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Sample records for barrel toroid coil

  1. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  2. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  3. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  4. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  5. The protection system of the superconducting coils in the Barrel Toroid of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Acerbi, E; Volpini, G; Daël, A; Lesmond, C

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of the discharge of the Barrel Toroid under several operating conditions has been carried out. The main critical parameters of the discharge (i.e. the maximum temperature inside the coils, the maximum temperature $9 gradient, the maximum voltage at the coil ends and the maximum decentering forces acting on the BT and ECT magnets) have been calculated for several operating conditions (heaters on, heaters off, short circuit with heaters on or $9 off). The aim of this analysis is to provide a cross check of the protection design of the Barrel Toroid coils with an independent study. The results validate the choice to use a low value of dump resistance, and give some important $9 warning in the case of heater failure or presence of a short circuit. (5 refs).

  6. The First ATLAS Barrel Toroid Coil Successfully Tested in Hall 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Rabbers, J J

    2004-01-01

    The first Barrel Toroid coil has been successfully tested with magnetic mirror at nominal current I=20.5 kA, up to a maximum current Imax=22 kA. After 14 days of cooling down, BT1 reached 4.5 Kelvin and the test program started on September 2nd. First the instrumentation and safety systems of the coil were tested at relatively low operating currents, up to 5 kA. Since all the systems and the coil were performing well, the current was increased by steps in several runs, while monitoring and evaluating the temperatures, voltages and mechanics. On early Wednesday morning September 8th the current was ramped up to 22 kA, shown by the red curve in the picture shown below: Thereafter the current was ramped down by a slow dump, where the stored energy of about 130 MJ is dissipated in a resistor/diode ramp down unit. This is the regular way of ramping down the current, which takes about one hour. Thereafter the current was ramped up to 22 kA for a second time, this time a so-called fast dump was initiated, ...

  7. First full-size ATLAS barrel toroid coil successfully tested up to 22 kA at 4 T

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Benoit, P; Berriaud, C P; Broggi, F; Deront, L; Foussat, A; Junker, S; ten Kate, H H J; Kopeykin, N; Olesen, G; Olyunin, A; Pengo, R; Rabbers, J J; Ravat, S; Rey, J M; Sbrissa, E; Shugaev, I; Stepanov, V; Védrine, P; Volpini, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The Superconducting Barrel Toroid is providing (together with the two End-Cap Toroids not presented here) the magnetic field for the muon detectors in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC at CERN. The toroid with outer dimensions of 25 m length and 20 m diameter, is built up from 8 identical racetrack coils. The coils with 120 turns each are wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and operate at 20.5 kA at 3.9 T local field in the windings and is conduction cooled at 4.8 K by circulating forced flow helium in cooling tubes attached to the cold mass. The 8 coils of 25 m * 5 m are presently under construction and the first coils have already been fully integrated and tested. Meanwhile the assembly of the toroid 100 m underground in the ATLAS cavern at CERN has started. The 8 coils are individually tested on surface before installation. In this paper the test of the first coil, unique in size and manufacturing technology, is described in detail and the results are compared to the previous experience with the...

  8. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  9. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  10. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  11. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 180 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  12. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  13. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  14. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  15. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  16. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  17. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  18. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  19. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  20. Design status of the NET toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Toroidal Field Coil System consists of 16 superconducting coil windings, their coil casings and the intercoil structure. All of these components are located inside a common cryostat vessel and will therefore be at a temperature of about 4.50 degK during operation of the machine. The 16 coils are arranged in a toroidal configuration in order to provide a magnetic field for the confinement of the ring shaped plasma. The inner legs of the D-shaped coils form a vault which is subjected to the centering forces that are caused by the toroidal field itself. The interaction between the poloidal field and the toroidal currents creates Lorentz Forces which are perpendicular to the TF coil plane. Intercoil structure and vault have to resist these forces. The huge size of the coils in combination with the fact that an A15 conductor material has to be used require techniques that are somewhat beyond the present state of the art. Therefore, a conductor and magnet development program has been launched. The development studies carried out by Associated Laboratories in cooperation with NET Team have resulted in several flow cooled composite conductors. Futheron, full size conductor samples were manufactured and two subsize conductors were manufactured and wound into two 12 T model coils. Proposals for the manufacture of the coil winding, the power supply and quench protection system, the cooling system and the instrumentation have been worked out in the course of these studies. To ensure the feasibility of the cois two study contracts have been placed with industry. This report will stress the most difficult aspects of the coil manufacture, the assembly of the winding in its steel casing and the assembly of the 16 coils with the intercoil structure to a toroidal configuration. The results of the thermomechanical and electromagnetic analysis (e.g. eddy currents in coils case, stress, a.c. losses) - will be reported and their impact on the design of the TF system will be

  1. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Use of the overhead travelling crane to hoist the coil up and then tilt it over, the coil frame's metal feet being used as rotational pivots, supporting half the coil's weight. Once it has been turned over, the coil, now with only half the frame, is transported to the heating table using a special lifting gant...

  2. Toroidal high temperature superconducting coils for ISTTOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, H., E-mail: hf@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Goemoery, F. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 84104 Bratislava (Slovakia); Corte, A. della; Celentano, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Souc, J. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 84104 Bratislava (Slovakia); Silva, C.; Carvalho, I.; Gomes, R. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Di Zenobio, A.; Messina, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) are very attractive to be used in fusion devices mainly due to lower operations costs. The HTS technology has reached a point where the construction of toroidal field coils for a tokamak is possible. The feasibility of a tokamak operating with HTS is extremely relevant and ISTTOK is the ideal candidate for a meaningful test due to its small size (and consequently lower cost) and the possibility to operate in a steady-state inductive regime. In this paper, a conceptual study of the ISTTOK upgrade to a superconducting device is presented, along with the relevant boundary conditions to achieve a permanent toroidal field with HTS. It is shown that the actual state of the art in HTS allows the design of a toroidal field coil capable of generating the appropriate field on plasma axis while respecting the structural specification of the machine.

  3. Toroidal high temperature superconducting coils for ISTTOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) are very attractive to be used in fusion devices mainly due to lower operations costs. The HTS technology has reached a point where the construction of toroidal field coils for a tokamak is possible. The feasibility of a tokamak operating with HTS is extremely relevant and ISTTOK is the ideal candidate for a meaningful test due to its small size (and consequently lower cost) and the possibility to operate in a steady-state inductive regime. In this paper, a conceptual study of the ISTTOK upgrade to a superconducting device is presented, along with the relevant boundary conditions to achieve a permanent toroidal field with HTS. It is shown that the actual state of the art in HTS allows the design of a toroidal field coil capable of generating the appropriate field on plasma axis while respecting the structural specification of the machine.

  4. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid Coil Passes Test

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    First they secured anything magnetic: metal tools, nuts and bolts, tables. Then they cleared the magnet assembly building, as big as an airplane hangar, and locked it tight. Before turning on the magnet for its maiden test, they waited till the dead of night so no one else would be around.

  5. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  6. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  7. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  8. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  9. Mechanical tests of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC) was designed to allow an overall mechanical test representative of the ITER toroidal field (TF) coils. The paper details the mechanical tests performed, compares them to model predictions and discusses the experience gained in the understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the ITER TF coils. The good agreement found between prediction given by a finite element model and mechanical measurements performed during the tests demonstrates that coil mechanical behaviour is well understood. The reproducibility of the evolution of stresses and coil deformation during testing including cycling tests showed that no measurable degradation of the mechanical properties of the coil occurred. This test contributed to the qualification of the design and manufacturing procedures of the ITER TF coils

  10. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  11. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  12. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B; Kozak, S; Kozak, J; Wojtasiewicz, G; Majka, M [Electrotechnical Institute in Warsaw (Poland); Janowski, T, E-mail: t.janowski@pollub.p [Lublin University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-06-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  13. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  14. CPRF/ZTH poloidal and toroidal field coil sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ZTH is a reverse field pinch fusion machine being designed for construction and operation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The plasma magnetic confinement and reversed field is accomplished by poloidal field and toroidal field coils. These coils are to be made of copper conductor with water cooling and are to be vacuum/pressure epoxy impregnated with insulating materials - fiberglass, G10 epoxy fiberglass laminate, Kapton, and possibly Mylar. The poloidal field coils are divided into two subsets according to their function and are called ohmic heating (OH) and equilibrium field (EF) coils. They are symmetrical in geometrical arrangement across a horizontal midplane, thus, the coils are mirror image pairs. The coils are to be made of OFHC CDA 104 copper. Specifications of the coils are presented here. 1 fig., 7 tabs

  15. Control and monitoring of the Tore Supra toroidal superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light nuclei controlled fusion reactions are seen as a possible way to produce nuclear energy. For this reason, the interest in hot plasma researches in tokamaks has increased. The Tore Supra main characteristic is related to the superconducting magnet coils. They allow a suitable energy balance, however, they require an accurate and preventive fault detection. The Tore Supra machine and the different methods to detect a transition (from superconducting to normal mode) in the toroidal coils are described. The voltage of the coils, the pressure of the helium superfluid at 1.8 K and the electric current in the circuit parallel resistances, are measured. A computer aided control system allows the toroidal field monitoring (current in the coils, fault detection). The superconducting magnet configuration chosen for Tore Supra seems to be suitable for future large Tokamak devices

  16. The toroidal field coil design for ARIES-ST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evolutionary process was used to develop the toroidal field (TF) coil design for the ARIES-ST (Spherical Tokamak). Design considerations included fabricability, assembly, maintenance, energy efficiency, and structural robustness. The design addresses a number of the concerns (complexity) and criticisms (high cost, high recirculating power) of fusion. It does this by: (1) Applying advanced, but available laser forming and spray casting techniques for manufacturing the TF coil system; (2) Adopting a simple single toroidal field coil system to make assembly and maintenance much easier, the single turn design avoids the necessity of using the insulation as a structural component of the TF coils, and hence is much more robust than multi-turn designs; and (3) Using a high conductivity copper alloy and modest current densities to keep the recirculating power modest

  17. Toroidal field coil system for STARFIRE, a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important element of STARFIRE is the 12-coil superconducting toroidal field coil system which is required to generate 5.6 tesla at the 7.0 m plasma axis, with a peak-to-peak field ripple of 1% (maximum). Internal spatial requirements dictate a clear bore about 15 1/2 m high x 10 m wide, resulting in a total stored energy of 67 GJ

  18. Sliding joint concept for toroidal field coils of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-cost, compact, copper-coil ignition tokamak is the focus of design studies in FY85. For a minimum-cost machine, the toroidal field (TF) coils must be as compact as practical. On the other hand, smaller TF coils inhibit the assembly and maintenance of the components entrapped by the TF coils, such as the plasma vacuum vessel, limiter, poloidal field coils, etc. If the compact TF coil has at least two demountable electrical joints, removal of the outer part of the TF coil would permit servicing of the entrapped components. The vertical straight leg of a TF coil has the smallest cross-sectional area, but it experiences the largest tensile and compressive forces. The tensile load on the vertical leg can be eliminated if the demountable joints can slide. A possible sliding joint design concept is described in this paper. This sliding joint transfers only current. No forces are transferred from the outer curved leg to the straight leg of the TF coils. The outer curved leg can be separated at the sliding joint to gain access to the components inside the TF coil bore

  19. Helical coil alignment in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is comprised of several major structural and magnetic coil systems tightly fitted around a thin helically contoured vacuum vessel. A critical parameter for successful operation of this device is the precise alignment of the various coil systems, with particular emphasis on the exact positioning of the helical field (HF) coils. This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion

  20. Experiments on large superconducting toroidal coil in LCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment on Large Coil Task (LCT) project which is the works of developing the superconductive coils for nuclear fusion, and has been advanced centering around IEA, was successfully completed on September 3, 1987. In these works which were accompanied by huge hardwares and took 10 years, the contents of the experiment carried out in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in USA, which was the highlight, and the perspective of the evaluation are described. This paper is intended to let those concerned with the technical development of atomic energy understand the experimental results of LCT coils and the contents of the development of large scale technology. The fundamental constitution of the LCT is as follows. ORNL determined the specification of the performance of superconductive toroidal coils. The participants decided their own specification of the construction. The coils were assembled in torus form, and the aptitude of the construction and materials was tested and evaluated under the same condition. The features of six coils made in USA, Euratom, Switzerland and Japan, the experimental items and the most difficult points, the results of precooling and temperature rise, the characteristics of the Japanese coil, the general comparison of six coils, and the technical problems surrounding coils are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. ITER-hard Toroidal Field coil structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Aspect Ratio Design (HARD) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has Toroidal Field (TF) coils that are farther out from the center of the Toroidal ring and more elongated than the previous design (CDA). These coils should see higher forces than in CDA and were designed accordingly. The objective of this work, conducted at LLNL and the MIT Plasma Fusion Center, was to determine whether stress levels in the ITER-HARD design are acceptable. A global finite element model, representing one of the coils, was modeled at MIT to obtain stresses and displacements both during operation of the TF coils alone, and during the End of Burn phase with TF and PF (Poloidal Field) coils operating. At LLNL, a detail model of the TF coil straight leg near the equator was used to obtain stresses and displacements during TF operation only. Further detailed analysis of the winding pack of this model was done to estimate stress concentrations in the conduit and insulation

  2. Testing of the Toroidal Field model Coil (TFMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper shortly describes the Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) design, fabrication choices and issues with respect to technological and management aspects. The experience gained during the assembly and disassembly of the TFMC for phase 1 testing, as well as the assembly with the LCT coil for phase 2 testing will be reported. During phase 1 the TFMC was energised at 80 kA and was fast discharged several times without changes in the coil performances. The first test campaign has demonstrated the feasibility and operability of the ITER Toroidal Field coils including the joints. An in depth analysis of the test results will be presented in the paper. The goal for phase 2 testing is to determine the actual margins which have been achieved in the design and manufacture of the TFMC in selected areas. For this purpose, the TFMC will be operated beyond the design conditions in terms of current, temperature and parameters related to coil protection (discharge time constant, quench detection time). This second phase has started in September 2002 and will last about four months, therefore the test results can be used to optimise the ITER design, in particular on the conductors and insulation system. (author)

  3. Research and development for the ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils are made up of a winding pack enclosed in a case. In the central region the noses of the coils are wedge shaped and fit together to form a circular vault. On the outside an intercoil support structure joins the coil above and below the equator. The goal of the ITER project L2 is to verify the design principles, design procedures, design criteria, operating margins, analysis methods and manufacturing process, including Quality Assurance (QA) capable of application to the ITER TF coils. The project is divided into two subprojects: TF Model Coil (TFMC) construction and testing and TF coil case fabrication demonstration. The conceptual design of the ITER TFMC has been carried out by the ITER EU HT, the engineering design and construction by European Industries. The testing of the TFMC is foreseen in the TOSKA facility at FZK Karlsruhe starting in the first quarter of 2001. The feasibility demonstration of the TF coil case is being carried out also by European industry by: Forging trapezoidal tubes with variable wall thickness, casting new modified 316LN type material for the intercoil structure and the parts of the case subject to lower stresses, qualifying the welding and NDT methods to be applied to the heavy thickness (∼250mm) to be joined together to form the casing. (author)

  4. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  5. Completion of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the ITER EDA a Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) has been manufactured accompanied by a thorough Quality Assurance (QA) test program. This large superconducting coil has been conceptually designed by the ITER European Home Team (EUHT) and manufactured by European industry. The coil is being completed and will be tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in spring 2001. The race track shaped winding is made of a cable-in-conduit conductor in a circular 316LN stainless steel jacket. From this conductor five double pancake (DP) modules were fabricated. Results of conductor and DP manufacture were already presented at previous conferences and are therefore only summarized here. The paper concentrates on the subsequent manufacturing steps, namely the stacking of the DP modules, the insulation and impregnation of the winding pack, the outer joint manufacture by electron beam welding, the assembly of the winding pack with the stainless steel case, the mounting of the helium pipes, the sensors and the busbars. To assemble the coil into the TOSKA facility and to fit it to the EU-LCT coil a heavy Inter-Coil Structure (ICS) has been built, in which the TFMC will rest on four wedges

  6. Results of the ITER toroidal field model coil project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the ITER EDA one of the seven largest projects was devoted to the development, manufacture and testing of a Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC). The industry consortium AGAN manufactured the TFMC based on on a conceptual design developed by the ITER EDA EU Home Team. The TFMC was completed and assembled in the test facility TOSKA of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the first half of 2001. The first testing phase started in June 2001 and lasted till October 2001. The first results have shown that the main goals of the project have been achieved

  7. Development of manufacturing technologies for ITER toroidal field coil conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is responsible for procuring 25% of the ITER toroidal field (TF) coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) for the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless-steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA has constructed a new conductor manufacturing facility. Prior to starting the conductor manufacturing, JAEA manufactured a 760 m-long Cu dummy conductor as a conductor manufacturing process qualification, such as processes of welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling. All manufacturing processes have been qualified and JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils. (author)

  8. Insertion of the CMS coil into the barrel yoke on 14 September 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Insertion of the CMS coil into the barrel yoke on 14 September 2005. The pictures have been taken in the CMS experimental hall SX5 in Cessy, neighbouring France. The second picture shows the insertion of the Inner Vacuum Tank.

  9. Protection of toroidal field coils using multiple circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of toroidal field (TF) coils using multiple circuits is described. The discharge of a single-circuit TF system is given for purposes of definition. Two-circuit TF systems are analyzed and the results presented analytically and graphically. Induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and discharge time constants are compared to the single-circuit system. Three-circuit TF systems are analyzed. In addition to induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and time constants, several different discharge scenarios are included. The impacts of having discharge rates versus final maximum coil temperatures as requirements are examined. The out-of-plane forces which occur in the three-circuit system are analyzed using an approximate model. The analysis of multiplecircuit TF systems is briefly described and results for a Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) scale device are given based on computer analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of using multiple-circuit systems are summarized and discussed. The primary disadvantages of multiple circuits are the increased circuit complexity and potential for out-of-plane forces. These are offset by the substantial reduction in maximum discharge voltages, as well as other design options which become available when using multiple circuits

  10. Advances in the Fabrication of Toroidal Field Coil Prototypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, A.; Cucchiaro, A.; Frosi, R.; Ramogida, G.; Boert, F.; Wobker, H. G.; Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Coppi, B.

    2006-10-01

    The Bitter-type Toroidal Field Coils (TFC) adopted for Ignitor consist of plates that are cooled down to 30 K by Helium gas. Copper OFHC has been selected for these plates, allowing for an Electron Beam (EB) welding solution of the cooling channels. Kabel Metal set up the welding parameters and qualified the process to achieve full joint penetration with acceptable metallurgical structure. The qualification covers both the welding of the cooling channels and the inlet/outlet tube made on two full size samples. A metallographic examination and vacuum and pressure tests have been preformed to validate the basic suitability of the EB welding process. *Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  11. First qualification of ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductor jacketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Kazuya, E-mail: hamada.kazuya@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Isono, Takaaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Kawano, Katsumi; Oshikiri, Masayuki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Nakajima, Hideo; Okuno, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Matsuda, Hidemitsu; Yano, Yoshitaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co. Ltd (Japan); Devred, Arnauld; Bessette, Denis [ITER Organization (France)

    2011-10-15

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility to procure 25% of the ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) in the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA started to produce strand, cables and jacket sections and to construct a conductor manufacturing (jacketing) facility in 2008. Following preparation in December 2009 of the jacketing facility, the dummy cable, the jacket sections and fabrication procedures, such as welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling, JAEA manufactured a 760 m long Cu dummy conductor for process qualification. Into the 760 m long Cu dummy conductor jacketing, JAEA successfully inserted the cable with a maximum force of 32 kN. The outer diameter of the cross section of the spooled conductor was 43.7 {+-} 0.15 mm, which complies with the ITER target requirement of 43.7 {+-} 0.3 mm. Following qualification of all manufacturing processes, JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils.

  12. First qualification of ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductor jacketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility to procure 25% of the ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) in the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA started to produce strand, cables and jacket sections and to construct a conductor manufacturing (jacketing) facility in 2008. Following preparation in December 2009 of the jacketing facility, the dummy cable, the jacket sections and fabrication procedures, such as welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling, JAEA manufactured a 760 m long Cu dummy conductor for process qualification. Into the 760 m long Cu dummy conductor jacketing, JAEA successfully inserted the cable with a maximum force of 32 kN. The outer diameter of the cross section of the spooled conductor was 43.7 ± 0.15 mm, which complies with the ITER target requirement of 43.7 ± 0.3 mm. Following qualification of all manufacturing processes, JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils.

  13. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are pr...

  14. Project status of manufacturing of European toroidal coils ITER. Validation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal field coils are the ITER magnets responsible for confining the plasma inside the vacuum vessel. The consortium formed by IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Construccion, ASG Superconductors y ELYTT Energy is the responsible for the supply of 10 coils that the european agency F4E has to supply for the ITER project. At present, the coils are been manufactured in La Spezia (Italy), after the qualification of all the manufacturing process and the sucessfull manufacturing of a full scale prototype. (Author)

  15. Operation of a Fluorinert{trademark} cooling system for the toroidal field coils on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, G.W.; Pysher, R.; Chrzanowski, J.; Woolley, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An alternate cooling fluid (Fluorinert{trademark}) was introduced during the D-T experimental runs for cooling the toroidal field (TF) coils on TFTR. This paper addresses how this system performed during the D-T operational period and the special techniques that the alternate cooling system requires for operations and maintenance. Radiation from neutron activation of Fluorinet{trademark} (Fluorine 18 etc) and associated personnel safety issues and safeguards are discussed. Flow reversal in the TF Coils has proven to be a valuable mechanism by which any loose particulates can be cleared from the coolant passages and the development of this operational tool is addressed. Specific draining procedures for the TF Coils have been developed during the D-t run in order to minimize losses of fluid. The toroidal field coil operational characteristics with Fluorinert {trademark} are compared to those previously observed with water cooling.

  16. SDC muon barrel toroid 1/9.197 scale test model at SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the scale model for the muon barrel toroid (MBT) is to discover any problems in the preliminary design associated with the fabrication, assembly and installation. The information obtained from the model fabrication, assembly, installation, and testing processes will be used to evaluate the MBT preliminary design and to verify the finite element (FE) analysis. The final design of the MBT will take advantage of the experience gained from the test model to improve the design and engineering, fabrication methods, and assembly methods. The goals that are considered relevant to the test model include the following: Verify the in-plane and out-of-plane stiffness of the test model as predicted by the FE analysis. Verify the corner joint stiffness of the test model as predicted by the FE analysis. Verify the fabrication and assembly methods for the blocks, pins and keys on a small scale. Demonstrate the plate flattening scheme on a small scale. Insure that the preliminary design of the MBT can be assembled into the correct shape on a small scale. A magnetic measurement will be performed to record the field density inside an air gap. The main goal is to find out the field distribution for the test model due to geometry variation. The field measurements will also provide the information to verify the magnetic property of the steel material as well as the impact on the field distribution due to material variation

  17. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}∼ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}∼ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (‑100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  18. Test of potential interturn faults of COMPASS-D toroidal field coils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žáček, František; Zajac, Jaromír; Kryška, Ladislav; Havlíček, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 287-294. ISSN 0001-7043. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/23rd./. Prague, 16.06.2008-19.06.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * toroidal field coils * coil inductance * resonant circuit * resonant frequency shift * circuit impedance * model experiment * computer simulation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  19. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  20. Steady-state resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If spatially-averaged values of the beta ratio can reach 5 to 10% in tokamaks, as now seems likely, resistive toroidal-field coils may be advantageous for use in reactors intended for fusion-neutron applications. The present investigation has parameterized the design of steady-state water-cooled copper coils of rectangular cross section in order to maximize figures of merit such as the ratio of fusion neutron wall loading to coil power dissipation. Four design variations distinguished by different ohmic-heating coil configurations have been examined. For a wall loading of 0.5 MW/m2, minimum TF-coil lifetime costs (including capital and electricity costs) are found to occur with coil masses in the range 2400 to 4400 tons, giving 200 to 250 MW of resistive dissipation, which is comparable with the total power drain of the other reactor subsystems

  1. Toroidal field coil system of the Oak Ridge EPR reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A refined design of the toroidal field (TF) coil system for the Oak Ridge Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) study is presented. This design is based on cable conductor cooled by force-flow supercritical helium. It uses superconducting multifilamentary Nb3Sn for a maximum design field of 11 T at the coil windings. A hybrid system which uses NbTi at low field regions is recommended. The coil structure consists of stainless steel segments welded together to form a continuous stiff honeycomb. Conductor optimization and stability analysis specifically applicable to the forced-flow cooled conductors are given

  2. Helical coil alignment in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion. 2 refs., 8 figs

  3. Strain Measurement on the Toroidal Field (TF) Coil Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhuomin; Long Feng; Wu Hao

    2005-01-01

    The stress-strain state of the structure is a matter of interest to designer. The strain measurement of superconducting magnets at cryogenic temperature is a specific technique. Based on strain measurement of TF coil case for EAST, this paper presents a measuring technique at cryogenic temperature and on intense magnetic field. The compensation methods for both temperature and magnetic field effects of the gauges, together with the measured results are involved, and the discussions of the measured results are given in the paper.

  4. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document

  5. Experimental thermal behaviour of the toroidal field model coil: application to ITER TF transient regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet is made of 18 coils. The 7 winding-pack modules constituting their structure, contain each one double pancake cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) inserted in a stainless steel radial plate. The winding pack is enclosed inside a thick stainless steel case. During a safety discharge of the TF system, eddy currents and associated heat generation are induced in the plates and in the case. Such fast discharges have been performed during Phase I and Phase II experiment of the Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) tests, respectively without and with an additional background coil (LCT), in order to investigate heat generation and transfer. Simple models have been developed to predict the behaviour of the coil during these transients. These models have been validated by calorimetric measurements. In addition, for the TF Coil, during a plasma disruption which induces here also an instantaneous heat deposition, these models can be used to estimate the temperature increase of the TF Conductor and investigate whether a quench can happen. (authors)

  6. Toroid field coil shear key installation study, DOE task No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts for fitting and installation of the scissor keys, triangular keys, and truss keys in the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coil Assembly were developed and evaluated. In addition, the process of remote removal and replacement of a failed TF coil was considered. Two concepts were addressed: central solenoid installed last (Naka Option 1) and central solenoid installed first (Naka Option 2). In addition, a third concept was developed which utilized the favorable features of both concepts. A time line for installation was estimated for the Naka Option 1 concept

  7. Highlights from the assembly of the helical field coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helical field (HF) coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device consist of a set of 24 identical segments connected to form a continuous pair of helical coils wrapped around a toroidal vacuum vessel. Each segment weighs approximately 1364 kg (3000 lb) and is composed of 14 water-cooled copper plate conductors bolted to a cast stainless steel structural support member with a T-shape cross section (known as the structural tee). The segment components are electrically insulated with Kapton adhesive tape, G-10, Tefzel, and rubber to withstand 2.5 kV. As a final insulator and structural support, the entire segment is vacuum impregnated with epoxy. This paper offers a brief overview of the processes used to assemble the component parts into a completed segment, including identification of items that required special attention. 4 figs

  8. About the Toroidal Magnetic Field of a Tokamak Burning Plasma Experiment with Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In tokamaks, the strong dependence on the toroidal magnetic field of both plasma pressure and energy confinement is what makes possible the construction of small and relatively inexpensive burning plasma experiments using high-field resistive coils. On the other hand, the toroidal magnetic field of tokamaks using superconducting coils is limited by the critical field of superconductivity. In this article, we examine the relative merit of raising the magnetic field of a tokamak plasma by increasing its aspect ratio at a constant value of the peak field in the toroidal magnet. Taking ITER-FEAT as an example, we find that it is possible to reach thermonuclear ignition using an aspect ratio of approximately 4.5 and a toroidal magnetic field of 7.3 T. Under these conditions, fusion power density and neutron wall loading are the same as in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor], but the normalized plasma beta is substantially smaller. Furthermore, such a tokamak would be able to reach an energy gain of approximately 15 even with the deterioration in plasma confinement that is known to occur near the density limit where ITER is forced to operate

  9. Upgrades to Power Systems and Magnetic Field Coils in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Bradisse, M. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Swager, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    A set of facility upgrades for Pegasus is currently underway to improve the control and performance of the power systems and the magnetic field coils, with the aim of increased helicity-driven current drive for non-inductive startup. The plasma current achieved through helicity injection goes as √ITF Iinj , the toroidal field rod current and injector bias current, respectively. To increase this quantity, the toroidal field power system will be upgraded. Eight new high-current IGBT bridges will replace the 6 bridges currently in place, bringing ITF from 288 kA-turns to 600 kA-turns. Iinj is increased via a new 14 kA, 2.2 kV, single-quadrant IGCT switching power supply. The main poloidal field coil system is expanded to provide faster vertical field penetration of the vessel wall, thereby providing more flexible control of plasma position during startup and current growth. The L/R time for these coils is reduced by ˜40%. New divertor coils are being installed to provide more shaping flexibility and separatrix-limited operations. Overall power supply control will be improved and simplified by deployment of digital feedback controllers using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to replace PWM analog feedback controllers. FPGAs will provide faster control frequencies, improved fault-handling capability, and streamlined recording of power system operations.

