soma of a local amacrine cell is one of the likely postsynaptic partners. A minority of efferent fibers also give rise to a thicker process terminating in a strongly diaphorase positive ball about 5μm in diameter. PMID:19439107

  8. Retina neural circuitry seen with particle detector technology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Using particle physics techniques, high energy physics researchers have recently provided new insight into neural circuits inside the retina. After uncovering a new type of retinal cell and mapping how the retina deals with colours, the team from Santa Cruz (US), Krakow and Glasgow is now turning its attention to more complex issues such as how the retina gets wired up and how the brain deals with the signals it receives from the retina. All this using technology derived from high-density, multistrip silicon detectors…   Seen from the point of view of a particle physicist, eyes are image detectors that can gather many different types of data: light and dark, different colours, motion, etc. In particular, the retina, a thin tissue that lines the back of the eye, is a biological pixel detector that detects light and converts it to electrical signals that travel through the optic nerve to the brain. Neurobiologists know that many different cell types are involved in these processes, but they...

  9. Selective Gene Transfer to the Retina Using Intravitreal Ultrasound Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Sonoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal ultrasound (US irradiation for green fluorescent protein (GFP plasmid transfer into the rabbit retina using a miniature US transducer. Intravitreal US irradiation was performed by a slight modification of the transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system utilizing a small probe. After vitrectomy, the US probe was inserted through a scleral incision. A mixture of GFP plasmid (50 μL and bubble liposomes (BLs; 50 μL was injected into the vitreous cavity, and US was generated to the retina using a SonoPore 4000. The control group was not exposed to US. After 72 h, the gene-transfer efficiency was quantified by counting the number of GFP-positive cells. The retinas that received plasmid, BL, and US showed a significant increase in the number (average ± SEM of GFP-positive cells (32±4.9; n=7; P<0.01 . No GFP-positive cells were observed in the control eyes (n=7. Intravitreal retinal US irradiation can transfer the GFP plasmid into the retina without causing any apparent damage. This procedure could be used to transfer genes and drugs directly to the retina and therefore has potential therapeutic value.

  10. Funciones no visuales de la retina: Razones para cuidar la retina en la ceguera total

    OpenAIRE

    Esquiva Sobrino, Gema; Lax, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    La retina es una porción del sistema nervioso central formada por una red de neuronas especializadas que se localiza tapizando el interior del globo ocular. En este tejido, los estímulos luminosos desencadenan respuestas eléctricas y químicas que activan diferentes vías paralelas de transmisión de la información hacia distintas áreas del sistema nervioso. La vía clásica visual, “formadora de imágenes”, se inicia con el proceso de transformación de las señales luminosas en impulsos eléctricos ...

  11. Cancer-like metabolism of the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Soo Khai; Wood, John P M; Chidlow, Glyn; Han, Guoge; Kittipassorn, Thaksaon; Peet, Daniel J; Casson, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The retina, like many cancers, produces energy from glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon is known as aerobic glycolysis and eponymously as the Warburg effect. In recent years, the Warburg effect has become an explosive area of study within the cancer research community. The expanding knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underpinning the Warburg effect in cancer promises to provide a greater understanding of mammalian retinal metabolism and has motivated cancer researchers to target the Warburg effect as a novel treatment strategy for cancer. However, if the molecular mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are shared by the retina and cancer, treatments targeting the Warburg effect may have serious adverse effects on retinal metabolism. Herein, we provide an updated understanding of the Warburg effect in mammalian retina. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  12. Water involvement in the mechanisms of retina electrical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirieri-Kovacs, E.; Vasilescu, V.

    1982-01-01

    Retina is an excitable system containing approximately 90% water. As we found that deuteration selectively changes amplitudes and latencies of retina biopotentials, specifically the ON and OFF responses, we used it to probe the role of water in those processes. A study of the retina deuteration kinetics was simultaneously performed. This revealed the existence of at least two retinal water compartments. The data suggested a third compartment also, with a lower motional ''degree of freedom,'' existing where H 2 O-D 2 O exchange becomes important only after saturation by D 2 O of the first two compartments. Correlation of the electrophysiological effects of D 2 O with the kinetic data suggests that the ON response is related to the first water compartment and the OFF response to the third. The results point to independence on the ON and OFF response mechanisms and, very probably, to their different morphological origins

  13. [Lattice degeneration of the peripheral retina: ultrastructural study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, P; Malecaze, F; Arne, J L; Mathis, A

    1985-01-01

    The ultrastructural study of a case of snail track degeneration shows the presence of lipid inclusions in both the glial and the macrophage cells in every layer of the retina, and the existence of intraretinal fibers different from collagen fibers appearing to be glial filaments similar to those found in astrocytic gliomes and to the Rosenthal fibers observed in senile nervous cells. Other features were thinning of the retina and absence of blood vessels in the retina. There are no abnormalities of the vitreo-retinal juncture. All the lesions are in agreement with those observed by Daicker [Ophthalmologica, Basel 165: 360-365, 1972; Klin. Mbl. Augenheilk. 172: 581-583, 1978] with some differences, however. They are different from those found in lattice degeneration. They show that snail track degeneration is a specific form of peripheral retinal degeneration which is quite different from lattice degeneration and must not be considered similar.

  14. A Possible Role of Neuroglobin in the Retina After Optic Nerve Injury: A Comparative Study of Zebrafish and Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a new member of the family of heme proteins and is specifically expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems in all vertebrates. In particular, the retina has a 100-fold higher concentration of Ngb than do other nervous tissues. The role of Ngb in the retina is yet to be clarified. Therefore, to understand the functional role of Ngb in the retina after optic nerve injury (ONI), we used two types of retina, from zebrafish and mice, which have permissible and non-permissible capacity for nerve regeneration after ONI, respectively. After ONI, the Ngb protein in zebrafish was upregulated in the amacrine cells within 3 days, whereas in the mouse retina, Ngb was downregulated in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) within 3 days. Zebrafish Ngb (z-Ngb) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in retinal explant culture. According to these results, we designed an overexpression experiment with the mouse Ngb (m-Ngb) gene in RGC-5 cells (retinal precursor cells). The excess of m-Ngb actually rescued RGC-5 cells under hypoxic conditions and significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in cell culture. These data suggest that mammalian Ngb has positive neuroprotective and neuritogenic effects that induce nerve regeneration after ONI.

  15. Development of Retinal Layers in Prenatal Human Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Anita

    2016-01-01

    To determine the developmental sequence of retinal layers to provide information on where in utero pathologic events might affect retinal development. Qualitative and quantitative descriptive research. A histology collection of human eyes from fetal week (Fwk) 8 to postnatal (P) 10 weeks was analyzed. The length of the nasal and temporal retina was measured along the horizontal meridian in 20 eyes. The location of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and outer plexiform layer (OPL) was identified at each age, and its length measured. The human eye retinal length increased from 5.19 mm at Fwk 8 to 20.92 mm at midgestation to 32.88 mm just after birth. The IPL appeared in the presumptive fovea at Fwk 8, reached the eccentricity of the optic nerve by Fwk 12, and was present to both nasal and temporal peripheral edges by Fwk 18-21. By contrast, the OPL developed slowly. A short OPL was first present in the Fwk 11 fovea and did not reach the eccentricity of the optic nerve until midgestation. The OPL reached the retinal edges by Fwk 30. Laminar development of both IPL and OPL occurred before vascular formation. In human fetal retina, the IPL reached the far peripheral edge of the retina by midgestation and the OPL by late gestation. Only very early in utero events could affect IPL lamination in the central retina, but events occurring after Fwk 20 in the peripheral retina would overlap OPL laminar development in outer retina. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in rhesus monkey retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; McGlinn, Alice M; Fernandes, Alcides; Milam, Ann H; Strang, Christianne E; Andison, Margot E; Lindstrom, Jon M; Keyser, Kent T; Stone, Richard A

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect and establish the cellular localizations of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in Rhesus monkey retina. Retinas were dissected from the eyes of monkeys killed after unrelated experiments. RNA was extracted and analyzed by RT-PCR, using primers designed against human sequences of alpha3-alpha7, alpha9, and beta2-beta4 nAChR subunits. The RT-PCR products were separated by gel electrophoresis and sequenced. Frozen sections of postmortem fixed monkey eyes were immunolabeled with well-characterized and specific monoclonal antibodies against the alpha3, alpha4, alpha6, alpha7, beta2, or beta4 nAChR subunits and visualized with fluorescence labeling. Products of the predicted size for the alpha3-alpha7, alpha9, and beta2-beta4 nAChR subunits were detected by RT-PCR in Rhesus monkey retina. Homology between transcripts from monkey retina and human nucleotide sequences ranged from 93 to 99%. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that neurons in various cell layers of monkey retina expressed alpha3, alpha4, alpha7, or beta2 nAChR subunits and cells with the morphology of microglia were immunoreactive for the alpha6 or beta4 nAChR subunits. nAChR subunits are expressed in the monkey retina and localize to diverse retinal neurons as well as putative microglia. Besides mediating visual processing, retinal nAChRs may influence refractive development and ocular pathologies such as neovascularization.

  17. Dynamical pattern selection of growing cellular mosaic in fish retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Noriaki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Tachikawa, Masashi

    2017-09-01

    A Markovian lattice model for photoreceptor cells is introduced to describe the growth of mosaic patterns on fish retina. The radial stripe pattern observed in wild-type zebrafish is shown to be selected naturally during retina growth, against the geometrically equivalent circular stripe pattern. The mechanism of such dynamical pattern selection is clarified on the basis of both numerical simulations and theoretical analyses, which find that the successive emergence of local defects plays a critical role in the realization of the wild-type pattern.

  18. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Bedore

    Full Text Available Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina.A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5 deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses.This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina.

  19. Remediation measures at the former hazardous waste dump at Malsch near Heidelberg; Sanierung der ehemaligen Sonderabfalldeponie Malsch. Hydrogeologische Bewertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanstein, P.; Hoetzl, H. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Geologie

    1998-12-31

    The former hazardous waste deposit of Malsch is located south of Heidelberg at the eastern margin of the Upper Rhine Graben. Using a former clay pit about 700.000 m{sup 3} of partly high toxic organic and inorganic wastes were deposited from 1971 to 1984. A leakage from the deposit was first recognised in 1984. Detailed investigation showed that thin channel-like conglomerate layers intercalated in the clays and marls as well as faults are cropping out into the base of the deposit and cause a direct seepage of leachate. Contaminants pollute the downstream area over a distance of 500 m. Remediation measures adding up to 100 Mio. DM were carried out including the construction of a slurry wall encircling laterally the whole site, a surface cover with a multi-liner system as well as a pump and treat system for the leachate was installed and are now in operation. Model studies of the ground water flow including a 3-dimensional site model and a 2-dimensional regional model started during the remediation work. According to the complex geological situation specific procedures was applied to transform the heterogeneous tectonical structure into the numerical models. The balance of water flowing through the deposit was calculated by the piezometric heads to assess different remediation stages. In spite of the missing impervious base the calculation could prove that in connection of a certain pumping rate of the leachate the environment and especially the groundwater can be protected from further leakage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die fruehere Sonderabfalldeponie Malsch wurde 1971 in einer stillgelegten Tongrube suedlich von Heidelberg am oestlichen Rand des Oberrheingrabens angelegt und bis 1984 betrieben. Insgesamt wurden ueber 700.000 m{sup 3} zum Teil hochtoxische organische und anorganische Sonderabfaelle abgelagert. Mit Abschluss der Deponierungsphase wurden Sickerwasseraustritte im westlichen Deponievorfeld festgelstellt. Ursache fuer die Undichtigkeiten waren geringmaechtige

  20. Near UV radiation effect on the lens and retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigman, S.

    1987-01-01

    The discussion presented in this paper indicates that the retina of a diurnal animal with a natural UV-absorbing lens (ie: the gray squirrel) is susceptible to near-UV damage from environmental sources only after the lens has been removed. This suggests that it is very important to protect against near-UV exposure of human eyes after cataract surgery

  1. Injurious effect of low level laser irradiation on rat retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Wenhua; Shan Qing; Chen Peng; Ma Ping; Liang Jie; Qian Huanwen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of injury in rat retina after the low dose laser exposure. Methods: Forty healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control group and 6 h, 12 h, 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 14 d and 28 d seven time phase groups after the laser exposure. Their morphological and functional changes were observed with funduscope, histopathology, TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL), immunohistochemistry, image analysis and electroretinograms. Results: There were diffuse histopathological changes in the whole retina and the changes in visual sensitive region below the optic disc were more obvious. Degenerative changes in different degrees occurred in the photoreceptor cells. TUNEL positive cells could be seen in all layers of retina after exposure, but mainly in the inner nuclear layer. The positive cells began to decrease on the 14th day. The reduction of b-wave amplitude of ERG indicated the decline of visual function. Conclusions: He-Ne laser (mean power density: 30 mW/cm 2 , time: 15 min) can cause changes in the function and morphology of rat retina. The high expression of NMDAR may be one of the causes in retinal laser injury. (authors)

  2. Müller glia cell reprogramming and retina regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Müller glia are the major glial component of the retina. They are one of the last retinal cell types to be born during development and they function to maintain retinal homeostasis and integrity. In mammals, Müller glia respond to retinal injury in a variety of ways that can be either protective or detrimental to retinal function. Although under special circumstances these cells can be coaxed to proliferate and generate neurons, these responses are meager and insufficient for repairing a damaged retina. By contrast, in teleost fish (such as zebrafish) the response of Müller glia to retinal injury involves a reprogramming event that imparts retinal stem cell characteristics and allows them to produce a proliferating population of progenitors that can regenerate all major retinal cell types and restore vision. Recent studies have revealed a number of important mechanisms underlying Müller glia reprogramming and retina regeneration in fish that may lead to new strategies for stimulating retina regeneration in mammals. PMID:24894585

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  4. Functional Architecture of the Retina: Development and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoon, Mrinalini; Okawa, Haruhisa; Santina, Luca Della; Wong, Rachel O.L.

    2014-01-01

    Structure and function are highly correlated in the vertebrate retina, a sensory tissue that is organized into cell layers with microcircuits working in parallel and together to encode visual information. All vertebrate retinas share a fundamental plan, comprising five major neuronal cell classes with cell body distributions and connectivity arranged in stereotypic patterns. Conserved features in retinal design have enabled detailed analysis and comparisons of structure, connectivity and function across species. Each species, however, can adopt structural and/or functional retinal specializations, implementing variations to the basic design in order to satisfy unique requirements in visual function. Recent advances in molecular tools, imaging and electrophysiological approaches have greatly facilitated identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that establish the fundamental organization of the retina and the specializations of its microcircuits during development. Here, we review advances in our understanding of how these mechanisms act to shape structure and function at the single cell level, to coordinate the assembly of cell populations, and to define their specific circuitry. We also highlight how structure is rearranged and function is disrupted in disease, and discuss current approaches to re-establish the intricate functional architecture of the retina. PMID:24984227

  5. Delayed response of the retina after hyperbaric oxygen exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Hasler, Pascal W; Sander, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    .020). The bulk of the response to HBO was found in the foveal and parafoveal regions. No detectable change was seen in mfERG amplitudes or in the volume or thickness of the retina. Conclusion: A mfERG component related to bipolar and Müller cell function was accelerated by a short intermittent exposure to HBO...

  6. CHANGES IN NEUROTRANSMITTER GENE EXPRESSION IN THE AGING RETINA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand mechanisms of neurotoxicity in susceptible populations, we examined age-related changes in constitutive gene expression in the retinas of young (4mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) male Long Evans rats. Derived from a pouch of the forebrain during develop...

  7. The Virtual Retina: Is Good Educational Technology Always Strategic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, Sandra

    Educational technology units must continually monitor their strategic plans to ensure that they are aligned with the realities of their institutions. Strategic dissonance occurs when previously successful strategies are no longer achieving the same positive outcomes. The Virtual Retina CD-ROM project is used in this paper as an example of…

  8. Localization and characterization of immunocompetent cells in the human retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, P.; Das, P. K.; Kijlstra, A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that experimental uveitis can be induced by the appropriate administration of various retinal antigens. Little is known about the in-situ interactions between immune cells in the retina as a prerequisite for understanding the mechanisms involving the presentation of

  9. The effects of iodoacetic acid on the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Sarah; Johnen, Sandra; Mazinani, Babac; Müller, Frank; Pfarrer, Christiane; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the effects of intravitreal injections of iodoacetic acid (IAA) in comparison to its systemic application as a measure to induce unilateral photoreceptor degeneration. Seven-week-old C57BL/6 J mice received either intravitreal injections of IAA or systemic treatment (intraperitoneal vs intravenous) and were observed in the following 5 weeks using ERG, OCT, and histology. Systemic treatment with IAA induced high toxic effects and a high mortality in contrast to the intravitreal injection. Intraperitoneal application had no effect on the retina. Intravenous application of 2 × 30 mg/kg BW IAA (time between injections 3.5 h) resulted in an extinction of the ERG and a thinning of the retina, in particular of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) indicating photoreceptor degeneration. Animals receiving intravitreal injections developed cataracts already at low concentrations (up to 100% at 0.25 mg/kg BW). Higher intravitreal IAA doses led to extinguished ERGs. In histology, a thinning of the entire retina was observed that was most prominent in the inner part of the retina. In contrast to intraperitoneal administration, intravenous application of IAA led to a selective photoreceptor degeneration. After intravitreal injection, dense cataracts were already observed at concentrations lower than those needed to induce changes in the ERG. ERG results must be interpreted carefully. A thinning of all retinal layers rather than a specific outer retinal degeneration was observed upon intravitreal injection. IAA is not a useful model to induce outer retinal degeneration in mice.

  10. Probabilistic Model for Laser Damage to the Human Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-OR-MS-ENS-12-30 PROBABILISTIC MODEL FOR LASER DAMAGE TO THE HUMAN RETINA THESIS Presented to the Faculty of...described by refractive error. Eyeglasses and contact lenses are able to correct for refractive errors by reforming the light entering into the cornea

  11. A silicon retina that reproduces signals in the optic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2006-12-01

    Prosthetic devices may someday be used to treat lesions of the central nervous system. Similar to neural circuits, these prosthetic devices should adapt their properties over time, independent of external control. Here we describe an artificial retina, constructed in silicon using single-transistor synaptic primitives, with two forms of locally controlled adaptation: luminance adaptation and contrast gain control. Both forms of adaptation rely on local modulation of synaptic strength, thus meeting the criteria of internal control. Our device is the first to reproduce the responses of the four major ganglion cell types that drive visual cortex, producing 3600 spiking outputs in total. We demonstrate how the responses of our device's ganglion cells compare to those measured from the mammalian retina. Replicating the retina's synaptic organization in our chip made it possible to perform these computations using a hundred times less energy than a microprocessor—and to match the mammalian retina in size and weight. With this level of efficiency and autonomy, it is now possible to develop fully implantable intraocular prostheses.

  12. The effects of microwave radiation on rabbit's retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R. Talebnejad

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: Histopathologically, cell phone simulated MW irradiation had no significant detrimental effect on the retina. However, ciliary body congestion was observed in greater fraction of those who received higher MW doses. Although there was no significant difference between post-treatment mean ERG values, there were statistically non-significant trends toward greater changes in the MW irradiated eyes.

  13. GABA sensitivity of spectrally classified horizontal cells in goldfish retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, J.; Kamermans, M.; Negishi, K.; Spekreijse, H.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the GABA sensitivity of horizontal cells in the isolated goldfish retina. After the glutamatergic input to the horizontal cells was blocked with DNQX, GABA depolarized the monophasic and biphasic horizontal cells. The pharmacology of these GABA-induced depolarizations was tested with the

  14. Spontaneous activity in the developing mammalian retina: Form and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Daniel Allison

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is present in the immature mammalian retina during the initial stages of visual system development, before the retina is responsive to light. This activity consists of bursts of action potentials fired by retinal ganglion cells, and propagates in a wavelike manner across the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Unlike waves in other neural systems, retinal waves have large variability in both their rate and direction of propagation, and individual waves only propagate across small regions of the retina. The unique properties of retinal activity arise from dynamic processes within the developing retina, and produce characteristic spatiotemporal properties. These spatiotemporal properties are of particular interest, since they are believed to play a role in visual system development. This dissertation addresses the complex spatiotemporal patterning of the retinal waves from two different perspectives. First, it proposes how the immature circuitry of the developing retina generates these patterns of activity. In order to reproduce the distinct spatiotemporal properties observed in experiments, a model of the immature retinal circuitry must meet certain requirements, which are satisfied by a coarse-grained model of the developing retina that we propose. Second, this dissertation addresses how the particular spatiotemporal patterning of the retinal waves provides information to the rest of the visual system and, as a result, can be used to guide visual system development. By measuring the properties of this information, we place constraints on the developmental mechanisms that use this activity, and show how the particular spatiotemporal properties of the retinal waves provide this information. Together, this dissertation demonstrates how the apparent complexity of retinal wave patterning can be understood both through the immature circuitry that generates it, and through the developmental mechanisms that may use it. The first three

  15. Optical coherence tomography identifies outer retina thinning in frontotemporal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Benjamin J; Irwin, David J; Song, Delu; Daniel, Ebenezer; Leveque, Jennifer D; Raquib, Aaishah R; Pan, Wei; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Aleman, Tomas S; Dunaief, Joshua L; Grossman, Murray

    2017-10-10

    Whereas Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with inner retina thinning visualized by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), we sought to determine if the retina has a distinguishing biomarker for frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). Using a cross-sectional design, we examined retinal structure in 38 consecutively enrolled patients with FTD and 44 controls using a standard SD-OCT protocol. Retinal layers were segmented with the Iowa Reference Algorithm. Subgroups of highly predictive molecular pathology (tauopathy, TAR DNA-binding protein 43, unknown) were determined by clinical criteria, genetic markers, and a CSF biomarker (total tau: β-amyloid) to exclude presumed AD. We excluded eyes with poor image quality or confounding diseases. SD-OCT measures of patients (n = 46 eyes) and controls (n = 69 eyes) were compared using a generalized linear model accounting for intereye correlation, and correlations between retinal layer thicknesses and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were evaluated. Adjusting for age, sex, and race, patients with FTD had a thinner outer retina than controls (132 vs 142 μm , p = 0.004). Patients with FTD also had a thinner outer nuclear layer (ONL) (88.5 vs 97.9 μm, p = 0.003) and ellipsoid zone (EZ) (14.5 vs 15.1 μm, p = 0.009) than controls, but had similar thicknesses for inner retinal layers. The outer retina thickness of patients correlated with MMSE (Spearman r = 0.44, p = 0.03). The highly predictive tauopathy subgroup (n = 31 eyes) also had a thinner ONL (88.7 vs 97.4 μm, p = 0.01) and EZ (14.4 vs 15.1 μm, p = 0.01) than controls. FTD is associated with outer retina thinning, and this thinning correlates with disease severity. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Wing Hoi Poon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, ‘BPD’ group or room air (21% O2, ‘control’ group from postnatal day 4–14 (P4–14; the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001. This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=−0.49, P=0.02 and retina (r=−0.70, P=0.0008 structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia.

  17. Status of the 7 MeV/u, 217 MHz Injector Linac for the Heidelberg Cancer Therapy Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schlitt, B; Hutter, G; Klos, F; Lu, Y; Minaev, S A; Mühle, C; Ratzinger, U; Schlitt, B; Tiede, R; Vinzenz, W; Will, C; Zurkan, O

    2004-01-01

    A clinical synchrotron facility for cancer therapy using energetic proton and ion beams (C, He and O) is under construction and will be installed at the Radiologische Universitätsklinik in Heidelberg, Germany, starting in 2005. The status of the ECR ion source systems, the beam line components of the low energy beam transport lines, the 400 keV/u RFQ and the 20 MV IH-cavity as well as the linac rf system will be reported. Two prototype magnets of the linac quadrupole magnets have been built at GSI and have been tested successfully. A test bench for the 1.4 MW, 217 MHz cavity amplifier built by industry has been installed at GSI including a 120 kW driver amplifier which will be used also for high power tests of the RFQ. A test bench for the RFQ using proton beams is presently being set up at the IAP. RF tuning of the 1:2 scaled IH-DTL model as well as Microwave Studio simulations of the model and the power cavity have been also performed at the IAP [1].

  18. Improvements for extending the time between maintenance periods for the Heidelberg ion beam therapy center (HIT) ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Tim; Cee, Rainer; Haberer, Thomas; Naas, Bernd; Peters, Andreas; Schreiner, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    The clinical operation at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) started in November 2009; since then more than 1600 patients have been treated. In a 24/7 operation scheme two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce protons and carbon ions. The modification of the low energy beam transport line and the integration of a third ion source into the therapy facility will be shown. In the last year we implemented a new extraction system at all three sources to enhance the lifetime of extraction parts and reduce preventive and corrective maintenance. The new four-electrode-design provides electron suppression as well as lower beam emittance. Unwanted beam sputtering effects which typically lead to contamination of the insulator ceramics and subsequent high-voltage break-downs are minimized by the beam guidance of the new extraction system. By this measure the service interval can be increased significantly. As a side effect, the beam emittance can be reduced allowing a less challenging working point for the ion sources without reducing the effective beam performance. This paper gives also an outlook to further enhancements at the HIT ion source testbench.

  19. Development of Recombinant Flagellar Antigens for Serological Detection of Salmonella enterica Serotypes Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Hofacre

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and fast detection of harmful Salmonella is a major concern of food safety. Common Salmonella serotypes responsible for human associated foodborne outbreaks are S. Enteritidis, S. Hadar, S. Heidelberg, and S. Typhimurium are also commonly isolated from poultry. Serology is commonly used to monitor disease in poultry, therefore application of Salmonella serotype-specific test will have added value in Salmonella surveillance or monitoring vaccine efficacy. Recombinant flagellins were purified to be used as antigens in an ELISA. In this study, an ELISA was developed for the serological detection of S. Enteritidis. Once optimized, 500 ng of purified recombinant S. Enteritidis flagellin and a 1:64 dilution were determined to be optimal for testing sera. A negative baseline cutoff was calculated to be an optical density (OD of 0.35. All sera from birds with history of S. Enteritidis exposure tested positive and all sera from chickens with no exposure tested negative to this Salmonella serotype. Current ELISA for serological detection of Salmonella suffers from cross reactivity inherent in lipopolysaccharide (LPS or whole cell antigen based serological tests. This new ELISA eliminates common cross reactivity by focusing specifically on the flagellins of the Salmonella serotypes common in poultry and associated with foodborne outbreaks.

  20. Food and nutrient intake, anthropometric measurements and smoking according to alcohol consumption in the EPIC Heidelberg study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, T; Nagel, G; Altenburg, H-P; Miller, A B; Thorand, B

    2005-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine associations of reported alcohol intake with dietary habits, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and smoking. 24,894 subjects who participated in the baseline examination of the German part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) in Heidelberg and were between 35 and 65 years of age at baseline were included in the present cross-sectional analysis (11,617 men, 13,277 women). Diet and alcohol consumption were assessed with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Analysis of covariance with age as a covariate was used to analyse the association between alcohol intake and dietary consumption patterns, BMI, WHR and smoking. Alcohol did not replace other food items, but was an addition to the diet. Among alcohol consumers, fat and protein intake as a percentage of energy was slightly higher and carbohydrate intake was slightly lower than among abstainers. Alcohol consumers had a lower intake of fruits, dairy products, cereal products, and added vegetable fat and a higher intake of animal products such as meat, fish, eggs and added animal fat than abstainers. The prevalence of current smoking showed a U-shaped relation to alcohol intake in men and women. In men, a U-shaped association was also seen between the prevalence of former smoking and alcohol intake, while the prevalence of former smoking increased linearly with alcohol intake in women. The results show that alcohol consumption is associated with dietary consumption patterns and smoking. Therefore, it will be important to consider dietary patterns and other lifestyle parameters when investigating the health effects of alcohol intake in the future. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Construction and testing of a source for the production of polarized heavy ions at the Heidelberg MP tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    At the Heidelberg MP tandem a source for the production of nuclear-spin polarized lithium and sodium ions was constructed. The ion source works according to the atomic beam principle. By a furnace a thermal atomic beam is produced the electron shell of which is polarized in a quadrupole magnet. This beam passes then three high frequency passages in which by exchange of suitable hyperfine structure levels the nuclear spin is partly polarized. The atoms are ionized on a hot tungsten surface and transcharged in cesium vapour to negative ions. The alignment of the spin in the desired spatial direction is rendered possible by means of a Wien filter rotable around the beam axis. For the beam transport until the accelerator exclusively electrostatic lenses and deviation elements are used. For the checking of the function modus of the different source parts the polarization of the atomic beam and low energy ion beams was studied. The polarization of the accelerated sup(7->)Li beam was measured by the reaction 1 H(sup(7->)Li, α) 4 He at Esub(Li) = 44 MeV. The tensor polarization was determined to Psub(zz) = 0.35 +- 0.01. The polarization of odd stages was determined to >= 80% of the theoretically reachable values. For a tensor polarized 23 Na 9+ beam accelerated to 110 MeV could be shown that during the acceleration 50% of the polarization remains conserved. With this at the first time a powerful source for the production of polarized Na beams of an accelerator is available which permits nuclear physics studies inthe energy range Esub(Na) [de

  2. The impact of social status inconsistency on cardiovascular risk factors, myocardial infarction and stroke in the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Silke

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social inequalities in cardiovascular diseases are well documented. Yet, the relation of social status inconsistency (having different ranks in two or more status indicators like education, occupational position or income and medical conditions of heart or vessels is not clear. Status inconsistency (SI is assumed to be stressful, and the association of psychosocial distress and health is well known. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the relationship between cardiovascular diseases (CVD and status inconsistency. Another target was to assess the influence of behaviour related risk factors on this association. Methods 8960 men and 6070 women, aged 45-65 years, from the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition were included. Socio-economic status was assessed by education/vocational training and occupational position at recruitment. During a median follow-up of 8.7 years, information on CVD was collected. Results Compared to status consistent subjects, men who were in a higher occupational position than could be expected given their educational attainment had a nearly two-fold increased incidence of CVD (Odds Ratio (OR = 1.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI = 1.5; 2.4, adjusted for age. Smoking behaviour and BMI differed significantly between those who had adequate occupational positions and those who did not. Yet, these lifestyle factors, as opposed to age, did not contribute to the observed differences in CVD. No association of cardiovascular diseases and status inconsistency was found for women or in cases where education exceeded occupational position. Conclusions Status inconsistent men (occupational position > education had a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than status consistent men. However, harmful behaviour did not explain this relationship.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  5. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  6. Optical combing to align photoreceptors in detached retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shizhuo; Gardner, Thomas W.; Wu, Fei; Cholker, Milind S.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel micro-manipulating method, called 'optical combing', that could improve the retina reattachment surgery results. Optical combing adopts the working principle of optical tweezers (i.e., focused Gaussian beam produces a trapping force when it incidents onto a micro-object. The trapping force can pull the micro-object to the central point of focused laser beam. Optical combing is implemented by scanning a focused laser beam on the misaligned micro objects (such as misaligned photoreceptors). In our preliminary experiment, a set of misaligned micro glass rods was re-aligned by applying this optical combing technology, which verified our theory. In the future, this technique will be used to re-align misaligned photoreceptors in real retina.

  7. Effect of Various Inoculum Levels of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg (2011 Ground Turkey Outbreak Isolate on Cecal Colonization, Dissemination to Internal Organs, and Deposition in Skeletal Muscles of Commercial Turkeys after Experimental Oral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divek V. T. Nair

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg is a major foodborne pathogen colonizing poultry. The pathogen is associated with a significant number of foodborne outbreaks through contaminated poultry meat, including turkeys. Recently, multidrug-resistant (MDR strains of S. Heidelberg have emerged as a threat to human public health in the United States. The objective of this study was to determine the cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and the potential for skeletal muscle deposition of an MDR S. Heidelberg isolate from the 2011 ground turkey outbreak in the United States after the experimental oral challenge of poults (young turkeys and adult turkey hens. In the poult study, two separate experiments using day-old, straight-run, commercial hybrid converter poults were randomly assigned to five challenge groups (0, 10∧2, 10∧4, 10∧6, 10∧8 CFU groups; 12 poults/group; N = 60/experiment and a week after, treatment groups were challenged separately with 0-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8- log10 CFU of S. Heidelberg orally. After 14 days post-challenge, the poults were euthanized, and samples were collected to determine MDR S. Heidelberg colonization in the cecum, dissemination to liver and spleen, and deposition in the thigh, drumstick, and breast muscles. A similar experimental design was followed for the adult turkey hens. In two separate experiments, 11-week-old commercial Hybrid Converter turkey hens (4 hens/group; N = 20/experiment were challenged with MDR S. Heidelberg and on day 16 post-challenge, birds were euthanized and samples were collected to determine Salmonella populations in the samples. The results indicated that, in turkey poults, the recovery of MDR S. Heidelberg was highest in the cecum followed by spleen, liver, thigh, drumstick, and breast. All tested inoculum levels resulted in more than 3.5 log10 CFU/g colonization in the poult cecum. The cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and tissue

  8. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  9. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is vi...

  10. The Retina and other Light Sensitive Ocular Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharse, Joseph C.; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2017-01-01

    Ocular clocks, first identified in the retina, are also found in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), cornea and ciliary body. The retina is a complex tissue of many cell types and considerable effort has gone into determining which cell types exhibit clock properties. Current data suggest that photoreceptors as well as inner retinal neurons exhibit clock properties with photoreceptors dominating in non-mammalian vertebrates and inner retinal neurons dominating in mice. However, these differences may in part reflect the choice of circadian output, and it is likely that clock properties are widely dispersed among many retinal cell types. The phase of the retinal clock can be set directly by light. In non-mammalian vertebrates direct light sensitivity is commonplace among body clocks, but in mice only the retina and cornea retain direct light-dependent phase regulation. This distinguishes the retina and possibly other ocular clocks from peripheral oscillators whose phase depends on the pace-making properties of the hypothalamic central brain clock, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, in mice retinal circadian oscillations dampen quickly in isolation due to weak coupling of its individual cell autonomous oscillators and there is no evidence that retinal clocks are directly controlled through input from other oscillators. Retinal circadian regulation in both mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates uses melatonin and dopamine as dark- and light-adaptive neuromodulators respectively, and light can regulate circadian phase indirectly through dopamine signaling. The melatonin/dopamine system appears to have evolved among non-mammalian vertebrates and retained with modification in mammals. Circadian clocks in the eye are critical for optimum visual function where they play a role fine tuning visual sensitivity, and their disruption can impact diseases such as glaucoma or retinal degeneration syndromes. PMID:27095816

  11. Mechanical characteristics of the porcine retina in low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kinon; Weiland, James D

    2012-04-01

    We previously observed that the stiffness of the porcine retina was significantly higher when deforming at room temperature than at body temperature. The present study further investigates this phenomenon by examining the mechanical properties of the retina in saline at temperature lower than room temperature. Tensile testing was performed on a total of 15 retinal strips dissected from pig eyes. Equal amount of strips from the dissection were tested at 37.0 ± 0.3°C, 26.1 ± 0.1°C, and 7.8 ± 1.2°C. Their transition modulus, stress, and strain were measured for statistical analysis. The transition modulus, the transition stress, and the transition strain of the retinal strips were found to be 11.12 ± 6.10 kPa, 0.12 ± 0.07 kPa, and 0.016 ± 0.001, respectively, at 37.0°C. These values were 111.25 ± 88.16 kPa, 1.11 ± 0.85 kPa, and 0.016 ± 0.001 at 26.1°C, and 125.13 ± 63.61 kPa, 1.30 ± 0.50 kPa, and 0.017 ± 0.003 at 7.8°C, respectively. The differences of the transition modulus and the transition stress at between 37.0°C and 26.1°C and at between 37.0°C and 7.8°C were statistically significant (P retina from body temperature is potentially useful to decrease retinal damage in posterior eye surgeries by increasing the resistance of the retina to mechanical deformation.

  12. Analysis of bipolar and amacrine populations in marmoset retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzien, Felix; Percival, Kumiko A; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2015-02-01

    About 15 parallel ganglion cell pathways transmit visual signals to the brain, but the interneuron (bipolar and amacrine) populations providing input to ganglion cells remain poorly understood in primate retina. We carried out a quantitative analysis of the inner nuclear layer in the retina of the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Vertical Vibratome sections along the horizontal meridian were processed with immunohistochemical markers. Image stacks were taken with a confocal microscope, and densities of cell populations were determined. The density of flat midget bipolar cells fell from 15,746 cells/mm(2) at 1 mm (8 deg) to 7,827 cells/mm(2) at 3 mm (25 deg). The rod bipolar cell density fell from 8,640 cells/mm(2) at 1 mm to 4,278 cells/mm(2) at 3 mm, but the ratio of the two bipolar cell types did not change with eccentricity. The amacrine cell density ranged from 30,000 cells/mm(2) at 8 deg to less than 15,000 cells/mm(2) at 25 deg, but throughout the retina, the ratio of glycinergic to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic to amacrine cells remained relatively constant. The fractions of rod bipolar, cone bipolar, amacrine, Müller, and horizontal cells of all cells in the inner nuclear layer were comparable in central and peripheral retina. Marmosets had lower proportions of midget bipolar and rod bipolar in comparison with macaque. These differences were correlated with differences in rod and cone densities between the two species and did not reflect fundamental differences in the wiring between the two species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. An analysis of the mechanical behaviour of a detaching retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakawicz, Joseph M; Bottega, William J; Prenner, Jonathan L; Fine, Howard F

    2015-06-01

    An improved solution to the mechanics-based mathematical model for retinal detachment developed by Bottega et al. (2013, Math. Med. Biol., 30, 287-310) is found by removing the simplifying assumption of negligible meridian displacement employed in that study. The model considers retinas with and without central tears and takes contraction of the vitreous and extension of its fibrils, along with a pressure difference across the retina, as the impetus for detachment propagation. Exact analytical solutions are established for the meridian and radial displacements of detaching retinas with and without tears, and numerical simulations are performed based on these solutions. Inclusion of the meridian displacements is seen to result in substantially larger radial displacements without affecting the 'dimpling' behaviour of the detaching retina observed previously. However, the critical stress for detachment propagation is substantially decreased by the inclusion of the meridian displacement. The effects of changes in material and geometric parameters, as well as the influence of the presence and size of the retinal tear on detachment propagation are also studied. The model predicts that retinal detachment propagates catastrophically, which is in agreement with the results found by Bottega et al. (2013, Math. Med. Biol., 30, 287-310) and also with clinical observations. Results show that the inclusion of the meridian displacements enhances the previously seen stabilizing effect a retinal tear can have with regard to detachment propagation. The meridian displacement is similarly seen to enhance the influence that the size of the tear has on this effect. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  14. Bmp4 from the Optic Vesicle Specifies Murine Retina Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Oltean, Alina; Beebe, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of mouse embryos concluded that after the optic vesicle evaginates from the ventral forebrain and contacts the surface ectoderm, signals from the ectoderm specify the distal region of the optic vesicle to become retina and signals from the optic vesicle induce the lens. Germline deletion of Bmp4 resulted in failure of lens formation. We performed conditional deletion of Bmp4 from the optic vesicle to test the function of Bmp4 in murine eye development. The optic vesicle evagi...