  10. Comparative evaluation of existing concepts for a 10 tesla FED toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing design concept options for FED toroidal field coils have been studied and evaluated by General Atomic Company as part of the FED/INTOR Critical Magnetic Issues effort for 1982. The various design concepts studied are: (1) forced flow cooled NbTi cabled conductor, (2) He-II bath cooled Nb3Sn-NbTi hybrid with cabled conductor. These design concepts are evaluated based upon their relative merits, including technological maturity, operational reliability, overall reactor compatability, maintainability, and cost. An important aspect of this study was the normalization of each design concept to meet similar operational requirements. The critical issues in the TF coil design, including the structural role of the helium vessel, quench protection, accommodation of neutronic and eddy current heating, credible fault criteria, and the possibility of prototype coil demonstration are discussed. The consequences and implications of extending the peak field in the range from 8 to 10 tesla was also studied

  11. Elastic-plastic analysis of the toroidal field coil inner leg of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastic-plastic analyses were made for the inner leg of the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field (TF) coil, which is made of copper-Inconel composite material. From the result of the elastic-plastic analysis, the effective Young's moduli of the inner leg were determined by the analytical equations. These Young's moduli are useful for the three-dimensional, elastic, overall TF coil analysis. Comparison among the results of the baseline design (R = 1.324 m), the bucked pressless design, the 1.527-m major radius design, and the 1.6-m major radius design was also made, based on the elastic-plastic TF coil inner leg analyses

  12. Electromechanical analysis of a prototype 20 TESLA, single turn toroidal field coil for IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion ignition experiment (IGNITEX) device is a single turn coil tokamak designed to produce and control an ignited plasma using ohmic heating alone. The proposed high strength toroidal field (TF) magnet operates at a magnetic field on axis of 20 T, using homopolar generators (HPGs). In this paper, the electromechanical analysis of a scaled down prototype (0.06 scale in linear dimensions) of the IGNITEX TF magnet is presented. The objective of the Ignition Technology, Demonstration (ITD) program is to design, build, and test the operation of a single turn, 20 T, TF coil, powered by an existing: HPG power supply system. Unlike conventional TF coils that use: multiple turns of the conductor, the single turn coil eliminates the need for turn-to-turn insulation; therefore, better utilizing the available area for stress and thermal management. Precooling of the coil to liquid-nitrogen temperature permits the magnet to operate in a wider temperature regime without exceeding material properties. Scaling relationships presented in this paper show that temperatures and stresses of a scaled-down coil and their relative distribution will approximate predicted levels of the full-scale IGNITEX device. A finite element program (TEXCOR) which solves a set of coupled electrical circuit, magnetic diffusion, and thermal diffusion equations with temperature dependent properties was developed. TEXCOR provides temperatures and magnetic body force densities for stress analysis of the magnet structure. The effect of flatness tolerance stackups in the TF coil assembly is discussed and methods to characterize and minimize the negative effect of nonideal conditions are given. Generator fault scenarios are also addressed. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to a high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  14. NbTi based conductors for use in 12 Tesla toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using NbTi based alloy for high field applications has been investigated. Results have shown that the useful range of alloys of NbTi and NbTiTa can easily be extended to 12 Tesla by operating at temperatures in the 2 K range. In this paper the results of the conductor optimization of 5 NbTi based alloys are presented. These results have been used in the design of 12 Tesla toroidal field coils based on ETF design parameters. 8 refs

  15. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  16. Feasibility Study on Welding Structure of the HT-7U Toroidal Field Coil Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Toroidal Field (TF) coil case of the HT-7U superconducting tokamak device is made of austenitic stainless steel 316LN and is designed to operate at cryogenic temperature (4 K). 316LN can retain high strength and fracture toughness at 4 K. Feasibility study on technical process of welding has been experimentally considered as a hopeful joint method for suppression of post-welding deformation and reduction of over-heating. Meanwhile the final range of stress in- tensity and the stress intensity factor (K) for pre-cracks of welding structure have been determined by using J-integral. These related results are optimistic and have shown that there's no problem in strength and fracture toughness at the vicinity of the pre-crack tip. This paper introduces the welding structure of TF coil case in detail.

  17. Mass production and quality control of Nb3Sn superconducting strands for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting conductors are applied in the toroidal field (TF) coils, poloidal field coils, and central solenoid (CS) in the ITER. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency plans to procure 25% of the TF conductors and 100% of the CS conductors. Mass-produced Nb3Sn superconducting strands for TF conductors have been supplied by two manufacturers since 2008. The total length of the strands is approximately 23,000 km; thus, quality control is extremely important. A statistical process control has been adopted in order to reduce the dispersion of strand performance, and stable performance of the mass-produced strands was achieved. Both manufacturers improved the fabrication yield through mass production. Approximately 72% of the Japanese share in TF strands has been produced as of October 2011. (author)

  18. Barrel-stave model or toroidal model? A case study on melittin pores.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, L; Harroun, T A; Weiss, T M; Ding, L; Huang, H W

    2001-01-01

    Transmembrane pores induced by amphiphilic peptides, including melittin, are often modeled with the barrel-stave model after the alamethicin pore. We examine this assumption on melittin by using two methods, oriented circular dichroism (OCD) for detecting the orientation of melittin helix and neutron scattering for detecting transmembrane pores. OCD spectra of melittin were systematically measured. Melittin can orient either perpendicularly or parallel to a lipid bilayer, depending on the phy...

  19. Development of the KfK NET toroidal field coil react and wind conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the Euratom Fusion Technology program an A15 forced flow cooled conductor for the toroidal field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET) was developed at KfK Karlsruhe. The conductor is based on the bronze route of Nb3Sn. It was designed as a react and wind conductor in a sandwich type where the flat Nb3Sn Rutherford cable was enclosed between two Cu stabilizers based on roebeled Cu profiles. A subsize conductor at the scale 1:1.75 was fabricated for developing the industrial fabrication procedure and testing the electrical properties within an acceptable cost frame. For the heat treatment of the Rutherford cable a suitable process was developed. No unexpected degradations were found on samples taken at different fabrication stages and tested in the FBI facility at KfK. In a late stage of development the NET parameters were changed which loaded the conductor with 10 times higher field transients caused by plasmas disruption with respect to the original specifications. A detailed analysis showed that the conductor fulfilled further all specifications except the field transients of the plasma disruption where the conductor will quench. The development of the Nb3Sn conductor in react and wind technique demonstrate that this conductor type is feasible using the common manufacturing techniques of large coils which were already successfully demonstrated in the Large Coil Task and in the KfK-Polo project. (orig.)

  20. Comparative evaluation of existing concepts for a 10-tesla FED toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing design concept options for FED toroidal field coils have been studied and evaluated by General Atomic Company as part of the FED/INTOR Critical Magnetic Issues effort for 1982. The various design concepts studied are: (1) forced flow cooled NbTi cabled conductor, (2) He-II bath cooled NbTi cabled conductor, and (3) He-I bath cooled Nb3Sn-NbTi hybrid with cabled conductor. These design concepts are evaluated based upon their relative merits, including technological maturity, operational reliability, overall reactor compatability, maintainability, and cost. An important aspect of this study was the normalization of each design concept to meet similar operational requirements. The critical issues in the TF coil design, including the structural role of the helium vessel, quench protection, accommodation of neutronic and eddy current heating, credible fault criteria, and the possibility of prototype coil demonstration are discussed. The consequences and implications of extending the peak field in the range from 8 to 10 tesla was also studied

  1. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  2. Four giga joule flywheel motor-generator for JT-60 toroidal field coil power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fusion test reactor often needs motor-generators as a power source in order to reduce disturbances to utility lines. The toroidal field coil power supply system of JT-60 also adopted a motor-generator for this purpose. The motor-generator started operation in April, 1985 at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute together with the whole system. The motor-generator has several special features both electrically and mechanically. One electrical feature is that it is used as a pulse source of large current and power for periodic short-time duty. A mechanical feature is that a large flywheel is directly coupled to the motor-generator shaft and operated intermittently and at high speed. Therefore detailed investigations were carried out concerning constitution, characteristics as well as the coordination with the system performance. This paper describes the outlines of the flywheel motor-generator and discusses several topics

  3. Axial preloading of a 20 TESLA prototype of a single turn Tokamak toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An axial preloading system has been designed and built as part of the 0.06 scale prototype toroidal field (TF) magnet for the IGNITEX experiment. In the prototype TF coil, as in the full size IGNITEX tokamak, the peak stresses in the inner leg during discharge are made more isotropic (hence the von Mises stress intensity is lowered) through axial preloading. Although preliminary (nonpreloaded) tests of the TF magnet should produce fields as high as 15 T, preloading will permit demonstration of the high (20 T) on-axis magnetic field to be achieved in the IGNITEX device. The preloading system for the prototype is a hydraulic press capable of a load of 580 tons. The press is designed with a short stroke which takes the press from a condition of noncontact to full preloading. During the magnet's pulse and subsequent thermal growth, the hydraulic system of the press maintains the preload force

  4. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER and NET by analytic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of structural efficiency of the toroidal field (TF) coils between the Next European Torus (NET) and the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) machines was made. The effectiveness of their winding packs to help react loads incurred from in-plane and out-of-plane electromagnetic forces was estimated. Only analytic techniques, including mechanics of materials methods and composite mixture rules, were used. The results of NET compared well with the fairly detailed two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) performed by the NET team. Similar FEAs of the Advanced Option C (ACS) version of FER have not been done, but the analytic results should be reasonable. The methodology used has been successfully programmed for use in reactor system codes

  5. Solenoid-free toroidal plasma start-up concept utilizing only the outer poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Eventual elimination of in-board ohmic heating solenoid is required for the spherical torus (ST) reactors and it is considered to be highly desirable for advanced tokamak reactors. A fundamental challenge for using only the outer poloidal field coils for the start-up purpose is the difficulty of creating a sufficiently high quality field null region while retaining significant poloidal flux needed for subsequent current ramp up. Here, we show through both static and dynamic calculations that a carefully chosen proper set of outer poloidal field coils can indeed offer a promising prospect of creating a good quality 'multi-pole' field null while retaining sufficient poloidal flux, in particular, satisfying the 'Lloyd' criteria for the inductive plasma start-up. For a single turn TF system envisioned for ST-based CTF and power plant, the poloidal magnetic flux stored in the TF inner leg can provide additional significant flux. This concept can be readily extended to future devices for a multi-MA level start-up current due to the relatively simple physics principles and a favorable scaling with device size and toroidal magnetic field. (author)

  6. Team one (GA/MCA) effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. 12 Tesla ETF toroidal field coil helium bath cooled NbTi alloy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the conceptual design of an ETF compatible toroidal field coil, employing helium bath cooled NbTi alloy conductor. The ten TF-coil array generates a peak field of 11-1/2 tesla at 2.87 m radius, corresponding to a major axis field of 6.1 tesla. The 10 kA conductor is an uninsulated, unsoldered Rutherford cable, employing NbTiTa ally as developed in Phase I of this effort. The conductor is encased within a four element frame of stainless steel strips to provide hoop and bearing load support

  7. Physics progress towards compact tokamak reactors with normal conducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very low aspect ratio (R0/a ∼ 1.2) tokamaks utilizing a demountable, normal conducting center leg to carry the toroidal field current are estimated to lead to compact (R0 + a ∼ 5.4 m) and economically competitive fusion power plants, given certain key plasma properties. Calculations are carried out to determine if these properties can be obtained for such low R0/a, using tokamak physics models recently improved by data from START. High toroidal field utilization (Ip/Itfc ∼ 1-2) and strong plasma ''shaping'' S (≡ Ipqψ/ABt0 ∼ 100-200 MA·m-1·T-1) can be obtained using only two pairs of outboard poloidal field coils. The fraction of the scrap-off layer (SOL) connected to the inboard side of such plasmas diminishes as R0/a is reduced, while the remainder is diverted. Order-unity toroidal average betas (t> ≡ 2μo/B2t0 ∼ 0.5-1) which are ballooning stable are obtained having a second-regime core of low magnetic shear and high q0 (5 ≥ q0 ≥ 3), and a first-regime periphery of high magnetic shear and high edge qψ (22 ≥ qψ 11). Large self-driven currents (Iself/Ip ≤ 0.7), well aligned with a hollow plasma current in these equilibria, are calculated for an element of β1 ≤ 0.9. For marginal MHD stability of the outboard SOL, it is shown that the minimum pressure e-folding length λp scales approximately according to (niTi/R)(Lc/B)2, ni and Ti being the edge ion density and temperature, respectively, and Lc being the connected field line length. A large outboard SOL pressure e-folding thickness can therefore exist for low R0 and Bt0 configurations of very low R0/a (λp ∼ ΔSOL/3 ∼ 10 cm in the case of reactors). This reduces the divertor heat flux expected in compact fusion systems of high power density. Progress in these topics will help ensure that very low R0/a tokamaks are effective vehicles for fusion power as well as blanket testing. (author). 26 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  8. Technology development and mass production of Nb3Sn conductors for ITER toroidal field coils in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and manufacture of Nb3Sn conductors for ITER toroidal field (TF) coils have many technical challenges. Although it was demonstrated in the ITER model coil project that the conductors have a sufficiently high performance and the engineering design is valid, unexpected issues arose. Through both theoretical and experimental efforts improved conductors were developed. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency started to procure improved conductors for TF coils as part of the ITER project. Because the required tonnage of Nb3Sn strands is quite large compared with past experience and the required superconducting performance is higher than that of the model coils, quality control techniques are very important for the successful manufacture of the strands. Approximately 60 ton of Nb3Sn strands have been successfully completed under a severe quality control regimen and all strands meet ITER specifications. This paper summarizes the technical developments leading to the first successful mass production of ITER TF conductors.

  9. Fabrication of Nb3Sn cables for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER toroidal field (TF) coils will be operated at 68 kA and 11.8 T. The cable is composed of 1,422 strands with a diameter of 0.82 mm. There were two options for initial procurement. For option 2, the twist pitches at lower stages are longer than in option 1. Trials were performed to assess the feasibility of these options. In the trials for option 1, the nominal outer diameter of sub-cables and reduction schedule of final cables were evaluated and finalized. In the trials for option 2, problems were encountered at the third stage cabling. These problems were resolved through increasing the die size in that stage and improving the tension balance of the second-stage cables to reduce friction between the die and the cable, and also through avoiding loose twisting at both edges of the third cables. Option 2 was finally selected in 2009 based on superconducting performance enhancement of the cable. After the qualification of the fabrication procedure using fabrication of a 760-m dummy cable and a 415-m superconducting cable, mass production of the cables started in March 2010. (author)

  10. Mechanical characteristics of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Volpini, G

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been tested at CERN to verify the design parameters of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT). The mechanical behavior of the B0 superconducting coil and its support structure is reported and compared with coil design calculations. The mechanical stresses and structural force levels during cooling down and excitation phases were monitored using strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers instrumentation. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce the electromagnetic forces present in the BT coils, once these are assembled in toroid in the underground cavern in 2004. (8 refs).

  11. Field load and displacement boundary condition computer program used for the finite element analysis and design of toroidal field coils in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design evaluation of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been performed by structural analysis with the finite element method. The technique employed has been simplified with supplementary computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element computer program. Significant automation has been provided by computer codes in three areas of data input. These are the definition of coil geometry by a mesh of node points, the definition of finite elements via the node points and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The computer programs by name that have been used to perform the above functions are PDXNODE, ELEMENT and PDXFORC. The geometric finite element modeling options for toroidal field coils provided by PDXNODE include one-fourth or one-half symmetric sections of circular coils, oval shaped coils or dee-shaped coils with or without a beveled wedging surface. The program ELEMENT which defines the finite elements for input to the finite element computer code can provide considerable time and labor savings when defining the model of coils of non-uniform cross-section or when defining the model of coils whose material properties are different in the R and THETA directions due to the laminations of alternate epoxy and copper windings. The modeling features provided by the program ELEMENT have been used to analyze the PLT and the TFTR toroidal field coils with integral support structures. The computer program named PDXFORC is described. It computes the node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil from the vector crossproduct of the coil current and the magnetic field. The model can be of one-half or one-fourth symmetry to be consistent with the node model defined by PDXNODE, and the magnetic field is computed from toroidal or poloidal coils

  12. Development of Optimum Manufacturing Technologies of Radial Plates for the ITER Toroidal Field Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stainless steel structure called a radial plate is used in the toroidal field (TF) coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in order to support large electromagnetic force generated in the conductors. It is a 13.7 m x 8.7 m D-shaped plate having 11 grooves on each side in which conductors are wound. Although severe dimensional accuracy, for example flatness within 2 mm, and tight schedule that all radial plates for 9 TF coils (63 plates) have to be manufactured in about 4 years are required in manufacture of the radial plates, there are no industries in the world who have manufactured a large complicated structure like the radial plate with high accuracy. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been studying rational manufacturing method and developing the optimum manufacturing technologies of the radial plates in order to satisfy the above requirements in collaboration with the Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). Several trial manufactures of radial plates have been performed to clarify the following key points: · Effect of nitrogen content in material on machinability · Effect of cutting direction of a piece on deformation caused by machining · Effect of machining shape (curve or straight) on machining condition · Effect of laser welding technique on penetration and welding deformation Three different 316LN materials having nitrogen content of 0.12 %, 0.17%, and 0.20% were used to investigate nitrogen content effect on machinability. Machinability of lower nitrogen content material was slightly better than that of higher nitrogen content material. Three sectoral pieces were cut by plasma cutting technique from a hot rolled plate without any difficulties and one of them was machined to a curved segment of the radial plate having the same size as actual one. However, unacceptable large deformation over 5 mm flatness was found during machining which would be caused by curved shape of grooves and/or cutting direction

  13. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  14. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1; Diseno mecanico del encapsulado de las bobinas de campo toroidal del Tokamak TPM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ucaldino@outlook.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  15. Project status of manufacturing of European toroidal coils ITER. Validation tests; Estado del proyecto de fabricacion de las bobinas toroidales european para el ITER. Ensayos de validacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pando, F.; Felipe, A.; Madorran, A.; Pallisa, J.; Dormicch, O.; Valle, N.; D' Urzo, C.; Marin, M.; Pesenti, P.; Lucas, J.; Moreno, N.; Bonito-Oliva, A.; Harrison, R.; Bellesia, B.; Cornelis, M.; Cornella, J.

    2015-07-01

    The toroidal field coils are the ITER magnets responsible for confining the plasma inside the vacuum vessel. The consortium formed by IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Construccion, ASG Superconductors y ELYTT Energy is the responsible for the supply of 10 coils that the european agency F4E has to supply for the ITER project. At present, the coils are been manufactured in La Spezia (Italy), after the qualification of all the manufacturing process and the sucessfull manufacturing of a full scale prototype. (Author)

  16. Implementation of Rogowski coil and Taylor discharge for ionospheric plasma chamber experiments in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VTF is a large torus used to simulate ionospheric plasmas. Currently, plasmas can be generated by electron emission from four LaB6 cathodes, spaced around the bottom of the chamber, by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with microwaves injected radially into the chamber from a 3 kilowatt magnetron, and by a Taylor discharge apparatus. Electron beams travel in a helical path till they reach a collector plate at the top of the chamber, and produce plasma currents from 500 to 1,500 amps. Recently, a Rogowski coil has been calibrated to quantitatively measure current in the plasma. A 4.2 meter coil of approximately 5,500 turns encircles the torus vertically. As a changing current goes through the coil, a changing magnetic field is produced perpendicular to each of the coil's turns. Each turn produces a small voltage, and the sum of all the voltages from all the turns in the coil is proportional to the change in plasma current. The voltage signal is integrated and the result is the plasma current circulating toroidally inside the chamber. Good results measuring electron beam plasma current have been obtained and will be reported on. Continuing work will include measuring alternating current from the Taylor discharge plasma and is hoped to give insight as to how to increase plasma density using the Taylor discharge device

  17. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  18. Mechanical behavior of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Acerbi, E; Alessandria, F; Berthier, R; Broggi, F; Daël, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Reytier, M; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Vanenkov, I; Volpini, G

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been developed and constructed to verify the design parameters and the manufacture techniques of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT) that are under construction for the ATLAS Detector. Essential for successful operation is the mechanical behavior of the superconducting coil and its support structure. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce in the model coil the electromagnetic forces of the BT coils when assembled in the final Barrel Toroid magnet system. The model coil is extensively equipped with mechanical instrumentation to monitor stresses and force levels as well as contraction during a cooling down and excitation up to nominal current. The installed set up of strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers is presented. Moreover the first mechanical results in terms of expected main stress, strain and deformation values are presented based on detailed mechanical analysis of the design. (7 refs).

  19. A study on radiation shielding analysis for toroidal field coils of a tokamak-type fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the radiation shield for toroidal field (TF) coils of a tokamak type fusion device is reported. The study was performed to provide the design data base for the radiation shielding analysis for TF coils which can be commonly used for other systems, and to produce some universal recommendation about the neutron flux attenuation in the shield of a fusion reactor. Some simple estimation procedure instead of difficult and expensive neutron calculation can be carried out in this case on the basis of the fundamental knowledge on neutron behavior. The present studies are composed of the fundamentals required for shield estimation, the analysis of shield effectiveness, the analysis of the shielding performance of blankets, the analysis of radiation permeating through the inhomogeneous blanket and shield of a fusion reactor, and the analysis of the TF coil shield of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the basis of the results of the ITER conceptual design activities for three years. The methodological recommendation was developed for the ANISN and the DOT3 codes. (K.I.)

  20. ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC). Test and analysis summary report (testing handbook) chapter 3 TOSKA FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a contract between the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Director and the European Home Team Director was concluded the extension of the TOSKA facility of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe as test bed for the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), one of the 7 large research and development projects of the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activity). The report describes the work and development, which were performed together with industry to extend the existing components and add new components. In this frame a new 2 kW refrigerator was added to the TOSKA facility including the cold lines to the Helium dewar in the TOSKA experimental area. The measuring and control system as well as data acquisition was renewed according to the state-of-the-art. Two power supplies (30 kA, 50 kA) were switched in parallel across an Al bus bar system and combined with an 80 kA dump circuit. For the test of the TFMC in the background field of the EURATOM LCT coil a new 20 kA power supply was taken into operation with the existing 20 kA discharge circuit. Two forced flow cooled 80 kA current leads for the TFMC were developed. The total lifting capacity for loads in the TOSKA building was increased by an ordered new 80 t crane with a suitable cross head (125 t lifting capacity +5 t net mass) to 130 t for assembling and installation of the test arrangement. Numerous pre-tests and development and adaptation work was required to make the components suitable for application. The 1.8 K test of the EURATOM LCT coil and the test of the W 7-X prototype coil count to these tests as overall pre-tests. (orig.)

  1. A Consideration on Increasing Current Density in Normal Conducting Toroidal Field Coil for Spherical Tokamak Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Yuntao; Satoshi NISHIO

    2005-01-01

    The center post is the most critical component as an inboard part of the toroidal field coil for the low aspect ratio tokamak. During the discharge it endures not only a tremendous ohmic heating owing to its carrying a rather high current but also a large nuclear heating and irradiation owing to the plasma operation. All the severe operating conditions, including the structure stress intensity and the stability of the structure, largely limit the maximum allowable current density. But in order to contain a very high dense plasma, it is hoped that the fusion power plant system can operate with a much high maximum magnetic field BT ≥12 T~15 T in the center post. A new method is presented in this paper to improve the maximum magnetic field up to 17 T and to investigate the possibility of the normal conducting center post to be used in the future fusion tokamak power plant.

  2. CMS plenary session. Coil Status/D Campi. Barrel Yoke Status/H Gerwig. Endcap Yoke Status/D Loveless. Status report on Tracker Electronics/G Hall. PSI MSGC Tests Barrel/R Bellazzini. PSI MSGC Tests Forward/W van Doninck

    CERN Document Server

    Campi, D; Denes, P; Dittmar, Michael; Gerwig, H; Hall, G; Loveless, D; Meijer, F; Snow, G; Van Doninck, W K; Wrochna, G; CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    1999-01-01

    CMS plenary session. Coil Status/D Campi. Barrel Yoke Status/H Gerwig. Endcap Yoke Status/D Loveless. Status report on Tracker Electronics/G Hall. PSI MSGC Tests Barrel/R Bellazzini. PSI MSGC Tests Forward/W van Doninck

  3. ATLAS superconducting toroids and solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    ten Kate, H H J

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS particle detector in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN features a hybrid system of four superconducting magnets: a Central Solenoid surrounded by 2 End-cap Toroids and a Barrel Toroid. The magnet system dimensions are 20 m in diameter and 26 m in length. With its 1.55 GJ stored energy in air, it actually is the largest superconducting magnet in the world. The construction of the magnets has started in 1998 and will end in 2006 with the completion of the installation underground. Currently, in October 2004, practically all magnet parts are manufactured and delivered to CERN for final integration. The first two out of 8 full size 25*5 m/sup 2/ size coils for the Barrel Toroid have been completed and tested while the other 6 are near to completion as well. The production of the so- called End-Cap Toroids is progressing well. The Central Solenoid is complete and ready for installation. The installation underground of the entire system including its services has commenced. In the paper the main features ...

  4. Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors for 12 Tesla toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several advanced multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors were examined for various modes of cooling for the 12 Tesla ETF application. Of these, a pancake-wound 15,000 amp flat cable of triplets of large strands in a perforated stainless steel channel was selected as the preferred candidate. This cable will be cold-end cryostable in a pool-boiling environment with a maximum heat transfer from the unoccluded strand surface of 0.24 w/cm/sup 2/. The construction of the conductor and coil is relatively simple, offering potential economies in quality assurance and production costs. 15 refs

  5. Technical aspects and manufacturing methods for JT-60SA toroidal field coil casings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. • Design and manufacturing of mock-ups representative of straight and curved legs of the casings have been completed. • Final design of the casings has been completed and manufacturing activities have already started and are ongoing. • The completion of the first three casings will be completed within the end of 2013 and the production of all the 18 casings is foreseen by the end of 2015. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak machine to be assembled in Naka site, Japan, designed to contribute to the early realization of fusion energy by supporting the exploitation of ITER and research toward DEMO. In the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement a contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto (Chieti, Italy) started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. Two different sets of 9 casings each will be progressively delivered, from 2013 to the end of 2015, to ASG Superconductors (Genoa, Italy) and to Alstom (Belfort, France), where the integration of the winding pack into the casing will be carried out. Each TF coil casing (height 7.5 m and width 4.5 m) consists of four main components: one “Straight Leg Outboard” and one “Curved Leg Outboard” both with their own covers, “Straight Leg Inboard” and “Curved Leg Inboard”. The casing components are segmented in forgings and plates made of FM316LNL. The straight leg outboard is composed of two wings welded to a central core and two elbows welded at the ends with a cooling channel installed inside. Elbows of straight leg outboard are segmented in two half-elbows machined from 1 rough forging and welded to the central core made by plate. Welding of wings to the central core is performed in EBW (electron beam welding) and the straight part is welded to the elbows by NGTIG (TIG narrow gap) process. The curved leg outboard is composed of two

  6. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. The structural system developed is an arrangement in which the CIT device is installed in the jaws of the press. Large built-up beams above and below the CIT span the machine and deliver the vertical force to the center cylinder formed by the inboard legs of the TF coils. During the conceptual design study, the vertical force requirement has ranged between 25,000 and 52,000 t. The access requirement on top and bottom limits the width of the spanning beams. Nonmagnetic steel materials are also required because of operation in the high magnetic fields. In the hydraulic system design for the press, several options are being explored. These range from small-diameter jacks operating at very high pressure [228 MPa (33 ksi)] to large-diameter jacks operating at pressures up to 69 MPa (10 ksi). Configurations with various locations for the hydraulic cylinders have also been explored. The nuclear environment and maintenance requirements are factors that affect cylinder location. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  7. Mechanical properties of full austenitic welding joint at cryogenic temperature for the ITER toroidal field coil structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, M., E-mail: iguchi.masahide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, ITER Superconducting Magnet Technology Group, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 Japan (Japan); Saito, T.; Kawano, K.; Chida, Y.; Nakajima, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, ITER Superconducting Magnet Technology Group, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 Japan (Japan); Ogawa, T.; Katayama, Y.; Ogata, H.; Minemura, T. [Toshiba Cooperation, Power Systems Company, 2-4, Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 2300-0045 (Japan); Tokai, D.; Niimi, K. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, LTD., Plant and Infrastructure Company, Production Center, 8, Niijima, Harima-cho, Kako-gun, Hyogo 675-0180 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • No significant distribution of tensile strengths at 4 K, 77 K and room temperature along welding thickness of 200 mm manufactured by one side narrow gap TIG welding with FMYJJ1. • Tensile strengths at cryogenic temperature of welded joint are increased with increasing of C + N contents of base material. • In the case that welded joint is manufactured by combination of different base materials, strength at 4 K of welded joints are below strength of base material having higher C + N contents. -- Abstract: ITER toroidal field coil (TFC) structures are large welding structures composed of coil case and support structures made of heavy thick high strength and high toughness stainless steels. Japan Atomic Energy Agency plans to apply narrow gap Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding with FMYJJ1 (0.03C–10Mn–12Cr–14Ni–5Mo–0.13N) which is full austenitic stainless filler material. In order to evaluate effect of base material thickness and combinations of base material on tensile properties, tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 77 K and 4 K by using tensile specimens taken from 200 mm thickness welded joints of two combinations of base materials and 40 mm thickness welded joints of four combinations of base materials. As the results, it was confirmed that there were no large distribution of yield and tensile strength along the thickness of welded joints of 200 mm thickness and yield and tensile strengths of welded joints were decreased with decreasing of C + N contents of base material.

  8. Toroidal field coil design concept and structural support system for CTHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CTHR conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined (tokamak) fusion reactor fitted with a fertile uranium blanket. The fusion driver concept was based on an ignited plasma. All concepts and parameters were selected on the basis that technical feasibility would be achieved by 1995 to assure a viable commercial operation in the early to mid-21st century. The reactor was designed to achieve good fissile fuel production, with electricity production being a second order priority. However, the resulting concepts that evolved were all excellent power producers which significantly improved the economic performance. The subsystems discussed in the following paragraphs provide a background of the application for the TF coil design described in this report

  9. A novel approach to calculate inductance and analyze magnetic flux density of helical toroidal coil applicable to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage systems (SMES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh Pahlavani, M.R., E-mail: Mr_Alizadehp@iust.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Power Electronic Research Laboratory (PERL), 16846 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shoulaie, A., E-mail: shoulaie@iust.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Power Electronic Research Laboratory (PERL), 16846 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, formulas are proposed for the self and mutual inductance calculations of the helical toroidal coil (HTC) by the direct and indirect methods at superconductivity conditions. The direct method is based on the Neumann's equation and the indirect approach is based on the toroidal and the poloidal components of the magnetic flux density. Numerical calculations show that the direct method is more accurate than the indirect approach at the expense of its longer computational time. Implementation of some engineering assumptions in the indirect method is shown to reduce the computational time without loss of accuracy. Comparison between the experimental measurements and simulated results for inductance, using the direct and the indirect methods indicates that the proposed formulas have high reliability. It is also shown that the self inductance and the mutual inductance could be calculated in the same way, provided that the radius of curvature is >0.4 of the minor radius, and that the definition of the geometric mean radius in the superconductivity conditions is used. Plotting contours for the magnetic flux density and the inductance show that the inductance formulas of helical toroidal coil could be used as the basis for coil optimal design. Optimization target functions such as maximization of the ratio of stored magnetic energy with respect to the volume of the toroid or the conductor's mass, the elimination or the balance of stress in some coordinate directions, and the attenuation of leakage flux could be considered. The finite element (FE) approach is employed to present an algorithm to study the three-dimensional leakage flux distribution pattern of the coil and to draw the magnetic flux density lines of the HTC. The presented algorithm, due to its simplicity in analysis and ease of implementation of the non-symmetrical and three-dimensional objects, is advantageous to the commercial software such as ANSYS, MAXWELL, and FLUX. Finally, using

  10. A novel approach to calculate inductance and analyze magnetic flux density of helical toroidal coil applicable to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage systems (SMES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Pahlavani, M. R.; Shoulaie, A.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, formulas are proposed for the self and mutual inductance calculations of the helical toroidal coil (HTC) by the direct and indirect methods at superconductivity conditions. The direct method is based on the Neumann’s equation and the indirect approach is based on the toroidal and the poloidal components of the magnetic flux density. Numerical calculations show that the direct method is more accurate than the indirect approach at the expense of its longer computational time. Implementation of some engineering assumptions in the indirect method is shown to reduce the computational time without loss of accuracy. Comparison between the experimental measurements and simulated results for inductance, using the direct and the indirect methods indicates that the proposed formulas have high reliability. It is also shown that the self inductance and the mutual inductance could be calculated in the same way, provided that the radius of curvature is >0.4 of the minor radius, and that the definition of the geometric mean radius in the superconductivity conditions is used. Plotting contours for the magnetic flux density and the inductance show that the inductance formulas of helical toroidal coil could be used as the basis for coil optimal design. Optimization target functions such as maximization of the ratio of stored magnetic energy with respect to the volume of the toroid or the conductor’s mass, the elimination or the balance of stress in some coordinate directions, and the attenuation of leakage flux could be considered. The finite element (FE) approach is employed to present an algorithm to study the three-dimensional leakage flux distribution pattern of the coil and to draw the magnetic flux density lines of the HTC. The presented algorithm, due to its simplicity in analysis and ease of implementation of the non-symmetrical and three-dimensional objects, is advantageous to the commercial software such as ANSYS, MAXWELL, and FLUX. Finally, using the

  11. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER and NET using analytic methods and improved computer subroutine for TFC stress estimation in TRESCODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the comparison of TF coil stresses in NET and FER. The analyses focus on the straight part of the inner legs, since it is this part of the coil which most directly influences the radial build of the machine. NET's TF coils are wedged together and the centering force on each of the coils is reacted by toroidal compression of the inner legs. The forces that act out of the plane of each coil are reacted by friction between adjacent inner legs such that the set of legs behave much like a cylinder under torsion. In contrast, the FER device employs a bucking cylinder to react the centering load, which incurs a penalty in radial thickness, and the out of plane forces are reacted by the use of shear keys between adjacent inner legs. Analytic techniques or ''hand methods'' have been used to estimate and compare the strains and stresses at the inner leg mid-plane section resulting from both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic forces. Such techniques forced a more thorough understanding of the structural behavior of the coils. The amount of effort in analyzing the NET coil is greater than for FER as the reaction of centering load in its wedged design is more complex, and because it was found that friction plays a very important part in determining the coil stresses. The FER coil is simpler in this regard, and a ''hand estimation'' of its coil stresses was straightfoward. In this report, the program written to perform these analyses is also described. It was desired to provide new capabilities to the original TF stress subroutine in TRESCODE and to review and improve it where possible. This has been accomplished, and subroutines are now available for use in JAERI's system code, TRESCODE. It is hoped that the inner leg radial thickness can be better optimized by using the program. (author)

  12. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code

  13. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  14. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: 'Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented

  15. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.M. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: `Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented.

  16. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER [Fusion Experimental Reactor] and NET [Next European Torus] using analytic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of structural efficiency of the toroidal field (TF) coils between the Next European Torus (NET) and Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) machines was made. The effectiveness of their winding packs to help react loads incurred from in-plane and out-of-plane electromagnetic forces was estimated. Only analytic techniques, including mechanics of materials methods and composite mixture rules, were used. The results for NET compared well with the fairly detailed (2-D) and (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) performed by the NET team. Similar FEA of the Advanced Option C (ACS) version of FER have not been done, but the analytic results should be reasonable. The methodology used has been successfully programmed for use in reactor systems codes. 6 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Potential control and flow generation in a toroidal internal-coil system - A new approach to high-beta equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential control and flow generation have been studied on the Proto-RT device that is equipped with an internal ring coil producing a stationary magnetic field. Biasing the surface of the internal coil, the radial electric field is controlled. Supersonic flow has been generated when the plasma is negatively biased. The present experiment is limited in a low-density (∼ 1014 m-3) regime, and hence, only electrostatic effects dominate the structure and stability. Higher density plasma will be produced in a new device Mini-RT that has a super-conducting levitated internal ring. When the flow velocity becomes comparable to the Alfven speed, the hydrodynamic pressure can produce a new type of high-beta (diamagnetic) equilibrium, so-called 'double Beltrami (DB) state'. Recent theory predicts 'self-organization' of a DB state that may have Lyapunov stability. This regime is the target of the new device Mini-RT that is equipped with a super-conducting levitated internal coil system. (author)

  18. An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  19. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  20. Review of the ATLAS B0 model coil test program

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgetta, N; Acerbi, E; Berriaud, C; Boxman, H; Broggi, F; Cataneo, F; Daël, A; Delruelle, N; Dudarev, A; Foussat, A; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Mayri, C; Paccalini, A; Pengo, R; Rivoltella, G; Sbrissa, E

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been extensively tested, reproducing the operational conditions of the final ATLAS Barrel Toroid coils. Two test campaigns have taken place on B0, at the CERN facility where the individual BT coils are about to be tested. The first campaign aimed to test the cool-down, warm-up phases and to commission the coil up to its nominal current of 20.5 kA, reproducing Lorentz forces similar to the ones on the BT coil. The second campaign aimed to evaluate the margins above the nominal conditions. The B0 was tested up to 24 kA and specific tests were performed to assess: the coil temperature margin with respect to the design value, the performance of the double pancake internal joints, static and dynamic heat loads, behavior of the coil under quench conditions. The paper reviews the overall test program with emphasis on second campaign results not covered before. 10 Refs.

  1. Superconducting toroid design for the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS Experiment proposed for LHC will use toroidal magnet systems to achieve high muon momentum resolution. The proposal is based on an air-cored superconducting toroid magnet system consisting of a long barrel toroid with a pair of end cap toroids to provide high resolution at large rapidity. Each end cap toroid will have an outer diameter of approximately 11m and an axis length of 5m and will provide field integrals in the range 4-8Tm over the rapidity span η = 1.5--2.8. This paper presents the magnetic, mechanical and cryogenic design of the end cap toroid magnet systems

  2. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  3. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  4. Resource Review Board Celebrates the Magnet and Liquid Argon Barrel Tests in Hall 180

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, P.

    2004-01-01

    Address by the Director-General, R. Aymar, in front of the barrel cryostat. On 25th October 2004 many RRB delegates and guests, ATLAS National Contact Physicists, and colleagues from far and from CERN working on the Liquid Argon calorimeter and the magnet system were gathering in Hall 180 to celebrate the major milestones reached during the past months in this hall: the successful cold tests of the first barrel toroid coil, of the solenoid, and of the barrel Liquid Argon calorimeter. About 250 people spent a relaxing evening after the speeches by the Director-General R. Aymar and by the spokesperson who gave the following address: 'It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here in Hall 180 in the name of the ATLAS Collaboration! With a few words I would like to recall why we are actually here today to share, what I hope, is a relaxed and joyful moment. To concentrate it all in one sentence I could say: To thank cordially all the main actors for the enormous work accomplished here over many years,...

  5. Elongated toroid fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for achieving ignition of a plasma with ohmic heating is described comprising: means for defining a toroidal plasma chamber,a and confining gas therein, and means including electrically conductive coils for generating plasma within the chamber and for confining and shaping such plasma substantially into and filling a predetermined single region of the chamber without an axisymmetric internal separatix and ohmically heating the confined plasma to ignition. The predetermined region is toroidal with a major axis defining an axial direction parallel thereto and a transaxial direction perpendicular to the axis and having an axial cross section with an elongation, k, greater than 4, where k is the ratio of the maximum axial dimension of the cross section to the maximum transaxial dimension of the cross section

  6. Computational modelling of compact toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary simulations of the formation of compact toroids are presented. This work is in support of current experiments in which compact toroids - a minimum magnetic energy configuration with linked toroidal and poloidal flux - are being formed, accelerated and compressed. Simulations were performed using MACH2, a 2D magnetohydrodynamic code with a newly implemented Van Lear transport scheme. Simulations also include a detailed modelling of the initial poloidal flux distribution produced by the external solenoidal coils, which is through to significantly effect the toroid's formation

  7. Heating of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limitations of ohmic heating in achieving the thermonuclear ignition of a low-β toroidal plasma can be overcome by using several heating methods. Such methods are: fast neutral beam injection (possibly combined with an adiabatic compression or any other means) and HF heating, the most interesting schemes being based on plasma resonances. The basic physical phenomena in each method are briefly explained and results obtained are given. A new heating scheme using an outer frequency of a few kHz is described, that makes it possible to locate the exciting coils outside the vacuum vessel (some of these coils can be that producing the vertical magnetic field for the plasma equilibrium)

  8. Toroidal Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We will discuss how nematic liquid crystals organize inside toroidal droplets. When the director is parallel to the bounding surface, we find spontaneous reflection symmetry breaking, which we attribute to the role played by saddle-splay contributions to the Frank free energy. When the director is perpendicular to the bounding surface, we find that the structure is reminiscent of the escape radial configuration seen in cylinders, but with a central doubly-twisted organization, which we attribute to the geometry of the torus. We will end by presenting recent experiments with active nematics on the toroidal surface. In this case, topology and activity both affect the structure and dynamics of the material.

  9. Proposal to produce large compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relatively large, hot compact toroids might be produced in the annular space between two concentric one-turn coils. With currents in the two coils flowing in the same direction, the magnetic fields on each side of the plasma are in opposite directions. As the fields are raised, the plasma ring is heated and compressed radially towards the center of the annular space. By the addition of two sets of auxiliary coils, the plasma ring can be ejected out one end of the two-coil system into a long axial magnetic field

  10. New Superconducting Toroidal Magnet System for IAXO, the International AXion Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    Axions are hypothetical particles that were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. The new International AXion Observatory (IAXO) will incorporate the most promising solar axions detector to date, which is designed to enhance the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling by one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current state-of-the-art detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions into X-ray photons. Inspired by the successful realization of the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a very large superconducting toroid is currently designed at CERN to provide the required magnetic field. This toroid will comprise eight, one meter wide and twenty one meter long, racetrack coils. The system is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length. Its peak magnetic field is 5.4 T with a stored e...

  11. Superconducting Magnet with the Reduced Barrel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Berriaud, C; Curé, B; Dudarev, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mentink, M; Rolando, G; Da Silva, H F Pais; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 24.518 m long has seven 3.5 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 21 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and 0.7 m thick nose disk, four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks, and three 0.8 m thick muon toroid disks each side. The outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length without the forward muon toroids is 33 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity of \\pm 3.5. The conventional forward muon spectrometer provides the measuring of the muon momenta in the pseudorapidity region from \\pm 2.7...

  12. Last Few Metres for the Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Nyman, T.

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15. The Barrel Calorimeter which will absorb and measure the energy of photons, electrons and hadrons at the core of the ATLAS detector is 8.6 meters in diameter, 6.8 meters long, and weighs over 1600 Tonnes. It consists of two concentric cylindrical detector elements. The innermost comprises aluminium pressure vessels containing the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and the solenoid magnet. The outermost is an assembly of 64 hadron tile calorimeter sectors. Assembled 18 meters away from its final position, the Barrel Calorimeter was relocated with the help of a railway, which allows ...

  13. The outer vactank, an object of 7.6m diameter and 13m length is built up of three cylindrical parts. The central part that is integral part of the central barrel and the the extension on either side each one 4.5m long. These extensions house the shoulders that will support and prestress the CMS Coil. To weld the extensions onto the central part a full penetration weld of 24m length and 45 mm thickness has to be done by hand from inside and outside the vacuum tank and its deformation is controled permanently.

    CERN Multimedia

    Hubert Gerwig

    2001-01-01

    The outer vacuum tank will hold the coil suspension system and transmits the weight of the inner detectors to the central barrel. Its thickness is staggered. In the central part its thickness is 60 mm and then goes down to 30 mm at the extremity.

  14. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  15. The upgraded Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment was developed to explore the physics limits of plasma operation as the aspect ratio (A) approaches unity. Initial experiments on the device found that access to high normalized current and toroidal beta was limited by the presence of large-scale tearing modes. Major upgrades have been conducted of the facility to provide the control tools necessary to mitigate these resistive modes. The upgrades include new programmable power supplies, new poloidal field coils and increased, time-variable toroidal field. First ohmic operations with the upgraded system demonstrated position and current ramp-rate control, as well as improvement in ohmic flux consumption from 2.9 MA Wb-1 to 4.2 MA Wb-1. The upgraded experiment will be used to address three areas of physics interest. First, the kink and ballooning stability boundaries at low A and high normalized current will be investigated. Second, clean, high-current plasma sources will be studied as a helicity injection tool. Experiments with two such sources have produced toroidal currents three times greater than predicted by geometric field line following. Finally, the use of electron Bernstein waves to heat and drive current locally will be studied at the 1 MW level; initial modelling indicates that these experiments are feasible at a frequency of 2.45 GHz

  16. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  17. Mechanical characterization of the tie rods for the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandria, Franco; Todero, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Barrel Toroid (BT) consists of 8 superconducting coils of 25 m length and 5 m width. Each coil is equipped with eight titanium alloy tie rods acting as support for the magnetic forces, the intensity of which will be up to 180 t for the most loaded one. The B0 model coil is about 1/3 length scale of the BT, equipped with three tie rods. In order to simulate the behavior of the coil supports, a test facility has been built to test individual tie rods at cryogenic temperature. The initial aim was to verify the amount of stick and slip, the possibility of it occurring during the excitation and the flexion of the support at the anchoring point on the magnet. This was achieved by inducing in the support the same movements foreseen during the cool-down and the excitation of the magnet and loading with the same forces. Following the evolution of the project it was decided to test the tie rod simply in traction at 250 tons, without displacements. In this paper the test facility is described and the data of t...

  18. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 x 1013 cm-3, nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60 degree wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak

  19. TRT Barrel milestones passed

    CERN Multimedia

    Ogren, H

    2004-01-01

    The barrel TRT detector passed three significant milestones this spring. The Barrel Support Structure (BSS) was completed and moved to the SR-1 building on February 24th. On March 12th the first module passed the quality assurance testing in Building 154 and was transported to the assembly site in the SR-1 building for barrel assembly. Then on April 21st the final production module that had been scanned at Hampton University was shipped to CERN. TRT Barrel Module Production The production of the full complement of barrel modules (96 plus 9 total spares) is now complete. This has been a five-year effort by Duke University, Hampton University, and Indiana University. Actual construction of the modules in the United States was completed in the first part of 2004. The production crews at each of the sites in the United States have now completed their missions. They are shown in the following pictures. Duke University: Production crew with the final completed module. Indiana University: Module producti...

  20. Design description of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a large torsatron being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to replace the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. ATF will have a major radius of 2.1 m and an average plasma minor radius of 0.3 m. Major components of the device include the coil sets, structure, and vacuum vessel. The coil sets are designed for broad operating envelopes, including the capability to drive up to 100 kA of plasma current, to produce helical axis configurations, and to operate continuously at one-half the baseline currents. The ATF structure consists of a 40-mm-thick stainless steel toroidal shell encasing the helical coil set. The shell is constructed from 24 identical upper and lower segments, with 12 pairs of intermediate panels to provide access to the helical field (HF) coil joints. The lower portion of the shell also serves as an assembly fixture for the HF coil set. The vacuum vessel is a highly contoured 6-mm-thick stainless steel shell closely fitting the bore and sidewalls of the HF coil winding to provide maximum volume for the plasma. Forty-eight large ports allow good access for diagnostics and neutral beam injection

  1. The MDT Barrel Organ

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Have you ever looked for an interesting use for the spare detector parts once the construction phase was finished? Henk Tiecke, with the help of Oscar van Petten and Marco Kraan, all from NIKHEF, came up with a great idea for leftover MDT tubes. They simply built a pipe organ! See the MDT Barrel Organ in action, as recorded during a party thrown on the occasion of the first shipment of MDT chambers from NIKHEF to CERN. Want to know more about the organ? Please contact Henk Tiecke. Henk Tiecke playing the MDT Barrel Organ.

  2. Barrelled locally convex spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez Carreras, P

    1987-01-01

    This book is a systematic treatment of barrelled spaces, and of structures in which barrelledness conditions are significant. It is a fairly self-contained study of the structural theory of those spaces, concentrating on the basic phenomena in the theory, and presenting a variety of functional-analytic techniques.Beginning with some basic and important results in different branches of Analysis, the volume deals with Baire spaces, presents a variety of techniques, and gives the necessary definitions, exploring conditions on discs to ensure that they are absorbed by the barrels of the sp

  3. Thin Concrete Barrel Vault

    OpenAIRE

    Kamerling, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the structural design of a thin barrel vault constructed with Fusée Ceramique infill elements. The load transfer is analyzed and validated. For the structure composed of Fusée Ceramique elements, steel and concrete the stresses are calculated and compared to the stresses given in the codes used from 1950 to the present. The advantages and disadvantages of these low rise barrel vaults are showed. Further the possibilities of a light infill to reduce, for structures of concre...

  4. TFTR coil case design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor) TF (Toroidal Field) coil cases are highly loaded structures designed within severe constraints. Foremost among these are basic machine geometry, material characteristics of both the case and the copper/epoxy matrix it supports, and overall cost. Scoping and parametric studies have been performed continuously since conceptual design. The progression of design decisions including coil shape, support locations and their stiffnesses, material selection, and element sizing are described. The significant variables are identified for each of the studies. The current coil case design is presented in detail along with aspects of the design still under consideration. Questions that remain involve the effects of limitations placed upon the coil materials (copper, epoxy) themselves. Resolution of these questions is to be accomplished by development tests of coil elements similar to those in the current design. Two alternate designs have been held in reserve pending completion of the development tests. Each is briefly described as to its basic configuration, potential for improvement, and its effect on the overall device

  5. Thin Concrete Barrel Vault

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerling, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the structural design of a thin barrel vault constructed with Fusée Ceramique infill elements. The load transfer is analyzed and validated. For the structure composed of Fusée Ceramique elements, steel and concrete the stresses are calculated and compared to the stresses given in

  6. A crystal barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The production of crystals for the barrel of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed. This is an important milestone for the experiment, which received the last of its 62,960 crystals on 9 March. The members of the team responsible for the crystal acceptance testing at CERN display the last crystal for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. From left to right: Igor Tarasov, Etiennette Auffray and Hervé Cornet.One of the six machines specially developed to measure 67 different parameters on each crystal. Igor Tarasov is seen inserting the last batch of crystals into the machine. The last of the 62,960 CMS barrel crystals arrived at CERN on 9 March. Once removed from its polystyrene protection, this delicate crystal, like thousands of its predecessors, will be inserted into the last of the 36 supermodules of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter in a few days' time. This marks the end of an important chapter in an almost 15-year-long journey by the CMS crystals team, some of whose member...

  7. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  8. Design and manufacture of a toroidal-type SMES for combination with real-time digital simulator (RTDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-min; Kim, A.-Rong; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Eom, Bum-Yong; Sim, Kidoek; Kim, Seok-Ho; Sohn, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Jong; Bae, Joon-Han; Seong, Ki-Cheol

    2011-06-01

    The authors designed and manufactured a toroidal-type superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The toroidal-type SMES was designed using a 3D CAD program. The toroidal-type magnet consists of 30 double pancake coils (DPCs). The single pancake coils (SPCs), which constitute the double pancake coils, are arranged at an angle of 6° from each other, based on the central axis of the toroidal-type magnet. The cooling method used for the toroidal-type SMES is the conduction cooling type. When the cooling method for the toroidal-type SMES was designed, the two-stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerator was considered. The Bi-2223 HTS wire, which was made by soldering brass on both sides of the superconductor, is used for the magnet winding. Finally, the authors connected the toroidal-type SMES to a real-time digital simulator (RSCAD/RTDS) to simulate voltage sag compensation in a power utility.

  9. Response of superconducting coils to internal heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development testing of six different superconducting toroidal field coils from four countries in the Large Coil Task has included investigation of each coil's tolerance for various forms of heating, such as may be encountered in the magnets of a fusion reactor. Embedded heaters and temperature and voltage sensors in the coils were used in stability tests, simulated nuclear heating tests, and measurements of current-sharing temperature at high fields and currents. Results were gratifying and promise to be useful in design of magnets for reactors

  10. Paying by the Barrel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francis L.Sackitey; Ghana

    2012-01-01

    CHINA'S UNIPEC Asia Co. Ltd. will buy up the entire oil share from Ghana's Jubilee field for the next 15 years in a commercial agreement entered into by the government of Ghana. Under the agreement, the West African nation will be supplying China with 13,000 barrels of crude oil daily to pay for a $3 billion loan granted to Ghana by China under a Master Facility Agreement with the China Development Bank.

  11. Toroidal circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  12. Production and qualification of the 60-kA, aluminum-stabilized conductor for the ATLAS B0 coil

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L; Pedrini, D; Berriaud, C; Horváth, I L

    1999-01-01

    For the toroidal ATLAS magnet system, some 90 km of aluminum stabilized conductor are required. The conductor is a Rutherford cable, coextruded with very pure aluminum. The main characteristics of the conductor are: (1) a very large $9 critical current, 60 kA at 5 T and 4.2 K; (2) RRR of the stabilizing aluminum of at least 1000 on the finished conductor; (3) a good bonding between the Rutherford cable and the stabilizer: a shear stress of 20 MPa is required; and $9 (4) 1750 m of unit length. To assure a good quality of the conductor all along the production and to minimize the risk of rejection of such expensive units, a strict quality assurance was established. The paper describes the results $9 of the R&D phase to set all parameters to produce the first two unit lengths necessary for the winding of the B0 coil (a 9 m long model coil of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid). It also describes the control system based on continuous $9 ultrasonic inspection, able to provide images of the cable inside the aluminum that...