  15. A biochemical basis for induction of retina regeneration by antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri-Ruiz, Nancy; Haynes, Tracy; Landers, Joseph; Woods, Justin; Gemma, Michael J; Hughes, Michael; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2018-01-15

    The use of antioxidants in tissue regeneration has been studied, but their mechanism of action is not well understood. Here, we analyze the role of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in retina regeneration. Embryonic chicks are able to regenerate their retina after its complete removal from retinal stem/progenitor cells present in the ciliary margin (CM) of the eye only if a source of exogenous factors, such as FGF2, is present. This study shows that NAC modifies the redox status of the CM, initiates self-renewal of the stem/progenitor cells, and induces regeneration in the absence of FGF2. NAC works as an antioxidant by scavenging free radicals either independently or through the synthesis of glutathione (GSH), and/or by reducing oxidized proteins through a thiol disulfide exchange activity. We dissected the mechanism used by NAC to induce regeneration through the use of inhibitors of GSH synthesis and the use of other antioxidants with different biochemical structures and modes of action, and found that NAC induces regeneration through its thiol disulfide exchange activity. Thus, our results provide, for the first time, a biochemical basis for induction of retina regeneration. Furthermore, NAC induction was independent of FGF receptor signaling, but dependent on the MAPK (pErk1/2) pathway. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H; Sweet, Ian R; Hurley, James B

    2016-02-26

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5'-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The Role of Sigma1R in Mammalian Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Xuezhi; Roon, Penny; Saul, Alan; Smith, Sylvia B

    2017-01-01

    This review article focuses on studies of Sigma 1 Receptor (Sigma1R) and retina . It provides a brief overview of the earliest pharmacological studies performed in the late 1990s that provided evidence of the presence of Sigma1R in various ocular tissues. It then describes work from a number of labs concerning the location of Sigma1R in several retinal cell types including ganglion, Müller glia , and photoreceptors . The role of Sigma1R ligands in retinal neuroprotection is emphasized. Early studies performed in vitro clearly showed that targeting Sigma1R could attenuate stress-induced retinal cell loss. These studies were followed by in vivo experiments. Data about the usefulness of targeting Sigma1R to prevent ganglion cell loss associated with diabetic retinopathy are reviewed. Mechanisms of Sigma1R-mediated retinal neuroprotection involving Müller cells , especially in modulating oxidative stress are described along with information about the retinal phenotype of mice lacking Sigma1R (Sigma1R -/- mice). The retina develops normally in Sigma1R -/- mice, but after many months there is evidence of apoptosis in the optic nerve head, decreased ganglion cell function and eventual loss of these cells. Additional studies using the Sigma1R -/- mice provide strong evidence that in the retina, Sigma1R plays a key role in modulating cellular stress. Recent work has shown that targeting Sigma1R may extend beyond protection of ganglion cells to include photoreceptor cell degeneration as well.

  18. Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contín, M A; Benedetto, M M; Quinteros-Quintana, M L; Guido, M E

    2016-02-01

    Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution.

  19. Meduloepitelioma teratóide da retina: relato de caso Teratoid medulloepithelioma of the retina: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Coral Ghanem

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O meduloepitelioma é um tumor intra-ocular congênito originário do epitélio medular primitivo que, por sua vez, é responsável pela formação do epitélio não pigmentado do corpo ciliar. Ocorre geralmente na infância, de forma unilateral, acometendo o corpo ciliar. O objetivo deste trabalho é documentar um caso raro de meduloepitelioma teratóide originário da retina. Paciente de nove anos, feminina, apresentava baixa acuidade visual (AV, estrabismo e leucocoria no olho esquerdo (OE. A AV era de 1,0 no olho direito e movimentos de mão no OE. Foi observada tumoração retrocristaliniana branco-acinzentada no OE, aparentemente subretiniana, vascularizada, de grande extensão, com alterações císticas na sua superfície. Foram realizadas tomografia de crânio e órbitas e ecografia ocular. A paciente foi submetida à enucleação com suspeita clínica de retinoblastoma. Pelo aspecto histopatológico foi feito o diagnóstico de meduloepitelioma teratóide benigno originário da retina. Na maioria dos casos apresentados na literatura o meduloepitelioma tem origem a partir do epitélio não pigmentado do corpo ciliar. No nosso caso, a neoplasia parece ter tido origem a partir da retina, já que os cortes revelaram epitélio do corpo ciliar preservado e não foi reconhecida a estrutura normal da retina. Embora o tumor apresentado neste relato tenha sido classificado como benigno, o fato de ser lesão de grandes proporções e de crescimento aparentemente recente, justifica a conduta cirúrgica empregada. O tratamento do meduloepitelioma deve objetivar a intervenção cirúrgica precoce, na tentativa de se evitar a disseminação extra-ocular.Medulloepithelioma is a congenital intraocular tumor that usually arises from the primitive medullary epithelium that is destined to form the nonpigmented ciliary epithelium of the ciliary body. It occurs most frequently in early childhood and is unilateral. This report documents a rare case of

  20. Evaluación bajo microscopio electrónico de barrido de sellantes de fosas y fisuras hidrófobos e hidrófilos, bajo diferentes condiciones de humedad: Un estudio in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyra Elvyra Rangel Padilla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar el efecto de diferentes marcas de selladores de fosas y fisuras hidrófobos e hidrófilos en Microscopio electrónico de barrido de emisión de campo (MEB-EC expuestos a humedad relativa. Materiales y Métodos: Se utilizaron 40 premolares extraídos con fines ortodóncicos, se dividieron al azar en 8 grupos: Grupo 1: sellador Clinpro® (ambiente seco, Grupo 2: sellador Clinpro® (ambiente húmedo, Grupo 3: sellador Embrace WetBond® (ambiente seco, Grupo 4: sellador Embrace Wet-Bond® (ambiente húmedo, Grupo 5: sellador UltraSeal XT Hydro® (ambiente seco, Grupo 6: sellador UltraSeal XT Hydro® (ambiente húmedo, Grupo 7: sellador UltraSeal XT Plus® (ambiente seco y el Grupo 8 sellador UltraSeal XT Plus® (ambiente húmedo. Resultados: El Grupo 1 (Clinpro®/ambiente seco Mostró valores de adhesión al esmalte superiores, de forma estadísticamente significativa, en relación a los demás grupos y mejor calidad en la formación de “tags” en comparación con los otros grupos, independientemente si el ambiente era seco o húmedo. Conclusiones: Los selladores Clinpro 3M®, utilizados en condiciones secas o de relativa humedad demostró tener buenos resultados. La resina fluida UltraSeal XT Plus® utilizada en condiciones húmedas no proporcionó buenos resultados observándose poca formación de tags; los selladores hidrófilos (Embrace Wetbond ® y UltraSeal XT Hydro® utilizados en un ambiente húmedo tenían una capacidad de adaptación, observándose buena formación de tags; Los selladores hidrófilos usados en ambientes secos no se adaptan a la superficie y tienen una tendencia a fallar en lo que respecta a la adhesión.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed in various parts of the central nervous system, including the retina. The localization of the key eCB receptors, particularly CB1R and CB2R, has been recently reported in rodent and primate retinas with striking interspecies differences. Little...... is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well...... of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina...

  2. Müller cells express the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The presence of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) has been largely documented in the rodent and primate retinae in recent years. There is, however, some controversy concerning the presence of the CB2 receptor (CB2R) within the central nervous system. Only recently, CB2R has been found...... in the rodent retina, but its presence in the primate retina has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of this study was twofold: 1) to characterize the distribution patterns of CB2R in the monkey retina and compare this distribution with that previously reported for CB1R and 2) to resolve the controversy...... on the presence of CB2R in the neural component of the retina. We therefore thoroughly examined the cellular localization of CB2R in the vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus) retina, using confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrate that CB2R, like CB1R, is present throughout the retinal layers, but with striking...

  3. Wavy multistratified amacrine cells in the monkey retina contain immunoreactive secretoneurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordt, Andrea S; Long, Ye; Kouyama, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    The goals of this study were to describe the morphology, neurotransmitter content and synaptic connections of neurons in primate retinas that contain the neuropeptide secretoneurin. Amacrine cells were labeled with antibodies to secretoneurin in macaque and baboon retinas. Their processes formed...... contacts with retinal ganglion cell dendrites labeled with antibody to the photopigment melanopsin, which have OFF responses to stimulation of S cones. Using electron microscopic immunolabeling, 436 synapses from macaque retina were analyzed. Axons from bipolar cells were identified by their characteristic...

  4. Rax: Developmental and Daily Expression Patterns in the Rat Pineal Gland and Retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Klein, David C; Møller, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Retina and anterior neural fold homeobox (Rax) gene encodes a transcription factor essential for vertebrate eye development. Recent microarray studies indicate that Rax is expressed in the adult rat pineal gland and retina. The present study reveals that Rax expression levels in the rat change...... to phenotype maintenance in the mature retina and pineal gland and may facilitate 24-h changes in the pineal transcriptome....

  5. Simulation and performance of an artificial retina for 40 MHz track reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abba, A.; Citterio, M.; Caponio, F.; Cusimano, A.; Geraci, A.; Neri, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Punzi, G.; Piucci, A.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Marino, P.; Morello, M.J.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed simulation of the artificial retina pattern-recognition algorithm, designed to reconstruct events with hundreds of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon detectors at LHCb with LHC crossing frequency of 40 MHz. Performances of the artificial retina algorithm are assessed using the official Monte Carlo samples of the LHCb experiment. We found performances for the retina pattern-recognition algorithm comparable with the full LHCb reconstruction algorithm

  6. DNA repair synthesis in the rat retina following in vivo exposure to 300-nm radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, L.M.; Jose, J.G.; Pitts, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to study the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine into the retina of albino rats following in vivo exposure to 300-nm radiation. Relative to background labeling in unexposed eyes, there was 8-20 times as much label per unit area in the outer nuclear layer, inner nuclear layer, and ganglion cells of 300-nm exposed retinas. The photoreceptor inner segments also showed thymidine labeling in both control and exposed retinas

  7. Thermofusion of the retina with the RPE to seal tears during retinal detachment repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriot, Wilson J

    2016-04-01

    To develop an animal model to test the hypothesis that immediate adhesion of the retina to the choroid (retinopexy) can be created by elimination of the water separating the retina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) prior to photocoagulation. The retina and RPE are hydrophobic lipoprotein structures separated intraoperatively by a thin layer of fluid despite surgical drainage. If the RPE and retina are contacting, heating should create a unified local coagulum and achieve instantaneous fusing of the retina and RPE, thus sealing the subretinal space around the retinal tear. The surgical technique and histological findings in a rabbit model of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) are reported here. Nine Dutch-belted, pigmented rabbits underwent vitrectomy with lensectomy, creation of localised retinal detachment by subretinal injection of balanced salt solution (BSS), enlargement of the hole and fluid-gas exchange to "re-attach" the retina. Dehydration of the retina surrounding the hole was achieved by an airstream from a flute needle. A laser (810 nm) was applied in long pulses to achieve a mild retinal reaction around the hole in the dehydrated adjacent retina. The BSS irrigation was resumed. Eyes were then enucleated and the treated retina examined histologically. The dehydrated and lasered retinal tear margin demonstrated fusion of the retina with the RPE/choroid. The non-dehydrated adjacent areas showed thermal tissue changes in the retina, RPE/choroid and adjacent sclera but remained separated by persistent subretinal fluid and no fusion or unified coagulum developed. Immediate laser-induced thermal fusion of the retina with the RPE at the margin of a retinal tear can be achieved by removing the subretinal fluid prior to photocoagulation. The integrated coagulum seals the tear margin preventing further fluid entering the subretinal space, thus correcting the cause of RRD. This method may facilitate RRD repair without buckling or internal tamponade.

  8. Comparison of methods for quantitating Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Heidelberg strain attachment to reusable plastic shipping container coupons and preliminary assessment of sanitizer efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhaohao; Baker, Christopher A; Lee, Sang In; Park, Si Hong; Kim, Sun Ae; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella serovars, one of the leading contributors to foodborne illness and are especially problematic for foods that are not cooked before consumption, such as fresh produce. The shipping containers that are used to transport and store fresh produce may play a role in cross contamination and subsequent illnesses. However, methods for quantitatively attached cells are somewhat variable. The overall goal of this study was to compare conventional plating with molecular methods for quantitating attached representative strains for Salmonella Typhimurium and Heidelberg on reusable plastic containers (RPC) coupons, respectively. We attached Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and serovar Heidelberg SL486 (parent and an antibiotic resistant marker strain) to plastic coupons (2.54 cm(2)) derived from previously used shipping containers by growing for 72 h in tryptic soy broth. The impact of the concentration of sanitizer on log reductions between unsanitized and sanitized coupons was evaluated by exposing attached S. Typhimurium cells to 200 ppm and 200,000 ppm sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). Differences in sanitizer effectiveness between serovars were also evaluated with attached S. Typhimurium compared to attached S. Heidelberg populations after being exposed to 200 ppm peracetic acid (PAA). Treatment with NaClO caused an average of 2.73 ± 0.23 log CFU of S. Typhimurium per coupon removed with treatment at 200 ppm while 3.36 ± 0.54 log CFU were removed at 200,000 ppm. Treatment with PAA caused an average of 2.62 ± 0.15 log CFU removed for S. Typhimurium and 1.41 ± 0.17 log CFU for S. Heidelberg (parent) and 1.61 ± 0.08 log CFU (marker). Lastly, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize cell attachment and coupon surface topography. SEM images showed that remaining attached cell populations were visible even after sanitizer application. Conventional plating and qPCR yielded similar levels of enumerated bacterial populations

  9. Characterization of extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg isolated from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, J P; Pecic, G; Singh, A; Duval, B; Rickert, R; Ayers, S; Abbott, J; McGlinchey, B; Bauer-Turpin, J; Haro, J; Hise, K; Zhao, S; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Whichard, J; McDermott, P F

    2012-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of foodborne illness in the United States. Although salmonellosis is usually self-limiting, severe infections typically require antimicrobial treatment, and ceftriaxone, an extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC), is commonly used in both adults and children. Surveillance conducted by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) has shown a recent increase in ESC resistance among Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from food animals at slaughter, retail meat, and humans. ESC resistance among Salmonella in the United States is usually mediated by a plasmid-encoded bla(CMY) β-lactamase. In 2009, we identified 47 ESC-resistant bla(CMY)-positive Heidelberg isolates from humans (n=18), food animals at slaughter (n=16), and retail meats (n=13) associated with a spike in the prevalence of this serovar. Almost 90% (26/29) of the animal and meat isolates were isolated from chicken carcasses or retail chicken meat. We screened NARMS isolates for the presence of bla(CMY), determined whether the gene was plasmid-encoded, examined pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns to assess the genetic diversities of the isolates, and categorized the bla(CMY) plasmids by plasmid incompatibility groups and plasmid multi-locus sequence typing (pMLST). All 47 bla(CMY) genes were found to be plasmid encoded. Incompatibility/replicon typing demonstrated that 41 were IncI1 plasmids, 40 of which only conferred bla(CMY)-associated resistance. Six were IncA/C plasmids that carried additional resistance genes. pMLST of the IncI1-bla(CMY) plasmids showed that 27 (65.8%) were sequence type (ST) 12, the most common ST among bla(CMY)-IncI1 plasmids from Heidelberg isolated from humans. Ten plasmids had a new ST profile, ST66, a type very similar to ST12. This work showed that the 2009 increase in ESC resistance among Salmonella Heidelberg was caused mainly by the dissemination of bla(CMY) on IncI1 and IncA/C plasmids in a variety of

  10. Helium ions at the heidelberg ion beam therapy center: comparisons between FLUKA Monte Carlo code predictions and dosimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T.; Mairani, A.; Brons, S.; Sala, P.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-08-01

    In the field of particle therapy helium ion beams could offer an alternative for radiotherapy treatments, owing to their interesting physical and biological properties intermediate between protons and carbon ions. We present in this work the comparisons and validations of the Monte Carlo FLUKA code against in-depth dosimetric measurements acquired at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Depth dose distributions in water with and without ripple filter, lateral profiles at different depths in water and a spread-out Bragg peak were investigated. After experimentally-driven tuning of the less known initial beam characteristics in vacuum (beam lateral size and momentum spread) and simulation parameters (water ionization potential), comparisons of depth dose distributions were performed between simulations and measurements, which showed overall good agreement with range differences below 0.1 mm and dose-weighted average dose-differences below 2.3% throughout the entire energy range. Comparisons of lateral dose profiles showed differences in full-width-half-maximum lower than 0.7 mm. Measurements of the spread-out Bragg peak indicated differences with simulations below 1% in the high dose regions and 3% in all other regions, with a range difference less than 0.5 mm. Despite the promising results, some discrepancies between simulations and measurements were observed, particularly at high energies. These differences were attributed to an underestimation of dose contributions from secondary particles at large angles, as seen in a triple Gaussian parametrization of the lateral profiles along the depth. However, the results allowed us to validate FLUKA simulations against measurements, confirming its suitability for 4He ion beam modeling in preparation of clinical establishment at HIT. Future activities building on this work will include treatment plan comparisons using validated biological models between proton and helium ions, either within a Monte Carlo

  11. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Restores Attention-Related Activity in the Angular Gyrus in Chronic Tinnitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Christoph M; Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Plinkert, Peter K; Reith, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tinnitus is the perception of a phantom sound without external acoustic stimulation. Recent tinnitus research suggests a relationship between attention processes and tinnitus-related distress. It has been found that too much focus on tinnitus comes at the expense of the visual domain. The angular gyrus (AG) seems to play a crucial role in switching attention to the most salient stimulus. This study aims to evaluate the involvement of the AG during visual attention tasks in tinnitus sufferers treated with Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT), an intervention that has been shown to reduce tinnitus-related distress. Methods: Thirty-three patients with chronic tinnitus, 45 patients with recent-onset tinnitus, and 35 healthy controls were tested. A fraction of these (21/21/22) were treated with the "compact" version of the HNMT lasting 1 week with intense treatments, while non-treated participants were included as passive controls. Visual attention was evaluated during functional Magnet-Resonance Imaging (fMRI) by a visual Continous Performance Task (CPT) using letter-based alarm cues ("O" and "X") appearing in a sequence of neutral letters, "A" through "H." Participants were instructed to respond via button press only if the letter "O" was followed by the letter "X" (GO condition), but not to respond if a neutral letter appeared instead (NOGO condition). All participants underwent two fMRI sessions, before and after a 1-week study period. Results: The CPT results revealed a relationship between error rates and tinnitus duration at baseline whereby the occurrence of erroneous "GO omissions" and the reaction time increased with tinnitus duration. Patients with chronic tinnitus who were treated with HNMT had decreasing error rates (fewer GO omissions) compared to treated recent-onset patients. fMRI analyses confirmed greater activation of the AG during CPT in chronic patients after HNMT treatment compared to treated recent-onset patients. Conclusions: Our

  12. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Restores Attention-Related Activity in the Angular Gyrus in Chronic Tinnitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M. Krick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tinnitus is the perception of a phantom sound without external acoustic stimulation. Recent tinnitus research suggests a relationship between attention processes and tinnitus-related distress. It has been found that too much focus on tinnitus comes at the expense of the visual domain. The angular gyrus (AG seems to play a crucial role in switching attention to the most salient stimulus. This study aims to evaluate the involvement of the AG during visual attention tasks in tinnitus sufferers treated with Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT, an intervention that has been shown to reduce tinnitus-related distress.Methods: Thirty-three patients with chronic tinnitus, 45 patients with recent-onset tinnitus, and 35 healthy controls were tested. A fraction of these (21/21/22 were treated with the “compact” version of the HNMT lasting 1 week with intense treatments, while non-treated participants were included as passive controls. Visual attention was evaluated during functional Magnet-Resonance Imaging (fMRI by a visual Continous Performance Task (CPT using letter-based alarm cues (“O” and “X” appearing in a sequence of neutral letters, “A” through “H.” Participants were instructed to respond via button press only if the letter “O” was followed by the letter “X” (GO condition, but not to respond if a neutral letter appeared instead (NOGO condition. All participants underwent two fMRI sessions, before and after a 1-week study period.Results: The CPT results revealed a relationship between error rates and tinnitus duration at baseline whereby the occurrence of erroneous “GO omissions” and the reaction time increased with tinnitus duration. Patients with chronic tinnitus who were treated with HNMT had decreasing error rates (fewer GO omissions compared to treated recent-onset patients. fMRI analyses confirmed greater activation of the AG during CPT in chronic patients after HNMT treatment compared to treated

  13. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S; Block, Glenn; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Topp, Edward; Beiko, Robert G; Diarra, Moussa S

    2015-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics. The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky) were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS) varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments) to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA) and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. This study showed that the predominant Salmonella serovars in broiler chickens harbor genes encoding adhesins

  14. Phase space generation for proton and carbon ion beams for external users’ applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eTessonnier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT, the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PS are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The generated PS were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles, with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for

  15. A Perspective on the Müller Cell-Neuron Metabolic Partnership in the Inner Retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, A K; Skytt, D M; Kolko, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    between the vessels and neurons, Müller cells are responsible for the functional and metabolic support of the surrounding neurons. As a consequence of major energy demands in the retina, high levels of glucose are consumed and processed by Müller cells. The present review provides a perspective......The Müller cells represent the predominant macroglial cell in the retina. In recent decades, Müller cells have been acknowledged to be far more influential on neuronal homeostasis in the retina than previously assumed. With its unique localization, spanning the entire retina being interposed...

  16. Localization and regulation of dopamine receptor D4 expression in the adult and developing rat retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitten, Laura L; Rath, Martin F; Coon, Steven L

    2008-01-01

    Levels of dopamine and melatonin exhibit diurnal rhythms in the rat retina. Dopamine is high during daytime adapting the retina to light, whereas melatonin is high during nighttime participating in the adaptation of the retina to low light intensities. Dopamine inhibits the synthesis of melatonin...... in the photoreceptors via Drd4 receptors located on the cell membrane of these cells. In this study, we show by semiquantitative in situ hybridization a prominent day/night variation in Drd4 expression in the retina of the Sprague-Dawley rat with a peak during the nighttime. Drd4 expression is seen in all retinal...

  17. Seeing double: visual physiology of double-retina eye ontogeny in stomatopod crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Kathryn D; Cohen, Jonathan H; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    Stomatopod eye development is unusual among crustaceans. Just prior to metamorphosis, an adult retina and associated neuro-processing structures emerge adjacent to the existing material in the larval compound eye. Depending on the species, the duration of this double-retina eye can range from a few hours to several days. Although this developmental process occurs in all stomatopod species observed to date, the retinal physiology and extent to which each retina contributes to the animal's visual sensitivity during this transition phase is unknown. We investigated the visual physiology of stomatopod double retinas using microspectrophotometry and electroretinogram recordings from different developmental stages of the Western Atlantic species Squilla empusa. Though microspectrophotometry data were inconclusive, we found robust ERG responses in both larval and adult retinas at all sampled time points indicating that the adult retina responds to light from the very onset of its emergence. We also found evidence of an increase in the response dynamics with ontogeny as well as an increase in sensitivity of retinal tissue during the double-retina phase relative to single retinas. These data provide an initial investigation into the ontogeny of vision during stomatopod double-retina eye development.

  18. Dual illumination for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    A dual illumination system is proposed for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The system is designed to acquire cornea and retina imaging with dual illumination with limited optics and using a single spectrometer. The beam propagation for cornea and retina imaging in dual illumination enables to acquire the images of different segments. This approach will reduce the imaging time for separate corneal and retinal imaging. The in vivo imaging of both the cornea and retina of a health volunteer shows the feasibility of the system for clinical applications

  19. [VEGF expression in dog retina after chorioretinal venous anastomosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ning; Li, Zhihui; Sun, Xianli; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoyan

    2002-09-01

    To identify changes in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in the dog retina after laser-induced chorioretinal venous anastomosis (CRVA), in order to find out the relationship between CRVA treatment and the related neovascular complications. Immediately after branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) model was made in 5 eyes of 5 normal dogs, CRVA treatment was done over a small tributary vein in the drainage distribution of the occluded vein. In each eye, there were 2 - 3 treatment sites. Four to six weeks later, a repeated treatment was given if the first treatment failed to show the anastomosis. The treatment sites with successful CRVA were divided into two groups: the small laser spot group, which received one treatment and the big laser spot group, which received more than one treatment. The expression of VEGF was investigated immunohistochemically in the treatment sites with successful anastomoses and in the 5 normal fellow eyes (control). There were totally 10 successful anastomoses in the 5 experimental eyes, among which, five received one treatment and the other 5 received more than one treatment. On fundus examination, the small laser spots were round and small, and the big laser spots were large with local proliferation. VEGF immunoreactivity was absent/weak in the normal dog retina, and remained unchanged in the small laser spot group, but somewhat increased in the big laser spot group. No neovascular complications occurred. All immunostaining experiments were accompanied by proper controls and none of the negative controls showed any immunoreactivity. Proper laser treatment can induce CRVA quite safely in nonischemic dog retina, which does not cause changes in the expression of VEGF, but severe laser damage in the treatment site can cause increased VEGF expression which may be related to neovascular complications.

  20. Survey of intravitreal injection techniques among retina specialists in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segal O

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ori Segal,1,2 Yael Segal-Trivitz,1,3 Arie Y Nemet,1,2 Noa Geffen,1,2 Ronit Nesher,1,2 Michael Mimouni4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, 2The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 3Department of Psychiatry, Geha Psychiatric Hospital, Petah Tikva, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe antivascular endothelial growth factor intravitreal injection techniques of retinal specialists in order to establish a cornerstone for future practice guidelines. Methods: All members of the Israeli Retina Society were contacted by email to complete an anonymous, 19-question, Internet-based survey regarding their intravitreal injection techniques. Results: Overall, 66% (52/79 completed the survey. Most (98% do not instruct patients to discontinue anticoagulant therapy and 92% prescribe treatment for patients in the waiting room. Three quarters wear sterile gloves and prepare the patient in the supine position. A majority (71% use sterile surgical draping. All respondents apply topical analgesics and a majority (69% measure the distance from the limbus to the injection site. A minority (21% displace the conjunctiva prior to injection. A majority of the survey participants use a 30-gauge needle and the most common quadrant for injection is superotemporal (33%. Less than half routinely assess postinjection optic nerve perfusion (44%. A majority (92% apply prophylactic antibiotics immediately after the injection. Conclusion: The majority of retina specialists perform intravitreal injections similarly. However, a relatively large minority performs this procedure differently. Due to the extremely low percentage of complications, it seems as though such differences do not increase the risk. However, more evidence-based medicine, a cornerstone for practice guidelines, is required in order to identify the intravitreal injection techniques

  1. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stout Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Results Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. Conclusion These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth.

  2. Characterization and Evolution of the Spotted Gar Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeena, Joshua M.; Galicia, Carlos A.; Wilson, Jacob D.; McGinn, Tim; Boughmann, Janette W.; Robison, Barrie D.; Postlethwait, John H.; Braasch, Ingo; Stenkamp, Deborah L.; Fuerst, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we characterize the retina of the spotted gar, Lepisosteus oculatus, a ray-finned fish. Gar did not undergo the whole genome duplication event that occurred at the base of the teleost fish lineage, which includes the model species zebrafish and medaka. The divergence of gars from the teleost lineage and the availability of a high quality genome sequence make it a uniquely useful species to understand how genome duplication sculpted features of the teleost visual system, including photoreceptor diversity. We developed reagents to characterize the cellular organization of the spotted gar retina, including representative markers for all major classes of retinal neurons and Müller glia. We report that the gar has a preponderance of predicted short-wavelength (SWS) shifted opsin genes, including a duplicated set of SWS1 (ultraviolet) sensitive opsin encoding genes, a SWS2 (blue) opsin encoding gene, and two rod opsin encoding genes, all of which were expressed in retinal photoreceptors. We also report that gar SWS1 cones lack the geometric organization of photoreceptors observed in teleost fish species, consistent with the crystalline photoreceptor mosaic being a teleost innovation. Of note the spotted gar expresses both exo-rhodopsin (RH1-1) and rhodopsin (RH1-2) in rods. Exo-rhodopsin is an opsin that is not expressed in the retina of zebrafish and other teleosts, but rather is expressed in regions of the brain. This study suggests that exo-rhodopsin is an ancestral actinopterygian (ray finned fish) retinal opsin, and in teleosts its expression has possibly been subfunctionalized to the pineal gland. PMID:27862951

  3. Inflamed In Vitro Retina: Cytotoxic Neuroinflammation and Galectin-3 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Maximilian Bauer

    Full Text Available Disease progression in retinal neurodegeneration is strongly correlated to immune cell activation, which may have either a neuroprotective or neurotoxic effect. Increased knowledge about the immune response profile and retinal neurodegeneration may lead to candidate targets for treatments. Therefore, we have used the explanted retina as a model to explore the immune response and expression of the immune modulator galectin-3 (Gal-3, induced by the cultivation per se and after additional immune stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and how this correlates with retinal neurotoxicity.Post-natal mouse retinas were cultured in a defined medium. One group was stimulated with LPS (100 ng/ml, 24 h. Retinal architecture, apoptotic cell death, and micro- and macroglial activity were studied at the time of cultivation (0 days in vitro (DIV and at 3, 4 and 7 DIV using morphological staining, biochemical- and immunohistochemical techniques.Our results show that sustained activation of macro- and microglia, characterized by no detectable cytokine release and limited expression of Gal-3, is not further inducing apoptosis additional to the axotomy-induced apoptosis in innermost nuclear layer. An elevated immune response was detected after LPS stimulation, as demonstrated primarily by release of immune mediators (i.e. interleukin 2 (IL-2, IL-6, KC/GRO (also known as CLCX1 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, increased numbers of microglia displaying morphologies of late activation stages as well as Gal-3 expression. This was accompanied with increased apoptosis in the two additional nuclear layers, and damage to retinal gross architecture.We demonstrate that an immune response characterized by sustained and increased release of cytokines, along with an increase in Gal-3 expression, is accompanied by significant increased neurotoxicity in the explanted retina. Further investigations using the current setting may lead to increased understanding on the

  4. Instant website optimization for retina displays how-to

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Kyle J

    2013-01-01

    Written in an accessible and practical manner which quickly imparts the knowledge you want to know. As a How-to book it will use applied examples and teach you to optimize websites for retina displays. This book is for web designers and developers who are familiar with HTML, CSS, and editing graphics who would like to improve their existing website or their next web project with high-resolution images. You'll need to have a high-definition device to be able to test the examples in this book and a server to upload your code to if you're not developing it on that device.

  5. [Balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery for evaluating resectability of blood vessel infiltrating cervical metastasis of advanced head and neck cancers--Heidelberg experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A; von Kummer, R; Adams, H P; Kneip, M; Galito, P; Maier, H

    1993-11-01

    During the last two years 17 patients of the ENT-Department of the University of Heidelberg suffering from squamous-cell carcinomas of the head and neck underwent a balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The investigation was performed because of tumorous infiltration of the large cervical vessels. The balloon occlusion of the ICA was accomplished at the Department of Neuroradiology of the University of Heidelberg. While stopping bloodflow in the ICA of one side for 15-20 min, clinical, electrophysiological and Doppler sonographic monitoring was performed, to detect severe cerebral complications. The specific electrophysiological monitoring contained the detection of MSSEP's (median nerve stimulated somatosensorial evoked potentials) and TCMEP's (transcortical motor evoked potentials) during test occlusion. Balloon occlusion was not possible in three patients because of severe arteriosclerosis. Test occlusion had to be discontinued in three patients because of clinical complications (temporary amaurosis, orthostatic complications). Finally, seven patients showed contraindications during test occlusion for permanent occlusion of the ICA. Four patients had a permanent occlusion of the ICA after tumour resection. In two patients the ICA was removed without problems in test occlusion. The third patient underwent a permanent carotid occlusion because of bleeding complications (in spite of poor clinical tolerance of the test occlusion). In the fourth patient, only intraoperative neuromonitoring with MSSEP's was conducted before permanent carotid occlusion. All four patients did not show any neurological deficits after resection of the ICA. Neurophysiological monitoring played an important role in predicting cerebral complications after permanent occlusion of the ICA.

  6. Comparación de guantes de látex de uso clínico de diferentes marcas comerciales mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto González

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumen (español El uso de guantes de látex representa la primera barrera contra patógenos por parte del personal de ciencias de la salud, sin embargo, es cotidiano escuchar quejas sobre la calidad de los mismos, ya que en algunos casos tienden a romperse con facilidad disminuyendo así su capacidad protectora, además de utilizar como lubricante almidón de maíz, sustancia que puede provocar alergias. En esta investigación se compararon las características morfológicas del látex y la composición química del polvo de guantes de látex de uso clínico, de cinco marcas comerciales mediante microscopia electrónica de barrido. La calidad protectora se estableció como un arreglo entre el promedio de poros, el diámetro de los mismos y la rugosidad de la superficie. La marca Sensimedical® conto con poros de menor diámetro entre 0,1–0,7 μm, un promedio de 36,7 y superficie poco rugosa, seguida por las marcas Mc medical®, Confit®, King® y por ultimo Medac® con poros entre 0,6-2μm, un promedio de 28,1 y superficie muy rugosa. En cuanto a la composición química elemental del polvo lubricante se encontró predominio de calcio, níquel, magnesio y sodio. La presencia del sodio y magnesio puede deberse a mejorar propiedades de sudoración del usuario, pero el níquel puede generar alergias. Además otros elementos en baja proporción considerados contaminantes. Abstract (english The use of latex gloves is the first barrier against pathogens from the staff of health sciences, however, it is commonplace to hear complaints about the quality of them, since in some cases tend to break easily thus reducing their protective capacity, besides using corn starch as a lubricant, a substance that can cause allergies. In this research the morphological characteristics of latex and chemical composition of the powder latex gloves for clinical use, five trademarks by scanning electron microscopy were compared. The protective quality was established

  7. Agregación de sedimentos en una cuenca de llanura: utilización del Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido como herramienta de evaluación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez, P.

    2015-12-01

    sedimentos de fondo del río Negro, tributario del río Paraná, ubicado en la provincia del Chaco (Argentina. Para ello se realizaron análisis granulométricos en etapas consecutivas de procesamiento de muestras que evaluaron los efectos de la presencia de materia orgánica y las sales disueltas en el estado de agregación de las partículas sedimentarias. En cada etapa las muestras fueron observadas bajo Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido (MEB. Los resultados conseguidos representan la primera evaluación cuantitativa sobre la presencia de agregados naturales de sedimentos en un río de la llanura Chaqueña, pudiéndose usar además como referencia para la caracterización de otros ríos similares. Los resultados obtenidos permiten apreciar un aumento marcado de la fracción limo al eliminar materia orgánica, y de la fracción arcilla al eliminar el efecto electroquímico producto de las altas concentraciones salinas. Se concluye que para estudios destinados a interpretaciones ambientales no es recomendable el uso de técnicas que incluyan eliminación de materia orgánica particulada fina y la dispersión química, pues la información generada puede conducir a una interpretación sesgada de la dinámica de transporte de los sedimentos en el medio natural.