  13. Active toroidal field ripple reduction system in FAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion advanced studies torus (FAST) has been proposed as a flexible and cost effective machine that is able to support the development of ITER and DEMO operating scenarios exploiting some innovative technology solutions and to investigate the physics of high-performance plasmas in a dimensionless parameter range close to ITER. The FAST magnet consists of 18 coils, spaced by 20o in the toroidal angle, each made up of 14 copper plates, suitably arranged in order to realise 3 turns in the radial direction, with 89.2 kA per coil (in the H-mode plasma scenario 6.5 MA at 7.5 T). The finite number and toroidal extension of the toroidal field coils (TFCs) cause a periodic variation of the toroidal field from its nominal value called toroidal field ripple (TFR). An active ripple reduction system has been comprehensively investigated, by using proper 3D finite elements models, to provide an efficient and flexible system able to minimize the TFR in the region of interest. An optimization study of position and size of the coils required to reduce to an acceptable level for the operations the maximum ripple on the plasma (well below 0.3%), feeding them with currents sustainable during the whole scenario (∼1/10 of the current flowing in TFCs), is presented in this paper.

  14. Large coil test facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of a superconducting toroidal field (TF) magnet for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak reactor, several different TF coils, about half TNS size, will be built and tested to permit selection of a design and fabrication procedure for full-scale TNS coils. A conceptual design has been completed for a facility to test D-shaped TF coils, 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, operating at 4-6 K, cooled either by boiling helium or by forced-flow supercritical helium. Up to six coils can be accommodated in a toroidal array housed in a single vacuum tank. The principal components and systems in the facility are an 11-m vacuum tank, a test stand providing structural support and service connections for the coils, a liquid nitrogen system, a system providing helium both as saturated liquid and at supercritical pressure, coils to produce a pulsed vertical field at any selected test coil position, coil power supplies, process instrumentation and control, coil diagnostics, and a data acquisition and handling system. The test stand structure is composed of a central bucking post, a base structure, and two horizontal torque rings. The coils are bolted to the bucking post, which transmits all gravity loads to the base structure. The torque ring structure, consisting of beams between adjacent coils, acts with the bucking structure to react all the magnetic loads that occur when the coils are energized. Liquid helium is used to cool the test stand structure to 5 K to minimize heat conduction to the coils. Liquid nitrogen is used to precool gaseous helium during system cooldown and to provide thermal radiation shielding

  15. Design and Comparison of a 1 MW / 5s HTS SMES with Toroidal and Solenoidal Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Antonio; Gholizad, Babak; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frédéric; Zermeño, Víctor M R

    2015-01-01

    The design of a HTS SMES coil with solenoidal and toroidal geometry is carried out based on a commercially available 2G HTS conductor. A SMES system of practical interest (1 MW / 5 s) is considered. The comparison between ideal toroidal and solenoidal geometry is first discussed and the criteria used for choosing the geometrical parameters of the coils' bore are explained. The design of the real coil is then carried out and the final amount of conductor needed is compared. A preliminary comparison of the two coils in terms of AC loss during one charge discharge cycle is also discussed.

  16. ALEPH Coil

    CERN Multimedia

    ALEPH was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The detector was used by a collaboration of hundreds of physicists, mostly from Europe but also from China and the USA. The ALEPH superconducting magnet coils provide a very uniform magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. The current in the coil is about 5000 A and the stored energy is 136 MJ. The coils are cooled by liquid Helium. Two correction coils serve to improve the uniformity of the field. This piece is connected to OBJ-DE-054.

  17. Safety analysis of superconducting toroidal field magnet for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety analysis of the superconducting toroidal field magnet for a Tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been carried out. Works were accident classification, FMEA and FTA analyses, coil stability and quench behavior calculations, failure detection and coil protection system designs, structure analysis, fracture and fatigue studies, and earthquake response analysis. Accident analysis of cryostat and refrigeration system was also performed. The objective of this work is to reveal technological problems of the toroidal field magnet by safety analysis. (author)

  18. Triggering and measuring bent cosmic muon tracks with the Muon Spectrometer barrel for the first time

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Cerutti

    During the ATLAS barrel toroid stability test, bent cosmic muon tracks were seen for the first time in the ATLAS cavern by means of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The barrel toroid has been powered at its nominal current (20.5 thousand Amperes) and kept in steady state for more than one day during the weekend of 18-19 November (see a report on this test in the Magnet section). During this test one large sector and part of a small sector of the barrel muon spectrometer were readout and used to detect the cosmic muons tracks bent by the toroidal magnetic field. Thirteen muon stations in the feet sectors (sectors 13 and 14) have been used in this test. The muon stations are formed of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) that were providing the muon trigger, and Monitored Drift Tubes that were used to measure with high accuracy the muon curvature hence their momentum. The Level-1 Barrel trigger chain was based on the Barrel Middle Large chambers equipped with final production modules on both the on-detector and the o...

  19. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  20. Weapons barrel life cycle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Pene Hristov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the dynamic processes within the gun barrel during the firing process in exploitation. It generally defines the basic principles of constructing tube elements, and shows the distortion of the basic geometry of the tube interior due to wear as well as the impact it causes during exploitation. The article also defines basic empirical models as well as a model based on fracture mechanics for the calculation of a use-life of the barrel, and other elements essential for the safe use of the barrel as the basic weapon element. Erosion causes are analysed in order to control and reduce wear and prolong the lifetime of the gun barrel. It gives directions for the reparation of barrels with wasted resources. In conclusion, the most influential elements of tube wear are given as well as possible modifications of existing systems, primarily propellant charges, with a purpose of prolonging lifetime of gun barrels. The guidelines for a proper determination of the lifetime based on the barrel condition assessment are given as well. INTRODUCTION The barrel as the basic element of each weapon is described as well as the processes occurring during the firing that have impulsive character and are accompanied by large amounts of energy. The basic elements of barrel and itheir constructive characteristics are descibed. The relation between Internal ballistics, ie calculation of the propellant gas pressure in the firing process, and structural elements defined by the barrel material resistance is shown. In general, this part of the study explains the methodology of the gun barrel structural elements calculation, ie. barrel geometry, taking into account the degrees of safety in accordance with Military Standards.   TUBE WEAR AND DEFORMATIONS The weapon barrel gradually wears out during exploitation due to which it no longer satisfies the set requirements. It is considered that the barrel has experienced a lifetime when it fails to fulfill the

  1. Induced toroid structures and toroid polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency-dependent toroid dipole polarizability γ(ω) of a (nonrelativistic, spinless) hydrogen-like atom in its ground state is calculated analytically in terms of two Gauss hypergeometric functions. The static result reads simply γ(ω=0)=(23/60)α2Z-4a05 (α - fine structure constant, Z - nucleus charge number, a0 - Bohr radius). Comparing the present evaluations for H-like atoms with previous ones for pions, one sees that the role of the induced toroid moments (as against that of the usual electric ones) increases considerably when passing from atomic to particle physics

  2. A toroidal magnet option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using, for the ALICE forward muon spectrometer, a superconducting toroidal magnet has been considered in place of the SC dipole. The study has been restricted to the acceptance calculations and to the tracking simulations of the toroidal magnet but without technical investigations. The estimated performances are found maladjusted to the physics requirements of the heavy ion runs. (author)

  3. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  4. Progress in the ICCS-HFTF 12 Tesla coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Program requires the development of very large and powerful superconducting toroidal magnets. Combined with optimized reactors, these superconducting coils will provide plasma confinement for the generation of electricity. This development is being carried out on two parallel fronts. The Large Coil Program (LCP) is focusing on the development of 5 m scale toroidal coils in a medium field. The second so-called 12 tesla program has its focus on high magnetic field and the development of advanced superconductors. Four advanced superconductor concepts are being developed as part of this 12T program. One of these programs is reported. 3 refs

  5. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high field and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼ 20 T. This coil system causes a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii of 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  6. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼20 T. This coil system causes, a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii o 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  7. Invisibility cloaks for toroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-04-13

    The material properties of toroidal invisibility cloaks are derived based on the coordinate transformation method. The permittivity and permeability tensors for toroidal cloaks are substantially different from those for spherical cloaks, but quite similar to those for 2D cylindrical cloaks because a singularity is involved at the inner boundary in both the cases. The cloaking effect is confirmed by the electric field distribution in the vicinity of toroidal cloaks simulated from the generalized discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. This study extends the concept of electromagnetic cloaking of arbitrarily-shaped objects to a complex geometry. PMID:19365485

  8. The PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Schwarz, C.; Belias, A.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PANDA detector at the international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) addresses fundamental questions of hadron physics. Experiments concerning charmonium spectroscopy, the search for hybrids and glueballs and the interaction of hidden and open charm particles with nucleons and nuclei will be performed with antiproton beams impinging on hydrogen or nuclear targets. Cooled beams allow the precision scan of resonances in formation experiments. The momentum range of the antiproton beam between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c tests predictions by perturbation theory and will reveal deviations originating from strong QCD . An excellent hadronic particle identification will be accomplished by DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counters. The design for the barrel region is based on the successful BaBar DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. DIRC designs based on different radiator geometries with several focusing options were studied in simulation. The performance of each design was characterized in terms of photon yield and single photon Cherenkov angle resolution. Selected design options were implemented in prototypes and tested with hadronic particle beams at GSI and CERN.

  9. Design of radiation-thin air core toroids for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general problem is defined and performance criteria established. A variety of possible designs is presented and the basis for each concept iis outlined. Toroidal coils which enclose central calorimetric detectors are described; end coils may be used in conjunction with solenoidal detectors for improved measurements in the forward, high rapidity range

  10. Toroidal Field Ripple reduction studies for ITER and FAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different approaches to control the Toroidal Field Ripple (TFR) amplitude in ITER and FAST devices are presented in this paper. The approach currently adopted to reduce the TFR in ITER is based on the installation of ferromagnetic inserts between the vacuum vessel shells. The same approach has been analyzed in the design of the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) proposal. Details of the system's layout are given. A new approach based on the insertion of active coils between the outer legs of the Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs) and the plasma, has been extensively investigated for these two machines. This active system would allow reducing the TFR to values even smaller than with the ferromagnetic inserts. The case of a localized disturb like that introduced by a Test Blanket Module (TBM) for ITER is presented where only well localized active coils can produce a significant ripple reduction.

  11. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  12. Heat characteristic analysis of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.M.; Kim, A.R.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, D.W.; Park, M. [Changwon National University, 9 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, I.K., E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.k [Changwon National University, 9 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, B.Y.; Sim, K.; Kim, S.H.; Shon, M.H.; Kim, H.J.; Bae, H.J.; Seong, K.C. [Superconducting Device and Cryogenics Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    This paper analyzed the heat characteristics of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet. The authors designed and manufactured a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet which consists of 30 double pancake coils. One (a single pancake coil) of a double pancake coil is arranged at an angle of 6{sup o} from each other. The shape of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was designed by a 3D CAD program. The heat invasion was investigated under no-load condition and the thermal characteristic of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was analyzed using the Finite Elements Method program. Both the analyzed and the experiment results are compared and discussed in detail.

  13. Modular Coils and Plasma Configurations for Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-09-10

    Characteristics of modular coils for quasi-axisymmetric stellarators that are related to the plasma aspect ratio, number of field periods and rotational transform have been examined systematically. It is observed that, for a given plasma aspect ratio, the coil complexity tends to increase with the increased number of field periods. For a given number of field periods, the toroidal excursion of coil winding is reduced as the plasma aspect ratio is increased. It is also clear that the larger the coil-plasma separation is, the more complex the coils become. It is further demonstrated that it is possible to use other types of coils to complement modular coils to improve both the physics and the modular coil characteristics.

  14. Design description of the Large Coil Test Facility pulse-coil support and transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to simulate the transient fields which would be imposed on superconducting toroidal field coils in an operating tokamak reactor, the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) test stand includes a set of pulse coils. This set of pulse coils is designed to be moved from one test location to another within the LCTF vacuum vessel while the vessel is operating under vacuum and the test stand and test coils are at an operating temperature of 4.2K. This operating environment and the extremely high magnetic loads have necessitated some unique design features for the pulse coil support and transport system. The support structure for the pulse coil must react high overturning moments and axial loads induced on the pulse coil by the interaction of the pulse field with the field generated by the large test coils. These loads are reacted into the test stand support structure or spider frame by an arrangement of six pedestals and a support beam. In order to move the pulse coil set from one test location to another, the support beam containing the pulse coils must be driven across rollers mounted on the pedestals, then clamped securely to react the loads. Because these operations must be performed in a vacuum environment at cryogenic tmperature, special consideration was given to component design

  15. Barrel-shaped supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors argue that the majority of radio supernova remnants have a three-dimensional distribution of emissivity which is barrel shaped, with little emission from the end-caps. They examine some mechanisms which could produce this distribution

  16. COMPASS magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. Both coil systems are supported form a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given and shows the D-shaped vacuum vessel, the major components and the various field windings

  17. Compass magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1 T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. These consist of magnetising windings which can induce a plasma current up to 400 kA and shaping, feedback and equilibrium windings, combinations of which may be selected by link-board arrangements to produce Tokamak discharges of circular, dee, inverse dee, ellipse and kidney bean cross-sections. Both coil systems are supported from a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given. (author)

  18. The results of the KSTAR superconducting coil test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device is under construction using superconducting (SC) coils for long pulse operation. The KSTAR superconducting magnet system consists of 16 D-shaped toroidal field (TF) coils, 3 pairs of poloidal field (PF) coils, and 4 pairs of central solenoid (CS) coils. Two kinds of SC coils have been fabricated and tested in the coil test facility in the Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI). One of the coils was a prototype TF coil, TF00 coil, which has been fabricated in the same size as the real coils using Nb3Sn SC cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC). The other was a pair of CS model coils, which were fabricated as a part of a background field system to test the superconductor in a pulsed field environment. The major objectives of the SC coil tests were (i) to verify the coil design and fabrication process in the KSTAR coil development, (ii) to measure the coil performances during cool-down, current excitation, and discharge scenarios, and (iii) to achieve the operational experience of the SC coil test facility and the SC magnet system in the KSTAR device. The prototype TF coil was cooled down to the operating temperature of 4.5 K in 10 days. The coil was charged in steps and this was followed by slow or fast discharges. The transient hydraulic parameters were measured according to the different scenarios. The results of the coil test showed that no noticeable defects of the coil were found, such as helium leaks at cryogenic temperature, and helium circulation through the coil was sufficient to keep the coil at the operating temperature. The CS model coil was also cooled down in 9 days and basic current excitation and discharge tests of the coil have been done. To assess the ac performance of the coil, current charging experiments of the coil will be continued until the end of 2004. In this paper, the experimental results of the prototype TF coil and the CS model coil are described as well as the general coil test

  19. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  20. Approximations to toroidal harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroidal harmonics P/sub n-1/2/1(cosh μ) and Q/sub n-1/2/1(cosh μ) are useful in solutions to Maxwell's equations in toroidal coordinates. In order to speed their computation, a set of approximations has been developed that is valid over the range 0 -10. The simple method used to determine the approximations is described. Relative error curves are also presented, obtained by comparing approximations to the more accurate values computed by direct summation of the hypergeometric series

  1. Drift in toroidal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  2. Structure design of the Westinghouse superconducting magnet for the Large Coil Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the on-going development of superconducting toroidal field coils for tokamak reactors, the Large Coil Program (LCP) managed by Union Carbide Corporation will include the design, fabrication, and testing of large superconducting coils to determine their feasibility for use in the magnetic fusion energy effort. Structural analysis of the large coil is essential to ensure adequate safety in the test coil design and confidence in the scalability of the design. This paper will discuss the action of tensile and shear loads on the various materials used in the coil. These loads are of magnetic and thermal origin

  3. ID Barrel installed in cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Apsimon, R.; Romaniouk, A.

    Wednesday 23rd August was a memorable day for the Inner Detector community as they witnessed the transport and installation of the central part of the inner detector (ID-barrel) into the ATLAS detector. Many members of the collaboration gathered to witness this moment at Point 1. After years of design, construction and commissioning, the outer two detectors (TRT and SCT) of the ID barrel were moved from the SR1 cleanroom to the ATLAS cavern. The barrel was moved across the car park from building 2175 to SX1. Although only a journey of about 100 metres, this required weeks of planning and some degree of luck as far as the weather was concerned. Accelerometers were fitted to the barrel to provide real-time monitoring and no values greater than 0.1 g were recorded, fully satisfying the transport specification for this extremely precise and fragile detector. Muriel, despite her fear of heights, bravely volunteered to keep a close eye on the detector. Swapping cranes to cross the entire parking lot, while Mur...

  4. Smaller coil systems for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripple reduction by ferro-magnetic iron shielding is used to reduce the size of the toroidal field coils down to 7.8 by 10.4 m bore for a commercial tokamak reactor design with plasma parameters similar to STARFIRE. For maximum effectiveness, it is found that the blocks of ferromagnetic iron shielding should have triangular cross section and should be placed as close to the plasma as possible

  5. Choice of coils for a fusion reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Romeo; Garabedian, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    In a fusion reactor a hot plasma of deuterium and tritium is confined by a strong magnetic field to produce helium ions and release energetic neutrons. The 3D geometry of a stellarator provides configurations for such a device that reduce net toroidal current that might lead to disruptions. We construct smooth coils generating an external magnetic field designed to prevent the plasma from deteriorating.

  6. Reduction of toroidal ripple by using high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present a new method to reduce the toroidal ripple with use of high Tc superconductors. High Tc superconductors can behave as ferromagnetic or diamagnetic materials depending on their magnetic hysteresis. If they are appropriately arranged and magnetized between the toroidal field coils, they possibly decrease the toroidal field ripple. Here, the preliminary design of ITER is taken as an example, and the effect of the high Tc superconductors on the ripple is evaluated. The magnetic induction due to the superconductors is calculated by the current vector potential method based on the critical state model. Several arrangements of the high Tc superconductors were quantitatively examined in order to reduce the ripple. The results obtained by the calculation show that the maximum ripple value can be reduced to be the required value. (orig.)

  7. Work on a ATLAS tile calorimeter Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is designed as one barrel and two extended barrel hadron parts. The calorimeter consists of a cylindrical structure with inner and outer radius of 2280 and 4230 mm respectively. The barrel part is 5640 mm in length along the beam axis, while each of the extended barrel cylinders is 2910 mm long. Each detector cylinder is built of 64 independent wedges along the azimuthal direction. Between the barrel and the extended barrels there is a gap of about 600 mm, which is needed for the Inner Detector and the Liquid Argon cables, electronics and services. The barrel covers the region -1.0barrels cover the region 0.8<|h|<1.7.

  8. TFTR TF coil thermal analysis and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water cooling passage leak which developed in a TFTR toroidal field (TF) coil has precipitated interest in developing alternative cooling options for this coil system. A test on a spare coil was performed to establish a low power heating schedule and to determine the efficacy of gas cooling the TF coils. A computer analysis was also performed using the test results to benchmark the code. The investigation of gas cooling was initiated as a contingency in the event of future irreparable leaks developing in the TF coil cooling passages. It is generally acknowledged that gas leakage into the electrical insulation would have a relatively benign effect on its dielectric strength whereas recent experience on TFTR indicates a substantial degradation of dielectric strength when wetted with water (the use of high dielectric silicone oil as an alternative coolant, is discussed elsewhere in these proceedings). The purpose of the low power heating test was to establish the proper current settings and IR drop to maintain the TF coil at a prescribed temperature of 80 degree C, in preparation for an elevated temperature dry-out cycle on the leaking coil in TFTR. 3 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreman, Matt; Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  10. Sustainment of spheromak plasma by driving the toroidal current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spheromak plasma productions by means of quasi-static method on the basis of z-discharge and theta-discharge have been investigated using the machine named TS-3. This machine consists of a SUS vacuum vessel with an inner diameter of 76 cm and an axial length of 95 cm, two internal poloidal coils enclosed with SUS thin cases with a major diameter of 43 cm and an axial separation of 39 cm, and two sets of eight pairs of electrodes around each poloidal coil. Up to 0.2 T vertical magnetic field can be applied using an external DC mirror type magnet. Either one or two isolated spheromak(s) can be generated by the selection of sets of electrodes in proper manner. An optional current transformer with an outer cylinder diameter of 9 cm installed along the major symmetric axis of the vessel enables us to perform toroidal current driving of spheromak plasma. Spheromak plasmas produced in He has of about 10 mTorr have a decay time of about 30 micro sec. with the center conductor when it has no current for the toroidal current driving. However, when a flux change of 30 to 60 Wb/s is given to the center coil during 100 micro sec after the initiation of the spheromak configuration, the sustainment of the configuration is observed by the measurement of both poloidal and toroidal field spatial profile

  11. Reduction of toroidal ripple by using high Tc conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The loss of alpha particles in a rippled toroidal field is one of the most critical issues for the design of tokamak reactors, because it has direct impacts on the design of toroidal field (TF) coils and the first wall. In the preliminary design of the ITER, the alpha particle ripple loss and the additional first wall heat load due to such loss has been assessed. From these assessments the maximum ripples (Bmax - Bmin)/(Bmax + Bmin), at the plasma edge is required to be decreased to 1 - 1.5%. There are several possible ways to decrease the ripple value without changing the TF coil shape. One of them is to use ferromagnetic balls in the vacuum vessel under the outer TF coil legs. Preliminary estimations show that in this way the ripple can be decreased by a factor of 2. In this paper, a new method to reduce the toroidal ripple using high Tc superconductors is presented. High Tc superconductor have the advantage of working above the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen and they have other properties that make their practical applications. For example, they behave as a ferromagnetic or diamagnetic material depending on their magnetization. Therefore, if superconductors are appropriately arranged and magnetized, they decrease the maximum ripple at the plasma edge to the required value

  12. OCLATOR II (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the general description of OCLATOR (I), more thoughts are presented here. It suggests that the blanket may not be changed for the plant lifetime. Also miniaturization of OCLATOR is discussed, especially if the ripple turbulence could be improved upon the presently set limit which applies to a large number of ripples

  13. The PANDA Barrel DIRC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, M., E-mail: matthias.hoek@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V. Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Efficient Particle Identification for a wide momentum range and the full solid angle is required for reconstructing the various physics channels of the PANDA program. Hadronic Particle Identification in the barrel region of the detector will be provided by a DIRC counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with important improvements, such as focusing optics and fast photon timing. Several of these improvements, including different radiator geometries and optics, were tested in particle beams at GSI and at CERN. The evolution of the conceptual design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the performance of complex prototypes in test beam campaigns will be discussed.

  14. Completion of the TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Gagnon, P

    On February 3, the US-TRT team proudly completed the installation of the 96th barrel TRT module on its support structure in the SR building at CERN. This happy event came after many years of R&D initiated in the nineties by the TA1 team at CERN, followed by the construction of the modules in three American institutes (Duke, Hampton and Indiana Universities) from 1996 to 2003. In total, the 96 barrel modules contain 52544 kapton straws, each 4 mm in diameter and strung with a 30 micron gold-plated tungsten wire. Each wire was manually inserted, a feat in itself! The inner layer modules contain 329 straws, the middle layer modules have 520 straws and the outer layer, 793 straws. Thirty- two modules of each type form a full layer. Their special geometry was designed such as to leave no dead region. On average, a particle will cross 36 straws. Kirill Egorov, Chuck Mahlon and John Callahan inserted the last module in the Barrel Support Structure. After completion in the US, all modules were transferred...

  15. FORCE DISTRIBUTIONS AND STRESS ANALYSIS OF THE INTOR-CH SUPERCONDUCTING COIL

    OpenAIRE

    Marinucci, C.; Palladino, L.; Pasotti, G.; Ricci, M.; Vécsey, G.

    1984-01-01

    The status of the electro-mechanical calculations of the SIN concept for the INTOR/NET 11 Tesla toroidal field coils is presented. Optimization of the constant-tension D-shape curve, calculations of electromagnetic forces and stress analysis of conductor, winding and complete coil are discussed.

  16. Coiled tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil and gas wells that flow on initial completion eventually reach a condition of liquid loading that kills the wells. This results form declining reservoir pressure, decreased gas volume (velocity), increased water production and other factors that cause liquids to accumulate at the bottom of the well and exert back pressure on the formation. This restricts or in some cases prevents fluid entry into the wellbore form the formation. Flowing production can be restored or increased by reducing surface backpressure, well bore stimulation, pressure maintenance or by installing a string of smaller diameter tubing. This paper reports on installation (hanging off) of a concentric string of coiled tubing inside existing production tubing which is an economically viable, safe, convenient and effective alterative for returning some of these liquid loaded )logged-up) wells to flowing status

  17. Magnetic field and force of helical coils for force free helical reactor (FFHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic force on a helical coil becomes smaller by decreasing the coil pitch parameter which is the angle of the coil to the toroidal direction. This makes it possible to enlarge the central toroidal field or to simplify the supporting structures of the coil. The plasma minor radius, however, becomes smaller with the pitch parameter, and a higher field is necessary to attain the same plasma performance. Another important item in a helical reactor is the distance between the helical coil and the plasma to gain enough space for blankets. In order to reduce the mass of the coil supports, a lower aspect ratio is advantageous, and an optimum value of the pitch parameter will exist around 1.2 and 1.0 for the helical systems of the pole numbers of 2 and 3, respectively. (author)

  18. Integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) applications to the TITAN reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integrated-Blanket-Coil (IBC) concept has been adopted for use in the toroidal field and divertor coil systems of the TITAN-I lithium/vanadium design. The IBC approach combines the breeding and energy recovery functions of the blanket with the magnetic field production of the coils into a single component. This is accomplished by passing the current through the liquid metal coolant, lithium, which flows poloidally around the plasma. A reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactor offers an attractive context for IBC coils since the low toroidal field at the plasma surface (-- 0.36 T) leads to relatively low coil currents. Examination of nuclear, magnetic, thermal-hydraulic, electrical and design integration issues indicates that the IBC coils are a viable and attractive option for the TITAN reactor

  19. Divertor Coil Design and Implementation on Pegasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriwise, P. C.; Bongard, M. W.; Cole, J. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Kujak-Ford, B. A.; Lewicki, B. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    An upgraded divertor coil system is being commissioned on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment in conjunction with power system upgrades in order to achieve higher β plasmas, reduce impurities, and possibly achieve H-mode operation. Design points for the divertor coil locations and estimates of their necessary current ratings were found using predictive equilibrium modeling based upon a 300 kA target plasma. This modeling represented existing Pegasus coil locations and current drive limits. The resultant design calls for 125 kA-turns from the divertor system to support the creation of a double null magnetic topology in plasmas with IpIGBT power supply modules to provide IDIV<=4 kA. The resulting 20 kA-turn capability of the existing divertor coil will be augmented by a new coil providing additional A-turns in series. Induced vessel wall current modeling indicates the time response of a 28 turn augmentation coil remains fast compared to the poloidal field penetration rate through the vessel. First results operating the augmented system are shown.

  20. 10 tesla toroidal field magnet system for General Atomic's PGFR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic's concept for a reactor compatible superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept employs bath cooled, copper stabilized NbTi conductor to generate 10 tesla at a nominal temperature of 4.50K. The emphasis of this paper is on the coil configuration, stability criterion, cryodynamic performance, and support of magnetic loads. The guiding principles of the design are fabrication economy, reactor compatibility, and operational reliability

  1. Designing Stable Antiparallel Coiled Coil Dimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾宪纲; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    The history of antiparallel coiled coil dimer design is briefly reviewed and the main principles governing the successful designs are explained. They include analysis of the inter-subunit electrostatic repulsion for determining partners for dimerization and of the buried polar interaction for determining the relative orientation of the partners. A theory is proposed to explain the lack of antiparallel coiled coil homodimers in nature.