  8. QRI, a retina-specific gene, encodes an extracellular matrix protein exclusively expressed during neural retina differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, F J; Pouponnot, C; Jeanny, J C; Lecoq, O; Calothy, G; Pierani, A

    1996-02-01

    Neural retina development results from growth arrest of neuroectodermal precursors and differentiation of postmitotic cells. The QRI gene is specifically expressed in Müller retinal glial cells. Its expression coincides with the stage of withdrawal from the cell cycle and establishment of differentiation and is repressed upon induction of retinal cell proliferation by the v-src gene product. In this report, we show that the QR1 gene encodes several glycosylated proteins that are secreted and can either associate with the extracellular matrix or remain diffusible in the medium. By using pulse-chase experiments, the 100-103 kDa forms seem to appear first and are specifically incorporated into the extracellular matrix, whereas the 108 and 60 kDa polypeptides appear later and are detected as soluble forms in the culture medium. We also report that expression of the QR1 gene is developmentally regulated in the chicken. Its mRNA is first detectable at embryonic day 10, reaches a maximal level at embryonic day 15 and is no longer detected at embryonic day 18. Immunolocalization of the QR1 protein in chicken retina sections during development shows that expression of the protein parallels the differentiation pattern of post-miotic cells (in particular Müller cells and rods), corresponding to the two differentiation gradients in the retina: from the ganglion cell layer to the inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer, and from the optic nerve to the iris. At embryonic day 10, expression of the QR1 protein(s) is restricted to the optic nerve region and the inner nuclear layer, colocalizing with Müller cell bodies. As development proceeds, QR1 protein localization spreads towards the iris and towards the outer nuclear layer, following Müller cell elongations towards the photoreceptors. Between embryonic days 16 and 18, the QR1 protein is no longer detectable in the optic nerve region and is concentrated around the basal segment of the photoreceptors in the peripheral

  9. [Chloroquine- and chlorphentermin-induced lipidosis in rat retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehorn, T; Duncker, G I

    1999-03-01

    The amphiphilic drugs chloroquine and chlorphentermine are known to cause lipidosis in the human and rat retina. We treated femal albino Wistar rats orally with chloroquine for 12 weeks, followed by a period of 4 months with normal feed and another group with chlorphentermine for 4-16 weeks. The animals were submitted to electroretinography, and the retinae were prepared for histological investigations. Chloroquine caused severe lipidosis in the neuroretina and slight photoreceptor cell degeneration after 12 weeks of treatment. The b-wave was reduced to 30% of initial values. After withdrawal the lipidosis remitted, but the degeneration of the photoreceptor cell layer continued to progress. The a-wave and b-wave amplitudes were reduced to 25% and 16% of initial values, respectively. Chlorphentermine caused pronounced lipidosis in the pigment epithelium and less numerous in the neuroretina after 16 weeks; no photoreceptor cell degeneration was found. The b-wave was reduced to 80% of initial values, the a-wave appeared unaffected. Whether lipidosis is the primary cause of changes in the electroretinogram and of receptor cell degeneration is doubtful. Excessive lipid storage may be the cause of secondary changes. It is unlikely that lipidosis in pigment epithelium played a role.

  10. Vsx2 in the zebrafish retina: restricted lineages through derepression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashijima Shin-ichi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurons in the vertebrate retina arise from multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs. It is not clear, however, which progenitors are multipotent or why they are multipotent. Results In this study we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Vsx2 is initially expressed throughout the retinal epithelium, but later it is downregulated in all but a minor population of bipolar cells and all Müller glia. The Vsx2-negative daughters of Vsx2-positive RPCs divide and give rise to all other cell types in the retina. Vsx2 is a repressor whose targets include transcription factors such as Vsx1, which is expressed in the progenitors of distinct non-Vsx2 bipolars, and the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ath5, which restricts the fate of progenitors to retinal ganglion cells, horizontal cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptors fates. Foxn4, expressed in the progenitors of amacrine and horizontal cells, is also negatively regulated by Vsx2. Conclusion Our data thus suggest Vsx2-positive RPCs are fully multipotent retinal progenitors and that when Vsx2 is downregulated, Vsx2-negative progenitors escape Vsx2 repression and so are able to express factors that restrict lineage potential.

  11. Regeneration of axons in the mouse retina after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, P; Berry, M

    1982-01-01

    It is generally accepted that most axons in the mammalian CNS show only transient growth in response to injury, and numerous hypotheses have been advanced to account for this phenomenon. Detailed knowledge of the time-course and extent of this so-called 'abortive regeneration' is, however, surprisingly lacking. The retina of the adult albino mouse provides a convenient system in which to quantify the response of central axons to injury, since the retina can be prepared as a whole mount, allowing silver-impregnated axons to be followed along their entire course. Using this experimental model, sprouting of injured axons was observed as early as 14 h post lesion (hpl) with rapid growth (20 micrometers/day on average) continuing until 10 dpl. Thereafter, a decline in the overall growth rate was observed, presumably regenerated sprouts began to degenerate. However, not all axons showed this abortive response: numerous unfasciculated axons continued in random growth until at least 100 dpl. One possible interpretation of these results is that the concept of abortive regeneration of injured axons is untenable in regions of the CNS which are lacking in myelin.

  12. Three dimensional reconstruction of tomographic images of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glittenberg, C.; Zeiler, F.; Falkner, C.; Binder, S.; Povazay, B.; Hermann, B.; Drexler, W.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new display system for the three-dimensional visualization of tomographic images in ophthalmology. Specifically, a system that can use stacks of B-mode scans from an ultrahigh resolution optical tomography examination to vividly display retinal specimens as three-dimensional objects. Several subroutines were programmed in the rendering and raytracing program Cinema 4D XL 9.102 Studio Bundle (Maxon Computer Inc., Friedrichsburg, Germany), which could process stacks of tomographic scans into three-dimensional objects. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography examinations were performed on patients with various retinal pathologies and post processed with the subroutines that had been designed. All ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomographies were performed with a titanium: sapphire based ultra broad bandwidth (160 nm) femtosecond laser system (INTEGRAL, Femtolasers Productions GmbH. Vienna Austria) with an axial resolution of 3 μm. A new three dimensional display system for tomographic images in ophthalmology was developed, which allows a highly vivid display of physiological and pathological structures of the retina. The system also distinguishes itself through its high interactivity and adaptability. This new display system allows the visualization of physiological and pathological structures of the retina in a new way, which will give us new insight into their morphology and development. (author) [de

  13. Flash photolysis of rhodopsin in the cat retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripps, H.; Mehaffey, L.; Siegel, I.M.; Ernst, W.; Kemp, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The bleaching of rhodopsin by short-duration flashes of a xenon discharge lamp was studied in vivo in the cat retina with the aid of a rapid, spectral-scan fundus reflectometer. Difference spectra recorded over a broad range of intensities showed that the bleaching efficacy of high-intensity flashes was less than that of longer duration, steady lights delivering the same amount of energy. Both the empirical results and those derived from a theoretical analysis of flash photolysis indicate that, under the conditions of these experiments, the upper limit of the flash bleaching of rhodopsin in cat is approximately 90%. Although the fact that a full bleach could not be attained is attributable to photoreversal, i.e., the photic regeneration of rhodopsin from its light-sensitive intermediates, the 90% limit is considerably higher than the 50% (or lower) value obtained under other experimental circumstances. Thus, it appears that the duration (approximately 1 ms) and spectral composition of the flash, coupled with the kinetic parameters of the thermal and photic reactions in the cat retina, reduce the light-induced regeneration of rhodopsin to approximately 10%

  14. Functional Compartmentalization within Starburst Amacrine Cell Dendrites in the Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Poleg-Polsky

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Dendrites in many neurons actively compute information. In retinal starburst amacrine cells, transformations from synaptic input to output occur within individual dendrites and mediate direction selectivity, but directional signal fidelity at individual synaptic outputs and correlated activity among neighboring outputs on starburst dendrites have not been examined systematically. Here, we record visually evoked calcium signals simultaneously at many individual synaptic outputs within single starburst amacrine cells in mouse retina. We measure visual receptive fields of individual output synapses and show that small groups of outputs are functionally compartmentalized within starburst dendrites, creating distinct computational units. Inhibition enhances compartmentalization and directional tuning of individual outputs but also decreases the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations suggest, however, that the noise underlying output signal variability is well tolerated by postsynaptic direction-selective ganglion cells, which integrate convergent inputs to acquire reliable directional information. : Poleg-Polsky et al. examine the directional signaling fidelity of individual synapses on starburst amacrine cell dendrites. They identify functionally and morphologically distinct signaling compartments within SAC dendrites and show that inhibition enhances reliable decoding by postsynaptic direction-selective ganglion cells. Keywords: retina, synaptic transmission, amacrine cell, correlation, visual processing, inhibition, direction selectivity

  15. An experimental platform for systemic drug delivery to the retina.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Campbell, Matthew

    2009-10-20

    Degenerative retinopathies, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and hereditary retinal disorders--major causes of world blindness--are potentially treatable by using low-molecular weight neuroprotective, antiapoptotic, or antineovascular drugs. These agents are, however, not in current systemic use owing to, among other factors, their inability to passively diffuse across the microvasculature of the retina because of the presence of the inner blood-retina barrier (iBRB). Moreover, preclinical assessment of the efficacies of new formulations in the treatment of such conditions is similarly compromised. We describe here an experimental process for RNAi-mediated, size-selective, transient, and reversible modulation of the iBRB in mice to molecules up to 800 Da by suppression of transcripts encoding claudin-5, a protein component of the tight junctions of the inner retinal vasculature. MRI produced no evidence indicative of brain or retinal edema, and the process resulted in minimal disturbance of global transcriptional patterns analyzed in neuronal tissue. We show that visual function can be improved in IMPDH1(-\\/-) mice, a model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa, and that the rate of photoreceptor cell death can be reduced in a model of light-induced retinal degeneration by systemic drug delivery after reversible barrier opening. These findings provide a platform for high-throughput drug screening in models of retinal degeneration, and they ultimately could result in the development of a novel "humanized" approach to therapy for conditions with little or no current forms of treatment.

  16. Purinergic control of vascular tone in the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic control of vascular tone in the CNS has been largely unexplored. This study examines the contribution of endogenous extracellular ATP, acting on vascular smooth muscle cells, in controlling vascular tone in the in vivo rat retina. Retinal vessels were labelled by i.v. injection of a fluorescent dye and imaged with scanning laser confocal microscopy. The diameters of primary arterioles were monitored under control conditions and following intravitreal injection of pharmacological agents. Apyrase (500 units ml−1), an ATP hydrolysing enzyme, dilated retinal arterioles by 40.4 ± 2.8%, while AOPCP (12.5 mm), an ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor that increases extracellular ATP levels, constricted arterioles by 58.0 ± 3.8% (P fluorocitrate (150 μm) dilated retinal vessels by 52.3 ± 1.1% (P < 0.001) and inhibited the vasodilatory response to NF023 (50 μm, 7.9 ± 2.0%; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that vascular tone in rat retinal arterioles is maintained by tonic release of ATP from the retina. ATP acts on P2X1 receptors, although contributions from other P2X and P2Y receptors cannot be ruled out. Retinal glial cells are a possible source of the vasoconstricting ATP. PMID:24277867

  17. Abnormal vascularization in mouse retina with dysregulated retinal cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarova, Saida; Charvet, Casey D; Reem, Rachel E; Mast, Natalia; Zheng, Wenchao; Huang, Suber; Peachey, Neal S; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2012-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a link between age-related macular degeneration and retinal cholesterol maintenance. Cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) is a ubiquitously expressed mitochondrial sterol 27-hydroxylase that plays an important role in the metabolism of cholesterol and cholesterol-related compounds. We conducted a comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation of mice lacking CYP27A1. We found that the loss of CYP27A1 led to dysregulation of retinal cholesterol homeostasis, including unexpected upregulation of retinal cholesterol biosynthesis. Cyp27a1-/- mice developed retinal lesions characterized by cholesterol deposition beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. Further, Cyp27a1-null mice showed pathological neovascularization, which likely arose from both the retina and the choroid, that led to the formation of retinal-choroidal anastomosis. Blood flow alterations and blood vessel leakage were noted in the areas of pathology. The Cyp27a1-/- retina was hypoxic and had activated Müller cells. We suggest a mechanism whereby abolished sterol 27-hydroxylase activity leads to vascular changes and identify Cyp27a1-/- mice as a model for one of the variants of type 3 retinal neovascularization occurring in some patients with age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Pannexin1 in the outer retina of the zebrafish, Danio rerio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prochnow, N.; Hoffmann, S.; Vroman, R.; Klooster, J.; Bunse, S.; Kamermans, M.; Dermietzel, R.; Zoidl, G.

    2009-01-01

    In the retina, chemical and electrical synapses couple neurons into functional networks. New candidates encoding for electrical synapse proteins have recently emerged. In the present study, we determined the localization of the candidate protein pannexin1 (zfPanx1) in the zebrafish retina and

  19. Pannexin1 channel proteins in the zebrafish retina have shared and unique properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina,

  20. Protein changes in the retina following experimental retinal detachment in rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandal, Nakul; Lewis, Geoffrey P; Fisher, Steven K

    2011-01-01

    Retinal detachment leads to the widespread cellular remodeling of the retina. The purpose of this study was to identify protein changes that accompany these cellular alterations by comparing the proteomic profiles of sham and experimentally detached rabbit retina. Elucidation of the proteins most...

  1. Delayed neurogenesis with respect to eye growth shapes the pigeon retina for high visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tania; Krawczyk, Michal; Skowronska-Krawczyk, Dorota; Matter-Sadzinski, Lidia; Matter, Jean-Marc

    2016-12-15

    The macula and fovea located at the optical centre of the retina make primate visual perception unique among mammals. Our current understanding of retina ontogenesis is primarily based on animal models having no macula and no fovea. However, the pigeon retina and the human macula share a number of structural and functional properties that justify introducing the former as a new model system for retina development. Comparative transcriptome analysis of pigeon and chicken retinas at different embryonic stages reveals that the genetic programmes underlying cell differentiation are postponed in the pigeon until the end of the period of cell proliferation. We show that the late onset of neurogenesis has a profound effect on the developmental patterning of the pigeon retina, which is at odds with the current models of retina development. The uncoupling of tissue growth and neurogenesis is shown to result from the fact that the pigeon retinal epithelium is inhibitory to cell differentiation. The sum of these developmental features allows the pigeon to build a retina that displays the structural and functional traits typical of primate macula and fovea. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Immune cells in the porcine retina: distribution, characterization and morphological features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Peizeng; Chen, Ling; Zwart, Rob; Kijlstra, Aize

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the presence of immunocompetent cells in the porcine retina and to compare the findings with those obtained earlier in human retinas. Retinal wholemounts or cryostat sections from outbred Dutch Landrace pigs were analyzed for the presence of microglia (CD45), macrophages-monocytes

  3. A comparison of some organizational characteristics of the mouse central retina and the human macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Hoo, Juyea; Yee, Claudine; Williams, David S

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have greatly assisted our understanding of retinal degenerations. However, the mouse retina does not have a macula, leading to the question of whether the mouse is a relevant model for macular degeneration. In the present study, a quantitative comparison between the organization of the central mouse retina and the human macula was made, focusing on some structural characteristics that have been suggested to be important in predisposing the macula to stresses leading to degeneration: photoreceptor density, phagocytic load on the RPE, and the relative thinness of Bruch's membrane. Light and electron microscopy measurements from retinas of two strains of mice, together with published data on human retinas, were used for calculations and subsequent comparisons. As in the human retina, the central region of the mouse retina possesses a higher photoreceptor cell density and a thinner Bruch's membrane than in the periphery; however, the magnitudes of these periphery to center gradients are larger in the human. Of potentially greater relevance is the actual photoreceptor cell density, which is much greater in the mouse central retina than in the human macula, underlying a higher phagocytic load for the mouse RPE. Moreover, at eccentricities that correspond to the peripheral half of the human macula, the rod to cone ratio is similar between mouse and human. Hence, with respect to photoreceptor density and phagocytic load of the RPE, the central mouse retina models at least the more peripheral part of the macula, where macular degeneration is often first evident.

  4. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Rod bipolar cells in ageing human retina. 293. J. Biosci. ... During normal ageing, the rods (and other neurones) undergo a significant decrease in density in the human retina ..... Brain Res. 84 293–300. Figure 3. Immunohistochemical demonstration of protein kinase C-α labelling in the macula of the 91-year-old donor. The.

  5. Functional and Cellular Responses to Laser Injury in the Rat Snake Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glickman, Randolph D; Elliott, III, W. R; Kumar, Neeru

    2007-01-01

    .... This animal is of interest for vision research because its eye has an all-cone retina. A linear array of 5 thermal lesions was placed in the retina of anesthetized animals, near the area centralis, using a Nd:VO4 laser (532 nm...

  6. Mapping the retinas of a patient using a mixed set of fundus photographs from both eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quellec, Gwenole; Lamard, Mathieu; Cazuguel, Guy; Erginay, Ali; Cochener, Beatrice

    2016-08-01

    With the increased prevalence of retinal pathologies, automating the detection and progression measurement of these pathologies is becoming more and more relevant. Color fundus photography is the leading modality for assessing retinal pathologies. Because eye fundus cameras have a limited field of view, multiple photographs are taken from each retina during an eye fundus examination. However, operators usually don't indicate which photographs are from the left retina and which ones are from the right retina. This paper presents a novel algorithm that automatically assigns each photograph to one retina and builds a composite image (or "mosaic") per retina, which is expected to push the performance of automated diagnosis forward. The algorithm starts by jointly forming two mosaics, one per retina, using a novel graph theoretic approach. Then, in order to determine which mosaic corresponds to the left retina and which one corresponds to the right retina, two retinal landmarks are detected robustly in each mosaic: the main vessel arch surrounding the macula and the optic disc. The laterality of each mosaic derives from their relative location. Experiments on 2790 manually annotated images validate the very good performance of the proposed framework even for highly pathological images.

  7. Ontogenetic expression of the Otx2 and Crx homeobox genes in the retina of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Morin, Fabrice; Shi, Qiong

    2007-01-01

    Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail. This conf......Otx2 and Crx are vertebrate orthologs of the orthodenticle family of homeobox genes, which are involved in retinal development. In this study, the temporal expression patterns of Otx2 and Crx in the rat retina during embryonic and postnatal stages of development were analyzed in detail....... This confirmed the presence of Otx2 mRNA in both the embryonic retinal pigment epithelium and the developing neural retina. During development, the expression of Otx2 persists in the pigment epithelium, whereas Otx2 expression of the neural retina becomes progressively restricted to the outer nuclear layer...... in the developing and mature mammalian retina....

  8. Rod photoreceptors express GPR55 in the adult vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    . Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial...... components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin......, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55...

  9. FPGA-Based Real Time, Multichannel Emulated-Digital Retina Model Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörösházi, Zsolt; Nagy, Zoltán; Szolgay, Péter

    2009-12-01

    The function of the low-level image processing that takes place in the biological retina is to compress only the relevant visual information to a manageable size. The behavior of the layers and different channels of the neuromorphic retina has been successfully modeled by cellular neural/nonlinear networks (CNNs). In this paper, we present an extended, application-specific emulated-digital CNN-universal machine (UM) architecture to compute the complex dynamic of this mammalian retina in video real time. The proposed emulated-digital implementation of multichannel retina model is compared to the previously developed models from three key aspects, which are processing speed, number of physical cells, and accuracy. Our primary aim was to build up a simple, real-time test environment with camera input and display output in order to mimic the behavior of retina model implementation on emulated digital CNN by using low-cost, moderate-sized field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures.

  10. Damage and functional recovery of the mouse retina after exposure to genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, Yu.V.; Tronov, V.A.; Lyakhova, K.N.; Ostrovskij, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    As is known, the mature retina is characterized by high radiation resistance. We showed earlier that ionizing radiation at a dose of ≥25 Gy and the chemical genotoxic agent methylnitrosourea (MNU) in a concentration of ≥60 mg/kg induce acute retinal degeneration, combined with proapoptotic protein expression. The process has a high genotoxic threshold, below which no degeneration signs were traced. The aim of this work was to study the damaging effect of ionizing radiation and MNU on the functional activity of the retina and its ability to recover after exposure to these genotoxicants. The functional activity of the mouse retina was evaluated with electroretinograms (ERG). In parallel, morphological changes in the retina were controlled, and the TUNEL detection of the death of its cell elements was performed. It has been shown that gamma rays or accelerated proton irradiation below 15 Gy cause no structural or functional changes in the mouse retina, which confirms the mature retina's high radiation resistance. Irradiation with a higher dose of 25 Gy leads to photoreceptor layer destruction. This goes along with an increase in the number of the TUNEL-positive photoreceptors, among which are cells with fragmented nuclei, which are typical of apoptosis. MNU in a concentration of 70 mg/kg caused the irreversible loss of the retina's physiological activity, and the morphological degeneration of photoreceptors and their mass death. In a concentration of 35 mg/kg, however, MNU had no cytotoxic effect on the retina. Moreover, this dose caused a reversible ERG amplitude decrease. Also, adaptive response was observed in the retina, which became apparent after two consecutive MNU injections - first, at a dose of 17 mg/kg; then, at a cytotoxic dose of 70 mg/kg. These results point to the possibility of the neurohormesis effect, which was described concerning the retina's exposure to ionizing radiation and some chemicals.

  11. Heterogeneity of glia in the retina and optic nerve of birds and mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy J Fischer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have recently described a novel type of glial cell that is scattered across the inner layers of the avian retina [1]. These cells are stimulated by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 to proliferate, migrate distally into the retina, and up-regulate the nestin-related intermediate filament transition. These changes in glial activity correspond with increased susceptibility of neurons to excitotoxic damage. This novel cell-type has been termed the Non-astrocytic Inner Retinal Glia-like (NIRG cells. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the retinas of non-avian species contain cells that resemble NIRG cells. We assayed for NIRG cells by probing for the expression of Sox2, Sox9, Nkx2.2, vimentin and nestin. NIRG cells were distinguished from astrocytes by a lack of expression for Glial Fibrilliary Acidic Protein (GFAP. We examined the retinas of adult mice, guinea pigs, dogs and monkeys (Macaca fasicularis. In the mouse retina and optic nerve head, we identified numerous astrocytes that expressed GFAP, S100beta, Sox2 and Sox9; however, we found no evidence for NIRG-like cells that were positive for Nkx2.2, nestin, and negative for GFAP. In the guinea pig retina, we did not find astrocytes or NIRG cells in the retina, whereas we identified astrocytes in the optic nerve. In the eyes of dogs and monkeys, we found astrocytes and NIRG-like cells scattered across inner layers of the retina and within the optic nerve. We conclude that NIRG-like cells are present in the retinas of canines and non-human primates, whereas the retinas of mice and guinea pigs do not contain NIRG cells.

  12. cis Retinol oxidation regulates photoreceptor access to the retina visual cycle and cone pigment regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinya; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-11-15

    This study explores the nature of the cis retinol that Müller cells in the retina provide to cones for the regeneration of their visual pigment. We report that the retina visual cycle provides cones exclusively with 11-cis chromophore in both salamander and mouse and show that this selectivity is dependent on the 11-cis-specific cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) present in Müller cells. Even though salamander blue cones and green rods share the same visual pigment, only blue cones but not green rods are able to dark-adapt in the retina following a bleach and to use exogenous 9-cis retinol for pigment regeneration, suggesting that access to the retina visual cycle is cone-specific and pigment-independent. Our results show that the retina produces 11-cis retinol that can be oxidized and used for pigment regeneration and dark adaptation selectively in cones and not in rods. Chromophore supply by the retinal Müller cells (retina visual cycle) supports the efficient pigment regeneration required for cone photoreceptor function in bright light. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the chromophore produced by dihydroceramide desaturase-1, the putative all-trans retinol isomerase in Müller cells, appears to be 9-cis retinol. In contrast, the canonical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) visual cycle produces exclusively 11-cis retinal. Here, we used the different absorption spectra of 9-cis and 11-cis pigments to identify the isoform of the chromophore produced by the visual cycle of the intact retina. We found that the spectral sensitivity of salamander and mouse cones dark-adapted in the isolated retina (with only the retina visual cycle) was similar to that of cones dark-adapted in the intact eye (with both the RPE and retina visual cycles) and consistent with pure 11-cis pigment composition. However, in mice lacking the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP), cone spectral sensitivity contained a substantial 9-cis component. Thus, the retina visual

  13. Functional Compartmentalization within Starburst Amacrine Cell Dendrites in the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Ding, Huayu; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2018-03-13

    Dendrites in many neurons actively compute information. In retinal starburst amacrine cells, transformations from synaptic input to output occur within individual dendrites and mediate direction selectivity, but directional signal fidelity at individual synaptic outputs and correlated activity among neighboring outputs on starburst dendrites have not been examined systematically. Here, we record visually evoked calcium signals simultaneously at many individual synaptic outputs within single starburst amacrine cells in mouse retina. We measure visual receptive fields of individual output synapses and show that small groups of outputs are functionally compartmentalized within starburst dendrites, creating distinct computational units. Inhibition enhances compartmentalization and directional tuning of individual outputs but also decreases the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations suggest, however, that the noise underlying output signal variability is well tolerated by postsynaptic direction-selective ganglion cells, which integrate convergent inputs to acquire reliable directional information. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Pixel detectors for use in retina neurophysiology studies

    CERN Document Server

    Cunningham, W; Chichilnisky, E J; Horn, M; Litke, A M; Mathieson, K; McEwan, F A; Melone, J; O'Shea, V; Rahman, M; Smith, K M

    2003-01-01

    One area of major inter-disciplinary co-operation is between the particle physics and bio-medical communities. The type of large detector arrays and fast electronics developed in laboratories like CERN are becoming used for a wide range of medical and biological experiments. In the present work fabrication technology developed for producing semiconductor radiation detectors has been applied to produce arrays which have been used in neuro-physiological experiments on retinal tissue. We have exploited UVIII, a low molecular weight resist, that has permitted large area electron beam lithography. This allows the resolution to go below that of conventional photolithography and hence the production of densely packed similar to 500 electrode arrays with feature sizes down to below 2 mum. The neural signals from significant areas of the retina may thus be captured.

  15. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells) in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission) can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively). Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels) and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1). These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:28562601

  16. Melanopsin bistability: a fly's eye technology in the human retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic S Mure

    Full Text Available In addition to rods and cones, the human retina contains light-sensitive ganglion cells that express melanopsin, a photopigment with signal transduction mechanisms similar to that of invertebrate rhabdomeric photopigments (IRP. Like fly rhodopsins, melanopsin acts as a dual-state photosensitive flip-flop in which light drives both phototransduction responses and chromophore photoregeneration that bestows independence from the retinoid cycle required by rods and cones to regenerate photoresponsiveness following bleaching by light. To explore the hypothesis that melanopsin in humans expresses the properties of a bistable photopigment in vivo we used the pupillary light reflex (PLR as a tool but with methods designed to study invertebrate photoreceptors. We show that the pupil only attains a fully stabilized state of constriction after several minutes of light exposure, a feature that is consistent with typical IRP photoequilibrium spectra. We further demonstrate that previous exposure to long wavelength light increases, while short wavelength light decreases the amplitude of pupil constriction, a fundamental property of IRP difference spectra. Modelling these responses to invertebrate photopigment templates yields two putative spectra for the underlying R and M photopigment states with peaks at 481 nm and 587 nm respectively. Furthermore, this bistable mechanism may confer a novel form of "photic memory" since information of prior light conditions is retained and shapes subsequent responses to light. These results suggest that the human retina exploits fly-like photoreceptive mechanisms that are potentially important for the modulation of non-visual responses to light and highlights the ubiquitous nature of photoswitchable photosensors across living organisms.

  17. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark A; Sendler, Edward D; Buschbeck, Elke K; Cook, Tiffany A

    2017-05-01

    Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells) in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission) can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively). Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels) and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1). These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates.

  18. Effect of dietary fatty acid intake on prospective weight change in the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabi; Linseisen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between fatty acid (alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, DHA, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) intake and prospective weight change in the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. DESIGN....... RESULTS: Stearic acid intake was linearly associated with weight gain (P acid intake, significantly so in women. In multinomial models, women in the highest tertile of ALA and stearic acid intake showed increased OR (95 % CI......) and categorised into four groups (weight loss, or =2.5 to or =7.5%/5 years). Energy-adjusted dietary fatty acid intake data were estimated from the FFQ completed at baseline. Multivariate linear regression models as well as multinomial logistic regression analyses (carbohydrate replacement models) were conducted...

  19. Clonal origins of cells in the pigmented retina of the zebrafish eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streisinger, G.; Coale, F.; Taggart, C.; Walker, C.; Grunwald, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Mosaic analysis has been used to study the clonal basis of the development of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. Zebrafish embryos heterozygous for a recessive mutation at the gol-1 locus were exposed to gamma-irradiation at various developmental stages to create mosaic individuals consisting of wild-type pigmented cells and a clone of pigmentless (golden) cells in the eye. The contribution of individual embryonic cells to the pigmented retina was measured and the total number of cells in the embryo that contributed descendants to this tissue was determined. Until the 32-cell stage, almost every blastomere has some descendants that participate in the formation of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish. During subsequent cell divisions, up to the several thousand-cell stage, the number of ancestral cells is constant: approximately 40 cells are present that will give rise to progeny in the pigmented retina. Analysis of the size of clones in the pigmented retina indicates that the cells of this tissue do not arise through a rigid series of cell divisions originating in the early embryo. The findings that each cleavage stage cell contributes to the pigmented retina and yet the contribution of such cells is highly variable are consistent with the interpretation that clonal descendants of different blastomeres normally intermix extensively prior to formation of the pigmented retina

  20. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein expression in the retina is regulated by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Souza, E M; Perche, O; Morgans, C W; Duvoisin, R M; Calaza, K C

    2016-05-01

    Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a RNA-binding protein that modulates protein synthesis at the synapse and its function is regulated by glutamate. The retina is the first structure that participates in vision, and uses glutamate to transduce electromagnetic signals from light to electrochemical signals to neurons. FMRP has been previously detected in the retina, but its localization has not been studied yet. In this work, our objectives were to describe the localization of FMRP in the retina, to determine whether different exposure to dark or light stimulus alters FMRP expression in the retina, and to compare the pattern in two different species, the mouse and chick. We found that both FMRP mRNA and protein are expressed in the retina. By immunohistochemistry analysis we found that both mouse and chick present similar FMRP expression localized mainly in both plexiform layers and the inner retina. It was also observed that FMRP is down-regulated by 24 h dark adaptation compared to its expression in the retina of animals that were exposed to light for 1 h after 24 h in the dark. We conclude that FMRP is likely to participate in retinal physiology, since its expression changes with light exposure. In addition, the expression pattern and regulation by light of FMRP seems well conserved since it was similar in both mouse and chick. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Divergence of Central and Peripheral Neural Retina Precursors During Vertebrate Eye Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. PMID:25329498

  2. Early divergence of central and peripheral neural retina precursors during vertebrate eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Sara J; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-03-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body, and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra; Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver; Münter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2011-01-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  4. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  5. Characterization of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 7 (FABP7) in the Murine Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xinyi; Tan, Queenie S W; Parikh, Bhav H; Tan, Alison; Mehta, Milan N; Sia Wey, Yeo; Tun, Sai Bo Bo; Li, Ling-Jun; Han, Xiao-Yan; Wong, Tien Y; Hunziker, Walter; Luu, Chi D; Owada, Yuji; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Zhang, Samuel S; Chaurasia, Shyam S

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the mouse retina lacking fatty acid binding protein (FABP7-/-). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in 8-week-old mice to localize FABP7 in the retina. Retinal thickness was measured using image-guided spectral-domain optical coherence topography images. Electroretinography was carried out to assess retinal function. Fundus photography and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed on FABP7-/- and littermate wild-type (WT) mice, and retinal vascular changes were calculated using Singapore I Vessel Assessment (SIVA) analysis. Blood glucose levels were measured in the 8-week-old WT and FABP7-/- mice. In addition, retina was processed for trypsin digestion and retinal flat mounts for isolectin staining. Transcript levels of FABP7, VEGF, GFAP, and Na+K+ATPase were quantified using real-time PCR, and protein expression was analyzed by IHC and Western blot. Fatty acid binding protein 7 is expressed in the inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer, and photoreceptor inner segments. No significant difference in retinal thickness and ERG responses was observed between FABP7-deficient and WT retinas. FABP7-/- mice have significantly decreased retinal venular caliber retinal arteriolar fractal dimension compared with WT littermates. FABP7-/- mice showed significant increased areas of fluorescein leakage in the retina. FABP7-/- mice exhibited elevated high blood glucose levels compared with WT mice. Trypsin digested FABP7-/- mice retina showed increased acellular strands and endothelial cell drop outs, and reduced microvasculature branching compared with WT retina. FABP7-/- mice retina also have increased GFAP and VEGF expression. Fatty acid binding protein 7 is expressed in the retina and might play an important role in maintaining retinal vasculature.

  6. M-Type Pyruvate Kinase Isoforms and Lactate Dehydrogenase A in the Mammalian Retina: Metabolic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Robert J; Wood, John P M; Han, Guoge; Kittipassorn, Thaksaon; Peet, Daniel J; Chidlow, Glyn

    2016-01-01

    Like cancer cells, photoreceptor cells produce lactate aerobically, requiring lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A). Cancer cells also use glycolytic intermediates for biosynthesis. The molecular switch controlling glycolytic flow is thought to be an isoenzyme of pyruvate kinase (PKM2). Here, we determined the expression and localization of PKM2 and LDH-A in mammalian retina and make comparisons with the brain. Single- and double-labeling immunohistochemistry for PKM2, pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1), and LDH-A were performed using retinal sections from C57BL/6 mice, Sprague-Dawley rats, rabbits, marmosets, and humans. Pyruvate kinase M1 and PKM2 mRNA and protein expression levels were quantified in rodent retina and brain by using qPCR and immunoblotting. The quaternary forms of PKM2 in rat retina were also determined. Pyruvate kinase M2 was present in some glial cells and rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina of all species but was exclusively localized to glia in the brain. Pyruvate kinase M1 was confined to neurons in the retina and brain. Lactate dehydrogenase A was principally found in photoreceptors and inner portion of the avascular rabbit retina. Western blotting and qPCR confirmed high levels of PKM2 and LDH-A in the retina. There was a 6- to 9-fold greater expression of PKM2 mRNA in the rodent retina than in the brain. Both the dimeric (inactive, biosynthesis-driving form) and the active tetrameric (glycolytic-driving) forms of PKM2 were present in retina but not in brain. Mammalian photoreceptors contain dimeric and tetrameric PKM2 and LDH-A. This is consistent with the ability to switch between energy production and biosynthesis like a proliferating tissue, possibly due to demands of opsin synthesis.

  7. Assembly of the outer retina in the absence of GABA synthesis in horizontal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Edward

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA not only modulates excitability in the mature nervous system but also regulates neuronal differentiation and circuit development. Horizontal cells, a subset of interneurons in the outer retina, are transiently GABAergic during the period of cone photoreceptor synaptogenesis. In rodents, both horizontal cells and cone axonal terminals express GABAA receptors. To explore the possibility that transient GABA expression in mouse neonatal horizontal cells influences the structural development of synaptic connectivity in the outer retina, we examined a mutant in which expression of GAD67, the major synthesizing enzyme for GABA, is selectively knocked out in the retina. Results Immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy revealed that the assembly of triad synapses involving cone axonal pedicles and the dendrites of horizontal and bipolar cells is unaffected in the mutant retina. Moreover, loss of GABA synthesis in the outer retina did not perturb the spatial distributions and cell densities of cones and horizontal cells. However, there were some structural alterations at the cellular level: the average size of horizontal cell dendritic clusters was larger in the mutant, and there was also a small but significant increase in cone photoreceptor pedicle area. Moreover, metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6 receptors on the dendrites of ON bipolar cells occupied a slightly larger proportion of the cone pedicle in the mutant. Conclusions Together, our analysis shows that transient GABA synthesis in horizontal cells is not critical for synapse assembly and axonal and dendritic lamination in the outer retina. However, pre- and postsynaptic structures are somewhat enlarged in the absence of GABA in the developing outer retina, providing for a modest increase in potential contact area between cone photoreceptors and their targets. These findings differ from previous results

  8. Animal-vegetal asymmetries influence the earliest steps in retina fate commitment in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K B; Moody, S A

    1999-08-01

    An individual retina descends from a restricted and invariant group of nine animal blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. We tested which molecular signaling pathways are responsible for the competence of animal blastomeres to contribute to the retina. Inactivation of activin/Vg1 or fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling by expression of dominant-negative receptors does not prevent an animal blastomere from contributing to the retina. However, increasing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in the retina-producing blastomeres significantly reduces their contribution. Conversely, reducing BMP signaling by expression of a dominant-negative BMP receptor or Noggin allows other animal blastomeres to contribute to the retina. Thus, the initial step in the retinal lineage is regulated by position within the BMP/Noggin field of epidermal versus neural induction. Vegetal tier blastomeres, in contrast, cannot contribute to the retina even when given access to the appropriate position and signaling fields by transplantation to the dorsal animal pole. We tested whether expression of molecules within the mesoderm inducing (activin, FGF), mesoderm-modifying (Wnt), or neural-inducing (BMP, Noggin) pathways impart a retinal fate on vegetal cell descendants. None of these, several of which induce secondary head structures, caused vegetal cells to contribute to retina. This was true even if the injected blastomeres were transplanted to the dorsal animal pole. Two pathways that specifically induce head tissues also were investigated. The simultaneous blockade of Wnt and BMP signaling, which results in the formation of a complete secondary axis with head and eyes, did not cause the vegetal clone to give rise to retina. However, Cerberus, a secreted protein that also induces an ectopic head with eyes, redirected vegetal progeny into the retina. These experiments indicate that vegetal blastomere incompetence to express a retinal fate is not due to a lack of components of known

  9. Temperature rise and tissue damage in the primate retina from argon laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polhamus, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    Temperatures from argon laser irradiation were measured in vivo in Macaca mulatta retinae for exposure durations .002s to 100s with a microthermocouple probe specially designed for measuring transient tissue temperatures. Measured temperatures were compared to predicted temperatures from a mathematical model of temperature for the retina and choroid. Radiant energy levels required to produce retinal lesions were determined by both ophthalmoscopic and microscopic examination of the ocular fundus. Temperatures associated with retinal lesion formation were measured, for macular and paramacular exposures. Measured temperatures were used to improve a rate process model for predicting thermal damage to the retina

  10. Simulation and performance of an artificial retina for 40 MHz track reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Abba, A.; Citterio, M.; Caponio, F.; Cusimano, A.; Geraci, A.; Marino, P.; Morello, M.J.; Neri, N.; Punzi, G.; Piucci, A.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.