  2. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  3. Parametric design studies of toroidal magnetic energy storage units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units have a number of advantages as storage devices. Electrical current is the input, output and stored medium, allowing for completely solid-state energy conversion. The magnets themselves have no moving parts. The round-trip efficiency is higher than those for batteries, compressed air or pumped hydro. Output power can be very high, allowing complete discharge of the unit within a few seconds. Finally, the unit can be designed for a very large number of cycles, limited basically by fatigue in the structural components. A small systems code has been written to produce and evaluate self-consistent designs for toroidal superconducting energy storage units. The units can use either low temperature or high temperature superconductors. The coils have 'D' shape where the conductor and its stabilizer/structure is loaded only in tension and the centering forces are borne by a bucking cylinder. The coils are convectively cooled from a cryogenic reservoir in the bore of the coils. The coils are suspended in a cylindrical metal shell which protects the magnet during rail, automotive or shipboard use. It is important to note that the storage unit does not rely on its surroundings for structural support, other than normal gravity and inertial loads. This paper presents designs for toroidal energy storage units produced by the systems code. A wide range of several parameters have been considered, resulting in units storing from 1 MJ to 72 GJ. Maximum fields range from 5 t to 20 T. The masses and volumes of the coils, bucking cylinder, coolant, insulation and outer shell are calculated. For unattended use, the allowable operating time using only the boiloff of the cryogenic fluid for refrigeration is calculated. For larger units, the coils have been divided into modules suitable for normal truck or rail transport. 8 refs., 5 tabs

  4. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Allison, J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Ashton, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Bahan, G.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Baines, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Banks, J.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barlow, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barnett, S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Beeston, C. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Chrin, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Clowes, S.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Davies, O.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Duerdoth, I.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hinde, P.S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hughes-Jones, R.E. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Lafferty, G.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Loebinger, F.K. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Macbeth, A.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; McGowan, R.F. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Moss, M.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Murphy, P.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Nijjhar, B. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; O`Dowd, A.J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Pawley, S.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Phillips, P.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Richards, G.E.

    1995-04-21

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.)).

  5. Geometry Design of Wooden Barrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan CISMARU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a design methodology of the wooden barrel geometry, as an algorithm of successive calculations. Thus, starting from the required elements (volume, length, shape, maximum height of storage space the user will be able to define the geometry which must be obtained by processing. Based on these calculations, one can define the structure, size and shape of the staves in order to establish the processing technology of both components and subassemblies (jacket and bottoms which are to form the final product by their assembling using metal circles.

  6. TEXT tf coil bonding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive bond test program was conducted prior to manufacturing and bonding the toroidal field (TF) coils for the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The bonding materials consisted of fiberglass cloth with pre-impregnated, 'B' staged Hexcel F-159 resin. Approximately 100 double lap bond samples were constructed to test quality, strength, and repeatability of the bonds. The variables investigated included surface machining methods, surface preparations, bond sample size (planform area), bonding pressure, bonding temperature, and the number of laminations bonded simultaneously. Double lap shear tests conducted at room temperature resulted in ultimate shear strengths for all variables in the range of 3000 to 7000 psi with an average value of 5650 psi. Fatigue tests were also conducted to demonstrate bond integrity over the anticipated cycle lifetime of the TEXT machine (10/sup 6/ cycles) under simulated worst case conditions. 2 refs

  7. Epoxide insulation for Tokamak coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and testing of 12-tonne toroidal-field electromagnets for the Joint European Torus by Brown Boveri and Cie (Mannheim) are described. The principle of Tokamak confinement of a plasma which acts as the secondary winding of a transformer is explained. The Cu conductors are sanded and coated with epoxide adhesive before being wrapped in 7mm thick woven glass fibre, dried by heating under vacuum, impregnated and encapsulated in 1.2 tonnes of Araldite, which is solidified under pressure of 4 atmospheres and hardened for ten hours at 1500C. The prototype withstood tests involving 25,000 flexure cycles at 1.1 MN and 2 Hz, 2,000 quarter-hour 10kA heating cycles between 840 and 200C, and exposure to 500 million rads. 32 such coils were constructed at the rate of one every three weeks. (M.B.D.)

  8. TRT and SCT barrels merge

    CERN Multimedia

    Wells, P S

    2006-01-01

    The SCT barrel was inserted in the TRT on 17 February, just missing Valentine's day. This was a change of emphasis for the two detectors. In the preceeding months there had been a lot of focus on testing their performance. The TRT had been observing cosmic rays through several sectors of the barrel, and all the modules on each of the four layers of the SCT had been characterised prior to integration. In parallel, the engineering teams, lead by Marco Olcese, Andrea Catinaccio, Eric Perrin, Neil Dixon, Iourii Gusakov, Gerard Barbier and Takashi Kohriki, had been preparing for this critical operation. Figure 1: Neil Dixon and Marco Olcese verifying the final alignment The two detectors had to be painstakingly aligned to be concentric to within a millimetre. The SCT was held on a temporary cantilever stand, and the TRT in the ID trolley had to inch over it. Finally the weight of the SCT was transferred to the rails on the inside of the TRT itself. The SCT services actually protruded a little outside the oute...

  9. Temperature detection circuit on the low-temperature superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the fully superconducting Tokamak. The EAST magnet system comprises 16 D-shaped toroidal field coils and 14 poloidal field coils which are cooled by supercritical helium at 4.2 K and 3.8 K. The temperature of superconducting coils is measured by Cernox as a new type low-temperature sensor, and monitored during the cooling and operation. The helium temperature can offer reference for quench signal. In this paper, a technique for the weak temperature signal measurement of superconducting coils is introduced, and its weak voltage is extracted from the intrinsic noise of the amplifier by the low-noise instrumentation amplifier, filter circuit, and high-linearity analog optocoupler. The temperature detection circuit works accurately and safely whether in cooling or operating process. This technique is an effective for the temperature detection on the low-temperature superconducting coils. (authors)

  10. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November.

  11. Mechanical Self-shrinkage of Artillery Barrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ciorba

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this paper is to define what self-shrink artillery barrel is. She is considered to be a compound barrel like as a thick-walled tube (k>2, in his wall being introduced a state of stress and strain using specific technological proceeds. This type of treatment is aimed to increase the artillery barrel load capacity and wear resistance in operation. The experimental part was realized using an industrial plant at Mechanical Factory of Resita. This part presents a comparative study between mechanical self-shrinkage on artillery head barrel, first using a mandrel and seconds a ball.

  12. Structural analysis and verification of the ITER TF model coil test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An FE-model already used during the design of the test assembly consisting of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC), the EURATOM LCT-coil and the Inter Coil Structure (ICS) was extended to allow for predictions of tests, which will be performed in the TOSKA facility. For the first test step, with the TFMC current loaded alone (single coil test), predictions are given for 80 kA, the design current. Because of some uncertainty in the friction behaviour between winding pack (WP) and coil case, a parameter study was performed describing the limiting cases of the coil behaviour. Since the mechanical sensors could be installed only on the outer coil case surface, the possibility of deriving from this information details of the internal coil behaviour also is discussed

  13. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 530C; for the OH coils 460C and for the EF coils 390C, which are well below the coil design limit of 1200C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 330C which is below the coolant design limit of 1000C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 105 Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil

  14. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, C., E-mail: C.Schwarz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V.Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  15. Recent results from Crystal Barrel

    CERN Document Server

    Doser, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The Crystal Barrel detector has collected data on antiproton annihilation on Hydrogen and Deuterium at rest and at momenta up to 1940 MeV/c, accumulating a total of 600 M events with the goal of studying meson spectroscopy and searching for non-qbarq states. This large amount of data has allowed high statistics studies of exclusive final states produced under various initial conditions. Comparisons between different initial and final states greatly constrain the interpretation of these data sets. In particular, the requirement of consistency between fits of 3-body final state Dalitz plots is a powerful tool in the search for non-standard model resonances [1]. More recently, the study of the same Dalitz plot produced from antiproton annihilation on liquid and gaseous hydrogen, on deuterium or on liquid hydrogen at different center-of-mass energies has extended this approach to higher mass resonances.

  16. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhunia, Uttam, E-mail: ubhunia@vecc.gov.in; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The optimization approach minimizes both the magnet size and necessary cable length of a sectored toroidal SMES unit. • Design approach is suitable for low temperature superconducting cable suitable for medium size SMES unit. • It investigates coil parameters with respect to practical engineering aspects. - Abstract: A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium–titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  17. Using e-beam mapping to detect coil misalignment in NCSX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary object of the e-beam mapping simulation program on NCSX is to develop requirements for the hardware and machine capabilities necessary for the actual e-beam mapping experiments. The magnetic flux surface configuration was constructed using a numerical code, based on the Biot-Savart law, to calculate the magnetic field components and trace the field line trajectory many times around the torus. Magnetic surfaces are then mapped by recording the field line intersections with toroidal cross-sections of the magnetic system, much as in an actual e-beam mapping experiment. In the course of these calculations, a catalog of many hundreds of vacuum magnetic configurations was compiled, each with varying sensitivity to the coil displacements. The NCSX coils were designed to provide good magnetic surfaces at high beta with significant bootstrap current. The coil set includes separately powered modular, toroidal field, and poloidal field coils, and can produce a wide range of magnetic configurations. Many of the vacuum field configurations with low order rational surfaces have finite, stellarator-symmetric islands present. Nevertheless, despite the presence of these islands, configurations have been found which will allow, we believe, the identification of modular and poloidal field coil displacements of < 0.5 mm. There was generally less sensitivity to toroidal field coil displacement, and a novel approach of energizing a subset of the toroidal field coils at higher current is proposed. By using half of the toroidal field coils, at twice the current, it is possible to detect alignment errors of less than approximately 1 mm. These results assume that the spatial resolution of the e-beam mapping apparatus is of order 5 mm, a previously achieved result for the luminescent rod method. We have also investigated the possibility of performing the initial e-beam mapping (and possibly start-up) studies in NCSX using two or fewer power supplies for the coils in the magnetic

  18. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  19. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised. Recently, we had developed a tokamak with force-balanced coils (FBCs) which are multi-pole helical hybrid coils combining TF coils and a CS coil. The combination reduces the net electromagnetic force in the direction of major radius. In this work, we have extended the FBC concept using the virial theorem. High-field coils should accordingly have same averaged principal stresses in all directions, whereas conventional FBC reduces stress in the toroidal direction only. Using a shell model, we have obtained the poloidal rotation number of helical coils which satisfy the uniform stress condition, and named the coil as virial-limited coil (VLC). VLC with circular cross section of aspect ratio A=2 reduces maximum stress to 60% compared with that of TF coils. In order to prove the advantage of VLC concept, we have designed a small VLC tokamak Todoroki-II. The plasma discharge in Todoroki-II will be presented. (author)

  20. Toroidal Multipole Confinement Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confinement of plasma is studied in the General Atomic toroidal octopole machine. The magnetic field is produced by four current carrying rings supported inside a contoured conductor. The rings are energized by a transformer core linking the machine. The major radius of the machine is 63.5 cm with an aspect ratio of 5. The magnetic field on the minor axis is zero and increases to 3500 G at the wall between the rings. After crowbarring, the field decays in 6 msec to its half value. The MHD stability calculation has been carried out and the stability is assured up to the plasma pressure of 1016 eV cm-3. Hydrogen plasmas from either a coaxial gun or a pinch gun with ion energies of 50 to 200 eV and with densities of 1014 cm-3 are successfully injected through a port located at the outer conductor wall. After the injection, plasma spreads azimuthally, filling the machine. Electric probes, magnetic probes, and calorimetric probes have been used extensively. Optical spectrometers and particle detectors are also used. The initial plasma density of 1013 cm-'3 decays with a time constant of 700 μsec. The electron temperature decays more quickly in about 100 μsec. No electric or magnetic fluctuations have been observed on any of the probes. Since no provision is made to avoid the plasma loss to the ring supports which penetrate the plasma region, the decay of ion temperature may be attributed to the support loss. (author)

  1. PEGASUS Toroidal Experimental Facility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, B.; Pegasus Group

    1998-11-01

    P EGASUS began operations in June 98 and will study the characteristics of Extremely Low-Aspect Ratio Tokamak (ELART) plasmas. The 2.0m diameter, thin-walled (6.35 mm) vacuum vessel is a continuous stainless steel shell with generous port access. Initial pump down base pressure was 5 × 10-8 torr. The high stress ohmic solenoid is powered by a 15 kV, 4.5 MJ capacitor bank and will be impedance-matched through a 10:1 step-down transformer to extend the pulse length. Operating at peak fields of 13 - 20 T, the solenoid can achieve a flux swing of up to 190mV-s over 60 ms. The toroidal field of 0.1 T on axis is powered by a 3 MVA AC/DC converter capable of 3.5 kA at 600 VDC. The equilibrium and shaping field magnets are powered by 2.2 F of commutated capacitor banks plus a 0.5 MVA programmable switching supply. Modest waveform control is available to compensate for the resistive vacuum vessel and aid in plasma shaping for elongated and diverted plasmas. Operational diagnostics include internal magnetic pickup loops, high resolution and fast framing cameras, and impurity monitoring systems. * *Supported by U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-96ER54375

  2. Compact toroid formation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and experimental performance of a compact toroid (CT) formation experiment. The device has co-axial electrode diameters of 0.9 m (inner) and 1.25 m (outer), and an electrode length of ∼ 1.2 m, including an expansion/drift section. The CT is formed by a 0.1--0.2 Tesla initial radial magnetic field embedded co-axial puff gas discharge. The gas puff is injected with an array of 60 pulsed solenoid driven fast valves. The formation discharge is driven by a 108 microfarad, 40 to 100 KV, 86 to 540 kilojoule 2 to 5 megamp capacitor discharge with ∼ 20 nanohenry initial total discharge inductance. The hardware includes transmission line connections for a Shiva Star (1300 microfarad, up to 120 KV, 0.4 megajoule) capacitor bank driven acceleration discharge. Experimental measurements include current, voltage; azimuthal, radial and axial magnetic field at numerous location; fast photography, optical spectroscopy; microwave, CO2 laser, and He-Ne laser interferometry. Auxiliary experiments include Penning ionization gauge, pressure probe, and breakdown gas trigger diagnostics of gas injection, and Hall probe measurements of magnetic field injection

  3. CALIFA Barrel prototype detector characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietras, B., E-mail: benjamin.pietras@usc.es [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Gascón, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd. Berkeley, CA 94701 (United States); Álvarez-Pol, H. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Bendel, M. [Technische Universität München, 80333 (Germany); Bloch, T. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Casarejos, E. [Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 (Spain); Cortina-Gil, D.; Durán, I. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Fiori, E. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhäuser, R. [Technische Universität München, 80333 (Germany); González, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Kröll, T. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Le Bleis, T. [Technische Universität München, 80333 (Germany); Montes, N. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Nácher, E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Robles, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Perea, A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Vilán, J.A. [Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 (Spain); Winkel, M. [Technische Universität München, 80333 (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    Well established in the field of scintillator detection, Caesium Iodide remains at the forefront of scintillators for use in modern calorimeters. Recent developments in photosensor technology have lead to the production of Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs), a huge advancement on traditional photosensors in terms of high internal gain, dynamic range, magnetic field insensitivity, high quantum efficiency and fast recovery time. The R{sup 3}B physics programme has a number of requirements for its calorimeter, one of the most challenging being the dual functionality as both a calorimeter and a spectrometer. This involves the simultaneous detection of ∼300MeV protons and gamma rays ranging from 0.1 to 20 MeV. This scintillator – photosensor coupling provides an excellent solution in this capacity, in part due to the near perfect match of the LAAPD quantum efficiency peak to the light output wavelength of CsI(Tl). Modern detector development is guided by use of Monte Carlo simulations to predict detector performance, nonetheless it is essential to benchmark these simulations against real data taken with prototype detector arrays. Here follows an account of the performance of two such prototypes representing different polar regions of the Barrel section of the forthcoming CALIFA calorimeter. Measurements were taken for gamma–ray energies up to 15.1 MeV (Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching, Germany) and for direct irradiation with a 180 MeV proton beam (The Svedberg Laboratoriet, Uppsala, Sweden). Results are discussed in light of complementary GEANT4 simulations. -- Highlights: •Prototypes corresponding to different sections of the forthcoming CALIFA Barrel calorimeter were tested. •The response to both high energy gamma rays and high energy protons was observed. •This response was reproduced by use of R3BROOT simulations, the geometry extrapolated to predict performance of the complete calorimeter. •Effects such as energy straggling of wrapping

  4. Overview of Torus Magnet Coil Production at Fermilab for the Jefferson Lab 12-GeV Hall B Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krave, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Velev, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Makarov, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nobrega, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kiemschies, O. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Robotham, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Elementi, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Elouadrhiri, Latifa [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Luongo, Cesar [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kashy, David H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wiseman, Mark A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) fabricated the torus magnet coils for the 12 GeV Hall B upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The production consisted of 6 large superconducting coils for the magnet and 2 spare coils. The toroidal field coils are approximately 2 m x 4 m x 5 cm thick. Each of these coils consists of two layers, each of which has 117 turns of copper-stabilized superconducting cable which will be conduction cooled by helium gas. Due to the size of the coils and their unique geometry, Fermilab designed and fabricated specialized tooling and, together with JLab, developed unique manufacturing techniques for each stage of the coil construction. This paper describes the tooling and manufacturing techniques required to produce the six production coils and two spare coils needed by the project.

  5. Constraints on the scale of toroidal-fusion experiments with application to the design of a helical-axis stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applying the constraints to the design of a helical axis stellarator we find a limit on the combination of toroidal field, current density and major radius. Another major constraint for this concept is the ability to obtain the plasma physics parameters dictated by similarity considerations. This depends on the heating method used. A minimum scale experiment with 2 periods and no linkage of the toroidal and poloidal coils, would have a major radius of 1.2m, a toroidal field of 3.5T and 2MW of ECRH power (for β = 1% nu2 = 10)

  6. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  7. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb3Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  8. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  9. High-frequency toroidal sensor of superconducting quantum magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal sensor consists of a superconducting induction loop electrically closed with a superconducting weak junction. The sensor features a cylindrical body. The body is integral and is made of superconducting material. It is provided with tow O-shape cavities in which cylindrical signal and exciting coils are installed. The precise cavity geometry and coil fitting is described on an example and shown in figures. The advantages of the configuration include suppression of spurious signals and improvement of the internal sensor shielding against external electromagnetic fields. The device is used for measuring low intensity magnetic fields, e.g., in the measurement of nuclear magnetic resonance, in particle detection, thermometry, geology, medicine, etc. (E.J.). 5 figs

  10. Integrated-blanket-coil applications in the TITAN-I reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TITAN-I Reversed-Field Pinch reactor incorporates the Integrated-Blanket-Coil (IBC) concept for the toroidal field and divertor field coil systems. The IBC approach combines the breeding and energy recovery functions of the blanket with the magnetic field production of the coils in a single component. This is accomplished by passing the current through the liquid metal coolant, lithium, which flows poloidally around the plasma. A reversed-field pinch reactor offers an attractive context for IBC coils since the low toroidal field at the plasma surface (∼0.36 T) leads to relatively low coil currents. Design of IBC components addresses four areas: (1) Neutronics, including tritium breeding and blanket energy multiplication; (2) thermal hydraulics, including magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drops; (3) magnetics, including field magnitude and topology; and (4) electrical engineering of the circuit determining the power supply requirements. The TF-IBC approach, in comparison to copper coils, offers several advantages for a compact RFP reactor: Increased access for coolant and auxiliary services, improved viability for single-piece maintenance, and reduced magnetic ripple in the toroidal magnetic field. In the divertor system, improved magnetic coupling and additional energy recovery and tritium breeding enhance the attractiveness of the IBC relative to copper coils. (orig.)

  11. Confinement studies of ECRH plasmas in a toroidal heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHEILA heliac is a toroidal device of major radius Ro=18.75 cm and mean minor radius a (last closed flux surface) of about 3.1 cm. 24 toroidal field coils displaced 2.5 cm about a poloidal ring coil (radius Ro) form a N=3 period helical axis stellarator. SHEILA has been converted to a flexible heliac by an additional l=1 helical winding about the ring coil. Considerable variation in the magnetic geometry can be obtained by adjusting the current ratio C=Ih/Ir between -0.16 to +0.25, equivalent to the range 0.55≥ι(0)≥1.86, where Ih and Ir are the currents in the helical winding and poloidal ring. The vacuum flux surfaces are generally bean-shaped in cross section, but change considerably with variations in the helical current. The |B| surfaces, however, remain roughly circular, concentric with the poloidal ring coil. Plasma formation by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) depends critically on the position of the fundamental resonance surface, and also the second harmonic surface at low field strengths, relative to the plasma column and the launching antenna. In this paper we investigate the particle confinement properties of the heliac geometry as the rotational transform is varied using up to 2.5 kW peak 10 ms wide pulses of microwave ECR power at 2.45 GHz. Cool (Te=6-10eV) but highly ionized argon plasmas with very reproducible characteristics are generated by discrete dipole/monopole or helical antennae positioned close to the plasma surface. Depending on the magnetic geometry and field strength the antennae can launch either from the high field side (HFS) or the low field side (LFS) of the fundamental resonance surface. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs

  12. Design of a 4.5 MJ/1 MW sectored toroidal superconducting energy storage magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Akhter, Javed; Nandi, Chinmay; Pal, Gautam; Saha, Subimal

    2014-09-01

    A 4.5 MJ/1 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is being developed at VECC centre, Kolkata. The magnet system consists of the cryostat and coil assembly comprising eight superconducting solenoid coils made of custom-made NbTi based Rutherford-type cable and arranged in toroidal fashion with finite inter-sector gap. Since the strong electromagnetic force distributed to the coil is asymmetric and non-uniform in nature, a precise 3-D finite element analysis (FEA) has been carried out to design a mechanically stable coil and support structure under various operational scenarios. The results reveal that maximum stress developed on coil and its support structure is below allowable stress limit. Extensive transient analysis has also been carried out to evaluate transient loss and assess the feasibility of using helium re-condensation technology with commercially available cryo-refrigerators. Finally, quench protection scenario has also been discussed suitable for this toroidal-type SMES system. The article investigates the design concept of the cryostat and coil assembly.

  13. High performance railgun barrels for laboratory use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, David P.; Newman, Duane C.

    1993-01-01

    High performance low-cost, laboratory railgun barrels are now available, comprised of an inherently stiff containment structure which surrounds the bore components machined from 'off the-shelf' materials. The shape of the containment structure was selected to make the barrel inherently stiff. The structure consists of stainless steel laminations which do not compromise the electrical efficiency of the railgun. The modular design enhances the utility of the barrel, as it is easy to service between shots, and can be 're-cored' to produce different configurations and sizes using the same structure. We have produced barrels ranging from 15 mm to 90 mm square bore, a 30 mm round bore, and in lengths varying from 0.25 meters to 10 meters long. Successful tests with both plasma and solid metal armatures have demonstrated the versatility and performance of this design.

  14. Work on the ATLAS semiconductor tracker barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Precision work is performed on the semiconductor tracker barrel of the ATLAS experiment. All work on these delicate components must be performed in a clean room so that impurities in the air, such as dust, do not contaminate the detector. The semiconductor tracker will be mounted in the barrel close to the heart of the ATLAS experiment to detect the path of particles produced in proton-proton collisions.

  15. Plasma production in a tokamak with force-balanced coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We manufactured a small pulsed tokamak with force balanced coils (FBCs), which balance the net centering force and the net radial hoop force due to the poloidal and toroidal current components, respectively. The centering force was demonstrated to be reduced by an order of magnitude compared with the computed one of the TF coils of the same dimension. The plasma current up to 10 kA was achieved by two-step FBC magnetization since the force-balanced winding provides not only toroidal magnetic fields but also the poloidal magnetic flux to induce the plasma current. The plasma column was well centered in the vacuum vessel within the time constant of shell effects of the vessel. (author)

  16. Results of the international Large Coil Task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an international development effort involving the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. The full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  17. Experience highlights from the design and manufacture of US LCT coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international Large Coil Task (LCT) is a major activity in the development of superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for tokamak fusion reactors. The technical objective of this program is to design, build, and test six large TF coils, thereby producing information and data that can be used directly by program planners and designers of tokamak reactors. After an intensive competitive bidding cycle, contracts were awarded in 1977 to three US industrial firms for the design and manufacture of test coils. Subsequently Japan, EURATOM, and Switzerland agreed to supply one coil each. External dimensions and minimum performance requirements are identical but freedom was allowed in the choice of internal design and manufacturing techniques. All six coils will be tested in a compact toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. With the coil fabrication phase approaching completion, it is an appropriate time to review the major technical challenges and lessons from the design and manufacture of the three US LCT coils

  18. Results of the variable toroidal field ripple experiments in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of ITER is to produce plasmas with high fusion gain (QDT > 10), where a large fraction of the plasma heating is supplied by the α-particles from fusion reactions. To first order, this requires both thermal and fast ion confinement to be at least as good as predictions. In all tokamak devices, the finite number and toroidal extension of the toroidal field (TF) coils causes a periodic variation of the toroidal field from its nominal value, called toroidal field ripple δBT = (Bmax - Bmin)/Bav. It is well known that ripple in the toroidal field adversely affects fast ion confinement, and in the case of ITER, this has been accounted for by including in the design Ferritic Insets (FI) compensation, reducing δBT from approx 1.2% to approx 0.5%, to reduce first wall power loads. In these conditions, the main α-particle loss mechanism in ITER will be ripple banana orbit diffusion, and that the magnitude of these losses is expected to be in the 1% region, therefore negligible in terms of alpha-particle confinement. Experimental results from JT60-U and H-mode dimensionless H-mode experiments in JET and JT-60U have indicated that ripple may also affect the H-mode confinement, pedestal height, ELM size and plasma rotation. Although the physics mechanisms at the root of the reduced energy confinement with δBT was not identified unambiguously, the implication of a reduction of energy confinement on projected ITER performance due to ripple stimulated a series of experiments at JET. The experiments were carried out in the ELMy H-mode regime with q95 = 3, and investigated the effect of δBT on the pedestal and core properties of the plasma. Plasma density pump out and reduction of the global energy confinement was found for δBT around 0.5, in some experimental conditions. Ripple was also found to affect the size and frequency of ELMs. Plasma toroidal rotation was also strongly affected by ripple: the toroidal velocity is reduced for increased ripple and becomes

  19. Extension of TFTR operations to higher toroidal field levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past year, TFTR has sometimes operated at extended toroidal field (TF) levels. The extension to 5.6 Tesla (79 kA) was crucial for TFTR's November 1994 10.7 MW DT fusion power record. The extension to 6.0 Tesla (85 kA) was commissioned on 9 September 1995. There are several reasons that one could expect the TF coils to survive the higher stresses that develop at higher fields. They were designed to operate at 5.2 Tesla with a vertical field of 0.5 Tesla, whereas the actual vertical field needed for the plasma does not exceed 0.35 Tesla. Their design specification explicitly required they survive some pulses at 6.0 Tesla. TF coil mechanical analysis computer models available during coil design were crude, leading to conservative design. And design analyses also had to consider worst-case misoperations that TFTR's real time Coil Protection Calculators (CPCs) now positively prevent from occurring

  20. First SCT Barrel arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Apsimon, R

    Mid-January saw the arrival at CERN of Barrel #3, the first of four SCT barrels. The barrels are formed as low-mass cylinders of carbon fibre skins on a honeycomb carbon core. They are manufactured in industry and then have all the final precision supports added and the final geometric metrology carried out at Geneva University. Barrel #3, complete with its 384 silicon detector modules, arrived by road from Oxford University in England where the modules were mounted using a purpose-built robot. The modules had been selected from the output of all four barrel module building clusters (in Japan, Scandinavia, USA and the UK). Since Barrel #3 will be exposed to high radiation levels within the tracker volume, these modules, representing over half a million readout channels, have been extensively tested at their operational temperature of around -25 degrees Celcius and at voltages of up to 500V. The dangers of shipping such a fragile component of ATLAS were apparent to all and considerable attention was focused...

  1. The TileCal Barrel Test Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Leitner, R

    On 30th October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It started on 23rd June and is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year. The ATLAS engineers and technicians are quick: instead of the 27 weeks initially foreseen for assembling the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter (Tilecal) in building 185, they inserted the last of the 64 modules on 30th October after only 19 weeks. In part, this was due to the experience gained in the dry run assembly of the first extended barrel, produced in Spain, in spring this year (see Bulletin 23/2003); however, the central barrel is twice as long - and twice as heavy. With a length of 6.4 metres, an outer diameter of 8.5 metres and an inner diameter of 4.5 metres, the object weight is 1300 tonnes. The whole barrel cylinder is supported by the stainless steel support structure weighing only 27 tons. The barrel also has to have the right shape: over the whole 8...

  2. About electromagnetic load, stress state of current-carrying toroidal shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic loads which arise at interaction of toroidal coil's current with its own magnetic field are approximately determined. The values of current density and magnetic field intensity at any point of tore cross-section are obtained. By means of shell's membrane theory the stress state of tore is determined. It is shown that due to the electromagnetic load in the shell both of tensile meridional and compressible toroidal strengths arise. This state differs from case p=const., when one has only tensible strength. The engineering formulas, to determine the strengths are given. The numerical results are given in the case of superconducting Tokamak-7. (Auth.)

  3. Heavy ion toroidal collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on HIPAC at Maxwell Laboratories have shown that almost all of the confined electrons are trapped and do not go around the torus. A toroidal electric field produces a negligible toroidal electron current. An ion accelerator where electrons are magnetically contained and their space charge contains ions is considered. A toroidal electric field of suitable magnitude can be applied so that it accelerates all of the ions but does not accelerate most of the electrons. This is possible if the magnetic moment of electrons μsub(e) > μsub(i)/Z, where μsub(i) is the ion magnetic moment and Z is the charge of the ion. Ions would be contained by the electron space-charge electric field E, for energies up to ZeER/2 approximately 100 GeV where Z = 60, E = 107 V/cm and the major radius of the torus is R = 3.3 metres. (author)

  4. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  5. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick and...... placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  6. Coupling of Applied Non-axisymmetric Fields to Toroidal Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Menard, J. E.; Strait, E. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in the modeling of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) have enabled realistic predictions of the coupling between applied non-axisymmetric fields and the resultant toroidal torque in the DIII-D tokamak. The strong dependence of the NTV on the amplified plasma kink response reduces the control of the non-resonant torque to a single mode model, in which the torque optimization is equivalent to an optimization of the net non-axisymmetric field's overlap with the spatial structure of the dominant mode. This single mode model has enabled efficient feed-forward correction of the n = 1 and n = 2 intrinsic error fields and n = 1-3 proxy error fields in NTV dominated scenarios. In addition, rotation drive toward a neoclassical offset using multiple coil sets has been optimized in accordance with the single mode model. Similar linear optimization techniques could be used to design future coil sets for rotation control, while inclusion of multimodal effects will be necessary for rotation profile control. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  7. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  8. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, Donald A., E-mail: spongda@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  9. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  10. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2012-01-01

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of t...

  11. The JET divertor coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The divertor coil is mounted inside the Jet vacuum vessel and is able to carry 1 MA turns. It is of conventional construction - water cooled copper, epoxy glass insulation -and is contained in a thin stainless steel case. The coil has to be assembled, insulated and encased inside the Jet vacuum vessel. A description of the coil is given, together with technical information (including mechanical effects on the vacuum vessel), an outline of the manufacture process and a time schedule. (author)

  12. Technology of toroidal plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After research into many different magnetic confinement systems, there is now general agreement that the most favorable ones for future fusion reactors are all based on toroidal geometry, as distinct from having open ends like mirror machines. For this reason plasma physics research, even when not aimed directly at the fusion problems, has in recent years increasingly concentrated on toroidal systems. One reason is that by using their good confinement properties the experimenter has available a range of high temperature plasma parameters in quasisteady (or even steady) state conditions not otherwise available on Earth. Despite the wide variety of both geometrical possibilities and sizes, ranging from table-top experiments with plasmas a few centimetres across to near reactor scale ones like JET with plasmas several metres across, toroidal systems have many common features, both in their physical principles and of experimental design: the purpose of this paper is to highlight those common features, using some specific examples for illustration, and emphasizing some of the more practical aspects. It will also try to point out important differences between two of the main classes of toroidal systems

  13. Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodsi, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

  14. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  15. Extremely high Q-factor toroidal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that, owing to the unique topology of the toroidal dipolar mode, its electric/magnetic field can be spatially confined within subwavelength, externally accessible regions of the metamolecules, which makes the toroidal planar metamaterials a viable platform for high Q-factor resonators due to interfering toroidal and other dipolar modes in metamolecules.

  16. ATLAS End Cap toroid in upstanding position

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    End Cap toroid The ATLAS End Cap toroid weights 240-ton and is 12-m diameter high. The parts of this vacuum vessel had to be integrated and tested so that End Cap Toroid has no leaks. After that it could be cooled down to 80 K.

  17. The power-supply control system for the toroidal magnets of the JFT-2M nuclear fusion research tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsubishi Electric has completed the control system for the flywheel-equipped DC motor-generator that powers the toroidal field coils of the JFT-2M nuclear fusion research Tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The motor-generator, which has a maximum pulse output of 2.7 kV and 19 kA, was introduced in the May '96 issue of Giho. This article reports the key features of the coil current control. Emphasis is placed on the motor-generator field control provided by the thyristor converters, which opens the contacts of the main circuit switches in addition to controlling coil current. (author)

  18. Applications of the integrated-blanket-coil concept to the compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact reactors, by their nature, are high-power-density devices. They place a premium on space usage within the system volume, and access to the fusion power core components is limited. The integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept relaxes some of these requirements by combining the functions of the breeding blanket with those of the magnet systems. In this paper, the IBC potential is analyzed for the compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR) coil sets: (a) the toroidal field (TF) system; (b) the polidal field (PF) system; (c) the ohmic heating (OH) subsystem of the PF system; and (d) the divertor coils in the impurity control system. Use is made of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) RFP systems code with suitable modifications, to estimate ohmic losses, coil masses, and economic (cost of electricity) impact of the different configurations. Preliminary evaluations indicate that a symmetric toroidal divertor would be suitable for the CRFPR. This presents a special attraction for use of IBC divertor coils. Since the minority field (TF) is < 1 T at the plasma edge, the required nulling current is modest. In addition, IBC coils can be placed closer to the plasma, allowing a trade-off between the higher resistive losses and reduced current requirements. Perhaps most importantly, use of IBC divertor coils would improve the tritium breeding ratio, which is somewhat marginal with copper divertor coils

  19. Design study of superconducting toroidal field magnet for tokamak fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design study of the superconducting toroidal field magnet for a 2000 MW sub(t) tokamak fusion power reactor has been carried out. Performed here were conductor design, magnetic field calculation, design of coil support, stress analysis and design of refrigeration system. The maximum toroidal field at the coil is 12T, providing 6T at the plasma center. Nb3Sn superconductors are employed in the higher field zone. The operation current is 34.72 kA, and the conductors are fully stabilized. The heat load in the magnet is 21.1 kW, and the required liquefaction rate is 36,000 l/h. Many technological problems were revealed by the design study. (auth.)

  20. Development of ITER toroidal field insert. International collaboration with Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Solenoid (CS) model coil programme was performed since 1992 as one of the projects in the Engineering Design Activity (EDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER). The CS model coil programme involves a plan to develop the Toroidal Field (TF) insert to demonstrate the conductor performance of ITER TF coils under a magnetic flux density of 13T. The TF insert was fabricated by Russia and tested by Japan under the framework of the ITER-EDA. The TF insert developed a single-layer solenoid with nine turns. It is wound with a cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor which consists of 1,152 Nb3Sn strands, a thin titanium jacket and a central channel. The outer diameter, height and weight of the TF insert are 1.56 m, 3.2 m and 3.1 ton, respectively. Fabrication of the TF insert was completed in May 2001 at the D.V.Efremov Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Apparatus (Efremov institute) in St. Petersburg, Russia. The TF insert was then transported to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Installation of the TF insert to CS model coil test facility was completed in August, 2001. Experiments including the cooldown and warmup processes, were completed in November 2001. The TF insert was charged to 13T with 46 kA without any instability under a back up magnetic field from the CS model coil. This report introduces an overview of the fabrication, installation and experiments for the TF insert conducted under collaboration between Japan and Russia. (author)

  1. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum. PMID:23215195

  2. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  3. Fabrication and installation of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) has been completed and installed in the facility. The vessel fabrication has involved many unique methods to correct unanticipated problems. The primary fabrication concern has been to correct for dimensional inconsistency so that the vessel would fit into the closely nested helical coil set. The vessel has been installed and the remainder of the facility components are being assembled

  4. Toroidal magnet system conceptual design for the ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luton, Jr, J. N.; Yeh, H. T.

    1977-01-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is a fusion reactor device based on the concept of toroidally linked mirrors. To minimize engineering uncertainties, the EBTR superconducting magnet system is designed so that it could be built with existing or near-term technology. The design uses identical coils in standard modules, thus facilitating commercialization. The reference design uses 48 modules and produces 4000 MW(th).

  5. Simulation of chain of quenches on toroidal HTS-SMES taking account of thermal and electromagnetic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oga, Y.; Noguchi, S.; Igarashi, H.

    When a temperature rise occurs at a local area inside a coil of toroidal HTS-SMES by any reason, a temperature hotspot which results in a thermal runaway appears at the local area. Subsequently, after appearing the local normal zone in the HTS coil, the transport current of the HTS coil decrease since the resistance of HTS coil appears and the current partially flows into a parallel-connecting shunt resistance. However, if the transport current of the normal-transitioned HTS coil is hardly changed, the temperature on the hotspot would rise more and then the normal zone would spread rapidly. It may cause a serious accident due to high stored energy. Therefore, using the numerical simulation, we have investigated the behaviors of the coil current, the critical current, and the temperature in the superconducting element coils of HTS-SMES. Consequently, the temperature of the superconducting element coils rises up extremely when a large heat is generated at a certain area of one of them by any reason. Moreover, there is a possibility that the shunt resister hardly functions for protection since the coil is burned out due to high inductances and low resistance of the superconducting element coil.

  6. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  7. Active internal corrector coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.; Fernow, R.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Hahn, H.; Herrera, J.

    1986-01-01

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. This paper describes some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained.

  8. Active internal corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. Some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained are described

  9. Design and Simulation of Toroidal Twister Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Huifang; LIN Xizhen; ZENG Qinqin

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is a new kind of structural pressure vessels, which not only has high structure efficiency of compound materials pressure vessel, good security and so on, but also has special shape and the property of utilizing toroidal space, and the prospect of the application of toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is extremely broad. By introducing parameters establishment of toroidal vessel and elaborating the principle of filament winding for toroidal vessel, the design model of filament winding machine for toroidal vessel has been introduced, and the design model has been dynamically simulated by the software of ADAMS, which will give more referrence for the design of real toroidal vessel twister.

  10. Proto-CIRCUS tilted-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid: Design and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.W.; Doumet, M.; Hammond, K.C. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kornbluth, Y. [Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10033 (United States); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Sweeney, R. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Volpe, F.A., E-mail: fvolpe@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak-like device with tilted toroidal field (TF) coils needs less plasma current than a conventional tokamak. • Rotational transform is partly generated by external coils. Device can be considered a tokamak–torsatron hybrid. • We designed and constructed the first device of this type. • Tilted TF coils are interlinked to each other, which helps to reduce aspect ratio of plasma. • This is a six-coil generalization of CNT stellarator, also at Columbia University, which features two interlinked coils. - Abstract: We present the field-line modeling, design, and construction of a prototype circular-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid called Proto-CIRCUS. The device has a major radius R = 16 cm and minor radius a < 5 cm. The six “toroidal field” coils are planar as in a tokamak, but they are tilted. This, combined with induced or driven plasma current, is expected to generate rotational transform, as seen in field-line tracing and equilibrium calculations. The device is expected to operate at lower plasma current than a tokamak of comparable size and magnetic field, which might have interesting implications for disruptions and steady-state operation. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced than in an equivalent tokamak in which the coils are not tilted. The tilted coils are interlocked, resulting in a relatively low aspect ratio, and can be moved, both radially and in tilt angle, between discharges. This capability will be exploited for detailed comparisons between calculations and field-line mapping measurements. Such comparisons will reveal whether this relatively simple concept can generate the expected rotational transform.

  11. Structural design of the toroidal configuration of the HTS SMES cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, H. K.; Koh, D. Y.; Ko, J. S.; Kim, H. B.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    The superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is working on around 30 K, because the magnet is made of high temperature superconductor. To maintain the cryogenic temperature, the superconducting coil is cooled by cryogen, helium gas or liquid neon. But there are some weak points in the cryogen cooling system. For example periodic charge of the cryogen and size is big and so on. So, we have designed the conduction cooling system for toroidal configuration HTS SMES. The toroidal type HTS SMES has some merits, so it is very small magnetic field leakage, and magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape surface can be reduced. Our system has 28 numbers of HTS double pancake coils and they are arrayed toroidal configuration. The toroidal inner radius is 162 mm, and outer radius is 599 mm, and height is about 162 mm. In this study, we have designed the cooling structure and analyzed temperature distribution of cooling path, thermal stress and deformation of the cooling structure.

  12. Structural design of the toroidal configuration of the HTS SMES cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, H.K., E-mail: hkyeom@kimm.re.kr [Cryogenic Engineering Team of Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 104 Sinseong-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, D.Y.; Ko, J.S.; Kim, H.B.; Hong, Y.J. [Cryogenic Engineering Team of Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 104 Sinseong-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.H. [Mechanical Engineering Department of Changwon National University, 65 Sonamu 5-gil, Euichang-gu, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, K.C. [Applied Superconducting Research Team of Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 70 Bulmosan-gil, Seongsan-gu, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is working on around 30 K, because the magnet is made of high temperature superconductor. To maintain the cryogenic temperature, the superconducting coil is cooled by cryogen, helium gas or liquid neon. But there are some weak points in the cryogen cooling system. For example periodic charge of the cryogen and size is big and so on. So, we have designed the conduction cooling system for toroidal configuration HTS SMES. The toroidal type HTS SMES has some merits, so it is very small magnetic field leakage, and magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape surface can be reduced. Our system has 28 numbers of HTS double pancake coils and they are arrayed toroidal configuration. The toroidal inner radius is 162 mm, and outer radius is 599 mm, and height is about 162 mm. In this study, we have designed the cooling structure and analyzed temperature distribution of cooling path, thermal stress and deformation of the cooling structure.

  13. Performance of a 12-coil superconducting 'bumpy torus' magnet facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis 'bumpy torus' facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm ID and capable of 3.0 tesla on their axes. The coils are equally spaced around a toroidal array with a major diameter of 1.52 m, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.6 m in diameter. Final shakedown tests of the facility mapped out its magnetic, cryogenic, vacuum, mechanical, and electrical performance. The facility is now ready for use as a plasma physics research facility. A maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis of 3.23 teslas has been held for a period of more than sixty minutes without a coil normalcy.

  14. Manufacture of EAST VS In-Vessel Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ITER like Stainless Steel Mineral Insulation Conductor (SSMIC) used for EAST Tokamak VS In-Vessel Coil manufacture first time. • Research on SSMIC fabrication was introduced in detail. • Two sets totally four single-turn VS coils were manufactured and installed in place symmetrically above and below the mid-plane in the vacuum vessel of EAST. • The manufacture and inspection of the EAST VS coil especially the joint for the SSMIC connection was described in detail. • The insulation resistances of all the VS coils have no significant reduction after endurance test. -- Abstract: In the ongoing latest update round of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two sets of two single-turn Vertical Stabilization (VS) coils were manufactured and installed symmetrically above and below the mid-plane in the vacuum vessel of EAST. The Stainless Steel Mineral Insulated Conductor (SSMIC) developed for ITER In-Vessel Coils (IVCs) in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (ASIPP) was used for the EAST VS coils manufacture. Each turn poloidal field VS coil includes three internal joints in the vacuum vessel. The middle joint connects two pieces of conductor which together form an R2.3 m arc segment inside the vacuum vessel. The other two joints connect the arc segment with the two feeders near the port along the toroidal direction to bear lower electromagnetic loads during operation. Main processes and tests include material performances checking, conductor fabrication, joint connection and testing, coil forming, insulation performances measurement were described herein

  15. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  16. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  17. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  18. Performance of a 12-coil superconducting bumpy torus magnet facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm i.d. and capable of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The coils are equally spaced around a toroidal array with a major diameter of 1.52 m, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.6 m in diameter. Final shakedown tests of the facility mapped out its magnetic, cryogenic, vacuum, mechanical, and electrical performance. The facility is now ready for use as a plasma physics research facility. A maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis of 3.23 teslas was held for a period of more than sixty minutes without a coil normalcy. The design field was 3.00 teslas. The steady-state liquid helium boil-off rate was 87 liters per hour of liquid helium without the coils charged. The coil array was stable when subjected to an impulsive loading, even with the magnets fully charged. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 teslas, the system was driven normal without damage.

  19. Operation of a 20 tesla on-axis tokamak toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT) has designed, built, and is presently testing a 20 T on-axis, single turn, toroidal field (TF) coil. The Ignition Technology Demonstration (ITD) is a 0.06-scale IGNITEX (Texas Fusion Ignition Experiment) TF-coil experiment. The purpose of the ITD program is to demonstrate the operation of a 20 T, single turn, TF coil powered by homopolar generators (HPGs). This program is funded by the Advanced Technology Program and the Texas Atomic Energy Research Foundation. Scaling of the prototype 20 T TF coil was selected to be 0.06 on the basis of the maximum current capability of CEM-UT's 60 MJ HPG power supply, which has a rating of 9 MA at 100 V in a parallel configuration. Stresses and temperatures reached in the scale TF coil are representative of those that would be experienced in a full-scale IGNITEX TF coil with a 1.5 m major radius and a 5 s flat top current profile. The 60 MJ HPG system consists of six, 20 MJ, drum-type HPGs each capable of 1.5 MA at 100 V. Only 25% of the available system energy is used to drive the single turn TF coil to 20 T

  20. Liquid nitrogen tests of a Torus coil for the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, Ruben J. [JLAB; Ghoshal, Probir K. [JLAB; Bruhwel, Krister B. [JLAB; Kashy, David H. [JLAB; Machie, Danny [JLAB; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [JLAB; Taylor, William; Fischer, John W. [JLAB; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Powers, Jacob R. [JLAB

    2015-06-01

    A magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils is being built for the Jefferson Lab 12-GeV accelerator upgrade project. The magnet coils are wound with Superconducting Super Collider-36 NbTi strand Rutherford cable soldered into a copper channel. Each superconducting toroidal coil is force cooled by liquid helium, which circulates in a tube that is in good thermal contact with the inside of the coil. Thin copper sheets are soldered to the helium cooling tube and enclose the superconducting coil, providing cooling to the rest of the coil pack. As part of a rigorous risk mitigation exercise, each of the six coils is cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2) to 80 K to validate predicted thermal stresses, verify the robustness and integrity of electrical insulation, and evaluate the efficacy of the employed conduction cooling method. This paper describes the test setup, the tests performed, and the findings.

  1. Rain Barrels: A Catalyst for Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakacs, Michele E.; Haberland, Mike; Mangiafico, Salvatore S.; Winquist, Aileen; Obropta, Christopher C.; Boyajian, Amy; Mellor, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 4 years, rain barrel programming for residents has been implemented in both Northern Virginia and New Jersey as a method for educating the public about stormwater management and water conservation. Program participants demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge of water resource issues. Follow-up surveys showed 58% of New…

  2. CMS : the first barrel ring completed !

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    On 14 November, the CMS collaboration and the German firm DWE celebrated the successful construction of the detector's first yoke barrel ring. To mark the occasion, those in charge of the construction at CERN and DWE posed for the camera in the middle of the giant component.

  3. ATLAS semiconductor tracker installed into its barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker is installed in the silicon tracker barrel. Absolute precision was required in this operation to ensure that the tracker was inserted without damage through minimal clearance. The installation was performed in a clean room on the CERN site so that no impurities in the air would contaminate the tracker's systems.

  4. Iron Blocks of CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke.

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On the occasion of presenting the CMS Award 2000 to Deggendorfer Werft und Eisenbau GmbH the delivered blocks were inspected at CERN Point 5. From left to right: H. Gerwig (CERN, CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke Coordinator), G. Waurick (CERN), F. Leher (DWE, Project Engineer) and W. Schuster (DWE, Project Manager).

  5. ALEPH separated barrel and end-caps

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    The end-caps can be seen at the left and right of the image with the barrel at the centre. Technicians inspect the end-cap before they begin to take it apart. ALEPH was an experiment on the LEP accelerator, which studied high-energy collisions between electrons and positrons from 1989 to 2000.

  6. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  7. Engineering design and integration of radial control coil in vacuum vessel of SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to unsymmetrical placement of toroidal field coil inside the vacuum vessel, which generates field error and tend to push the plasma from its major radius 1100 mm to towards inboard side. Hence it was require install the Radial control coil (RCC) at a location of 1300 mm radius and elevation of 350 mm above and below the mid-plane of the toroidal field coil. The radial control coil is decided to make from multi-strand flexible super conducting cable encased inside the prefabricated SS 304 L piped casing made in four segment and in-situ welded together inside the vacuum vessel to form the shape of coil. The radial control coil is open to atmosphere and experiencing the vacuum inside the vacuum vessel. To maintain the circular shape of the copper cable inside the SS casing, very close tolerances are maintained e.g. super-conducting cable has outer diameter of 14 mm and after FRP insulation and Teflon rapping the outer diameter reaches to 16 mm while inner diameter of the pipe is 18 mm. This paper will present the design drivers, material selection, advantages and constraints of the RC coils, its conceptual and engineering design, CAD models, finite element analysis using ANSYS, its fabrication, quality assurance/control and assembly/integration aspects inside vacuum vessel of SST-1. (author)

  8. Coiled tubing sidetrack: Slaughter Field case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, C.M.; Blount, C.G.; Ward, S.L.; Martin, R.F.; Cantwell, D.L.; Ackers, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The paper describes the successful sidetrack of an oil well in the Slaughter Field in West Texas using coiled tubing (CT). Several first-time CT operations performed during this workover include: setting a whipstock in casing on CT; cutting a window with CT; using mud pulse measurement-while-drilling (MWD) with CT in a real well; use of a fluid-operated orientation tool for in-hole toolface changes; successful use of an autodriller to maintain weight on bit while drilling. Directional control of the sidetracked hole proved to be ineffective due to a surface software problem. The resultant wellbore was not horizontal as planned, but instead closely paralleled the original well for much of its length. However, the previously non-productive well flowed 1,000 barrels of fluid per day (BFPD) from the sidetrack following the workover.

  9. Melittin-Induced Bilayer Leakage Depends on Lipid Material Properties: Evidence for Toroidal Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Allende, Daniel; Simon, S. A.; McIntosh, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The membrane-lytic peptide melittin has previously been shown to form pores in lipid bilayers that have been described in terms of two different structural models. In the “barrel stave” model the bilayer remains more or less flat, with the peptides penetrating across the bilayer hydrocarbon region and aggregating to form a pore, whereas in the “toroidal pore” melittin induces defects in the bilayer such that the bilayer bends sharply inward to form a pore lined by both peptides and lipid head...

  10. A review of the structural aspects of the Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Coil Task (LCT) was initiated a decade ago by the United States (US), EURATOM (EU), Japan (JA), and Switzerland (CH) under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to develop superconducting magnets for toroidal field coils for tokamak fusion reactors. Under the IEA agreement, EU, JA, and CH each fabricated one coil and shipped it to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), where the coils were assembled, along with three US coils (GD, GE, and WH), in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) which was designed and built at ORNL. In addition to the fact that six widely varying designs are being tested under similar conditions in the same test facility, the LCT project is unique in at least two other aspects. First, these are the largest superconducting (SC) coils fabricated and tested to date for research and development of SC magnets. Second, as the magnets themselves are the experiment, they are each heavily instrumented; consequently, detailed information on thermal, electrical, and mechanical performance has been obtained, some for the first time on SC magnets of any size. This paper concentrates on those aspects of the tests most relevant for fusion reactor magnets: the structural measurements and simulated nuclear heating tests. Data on the US PB coils (GD and GE) and the US FF coil (WH) are used to illustrate the results. All six coils have achieved 100% design current at 8-T field and that in a symmetric torus arrangement all six coils have been simultaneously energized to 8 T

  11. Characteristics for beam focusing of a magnetically insulated diode with a toroidal magnetic field (TMID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of focusing intense pulsed ion beams, an ion diode insulated for electrons with a toroidal magnetic field (TMID) has been designed and tested as a preliminary experiment. The annular diode assembly is contained in the toroidal field produced with a toroidal coil. The diode power was supplied from a pulsed power supply ''ERIDATRON-II'' at a stored energy of 5kJ. Ion beams of 10 - 20kA with energies of 250 - 350 keV have been produced with an efficiency of about 10 %. It is suggested from observations of circulating current around the anode in nearly E x B direction, that the diode efficiency will be enhanced by increasing the toroidal field strength much above the critical magnetic field for insulation. The measured ion orbits agree well with the calculated single-particle ion orbits in this field even when the conditions for cross-field propagation are satisfied. The toroidal field was found to act as a magnetic lens as well as the insulating field for electrons in the diode. The features of the TMID appear to be very useful for obtaining a well focused ion beam in a simple device. (author)

  12. INITIAL RESULTS FROM THE NEW INTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELD COILS FOR RESISTIVE WALL MODE STABILIZATION IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK-B135 A set of 12 internal magnetic field coils (I-coils) has recently been installed and is being used in 2003 experiments. The purpose of this new coil set is to provide stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWM) for advanced tokamak plasmas with toroidal β above the no wall stability limit. Calculations with the 3D electromagnetic code VALEN predict that the performance of this system should be superior to the previously installed external compensation coils (C-coils) by providing feedback stabilization up to the ideal wall beta limit without the need for strong plasmas rotation, which was required in previous DIII-D experiments. Initial results have shown that with feedback this I-coil set can stabilize the RWM well above the no wall limit and simultaneously reduce the resonant field amplification (RFA) process allowing high toroidal rotation. With the I-coil fewer Amp-turns are required than with the existing external C-coil set. In this paper they will discuss these results, and other uses of the I-coils

  13. Modular coils and finite-β operation of a quasi-axially symmetric tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasi-axially symmetric tokamaks (QA tokamaks) are an extension of the conventional tokamak concept. In these devices the magnetic field strength is independent of the generalized toroidal magnetic co-ordinate even though the cross-sectional shape changes. An optimized plasma equilibrium belonging to the class of QA tokamaks has been proposed by Nuehrenberg. It features the small aspect ratio of a tokamak while allowing part of the rotational transform to be generated by the external field. In this article, two particular aspects of the viability of QA tokamaks are explored, namely the feasibility of modular coils and the possibility of maintaining quasi-axial symmetry in the free-boundary equilibria obtained with the coils found. A set of easily feasible modular coils for the configuration is presented. It was designed using the extended version of the NESCOIL code (MERKEL, P., Nucl. Fusion 27 (1987) 867). Using this coil system, free-boundary calculations of the plasma equilibrium were carried out using the NEMEC code (HIRSHMAN, S.P., VAN RIJ, W.I., MERKEL, P., Comput. Phys. Commun. 43 (1986) 143). It is observed that the effects of finite β and net toroidal plasma current can be compensated for with good precision by applying a vertical magnetic field and by separately adjusting the currents of the modular coils. A set of fully three dimensional (3-D) auxiliary coils is proposed to exert control on the rotational transform in the plasma. Deterioration of the quasi-axial symmetry induced by the auxiliary coils can be avoided by adequate adjustment of the currents in the primary coils. Finally, the neoclassical transport properties of the configuration are examined. It is observed that optimization with respect to confinement of the alpha particles can be maintained at operation with finite toroidal current if the aforementioned corrective measures are used. In this case, the neoclassical behaviour is shown to be very similar to that of a conventional tokamak

  14. GA effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. Progress report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the FY 83 effort of the GA 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. During the course of this six-year program, Team One (GA/MCA/University of Wisconsin) has developed a generic concept for a 10 to 12 tesla tokamak toroidal field coil system, employing cabled NbTi/Cu conductor, bath-cooled with superfluid helium at 1.8 K. Following a conductor development effort (FY 79, 80), a 40-cm bore coil/cryostat unit was constructed, using conductor/support/cooling features prototypical of those envisioned for full-scale TF-coils. This was delivered to LLNL in September 1983, for testing within the LLNL High Field Test Facility (TFTF) during FY 84. This report describes the test coil, and its fabrication. Included are facsimiles of the fabrication drawings, and procedures for testing in the LLNL HFTF

  15. Real-time protection of the ohmic heating coil force limits in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broesch, J.D.; Scoville, J.T.; Hyatt, A.W.; Coon, R.M.