    2015-03-05

    We present the results of a detailed simulation of the artificial retina pattern-recognition algorithm, designed to reconstruct events with hundreds of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon detectors at LHCb with LHC crossing frequency of 40MHz. The detailed geometry and charged-particle activity of a large tracking detector are simulated and used to assess the performance of the artificial retina algorithm. Excellent performances have been found for the retina pattern-recognition algorithm, comparable with the full LHCb reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Distribution of CGRP and its receptor components CLR and RAMP1 in the rat retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Frank W; Radziwon-Balicka, Aneta; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    (RAMP1). While there is a growing recognition that CGRP plays a key role in migraine, the function of CGRP in the retina has not been fully established. This study aims to investigate the distribution of CGRP and its two receptor components in the rat retina, visually by immunohistochemistry...... and quantitatively using flow cytometry. CGRP immunoreactivity was found in the Müller cells while CLR/RAMP1 was located in the nerve fiber layer. Furthermore, since almost all RAMP1 immunoreactive cells co-express CLR, we propose that RAMP1 expression in the retina reflects functional CGRP receptors....

  12. Mass spectrometric identification and quantification of 5-methoxytryptophol in quail retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.W.; Chan, S.F.; Lee, P.P.; Pang, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of 5-methoxytryptophol (5-MTL) in the quail retina was investigated by capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/selected ion monitoring using a deuterated internal standard. Based on ion intensity ratios in the mass spectra of pentafluoropropionyl and heptafluorobutyryl derivatives of 5-MTL and deuterated 5-MTL, 5-MTL was unequivocally identified in the quail retina. Similar to the circadian rhythm of retinal melatonin, retinal 5-MTL also exhibited a diurnal variation with high levels at mid-dark. However, no significant correlation between the diurnal levels of 5-MTL and melatonin was observed in the quail retina at mid-light or mid-dark

  13. Semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube biomimetic films for wire-free photostimulation of blind retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareket, Lilach; Waiskopf, Nir; Rand, David; Lubin, Gur; David-Pur, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Jacob; Roy, Soumyendu; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Banin, Uri; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-12

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications.

  14. Dual-path handheld system for cornea and retina imaging using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Kim, Pilun; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    A dual-path handheld system is proposed for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The handheld sample arm is designed to acquire two images simultaneously. Both eyes of a person can be imaged at the same time to obtain the images of the cornea of one eye and the retina of the other eye. Cornea, retina, and optic disc images are acquired with the proposed sample arm. Experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of this system for imaging of different eye segments. This system reduces the time required for imaging of the two eyes and is cost effective.

  15. Organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina followed by particle-mediated acute gene transfer in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Moritoh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina with an acute gene transfer that enables the efficient introduction of variable transgenes would greatly facilitate studies into retinas of adult rodents as animal models. However, it has been a difficult challenge to culture adult rodent retina. The purpose of this present study was to develop organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina followed by particle-mediated acute gene transfer in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an interphase organotypic tissue culture for adult rat retinas (>P35 of age which was optimized from that used for adult rabbit retinas. We implemented three optimizations: a greater volume of Ames' medium (>26 mL per retina, a higher speed (constant 55 rpm of agitation by rotary shaker, and a greater concentration (10% of horse serum in the medium. We also successfully applied this method to adult mouse retina (>P35 of age. The organotypic tissue culture allowed us to keep adult rodent retina morphologically and structurally intact for at least 4 days. However, mouse retinas showed less viability after 4-day culture. Electrophysiologically, ganglion cells in cultured rat retina were able to generate action potentials, but exhibited less reliable light responses. After transfection of EGFP plasmids by particle-mediated acute gene transfer, we observed EGFP-expressing retinal ganglion cells as early as 1 day of culture. We also introduced polarized-targeting fusion proteins such as PSD95-GFP and melanopsin-EYFP (hOPN4-EYFP into rat retinal ganglion cells. These fusion proteins were successfully transferred into appropriate locations on individual retinal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This organotypic culture method is largely applicable to rat retinas, but it can be also applied to mouse retinas with a caveat regarding cell viability. This method is quite flexible for use in acute gene transfection in adult rodent retina, replacing

  16. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  17. Starburst amacrine cells express parvalbumin but not calbindin and calretinin in rabbit retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Shil; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2013-11-13

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) are important components in calcium-mediated cellular signal transduction. Among the many CBPs, at least three EF-hand CBPs, calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV), have been extensively studied in the retina. In the present study, we investigated the expression patterns of these three CBPs in cholinergic starburst amacrine cells (SACs), which are the most important element for direction selectivity in the rabbit retina. Double-label immunocytochemical analysis of vibratome sections and single-cell injection after immunocytochemical analysis on whole mounts were carried out in rabbit retinas. We found that all SACs in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer contained PV. However, none of the SACs in the inner nuclear layer or ganglion cell layer contained either CB or CR. These results suggest that PV, but not CR or CB, may act as a calcium-buffering protein in the SACs of the rabbit retina.

  18. Multi-functional optical coherence tomography imaging of spontaneous neovascularization in the mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Marco; Wechdorn, Matthias; Pfeiffenberger, Ulrike; Fialová, Stanislava; Werkmeister, René M.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Baumann, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    A multi-functional OCT approach is used to identify different tissue types during the early development of spontaneous neovascularizations in the mouse retina based on their intrinsic optical properties.

  19. Cell proliferation after laser photocoagulation in primate retina. An autoradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiddy, W E; Fine, S L; Quigley, H A; Dunkelberger, G; Hohman, R M; Addicks, E M

    1986-07-01

    Argon blue-green laser and krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation were applied to primate retinas at intervals ranging from two to 23 days before the animals were killed. An injection of tritiated thymidine was given intravitreally three days before death. Argon blue-green laser photocoagulation induced cell proliferation in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium seven days after treatment, with quiescence at 23 days. Krypton red laser photocoagulation induced similar cell proliferation not only in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium but also around choroidal vessels and in the stroma of the choroid. Peak thymidine uptake occurred seven days after KRL treatment. There was less uptake at two and 11 days and no uptake at 23 days. Thymidine uptake in the retina and choroid also was detected with low levels of KRL treatment. True cell hyperplasia (cell division) occurred after laser treatment; only KRL treatment induced cellular reaction in the choroid.

  20. Frequency spectrum might act as communication code between retina and visual cortex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Gong, Bo; Lu, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore changes and possible communication relationship of local potential signals recorded simultaneously from retina and visual cortex I (V1). Fourteen C57BL/6J mice were measured with pattern electroretinogram (PERG) and pattern visually evoked potential (PVEP) and fast Fourier transform has been used to analyze the frequency components of those signals. The amplitude of PERG and PVEP was measured at about 36.7 µV and 112.5 µV respectively and the dominant frequency of PERG and PVEP, however, stay unchanged and both signals do not have second, or otherwise, harmonic generation. The results suggested that retina encodes visual information in the way of frequency spectrum and then transfers it to primary visual cortex. The primary visual cortex accepts and deciphers the input visual information coded from retina. Frequency spectrum may act as communication code between retina and V1.

  1. The organization of melanopsin-immunoreactive cells in microbat retina.

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    Mi-Jin Jeong

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs respond to light and play roles in non-image forming vision, such as circadian rhythms, pupil responses, and sleep regulation, or image forming vision, such as processing visual information and directing eye movements in response to visual clues. The purpose of the present study was to identify the distribution, types, and proportion of melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR cells in the retina of a nocturnal animal, i.e., the microbat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. Three types of melanopsin-IR cells were observed in the present study. The M1 type had dendritic arbors that extended into the OFF sublayer of the inner plexiform layer (IPL. M1 soma locations were identified either in the ganglion cell layer (GCL, M1c; 21.00% or in the inner nuclear layer (INL, M1d; 5.15%. The M2 type had monostratified dendrites in the ON sublayer of the IPL and their cell bodies lay in the GCL (M2; 5.79%. The M3 type was bistratified cells with dendrites in both the ON and OFF sublayers of the IPL. M3 soma locations were either in the GCL (M3c; 26.66% or INL (M3d; 4.69%. Additionally, some M3c cells had curved dendrites leading up towards the OFF sublayer of the IPL and down to the ON sublayer of the IPL (M3c-crv; 7.67%. Melanopsin-IR cells displayed a medium soma size and medium dendritic field diameters. There were 2-5 primary dendrites and sparsely branched dendrites with varicosities. The total number of the neurons in the GCL was 12,254.17 ± 660.39 and that of the optic nerve axons was 5,179.04 ± 208.00 in the R. ferrumequinum retina. The total number of melanopsin-IR cells was 819.74 ± 52.03. The ipRGCs constituted approximately 15.83% of the total RGC population. This study demonstrated that the nocturnal microbat, R. ferrumequinum, has a much higher density of melanopsin-IR cells than documented in diurnal animals.

  2. Adenosine as a signaling molecule in the retina: biochemical and developmental aspects

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    ROBERTO PAES-DE-CARVALHO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The nucleoside adenosine plays an important role as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system, including the retina. In the present paper we review compelling evidence showing that adenosine is a signaling molecule in the developing retina. In the chick retina, adenosine transporters are present since early stages of development before the appearance of adenosine A1 receptors modulating dopamine-dependent adenylate cyclase activity or A2 receptors that directly activate the enzyme. Experiments using retinal cell cultures revealed that adenosine is taken up by specific cell populations that when stimulated by depolarization or neurotransmitters such as dopamine or glutamate, release the nucleoside through calcium-dependent transporter-mediated mechanisms. The presence of adenosine in the extracellular medium and the long-term activation of adenosine receptors is able to regulate the survival of retinal neurons and blocks glutamate excitoxicity. Thus, adenosine besides working as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the mature retina, is considered as an important signaling molecule during retinal development having important functions such as regulation of neuronal survival and differentiation.O nucleosídeo adenosina apresenta um importante papel como neurotransmissor ou neuromodulador no sistema nervoso central, inclusive na retina. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão das evidências que mostram que a adenosina é uma molécula sinalizadora na retina em desenvolvimento. Na retina de pinto, transportadores de adenosina estão presentes desde estágios precoces do desenvolvimento, antes do aparecimento dos receptores A1 que modulam a atividade adenilato ciclase dependente de dopamina ou dos receptores A2 que ativam diretamente a enzima. Experimentos usando culturas de células de retina revelaram que a adenosina é captada por populações celulares específicas que, quando estimuladas por despolarização ou por

  3. An alternative pathway for signal flow from rod photoreceptors to ganglion cells in mammalian retina.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, S H; Baylor, D A

    1995-01-01

    Rod signals in the mammalian retina are thought to reach ganglion cells over the circuit rod-->rod depolarizing bipolar cell-->AII amacrine cell-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. A possible alternative pathway involves gap junctions linking the rods and cones, the circuit being rod-->cone-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. It is not clear whether this second pathway indeed relays rod signals to ganglion cells. We studied signal flow in the isolated rabbit retina with a multielectrode...

  4. Distribution of [35S] taurine in mouse retina after intravitreal and intravascular injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourcho, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of [ 35 S] taurine in mouse retinae was studied by autoradiographic techniques after either intravitreal or intravascular injection. The route of injection did not affect the final localization. The major sites of label accumulation were the outer nuclear layer, the inner nuclear layer, and Mueller cell processes adjacent to the vitreal surface. The distribution was consistent with the interpretation that taurine was localized within two cellular compartments of mouse retina, photoreceptor cells and Mueller cells. (author)

  5. Non-viral siRNA delivery into the mouse retina in vivo

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    Zoidl Georg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing in the retina using RNA interference could open broad possibilities for functional studies of genes in vivo and for therapeutic interventions in eye disorders. Therefore, there is a considerable demand for protocols to deliver siRNA into the vertebrate retina. In this work we explored a possibility to deliver synthetic 21 bp siRNA into the mouse retina after intravitreal application using a non-viral carrier. Methods Fluorescently labelled synthetic 21 bp siRNA duplex was combined with Transit-TKO transfection reagent and injected intravitreally into adult mice eyes. Eyes cryostat sections and whole mount retinas were prepared 24-48 h post-injection, stained with either Hoechst 33342 (cell nuclei or immunostained with anti-GFAP antibody (astroglia cells marker. Distribution of fluorescent siRNA signal in the retina was investigated. Results Single intravitreal injection of as little as 5 ng of siRNA combined with Transit-TKO transfection reagent by a modified protocol provided robust and non-toxic delivery of the siRNA into the retina. However, siRNA accumulation was predominantly confined to ganglion cells layer as analysed 24 h post-injection. Furthermore, siRNA containing particles were localized along GFAP cytoskeleton of retinal astroglial cells hinting on intracellular localization of the siRNA Conclusions In this work we demonstrated that siRNA can be efficiently delivered into the vertebrate retina in vivo with low-toxicity using a non-viral carrier, specifically Transit-TKO transfection reagent. However, the capacity of siRNA delivered by our protocol to induce gene silencing in the retina has to be further evaluated. Our report could raise a closer look on Transit-TKO transfection reagent as a promising siRNA carrier in vivo and be of interest for the researchers and companies who work on development of ocular RNAi techniques.

  6. Defects in the outer limiting membrane are associated with rosette development in the Nrl-/- retina.

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    Michael W Stuck

    Full Text Available The neural retinal leucine zipper (Nrl knockout mouse is a widely used model to study cone photoreceptor development, physiology, and molecular biology in the absence of rods. In the Nrl(-/- retina, rods are converted into functional cone-like cells. The Nrl(-/- retina is characterized by large undulations of the outer nuclear layer (ONL commonly known as rosettes. Here we explore the mechanism of rosette development in the Nrl(-/- retina. We report that rosettes first appear at postnatal day (P8, and that the structure of nascent rosettes is morphologically distinct from what is seen in the adult retina. The lumen of these nascent rosettes contains a population of aberrant cells protruding into the subretinal space that induce infolding of the ONL. Morphologically adult rosettes do not contain any cell bodies and are first detected at P15. The cells found in nascent rosettes are photoreceptors in origin but lack inner and outer segments. We show that the adherens junctions between photoreceptors and Müller glia which comprise the retinal outer limiting membrane (OLM are not uniformly formed in the Nrl(-/- retina and thus allow protrusion of a population of developing photoreceptors into the subretinal space where their maturation becomes delayed. These data suggest that the rosettes of the Nrl(-/- retina arise due to defects in the OLM and delayed maturation of a subset of photoreceptors, and that rods may play an important role in the proper formation of the OLM.

  7. The ciliary margin zone of the mammalian retina generates retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Wang, Qing; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Herrera, Eloisa; Mason, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live-imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. As Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2−/− mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2+ cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. PMID:28009286

  8. The Ciliary Margin Zone of the Mammalian Retina Generates Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Wang, Qing; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M Elizabeth; Mason, Carol; Herrera, Eloisa

    2016-12-20

    The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. Because Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2 -/- mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2 + cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  10. Vascular changes in the developing rat retina in response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Sivakumar, Viswanathan; Foulds, Wallace S; Ling, Eng Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the roles of tight junction (TJ) proteins and other factors in the increased permeability of the blood retinal barrier (BRB) affecting the immature neonatal retina following a hypoxic insult. The expression of endothelial TJ proteins such as claudin-5, occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and endothelial cell specific molecule-1 (ESM-1), and associated structural changes in the blood vessels were analyzed in the retinas of 1-day-old Wistar rats subjected to hypoxia for 2 h and subsequently sacrificed at different time points ranging from 3 h to 14 d. The mRNA and protein expression of claudin-5, occludin & ZO-1 was found to be reduced in the hypoxic retina, although, at the ultrastructural level, the TJ between the endothelial cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells appeared to be intact. Following the hypoxic insult vascular endothelial cells frequently showed presence of cytoplasmic vacuoles, vacuolated mitochondria and multivesicular aggregations projecting into the lumen of the capillaries. The expression of ESM-1 in the immature retinas was found to be increased following hypoxic exposure. The structural and molecular changes in the hypoxic neonatal retinas were consistent with a hypoxia induced impairment of the BRB. Hypoxia reduced the expression of TJ proteins in the neonatal retina, but the role of increased ESM-1 expression in this process warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cholesterol in mouse retina originates primarily from in situ de novo biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Joseph B; Mast, Natalia; Bederman, Ilya R; Li, Yong; Brunengraber, Henri; Björkhem, Ingemar; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-02-01

    The retina, a thin tissue in the back of the eye, has two apparent sources of cholesterol: in situ biosynthesis and cholesterol available from the systemic circulation. The quantitative contributions of these two cholesterol sources to the retinal cholesterol pool are unknown and have been determined in the present work. A new methodology was used. Mice were given separately deuterium-labeled drinking water and chow containing 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol. In the retina, the rate of total cholesterol input was 21 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day, of which 15 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day was provided by local biosynthesis and 6 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day was uptaken from the systemic circulation. Thus, local cholesterol biosynthesis accounts for the majority (72%) of retinal cholesterol input. We also quantified cholesterol input to mouse brain, the organ sharing important similarities with the retina. The rate of total cerebral cholesterol input was 121 μg of cholesterol/g brain • day with local biosynthesis providing 97% of total cholesterol input. Our work addresses a long-standing question in eye research and adds new knowledge to the potential use of statins (drugs that inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis) as therapeutics for age-related macular degeneration, a common blinding disease. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

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    Ciro Bonetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  13. Characteristic Parameters of MTF of the Retina-Brain System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixin, Zeng; Shisu, Chen

    2005-01-01

    [Objective] To search parameters characterizing the MTF curve of retina-brain system of the human eye for distinguishing eye disease use. [Method] Suppose the MTF can be expressed by (for symmetric MTF) or (for asymmetric MTF). Let y=ln(MTF), x=lnf, the above formula can be transformed into y=k1x+... (for symmetric MTF) or y=k1'x+...(for asymmetric MTF).Parameters kis(or ki's) are determined by curve fitting from experimental data and used as discriminating indices to indicate various eye diseases. The effectivity of the curve fitting is evaluated by F test.[Result] The fitting parameters and the peak frequencies, fc, of MTF for normal eyes and eyes with diseases are shown in table 1 with corresponding F value and F value under 0.01 confidence level. The experimental data are taken from Wang's paper for normal eyes, and Fang's paper for eyes with diseases.[Conclusion] It seems that the parameters kis (or ki's) can be used as the indices to distinguish eye diseases because they are remarkably different for normal and various eye diseases. In curve fitting, there are reasons to use cubic equations for symmetric MTF (as in the case of cataracts) and quadratic equation for asymmetric MTF (as in the case of amblyopia).

  14. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  15. Transcriptome analysis for UVB-induced phototoxicity in mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Mi-Jin; Kim, Chul-Hong; Nam, Gyu-You; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Rhee, Sangmyung; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, Jung-Woong

    2018-01-01

    Throughout life, the human eye is continuously exposed to sunlight and artificial lighting. Ambient light exposure can lead to visual impairment and transient or permanent blindness. To mimic benign light stress conditions, Mus musculus eyes were exposed to low-energy UVB radiation, ensuring no severe morphological changes in the retinal structure post-exposure. We performed RNA-seq analysis to reveal the early transcriptional changes and key molecular pathways involved before the activation of the canonical cell death pathway. RNA-seq analysis identified 537 genes that were differentially modulated, out of which 126 were clearly up regulated (>2-fold, P retina. Gene ontology analysis revealed that UVB exposure affected pathways for cellular stress and signaling (eg, Creb3, Ddrgk1, Grin1, Map7, Uqcc2, Uqcrb), regulation of chromatin and gene expression (eg, Chd5, Jarid2, Kat6a, Smarcc2, Sumo1, Zfp84), transcription factors (eg, Asxl2, Atf7, Per1, Phox2a, Rxra), RNA processing, and neuronal genes (eg, B4gal2, Drd1, Grm5, Rnf40, Rnps1, Usp39, Wbp4). The differentially expressed genes from the RNA-seq analysis were validated by quantitative PCR. Both analyses yielded similar gene expression patterns. The genes and pathways identified here improve the understanding of early transcriptional responses to UVB irradiation. They may also help in elucidating the genes responsible for the inherent susceptibility of humans to UVB-induced retinal diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Islet-1 Immunoreactivity in the Developing Retina of Xenopus laevis

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    Guadalupe Álvarez-Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet1 (Isl1 has been widely used as a marker of neuronal differentiation in the developing visual system of different classes of vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. In the present study, we analyzed the spatial and temporal distribution of Isl1-immunoreactive cells during Xenopus laevis retinal development and its relation to the formation of the retinal layers, and in combination with different markers of cell differentiation. The earliest Isl1 expression appeared at St29-30 in the cell nuclei of sparse differentiating neuroblasts located in the vitreal surface of the undifferentiated retina. At St35-36, abundant Isl1-positive cells accumulated at the vitreal surface of the neuroepithelium. As development proceeded and through the postmetamorphic juveniles, Isl1 expression was identified in subpopulations of ganglion cells and in subsets of amacrine, bipolar, and horizontal cells. These data together suggest a possible role for Isl1 in the early differentiation and maintenance of different retinal cell types, and Isl1 can serve as a specific molecular marker for the study of retinal cell specification in X. laevis.

  17. Lattice degeneration of the retina and retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semes, L P

    1992-01-01

    Lattice retinal degeneration is considered the most significant peripheral retinal disorder potentially predisposing to retinal breaks and retinal detachment. Lattice degeneration affects the vitreous and inner retinal layers with secondary changes as deep as the retinal pigment epithelium and perhaps the choriocapillaris. Variations in clinical appearance are the rule; geographically, lattice lesions favor the vertical meridians between the equator and the ora serrata. Lattice degeneration begins early in life and has been reported in sequential generations of the same family. Along with its customary bilateral occurrence, lattice shares other characteristics of a dystrophy. The association between the vitreous and retina in lattice lesions may be responsible for the majority of lattice-induced retinal detachments. The tumultuous event of posterior vitreous separation in the presence of abnormally strong vitreoretinal adherence is the trigger for a retinal tear that, in turn, may lead to retinal detachment. Although retinal holes in young patients with lattice degeneration may play a role in the evolution of retinal detachment, the clinical course of lattice degeneration seems to be one of dormancy rather than of progressive change. This discussion outlines the pathophysiology of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship of pathophysiology to clinical presentation. The epidemiology of lattice degeneration is summarized, as are the possible precursors to retinal detachment. A clinical characterization of the natural history of lattice degeneration is offered, and interventions for complications are described. To conclude, management strategies from a primary-care standpoint are reviewed.

  18. Neural retina identity is specified by lens-derived BMP signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Tanushree; Jidigam, Vijay K; Patthey, Cedric; Gunhaga, Lena

    2015-05-15

    The eye has served as a classical model to study cell specification and tissue induction for over a century. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the induction and maintenance of eye-field cells, and the specification of neural retina cells are poorly understood. Moreover, within the developing anterior forebrain, how prospective eye and telencephalic cells are differentially specified is not well defined. In the present study, we have analyzed these issues by manipulating signaling pathways in intact chick embryo and explant assays. Our results provide evidence that at blastula stages, BMP signals inhibit the acquisition of eye-field character, but from neural tube/optic vesicle stages, BMP signals from the lens are crucial for the maintenance of eye-field character, inhibition of dorsal telencephalic cell identity and specification of neural retina cells. Subsequently, our results provide evidence that a Rax2-positive eye-field state is not sufficient for the progress to a neural retina identity, but requires BMP signals. In addition, our results argue against any essential role of Wnt or FGF signals during the specification of neural retina cells, but provide evidence that Wnt signals together with BMP activity are sufficient to induce cells of retinal pigment epithelial character. We conclude that BMP activity emanating from the lens ectoderm maintains eye-field identity, inhibits telencephalic character and induces neural retina cells. Our findings link the requirement of the lens ectoderm for neural retina specification with the molecular mechanism by which cells in the forebrain become specified as neural retina by BMP activity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in Microglia of the Developing Quail Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A.; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M.; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  20. Requirement for Microglia for the Maintenance of Synaptic Function and Integrity in the Mature Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Zhang, Jun; Fariss, Robert N; Ma, Wenxin; Kretschmer, Friedrich; Wang, Minhua; Qian, Hao Hua; Badea, Tudor C; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Gan, Wen-Biao; Roger, Jerome E; Wong, Wai T

    2016-03-02

    Microglia, the principal resident immune cell of the CNS, exert significant influence on neurons during development and in pathological situations. However, if and how microglia contribute to normal neuronal function in the mature uninjured CNS is not well understood. We used the model of the adult mouse retina, a part of the CNS amenable to structural and functional analysis, to investigate the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina in a sustained manner using genetic methods. We discovered that microglia are not acutely required for the maintenance of adult retinal architecture, the survival of retinal neurons, or the laminar organization of their dendritic and axonal compartments. However, sustained microglial depletion results in the degeneration of photoreceptor synapses in the outer plexiform layer, leading to a progressive functional deterioration in retinal light responses. Our results demonstrate that microglia are constitutively required for the maintenance of synaptic structure in the adult retina and for synaptic transmission underlying normal visual function. Our findings on constitutive microglial function are relevant in understanding microglial contributions to pathology and in the consideration of therapeutic interventions that reduce or perturb constitutive microglial function. Microglia, the principal resident immune cell population in the CNS, has been implicated in diseases in the brain and retina. However, how they contribute to the everyday function of the CNS is unclear. Using the model of the adult mouse retina, we examined the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina. We found that in the absence of microglia, retinal neurons did not undergo overt cell death or become structurally disorganized in their processes. However, connections between neurons called synapses begin to break down, leading to a decreased ability of the retina to transmit light responses. Our results indicate

  1. Neural retina identity is specified by lens-derived BMP signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Tanushree; Jidigam, Vijay K.; Patthey, Cedric; Gunhaga, Lena

    2015-01-01

    The eye has served as a classical model to study cell specification and tissue induction for over a century. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the induction and maintenance of eye-field cells, and the specification of neural retina cells are poorly understood. Moreover, within the developing anterior forebrain, how prospective eye and telencephalic cells are differentially specified is not well defined. In the present study, we have analyzed these issues by manipulating signaling pathways in intact chick embryo and explant assays. Our results provide evidence that at blastula stages, BMP signals inhibit the acquisition of eye-field character, but from neural tube/optic vesicle stages, BMP signals from the lens are crucial for the maintenance of eye-field character, inhibition of dorsal telencephalic cell identity and specification of neural retina cells. Subsequently, our results provide evidence that a Rax2-positive eye-field state is not sufficient for the progress to a neural retina identity, but requires BMP signals. In addition, our results argue against any essential role of Wnt or FGF signals during the specification of neural retina cells, but provide evidence that Wnt signals together with BMP activity are sufficient to induce cells of retinal pigment epithelial character. We conclude that BMP activity emanating from the lens ectoderm maintains eye-field identity, inhibits telencephalic character and induces neural retina cells. Our findings link the requirement of the lens ectoderm for neural retina specification with the molecular mechanism by which cells in the forebrain become specified as neural retina by BMP activity. PMID:25968316

  2. Analysis of MTHFR, CBS, Glutathione, Taurine, and Hydrogen Sulfide Levels in Retinas of Hyperhomocysteinemic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuezhi; Navneet, Soumya; Wang, Jing; Roon, Penny; Chen, Wei; Xian, Ming; Smith, Sylvia B

    2017-04-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) is implicated in certain retinal neurovascular diseases, although whether it is causative remains uncertain. In isolated ganglion cells (GCs), mild Hhcy induces profound death, whereas retinal phenotypes in Hhcy mice caused by mutations in remethylation (methylene tetrahydrofolatereductase [Mthfr+/-]) or transsulfuration pathways (cystathionine β-synthase [Cbs+/-]) demonstrate mild GC loss and mild vasculopathy. The current work investigated compensation in vivo of one pathway for the other, and, because the transsulfuration pathway yields cysteine necessary for formation of glutathione (GSH), taurine, and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), they were analyzed also. Retinas isolated from wild-type (WT), Mthfr+/-, and Cbs+/- mice (12 and 22 weeks) were analyzed for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and cystathionase (CTH) RNA/protein levels. Retinas were evaluated for levels of reduced:oxidized GSH (GSH:GSSG), Slc7a11 (xCT), taurine, taurine transporter (TAUT), and H2S. Aside from decreased CBS RNA/protein levels in Cbs+/- retinas, there were minimal alterations in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways in the two mutant mice strains. Glutathione and taurine levels in Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- retinas were similar to WT, which may be due to robust levels of xCT and TAUT in mutant retinas. Interestingly, levels of H2S were markedly increased in retinas of Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- mice compared with WT. Ganglion cell loss and vasculopathy observed in Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- mouse retinas may be milder than expected, not because of compensatory increases of enzymes in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways, but because downstream transsulfuration pathway products GSH, taurine, and H2S are maintained at robust levels. Elevation of H2S is particularly intriguing owing to neuroprotective properties reported for this gasotransmitter.

  3. Mechanical spectroscopy of retina explants at the protein level employing nanostructured scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayazur Rahman, S; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zink, Mareike; Mayr, Stefan G

    2016-04-14

    Development of neuronal tissue, such as folding of the brain, and formation of the fovea centralis in the human retina are intimately connected with the mechanical properties of the underlying cells and the extracellular matrix. In particular for neuronal tissue as complex as the vertebrate retina, mechanical properties are still a matter of debate due to their relation to numerous diseases as well as surgery, where the tension of the retina can result in tissue detachment during cutting. However, measuring the elasticity of adult retina wholemounts is difficult and until now only the mechanical properties at the surface have been characterized with micrometer resolution. Many processes, however, such as pathological changes prone to cause tissue rupture and detachment, respectively, are reflected in variations of retina elasticity at smaller length scales at the protein level. In the present work we demonstrate that freely oscillating cantilevers composed of nanostructured TiO2 scaffolds can be employed to study the frequency-dependent mechanical response of adult mammalian retina explants at the nanoscale. Constituting highly versatile scaffolds with strong tissue attachment for long-term organotypic culture atop, these scaffolds perform damped vibrations as fingerprints of the mechanical tissue properties that are derived using finite element calculations. Since the tissue adheres to the nanostructures via constitutive proteins on the photoreceptor side of the retina, the latter are stretched and compressed during vibration of the underlying scaffold. Probing mechanical response of individual proteins within the tissue, the proposed mechanical spectroscopy approach opens the way for studying tissue mechanics, diseases and the effect of drugs at the protein level.

  4. Effect of ozone therapy on cell apoptosis and angiogenesis in retina tissue of diabetic retinopathy rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of ozone therapy on cell apoptosis and angiogenesis in retina tissue of diabetic retinopathy rats. Methods: SD rats were selected as experimental animals and divided into control group, model group and ozone group, and after diabetic models were built, ozone enema was conducted. Retina tissue was collected, TUNEL kits were used to detect the number of apoptotic cells, and Elisa kits were used to detect the contents of nerve damage molecules, angiogenesis-related molecules and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules. Results: The number of apoptotic cells in retina tissue of model group was significantly more than that of control group, and the number of apoptotic cells in retina tissue of ozone group was significantly less than that of model group; NgR, NR2B, ERK1, ERK2, GFAP, VEGF, STAT-3, HIF-1α, Apelin, APJ, PERK, IRE-1α, ATF-6, eIF2α and XBP-1 contents in retina tissue of model group were significantly higher than those of control group, and PEDF content was lower than that of control group; NgR, NR2B, ERK1, ERK2, GFAP, VEGF, STAT-3, HIF-1α, Apelin, APJ, PERK, IRE-1α, ATF-6, eIF2α and XBP-1 contents in retina tissue of ozone group were significantly lower than those of model group, and PEDF content was higher than that of model group. Conclusion: Ozone therapy can reduce the number of apoptotic cells while reduce nerve cell injury and inhibit angiogenesis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in retina tissue of diabetic rats.

  5. Characteristic lesions in mouse retina irradiated with accelerated iron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malachowski, M.J.; Philpott, D.E.; Corbett, R.L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to determine the radiation hazards of HZE particles using the Bevalac, a heavy-ion accelerator at LBL. Our earlier work with helium, carbon, neon, and argon particles, and exposure to rats to HZE particles in space flight demonstrated some deleterious biological effects. TEM studies have shown that some visual cells were missing and dislocated; these were termed channel lesions. Recently obtained is evidence that a single iron HZE particle may affect a series of cells. Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 1, 10, or 25 rad of 590 MeV/amu initial kinetic energy iron particles in groups of 10 animals per dose point. Irradiated and control animals were sacrificed at intervals from one week to two years postirradiation. The eye samples were dehydrated, critical points dried with freon, fractured, and Au-Pd coated for SEM, or plastic embedded, sectioned, and stained for TEM. Additionally, dry fractured samples viewed with the SEM were embedded in plastic, sectioned, and stained for the TEM. Characteristic tunnel shaped lesions were observed with the SEM. Stereo pairs showed tunnels of various lengths up to 100 μm. Light microscopy of serially cut sections from the same material had vacuoles (V) extending the same length. TEM of the same specimen and specimens prepared only for TEM exhibited large vacuoles, greater than or equal to 2 μm, in the inner segment (IS) and outer segment (OS) layers. Severe membrane disruption was found bordering the vacuoles and gross nuclear degeneration (ND) and loose tissue (LT) were seen in the outer nuclear layer (ONL). The number of lesions increased with increasing dose. Microscopy of the control retina failed to demonstrate similar lesions

  6. Endocannabinoids in the Retina: From Marijuana to Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazulla, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), produces numerous beneficial effects, including analgesia, appetite stimulation and nausea reduction, in addition to its psychotropic effects. THC mimics the action of endogenous fatty acid derivatives, referred to as endocannabinoids. The effects of THC and the endocannabinoids are mediated largely by metabotropic receptors that are distributed throughout the nervous and peripheral organ systems. There is great interest in endocannabinoids for their role in neuroplasticity as well as for therapeutic use in numerous conditions, including pain, stroke, cancer, obesity, osteoporosis, fertility, neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and inflammatory diseases, among others. However, there has been relatively far less research on this topic in the eye and retina compared with the brain and other organ systems. The purpose of this review is to introduce the “cannabinergic” field to the retinal community. All of the fundamental work on cannabinoids has been performed in non-retinal preparations, necessitating extensive dependence on this literature for background. Happily, the retinal cannabinoid system has much in common with other regions of the central nervous system. For example, there is general agreement that cannabinoids suppress dopamine release and presynaptically reduce transmitter release from cones and bipolar cells. How these effects relate to light and dark adaptation, receptive field formation, temporal properties of ganglion cells or visual perception are unknown. The presence of multiple endocannabinoids, degradative enzymes with their bioactive metabolites, and receptors provides a broad spectrum of opportunities for basic research and to identify targets for therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:18725316

  7. In vivo imaging of microscopic structures in the rat retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ying; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Wolfe, Robert; Gray, Daniel C.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dubra, Alfredo; Flannery, John G.; Williams, David R.; Porter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The ability to resolve single retinal cells in rodents in vivo has applications in rodent models of the visual system and retinal disease. We have characterized the performance of a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (fAOSLO) that provides cellular and subcellular imaging of rat retina in vivo. Methods Green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in retinal ganglion cells of normal Sprague Dawley rats via intravitreal injections of adeno-associated viral vectors. Simultaneous reflectance and fluorescence retinal images were acquired using the fAOSLO. fAOSLO resolution was characterized by comparing in vivo images with subsequent imaging of retinal sections from the same eyes using confocal microscopy. Results Retinal capillaries and eGFP-labeled ganglion cell bodies, dendrites, and axons were clearly resolved in vivo with adaptive optics (AO). AO correction reduced the total root mean square wavefront error, on average, from 0.30 μm to 0.05 μm (1.7-mm pupil). The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the average in vivo line-spread function (LSF) was ∼1.84 μm, approximately 82% greater than the FWHM of the diffraction-limited LSF. Conclusions With perfect aberration compensation, the in vivo resolution in the rat eye could be ∼2× greater than that in the human eye due to its large numerical aperture (∼0.43). While the fAOSLO corrects a substantial fraction of the rat eye's aberrations, direct measurements of retinal image quality reveal some blur beyond that expected from diffraction. Nonetheless, subcellular features can be resolved, offering promise for using AO to investigate the rodent eye in vivo with high resolution. PMID:19578019

  8. [Comparison of angiofluorography and Heidelberg II retinal tomography of the head of the optic nerve in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Liliana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Dascălu, Ana Maria; Ungureanu, Emil; Panca, Aida; Chivu, Răzvan Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study aims to evaluate how the vascular involvement of the optic disc, emphasised by angiofluorography (AFG), correlates with morphologic lesions observed by Heidelberg retinal tomography (HRT) II. AFG (Visucam Zeiss) and HRT II (with Moorfields regression and keratometry) have been performed on the study group -50 pts. with POAG- and in the control group -25 healthy subjects. Correlations have been calculated with Student (t) and Fisher tests. The value of p<0,05 was considered statistically significant. The number and size of hypo-fluorescent areas are significantly bigger in POAG pts. than in healthy subjects. They correlate with the involvement of retinal nerve fibers and C/D value. In POAG pts., areas of hypo-fluorescence are located mainly on the excavation's walls and the neuroretinal ring. Localization on the excavation's floor is not pathological, since it was also observed in the control group. The vascular involvement shown by angiofluorography significantly correlates with morphologic lesions observed by HRT II.