    1997-11-01

    The maximum safe operating limits of the DIII-D tokamak are determined by the force produced in the ohmic heating coil and the toroidal field coil during a plasma pulse. This force is directly proportional to the product of the current in the coils. Historically, the current limits for each coil were set statically before each pulse without regard for the time varying nature of the currents. In order to allow the full time-dependent capability of the ohmic coil to be used, a system was developed for monitoring the product of the currents dynamically and making appropriate adjustments in real time. This paper discusses the purpose, implementation, and results of this work.

  16. The jet divertor coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the JET Tokamak which is to be modified to incorporate a divertor. A coil system in the vacuum vessel has been developed, which can produce a range of different divertor plasmas. The divertor coils are of conventional construction and are contained in this Inconel cases. They will be assembled in the vacuum vessel, welded into their cases and impregnated with epoxy resin

  17. LHCb magnet coils arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Each of the two coils for the LHCb magnet comprises 15 individual monolayer 'pancakes' of identical trapezoidal racetrack shape, and is bent at 45 degrees on the two transverse sides. Each pancake consists of eight turns of conductor, wound from a single length (approx. 290 m) of extruded aluminium. The coils have arrived at CERN; one of them is seen here being unloaded above the LHCb experimental cavern.

  18. Trapped particle dynamics in toroidally rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed single particle orbit analysis is toroidally rotating plasma yields new analytical formulas for the second adiabatic invariant, the bounce frequency, and the precession frequency up to the first order correction in ρpi(poloidal ion gyroradium)/Lv(scale length of rotation velocity), for toroidal flow values of the order of ion thermal velocity. Toroidal plasma rotation effects on the trapped ion instabilities in tokamaks are investigated in the context of local theory. Toroidal plasma rotation increases both the fraction of trapped particles and their precession drift velocity. Consequently, the growth rate of trapped ion instability increases in both dissipative and collisionless regimes

  19. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  20. Design and manufacturing status of trim coils for the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riße, K., E-mail: konrad.risse@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Rummel, Th.; Freundt, S.; Dudek, A.; Renard, S.; Bykov, V.; Köppen, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Langish, S.; Neilson, G.H.; Brown, Th.; Chrzanowski, J.; Mardenfeld, M.; Malinowski, F.; Khodak, A.; Zhao, X. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Eksaa, G. [Everson Tesla Inc., Nazareth, PA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The trim coil system will fine tune the main magnetic field during plasma operation by reducing the magnetic field errors. ► The coil design and operational parameters are fixed, the manufacturing is running. ► The coils are equipped with temperature sensors and a voltage tap system to monitor the coil temperature. ► The max. operational deflection is in the order of 4.5 mm; the max. shearing stress across bond planes is of order 16 MPa. ► Special clamps equipped with elastomeric pads allow fixing the coils on the outer cryostat wall. -- Abstract: The stellarator fusion experiment Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is currently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald, Germany. The main magnetic field will be provided by a superconducting magnet system which generates a fivefold toroidal periodic magnetic field. However, unavoidable tolerances can result in small deviations of the magnetic field which disturb the toroidal periodicity. In order to have a tool to influence these field errors five additional normal conducting trim coils were designed to allow fine tuning of the main magnetic field during plasma operation. In the frame of an international cooperation the trim coils will be contributed by the US partners. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has accomplished several tasks to develop the final design ready for manufacturing e.g. detailed manufacturing design for the winding and for the coil connection area. The design work was accompanied by a detailed analysis of resulting forces and moments to prove the design. The manufacturing of the coils is running at Everson Tesla Inc; the first two coils were received at IPP.

  1. Pellet injection and toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of a technical committee meeting on pellet injection and toroidal confinement, held in Gut Ising, Federal Republic of Germany, 24-26 October, 1988, are given in this report. Most of the major fusion experiments are using pellet injectors; these were reported at this meeting. Studies of confinement, which is favorably affected, impurity transport, radiative energy losses, and affects on the ion temperature gradient instability were given. Studies of pellet ablation and effects on plasma profiles were presented. Finally, several papers described present and proposed injection guns. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Microstructures Formation by Fluorocarbon Barrel Plasma Etching

    OpenAIRE

    A. El Amrani; Tadjine, R.; F. Y. Moussa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study is to generate microstructures in order to improve optical properties of monocrystalline silicon. By mean of fluorocarbon plasma barrel texturing and under certain process conditions, silicon turned black. As a result of silicon surface-plasma particles reactions, porous microstructures are formed, while a longer process time microspikes are developed. These microstructures are responsible of the high level of light trapping on almost the whole range of the usable portion...

  3. Fault Analysis of ITER Coil Power Supply System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER magnet coils are all designed using superconductors with high current carrying capability. The Toroidal Field (TF) coils operate in a steadystate mode with a current of 68 kA and discharge the stored energy in case of quench with using 9 interleaved Fast Discharge Units (FDUs). The Central Solenoid (CS) coils and Poloidal Field (PF) coils operate in a pulse mode with currents of up to 45 kA and require fast variation of currents inducing more than 10 kV during normal operation on the coil terminals using Switching Network (SN) systems (CSs, PF1 and 6) and Booster and VS converters (PF2 to 5), which are series connected to Main converters. SN and FDU systems comprise high current DC circuit breakers and resistors for generating high voltage (SN) and to dissipate magnetic energy (FDUs). High transient voltages can arise due to the switching operation of SN and FD and the characteristics of resistors and stray components of DC distribution systems. Also, faults in power supply control such as shorts or grounding faults can produce higher voltages between terminals and between terminal and ground. Therefore, the design of the coil insulation, coil terminal regions, feeders, feed throughs, pipe breaks and instrumentation must take account of these high voltages during normal and abnormal conditions. Voltage insulation level can be defined and it is necessary to test the coils at higher voltages, to be sure of reliable performance during the lifetime of operation. This paper describes the fault analysis of the TF, CS and PF coil power supply systems, taking account of the stray parameter of the power supply and switching systems and inductively coupled superconducting coil models. Resistor grounding systems are included in the simulation model and all fault conditions such as converter hardware and software faults, switching system hardware and software faults, DC short circuits and single grounding faults are simulated. The occurrence of two successive faults

  4. Alignment of the MSGC barrel support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MSGC barrel is a sub-part of the tracking system of the CMS experiment at the LHC. The mechanical support structure of the MSGC barrel consists of ladder-like support beams carrying the detector modules and of four disks supporting the ladders. The required alignment precision of the modules, a few tens of micrometers, is designed to be obtained by precise part manufacture and by careful measurement of the alignment during the assembly of the structure. In the paper the use of digital photogrammetry for the measurement of the alignment of the disks and for the structural verification is presented. Digital photogrammetry was chosen from a number of potential methods after a careful evaluation. The use of photogrammetry for the structural verification of a prototype is presented. The displacements were measured both of unloaded and loaded disk by using photogrammetry and linear displacement transducers for verification. The displacements obtained from the two measurement methods corresponded well, not only to each other, but also to the results given by finite element analysis. The structural verification will be done and the alignment procedure will be tested with a full-sized prototype of a half of the MSGC barrel. Preparations for the photogrammetry measurements are presented and the design of the required supplementary equipment is shown. (authors)

  5. Edge magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Michael W.

    Peeling modes, an instability mechanism underlying deleterious Edge Localized Mode (ELM) activity in fusion-grade plasmas, are observed at the plasma edge in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment under conditions of high edge current density (Jedge(˜ 0.1 MA/m2) and low magnetic field (B ˜0.1 T) present at near-unity aspect ratio. Their macroscopic properties are measured using external Mirnov coil arrays, Langmuir probes, and high-speed visible imaging. The modest edge parameters and short pulse lengths of PEGASUS discharges permit direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure with an insertable array of Hall-effect sensors, providing the current profile and its dynamical evolution on ELM-relevant timescales. Peeling modes generate coherent, edge-localized electromagnetic activity with low toroidal mode numbers n ≤ 3 and high poloidal mode numbers, in agreement with theoretical expectations of a low- n external kink structure. Coherent MHD fluctuation amplitudes are found to be strongly dependent on the experimentally measured J edge/B peeling instability drive, consistent with theory. An equilibrium reconstruction obtained during peeling activity with its current profile constrained by internal Hall measurements is used to test the predictions of analytic peeling stability theory and the ideal MHD stability model. Both approaches are in agreement with experiment, with the latter finding instability to an external kink. Peeling modes nonlinearly generate ELM-like, field-aligned filamentary structures. They detach from the edge and transiently accelerate radially outward, followed by propagation with constant velocity. Time-resolved Jedge measurements demonstrate that the filaments are formed from an initial current-hole perturbation and carry net toroidal currents If ˜ 100--200 A, less than 0.2% of the plasma current. Their constant-velocity radial motions are in qualitative agreement with rates given by electromagnetic blob transport theory.

  6. World's largest DC flywheel generator for the toroidal field power supply of JAERI's JFT-2M Tokamak nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsubishi Electric has delivered the world's largest DC generator for the toroidal field coil power supply of the JFT-2M Tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The unit rotates at 225 or 460 rpm, providing a maximum rated output of 2,700 V, 19,000 A and 51.3 MW. The toroidal field is a DC field, so use of a DC generator permits a simpler design consuming less floor space than an AC drive system. The generator was manufactured following extensive studies on commutation, mechanical strength and insulation. (author)

  7. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors. [NbTi alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stekly, Z.J.J.; Lucas, E.J. (eds.)

    1976-12-01

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed.

  8. Thermal analysis of the forced cooled conductor for the TF superconducting coils in the TIBER II ETR Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The baseline design for TIBER II is to provide steady-state nuclear burn capabilities. The design is constrained to be cost effective and must therefore be sized as small as possible. This constraint limits the nuclear shielding in TIBER and dictates a nuclear heat load of up to 4.5 kW per coil for the toroidal field coils. The cooling scenario and thermal analysis for this design are presented

  9. Technical Diagnostics of Tank Cannon Smooth Barrel Bore and Ramming Device

    OpenAIRE

    Jiri Balla; Stanislav Prochazka; Robert Jankovych; Stanislav Beer; Zbynek Krist; Michal Kovarik

    2015-01-01

    The technical diagnostics of 125 mm tank cannon 2A46 smooth barrel and ramming devices are discussed respectively. Focuses on barrel diagnostics and suggests new procedures based on reconstructed BG20 Gun Barrel Bore Gauge System, measuring internal diameter of the barrel bore. The new system measures throughout the whole barrel bore the inner diameter not only at the beginning of barrel bore as it was usually measured before. Different nature of barrel wear was revealed between barrels firin...

  10. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques

  11. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised, and a new small tokamak with the concept was constructed. According to the virial theorem, the best TF coil to produce the strongest magnetic .eld under the weakest stress requires equal averaged principal stresses in all directions. Applying this condition to a helical coil, its pitch number is determined as a function of the aspect ratio. The helical winding with the condition is modulated in such a way that poloidal .eld exists only outside of torus, which reduces the torsional force on the helical coil and makes plasma breakdown possible. Moreover, a helical coil with this modulation and a low aspect ratio is similar to CS and TF coil systems in conventional tokamaks, because its helical winding is nearly vertical in the outer side of torus. In the case of an aspect ratio A = 2, our optimal coil theoretically reduces the working stress in the coil to about one third smaller than those of conventional TF coils. (author)

  12. Stability tests of the Westinghouse coil in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse coil is one of three forced-flow coils in the six-coil toroidal array of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is wound with an 18-kA, Nb3Sn/Cu, cable-in-conduit superconductor structurally supported by aluminum plates and cooled by 4-K, 15-atm supercritical helium. The coil is instrumented to permit measurement of helium temperature, pressure, and flow rate; structure temperature and strain; field; and normal zone voltage. A resistive heater has been installed to simulate nuclear heating, and inductive heaters have been installed to facilitate stability testing. The coil has been tested both individually and in the six-coil array. The tests covered charging to full design current and field, measuring the current-sharing threshold temperature using the resistive heaters, and measuring the stability margin using the pulsed inductive heaters. At least one section of the conductor exhibits a very broad resistive transition (resistive transition index = 4). The broad transition, though causing the appearance of voltage at relatively low temperatures, does not compromise the stability margin of the coil, which was greater than 1.1 J/cm3 of strands. In another, nonresistive location, the stability margin was between 1.7 and 1.9 J/cm3 of strands. The coil is completely stable in operation at 100% design current in both the single- and six-coil modes

  13. Stabilization of the vertical instability by non-axisymmetric coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Reiman, A. H.; Lao, L. L.; Cooper, W. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Buttery, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    In a published Physical Review Letter (Reiman 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 135007), it was shown that axisymmetric (or vertical) stability can be improved by placing a set of parallelogram coils above and below the plasma oriented at an angle to the constant toroidal planes. The physics of this stabilization can be understood as providing an effective additional positive stability index. The original work was based on a simplified model of a straight tokamak and is not straightforwardly applicable to a finite aspect ratio, strongly shaped plasma such as in DIII-D. Numerical calculations were performed in a real DIII-D -like configuration to provide a proof of principal that 3-D fields can, in fact raise the elongation limits as predicted. A four field period trapezioid-shaped coil set was developed in toroidal geometry and 3D equilibria were computed using trapezium coil currents of 10 kA , 100 kA , and 500 kA . The ideal magnetohydrodynamics growth rates were computed as a function of the conformal wall position for the n = 0 symmetry-preserving family. The results show an insignificant relative improvement in the stabilizing wall location for the two lower coil current cases, of the order of 10‑3 and less. In contrast, the marginal wall position is increased by 7% as the coil current is increased to 500 kA , confirming the main prediction from the original study in a real geometry case. In DIII-D the shift in marginal wall position of 7% would correspond to being able to move the existing wall outward by 5 to 10 cm. While the predicted effect on the axisymmetric stability is real, it appears to require higher coil currents than could be provided in an upgrade to existing facilities. Additional optimization over the pitch of the coils, the number of field periods and the coil positions, as well as plasma parameters, such as the internal inductivity {{\\ell}\\text{i}} , β , and {{q}95} would mitigate this but seem unlikely to change the conclusion.

  14. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  16. Analysis of an HTS coil for large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Se Yeon; Choi, Kyeong Dal; Park, Sang Ho; Hong, Gye Won; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Woo Seok [Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Kwang [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    It has been well known that a toroid is the inevitable shape for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil as a component of a large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) because it is the best option to minimize a magnetic field intensity applied perpendicularly to the HTS wires. Even though a perfect toroid coil does not have a perpendicular magnetic field, for a practical toroid coil composed of many HTS pancake coils, some type of perpendicular magnetic field cannot be avoided, which is a major cause of degradation of the HTS wires. In order to suggest an optimum design solution for an HTS SMES system, we need an accurate, fast, and effective calculation for the magnetic field, mechanical stresses, and stored energy. As a calculation method for these criteria, a numerical calculation such as an finite element method (FEM) has usually been adopted. However, a 3-dimensional FEM can involve complicated calculation and can be relatively time consuming, which leads to very inefficient iterations for an optimal design process. In this paper, we suggested an intuitive and effective way to determine the maximum magnetic field intensity in the HTS coil by using an analytic and statistical calculation method. We were able to achieve a remarkable reduction of the calculation time by using this method. The calculation results using this method for sample model coils were compared with those obtained by conventional numerical method to verify the accuracy and availability of this proposed method. After the successful substitution of this calculation method for the proposed design program, a similar method of determining the maximum mechanical stress in the HTS coil will also be studied as a future work.

  17. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  18. Cutoff frequency of toroidal plasma waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cutoff frequencies of E and H-modes of empty and plasma filled toroidal waveguides are evaluated. The effects of space curvature and plasma density on cutoff frequencies for both modes are investigated. Using a suitable variable change, a scalar wave equation in the direction of propagation was obtained. The study indicates that the curvature in the direction of wave propagation in toroidal waveguide has an analogous effect as a straight waveguide filled with anisotropic media. The Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation method was employed to solve for cutoff frequencies in the first order of approximation. In the limit of small space curvature, the toroidal waveguide cutoff frequencies for both E and H-modes approach those of TM and TE modes of empty cylindrical waveguide with a radius equal to toroidal waveguide minor radius. The analysis shows that the curvature in the direction of propagation in toroidal waveguides leads to the removal of the degeneracy between E and H-modes

  19. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  20. Toroidal Vortices in Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, D C; Li, S; Montgomery, David; Bates, Jason W.; Li, Shuojun

    1996-01-01

    Resistive steady states in toroidal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), where Ohm's law must be taken into account, differ considerably from ideal ones. Only for special (and probably unphysical) resistivity profiles can the Lorentz force, in the static force-balance equation, be expressed as the gradient of a scalar and thus cancel the gradient of a scalar pressure. In general, the Lorentz force has a curl directed so as to generate toroidal vorticity. Here, we calculate, for a collisional, highly viscous magnetofluid, the flows that are required for an axisymmetric toroidal steady state, assuming uniform scalar resistivity and viscosity. The flows originate from paired toroidal vortices (in what might be called a ``double smoke ring'' configuration), and are thought likely to be ubiquitous in the interior of toroidally driven magnetofluids of this type. The existence of such vortices is conjectured to characterize magnetofluids beyond the high-viscosity limit in which they are readily calculable.

  1. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  2. Tokamak with mechanical compression of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A collapsible toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. A toroidal magnetic field is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. A toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Pressure is applied to the liquid metal to collapse the liner and reduce the volume of the toroidal space, thereby increasing the toroidal magnetic flux density therein.

  3. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium-titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  4. Study of the feasibility of installing a toroidal or bundle divertor in EBT-S. Phase I: EBT-S divertor project. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following chapters are included: (1) magnetic field analysis of the basic EBT-S geometry with and without aspect ratio enhancement coils; (2) analyses of a toroidal divertor for EBT-S; (3) analysis of a bundle divertor for EBT-S; (4) engineering; and (5) divertor vacuum pumping

  5. Toroidal High-β Experiments in Compact Axisymmetric Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The confinement of plasmas heated by fast-rising (B/B ≈ 1 JJS) and confined by slowly decaying (|B/B| > 1 ms) magnetic fields is studied in axisymmetric toroidal configurations. Small aspect ratios R/a (R = major radius, a = characteristic minor dimension) are chosen to reach relatively high current densities and to confine plasmas of higher S below the Kruskal-Shafranov (K.S.) limit. In a first experiment (Helical Hard-core Thetapinch), plasmas with temperatures T ≈ 20 eV, densities n > 1016 cm-3 and strongly elliptical (typically b/a = 3) cross-sections are produced at the end of the fast compression. By adjusting the voltages and currents of the hard-core and the theta coil, and the, time-delay between switching the banks, R can be varied and the net plasma momentum in r direction can be made ≈ 0 at the end of the dynamic phase. Slower variations of R, resulting from the diffusion of the toroidal field into the plasma (β decreases to 15% in a few μs) and from the contraction of the plasma cross-section in the z-direction occur later. They can be controlled by programming the hard-core current. Theoretical results on the equilibrium plasma configuration agree with the result of magnetic-probe and optical measurements which further indicate some triangular deformation of the plasma cross-section. Outside the plasma, a vacuum magnetic field configuration is observed. The angle of rotational transform ℓ was varied by changing R and the ellipticity; the plasma appears hydromagnetically stable when q = 2 π/ℓ > 2.5. The observed confinement time (≈ 30 μs) agrees then with the decay time of the toroidal plasma current and can be explained by the relatively low plasma temperature. A second experiment is being built to study the high-fi stability limit in a torus with circular cross-section and larger dimensions (R = 25 cm, rw = 10 cm). The toroidal magnetic field (≤ 10 kG) and the discharge current rise simultaneously in 1.6 us. It will be attempted to

  6. Antiparallel coiled-coil-mediated dimerization of myosin X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Ye, Fei; Wei, Zhiyi; Wen, Zilong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-10-23

    Processive movements of unconventional myosins on actin filaments generally require motor dimerization. A commonly accepted myosin dimerization mechanism is via formation of a parallel coiled-coil dimer by a stretch of amino acid residues immediately carboxyl-terminal to the motor's lever-arm domain. Here, we discover that the predicted coiled-coil region of myosin X forms a highly stable, antiparallel coiled-coil dimer (anti-CC). Disruption of the anti-CC either by single-point mutations or by replacement of the anti-CC with a parallel coiled coil with a similar length compromised the filopodial induction activity of myosin X. We further show that the anti-CC and the single α-helical domain of myosin X are connected by a semirigid helical linker. The anti-CC-mediated dimerization may enable myosin X to walk on both single and bundled actin filaments. PMID:23012428

  7. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuzaki Daisuke

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  8. Compact toroid fueling for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical work indicates that deep fueling of ITER may be possible by Compact Toroid (CT) injection. CT velocities sufficient for center fueling of a reactor have been demonstrated in the RACE device. CT injections into the TdeV tokamak have achieved central penetration at 1.4 T, and have increased the particle inventory by more than 30% without disruption. Tests on the MARAUDER device have achieved CT mass-densities suitable for injection into 5 T tokamaks. Techniques for producing multiple-shot CT's with passive electric switching are being tested on CTIX. The advantages of deep fueling by CT injection include profile peaking to reach ignition, profile control, low tritium inventory and others. In this paper, the CT experimental results are summarized, a conceptual design of a CT fueler for ITER is presented, and the implications on ITER operation and fuel cycle are discussed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. The crystal barrel spectrometer at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Crystal Barrel spectrometer used at LEAR, CERN to study the products of anti pp and anti pd annihilations is described. A 1380 element array of CsI crystals measures photons from the decay of π0, η, η' and ω mesons. A segmented drift chamber in a 1.5 T magnetic field is used to identify and measure charged particles. A fast on-line trigger on charged and neutral multiplicities and on the invariant mass of secondary particles is available. The performance of the detector is discussed. (orig.)

  10. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb3Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb3TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.)

  11. The results of the international ''Large Coil Task'', a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting TF coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an outstanding international development effort during more than ten years of cooperation within an IEA agreement. Parties were the USDOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. The ORNL acted for DOE as the LCT Operating Agent, building and operating the required test facility. The U.S. also provided three test coils; the other three participants one coil each. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. After facility shakedown operations and preliminary coil tests, the full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Besides the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, these tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect, also, and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. At the time of ITER activities, it might also be worthwhile to mention that LCT demonstrated an effective multinational collaboration in an advanced technology project, involving large scale hardware produced in several countries then assembled and operated as a tightly integrated system. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Compact toroid formation using barrier fields and controlled reconnection in the TRX-1 field reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRX-1 is a new 20 cm diameter, 1-m long field reversed theta pinch with a magnetic field swing of 10 kG in 3 μsec. It employs z discharge preionization and octopole barrier fields to maximize flux trapping on first half cycle operation. Cusp coils are used at the theta pinch ends to delay reconnection and fast mirror coils are used to trigger reconnection at a time designed to maximize axial heating efficiency and toroid lifetime. These controls are designed to study toroid formation methods which are claimed to be especially efficient by Russian experimenters. Studies have been conducted on flux trapping efficiency, triggered reconnection, and equilibrium and lifetime

  13. Design and commissioning of a TF coil power system using deep-cycle batteries for versatile experiment spherical torus (VEST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A toroidal field (TF) coil power system has been designed and successfully commissioned to be suitable for the research objectives of VEST (Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus) which was recently constructed at Seoul National University. The TF coil power system for VEST is fabricated using a series–parallel connection of 200 deep-cycle batteries with 100 A h capacity so as to generate flat-top TF field of 0.12 T on magnetic axis for sufficiently long time up to hundreds of milliseconds. Ten battery modules are designed to operate independently through 10 magnetic contactor (MC) switches so as to produce toroidal magnetic field with various amplitudes and waveforms. During the initial start-up experiments of VEST, the modulation capability of toroidal magnetic field is successfully verified, showing possibility of its versatile utilization on various experimental topics in the future

  14. ATLAS TRT Barrel in Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Luehring, F

    In July, the TRT group made a highly successful test of 6 Barrel TRT modules in the ATLAS H8 testbeam. Over 3000 TRT straw tubes (4 mm diameter gas drift tubes) were instrumented and found to operate well. The prototype represents 1/16 of the ATLAS TRT barrel and was assembled from TRT modules produced as spares. This was the largest scale test of the TRT to this date and the measured detector performance was as good as or better than what was expected in all cases. The 2004 TRT testbeam setup before final cabling was attached. The readout chain and central DAQ system used in the TRT testbeam is a final prototype for the ATLAS experiment. The TRT electronics used to read out the data were: The Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator with Baseline Restoration (ASDBLR) chip is the front-end analog chip that shapes and discriminates the electronic pulses generated by the TRT straws. The Digital Time Measurement Read Out Chip (DTMROC) measures the time of the pulse relative to the beam crossing time. The TRT-ROD ...

  15. Parametric modeling of zoom lens barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Charles W.

    2001-12-01

    Today's customer requires zoom lens designs that are compact, inexpensive, and at six-sigma quality levels. While incorporating these customer requirements, a design team must often work within compressed design cycles and minimal product development budgets. These customer and project constraints, coupled with the inherent complexity of a zoom lens module, force the design team to try new and innovative techniques to deliver their products. This paper presents the methods used to develop lens barrels for several zoom lens module projects at Eastman Kodak Company. The lens barrel, a critical interface between the mechanical and optical systems, presented a technical barrier from both an engineering analysis and manufacturing perspective. The method used to overcome these barriers consisted of identifying several key functional parameters, creating a parameter-driven 3-D solid model in a commercially available CAD system, and then using the model to make iterative, data-driven design decisions while leveraging the model to create engineering drawings and the necessary prototypes and production tooling. As a result, the designs were able to meet their size, cost, and design cycle time requirements while realizing a better than anticipated first pass yield and quality level.