  9. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyyarikkandy, Muhammed Shafeekh; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne

    2017-11-09

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC) followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association could potentially decrease poultry meat and egg contamination. Hence, this study investigated the efficacy of Lactobacillus delbreuckii sub species bulgaricus (NRRL B548; LD), Lactobacillus paracasei (DUP-13076; LP), and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NRRL B442; LR) in reducing SE, ST, and SH colonization in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages. Additionally, their effect on expression of Salmonella virulence genes essential for cecal colonization and survival in macrophages was evaluated. All three probiotics significantly reduced Salmonella adhesion and invasion in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages ( p < 0.05). Further, the probiotic treatment led to a significant reduction in Salmonella virulence gene expression ( p < 0.05). Results of the study indicate that LD, LP, and LR could potentially be used to control SE, ST, and SH colonization in chicken. However, these observations warrant further in vivo validation.

  10. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Shafeekh Muyyarikkandy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Enteritidis (SE, Salmonella Typhimurium (ST, and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association could potentially decrease poultry meat and egg contamination. Hence, this study investigated the efficacy of Lactobacillus delbreuckii sub species bulgaricus (NRRL B548; LD, Lactobacillus paracasei (DUP-13076; LP, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NRRL B442; LR in reducing SE, ST, and SH colonization in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages. Additionally, their effect on expression of Salmonella virulence genes essential for cecal colonization and survival in macrophages was evaluated. All three probiotics significantly reduced Salmonella adhesion and invasion in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages (p < 0.05. Further, the probiotic treatment led to a significant reduction in Salmonella virulence gene expression (p < 0.05. Results of the study indicate that LD, LP, and LR could potentially be used to control SE, ST, and SH colonization in chicken. However, these observations warrant further in vivo validation.

  11. Treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): establishment of workflow and initial clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Witt, Olaf; Jäkel, Oliver; Kulozik, Andreas E; Debus, Jürgen; Kessel, Kerstin A; Herfarth, Klaus; Jensen, Alexandra; Oertel, Susanne; Blattmann, Claudia; Ecker, Swantje; Hoess, Angelika; Martin, Eike

    2012-01-01

    To report on establishment of workflow and clinical results of particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. We treated 36 pediatric patients (aged 21 or younger) with particle therapy at HIT. Median age was 12 years (range 2-21 years), five patients (14%) were younger than 5 years of age. Indications included pilocytic astrocytoma, parameningeal and orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, skull base and cervical chordoma, osteosarcoma and adenoid-cystic carcinoma (ACC), as well as one patient with an angiofibroma of the nasopharynx. For the treatment of small children, an anesthesia unit at HIT was established in cooperation with the Department of Anesthesiology. Treatment concepts depended on tumor type, staging, age of the patient, as well as availability of specific study protocols. In all patients, particle radiotherapy was well tolerated and no interruptions due to toxicity had to be undertaken. During follow-up, only mild toxicites were observed. Only one patient died of tumor progression: Carbon ion radiotherapy was performed as an individual treatment approach in a child with a skull base recurrence of the previously irradiated rhabdomyosarcoma. Besides this patient, tumor recurrence was observed in two additional patients. Clinical protocols have been generated to evaluate the real potential of particle therapy, also with respect to carbon ions in distinct pediatric patient populations. The strong cooperation between the pediatric department and the department of radiation oncology enable an interdisciplinary treatment and stream-lined workflow and acceptance of the treatment for the patients and their parents

  12. Correlation of structural retinal nerve fibre layer parameters and functional measures using Heidelberg Retinal Tomography and Spectralis spectral domain optical coherence tomography at different levels of glaucoma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaney, John; Healey, Paul R; Lee, Martin; Graham, Stuart L

    2012-11-01

    To compare the structure/function relationship in glaucoma cases at different levels of severity, and with different disc sizes, between the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography and Spectralis spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Retrospective study of glaucoma patients attending a Sydney-based private practice. 169 eyes of 169 patients with a clinical diagnosis of glaucoma. Patients were divided on visual field criteria into early (mean deviation > -4 dB), moderate (-4 dB fibre layer thickness sectoral measurement were calculated. Correlation, as measured by Spearman's rho, between retinal nerve fibre layer measurements and mean threshold scores. Comparison of correlation strengths between the two scanning modalities with analysis of the effect of disease severity and disc size. Both imaging techniques showed only moderate correlations at best. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (global retinal nerve fibre layer Spearman's rho = 0.670, P fibre layer (Spearman's rho = 0.421, P optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fibre layer measurements demonstrated closer correlations to visual field threshold reductions using a structure/function model in varying stages of glaucoma. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. La Biblioteca de la Universidad de Heidelberg y su colección temática especializada de Historia del Arte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effinger, Maria

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available La Biblioteca de la Universidad de Heidelberg participa en el sistema nacional cooperativo de adquisición de libros financiado por la Asociación Alemana de Investigación (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, en adelante DFG. Esta institución financia la construcción de fondos bibliográficos académicos con el doble fin de tejer una red de fuentes de información y hacer que éstas sean accesibles desde cualquier punto de la nación. Más de sesenta de las más eficientes bibliotecas universitarias alemanas participan en este sistema de cooperación. Las colecciones especializadas sed distribuyen de acuerdo con criterios académicos y regionales. La finalidad de este sistema de adquisición cooperativa es construir colecciones temáticas especializadas y comprensivas de recursos impresos y electrónicos y hacerlas accesibles de un modo fácil, pensando en el usuario. La DFG financia la adquisición de la producción completa de las obras más relevantes que se publican en el extranjero, mientras que a las bibliotecas les corresponde el pago de la literatura extranjera más común y de los documentos publicados en Alemania.

  14. Genetic and immunohistochemical analysis of HSPA5 in mouse and human retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R; Wang, XiaoFei; Li, Huiling; Lau, Yin H Chan; Williams, Robert W; Jablonski, Monica M

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor degenerative diseases are among the leading causes of vision loss. Although the causative genetic mutations are often known, mechanisms leading to photoreceptor degeneration remain poorly defined. We have previously demonstrated that the photoreceptor membrane-associated protein XAP-1 antigen is a product of the HSPA5 gene. In this study, we used systems genetic methods, statistical modeling, and immunostaining to identify and analyze candidate genes that modulate Hspa5 expression in the retina. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was used to map the genomic region that regulates Hspa5 in the cross between C57BL/6J X DBA/2J mice (BXD) genetic reference panel. The stepwise refinement of candidate genes was based on expression QTL mapping, gene expression correlation analyses (direct and partial), and analysis of regional sequence variants. The subcellular localization of candidate proteins and HSPA5 in mouse and human retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Differences in the localization of extracellular HSPA5 were assessed between healthy human donor and atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) donor eyes. In the eyes of healthy mice, extracellular HSPA5 was confined to the area around the cone photoreceptor outer segments. Mapping variation in Hspa5 mRNA expression levels in the retina revealed a statistically significant trans -acting expression QTL (eQTL) on Chromosome 2 (Chr 2) and a suggestive locus on Chr 15. Sulf2 on Chr 2 was the strongest candidate gene based on partial correlation analysis, Pearson correlation with Hspa5 , expression levels in the retina, a missense variant in exon 14, and its reported function in the extracellular matrix and interphotoreceptor matrix. SULF2 is localized to the rod and cone photoreceptors in both human and mouse retinas. In human retinas with no pathology, extracellular HSPA5 was localized around many cones within the macular area. In contrast, fewer HSPA5-immunopositive cones were

  15. Genetic and immunohistochemical analysis of HSPA5 in mouse and human retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R.; Wang, XiaoFei; Li, Huiling; Lau, Yin H. Chan; Williams, Robert W.; Jablonski, Monica M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor degenerative diseases are among the leading causes of vision loss. Although the causative genetic mutations are often known, mechanisms leading to photoreceptor degeneration remain poorly defined. We have previously demonstrated that the photoreceptor membrane-associated protein XAP-1 antigen is a product of the HSPA5 gene. In this study, we used systems genetic methods, statistical modeling, and immunostaining to identify and analyze candidate genes that modulate Hspa5 expression in the retina. Methods Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was used to map the genomic region that regulates Hspa5 in the cross between C57BL/6J X DBA/2J mice (BXD) genetic reference panel. The stepwise refinement of candidate genes was based on expression QTL mapping, gene expression correlation analyses (direct and partial), and analysis of regional sequence variants. The subcellular localization of candidate proteins and HSPA5 in mouse and human retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Differences in the localization of extracellular HSPA5 were assessed between healthy human donor and atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) donor eyes. Results In the eyes of healthy mice, extracellular HSPA5 was confined to the area around the cone photoreceptor outer segments. Mapping variation in Hspa5 mRNA expression levels in the retina revealed a statistically significant trans-acting expression QTL (eQTL) on Chromosome 2 (Chr 2) and a suggestive locus on Chr 15. Sulf2 on Chr 2 was the strongest candidate gene based on partial correlation analysis, Pearson correlation with Hspa5, expression levels in the retina, a missense variant in exon 14, and its reported function in the extracellular matrix and interphotoreceptor matrix. SULF2 is localized to the rod and cone photoreceptors in both human and mouse retinas. In human retinas with no pathology, extracellular HSPA5 was localized around many cones within the macular area. In contrast, fewer HSPA5

  16. Nitrosative Stress in the Rat Retina at the Onset of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Ernesto; Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Estrella-Salazar, Luis A; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a multifunctional molecule that can modify proteins via nitrosylation; it can also initiate signaling cascades through the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness, but its pathogenesis is unknown. Multiple mechanisms including oxidative-nitrosative stress have been implicated. Our main goal was to find significant changes in nitric oxide (NO) levels and determine their association with nitrosative stress in the rat retina at the onset of diabetes. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. The possible nitric oxide effects on the rat retina were evaluated by the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d), a specific marker for NO-producing neurons, detected by histochemistry performed on whole retinas and retina sections. Immunohistochemistry was also performed on retina sections for iNOS, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Retinal nitric oxide levels were assessed by measuring total nitrate/nitrite concentrations. Retinal cGMP levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Western blots for nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and oxidized proteins were performed. In the present study, we found increased activity of NADPH-diaphorase and iNOS immunoreactivity in the rat retina at the onset of diabetes; this increase correlated with a remarkable increase in NO levels as early as 7 days after the onset of diabetes. However, cGMP levels were not modified by diabetes, suggesting that NO did not activate its signaling cascade. Even so, Western blots revealed a progressive increase in nitrated proteins at 7 days after diabetes induction. Likewise, positive nitrotyrosine immunolabeling was observed in the photoreceptor layer, ganglion cell layer, inner nuclear layer and some Müller cell processes in the retinas of diabetic rats. In addition, levels of oxidized proteins were increased in the retina early after

  17. Magnetomechanical stress in the human retina and the safety of MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, S.J.; Groch, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have investigated a potential biologic effect on the human retina due to the high-intensity magnetic field used in clinical MR imaging. Isolated frog rod photoreceptor outer segments in aqueous suspension are known to rotate and align parallel to a magnetic field of intensity in the range currently used in MR imagers. Humans exposed to the magnetic field of an MR imager almost certainly experience a small magnetically induced mechanical stress of the retina. The orientation of cone photoreceptors in the human retina can be determined in vivo by psychophysical measurement of the directional sensitivity of the retina, known as the Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE). The authors have investigated whether the magnetomechanical stress on the human retina in the MR imaging environment is great enough to cause observable changes in the SCE. They obtained SCE measurements outside the magnetic field, before and immediately after human subjects were exposed for 1 hour to a 0.5-T magnetic field. No measureable change in retinal directional sensitivity was found with protocol. This result does not preclude the possibility that the SCE could be altered during magnetic field exposure

  18. Benign familial fleck retina: multimodal imaging including optical coherence tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jose Mauricio Botto de Barros; Isaac, David Leonardo Cruvinel; Sardeiro, Tainara; Aquino, Érika; Avila, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    This report presents multimodal imaging of a 27-year-old woman diagnosed with benign familial fleck retina (OMIM 228980), an uncommon disorder. Fundus photographs revealed retinal flecks that affected her post-equatorial retina but spared the macular area. Fundus autofluorescence and infrared imaging demonstrated a symmetrical pattern of yellow-white fleck lesions that affected both eyes. Her full-field electroretinogram and electrooculogram were normal. An optical coherence tomography B-scan was performed for both eyes, revealing increased thickness of the retinal pigmented epithelium leading to multiple small pigmented epithelium detachments. The outer retina remained intact in both eyes. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography with split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation algorithm and 3 × 3 mm structural en face optical coherence tomography did not show macular lesions. Benign familial fleck retina belongs to a heterogenous group of so-called flecked retina syndromes, and should be considered in patients with yellowish-white retinal lesions without involvement of the macula.

  19. Intrinsic lens potential of neural retina inhibited by Notch signaling as the cause of lens transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hideaki; Ishii, Yasuo; Kondoh, Hisato

    2017-01-15

    Embryonic neural retinas of avians produce lenses under spreading culture conditions. This phenomenon has been regarded as a paradigm of transdifferentiation due to the overt change in cell type. Here we elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Retina-to-lens transdifferentiation occurs in spreading cultures, suggesting that it is triggered by altered cell-cell interactions. Thus, we tested the involvement of Notch signaling based on its role in retinal neurogenesis. Starting from E8 retina, a small number of crystallin-expressing lens cells began to develop after 20 days in control spreading cultures. By contrast, addition of Notch signal inhibitors to cultures after day 2 strongly promoted lens development beginning at day 11, and a 10-fold increase in δ-crystallin expression level. After Notch signal inhibition, transcription factor genes that regulate the early stage of eye development, Prox1 and Pitx3, were sequentially activated. These observations indicate that the lens differentiation potential is intrinsic to the neural retina, and this potential is repressed by Notch signaling during normal embryogenesis. Therefore, Notch suppression leads to lens transdifferentiation by disinhibiting the neural retina-intrinsic program of lens development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell type-specific expression of FoxP2 in the ferret and mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Chihiro; Iwai-Takekoshi, Lena; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Although the anatomical and physiological properties of subtypes of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have been extensively investigated, their molecular properties are still unclear. Here, we examined the expression patterns of FoxP2 in the retina of ferrets and mice. We found that FoxP2 was expressed in small subsets of neurons in the adult ferret retina. FoxP2-positive neurons in the ganglion cell layer were divided into two groups. Large FoxP2-positive neurons expressed Brn3a and were retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin subunit B injected into the optic nerve, indicating that they are RGCs. The soma size and the projection pattern of FoxP2-positive RGCs were consistent with those of X cells. Because we previously reported that FoxP2 was selectively expressed in X cells in the ferret lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), our findings indicate that FoxP2 is specifically expressed in the parvocellular pathway from the retina to the LGN. Small FoxP2-positive neurons were positive for GAD65/67, suggesting that they are GABAergic amacrine cells. Most Foxp2-positive cells were RGCs in the adult mouse retina. Dendritic morphological analyses suggested that Foxp2-positive RGCs included direction-selective RGCs in mice. Thus, our findings suggest that FoxP2 is expressed in specific subtypes of RGCs in the retina of ferrets and mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Some indications of structural damage in retina by heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.C.; Hayes, T.L.; Tobias, C.A.; Yang, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac Facility, iron nuclei were accelerated to an energy of 600 MeV/amu. The beam of iron thus obtained was used to irradiate living biological specimens in order to study possible microscopic tissue damage with the aid of SEM. The experiments involved total head irradiation of live rats which were subsequently returned to their cages to remain for 1 day and 30 days before further examination. After the 1 day and 30 day waits, both eyes were enucleated and placed in chemical fixative followed by ethanol dehydration and critical point drying. Retinas were carefully removed from the eye cups and loaded separately on aluminum stubs which were sputter coated. SEM of the 1 day and 30 day retinas revealed lesions which were not found at all in control retinas. The 1 day and 30 day retinas manifest regions where outer rod segments were missing or rearranged. A single energetic iron nucleus may be capable of generating a retinal lesion which becomes enlarged as biological processes intervene during the 1 day and 30 day waits. Being composed of highly specialized nerve cells, retinas cannot regenerate following irradiation which severely damages the rod cells. Thus one would expect the observed radiation induced retinal lesions to correspond to permanent tissue damage and possible loss of visual acuity in the intact animal

  2. Pathways of cholesterol homeostasis in mouse retina responsive to dietary and pharmacologic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenchao; Mast, Natalia; Saadane, Aicha; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    Effects of serum cholesterol on cholesterol content in the retina are currently unknown. It is also unclear how cholesterol levels are controlled in the retina. High-cholesterol diet and oral administrations of simvastatin were used to modulate serum cholesterol in mice. These treatments only modestly affected cholesterol content in the retina and had no significant effect on retinal expression of the major cholesterol- and vision-related genes; the sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway of transcriptional regulation does not seem to be operative in the retina under the experimental conditions used. Evidence is obtained that posttranslational mechanisms play a role in the control of retinal cholesterol. Retinal genes were only upregulated by oral administrations of TO901317 activating liver X receptors. Three of the upregulated genes could be of particular importance (apoD, Idol, and Rpe65) and have not yet been considered in the context of cholesterol homeostasis in the retina. Collectively, the data obtained identify specific features of retinal cholesterol maintenance and suggest additional therapies for age-related macular degeneration, a blinding disease characterized by cholesterol and lipid accumulations in chorioretinal tissues. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Frequency of Toxoplasma gondii in the retina in eye banks in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Deise F; Nascimento, Heloisa; Sutili, Aline; Nobrega, Fernando A J; Fowler, Flavio; Nobrega, Mario Junqueira; Garrido, Cristina; de Oliveira Dias, Janaina; Adán, Consuelo B D; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Silveira, Claudio; Belfort, Rubens; Commodaro, Alessandra G

    2017-07-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is the main cause of posterior uveitis worldwide frequently leading to vision loss. In Brazil, the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection ranges from 50 to 80% depending of the region studied. The frequency of toxoplasmic retinal scar may reach 18% of the adults in the South of Brazil. Our goal was to determine the frequency of T. gondii DNA in retinas from eye banks from different regions in Brazil. A total of 162 eyes were obtained from eye banks in Manaus (n = 60), Sao Paulo (n = 60), Chapeco (n = 26), and Joinville (n = 16). The retinas were macroscopically analyzed and collected for DNA extraction. Real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed using the T. gondii B1 marker. By qPCR, a higher frequency of T. gondii DNA in the retinas from the eye bank of Joinville (25%) was found when compared to Manaus (5%). The retinas from Sao Paulo and Chapeco were qPCR negative. Clinical examination determined the retina lesions to be compatible with toxoplasmosis in the following frequencies: Joinville (62.5%), Manaus (10%), Sao Paulo (6.7%), and Chapeco (15.4%).

  4. The Retinome – Defining a reference transcriptome of the adult mammalian retina/retinal pigment epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz Thomas

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian retina is a valuable model system to study neuronal biology in health and disease. To obtain insight into intrinsic processes of the retina, great efforts are directed towards the identification and characterization of transcripts with functional relevance to this tissue. Results With the goal to assemble a first genome-wide reference transcriptome of the adult mammalian retina, referred to as the retinome, we have extracted 13,037 non-redundant annotated genes from nearly 500,000 published datasets on redundant retina/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE transcripts. The data were generated from 27 independent studies employing a wide range of molecular and biocomputational approaches. Comparison to known retina-/RPE-specific pathways and established retinal gene networks suggest that the reference retinome may represent up to 90% of the retinal transcripts. We show that the distribution of retinal genes along the chromosomes is not random but exhibits a higher order organization closely following the previously observed clustering of genes with increased expression. Conclusion The genome wide retinome map offers a rational basis for selecting suggestive candidate genes for hereditary as well as complex retinal diseases facilitating elaborate studies into normal and pathological pathways. To make this unique resource freely available we have built a database providing a query interface to the reference retinome 1.

  5. HB-EGF is necessary and sufficient for Müller glia dedifferentiation and retina regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jin; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Goldman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Summary Müller glia (MG) dedifferentiation into a cycling population of multipotent progenitors is crucial to zebrafish retina regeneration. The mechanisms underlying MG dedifferentiation are unknown. Here we report that heparin-binding epidermal-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is rapidly induced in MG residing at the injury site and that proHB-EGF ectodomain shedding is necessary for retina regeneration. Remarkably, HB-EGF stimulates the formation of multipotent MG-derived progenitors in the uninjured retina. We show that HB-EGF mediates its effects via an EGFR/MAPK signal transduction cascade that regulates the expression of regeneration-associated genes, like ascl1a and pax6b. We also uncover an HB-EGF/Ascl1a/Notch/hb-egfa signaling loop that helps define the zone of injury-responsive MG. Finally, we show that HB-EGF acts upstream of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade that controls progenitor proliferation. These data provide a link between extracellular signaling and regeneration-associated gene expression in the injured retina and suggest strategies for stimulating retina regeneration in mammals. PMID:22340497

  6. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S.; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P.; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Lambris, John D.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  7. FPGA-Based Real Time, Multichannel Emulated-Digital Retina Model Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Vörösházi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The function of the low-level image processing that takes place in the biological retina is to compress only the relevant visual information to a manageable size. The behavior of the layers and different channels of the neuromorphic retina has been successfully modeled by cellular neural/nonlinear networks (CNNs. In this paper, we present an extended, application-specific emulated-digital CNN-universal machine (UM architecture to compute the complex dynamic of this mammalian retina in video real time. The proposed emulated-digital implementation of multichannel retina model is compared to the previously developed models from three key aspects, which are processing speed, number of physical cells, and accuracy. Our primary aim was to build up a simple, real-time test environment with camera input and display output in order to mimic the behavior of retina model implementation on emulated digital CNN by using low-cost, moderate-sized field-programmable gate array (FPGA architectures.

  8. CELLULAR BASIS FOR ROD-CONE INTERACTIONS IN THE OUTER RETINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Križaj

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. At least twice daily our retinas move between a light adapted, cone-dominated (photopic state and a dark-adapted, color-blind and highly light-sensitive roddominated (scotopic state. In between is a rather ill-defined transitional state called the mesopic state in which retinal circuits express both rod and cone signals. Consequently, in the mesopic state the retinal output to the brain contained in the firing patterns of the ganglion cells consists of information derived from both rod and cone signals. Morphology, physiology and psychophysics all contributed to an understanding that the two systems are not independent but interact extensively via both pooling and mutual inhibition. This review lays down a rationale for such rod-cone interactions in the vertebrate retinas. It suggests that the important functional roles of rod-cone interactions is in that they shorten the duration of the mesopic state. As a result, the retina is maintained in either in the (rod-dominated high sensitivity photon counting mode or in the second mode which emphasizes temporal transients and spatial resolution (the cone-dominated photopic state.Conclusions. Experimental evidence for pre- and postsynaptic mixing of rod and cone signals in the retina is shown together with the preeminent neuromodulatory role of both light and dopamine in controling inter-actions between rod and cone signals. Dopamine is shown to be both necessary and sufficient to mediate light adaptation in the retina.

  9. Early activation of inflammation- and immune response-related genes after experimental detachment of the porcine retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollborn, Margrit; Francke, Mike; Iandiev, Ianors; Bühner, Eva; Foja, Christian; Kohen, Leon; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Uhlmann, Susann

    2008-03-01

    To determine early alterations in retinal gene expression in a porcine model of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Local detachment was created in eyes of adult pigs by subretinal application of sodium hyaluronate. The gene expression in control tissues and retinas detached for 24 hours was analyzed with a pig genome microarray. Genes with at least three-fold expression changes were detected in the detached retina and in the attached retinal tissue surrounding the local detachment in situ. Structural alterations of the retina were examined by light and electron microscopy. Identified were 85 genes that were upregulated and 7 that were downregulated in the detached retina. Twenty-eight genes were identified as upregulated in the nondetached retina of the surgical eyes. The genes upregulated in detached retinas were related to inflammation and immune responses (n = 52), antioxidants and metal homeostasis (n = 7), intracellular proteolysis (n = 6), and blood coagulation/fibrinolysis (n = 4). The upregulation of at least 15 interferon-stimulated genes indicates elevated interferon levels after detachment. Gene expression of blue-sensitive opsin was not detectable in the detached retinal tissue, suggesting an early reduction in phototransduction, especially in blue cones. Electron microscopy revealed an accumulation of microglial cells in the inner retinal tissue and of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the vessels of detached and peridetached retinas. Differentially expressed genes in the retina early after experimental detachment are mainly related to inflammation and immune responses, intracellular proteolysis, and protection against oxidative stress. A local immune and inflammatory response may represent a major causative factor for reactive changes in the retina after detachment. The inflammatory response is not restricted to the detached retina but is also observed in the nondetached retina; this response may underlie functional changes in these regions described in

  10. Wnt signaling in form deprivation myopia of the mice retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation, axonal outgrowth, cellular maintenance in retinas. Here we test the hypothesis that elements of the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in the regulation of eye growth and prevention of myopia, in the mouse form-deprivation myopia model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 One hundred twenty-five C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into form-deprivation myopia and control groups. Form-deprivation myopia (FDM was induced by suturing the right eyelid, while the control group received no treatment. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks of treatment, eyes were assessed in vivo by cycloplegic retinoscopic refraction and axial length measurement by photography or A-scan ultrasonography. Levels of retinal Wnt2b, Fzd5 and β-catenin mRNA and protein were evaluated using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. (2 Another 96 mice were divided into three groups: control, drugs-only, and drugs+FDM (by diffuser. Experimentally treated eyes in the last two groups received intravitreal injections of vehicle or the proteins, DKK-1 (Wnt-pathway antagonist or Norrin (Wnt-pathway agonist, once every three days, for 4 injections total. Axial length and retinoscopic refraction were measured on the 14th day of form deprivation. Following form-deprivation for 1, 2, and 4 weeks, FDM eyes had a relatively myopic refractive error, compared with contralateral eyes. There were no significant differences in refractive error between right and left eye in control group. The amounts of Wnt2b, Fzd5 and β-catenin mRNA and protein were significantly greater in form-deprived myopia eyes than in control eyes.DKK-1 (antagonist reduced the myopic shift in refractive error and increase in axial elongation, whereas Norrin had the opposite effect in FDM eyes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies provide the first evidence that the Wnt2b signaling pathway may play a role in the

  11. Testbeam results of the first real-time embedded tracking system with artificial retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, N., E-mail: nicola.neri@mi.infn.it; Abba, A.; Caponio, F.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fu, J.; Merli, A.; Monti, M.; Petruzzo, M.

    2017-02-11

    We present the testbeam results of the first real-time embedded tracking system based on artificial retina algorithm. The tracking system prototype is capable of fast track reconstruction with a latency of the response below 1 μs and track parameter resolutions that are comparable with the offline results. The artificial retina algorithm was implemented in hardware in a custom data acquisition board based on commercial FPGA. The system was tested successfully using a 180 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN SPS with a maximum track rate of about 280 kHz. Online track parameters were found in good agreement with offline results and with the simulated response. - Highlights: • First real-time tracking system based on artificial retina algorithm tested on beam. • Fast track reconstruction within one microsecond latency and offline like quality. • Fast tracking algorithm implemented in commercial FPGAs.

  12. Operating in the Dark: A Night Vision System for Surgery in Retinas Susceptible to Light Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komáromy, András M.; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2009-01-01

    A standard Zeiss OPMI 6 operating microscope was modified with a bandpass infrared filter in the light path, and infrared image intensifiers for each of the two eye pieces. The aim of the study was to evaluate this system for subretinal injections in normal control and rhodopsin mutant dogs. These dogs are a model for human autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), and their retinas degenerate faster when exposed to modest light levels as used in routine clinical examinations. We showed that the mutant retinas developed severe generalized degeneration when exposed to the standard operating microscope light, but not the infrared light. The modified operating microscope provided excellent view of the ocular fundus under infrared illumination, and allowed us to perform subretinal injections in the rhodopsin mutant dog retinas without any subsequent light-induced retinal degeneration. PMID:18474785

  13. Effect of high potassium on dopamine receptor activity in bovine retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that dopamine released by light caused a subsensitivity of the dopamine receptor was investigated. Bovine eyes were obtained from a slaughterhouse, and retinas were dissected in a dark room. Filter binding assays were developed to measure agonist and antagonist binding to the dopamine receptor using [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]SCH 23390, respectively, in a retinal membrane fraction. Adenylate cyclase activation was measured by the production of [ 32 P]cyclic AMP from 32 ATP. In desensitization experiments, bovine retinas were incubated for fifteen minutes with 56 mM potassium, which also causes a release of dopamine in retinas were washed, and membranes were prepared. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase evoked by dopamine and radiolabeled agonist and antagonist binding were measured. In the receptor binding characterization studies, the dissociation constant and the maximum number of binding sites were obtained for [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]SCH 23390 binding

  14. Isolation of progenitor cells from GFP-transgenic pigs and transplantation to the retina of allorecipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klassen, Henry; Warfvinge, Karin; Schwartz, Philip H

    2008-01-01

    Work in rodents has demonstrated that progenitor transplantation can achieve limited photoreceptor replacement in the mammalian retina; however, replication of these findings on a clinically relevant scale requires a large animal model. To evaluate the ability of porcine retinal progenitor cells...... to survival as allografts and integrate into the host retinal architecture, we isolated donor cells from fetal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic pigs. Cultures were propagated from the brain, retina, and corneo-scleral limbus. GFP expression rapidly increased with time in culture, although lower...... expression in subretinal grafts was high in cells expressing vimentin and lower in cells expressing photoreceptor markers, again consistent with possible downregulation during differentiation. Cells survived transplantation to the injured retina of allorecipients at all time points examined (up to 10 weeks...

  15. The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex localization in mouse retina is independent from dystrophins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Patrice; Estrada, Francisco-Javier; Bordais, Agnès; Mornet, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Rendon, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The sarcoglycan–sarcospan (SG–SSPN) complex is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that has been extensively characterized in muscle. To establish the framework for functional studies of sarcoglycans in retina here, we quantified sarcoglycans mRNA levels with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and performed immunohistochemistry to determine their cellular and subcellular distribution. We showed that the β-, δ-, γ-, ε-sarcoglycans and sarcospan are expressed in mouse retina. They are localized predominantly in the outer and the inner limiting membranes, probably in the Müller cells and also in the ganglion cells axons where the expression of dystrophins have never been reported. We also investigated the status of the sarcoglycans in the retina of mdx3cv mutant mice for all Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene products. The absence of dystrophin did not produce any change in the sarcoglycan–sarcospan components expression and distribution. PMID:15993965

  16. Sobre la terapia génica para enfermedades de la retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M Dominik

    2017-07-11

    Las mutaciones en un gran número de genes provocan degeneración de la retina y ceguera sin que exista actualmente cura alguna. En las últimas décadas, la terapia génica para enfermedades de la retina ha evolucionado y se ha convertido en un nuevo y prometedor paradigma terapéutico para estas enfermedades poco comunes. Este artículo refleja las ideas y los conceptos que parten de la ciencia básica hacia la aplicabilidad de la terapia génica en el ámbito clínico. Se describen los avances y las reflexiones actuales sobre la eficacia de los ensayos clínicos en la actualidad y se discuten los posibles obstáculos y soluciones de cara al futuro de la terapia génica para enfermedades de la retina. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Abnormal levels of histone methylation in the retinas of diabetic rats are reversed by minocycline treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wenjun; Sidoli, Simone; Zhang, Wenquan

    2017-01-01

    In this study we quantified the alterations of retinal histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) in diabetic rats using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach. Some diabetic rats were subsequently treated with minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, which has...... been shown to inhibit the diabetes-induced chronic inflammation in the retinas of rodents. We quantified 266 differentially modified histone peptides, including 48 out of 83 methylation marks with significantly different abundancein retinas of diabetic rats as compared to non-diabetic controls. About...... 67% of these marks had their relative abundance restored to non-diabetic levels after minocycline treatment. Mono-and di-methylation states of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me1/me2), markers related to DNA damage response, were found to be up-regulated in the retinas of diabetic rats and restored...

  18. Training and professional profile of retinologists in Spain: Retina 2 project, Report 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor JC

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available J Carlos Pastor1,3, Itziar Fernández2, Jimena Rojas1, Rosa Coco1, Maria R Sanabria1, Enrique Rodríguez-de la Rúa1,3, Diego Sánchez3, Carmen Valverde3, Anna Sala Puigdollers1,31University Institute of Applied Ophthalmobiology (IOBA, Retina Group, 2Ministry of Science and Innovation CIBER-BBN, Statistics Department, 3Clinic University Hospital, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, SpainBackground: Uniform postresidency systems to train medical specialists have not been developed in most European countries. Before developing a framework for such a system, we established the learning and professional profiles of Spanish ophthalmologists dedicated to medical retina and vitreoretina subspecialties.Methods: After identification of presumed subspecialists by experts from different autonomous regions, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed in 2006. A reminder was sent three weeks later. Postal mail was used. Nonresponder bias was determined.Results: Of 492 possible retina subspecialists, 261 replied to the questionnaires. While about 86% received specific retinal training, standardized fellowship programs were uncommon for both medical retina and vitreoretina (around 10%. Of the responders, 24.5% performed only medical retina, 11.8% vitreoretina, and 63.6% both. Most (60.5% practiced anterior segment surgery, and 78.7% declared skills in vitrectomy.Conclusion: We have developed a database of Spanish ophthalmologists dedicated to retinal pathologies and identified some characteristics of their professional profile. Although most of them have received specific retinal training, standardized mastership programs are still uncommon. These data will be useful in creating a standardized Retina Mastership, an important goal of the European Higher Education Area.Keywords: clinical activity, fellowship, mastership, professional profile, retinologist training

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients With the Subretinal Implant Retina Implant Alpha IMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehlewein, Laura; Kitiratschky, Veronique; Gosheva, Mariya; Edwards, Thomas L; MacLaren, Robert E; Groppe, Markus; Kusnyerik, Akos; Soare, Cristina; Jackson, Timothy L; Sun, Chen-Hsin; Chee, Caroline; Sachs, Helmut; Stingl, Krunoslav; Wilhelm, Barbara; Gekeler, Florian; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Zrenner, Eberhart; Stingl, Katarina

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in retinal structure and thickness after subretinal implantation of the Retina Implant Alpha IMS (Retina Implant AG, Reutlingen, Germany). Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging was performed to assess the structure and thickness of the retina anterior to the microphotodiode array preoperatively, within 6 weeks and 6 months ± 1 month after implantation. Thickness measurements were performed using the distance tool of the built-in software. Three thickness measurements were performed in each of the four quadrants of the retina on the microchip within 6 weeks and 6 months ± 1 month after implantation. The mean ± standard deviation change in retinal thickness from within 6 weeks to 6 months ± 1 month after implantation in all four quadrants combined was 24 μm ± 68 μm. None of the tested variables (location, time, or their interaction) had a statistically significant effect on the mean retinal thickness (P = .961, P = .131, and P = .182, respectively; n = 19). The authors report on qualitative and quantitative findings in retinal structure in 27 patients after subretinal implantation of the Retina Implant Alpha IMS using OCT technology. No significant changes of retinal thickness could be observed in a period of 6 months after surgery. With more patients receiving subretinal implants and with advanced OCT technology, the data set will be extended to study possible changes in retinal structure in finer detail. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:993-999.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Light-induced retinal degeneration causes a transient downregulation of melanopsin in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Di Pierdomenico, Johnny; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Villegas Pérez, María P

    2017-08-01

    In this work we study the effects of an acute light-induced retinal degeneration on the population of melanopsin positive retinal ganglion cells (m + RGCs) and the expression of the melanopsin protein in the retina. The m + RGCs may be more resistant than other RGCs to lesion, but the effects of an acute light exposure in this population are unknown. Albino rats were exposed to white light (3000 lux) continuously for 48 h and processed 0, 3, 7 or 30 days after light exposure (ALE). Whole-mounted retinas were immunodetected with antibodies against melanopsin, Brn3a, and rhodopsin to study the populations of m + RGC, Brn3a + RGC and rods (which are the most abundant photoreceptors in the rat retina). Three days ALE there was substantial rod loss in an arciform area of the superior retina and with time this loss expanded in the form of rings all throughout the retina. Light exposure did not affect the number of Brn3a + RGCs but diminished the numbers of m + RGCs. Immediately ALE there was a significant decrease in the mean number of immunodetected m + RGCs that was more marked in the superior retina. Later, the number of m + RGCs increased progressively and reached normal values one month ALE. Western blot analysis showed that melanopsin expression down-regulates shortly ALE and recovers thereafter, in accordance with the anatomical data. This study demonstrates that there is a transient downregulation of melanopsin expression in the RGCs during the first month ALE. Further studies would be needed to clarify the long-term effect of light exposure on the m + RGC population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  2. Expression and distribution of peroxiredoxins in the retina and optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidlow, Glyn; Wood, John P M; Knoops, Bernard; Casson, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in various pathological conditions of the retina and optic nerve. Peroxiredoxins (Prdxs) comprise a recently characterized family of antioxidant enzymes. To date, little information exists regarding the distribution of Prdxs in the eye. Herein, we employed a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting to determine the level of expression and distribution of the six Prdx isoforms in the retina and optic nerve of the rat. In addition, we performed some parallel analyses on the common marmoset (Callithrix Jacchus). In the rat, all of the Prdx transcripts were expressed in relatively high amounts in both retina and optic nerve, with abundances ranging from approximately 3-50 % of the level of the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. With regard to protein expression, each isoform was detected in the retina and optic nerve by either Western blotting and/or immunohistochemistry. Excepting Prdx4, there was a good correspondence between the rodent and primate results. In the retina, Prdx1 and Prdx2 were principally localized to neurons in the inner nuclear layer and cone photoreceptors, Prdx3 and Prdx5 displayed characteristic mitochondrial immunolabeling, while Prdx6 was associated with astrocytes and Müller cells. In the optic nerve, Prdx1 was robustly expressed by oligodendrocytes, Prdx3 and Prdx5 were observed in axons, and Prdx6 was restricted to astrocytes. The present findings augment our understanding of the distribution and expression of the Prdxs in the retina and optic nerve of rodents and primates and lay the foundation for subsequent analysis of their involvement in relevant blinding diseases.

  3. Highly Efficient Delivery of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors to the Primate Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Clark, Mark E; Sandefer, Kristen J; Girkin, Chris A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the preferred vector for targeting gene expression to the retina. Subretinally injected AAV can efficiently transduce retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors in primate retina. Inner and middle primate retina can be transduced by intravitreally delivered AAV, but with low efficiency. This is due to dilution of vector, potential neutralization of capsid because it is not confined to the immune-privileged retinal compartment, and the presence of the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a barrier separating the vitreous from the neural retina. We here describe a novel "subILM" injection method that addresses all three issues. Specifically, vector is placed in a surgically induced, hydrodissected space between the ILM and neural retina. In an initial experiment, we injected viscoelastic (Healon(®)), a substance we confirmed was biocompatible with AAV, to create a subILM bleb and subsequently injected AAV2-GFP into the bleb after irrigation with basic salt solution. For later experiments, we used a Healon-AAV mixture to place single, subILM injections. In all cases, subILM delivery of AAV was well tolerated-no inflammation or gross structural changes were observed by ophthalmological examination or optical coherence tomography. In-life fluorescence imaging revealed profound transgene expression within the area of the subILM injection bleb that persisted for the study duration. Uniform and extensive transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was achieved in the areas beneath the subILM bleb. Transduction of Müller glia, ON bipolar cells, and photoreceptors was also observed. Robust central labeling from green fluorescent protein-expressing RGCs confirmed their continued survival, and was observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the superior colliculus, and the pretectum. Our results confirm that the ILM is a major barrier to transduction by AAV in primate retina and that, when it is circumvented, the efficiency and

  4. Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Triggers TNFα Induced-Necroptosis in Rat Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cho Rong; Kim, Jie Hyun; Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Park, Chan Kee

    2017-05-01

    A recent study revealed a novel form of cell death, termed necroptosis, or programmed necrosis. Previous research indicated that after ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to the retina, Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) is increased, which may activate necroptosis. This study observed macroglial cell activation, and in particular, astrocyte activation, after the release of TNFα and other necroptosis factors in the rat retina due to IR. IR was induced in the retinas of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by increasing the intraocular pressure to 160 mmHg and then allowing reperfusion. In addition, to inhibit necroptosis, Nec-1 (necrostatin-1) was injected intravitreally after IR. Rats were sacrificed after reperfusion at 12 hours, 1, 3, and 5 days, and 1 and 2 weeks. Retinas from each time point were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB) to identify the initiator of necroptosis, TNFα, the expression of necroptosis factors, such as receptor interacting protein (RIP) 1, 3, and inactive caspase 8, and Brn3a. Cell death in the IR-injured retinas was identified by cell counting. We found decreased retinal cell numbers in the inner and outer nuclear layers (INL and ONL), as well as in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Increased glial cell activation was detected by using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) IHC. TNFα, RIP1, RIP3, and inactive caspase 8 were mainly expressed in the GCL after IR, as determined by IHC and WB. Nec-1 inhibited RIP1, a necroptosis factor, indicating protection against retinal cell loss after IR injury. We showed that IR injury triggered increases in both activation of astrocytes and the expression of TNFα. In addition, TNFα, which was activated by IR, triggered the release of necroptosis factors, particularly, in GCL. Inhibition of necroptosis using Nec-1 decreased the level of RIP1 and retinal cell loss in IR-injured retinas.

  5. Pre-exposure to low-power diode laser irradiation promotes cytoprotection in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Zhang, Shisheng; Liao, Huaping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether pre-exposure to low-power laser irradiation can provoke an effect on cellular protection in the rat retina. The right eyes of 40 rats were exposed to a 3-mm diode laser beam for 1 min in different light intensities and different experimental sets: group A low power of 60 mW (34.27 J/cm(2) on the retina in consideration of the energy losses along the optical pathway) prior to high power of 80 mW (44.88 J/cm(2) on the retina in consideration of the energy losses along the optical pathway), group B high power, group C low power, group D (the left eyes from the counterpart of group A) and group E (untreated rat eyes) as controls. Morphological retinal change retinas were assessed using light microscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 and cleaved caspase 3 protein expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Cellular injury was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Hsp 70 expression in the inner plexiform layer and the outer plexiform layer in group A were 73.09 ± 6.49 and 78.03 ± 3.05%, respectively, which was significantly higher (P retina) power laser irradiation stimulates a hyperexpression of Hsp70 together with a hypoexpression of cleaved caspase 3 in rat retina, which may suggest a cellular protective effect.

  6. Expression of the diabetes risk gene wolframin (WFS1) in the human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kastner, Rainald; Kreczmanski, Pawel; Preising, Markus; Diederen, Roselie; Schmitz, Christoph; Reis, Danielle; Blanks, Janet; Dorey, C Kathleen

    2009-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1, OMIM 222300), a rare genetic disorder characterized by optic nerve atrophy, deafness, diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus, is caused by mutations of WFS1, encoding WFS1/wolframin. Non-syndromic WFS1 variants are associated with the risk of diabetes mellitus due to altered function of wolframin in pancreatic islet cells, expanding the importance of wolframin. This study extends a previous report for the monkey retina, using immunohistochemistry to localize wolframin on cryostat and paraffin sections of human retina. In addition, the human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line termed ARPE-19 and retinas from both pigmented and albino mice were studied to assess wolframin localization. In the human retina, wolframin was expressed in retinal ganglion cells, optic axons and the proximal optic nerve. Wolframin expression in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was confirmed with intense cytoplasmic labeling in ARPE-19 cells. Strong labeling of the RPE was also found in the albino mouse retina. Cryostat sections of the mouse retina showed a more extended pattern of wolframin labeling, including the inner nuclear layer (INL) and photoreceptor inner segments, confirming the recent report of Kawano et al. [Kawano, J., Tanizawa, Y., Shinoda, K., 2008. Wolfram syndrome 1 (Wfs1) gene expression in the normal mouse visual system. J. Comp. Neurol. 510, 1-23]. Absence of these cells in the human specimens despite the use of human-specific antibodies to wolframin may be related to delayed fixation. Loss of wolframin function in RGCs and the unmyelinated portion of retinal axons could explain optic nerve atrophy in Wolfram Syndrome 1.

  7. Cyclic GMP in the pig vitreous and retina after experimental retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederen, Roselie M H; La Heij, Ellen C; Lemmens, Marijke A M; Kijlstra, Aize; de Vente, Jan; Hendrikse, Fred

    2008-02-04

    Earlier studies have revealed a decreased level of cGMP in vitreous fluid obtained from patients with a retinal detachment. To further investigate this phenomenon, we developed an experimental retinal detachment model in pigs. Experimental unilateral retinal detachments were induced in pig eyes by subretinal injection of 0.25% sodium hyaluronate. Fourteen days later the vitreous and retinas were analyzed for cGMP expression. Following enucleation, the retinas were incubated in the presence of a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX), and the particulate guanylyl cyclase stimulator atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator sodium nitroprusside (SNP). cGMP was visualized in retinal wholemounts by immunochemistry combined with a computer based stereology system. cGMP levels in vitreous were determined by ELISA. The mean vitreous cGMP level in pig eyes with a retinal detachment (1.45 pmol/ml) was significantly lower compared to the mean level of cGMP in healthy pig eyes (4.61 pmol/ml; p=0.028 was considered significant). In the inner retina, ANP as well as SNP induced cGMP immunoreactivity in both detached and healthy retinas. After incubation with ANP, cGMP could also be detected in the outer nuclear layer of the detached retina, whereas this was not the case in the normal retina. Experimental retinal detachment in the pig eye leads to a decrease of cGMP levels in vitreous similar to that observed in clinical studies. This model may be helpful to analyze the mechanisms involved in cGMP dynamics following retinal detachment.

  8. Gene expression and protein distribution of orexins and orexin receptors in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Xu, G Z; Wang, L; Jiang, S X; Yang, X L; Zhong, Y M

    2011-08-25

    Orexins, composed of orexin A and orexin B, are identified as endogenous ligands of two orphan G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). Orexins are implicated in regulating wake/sleep states, feeding behaviors, etc. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactive (RT-PCR) analysis and immunofluorescence double labeling, we investigated the distributions of orexin A, orexin B, OX1R and OX2R in rat retina. RT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of mRNAs of prepro-orexin, OX1R and OX2R in rat retina. Immunostaining for orexin A and orexin B was observed in many cells in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. In the outer retina, horizontal cells, labeled by calbindin, and bipolar cells, labeled by homeobox protein Chx10, were orexin A- and orexin B-positive. In the inner retina, two orexins were both found in GABAergic amacrine cells (ACs), including dopaminergic and cholinergic ones, stained by tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase respectively. Glycinergic ACs, including AII ACs, also expressed orexins. Weak to moderate labeling for orexin A and orexin B was diffusely distributed in the inner plexiform layer. Additionally, orexins were expressed in almost all ganglion cells (GCs) retrogradely labeled by cholera toxin B subunit. Specifically, double-labeling experiments demonstrated that melanopsin-positive GCs (intrinsically photosensitive retinal GCs, ipRGCs) were labeled by two orexins. Morever, OX1R immunoreactivity was observed in most of GCs and all dopaminergic ACs, as well as in both outer and inner plexiform layers. In contrast, no obvious OX2R immunostaining was detectable in the rat retina. These results suggest that orexins may modulate the function of neurons, especially in the inner retina. We further hypothesize that the orexin signaling via ipRGCs may be involved in setting the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian clock. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. Receptive field properties of rod-driven horizontal cells in the skate retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The large receptive fields of retinal horizontal cells result primarily from extensive intercellular coupling via gap (electrical) junctions; thus, the extent of the receptive field provides an index of the degree to which the cells are electrically coupled. For rod-driven horizontal cells in the dark-adapted skate retina, a space constant of 1.18 +/- 0.15 mm (SD) was obtained from measurements with a moving slit stimulus, and a comparable value (1.43 +/- 0.55 mm) was obtained with variation in spot diameter. These values, and the extensive spread of a fluorescent dye (Lucifer Yellow) from the site of injection to neighboring cells, indicate that the horizontal cells of the all-rod retina of skate are well coupled electrically. Neither the receptive field properties nor the gap-junctional features of skate horizontal cells were influenced by the adaptive state of the retina: (a) the receptive field organization was unaffected by light adaptation, (b) similar dye coupling was seen in both dark- and light-adapted retinae, and (c) no significant differences were found in the gap-junctional particle densities measured in dark- and light-adapted retinas, i.e., 3,184 +/- 286/microns 2 (n = 8) and 3,073 +/- 494/microns 2 (n = 11), respectively. Moreover, the receptive fields of skate horizontal cells were not altered by either dopamine, glycine, GABA, or the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. We conclude that the rod-driven horizontal cells of the skate retina are tightly coupled to one another, and that the coupling is not affected by photic and pharmacological conditions that are known to modulate intercellular coupling between cone-driven horizontal cells in other species. PMID:1359000

  10. Connections between atmospheric sulphuric acid and new particle formation during QUEST III–IV campaigns in Heidelberg and Hyytiälä

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Riipinen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the connections between atmospheric sulphuric acid and new particle formation during QUEST III and BACCI/QUEST IV campaigns. The campaigns have been conducted in Heidelberg (2004 and Hyytiälä (2005, the first representing a polluted site surrounded by deciduous forest, and the second a rural site in a boreal forest environment. We have studied the role of sulphuric acid in particle formation and growth by determining 1 the power-law dependencies between sulphuric acid ([H2SO4], and particle concentrations (N3–6 or formation rates at 1 nm and 3 nm (J1 and J3; 2 the time delays between [H2SO4] and N3–6 or J3, and the growth rates for 1–3 nm particles; 3 the empirical nucleation coefficients A and K in relations J1=A[H2SO4] and J1=K[H2SO4]2, respectively; 4 theoretical predictions for J1 and J3 for the days when no significant particle formation is observed, based on the observed sulphuric acid concentrations and condensation sinks. In both environments, N3–6 or J3 and [H2SO4] were linked via a power-law relation with exponents typically ranging from 1 to 2. The result suggests that the cluster activation theory and kinetic nucleation have the potential to explain the observed particle formation. However, some differences between the sites existed: The nucleation coefficients were about an order of magnitude greater in Heidelberg than in Hyytiälä conditions. The time lags between J3 and [H2SO4] were consistently lower than the corresponding delays between N3–6 and [H2SO4]. The exponents in the J3∝[H2SO4 ]nJ3-connection were consistently higher than or equal to the exponents in the relation N3–6∝[H2SO4 ]nN36. In the J1 values, no significant differences were found between the observed rates on particle formation event days and the predictions on non-event days. The J3 values predicted by the cluster activation or kinetic nucleation hypotheses, on the other hand, were considerably lower on non-event days

  11. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adejoke J. Adekanmbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L- opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S- opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA, and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina.

  12. Cellular disturbance in the rats retina after irradiation and metabolic errors during the postnatal period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lierse, W.; Franke, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    During the first five days of the postnatal period the retina has been vulnerable following administration of DNA blocking drugs and irradiation with conventional X-rays and fast neutrons. During this period the disturbance of lamination accompanied with pycnosis of neurons and neuroblasts has been the important morphologic reaction. During the same phase metabolic errors, like experimental phenylketonuria, have produced a swelling of photoreceptor cells and pigmentepithelium cells. The other neurons of the retina were pycnotic. Structural alterations like rosettes persisted during the rest of life. The relative minor error during the first phase of rats life may result in a persistent disease. (orig.)

  13. Joint Encoding of Object Motion and Motion Direction in the Salamander Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Norma Krystyna; Gollisch, Tim

    2016-11-30

    The processing of motion in visual scenes is important for detecting and tracking moving objects as well as for monitoring self-motion through the induced optic flow. Specialized neural circuits have been identified in the vertebrate retina for detecting motion direction or for distinguishing between object motion and self-motion, although little is known about how information about these distinct features of visual motion is combined. The salamander retina, which is a widely used model system for analyzing retinal function, contains object-motion-sensitive (OMS) ganglion cells, which strongly respond to local motion signals but are suppressed by global image motion. Yet, direction-selective (DS) ganglion cells have been conspicuously absent from characterizations of the salamander retina, despite their ubiquity in other model systems. We here show that the retina of axolotl salamanders contains at least two distinct classes of DS ganglion cells. For one of these classes, the cells display a strong preference for local over global motion in addition to their direction selectivity (OMS-DS cells) and thereby combine sensitivity to two distinct motion features. The OMS-DS cells are further distinct from standard (non-OMS) DS cells by their smaller receptive fields and different organization of preferred motion directions. Our results suggest that the two classes of DS cells specialize to encode motion direction of local and global motion stimuli, respectively, even for complex composite motion scenes. Furthermore, although the salamander DS cells are OFF-type, there is a strong analogy to the systems of ON and ON-OFF DS cells in the mammalian retina. The retina contains specialized cells for motion processing. Among the retinal ganglion cells, which form the output neurons of the retina, some are known to report the direction of a moving stimulus (direction-selective cells), and others distinguish the motion of an object from a moving background. But little is known

  14. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  15. Expression of folate receptor alpha in the mammalian retinol pigmented epithelium and retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S B; Kekuda, R; Gu, X; Chancy, C; Conway, S J; Ganapathy, V

    1999-04-01

    Folic acid is essential for DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, and deficiencies in folate can lead to nutritional amblyopia and optic neuropathy. The transport of folate from the choroidal blood supply to the retina is only now beginning to be understood. The reduced-folate transporter was reported recently to be present in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and is thought to be localized to the apical region of these cells. The authors hypothesize that the RPE plays a role in the vectorial transport of folate from the choroidal blood to the neural retina and uses not only the reduced-folate transporter but also the folate receptor alpha in mediating this transport. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the folate receptor alpha was present in the RPE and, if so, whether it was distributed along the basolateral membrane of the RPE, supporting a role for the protein in the initial steps of folate transport into the RPE. The expression of the folate receptor alpha in mouse RPE was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), functional assays, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RT-PCR analysis, cloning of the RT-PCR product, and subsequent sequencing established that folate receptor alpha mRNA transcripts are expressed in the mouse RPE/choroid and are expressed also in the neural retina. A heterologous functional expression assay using MTX(R)-ZR-75-1 cells showed that the folate receptor alpha cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the RPE/choroid complex and the neural retina was functional as assessed by the binding of folic acid and by the uptake of N5-methyltetrahydrofolate. In situ hybridization localized the folate receptor alpha mRNA to the mouse RPE cells and to cells of the neural retina. The folate receptor alpha was detected immunohistochemically in the mouse and rat RPE and in several layers of the neural retina. Laser scanning confocal microscopy

  16. Expression and localization of sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) in monkey retina

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung Wha; Fuda, Hirotoshi; Javitt, Norman B.; Strott, Charles A.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.

    2006-01-01

    Sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) is a mitochondrial P-450 enzyme with broad substrate specificity for C27 sterols including 7-ketocholesterol (7kCh). CYP27A1 is widely expressed in human tissues but has not been previously demonstrated in the retina. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of CYP27A1 in the monkey retina where it localized mainly to the photoreceptor inner segments. CYP27A1 was also observed in Müller cells with faint immuno staining detected in the RPE and ...

  17. Evaluation of interprofessional education: lessons learned through the development and implementation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication for undergraduate health care students in Heidelberg - a project report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah; Mahler, Cornelia; Krug, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    This project report describes the development, "piloting" and evaluation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication bringing together medical students and Interprofessional Health Care B.Sc. students at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University, Germany. A five-member interprofessional team collaborated together on this project. Kolb's experiential learning concept formed the theoretical foundation for the seminar, which explored three interprofessional competency areas: team work, communication and values/ethics. Evaluation for the purposes of quality assurance and future curricula development was conducted using two quantitative measures: descriptive analysis of a standardized course evaluation tool (EvaSys) ANOVA analysis of the German translation of the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (UWE-IP-D). The key finding from the standardized course evaluation was that the interprofessional seminars were rated more positively [M=2.11 (1 most positive and 5 most negative), SD=1, n=27] than the monoprofessional seminars [M=2.55, SD=0.98, n=90]. The key finding from the UWE-IP-D survey, comparing pre and post scores of the interprofessional (IP) (n=40) and monoprofessional (MP) groups (n=34), was that significant positive changes in mean scores for both groups towards communication, teamwork and interprofessional learning occurred. Lessons learnt included: a) recognising the benefit of being pragmatic when introducing interprofessional education initiatives, which enabled various logistical and attitudinal barriers to be overcome; b) quantitative evaluation of learning outcomes alone could not explain positive responses or potential influences of interprofessional aspects, which highlighted the need for a mixed methods approach, including qualitative methods, to enrich judgment formation on interprofessional educational outcomes.

  18. Dosimetric verification in water of a Monte Carlo treatment planning tool for proton, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T.; Böhlen, T. T.; Ceruti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.; Brons, S.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.; Mairani, A.

    2017-08-01

    The introduction of ‘new’ ion species in particle therapy needs to be supported by a thorough assessment of their dosimetric properties and by treatment planning comparisons with clinically used proton and carbon ion beams. In addition to the latter two ions, helium and oxygen ion beams are foreseen at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) as potential assets for improving clinical outcomes in the near future. We present in this study a dosimetric validation of a FLUKA-based Monte Carlo treatment planning tool (MCTP) for protons, helium, carbon and oxygen ions for spread-out Bragg peaks in water. The comparisons between the ions show the dosimetric advantages of helium and heavier ion beams in terms of their distal and lateral fall-offs with respect to protons, reducing the lateral size of the region receiving 50% of the planned dose up to 12 mm. However, carbon and oxygen ions showed significant doses beyond the target due to the higher fragmentation tail compared to lighter ions (p and He), up to 25%. The Monte Carlo predictions were found to be in excellent geometrical agreement with the measurements, with deviations below 1 mm for all parameters investigated such as target and lateral size as well as distal fall-offs. Measured and simulated absolute dose values agreed within about 2.5% on the overall dose distributions. The MCTP tool, which supports the usage of multiple state-of-the-art relative biological effectiveness models, will provide a solid engine for treatment planning comparisons at HIT.

  19. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity
department of addictive behaviour and addiction medicine, central institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, University of Heidelberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Addictive behaviour is as prevalent in Germany as in other western countries, but in contrast to some European countries and the United States, very little money was given to this research field. Change came in the early 1990s, when the German government started to launch specific grants for addiction research. The first chair in addiction research was created in 1999 (Karl Mann) at the Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim (CIMH; University of Heidelberg). The recruitment of a pre-clinical alcohol researcher as head of the department of psychopharmacology followed (Rainer Spanagel). This 'addiction research cluster' collaborates with several research groups at the CIMH (such as genetics). We inaugurated a clinical trial network which now comprises up to 20 treatment centres throughout Germany. Like most authors, we found effect sizes of different treatment modalities more in the low to moderate range, perhaps because of the heterogeneity of large patient samples. Therefore, we concentrated upon the biological basis of addiction in order to define more homogeneous 'subtypes' of patients for a better match with existing treatments. Results concerning genetics and neuroimaging (both animal and human) are promising, and could move our field towards a more personalized treatment approach. Our funding has been extended over the years, including involvement in several large European grants. We are studying substance-related problems as well as so-called 'behavioural addictions'. As a natural consequence of this development, we are deeply involved both in informing the general public on addiction issues as well as in counselling policy makers in Germany. © 2010 The Author, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Dosimetric verification in water of a Monte Carlo treatment planning tool for proton, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T; Böhlen, T T; Ceruti, F; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Brons, S; Haberer, T; Debus, J; Parodi, K; Mairani, A

    2017-07-31

    The introduction of 'new' ion species in particle therapy needs to be supported by a thorough assessment of their dosimetric properties and by treatment planning comparisons with clinically used proton and carbon ion beams. In addition to the latter two ions, helium and oxygen ion beams are foreseen at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) as potential assets for improving clinical outcomes in the near future. We present in this study a dosimetric validation of a FLUKA-based Monte Carlo treatment planning tool (MCTP) for protons, helium, carbon and oxygen ions for spread-out Bragg peaks in water. The comparisons between the ions show the dosimetric advantages of helium and heavier ion beams in terms of their distal and lateral fall-offs with respect to protons, reducing the lateral size of the region receiving 50% of the planned dose up to 12 mm. However, carbon and oxygen ions showed significant doses beyond the target due to the higher fragmentation tail compared to lighter ions (p and He), up to 25%. The Monte Carlo predictions were found to be in excellent geometrical agreement with the measurements, with deviations below 1 mm for all parameters investigated such as target and lateral size as well as distal fall-offs. Measured and simulated absolute dose values agreed within about 2.5% on the overall dose distributions. The MCTP tool, which supports the usage of multiple state-of-the-art relative biological effectiveness models, will provide a solid engine for treatment planning comparisons at HIT.

  1. Comparison of the diagnostic ability of Moorfield′s regression analysis and glaucoma probability score using Heidelberg retinal tomograph III in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindal Shveta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of the Heidelberg retinal tomograph (HRT glaucoma probability score (GPS with that of Moorfield′s regression analysis (MRA. Materials and Methods: The study included 50 eyes of normal subjects and 50 eyes of subjects with early-to-moderate primary open angle glaucoma. Images were obtained by using HRT version 3.0. Results: The agreement coefficient (weighted k for the overall MRA and GPS classification was 0.216 (95% CI: 0.119 - 0.315. The sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using the most specific (borderline results included as test negatives and least specific criteria (borderline results included as test positives. The MRA sensitivity and specificity were 30.61 and 98% (most specific and 57.14 and 98% (least specific. The GPS sensitivity and specificity were 81.63 and 73.47% (most specific and 95.92 and 34.69% (least specific. The MRA gave a higher positive likelihood ratio (28.57 vs. 3.08 and the GPS gave a higher negative likelihood ratio (0.25 vs. 0.44.The sensitivity increased with increasing disc size for both MRA and GPS. Conclusions: There was a poor agreement between the overall MRA and GPS classifications. GPS tended to have higher sensitivities, lower specificities, and lower likelihood ratios than the MRA. The disc size should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results of HRT, as both the GPS and MRA showed decreased sensitivity for smaller discs and the GPS showed decreased specificity for larger discs.

  2. Relation of cell division to the acquisition of responsiveness to cortisol in the neural retina of the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Or, S.; Eshel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Responsiveness of the neural retina to cortisol, as measured by cortisol-induced glutamine synthetase activity, is acquired in the chick embryo during the second week of embryogenesis. The magnitude of the response is inversely related to the growth rate of the neural retina. This developmental event is also acquired by the 8-d-old neural retina under organ culture conditions. The acquisition of competence to respond to the hormonal stimulation can be reversibly abolished by inhibition of DNA synthesis with 0.01 mM cytosine arabinoside; the magnitude of response that resumes after withdrawal of the drug, is characterized by the stage of growth of the neural retina. Responsiveness to cortisol in the embryonic neural retina is apparently coupled to the number of Muller cells (the targets for cortisol action) that have withdrawn from the cell cycle. (author)

  3. Degenerações periféricas da retina em pacientes candidatos à cirurgia refrativa Peripheral retina degeneration in patients who are candidates for refractive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique de Avila Morales

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: O objetivo desse estudo é verificar em indivíduos míopes candidatos à cirurgia refrativa a prevalência dos diferentes tipos de lesões retinianas periféricas degenerativas de acordo com o tipo de miopia. Métodos: De forma prospectiva, no período de um ano, foram examinados os olhos dos pacientes no Setor de Cirurgia Refrativa do Departamento de Oftalmologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina que durante a sua consulta inicial apresentassem refração com equivalente esférico superior ou igual a -1,00 dioptria esférica, e não tivessem antecedentes pessoais de doença ou cirurgia ocular no período. Foi investigada a existência de lesões e/ou degenerações periféricas predisponentes ao descolamento regmatogênico de retina. Resultados: O grupo foi composto, em sua maioria, por adultos jovens (média de idade de 31 anos. Foram observados olhos com miopia baixa (263 olhos, 31%, moderada (300 olhos, 36% e alta (277 olhos, 33%; em 35,4% dos pacientes (27% dos olhos foram encontradas degenerações periféricas, sendo o branco com e sem pressão a alteração mais freqüente (23,4% dos pacientes ou 17,5% dos olhos. Entre as lesões predisponentes ao descolamento regmatogênico da retina, a mais encontrada foi a degeneração em treliça (8,6% dos pacientes ou 6% dos olhos. Conclusões: As alterações periféricas predisponentes ou não ao descolamento regmatogênico de retina apresentaram aumento de prevalência de acordo com o aumento do grau de miopia, com exceção das roturas. Todos os pacientes com miopia alta e candidatos à cirurgia refrativa devem ter a periferia retiniana de ambos os olhos examinada.Purpose: To verify, in myopic individuals who are candidates for refractive surgery, the prevalence of different types of peripheral degenerative lesions of the retina, according to the type of myopia. Methods: Prospectively, during a one-year interval, we examined the eyes of patients in

  4. The retina in forensic medicine: applications of ophthalmic endoscopy: the first 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Neil L; Wetli, Charles V; Shakin, Jeffrey L

    2006-03-01

    The retina reflects a variety of diseases in the living patient. However, the retina is not routinely examined in deceased persons, and therefore it is unknown if routine retinal examination would be a useful adjunct to the forensic autopsy. To examine this issue, the retinae of routine medical examiner cases were examined utilizing an ophthalmic endoscope. The results of the first 100 examinations are reported. Specific attention was given to changes that reflected the postmortem interval, the development of petechiae as related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the association of retinal hemorrhages to subconjunctival hemorrhages. The procedure was helpful in cases of suspected shaken baby syndrome, exsanguination, and carbon monoxide poisoning and in cases with sudden increased intracranial pressure (Terson syndrome). It appears that lividity patterns exist in the retina, and this may be potentially useful in determining body position after death. Some natural disease processes, such as hypertension, were also identified. Finally, the utility of the ophthalmic endoscope as a means of circumventing the problem of corneal clouding is discussed, and ideas for further research using this technology are presented.

  5. Adaptive colour contrast coding in the salamander retina efficiently matches natural scene statistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genadiy Vasserman

    Full Text Available The visual system continually adjusts its sensitivity to the statistical properties of the environment through an adaptation process that starts in the retina. Colour perception and processing is commonly thought to occur mainly in high visual areas, and indeed most evidence for chromatic colour contrast adaptation comes from cortical studies. We show that colour contrast adaptation starts in the retina where ganglion cells adjust their responses to the spectral properties of the environment. We demonstrate that the ganglion cells match their responses to red-blue stimulus combinations according to the relative contrast of each of the input channels by rotating their functional response properties in colour space. Using measurements of the chromatic statistics of natural environments, we show that the retina balances inputs from the two (red and blue stimulated colour channels, as would be expected from theoretical optimal behaviour. Our results suggest that colour is encoded in the retina based on the efficient processing of spectral information that matches spectral combinations in natural scenes on the colour processing level.

  6. Photopic spectral sensitivities of the red and the yellow field of the pigeon retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.F.; Wubbels, R.J.; Nuboer, J.F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral sensitivities of the red field and the yellow field in the retina of the homing pigeon (Columba Livia) were determined on the basis of ERG responses. Between 450 and 550 nm the relative spectral sensitivity of the yellow field turned out to be higher than that of the red field. The

  7. The retina of Spalax ehrenbergi: novel histologic features supportive of a modified photosensory role.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cernuda-Cernuda, R.; Grip, W.J. de; Cooper, H.M.; Nevo, E.; Garcia-Fernandez, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The retina of the blind mole rat Spalax ehrenbergi was compared with other vertebrate photosensitive organs in an attempt to correlate its histologic organization with a presumptive nonvisual photoreceptor role. METHODS: The eyes of eight adult animals were analyzed by light and electron

  8. Expression of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Factors in the Retinas of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports show that ER stress plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy (DR, but ER stress is a complicated process involving a network of signaling pathways and hundreds of factors, What factors involved in DR are not yet understood. We selected 89 ER stress factors from more than 200, A rat diabetes model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ. The expression of 89 ER stress-related factors was found in the retinas of diabetic rats, at both 1- and 3-months after development of diabetes, by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction arrays. There were significant changes in expression levels of 13 and 12 ER stress-related factors in the diabetic rat retinas in the first and third month after the development of diabetes, Based on the array results, homocysteine- inducible, endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducible, ubiquitin-like domain member 1(HERP, and synoviolin(HRD1 were studied further by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses showed that the expression of HERP was reduced in the retinas of diabetic rats in first and third month. The expression of Hrd1 did not change significantly in the retinas of diabetic rats in the first month but was reduced in the third month.

  9. The combined effects of diabetes and ionising radiation on the rat retina: an ultrastructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stitt, A.W.; Anderson, H.R.; Gardiner, T.A.; Archer, D.B.; McIntyre, Irene

    1994-01-01

    The combined effect of STZ-diabetes and ionising radiation on the rat retina was investigated. Wistar rats, which had been diabetic for 6 months, were irradiated with a single dose of x-rays (1500 cGy) and the ultrastructural effects evaluated at 4-10 mths post-irradiation. At 4 months post-irradiation, the outer nuclear layer of the retina was greatly reduced in thickness and the photoreceptor outer segments were disorganised and reduced in length. By 6 months post-irradiation, the photoreceptor cells were virtually absent, bringing the external limiting membrane into close apposition to the RPE. At 10 months post-irradiation, the RPE was atrophic and degenerative with retinal glial cells coming into contact with Bruch's membrane. This study has described a progressive inner retinal ischemia, with cytoid bodies, capillary non-perfusion and general atrophy of the inner retina intensifying markedly with increasing post-irradiation time. The results suggest that irradiated STZ-diabetic rats may provide a useful model of outer retinal neovascularisation and progressive inner retina ischemia. (author)

  10. Effects of moderate-intensity light on vitamin A-deficient rat retinas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter-Dawson, L.; Kuwabara, T.; Bieri, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of moderate-intensity light (150 to 200 ft-cd) on retinal structure were compared between retinol-adequate and retinol-deficient rats after 1 to 6 days of light exposure during the 12 hr light phase of the cycle. Both damage to the outer segments and loss of photoreceptor cells were accelerated in retinol-adequate rats. Outer segments in retinas of retinol-adequate rats showed an abnormal staining pattern and disruption of disc structure in the distal portion about 2 days before those of retinol-deficient rats. After 4 days of exposure 24% of the photoreceptor cells had degenerated in the retinol-adequate retinas, but only 6% in the retinol-deficient retinas. By 6 days 65% and 41% of the photoreceptors had degenerated in the retinol-adequate and retinol-deficient retinas, respectively. Thus light exposure induced more rapid degeneration of photoreceptor cells in rats receiving adequate retinol than in those deficient in this vitamin

  11. Cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying blood flow regulation in the retina choroid in health disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A.; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2012-01-01

    We review the cellular and physiological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of blood flow in the retina and choroid in health and disease. Due to the intrinsic light sensitivity of the retina and the direct visual accessibility of fundus blood vessels, the eye offers unique opportunities for the non-invasive investigation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation. The ability of the retinal vasculature to regulate its blood flow is contrasted with the far more restricted ability of the choroidal circulation to regulate its blood flow by virtue of the absence of glial cells, the markedly reduced pericyte ensheathment of the choroidal vasculature, and the lack of intermediate filaments in choroidal pericytes. We review the cellular and molecular components of the neurovascular unit in the retina and choroid, techniques for monitoring retinal and choroidal blood flow, responses of the retinal and choroidal circulation to light stimulation, the role of capillaries, astrocytes and pericytes in regulating blood flow, putative signaling mechanisms mediating neurovascular coupling in the retina, and changes that occur in the retinal and choroidal circulation during diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. We close by discussing issues that remain to be explored. PMID:22580107

  12. Macrophages in the retina of normal Lewis rats and their dynamics after injection of lipopolysaccharide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, P.; de Vos, A. F.; Kijlstra, A.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the density, distribution, and morphology of macrophages (bone marrow-derived microglia) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cells in the retina of Lewis rats and the dynamics of these cells after systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection.

  13. IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hongkang; Katschke, Kenneth J.; Li, Yun; Truong, Tom; Lee, Wyne P.; Diehl, Lauri; Rangell, Linda; Tao, Jianhua; Arceo, Rommel; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Hackney, Jason A.; Iglesias, Antonio; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Elstrott, Justin; Weimer, Robby M.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population, is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors and can be associated with choroidal neovascularization. Mononuclear phagocytes are often present in AMD lesions, but the processes that direct myeloid cell recruitment remain unclear. Here, we identify IL-33 as a key regulator of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration after retina stress or injury. IL-33+ Müller cells were more abundant and IL-33 cytokine was elevated in advanced AMD cases compared with age-matched controls with no AMD. In rodents, retina stress resulted in release of bioactive IL-33 that in turn increased inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression in activated Müller cells. Deletion of ST2, the IL-33 receptor α chain, or treatment with a soluble IL-33 decoy receptor significantly reduced release of inflammatory mediators from Müller cells, inhibited accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the outer retina, and protected photoreceptor rods and cones after a retina insult. This study demonstrates a central role for IL-33 in regulating mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to the photoreceptor layer and positions IL-33 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in macular degenerative diseases. PMID:26755704

  14. DSCAM Promotes Refinement in the Mouse Retina through Cell Death and Restriction of Exploring Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Sukeena, Joshua M.; Simmons, Aaron B.; Hansen, Ethan J.; Nuhn, Renee E.; Samuels, Ivy S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we develop and use a gain-of-function mouse allele of the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) to complement loss-of-function models. We assay the role of Dscam in promoting cell death, spacing, and laminar targeting of neurons in the developing mouse retina. We find that ectopic or overexpression of Dscam is sufficient to drive cell death. Gain-of-function studies indicate that Dscam is not sufficient to increase spatial organization, prevent cell-to-cell pairing, or promote active avoidance in the mouse retina, despite the similarity of the Dscam loss-of-function phenotype in the mouse retina to phenotypes observed in Drosophila Dscam1 mutants. Both gain- and loss-of-function studies support a role for Dscam in targeting neurites; DSCAM is necessary for precise dendrite lamination, and is sufficient to retarget neurites of outer retinal cells after ectopic expression. We further demonstrate that DSCAM guides dendrite targeting in type 2 dopaminergic amacrine cells, by restricting the stratum in which exploring retinal dendrites stabilize, in a Dscam dosage-dependent manner. Based on these results we propose a single model to account for the numerous Dscam gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes reported in the mouse retina whereby DSCAM eliminates inappropriately placed cells and connections. PMID:25855178

  15. Dosimetry control and monitoring of selective retina therapy using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Daniel; Burri, Christian; Arnold, Patrik; Koch, Volker M.; Meier, Christoph; Považay, Boris; Justiz, Joern

    2017-07-01

    Selective retina therapy and optical coherence tomography have been combined to monitor laser-tissue interaction in real-time. An ex-vivo study of porcine eyes unveils mechanisms that enable automated and accurate dose-control during laser-therapy.

  16. Synthesis and secretion of interstitial retinol-binding protein by the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Fliesler, S.J.; Rayborn, M.E.; Fong, S.L.; Landers, R.A.; Bridges, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) is a soluble glycoprotein present between the retina and pigmented epithelium, which may function to shuttle vitamin A derivatives between these tissues. While previous studies have shown that the retina is solely responsible for IRBP synthesis, the specific retinal cell(s) in which this occurs has not been established. Since the carbohydrate moiety of IRBP contains fucose, the authors have analyzed the sites of incorporation of 3 H-fucose in the human retina in vitro, using autoradiography. Following a 30-min pulse incubation, all retinal layers exhibited incorporation of label; however, the rod photoreceptor inner segments contained one- to two-fold more radioactivity than was present in any other retinal compartment. In autoradiographs of retinas recovered following a 4 hr chase incubation, all retinal layers retained similar levels of radioactivity with the exception of the rod photoreceptors, cone photoreceptors and cells in the inner nuclear layer, which lost 75, 11, and 14 percent, respectively of the radioactivity present immediately following the 30-min pulse. Proteins present in the chase incubation medium were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. The principal labeled component in the chase medium was identified as IRBP by immunoprecipitation with antibovine-IRBP immunoglobulins

  17. Scotopic electrophysiology of the retina during transient hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Stig Kraglund; Klemp, Kristian; Kofoed, Peter Kristian

    2010-01-01

    by hyperglycemia. The scotopic ffERG amplitudes rose and fell in phase with the glycemia. Implicit times did not change with the rise and fall in glycemia. CONCLUSIONS: The change in scotopic signaling amplitude in the outer and middle layers of retina in subjects with diabetes was proportional to the change...

  18. Expression and Function of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina and the Visual Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Jean-François; Casanova, Christian; Cécyre, Bruno; Redmond, William John

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are important retrograde modulators of synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system. Cannabinoid receptors are seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors favoring Gi/o protein. They are known to play an important role in various processes, including metabolic regulation, craving, pain, anxiety, and immune function. In the last decade, there has been a growing interest for endocannabinoids in the retina and their role in visual processing. The purpose of this review is to characterize the expression and physiological functions of the endocannabinoid system in the visual system, from the retina to the primary visual cortex, with a main interest regarding the retina, which is the best-described area in this system so far. It will show that the endocannabinoid system is widely present in the retina, mostly in the through pathway where it can modulate neurotransmitter release and ion channel activity, although some evidence also indicates possible mechanisms via amacrine, horizontal, and Müller cells. The presence of multiple endocannabinoid ligands, synthesizing and catabolizing enzymes, and receptors highlights various pharmacological targets for novel therapeutic application to retinal diseases.

  19. Simulated human eye retina adaptive optics imaging system based on a liquid crystal on silicon device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Baoguang; Cao Zhaoliang; Mu Quanquan; Hu Lifa; Li Chao; Xuan Li

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain a clear image of the retina of model eye, an adaptive optics system used to correct the wave-front error is introduced in this paper. The spatial light modulator that we use here is a liquid crystal on a silicon device instead of a conversional deformable mirror. A paper with carbon granule is used to simulate the retina of human eye. The pupil size of the model eye is adjustable (3-7 mm). A Shack–Hartman wave-front sensor is used to detect the wave-front aberration. With this construction, a value of peak-to-valley is achieved to be 0.086 λ, where λ is wavelength. The modulation transfer functions before and after corrections are compared. And the resolution of this system after correction (691p/m) is very close to the dirraction limit resolution. The carbon granule on the white paper which has a size of 4.7 μm is seen clearly. The size of the retina cell is between 4 and 10 mu;m. So this system has an ability to image the human eye's retina. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  20. 'Green mice' display limitations in enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in retina and optic nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Elena; Vaquero, Cecilia F; García-Olmo, Dolores C

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of retinal cells, cell transplants and gene therapies may be helped by pre-labeled retinal cells, such as those transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein expression. The aim of this study was to analyze retinal cells and optic nerve components from transgenic green mice (GM) with the 'enhanced' green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene under the control of the CAG promoter (a chicken β-actin promoter and a cytomegalovirus enhancer). The structural analysis and electroretinography recordings showed a normal, healthy retina. Surprisingly, EGFP expression was not ubiquitously located in the retina and optic nerve. Epithelial cells, photoreceptors and bipolar cells presented high green fluorescence levels. In contrast, horizontal cells, specific amacrine cells and ganglion cells exhibited a null EGFP expression level. The synaptic terminals of rod bipolar cells displayed a high green fluorescence level when animals were kept in the dark. Immature retinas exhibited different EGFP expression patterns to those noted in adults. Axons and glial cells in the optic nerve revealed a specific regional EGFP expression pattern, which correlated with the presence of myelin. These results suggest that EGFP expression might be related to the activity of both the CAG promoter and β-actin in mature retinal neurons and oligodendrocytes. Moreover, EGFP expression might be regulated by light in both immature and adult animals. Since GM are used in numerous retina bioassays, it is essential to know the differential EGFP expression in order to select cells of interest for each study.

  1. Spatial organization of lipids in the human retina and optic nerve by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Gordon, William C; Murphy, Robert C; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2014-03-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) was used to characterize lipid species within sections of human eyes. Common phospholipids that are abundant in most tissues were not highly localized and observed throughout the accessory tissue, optic nerve, and retina. Triacylglycerols were highly localized in accessory tissue, whereas sulfatide and plasmalogen glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE) lipids with a monounsaturated fatty acid were found enriched in the optic nerve. Additionally, several lipids were associated solely with the inner retina, photoreceptors, or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE); a plasmalogen PE lipid containing DHA (22:6), PE(P-18:0/22:6), was present exclusively in the inner retina, and DHA-containing glycerophosphatidylcholine (PC) and PE lipids were found solely in photoreceptors. PC lipids containing very long chain (VLC)-PUFAs were detected in photoreceptors despite their low abundance in the retina. Ceramide lipids and the bis-retinoid, N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine, was tentatively identified and found only in the RPE. This MALDI IMS study readily revealed the location of many lipids that have been associated with degenerative retinal diseases. Complex lipid localization within retinal tissue provides a global view of lipid organization and initial evidence for specific functions in localized regions, offering opportunities to assess their significance in retinal diseases, such as macular degeneration, where lipids have been implicated in the disease process.

  2. Effects of Radiation on Rat Retina after 18 days of Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D.; Corbett, R.; Turnbill, C.; Black, S.; Dayhoff, D.; McGourty, J.; Lee, R.; Harrison, G.; Savick, L.

    1978-01-01

    Although cumulative effects an retina from low-dose radiation during prolonged spaceflight are not known, ary impairment of vision could set limits for spaceflight duration. Cosmic rays are now considered to be the cause of the "light flashes" seen during spaceflight by activating retina cells as they pass through the photoreceptors. Previous studies have also shown retinal cellular alterations and cell necrosis from high-energy, particle (HZE) radiation. Ten rats, 5 centrifuged during flight (FC) to simulate gravity and 5 in-flight stationary (FS) experiencing hypogravity, orbited Earth for 18.5 days on Cosmos 936. The animals were sacrificed 25 days post-recovery and the eyes flown to Ames Res. Ctr. The pattern of cell necrosis in the retinas from the FC group showed the same response to radiation as the FS. This would indicate that hypogravity was not a factor in the observed results. Also the cellular response in the retinas exposed in the Berkeley accelerator again matched both the FC and FS eyes. Thus all three conditions provide comparable changes and indicate HZE particles as the possible cause of the cellular alterations, channels, and breakdown.

  3. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina: an immunohistochemical study. P AGGARWAL, T C NAG and S WADHWA*. Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India. *Corresponding author (Fax, 91-11-26588663; Email, shashiwadhwa@hotmail.com).

  4. A preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in vivo in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig-Silva, M. S.; Hathcock, C. D.; Hetling, J. R.

    2005-03-01

    A remaining challenge to the development of electronic prostheses for vision is improving the effectiveness of retinal stimulation. Electrode design and stimulus parameters need to be optimized such that the neural output from the retina conveys information to the mind's eye that aids the patient in interpreting his or her environment. This optimization will require a detailed understanding of the response of the retina to electrical stimulation. The identity and response characteristics of the cellular targets of stimulation need to be defined and evaluated. Described here is an in vivo preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in rat at the cellular level. The use of rat makes available a number of well-described models of retinal disease that motivate prosthesis development. Artificial stimulation can be investigated by adapting techniques traditionally employed to study the response of the retina to photic stimuli, such as recording at the cornea, single-cell recording, and pharmacological dissection of the response. Pilot studies include amplitude-intensity response data for subretinal and transretinal stimulation paradigms recorded in wild-type rats and a transgenic rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The ability to record single-unit ganglion cell activity in vivo is also demonstrated.

  5. Circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes in the rat retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Cailotto, Cathy; Dijk, Frederike; Bergen, Arthur; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    The circadian expression patterns of genes encoding for proteins that make up the core of the circadian clock were measured in rat retina using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Transcript levels of several genes previously used for normalization of qPCR assays were determined and the effect of

  6. Lymphocyte bond with 125I-labelled extract of human chorioretina in detached retina patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smecka, Z.; Stankus, P.

    1982-01-01

    The level is assessed of cellular autoreactivity against retinal antigens in patients with detachment of the retina. A test was selected which can record the first stage of the immunological response, i.e., the bond of sensitized lymphocytes with antigen (mixture of antigens in the form of crude extract), in this case with antigen from the human chorioretina. Two modifications of the test were used: the bond of 125 I-labelled extract from the human chorioretina with isolated lymphocytes, and the bond of the same extract with lymphocytes of whole blood. Using the first modification, a total of 17 patients with detachment of the retina and 17 controls were examined. Usxng the second modification, 15 patients with detachment of the retina and 15 controls were examined. From the results of the test ensued that lymphocytes of patients with detachment of the retina do not differ from lymphocytes of controls in the capacity to bind 125 I-labelled extract from the human chorioretina. The method is described in detail. (author)

  7. A novel experimental mouse model of retinal detachment: complete functional and histologic recovery of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rui; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Fanjun; Kong, Fansheng

    2012-03-26

    To establish an experimental mouse model of retinal detachment (RD) created by corneal puncture (CP). Mouse corneas were punctured with a 30.5-gauge beveled needle, and the anterior chamber was penetrated. Histologic and functional changes of the retina were examined by light microscopy and electroretinography (ERG). Certain retinal cellular responses were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the retina was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL). RESULTS. CP caused transient leakage of aqueous humor along the needle shaft and immediate formation of multiple retinal blebs, which shrank and flattened within 24 hours. Bleb formation was associated with detachment of the neuroretina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). After CP, the RPE cells underwent extensive transformation during retinal detachment/reattachment, but they resumed normal morphology on retinal reattachment around 10 to 13 days after CP. Relative to pre-CP ERG amplitudes, the punctured eyes showed decreases of 45% and 24% in scotopic and 7% and 12% in photopic b- and a-wave amplitudes, respectively, within 10 to 20 minutes after CP. The ERG amplitudes recovered fully by 12 hours after CP. No infiltrated cells were observed in the subretinal space, and no proliferating or TUNEL-positive cells were observed in the retina of the punctured eyes. Puncturing the mouse cornea can create transient RD, and the functional and histologic changes in the retina can subsequently recover. This experimental mouse model of RD mimics human traction and serous RD.

  8. Surgical treatments for fibrous tissue extending to the posterior retina in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mari; Yokoi, Tadashi; Katagiri, Satoshi; Yoshida-Uemura, Tomoyo; Nishina, Sachiko; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2018-01-01

    To describe the clinical features and surgical outcomes of macular dragging or tractional retinal detachment that occurred as a result of fibrovascular tissue (FT) progression toward the posterior retina in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). The medical records of 4 patients (2 girls, 2 boys) with FEVR were reviewed retrospectively. All 4 patients had retinal dragging or radial retinal folds with FT in the peripheral retina in at least 1 eye at the initial visit. During the follow-up period, all the patients had FT that progressed toward the posterior pole and developed from the peripheral FT, resulting in macular dragging or posterior tractional retinal detachment. Vitrectomy with or without scleral buckling and laser photocoagulation were performed in all 4 cases, with removal of the FT in the posterior pole and segmentation of the FT between the posterior and peripheral FT. The traction resolved postoperatively and the retina extended in all 4 cases. In 4 cases with FEVR, the FT developed from the peripheral FT, progressed toward the posterior retina, and generated traction. Vitrectomy with focal removal and segmentation of the FT in the posterior pole might be a good surgical option in such eyes.

  9. Lymphocyte bond with /sup 125/I-labelled extract of human chorioretina in detached retina patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smecka, Z.; Stankus, P. (Palackeho Univ., Olomouc (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta)

    1982-11-01

    The level is assessed of cellular autoreactivity against retinal antigens in patients with detachment of the retina. A test was selected which can record the first stage of the immunological response, i.e., the bond of sensitized lymphocytes with antigen (mixture of antigens in the form of crude extract), in this case with antigen from the human chorioretina. Two modifications of the test were used: the bond of /sup 125/I-labelled extract from the human chorioretina with isolated lymphocytes, and the bond of the same extract with lymphocytes of whole blood. Using the first modification, a total of 17 patients with detachment of the retina and 17 controls were examined. Using the second modification, 15 patients with detachment of the retina and 15 controls were examined. From the results of the test ensued that lymphocytes of patients with detachment of the retina do not differ from lymphocytes of controls in the capacity to bind /sup 125/I-labelled extract from the human chorioretina. The method is described in detail.

  10. NOVEL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR COMBINED HAMARTOMA OF THE RETINA AND RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Vaidehi S; Ozgonul, Cem; Zacks, David N; Besirli, Cagri G

    2018-01-01

    To develop an anatomical classification scheme for combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and specify recommendations for follow-up interval. Retrospective review of patients with combined hamartoma of the retina and RPE examined during a 7-year period (2008-2015). The clinical presentation, fundus examination, and optical coherence tomography were analyzed. Lesions were classified based on location, fundus features, and optical coherence tomography findings. Lesion location: macular/peripapillary-Zone 1; mid-periphery-Zone 2; and far periphery-Zone 3. Associated fundus findings: no retinal traction-Stage 1; retinal traction and/or retinoschisis-Stage 2; and retinal detachment-Stage 3. Optical coherence tomography findings: epiretinal component only-A; partial retinal involvement-B; and complete retinal and RPE involvement-C. Complete ophthalmologic evaluation is recommended at least every 6 months for patients younger than 12 years, with more frequent follow-up in patients with: lesions in the macula/peripapillary (Zone 1) or with retinal traction, retinoschisis, or retinal detachment (Stage 2 and 3). Surgical intervention is recommended in patients with vision loss secondary to macular traction or retinal detachment. A new clinical classification system is proposed for evaluating and managing patients with combined hamartoma of the retina and RPE. The zone and stage of combined hamartoma of the retina and RPE lesion will assist in determining follow-up interval and surgical intervention. Application of a uniform classification scheme will facilitate assessment and comparison of findings across different studies.

  11. Curcumin Delays Retinal Degeneration by Regulating Microglia Activation in the Retina of rd1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhe; Yin, Zhiyuan; Gao, Lixiong; Sun, Dayu; Hu, Xisu; Xue, Langyue; Dai, Jiaman; Zeng, YuXiao; Chen, Siyu; Pan, Boju; Chen, Min; Xie, Jing; Xu, Haiwei

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by degeneration of photoreceptors, and there are currently no effective treatments for this disease. However, curcumin has shown neuroprotectant efficacy in a RP rat and swine model, and thus, may have neuroprotective effects in this disease. Immunofluorescence staining, electroretinogram recordings, and behavioral tests were used to analyze the effects of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mice. The number of apoptotic cells in the retina of rd1 mice at postnatal day 14 significantly decreased with curcumin treatment and visual function was improved. The activation of microglia and secretion of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the retina were inhibited by curcumin. These effects were also observed in a co-culture of BV2 microglial cells and retina-derived 661W cells. Curcumin delayed retinal degeneration by suppressing microglia activation in the retina of rd1 mice. Thus, it may be an effective treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as RP. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Chloride currents in cones modify feedback from horizontal cells to cones in goldfish retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, Duco; Fahrenfort, Iris; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Steijaert, Marvin; ten Eikelder, Huub; Kamermans, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    In neuronal systems, excitation and inhibition must be well balanced to ensure reliable information transfer. The cone/horizontal cell (HC) interaction in the retina is an example of this. Because natural scenes encompass an enormous intensity range both in temporal and spatial domains, the balance

  13. Retina Image Vessel Segmentation Using a Hybrid CGLI Level Set Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a nonintrusive method, the retina imaging provides us with a better way for the diagnosis of ophthalmologic diseases. Extracting the vessel profile automatically from the retina image is an important step in analyzing retina images. A novel hybrid active contour model is proposed to segment the fundus image automatically in this paper. It combines the signed pressure force function introduced by the Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (SBGFRLS model with the local intensity property introduced by the Local Binary fitting (LBF model to overcome the difficulty of the low contrast in segmentation process. It is more robust to the initial condition than the traditional methods and is easily implemented compared to the supervised vessel extraction methods. Proposed segmentation method was evaluated on two public datasets, DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction and STARE (Structured Analysis of the Retina (the average accuracy of 0.9390 with 0.7358 sensitivity and 0.9680 specificity on DRIVE datasets and average accuracy of 0.9409 with 0.7449 sensitivity and 0.9690 specificity on STARE datasets. The experimental results show that our method is effective and our method is also robust to some kinds of pathology images compared with the traditional level set methods.

  14. Psychophysical, Biochemical and Histological Studies of Spectrally Selective Photic Damage to Primate Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-25

    opponent type neural inhibition exists in rhesus, as in fish and amphibia , in the outer-plexiform layer of the retina, since it is detectable in the late... amphibia , are found in the cones themselves, because the a-wave is produced in the photoreceptors (see Brown, 1968). They undoubtedly result from cone to

  15. Rhythmic expressed clock regulates the transcription of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen in teleost retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hang; Wang, Defeng; De Jesus Perez, Felipe; Xie, Rongrong; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Chun-Chun; Yu, Meijuan; Yuan, Liudi; Fernald, Russell D; Zhao, Sheng

    2017-07-01

    Teleost fish continues to grow their eyes throughout life with the body size. In Astatotilapia burtoni, the fish retina increases by adding new retinal cells at the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) and in the outer nuclear layer (ONL). Cell proliferation at both sites exhibits a daily rhythm in number of dividing cells. To understand how this diurnal rhythm of new cell production is controlled in retinal progenitor cells, we studied the transcription pattern of clock genes in retina, including clock1a, clock1b, bmal1a (brain and muscle ARNT-Like), and per1b (period1b). We found that these genes have a strong diurnal rhythmic transcription during light-dark cycles but not in constant darkness. An oscillation in pcna transcription was also observed during light-dark cycles, but again not in constant darkness. Our results also indicate an association between Clock proteins and the upstream region of pcna (proliferating cellular nuclear antigen) gene. A luciferase reporter assay conducted in an inducible clock knockdown cell line further demonstrated that the mutation on predicted E-Boxes in pcna promoter region significantly attenuated the transcriptional activation induced by Clock protein. These results suggested that the diurnal rhythmic expression of clock genes in A. burtoni retina could be light dependent and might contribute to the daily regulation of the proliferation of the retina progenitors through key components of cell cycle machinery, for instance, pcna. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive Colour Contrast Coding in the Salamander Retina Efficiently Matches Natural Scene Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasserman, Genadiy; Schneidman, Elad; Segev, Ronen

    2013-01-01

    The visual system continually adjusts its sensitivity to the statistical properties of the environment through an adaptation process that starts in the retina. Colour perception and processing is commonly thought to occur mainly in high visual areas, and indeed most evidence for chromatic colour contrast adaptation comes from cortical studies. We show that colour contrast adaptation starts in the retina where ganglion cells adjust their responses to the spectral properties of the environment. We demonstrate that the ganglion cells match their responses to red-blue stimulus combinations according to the relative contrast of each of the input channels by rotating their functional response properties in colour space. Using measurements of the chromatic statistics of natural environments, we show that the retina balances inputs from the two (red and blue) stimulated colour channels, as would be expected from theoretical optimal behaviour. Our results suggest that colour is encoded in the retina based on the efficient processing of spectral information that matches spectral combinations in natural scenes on the colour processing level. PMID:24205373

  17. Nonapical symmetric divisions underlie horizontal cell layer formation in the developing retina in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godinho, Leanne; Williams, Philip R.; Claassen, Yvonne; Provost, Elayne; Leach, Steven D.; Kamermans, Maarten; Wong, Rachel O. L.

    2007-01-01

    Symmetric cell divisions have been proposed to rapidly increase neuronal number late in neurogenesis, but how critical this mode of division is to establishing a specific neuronal layer is unknown. Using in vivo time-lapse imaging methods, we discovered that in the laminated zebrafish retina, the

  18. Combined hamartoma of the retina and RPE: an unusual cause of the dragged disc appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C A; Gole, G A

    1986-08-01

    Combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a rare, benign, congenital fundal lesion which contains a mixture of glial tissue, blood vessels and pigment epithelium. Such tumours are variably pigmented and may be wrongly diagnosed as malignant melanoma or retinoblastoma. We report two cases which were located in the periphery of the fundus and which produced a dragged disc appearance.

  19. Macular pigment carotenoids in the retina and occipital cortex are related in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Lutein and zeaxanthin are dietary carotenoids that preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the retina. Together with mesozeaxanthin, a conversion product of lutein in the macula, they form the macular pigment. Lutein is also the predominant carotenoid in human brain tissue and...

  20. Modeling the impact of the Stiles-Crawford effect on accommodation directly at the retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vela-Garcia, Carmen; Lochocki, Benjamin; Vohnsen, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Although the Stiles-Crawford effect is of retinal origin, it is usually treated as a Gaussian apodization at the pupil. Here, the impact of defocus in effective retinal images for two eye models are calculated with the Stiles-Crawford effect introduced directly at the retina.

  1. Antioxidant Drug Therapy Approaches for Neuroprotection in Chronic Diseases of the Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Payne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular pathways contributing to visual signal transduction in the retina generate a high energy demand that has functional and structural consequences such as vascularization and high metabolic rates contributing to oxidative stress. Multiple signaling cascades are involved to actively regulate the redox state of the retina. Age-related processes increase the oxidative load, resulting in chronically elevated levels of oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species, which in the retina ultimately result in pathologies such as glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration, as well as the neuropathic complications of diabetes in the eye. Specifically, oxidative stress results in deleterious changes to the retina through dysregulation of its intracellular physiology, ultimately leading to neurodegenerative and potentially also vascular dysfunction. Herein we will review the evidence for oxidative stress-induced contributions to each of the three major ocular pathologies, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. The premise for neuroprotective strategies for these ocular disorders will be discussed in the context of recent clinical and preclinical research pursuing novel therapy development approaches.

  2. Visual behavior, eye and retina of the parasitic fish Carapus mourlani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Rochow, V B; Tiang, M K

    1978-12-01

    1. This is the first transmission electron microscope description of the retina of a parasitic fish. 2. The retina is well supplied with capillaries, some of which occur on the inner surface of the retina. An unusual and possibly primitive type of capillary junction is described. 3. The outer segments of the retina of Carapus mourlani, which measure approximately 2 micron in diameter, are of one type only. A certain degree of banking was observed. Outer segments are not isolated from each other by screening pigments; they are, however, surrounded by about 15 calycal processes. 4. Typical spheroids or conoids were not seen in the outer plexiform layer. The inner nuclear layer consists of only one or two layers of nuclei. The inner plexiform layer is unusually wide and some amacrine synapses can be identified. There are few ganglion cells and the ratio of nuclei in the outer nuclear layer to those of the inner nuclear layer to ganglion cells is approximately 100:10:1. 5. The eye of C. mourlani combines features of degenerated photoreceptors, characteristic of cave-organisms, with adaptations which are commonly found in nocturnal and deep-sea forms. 6. The visual behavior of the animal indicates that the eye is fully functional in spite of its corneal keratosis and small number of optic nerve fibers.

  3. The Retina of Asian and African Elephants: Comparison of Newborn and Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhrt, Heidrun; Bringmann, Andreas; Härtig, Wolfgang; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Peichl, Leo; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Elephants are precocial mammals that are relatively mature as newborns and mobile shortly after birth. To determine whether the retina of newborn elephants is capable of supporting the mobility of elephant calves, we compared the retinal structures of 2 newborn elephants (1 African and 1 Asian) and 2 adult animals of both species by immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. For the first time, we present here a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative characterization of the cellular composition of the newborn and the adult retinas of 2 elephant species. We found that the retina of elephants is relatively mature at birth. All retinal layers were well discernible, and various retinal cell types were detected in the newborns, including Müller glial cells (expressing glutamine synthetase and cellular retinal binding protein; CRALBP), cone photoreceptors (expressing S-opsin or M/L-opsin), protein kinase Cα-expressing bipolar cells, tyrosine hydroxylase-, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-, calbindin-, and calretinin-expressing amacrine cells, and calbindin-expressing horizontal cells. The retina of newborn elephants contains discrete horizontal cells which coexpress ChAT, calbindin, and calretinin. While the overall structure of the retina is very similar between newborn and adult elephants, various parameters change after birth. The postnatal thickening of the retinal ganglion cell axons and the increase in ganglion cell soma size are explained by the increase in body size after birth, and the decreases in the densities of neuronal and glial cells are explained by the postnatal expansion of the retinal surface area. The expression of glutamine synthetase and CRALBP in the Müller cells of newborn elephants suggests that the cells are already capable of supporting the activities of photoreceptors and neurons. As a peculiarity, the elephant retina contains both normally located and displaced giant ganglion cells, with single cells reaching a diameter of more than

  4. Expression of Quaking RNA-Binding Protein in the Adult and Developing Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiko, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Aono, Kentaro; Kawashima, Togo; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Ku, Li; Feng, Yue; Koike, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI), which belongs to the STAR family of KH domain-containing RNA-binding proteins, functions in pre-mRNA splicing, microRNA regulation, and formation of circular RNA. QKI plays critical roles in myelinogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous systems and has been implicated neuron-glia fate decision in the brain; however, neither the expression nor function of QKI in the neural retina is known. Here we report the expression of QKI RNA-binding protein in the developing and mature mouse retina. QKI was strongly expressed by Müller glial cells in both the developing and adult retina. Intriguingly, during development, QKI was expressed in early differentiating neurons, such as the horizontal and amacrine cells, and subsequently in later differentiating bipolar cells, but not in photoreceptors. Neuronal expression was uniformly weak in the adult. Among QKI isoforms (5, 6, and 7), QKI-5 was the predominantly expressed isoform in the adult retina. To study the function of QKI in the mouse retina, we examined quakingviable(qkv) mice, which have a dysmyelination phenotype that results from deficiency of QKI expression and reduced numbers of mature oligodendrocytes. In homozygous qkv mutant mice (qkv/qkv), the optic nerve expression levels of QKI-6 and 7, but not QKI-5 were reduced. In the retina of the mutant homozygote, QKI-5 levels were unchanged, and QKI-6 and 7 levels, already low, were also unaffected. We conclude that QKI is expressed in developing and adult Müller glia. QKI is additionally expressed in progenitors and in differentiating neurons during retinal development, but expression weakened or diminished during maturation. Among QKI isoforms, we found that QKI-5 predominated in the adult mouse retina. Since Müller glial cells are thought to share properties with retinal progenitor cells, our data suggest that QKI may contribute to maintaining retinal progenitors prior to differentiation into neurons. On the other hand, the expression of QKI in

  5. Separation of photoreceptor cell compartments in mouse retina for protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kasey; Walston, Steven T; Chen, Jeannie

    2017-04-11

    Light exposure triggers movement of certain signaling proteins within the cellular compartments of the highly polarized rod photoreceptor cell. This redistribution of proteins between the inner and outer segment compartments affects the performance and physiology of the rod cell. In addition, newly synthesized phototransduction proteins traverse from the site of their synthesis in the inner segment, through the thin connecting cilium, to reach their destination in the outer segment. Processes that impede normal trafficking of these abundant proteins lead to cell death. The study of movement and unique localization of biomolecules within the different compartments of the rod cell would be greatly facilitated by techniques that reliably separate these compartments. Ideally, these methods can be applied to the mouse retina due to the widespread usage of transgenic mouse models in the investigation of basic visual processes and disease mechanisms that affect vision. Although the retina is organized in distinct layers, the small and highly curved mouse retina makes physical separation of retinal layers a challenge. We introduce two peeling methods that efficiently and reliably isolate the rod outer segment and other cell compartments for Western blots to examine protein movement across these compartments. The first separation method employs Whatman ® filter paper to successively remove the rod outer segments from isolated, live mouse retinas. The second method utilizes Scotch TM tape to peel the rod outer segment layer and the rod inner segment layer from lyophilized mouse retinas. Both procedures can be completed within one hour. We utilize these two protocols on dark-adapted and light-exposed retinas of C57BL/6 mice and subject the isolated tissue layers to Western blots to demonstrate their effectiveness in detecting light-induced translocation of transducin (GNAT1) and rod arrestin (ARR1). Furthermore, we provide evidence that RGS9 does not undergo light

  6. Matrix metalloproteinases in the mouse retina: a comparative study of expression patterns and MMP antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groef, Lies; Andries, Lien; Lemmens, Kim; Van Hove, Inge; Moons, Lieve

    2015-12-29

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of Zn(2+)-dependent endoproteases, have been shown to act as fine regulators of both health and disease. Limited research revealed that they are essential to maintaining ocular physiology and inordinate MMP activities have been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and glaucomatous optic neuropathies (GONs). Nevertheless, a clear definition of their pathology-exacerbating and/or -resolving actions is lacking, especially in the context of GONs, as most studies thus far merely focused on expression profiling in human patients. Therefore, in an initial step towards an improved understanding of MMP functions in the retina, we studied the spatial expression pattern of MMP-2, -3, -9 and MT1-MMP in the healthy mouse retina. The spatial expression pattern of MMP-2, -3, -9 and MT1-MMP was studied in the healthy mouse retina via immunohistochemical stainings, and immunoreactivity profiles were compared to existing literature. Moreover, we considered sensitivity and specificity issues with commercially available MMP antibodies via Western blot. Basal expression of MMP-2,-3, -9 and MT1-MMP was found in the retina of healthy, adult mice. MMP-2 expression was seen in Müller glia, predominantly in their end feet, which is in line with available literature. MMP-3 expression was described for the first time in the retina, and was observed in vesicle-like structures along the radial fibers of Müller glia. MMP-9 expression, about which still discords exists, was seen in microglia and in a sparse subset of (apoptosing) RGCs. MT1-MMP localization was for the first time studied in adult mice and was found in RGC axons and Müller glia, mimicking the MT1-MMP expression pattern seen in rabbits and neonatal mice. Moreover, one antibody was selected for each MMP, based on its staining pattern in Western blot. The present MMP immunoreactivity

  7. Post-translational processing of synaptophysin in the rat retina is disrupted by diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis S D'Cruz

    Full Text Available Synaptophysin, is an abundant presynaptic protein involved in synaptic vesicle recycling and neurotransmitter release. Previous work shows that its content is significantly reduced in the rat retina by streptozotocin (STZ-diabetes. This study tested the hypothesis that STZ-diabetes alters synaptophysin protein turnover and glycosylation in the rat retina. Whole explant retinas from male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Rats were made diabetic by a single intraperitoneal STZ injection (65 mg/kg body weight in 10 mM sodium citrate, pH 4.5. mRNA translation was measured using a (35S-methionine labeling assay followed by synaptophysin immunoprecipitation and autoradiography. A pulse-chase study was used to determine the depletion of newly synthesized synaptophysin. Depletion of total synaptophysin was determined after treatment with cycloheximide. Mannose rich N-glycosylated synaptophysin was detected by treating retinal lysates with endoglycosidase H followed by immunoblot analysis. Synaptophysin mRNA translation was significantly increased after 1 month (p<0.001 and 2 months (p<0.05 of STZ-diabetes, compared to age-matched controls. Newly synthesized synaptophysin degradation was significantly accelerated in the retina after 1 and 2 months of diabetes compared to controls (p<0.05. Mannose rich glycosylated synaptophysin was significantly increased after 1 month of STZ-diabetes compared to controls (p<0.05.These data suggest that diabetes increases mRNA translation of synaptophysin in the retina, resulting in an accumulation of mannose rich glycosylated synaptophysin, a transient post-translational state of the protein. This diabetes-induced irregularity in post-translational processing could explain the accelerated degradation of retinal synaptophysin in diabetes.

  8. X-ray fluorescence microscopic measurement of elemental distribution in the mouse retina with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubman, Alexandra; Guennel, Philipp; Vessey, Kirstan A; Jones, Michael W M; James, Simon A; de Jonge, Martin D; White, Anthony R; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-10-01

    The biologically important metals such as zinc, copper and iron play key roles in retinal function, yet no study has mapped the spatio-temporal distribution of retinal biometals in healthy or diseased retina. We investigated a natural mouse model of retinal degeneration, the Cln6 nclf mouse. As dysfunctional metabolism of biometals is observed in the brains of these animals and deregulated metal homeostasis has been linked to retinal degeneration, we focused on mapping the elemental distribution in the healthy and Cln6 nclf mouse retina with age. Retinal and RPE elemental homeostasis was mapped in Cln6 nclf and C57BL6/J mice from 1 to 8 months of age using X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron. In the healthy retina, we detected a progressive loss of phosphorus in the outer nuclear layer and significant reduction in iron in the inner segments of the photoreceptors. Further investigation revealed a unique elemental signature for each retinal layer, with high areal concentrations of iron and sulfur in the photoreceptor segments and calcium, phosphorus, zinc and potassium enrichment predominantly in the nuclear layers. The analysis of retinae from Cln6 nclf mice did not show significant temporal changes in elemental distributions compared to age matched controls, despite significant photoreceptor cell loss. Our data therefore demonstrates that retinal layers have unique elemental composition. Elemental distribution is, with few exceptions, stably maintained over time in healthy and Cln6 nclf mouse retina, suggesting conservation of elemental distribution is critical for basic retinal function with age and is not modulated by processes underlying retinal degeneration.

  9. Step-By-Step Instructions for Retina Recordings with Perforated Multi Electrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Saad; Mutter, Marion; Benkner, Boris; Münch, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-electrode arrays are a state-of-the-art tool in electrophysiology, also in retina research. The output cells of the retina, the retinal ganglion cells, form a monolayer in many species and are well accessible due to their proximity to the inner retinal surface. This structure has allowed the use of multi-electrode arrays for high-throughput, parallel recordings of retinal responses to presented visual stimuli, and has led to significant new insights into retinal organization and function. However, using conventional arrays where electrodes are embedded into a glass or ceramic plate can be associated with three main problems: (1) low signal-to-noise ratio due to poor contact between electrodes and tissue, especially in the case of strongly curved retinas from small animals, e.g. rodents; (2) insufficient oxygen and nutrient supply to cells located on the bottom of the recording chamber; and (3) displacement of the tissue during recordings. Perforated multi-electrode arrays (pMEAs) have been found to alleviate all three issues in brain slice recordings. Over the last years, we have been using such perforated arrays to study light evoked activity in the retinas of various species including mouse, pig, and human. In this article, we provide detailed step-by-step instructions for the use of perforated MEAs to record visual responses from the retina, including spike recordings from retinal ganglion cells and in vitro electroretinograms (ERG). In addition, we provide in-depth technical and methodological troubleshooting information, and show example recordings of good quality as well as examples for the various problems which might be encountered. While our description is based on the specific equipment we use in our own lab, it may also prove useful when establishing retinal MEA recordings with other equipment. PMID:25165854

  10. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Role of Myo/Nog Cells in Neuroprotection: Evidence from the Light Damaged Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, Alice; Gerhart, Jacquelyn; Sutera, Christopher K; Purushothuman, Sivaraman; George-Weinstein, Mindy; Stone, Jonathan; Bravo-Nuevo, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    To identify Myo/Nog cells in the adult retina and test their role in protecting retinal photoreceptors from light damage. Light damage was induced by exposing albino rats raised in dim cyclic light to 1000 lux light for 24 hours. In one group of rats, Myo/Nog cells were purified from rat brain tissue by magnetic cell sorting following binding of the G8 monoclonal antibody (mAb). These cells were injected into the vitreous humour of the eye within 2 hours following bright light exposure. Retinal function was assessed using full-field, flash electroretinogram (ERG) before and after treatment. The numbers of Myo/Nog cells, apoptotic photoreceptors, and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in Muller cells were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Myo/Nog cells were present in the undamaged retina in low numbers. Light induced damage increased their numbers, particularly in the choroid, ganglion cell layer and outer plexiform layer. Intravitreal injection of G8-positive (G8+) cells harvested from brain mitigated all the effects of light damage examined, i.e. loss of retinal function (ERG), death of photoreceptors and the stress-induced expression of GFAP in Muller cells. Some of the transplanted G8+ cells were integrated into the retina from the vitreous. Myo/Nog cells are a subpopulation of cells that are present in the adult retina. They increase in number in response to light induced stress. Intravitreal injection of Myo/Nog cells was protective to the retina, in part, by reducing retinal stress as measured by the Muller cell response. These results suggest that Myo/Nog cells, or the factors they produce, are neuroprotective and may be therapeutic in neurodegenerative retinal diseases.

  12. Safety evaluation of "retina implant alpha IMS"--a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B D; Stingl, Katarina; Wilhelm, Barbara; Peters, Tobias; Besch, Dorothea; Sachs, Helmut; Gekeler, Florian; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-03-01

    To restore vision in patients with retinitis pigmentosa, several types of electronic devices have been developed to stimulate neurons at different levels along the visual pathway. Subretinal stimulation of the retina with the Retina Implant Alpha IMS (Retina Implant AG, Reutlingen, Germany) has been demonstrated to provide useful vision in daily life. Here we evaluated the safety of this device. An interventional, prospective, multi-center, single-arm study was conducted in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with the Retina Implant Alpha IMS. The results from the first nine patients of a single center regarding safety of the device are reported. Any untoward medical occurrence related or unrelated to the tested device was documented and evaluated. Nine adult subjects were included in the study at the Tübingen site. Seventy-five adverse events occurred in total, and 53 affected the eye and its adnexa. Thirty-one ocular adverse events had a relationship to the implant that was classified as "certain" while 19 had a probable or possible relationship; three had no relationship to the implant. Thirty-nine ocular adverse events resolved without sequelae, two resolved with sequelae, 11 remained unresolved, and in one the status was unknown. The intensity of ocular adverse events was mild in the majority of cases (n = 45), while six were of moderate and two of severe intensity. There was no non-ocular adverse event with certain relationship to the device. One subject lost light perception (without light localization) in her study eye. In conclusion, this prospective study, "Safety and Efficacy of Subretinal Implants for Partial Restoration of Vision in Blind Patients," shows that the Retina Implant Alpha IMS is an option for restoring vision using a subretinal stimulation device with a clinically acceptable safety profile.

  13. Evaluation of the central macula in commotio retinae not associated with other types of traumatic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Youn; Nam, Woo Ho; Kim, Seung Hoon; Jang, Sun Young; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2011-08-01

    To report on the anatomical and functional changes to the macula in nine patients suffering from commotio retinae not accompanied by any other types of traumatic retinopathy. Nine injured eyes with commotio retinae were evaluated soon after ocular trauma with ophthalmic examination, including Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In 12 eyes of 6 patients, Humphrey visual field (HVF) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) were performed. Re-examinations were periodically performed for a mean of 26 days. Data from 9 injured eyes were collected and compared to data collected from the 9 non-affected eyes of the same patients. SD-OCT revealed no significant differences in the foveal thickness and total macular volume between traumatized and intact eyes in all 9 patients. Only 3 out of the 9 injured eyes showed abnormal findings in SD-OCT images such as discontinuity of the inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction or abnormal hyper-reflectivity from the IS/OS and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lines in the macula. HVF and mfERG results did not show any functional deterioration in the injured eyes compared with intact eyes. During follow-up, the commotio retinae resolved in all 9 eyes. The changes to the outer retinal region detected in 3 patients by SD-OCT were also resolved. Acute retinal changes in commotio retinae, not associated with other retinal pathologies, were resolved without histological and functional sequelae. In a few cases of commotio retinae, SD-OCT revealed transient abnormalities mainly observed at the IS/OS and RPE complexes.

  14. Cerebral malaria in children: using the retina to study the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Nicholas A. V.; Taylor, Terrie E.; Barrera, Valentina; White, Valerie A.; Hiscott, Paul; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Dhillon, Baljean; Harding, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a dangerous complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection, which takes a devastating toll on children in sub-Saharan Africa. Although autopsy studies have improved understanding of cerebral malaria pathology in fatal cases, information about in vivo neurovascular pathogenesis is scarce because brain tissue is inaccessible in life. Surrogate markers may provide insight into pathogenesis and thereby facilitate clinical studies with the ultimate aim of improving the treatment and prognosis of cerebral malaria. The retina is an attractive source of potential surrogate markers for paediatric cerebral malaria because, in this condition, the retina seems to sustain microvascular damage similar to that of the brain. In paediatric cerebral malaria a combination of retinal signs correlates, in fatal cases, with the severity of brain pathology, and has diagnostic and prognostic significance. Unlike the brain, the retina is accessible to high-resolution, non-invasive imaging. We aimed to determine the extent to which paediatric malarial retinopathy reflects cerebrovascular damage by reviewing the literature to compare retinal and cerebral manifestations of retinopathy-positive paediatric cerebral malaria. We then compared retina and brain in terms of anatomical and physiological features that could help to account for similarities and differences in vascular pathology. These comparisons address the question of whether it is biologically plausible to draw conclusions about unseen cerebral vascular pathogenesis from the visible retinal vasculature in retinopathy-positive paediatric cerebral malaria. Our work addresses an important cause of death and neurodisability in sub-Saharan Africa. We critically appraise evidence for associations between retina and brain neurovasculature in health and disease, and in the process we develop new hypotheses about why these vascular beds are susceptible to sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes. PMID:24578549

  15. Protein changes in the retina following experimental retinal detachment in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nakul; Lewis, Geoffrey P; Fisher, Steven K; Heegaard, Steffen; Prause, Jan U; la Cour, Morten; Vorum, Henrik; Honoré, Bent

    2011-01-01

    Retinal detachment leads to the widespread cellular remodeling of the retina. The purpose of this study was to identify protein changes that accompany these cellular alterations by comparing the proteomic profiles of sham and experimentally detached rabbit retina. Elucidation of the proteins most dramatically affected by retinal detachment would add further understanding to the pathophysiology of this condition, and potentially identify therapeutic targets useful in preventing the deleterious effects of detachment, including photoreceptor cell death and the activation of non-neuronal microglial and Müller cells. Retinal detachments were induced in the right eyes of six New Zealand Red pigmented rabbits. Sham surgery was performed in the right eyes of six other rabbits that were used as controls. At seven days, the eyes were enucleated and the retinal tissue was harvested. The individual retinal samples were subjected to high resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Differentially expressed protein spots were processed for identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Further investigation was undertaken with western blotting, and immunocytochemical studies on a further set of four sham and four detached retinas. Eighteen protein spots were found to be at least twofold differentially expressed between the sham and detached retinas. These protein spots were identified as: vimentin; tubulin β-2C; fragments of α-enolase; fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A; ATP synthase subunit β; mitochondrial creatine kinase; N-terminal fragments of albumin; prohibitin; and transducin-β(1). The differentially expressed proteins determined in this study may play an important role in the cellular responses of the retina after its detachment, subsequent ability to recover following surgical reattachment, as well as in serious complications such as subretinal fibrosis and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  16. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?

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    Justyna Widomska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a high dietary intake of carotenoids may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Humans cannot synthesize carotenoids and depend on their dietary intake. Major carotenoids that have been found in human plasma can be divided into two groups, carotenes (nonpolar molecules, such as β-carotene, α-carotene or lycopene and xanthophylls (polar carotenoids that include an oxygen atom in their structure, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Only two dietary carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin (macular xanthophylls, are selectively accumulated in the human retina. A third carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin, is formed directly in the human retina from lutein. Additionally, xanthophylls account for about 70% of total carotenoids in all brain regions. Some specific properties of these polar carotenoids must explain why they, among other available carotenoids, were selected during evolution to protect the retina and brain. It is also likely that the selective uptake and deposition of macular xanthophylls in the retina and brain are enhanced by specific xanthophyll-binding proteins. We hypothesize that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs. Most importantly, xanthophylls are selectively concentrated in the most vulnerable regions of lipid bilayer membranes enriched in polyunsaturated lipids. This localization is ideal if macular xanthophylls are to act as lipid-soluble antioxidants, which is the most accepted mechanism through which lutein and zeaxanthin protect neural tissue against degenerative diseases.

  17. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on crystalline lens and retina in nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Seyhmus; Nergiz, Yusuf; Cingü, Abdullah Kürşat; Atay, Ahmet Engin; Sahin, Alparslan; Cinar, Yasin; Caca, Ihsan

    2013-03-01

    To determine histopathological changes on crystalline lens and retina of rats after subcutaneous injection of nicotine and to examine the effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on these changes related to nicotine exposure. Twenty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study and the rats were divided into four equal sized groups randomly (Group N: the rats exposed only to nicotine, group HB: the rats received only HBO, group N+HB: the rats that underwent to nicotine injection and subsequently received HBO, group C: the control group that neither exposed to nicotine nor received HBO). The rats were sacrificed by decapitation method and all were enucleated immediately after scarification. Tissue samples from crystalline lens, lens capsule, and the retina from the right eyes of the rats were examined by light microscopy. While the histological appearances of the retina and the lens was similar in group HB, group N+HB, and the control group; group N showed some pathological changes like decrement in the retinal ganglion cell density, atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer, congestion of the vessels in the optic nerve head, thinning of the internal plexiform layer, thinning of the lens capsule, and transformation of the anterior subcapsular epithelium into squamous epithelia. Subcutaneous injection of nicotine was found to be related with some pathological changes in the retina and lens of the Sprague-Dawley rats. However HBO caused no significant negative effect. Furthermore, the histopathological changes related to nicotine exposure in the lens and retina of the rats recovered by the application of HBO.

  18. Intravitreal NGF administration counteracts retina degeneration after permanent carotid artery occlusion in rat

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    De Sordi Nadia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF is produced by different cell types in the anterior and posterior eye, exerting a neuroprotective role in the adult life. The visual system is highly sensitive to NGF and the retina and optic nerve provides suitable subjects for the study of central nervous system degeneration. The model of bilateral carotid occlusion (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO is a well-established model for chronic brain hypoperfusion leading to brain capillary pathology, to retina and optic nerve degeneration. In order to study if a single intravitreal injection of NGF protects the retina and the optic nerve from degeneration during systemic circulatory diseases, we investigated morphological and molecular changes occurring in the retina and optic nerve of adult rats at different time-points (8, 30 and 75 days after bilateral carotid occlusion. Results We demonstrated that a single intravitreal injection of NGF (5 μg/3 μl performed 24 hours after 2VO ligation has a long-lasting protective effect on retina and optic nerve degeneration. NGF counteracts retinal ganglion cells degeneration by early affecting Bax/Bcl-2 balance- and c-jun- expression (at 8 days after 2VO. A single intravitreal NGF injection regulates the demyelination/remyelination balance after ischemic injury in the optic nerve toward remyelination (at 75 days after 2VO, as indicated by the MBP expression regulation, thus preventing optic nerve atrophy and ganglion cells degeneration. At 8 days, NGF does not modify 2VO-induced alteration in VEFG and related receptors mRNA expression. Conclusion The protective effect of exogenous NGF during this systemic circulatory disease seems to occur also by strengthening the effect of endogenous NGF, the synthesis of which is increased by vascular defect and also by the mechanical lesion associated with NGF or even vehicle intraocular delivery.

  19. Feasibility of 99mTc-TRODAT-1 micro-SPECT imaging of dopamine transporter in animal retinas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Juan; Liu Xingdang; Qi Yijin; Dai Qiusheng; Zhang Xuezhu; Qu Xiaomei; Huang Jia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 Micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) was used for imaging dopamine transporter (DAT) in retinas and to investigate the changes of DAT in retinas of guinea pigs with form deprivation myopia. Pigmented guinea pigs aged 3 weeks were devided into form deprivation myopia (FDM) group (n=6) and normal control group (n=6). The test group wore translucent goggles randomly for 4 weeks, and both groups underwent biometric measurement (refraction and axial length) before and after the experiment. Micro-SPECT retinas imaging was performed at the 4th week after injection of 99m Tcc-TRODAT-1. The retinas were clearly resolved in the images. The ratio of 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake in the myopic retinas (11.55 ± 2.80) was 3.64 ± 1.40 lower than that in the control eye (15.20 ± 1.98), and 2.35 ± 1.05 lower than that in the fellow eyes (13.90 ± 2.04). The results showed that 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 Micro-SPECT eye imaging can be used to trace the distribution and changes of DAT in retina, and DAT in the myopic retinas were lower than that in the normal control eyes and fellow eyes. Micro-SPECT may provide a new approach for further studies on the role of dopamine system in the experimental myopia. (authors)

  20. Spectral domain optical coherence tomographic analysis of healthy retina in branch retinal vein occlusion and its response to antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo-Villanueva, Guillermo; Harasawa, Mariana; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Mathias, Marc T; Siringo, Frank S; Olson, Jeffrey L; Oliver, Scott C; Mandava, Naresh; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    To propose a model that measures the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) on relatively healthy retina. The purpose is to analyze the remote effect of a branch retinal vein occlusion in the healthy retina, to determine the response it may have to IVB, and to determine if IVB has an atrophic effect on the healthy retina. Retrospective, longitudinal comparative analysis of patients with branch retinal vein occlusion treated with IVB. Eyes were divided into experimental (branch retinal vein occlusion eye) and control (contralateral eye) groups. Each eye was analyzed for thickness and area. Thickness measurements were performed for total retinal thickness, inner retina thickness, and outer retina thickness. Area was measured for photoreceptors, choroid, and total retina. Eighteen eyes of 9 patients. For thickness analysis, 1,050 scans were studied, and 126 measurements were performed on 42 scans for area analysis. No difference was observed for thickness, except for inner retina thickness. No difference was observed for area. No difference was observed when analyzing a cumulative exposure to IVB. There is no evidence to suggest an atrophic effect caused by IVB when analyzing thickness or area in this experiment. This model could be used to analyze the long-term safety of IVB in larger studies.

  1. Effect of Feeding Bacillus subtilis Spores to Broilers Challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg Brazilian Strain UFPR1 on Performance, Immune Response, and Gut Health

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    Ricardo Mitsuo Hayashi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a poultry industry and public health concern worldwide. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (SH has been reported in broilers in Brazil. The effect of feeding a blend of three strains of Bacillus subtilis (PRO was studied in broilers orally challenged (107 CFU/chick or not with a SH isolated in south of Brazil (UFPR1 strain. Twelve male Cobb 500 broilers per pen were randomly assigned to six treatments in a 3 × 2 factorial experiment where PRO was added at 0, 250, or 500 g/ton of broiler feed and fed to either SH-challenged (SH Control, SH + PRO 250, and SH + PRO 500 or non-challenged birds (Control, PRO 250, and PRO 500. Broiler performance, histologic alterations in intestinal morphology, Salmonella quantification and immune cells counts in liver (macrophages, T CD4+ and T CD8+ were analyzed. Changes in the intestinal microbiota of broilers were also studied by metagenomics for Control, SH Control, SH + PRO 250, and SH + PRO 500 only. Feeding PRO at 250 or 500 g/ton reduced SH counts and incidence in liver and cecum at 21 days of age. It was observed that PRO groups increased the macrophage mobilization to the liver in SH-challenged birds (P < 0.05 but reduced these cells in the liver of non-challenged birds, showing an interesting immune cell dynamics effect. PRO at 250 g/ton did not affect gut histology, but improved animal performance (P < 0.05 while PRO at 500/ton did not affect animal performance but increased histologic alteration related to activation of the defense response in the ileum in SH challenged birds compared to control birds (P < 0.05. SH + PRO 500 group presented a more diverse cecal microbiota (Shannon–Wiener index; P < 0.05 compared to Control and SH Control groups; while SH + PRO 250 had greater ileal richness (JackkNife index compared to Control (P < 0.05. PRO was effective in reducing Salmonella colonization in liver and cecum when

  2. Effects of mercury intoxication on the response of horizontal cells of the retina of thraira fish (Hoplias malabaricus

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    C.L. Tanan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Methyl mercury (MeHg is highly neurotoxic, affecting visual function in addition to other central nervous system functions. The effect of mercury intoxication on the amplitude of horizontal cell responses to light was studied in the retina of the fish Hoplias malabaricus. Intracellular responses were recorded from horizontal cells of fish previously intoxicated with MeHg by intraperitoneal injection (IP group or by trophic exposure (T group. Only one retina per fish was used. The doses of MeHg chloride administered to the IP group were 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 6.0 mg/kg. The amplitudes of the horizontal cell responses were lower than control in individuals exposed to 0.01 (N = 4 retinas, 0.05 (N = 2 retinas and 0.1 mg/kg (N = 1 retina, whereas no responses were recorded in the 1.0, 2.0, and 6.0 mg/kg groups. T group individuals were fed young specimens of Astyanax sp previously injected with MeHg corresponding to 0.75 (N = 1 retina, 0.075 (N = 8 retinas or 0.0075 (N = 4 retinas mg/kg fish body weight. After 14 doses, one every 5 days, the amplitude of the horizontal cell response was higher than control in individuals exposed to 0.075 and 0.0075 mg/kg, and lower in individuals exposed to 0.75 mg/kg. We conclude that intoxication with MeHg affects the electrophysiological response of the horizontal cells in the retina, either reducing or increasing its amplitude compared to control, and that these effects are related to the dose and/or to the mode of administration.

  3. Ceratoconjuntivite seca associada a degeneração de retina e esclerose nuclear em cadela. Relato de Caso

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Ana Carolina Henrique de; Universidade Estadual do Ceará.; Cunha, Duanny Murinelly de Souza; Universidade Estadual do Ceará.; Martins, Patricia Lustosa; Universidade Estadual do Ceará.; Mello, Mirza; Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Estadual do Ceará ,UECE, Fortaleza, CE; Costa, Paula Priscila Correia; Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Estadual do Ceará ,UECE, Fortaleza, CE

    2016-01-01

    Diversas alterações na retina e no cristalino ocorrem com o envelhecimento, culminando em degenerações de retina e esclerose nuclear para os quais não há tratamento. A ceratoconjuntivite seca é uma patologia imuno-mediada, mais em animais idosos, caracterizada por uma inflamação exarcebada nas glândulas lacrimais, reduzindo a produção de lágrimas. A sintomatologia das degenerações de retina é uma cegueira, enquanto na esclerose nuclear apenas uma opacidade no cristalino é observada. A sintoma...

  4. Segmentasi Pembuluh Darah Retina Pada Citra Fundus Menggunakan Gradient Based Adaptive Thresholding Dan Region Growing

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    Deni Sutaji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakSegmentasi pembuluh darah pada citra fundus retina menjadi hal yang substansial dalam dunia kedokteran, karena dapat digunakan untuk mendeteksi penyakit, seperti: diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, dan cardiovascular. Dokter membutuhkan waktu sekitar dua jam untuk mendeteksi pembuluh darah retina, sehingga diperlukan metode yang dapat membantu screening agar lebih cepat.Penelitian sebelumnya mampu melakukan segmentasi pembuluh darah yang sensitif terhadap variasi ukuran lebar pembuluh darah namun masih terjadi over-segmentasi pada area patologi. Oleh karena itu, penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan metode segmentasi pembuluh darah pada citra fundus retina yang dapat mengurangi over-segmentasi pada area patologi menggunakan Gradient Based Adaptive Thresholding dan Region Growing.Metode yang diusulkan terdiri dari 3 tahap, yaitu segmentasi pembuluh darah utama, deteksi area patologi dan segmentasi pembuluh darah tipis. Tahap segmentasi pembuluh darah utama menggunakan high-pass filtering dan tophat reconstruction pada kanal hijau citra yang sudah diperbaiki kontrasnya sehingga lebih jelas perbedaan antara pembuluh darah dan background. Tahap deteksi area patologi menggunakan metode Gradient Based Adaptive Thresholding. Tahap segmentasi pembuluh darah tipis menggunakan Region Growing berdasarkan informasi label pembuluh darah utama dan label area patologi. Hasil segmentasi pembuluh darah utama dan pembuluh darah tipis kemudian digabungkan sehingga menjadi keluaran sistem berupa citra biner pembuluh darah. Berdasarkan hasil uji coba, metode ini mampu melakukan segmentasi pembuluh darah retina dengan baik pada citra fundus DRIVE, yaitu dengan akurasi rata-rata 95.25% dan nilai Area Under Curve (AUC pada kurva Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC sebesar 74.28%.                           Kata Kunci: citra fundus retina, gradient based adaptive thresholding, patologi, pembuluh darah retina, region growing

  5. Functional characterization of rs2229094 (T>C polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor locus and lymphotoxin alpha expression in human retina: the Retina 4 project

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    Pastor-Idoate S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvador Pastor-Idoate,1,2 Irene Rodríguez-Hernández,2,3 Jimena Rojas,1 Lucia Gonzalez-Buendia,1 Santiago Delgado-Tirado,1,4 Jose Carlos López,1 Rogelio González-Sarmiento,2,3 Jose C Pastor1,4 1IOBA Eye Institute, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, 2Molecular Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, 3Molecular and Cellular Cancer Biology Institute, High Council of Scientific Research, Biomedical Research Institute of Salamanca, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, Spain Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine the expression and localization of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA in human retinas and the functionality of one of its polymorphisms rs2229094 (C13R (T>C, previously associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR development.Materials and methods: Total RNA from three healthy human retinas were extracted and subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis, using flanking primers of LTA cDNA. In addition, three human eyes with retinal detachment (RD and three healthy control eyes were subjected to immunohistochemistry (IHC with a specific antibody against LTA. The functionality of T and C alleles was assessed by using pCEFL-Flag expression vector and transient transfection assays in COS-1 cell line. In addition, expression analysis by RT-PCR, Western blot and subcellular localization of both alleles and by immunofluorescence assay was performed.Results: RT-PCR analysis revealed no significant levels of messenger RNA (mRNA LTA in healthy human retinas. Sequential IHC staining showed differences between healthy human and RD retinas. No differences in mRNA and protein expression levels and in subcellular localization between both alleles were found. Both alleles were located in the cytoplasm of COS-1 cells.Conclusion: Although results suggest lack of functionality, the differences found in IHC study and its strong association

  6. M1 ipRGCs Influence Visual Function through Retrograde Signaling in the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigge, Cameron L; Yeh, Po-Ting; Liou, Nan-Fu; Lee, Chi-Chan; You, Shih-Feng; Liu, Lei-Lei; McNeill, David S; Chew, Kylie S; Hattar, Samer; Chen, Shih-Kuo; Zhang, Dao-Qi

    2016-07-06

    Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs, with five subtypes named M1-M5) are a unique subclass of RGCs with axons that project directly to many brain nuclei involved in non-image-forming functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Recent evidence suggests that melanopsin-based signals also influence image-forming visual function, including light adaptation, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. Intriguingly, a small population of M1 ipRGCs have intraretinal axon collaterals that project toward the outer retina. Using genetic mouse models, we provide three lines of evidence showing that these axon collaterals make connections with upstream dopaminergic amacrine cells (DACs): (1) ipRGC signaling to DACs is blocked by tetrodotoxin both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that ipRGC-to-DAC transmission requires voltage-gated Na(+) channels; (2) this transmission is partly dependent on N-type Ca(2+) channels, which are possibly expressed in the axon collateral terminals of ipRGCs; and (3) fluorescence microscopy reveals that ipRGC axon collaterals make putative presynaptic contact with DACs. We further demonstrate that elimination of M1 ipRGCs attenuates light adaptation, as evidenced by an impaired electroretinogram b-wave from cones, whereas a dopamine receptor agonist can potentiate the cone-driven b-wave of retinas lacking M1 ipRGCs. Together, the results strongly suggest that ipRGCs transmit luminance signals retrogradely to the outer retina through the dopaminergic system and in turn influence retinal light adaptation. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) comprise a third class of retinal photoreceptors that are known to mediate physiological responses such as circadian photoentrainment. However, investigation into whether and how ipRGCs contribute to vision has just begun. Here, we provide convergent anatomical and physiological evidence that

  7. Blood flow MRI of the human retina/choroid during rest and isometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; San Emeterio Nateras, Oscar; Peng, Qi; Rosende, Carlos A; Duong, Timothy Q

    2012-06-28

    To investigate blood flow (BF) in the human retina/choroid during rest and handgrip isometric exercise using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Four healthy volunteers (25-36 years old) in multiple sessions (1-3) on different days. MRI studies were performed on a 3-Tesla scanner using a custom-made surface coil (7×5cm in diameter) at the spatial resolution of 0.5×0.8×6.0 mm. BF was measured using the pseudo-continuous arterial-spin-labeling technique with background suppression and turbo-spin-echo acquisition. During MRI, subjects rested for 1 minute followed by 1 minute of handgrip, repeating three times, while maintaining stable eye fixation on a target with cued eye blinks at the end of each data acquisition (every 4.6 seconds). Robust BF of the unanesthetized human retina/choroid was detected. Basal BF in the posterior retina/choroid was 149±48 mL/100 mL/min with a mean heart rate of 60±5 beats per minute, mean arterial pressure of 78±5 mm Hg, ocular perfusion pressure of 67±4 mm Hg at rest (mean±SD, n=4 subjects). Handgrip significantly increased retina/choroid BF by 25%±7%, heart rate by 19%±8%, mean arterial pressure by 22%±5% (measured at the middle of the handgrip task), and ocular perfusion pressure by 25%±6% (averaged across the entire handgrip task) (P0.05). This study demonstrates a novel MRI application to image quantitative BF of the human retina/choroid during rest and isometric exercise. Retina/choroid BF increases during brief handgrip exercise, paralleling increases in mean arterial pressure. Handgrip exercise changes ocular perfusion pressure free of potential drug side effect and can be done in the MRI scanner. MRI offers quantitative BF with large field of view without depth limitation, potentially providing insights into retinal pathophysiology.

  8. Phenotype of transgenic mice overexpressed with inducible nitric oxide synthase in the retina.

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    Guey Shuang Wu

    Full Text Available Unlike its constitutive isoforms, including neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS along with a series of cytokines are generated in inflammatory pathologic conditions in retinal photoreceptors. In this study, we constructed transgenic mice overexpressing iNOS in the retina to evaluate the effect of sustained, intense iNOS generation in the photoreceptor damage.For construction of opsin/iNOS transgene in the CMVSport 6 expression vector, the 4.4 kb Acc65I/Xhol mouse rod opsin promoter was ligated upstream to a 4.1 kb fragment encoding the complete mouse cDNA of iNOS. From the four founders identified, two heterozygote lines and one homozygote line were established. The presence of iNOS in the retina was confirmed and the pathologic role of iNOS was assessed by detecting nitrotyrosine products and apoptosis. Commercial TUNEL kit was used to detect DNA strand breaks, a later step in a sequence of morphologic changes of apoptosis process.The insertion and translation of iNOS gene were demonstrated by an intense single 130 kDa band in Western blot and specific immunolocalization at the photoreceptors of the retina. Cellular toxicity in the retinas of transgenic animals was detected by a post-translational modification product, tyrosine-nitrated protein, the most significant one of which was nitrated cytochrome c. Following the accumulation of nitrated mitochondrial proteins and cytochrome c release, marked apoptosis was detected in the photoreceptor cell nuclei of the retina.We have generated a pathologic phenotype with sustained iNOS overexpression and, therefore, high output of nitric oxide. Under basal conditions, such overexpression of iNOS causes marked mitochondrial cytochrome c nitration and release and subsequent photoreceptor apoptosis in the retina. Therefore, the modulation of pathways leading to iNOS generation or its effective neutralization can be of significant therapeutic benefit in the

  9. Unintentional displacement of the retina after standard vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiragami, Chieko; Shiraga, Fumio; Yamaji, Hidetaka; Fukuda, Kouki; Takagishi, Mai; Morita, Misako; Kishikami, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    To study unintentional displacement of the retina after standard vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Prospective interventional case series. Forty-three eyes of 43 consecutive patients with cystic RRD involving 1 or more quadrants underwent successful standard vitrectomy with 20% sulfur hexafluoride gas injection. Neither scleral buckling nor retinotomy was performed. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging was subsequently recorded to detect displacement of the retina using the Topcon TRC-50DX (Topcon, Tokyo, Japan) at 10 days and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Fluorescein angiography was also recorded using standard techniques for patients with abnormal FAF findings. Cyclotorsion and vertical deviation were measured postoperatively. The proportion of eyes with postoperative retinal displacement detected by FAF imaging. The mean age of these 43 patients was 60 years with a range of 39 to 77 years. Of the 43 eyes, retinal detachment involved 1 quadrant in 2 eyes, 2 quadrants in 31 eyes, 3 quadrants in 8 eyes, and 4 quadrants in 2 eyes. After complete reattachment of the retina, FAF photography demonstrated hyperfluorescent lines superiorly parallel to retinal vessels within the vascular arcade in 27 of the 43 eyes (62.8%). Fluorescein angiography did not demonstrate any abnormalities corresponding to the linear autofluorescence. This autofluorescence was hypothesized to originate from increased metabolic activity of the retinal pigment epithelium that had been preoperatively located under the major retinal vessels and was postoperatively exposed to light because of downward displacement of the retina. Of the 27 eyes with retinal displacement, 1 to 5 degrees of extorsion were seen in 16 eyes (59.3%), and 1 to 4 degrees of vertical deviation were seen in 13 eyes (48.1%). None of the 27 patients had diplopia or slant. The extent of retinal detachment (P = 0.019) and the macular status (on or off) (P = 0.016) were significantly associated with

  10. The elevation of intraocular pressure is associated with apoptosis and increased immunoreactivity for nitric oxide synthase in rat retina whereas the effectiveness of retina derived relaxing factor is unaffected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takır, Selçuk; Gürel-Gürevin, Ebru; Toprak, Ayça; Demirci-Tansel, Cihan; Uydeş-Doğan, B Sönmez

    2016-04-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive ocular disease that stands in the upper rank for the cause of blindness in worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the possible disturbances occurred in the layers of retina due to an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and to verify the effectiveness of retina derived relaxing factor, i.e., RRF in this pathologic condition. The increase in IOP was induced by cauterization of the three of episcleral veins simultaneously in rats. After 8 weeks period, the retinas excised from the vein cauterized eyes were evaluated for the possible histopathological and ultrastructural alterations as well as for the relaxing effects on isolated bovine retinal and rat mesenteric arteries, in comparison with the retinas obtained from contralateral sham-operated eyes. In the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes, profound morphological deteriorations were determined in the ganglion and outer nuclear cell layers which were associated with an increased number of TUNEL positive cells in the ganglion and inner nuclear cell layers. Increased immunohistochemical stainings for three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were defined in almost all layers of the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes, in which eNOS was abundant particularly in the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. An irregular basal folding of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and an increased inter lamellar space of photoreceptor cell layer furtherly characterized the prominent degeneration of those layers in the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes. On the other hand, the relaxing effects of the retina obtained from IOP-elevated eyes were determined to be unchanged on the retinal and mesenteric arteries precontracted either with prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 30 μM) or potassium chloride (K(+), 100 mM), when compared with the relaxations of control retina obtained from contralateral sham-operated eyes. Overall, these findings suggested that the elevation of IOP induces prominent structural changes in

  11. The area centralis in the chicken retina contains efferent target amacrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Cynthia; Lindstrom, Sarah H.; De Grip, Willem J.; Wilson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The retinas of birds receive a substantial efferent, or centrifugal, input from a midbrain nucleus. The function of this input is presently unclear but previous work in the pigeon has shown that efferent input is excluded from the area centralis, suggesting that the functions of the area centralis and the efferent system are incompatible. Using an antibody specific to rods, we have identified the area centralis in another species, the chicken, and mapped the distribution of the unique amacrine cells that are the postsynaptic partners of efferent fibers. Efferent target amacrine cells are found within the chicken area centralis and their density is continuous across the border of the area centralis. In contrast to the pigeon retina then, we conclude that the chicken area centralis receives efferent input. We suggest that the difference between the 2 species is attributable to the presence of a fovea within the area centralis of the pigeon and its absence from that of the chicken. PMID:19296862

  12. Processing of S-cone signals in the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Kiyoharu J; Grünert, Ulrike; Li, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Color information is encoded by two parallel pathways in the mammalian retina. One pathway compares signals from long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones and generates red-green opponency. The other compares signals from short- and middle-/long-wavelength sensitive cones and generates blue-green (yellow) opponency. Whereas both pathways operate in trichromatic primates (including humans), the fundamental, phylogenetically ancient color mechanism shared among most mammals is blue-green opponency. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how signals from short-wavelength sensitive cones are processed in the primate and nonprimate mammalian retina, with a focus on the inner plexiform layer where bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cell processes interact to facilitate the generation of blue-green opponency.

  13. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) delivery to retina: an overview of current research advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Maryam; Alizadeh, Effat; Saei Arezoumand, Khatereh; Fallahi Motlagh, Behzad; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2017-10-24

    The intraocular administration of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been found to attenuate the photoreceptor degeneration and preserve retinal functions in the animal research models of the inherited or induced retinal disease. Studies with the aim of CNTF transfer to the posterior segment inside the eye have been directed to determine the best method for its administration. An ideal delivery method would overcome the eye drug elimination mechanisms or barriers and provide the sustained release of the CNTF into retina in the safest fashion with the minimum harm to the quality of life. This review focuses on the present state of CNTF delivery to retina, also provides an overview of available technologies and their challenges.

  14. Uptake and release of [14C] GABA from rabbit retina synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redburn, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    A partial separation of two synaptosomal fractions was achieved using modifications of conventional homogenization and centrifugation techniques. The two fractions contained morphologically distinct synaptosomal populations, receptor cell synaptosomes (large synaptosomes, P 1 ), and synaptosomes from the other cell types (smaller, conventional-sized synaptosomes, P 2 ). [ 14 C]GABA was bound and released from subcellular fractions from retina under conditions which support its role as a neurotransmitter in retina. On the other hand, [ 3 H]leucine, which is very likely a non-transmitter compound, was bound by retinal fractions but not released to the appropriate stimulation. [ 14 C]GABA binding and release sites were more prevalent in P 2 fractions. [ 14 C]GABA was bound by P 1 fractions containing photoreceptor synaptosomes; however, the K + stimulated release of [ 14 C]GABA appeared to be insensitive to external Ca 2+ . Possible mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  15. Simulated treatment of recurrent choroidal neovascularization in primate retina. Comparative histopathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiddy, W E; Fine, S L; Quigley, H A; Hohman, R M; Dunkelberger, G

    1985-03-01

    We simulated the treatment of recurrent choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVM) by applying two courses of laser treatment to monkey retinas. Argon green, argon blue-green, and krypton red lasers (KRLs) were used in juxtafoveal, papillomacular bundle, and nonmacular areas. The effects were examined clinically and histopathologically. Results of once-treated control eyes were consistent with those of previous studies. Repeat treatment, however, resulted in full-thickness retinal destruction or necrosis with all laser modalities and in all fundus locations. These results are consistent with the absorptive characteristics of xanthophyll and melanin and suggest only limited advantages to the KRL when treatment of recurrent CNVM is performed in a previously treated area of the fundus. However, treatment of recurrent CNVM is still probably most successful with a KRL, because recurrent CNVM is usually at a border of a photocoagulation scar, where the retina is still untreated, and because histologic studies have demonstrated inner retinal sparing with a KRL in juxtafoveal areas.

  16. The utilization of glutamine by the retina: an autoradiographic and metabolic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voaden, M.J.; Lake, N.; Marshall, J.; Morjaria, B.

    1978-01-01

    The cells able to accumulate exogenously applied [ 3 H] glutamine in rat, cat, frog, pigeon and guinea pig retinas have been located by autoradiography, and the fate of the labelled glutamine, as regards its incorporation into aspartic, glutamic and γ-amino-butyric acids, followed for 60 min. The results support the notion of glutamine as a precursor of transmitter amino acids in some neurones. In particular, it would appear to be a source of a relatively stable pool of GABA which may be located, with species variation, in amacrine or ganglion cells. In the pigeon retina glutamate pool incorporates and retains a major percentage of the label, and perikarya in the middle of the inner nuclear layer of the tissue are predominantly labelled. (author)

  17. Readout circuit design of the retina-like CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengmei; Song, Shengyu; Bai, Tingzhu; Cao, Nan

    2015-02-01

    Readout circuit is designed for a special retina-like CMOS image sensor. To realize the pixels timing drive and readout of the sensor, the Altera's Cyclone II FPGA is used as a control chip. The voltage of the sensor is supported by a voltage chip initialized by SPI with AVR MCU system. The analog image signal outputted by the sensor is converted to digital image data by 12-bits A/D converter ADS807 and the digital data is memorized in the SRAM. Using the Camera-link image grabber, the data stored in SRAM is transformed to image shown on PC. Experimental results show the circuit works well on retina-like CMOS timing drive and image readout and images can be displayed properly on the PC.

  18. Distribution and protective function of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eNakamachi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, which is found in 27- or 38-amino acid forms, belongs to the VIP/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues, with PACAP known to exert a protective effect against several types of neural damage. The retina is considered to be part of the central nervous system, and retinopathy is a common cause of profound and intractable loss of vision. This review will examine the expression and morphological distribution of PACAP and its receptors in the retina, and will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the protective effect of PACAP against different kinds of retinal damage, such as that identified in association with diabetes, ultraviolet light, hypoxia, optic nerve transection, and toxins. This article will also address PACAP-mediated protective pathways involving retinal glial cells.

  19. Radicals excess in the retina: A model for light flashes in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narici, L.; De Martino, A.; Brunetti, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sannita, W.G.; Paci, M.

    2009-01-01

    The risk due to cosmic radiation is a major issue in planning future missions to the Moon or Mars and would be critical if inadequately addressed. Functional risks must also be considered. The perception of light flashes reported by astronauts in space, and ascribed mostly to the action of ionizing radiation in the eye (retina), is an evidence for radiation functional interaction. No detailed model of the ion/retina interaction is yet available. Here we present the first model for a generation mechanism compatible with light flashes in space, and the results of in vitro tests supporting it. The model can be a common end point for the interactions between ionizing radiation and visual system in space. It would also support the assessment of functional radiation risks in space.

  20. An artificial retina processor for track reconstruction at the LHC crossing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeschi, F.; Cenci, R.; Marino, P.; Morello, M. J.; Ninci, D.; Piucci, A.; Punzi, G.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.; Walsh, J.

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the INFN-RETINA R&D project is to develop and implement a computational methodology that allows to reconstruct events with a large number (> 100) of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon strip detectors at 40 MHz, thus matching the requirements for processing LHC events at the full bunch-crossing frequency. Our approach relies on a parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, dubbed artificial retina, inspired by the early stages of image processing by the brain. In order to demonstrate that a track-processing system based on this algorithm is feasible, we built a sizable prototype of a tracking processor tuned to 3 000 patterns, based on already existing readout boards equipped with Altera Stratix III FPGAs. The detailed geometry and charged-particle activity of a large tracking detector currently in operation are used to assess its performances. We report on the test results with such a prototype.