  16. Barrel Bolt Cracking in a German PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, R.; Maussner, G. [AREVA GmbH (Germany); Koenig, G. [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the results of failure analysis of cracked barrel bolts will be shown. The barrel bolts are made of German material number 1.4571 corresponding to 316 Ti. To ensure that the required mechanical properties are achieved, the material used was cold worked. At the end of the eighties, the bolts were installed to replace Inconel X- 750 bolts. The design used is a 'star bolt'. In 2005, cracking was first observed. In this report, the results of destructive examinations showing intergranular stress corrosion cracking will be presented. M16-Bolts exhibited cracking only in the area of cup, preventing unintentional loosening. All selected and examined M12-Bolts showed similar crack initiation in the head. Cracks may initiate on transition radii between the head and shank. The shank and thread of all bolts (M12 and M16) exhibited no indications of cracking. Bolts that experienced cracking could be clearly identified through visual inspection. The ultrasonic testing technique applied confirmed crack locations in the head. All cracks were attributed to Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC). Fracture surfaces exhibited relatively thin, dark layers and, in addition to corrosion products of the base metal, the debris on the shank and head also contained traces of Al, Si, Cu and Zn. (authors)

  17. Cosmic Ray Data in TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Hance

    "I had a great day in August when I went into SR1," said Daniel Froidevaux, former project leader of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker, "not only had all SCT barrels arrived at CERN, but there were cosmic ray tracks seen in the TRT!" Daniel's excitement was mirrored by the rest of the TRT collaboration when, on July 29, the first cosmic ray tracks were seen in the barrel. Along with many others in the community, Daniel was quick to point out that this is the cumulative result of years of R&D, test beam work, and an intense installation and integration schedule. Indeed, the cosmic ray readout is only possible through the coordination of many efforts, from detector mechanics to module assembly, power and high voltage control, cooling, gas systems, electronics and cabling, data acquisition, and monitoring. "Many people have worked very hard on the the TRT, some of them for more than 10 years," said Brig Williams, the leader of the UPenn group responsible for much of the TRT front end electronics. He ...

  18. Toroidal magnetic field system for a 2-MA reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The engineering design of the toroidal magnetic field (TF) system for a 2-MA Reversed-Field Pinch experiment (ZT-H) is described. ZT-H is designed with major radius 2.15 meters, minor radius 0.40 meters, and a peak toroidal magnetic field of 0.85 Tesla. The requirement for highly uniform fields, with spatial ripple <0.2% leads to a design with 72 equally spaced circular TF coils, located at minor radius 0.6 meters, carrying a maximum current of 9.0 MA. The coils are driven by a 12-MJ capacitor bank which is allowed to ring in order to aid the reversal of magnetic field. A stress analysis is presented, based upon calculated hoop tension, centering force, and overturning moment, treating these as a combination of static loads and considering that the periodic nature of the loading causes little amplification. The load transfer of forces and moments is considered as a stress distribution resisted by the coils, support structures, wedges, and the structural shell

  19. The toroid moment of Majorana neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total set of electromagnetic characteristics of Majorana neutrinos is considered. It is shown that in the static limit (mi=mf=mν) the Majorana neutrinos possess only one electromagnetic characteristic, the toroidal dipole moment (anapole). We have calculated the diagonal toroidal moment (form factor) of the Majorana neutrino in the one-loop approximation of the Standard Model by the dispersion method. All external particles are on the mass shells and there are no problems with the physical interpretation of the final result. Different applications of the toroidal moment of Majorana neutrino are also discussed. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Analytical and experimental investigation of electrical characteristics of a metallic insulation GdBCO coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D. G.; Choi, Y. H.; Kim, Y. G.; Song, J. B.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results, experimental and analytical, of the electrical characteristics of GdBCO single-pancake coils co-wound with a brass tape as metallic insulation (MI coil). The GdBCO pancakes were subjected to sudden discharge, charge-discharge, and over-current tests. The sudden discharge and charge-discharge test results of the MI coil demonstrated that MI coils can be charged and discharged significantly faster than non-insulated coils that are wound only with GdBCO tape. In over-current tests at 150 A (1.25Ic), the MI coil exhibited better electrical behavior, i.e., self-protecting features, than its counterpart co-wound with Kapton tape, an insulator. Moreover, the experimental and analytical results are in agreement, validating the use of a concise equivalent parallel-RL circuit model for the MI coil to characterize its electrical behavior. Overall, the MI winding technique is highly promising to help build compact, mechanically robust, and self-protecting magnets composed of REBCO pancake coils. With no organic material in the winding, MI REBCO pancakes will be immune to neutron radiation damage, making the MI winding technique a viable option for fusion reactors, such as for toroidal field, poroidal field magnets, and central solenoid.

  1. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  2. Demonstration Model Development of the Force-Balanced Coil for SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shinichi; Kasuya, Koji; Tanaka, Norihiro; Tsuboi, Kenji; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Shimada, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Akira; Ishigohka, Takashi

    In large-scale SMES, the superconducting coils require special considerations for induced electromagnetic forces to limit allowable tensile stress. Force-balanced coil (FBC) is a helically wound hybrid coil of toroidal field coils and a solenoid. The FBC can significantly reduce the required mass of the structure for induced electromagnetic forces. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the FBC concept for SMES, the authors have developed a superconducting model coil. The outer diameter of the model FBC is 0.53m. The hand-made winding, using NbTi/Cu composite strands with a diameter of 1.17mm, was finished with 10584 poloidal turns after four months. The helical windings of the model FBC were neither impregnated with epoxy resin nor reinforced with stainless steel wires. Three test runs were conducted with liquid helium cooling at intervals of several months. The number of quench tests was 81 in total. The first quench current was 293A, which was 53% of the critical coil current. The training phenomena could be observed even after the coil was warmed up to room temperature. After successive quenches the quench current was improved to 476A, corresponding to 86% of the critical coil current, and it was successfully excited up to 6.1T.

  3. Barrel for the compression, transport and storage or low activity solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The barrel made of spherolitic cast iron has devices for fitting lifting equipment with a barrel jacket, barrel floor and a barrel lid set on a top flange of the barrel jacket, which is connected by fixing screws to the top flange. The solid waste can be compressed in the barrel by a compression press. The package of solid waste produced in this way can be tensioned against the barrel jacket. (orig./HP)

  4. Design and Calculation of the Resistance Circles for Wooden Barrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana FOTIN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a design methodology for the circles of wooden barrels, usingappropriate strength calculations, so as to provide tightness while maintaining the integrity of the woodenmaterial embedded in the barrel structure, in the jacket and bottom staves, respectively.Based on these calculations, the circle dimensions (length, width and thickness can be defined,depending on the barrel type (for transport or storage and their relation to the barrel bottoms.Defining the dimensional characteristics of the circles is mandatory, as these are safety elements in thebarrel operation.

  5. High current transmission and switching system for a prototype 20 tesla toroidal magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ignition Technology Demonstration (ITD) is a 0.06 scale prototype toroidal field magnet of the proposed full-scale IGNITEX (Ignition Experiment) tokamak. The goal of ITD is to achieve an on-axis magnetic confinement field of 20 T while demonstrating the magnet's ability to withstand high magnetic and thermal stresses. To accomplish this task, a peak current of 9 Ma must be transferred from six balanced homopolar generator (HPG)/busbar circuits to the liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled magnet. HPGs are well suited for operation of single-turn coils because they are inherently high current, low voltage machines which can inertially store the energy required for a pulsed discharge. To date the system has delivered pulses of up to 8.14 MA to the toroidal magnet, producing an on-axis field of 18.1 T. Description of the ITD busbar/switching system, design improvements, and operational experience are presented in this paper

  6. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1–6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  7. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  8. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, Andy; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We present a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  9. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  10. Degradation analysis of REBCO coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RE-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) layer-wound coils were operated to investigate their properties under electromagnetic forces in an external magnetic field of up to 17.2 T. While REBCO coils were successfully operated under electromagnetic forces over 200 MPa, some showed degradation after quenching. To develop high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets, the reasons for the degradation of REBCO coils should be investigated. In this study, the degraded REBCO coils were carefully rewound. The critical current (Ic) of the rewound REBCO conductor was measured to check the damaged parts in the degraded REBCO coils, and the possible causes for the degradation were discussed. (paper)

  11. A Hybrid Heating Method for the HT-7U Coils during Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi-min; Wu, Song-tao; Pan, Wan-jiang; Weng, Pei-de; Wan, Yuan-xi

    2001-04-01

    The HT-7U superconducting tokamak is a full-superconducting magnetically confined fusion device, The toroidal magnet system of HT-7U is a very important part of the device. In VPI (Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation) process the magnet coils must be heated and degassed before impregnating and must be heated to the gel temperature and then the curing temperature, and keep the two kinds of temperatures for a long period of time after impregnating. Thus the heating method of VPI is critical. In this paper, a hybrid method of combining the internal and external heating for the coils is analyzed, especially the possibility of the internal heating method is proved.

  12. PIV-Analysis of collapsing toroidal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Georgia Tech Team

    2012-11-01

    Toroidal droplets are unstable and always undergo a transformation into spherical droplets driven by surface tension. They either break ala Rayleigh-Plateau if the torus is thin or grow fatter to become a single spherical droplet if the torus is fat. We analyze the velocity field inside and outside the toroidal droplet as it transforms into spherical droplets using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method and compare with recent theoretical calculations for this process. NSF CAREER.

  13. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  14. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  15. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  16. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  17. Resistive instabilities in toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this paper, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0) values in the vicinity of unity are reviewed; sawtooth reconnection to q(0) values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 2 and m = 3, n = 2 modes and limits the range of stable profile shapes. Major disruptions can be produced by the simultaneous growth of m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 magnetic islands, leading to destabilization of higher-order modes and to the overlapping of several island chains. Internal disruptions---or sawteeth---arise in a variety of forms other than that produced by the classically reconnecting m = 1 mode. In some case, the q(r) value is apparently close to unity over a large central part of the plasma; in other cases, the q(0) value remains substantially below unity throughout a sawtooth cycle. Toroidal effects are sufficient to stabilize the resistive m = 1 mode in the latter case. Feedback stabilization of m ≥ 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, than feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 resistive mode---although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0) values substantially below unity---is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal MHD mode can be given sufficient positive stability. This appears possible, however, either by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces or by appropriate tailoring of the current profile in the vicinity of the q = 1 surface

  18. Modular Coil Design Developments for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, David E [ORNL; Brooks, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Brown, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chrzanowski, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Fan, H-M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL; Fogarty, Paul J [ORNL; Hargrove, Tom [ORNL; Heitzenroeder, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lovett, G. [MK Technologies, Knoxville, TN; Miller, P. [MK Technologies, Knoxville, TN; Myatt, R. [Myatt Consulting, Norfolk, MA; Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Reiersen, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Strickler, Dennis J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a quasi-axisymmetric facility that combines the high beta and good confinement features of an advanced tokamak with the low current, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. The experiment is based on a three field-period plasma configuration with an average major radius of 1.4 m, a minor radius of 0.3m, and a toroidal magnetic field on axis of up to 2 T. The modular coils are set in a complex assembly of four coil systems that surround the highly shaped plasma. There are six each of three coil types in the assembly for a total of 18 modular coils. The coils are constructed by winding copper cable onto a cast stainless steel winding form that has been machined to high accuracy, so that the current center of the winding pack is within 1.5 mm of its theoretical position. The modular coils operate at a temperature of 80K and are subjected to rapid heating and stress during a pulse. At this time, the project has completed construction of several prototype components which validate the fabrication and inspection processes that are planned for the production coils. In addition, some advanced techniques for error-field compensation and assembly simulation using computer-aided design (CAD) have been developed.

  19. Modular coil design developments for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)]. E-mail: williamsonde@ornl.gov; Brooks, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Brown, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Chrzanowski, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Cole, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Fan, H.-M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Freudenberg, K. [BWXT Y-12, P.O. Box 2009, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8073 (United States); Fogarty, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Hargrove, T. [Hargrove Engineering, 118 Colonial Dr, Scottsboro, AL 35768 (United States); Heitzenroeder, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Lovett, G. [MK Technologies, P.O. Box 30197, Knoxville, TN 37930 (United States); Miller, P. [MK Technologies, P.O. Box 30197, Knoxville, TN 37930 (United States); Myatt, R. [Myatt Consulting, Norfolk, MA 02056 (United States); Nelson, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Reiersen, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Strickler, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a quasi-axisymmetric facility that combines the high beta and good confinement features of an advanced tokamak with the low current, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. The experiment is based on a three field-period plasma configuration with an average major radius of 1.4 m, a minor radius of 0.3 m, and a toroidal magnetic field on axis of up to 2 T. The modular coils are one set in a complex assembly of four coil systems that surround the highly shaped plasma. There are six, each of three coil types in the assembly for a total of 18 modular coils. The coils are constructed by winding copper cable onto a cast stainless steel winding form that has been machined to high accuracy, so that the current center of the winding pack is within {+-}1.5 mm of its theoretical position. The modular coils operate at a temperature of 80 K and are subjected to rapid heating and stress during a pulse. At this time, the project has completed construction of several prototype components which validate the fabrication and inspection processes that are planned for the production coils. In addition, some advanced techniques for error-field compensation and assembly simulation using computer-aided design (CAD) have been developed.

  20. Electromagnetic analyses on radial field sector coils for JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of EU - JA 'Broader Approach' Agreement, the JT-60SA satellite tokamak will be built in Naka, Japan. In JT-60SA, to achieve the steady-state high beta plasma, suppression of Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) is necessary. Therefore, a passive stabilizing plate and a RWM active control system based on in-vessel coils are foreseen for JT-60SA. In the present design, this system consists in 18 sector coils, 6 in the toroidal, 3 in the poloidal direction, rated for a maximum current of 2.5 kA and fed by a dedicated fast power supply system. The coils shall produce sufficient radial magnetic field at the plasma edge, and the active control system shall be fast enough to react in real time to the plasma instabilities. In addition, during fast transients of the plasma current, significant loop voltage could be induced along the sector coils, which could result in over-currents in the coils and in the power supplies. This paper deals with the electromagnetic analyses on the sector coils of JT-60SA, with the main aim to determine the voltage/current characteristic of the coils and, at the same time, to have a first estimation of amplitude and shape of the produced magnetic field; different sector coil design solutions were considered and evaluated. The studies on the coil over-currents during plasma disruption or vertical displacement events are also presented. The results give useful indications in support to the development of the sector coils and power supply design and the identification of their electrical and functional requirements.

  1. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,θ) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities

  2. Calculation method of Tesla coil

    OpenAIRE

    Коломієць, Роман Олександрович

    2015-01-01

    Tesla coil, despite the simplicity of its design may be called one of the least studied electronic devices. The article is an attempt to bring in various experimental results of general theoretical framework, which is the basis of exact calculation method of Tesla coils. Such calculation should be the starting point to create devices based on it. In order to develop such methods were considered the general principles of designing Tesla coil, reviewed the most famous mathematical models of its...

  3. ORNL Levitated Toroidal Multipole Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying confinement of gun-injected and microwave-produced plasmas in a levitated toroidal quadrupole in which internal hoop supports are not present to limit plasma confinement. Electromagnetic levitation is made possible by reducing the 60 Hz skin depth in the copper walls with liquid nitrogen cooling. The cooling also increases the magnetic field lifetime so that an e-folding time of 17 ms was measured after crowbarring. Computations indicate that in a properly designed, larger device, an e-folding time of 100 ms can be reached. Washer-gun hydrogen plasmas and Bostick-type lithium gun plasmas were injected into the levitated quadrupole with typical parameters: B ≥ 3 kG, Te ≈ 3 eV, ni ≈ 109 cm-3, and 1 i i ≈ 1010 cm-3, Te ≈ 30 eV, and τ/τBohm ≈ 30. Density fluctuations (Δn/n) in the region of good field curvature were less than 0.05 and in the region of bad curvature 0.10-0.25. With the removal of the magnetic well (by removing the inner hoop), τ/τBohm and ni each dropped a factor of 4 and Δn/n became greater than 0.25. Recent experiments using 200 W at λ = 3 cm have produced plasmas with higher densities (n > 1011 cm-3 assuming Te ≈ 100 eV), higher temperatures (Te ≈ 100 eV) and longer lifetimes (τ ≈ 80 μs ≈ 40 τBohm) than in the λ = 12 cm experiments. Detailed probe measurements of density and temperature are consistent with models for plasma behaviour based on computed magnetic field plots. Probe data show clear evidence of the changes in heating zones during the variation of the sinusoidal magnetic field and a large obstacle intercepting all flux lines effectively prevents the formation of the plasma. We are also studying a levitated helical hexapole, whose advantages over the quadrupole are a better ratio of connection length to radius of bad curvature and more confinement volume. (author)

  4. Experiments on feedback control of multiple resistive wall modes comparing different active coil arrays and sensor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been carried out on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch device to study several important issues related to feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). The feedback system includes a sensor coil array, a feedback controller implementing a feedback law and an active coil array. The issues include 1) effects of sideband harmonics produced by the feedback system, 2) the form of the controller and the feedback law, 3) feedback system stability, 4) selection of the sensor coil configuration and 5) effects of field errors on the feedback system. Side band harmonics are produced by the feedback system because the active saddle coil array consists of discrete coils. The presence of side bands can couple modes thus preventing simultaneous stabilisation of the coupled modes. The side band effect sets requirements for the minimum number of active coils in the array in both the poloidal and toroidal directions. Recent experiments using the intelligent shell concept with proportional-integral-derivative controller action have achieved complete simultaneous stabilisation of all RWMs modes when the requirements are satisfied. In addition to the intelligent shell concept, preliminary experiments have been performed to test the fake rotating shell concept. For this concept, the sensor coil array is shifted in phase relative to the active coil array thus a detected harmonic is induced to rotate by the active coil-produced control field. Under the condition that the phase shift is less than a quarter-wave length of the mode, mode suppression can be achieved. Feedback using a controller incorporating individual mode control has also been tested. This has enabled the first feedback experiments using a sensor array measuring the toroidal field component to be carried out. For this concept, an array consisting of localised toroidal field sensor coils is used. Mode suppression has been successfully accomplished. However pick-up of high order field error harmonics due

  5. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  6. Microstructures Formation by Fluorocarbon Barrel Plasma Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study is to generate microstructures in order to improve optical properties of monocrystalline silicon. By mean of fluorocarbon plasma barrel texturing and under certain process conditions, silicon turned black. As a result of silicon surface-plasma particles reactions, porous microstructures are formed, while a longer process time micro spikes are developed. These microstructures are responsible of the high level of light trapping on almost the whole range of the usable portion of the solar spectrum. In the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm, the AM 1.5 G weighted reflection has been reduced to 6.20%. In addition to good trapping, this surface morphology leads to superior absorption, which is about 95% in the 600-1000 nm range and decreases to 36% at 1200 nm. This material is thus less transparent and absorbs near infrared light far more than the untreated silicon. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows that elements from the ambient gas are deposited or superficially introduced into the silicon. In addition to surface texturing, these impurities are probably the reason of absorptance enhancement. Moreover, a pore formation mechanism is proposed.

  7. Traveling wave instability in helical coil flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D. R.; Humphrey, J. A. C.

    1997-02-01

    Complementary flow visualization photographs and numerical calculations are presented for the transitional state between the laminar and turbulent flow regimes in a helically coiled pipe. The flow visualization covers a Reynolds number range from 3800 to 8650 (890video recordings at Re=5060 and 5480 (De=1190 and 1280). The unsteady three-dimensional finite difference approximations of the Navier-Stokes equations formulated for the toroidal coordinate system are solved numerically. The calculations are performed in a curved pipe with a radius of curvature to pipe radius ratio equal to 18.2 and Re=5480 (De=1280). These test conditions match the flow visualization and previously reported laser Doppler velocimetry measurements. The calculations reveal a complex interaction between the centrifugal force and the cross-stream velocity, hence explaining the mechanism for maintaining the traveling wave. An analogy is made with known centrifugal instabilities to explain the character of the motion observed in the inner half of the pipe along planes defined by the radial and streamwise coordinate directions. Simple considerations show that the cross-stream flow has the potential for a centrifugal instability.

  8. IASCC evaluation of core barrel weld line in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a concern of IASCC (Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking) in Core barrel weld line in long term operation because it is located near the core region and exposed to high neutron flux and there is weld-induced residual stress. In this report, weld-induced residual stress analysis method for EBW (Electron Beam Welding) is validated by comparing calculated residual stress with measured stress in a mock-up. Using this analysis method, stress of Core barrel EBW weld line in operating condition is calculated and it is confirmed that the probability of IASCC initiation in weld line of Core barrel is considered to be low. (authors)

  9. A Classification Scheme For Toroidal Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, J; Berger, Jorge; Avron, Joseph E.

    1995-01-01

    We construct a class of periodic tilings of the plane, which corresponds to toroidal arrangements of trivalent atoms, with pentagonal, hexagonal and heptagonal rings. Each tiling is characterized by a set of four integers and determines a toroidal molecule. The tiling rules are motivated by geometric considerations and the tiling patterns are rich enough to describe a wide class of toroidal carbon molecules, with a broad range of shapes and numbers of atoms. The molecular dimensions are simply related to the integers that determine the tiling. The configurational energy and the delocalisation energy of several molecules obtained in this way were computed for Tersoff and H\\"uckel models. The results indicate that many of these molecules are not strained, and may be expected to be stable. We studied the influence of size on the H\\"{u}ckel spectrum: it bears both similarities and differences as compared with the case of tubules.

  10. Quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric condition for quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows on the order of the ion thermal speed are investigated. Equilibrium momentum balance equations including the inertia term due to the large flow velocity are used to show that, for rotating quasisymmetic plasmas with no local currents crossing flux surfaces, all components of the metric tensor should be independent of the toroidal angle in the Boozer coordinates, and consequently these systems need to be rigorously axisymmetric. Unless the local radial currents vanish, the Boozer coordinates do not exist and the toroidal flow velocity cannot take any value other than a very limited class of eigenvalues corresponding to very rapid rotation especially for low beta plasmas. (author)

  11. Toroidal mode-conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mode-conversion is studied in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighborhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave which deposits the wave energy through resonant interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted and could in experiments be driven to large amplitudes so as to interact efficiently with fast particles. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 48 refs

  12. Toroidal mode conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mode conversion is studied in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighbourhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave that deposits the wave energy through resonant Landau and cyclotron interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's fluid model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted, which could be used in experiments to form transport barriers and to interact with fast particles. (author)

  13. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  14. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  15. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. ...

  16. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  17. Some properties of toroidal isodynamic magnetostatic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA, CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR no 7158, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We establish some general properties of a 3D isodynamic magnetostatic equilibrium admitting a family of nested toroidal flux surfaces. In particular, we use the virial theorem to prove a simple relation between the total pressure (magnetic + thermal) and the magnetic pressure on each flux surface, and we derive some useful consequences of the latter. We also show the constancy on each rational surface of two integrals along magnetic lines. As a simple application of our results, we show the nonexistence of an equilibrium with vanishing toroidal current, and of an equilibrium with closed lines.

  18. Anomalous transport equations in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced transport equations for a toroidal plasma with fluctuations are derived. These equations include the effects of both anomalous and standard neoclassical transport, and allow clarification of the structure of convective fluxes caused by electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations. Special attention is paid to the combined effects of fluctuations and toroidicity on the transport. The formulation retains the effects of a magnetic field inhomogeneity on the anomalous transport. It is shown that phase space diffusion caused by the gradient in the equilibrium magnetic field appears as a pinch flux in the real space

  19. Optical spectroscopic analysis of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time- and space-resolved plasma emission spectra from the Weapons Laboratory compact toroid (MARAUDER) experiment have been recorded using an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The OMA is optically coupled to the emitting plasmas using fiber optic cables. Results are presented in terms of the composition and purity of plasma species and ionization states for compact toroids formed of hydrogen and argon. The authors use relative line strengths with a collisional radiative equilibrium (CRE) model to estimate the plasma temperature and density. Electron density has also been determined from line profile analysis of the Hβ line in hydrogen

  20. Control of Compact-Toroid Characteristics by External Copper Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    A collaborative research project by Tri Alpha Energy and Nihon University has been conducted for several years, which led to the development of a new compact toroid (CT) injector for efficient FRC particle refueling in the C-2U experiment. The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), consisting of coaxial cylindrical electrodes. In CT formation via MCPG, the magnetic helicity content of the generated CT is one of the critical parameters. A bias coil is inserted into the inner electrode to generate a poloidal flux. The resultant bias magnetic field is spread out of MCPG with time due to its low-frequency bias current. To obtain a more effectively distributed bias magnetic field as well as to improve the voltage breakdown between electrodes, the MCPG incorporates a novel ~ 1 mm thick copper shell mounted outside of the outer electrode. This allows for reliable and controlled operation and more robust CT generation. A detailed discussion of the copper shell and experimental test results will be presented.

  1. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  2. Diagnostic suite used for magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium reconstruction on the PEGASUS toroidal experiment (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic equilibrium reconstruction on the PEGASUS toroidal experiment is a crucial tool to determine macroscopic plasma parameters, such as geometry, li, βt, and qψ. These parameters are tightly coupled to the plasma shape due to the very high toroidicity in PEGASUS where A∼1.1--1.3. A systematic scan of model plasma parameters in a magnetic equilibrium code has been employed to determine an acceptable array of magnetic diagnostics for accurately characterizing the plasma equilibrium. The magnetic diagnostics used include a poloidal array of magnetic pickup coils and flux loops along with a Rogowski loop for the toroidal plasma current. A 270 GHz μ wave interferometer for line averaged density in conjunction with spectroscopic temperature estimates provide a central pressure constraint. Visible images of the plasma provide constraints on the plasma size and location. A one-dimensional SXR camera is being developed to provide a measurement of the magnetic axis location. A time evolving current filament model and wall flux loops are used to determine the induced currents flowing in the continuous, resistive vacuum vessel wall. The ability of the equilibrium reconstruction code to reproduce model equilibria using this diagnostic set provides a quantitative measure of the accuracy of these equilibrium reconstructions. A Monte Carlo analysis with Gaussian noise added to the model data tests the robustness of this technique. A comparison of the model equilibria with the reconstructions obtained using noisy data is shown

  3. A versatile ray-tracing code for studying rf wave propagation in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ray-tracing code named C3PO has been developed to study the propagation of arbitrary electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) waves in magnetized toroidal plasmas. Its structure is designed for maximum flexibility regarding the choice of coordinate system and dielectric model. The versatility of this code makes it particularly suitable for integrated modeling systems. Using a coordinate system that reflects the nested structure of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks, fast and accurate calculations inside the plasma separatrix can be performed using analytical derivatives of a spline-Fourier interpolation of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium. Applications to reverse field pinch magnetic configuration are also included. The effects of 3D perturbations of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium, due to the discreteness of the magnetic coil system or plasma fluctuations in an original quasi-optical approach, are also studied. Using a Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method for solving the set of ordinary differential equations, the ray-tracing code is extensively benchmarked against analytical models and other codes for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves. (paper)

  4. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  5. Comparison between two possible CMS Barrel Muon Readout Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison between two possible readout arquitectures for the CMS muon barrel readout electronics is presented, including various aspects like costs, reliability, installation, staging and maintenance. A review of the present baseline architecture is given in the appendix. (Author)

  6. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance

  7. Room Temperature Magnetic Determination of the Current Center Line for the ITER TF Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Lerch, Philippe; Buzio, Marco; Negrazus, Marco; Baynham, Elwyn; Sanfilippo, Stephane; Foussat, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The ITER tokamak includes 18 superconducting D-shaped toroidal field (IT) coils. Unavoidable shape deformations as well as assembly errors will lead to field errors, which can be modeled with the knowledge of the current center line (CCL). Accurate survey during the entire manufacturing and assembly process, including transfer of survey points, is complex. In order to increase the level of confidence, a room temperature magnetic measurement of the CCL on assembled and closed winding packs is foreseen, prior to insertion into their cold case. In this contribution, we discuss the principle of the CCL determination and present a low frequency ac measurement system under development at PSI, within an ITER framework contract. The largest current allowed to flow in the TF coil at room temperature and the precision requirements for the determination of the CCL loci of the coil are hard boundaries. Eddy currents in the radial plates, the winding pack enclosures, and possibly from iron in the reinforced concrete floor...

  8. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders; Casadio, Rita

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The widespread coiled-coil structural motif in proteins is known to mediate a variety of biological interactions. Recognizing a coiled-coil containing sequence and locating its coiled-coil domains are key steps towards the determination of the protein structure and function. Different...

  9. Performance of a Rain Barrel Sharing Network under Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Seong Jin Noh; Eun-Sung Chung; Yongwon Seo

    2015-01-01

    Rain barrels can be technically shared through social practices or mutual agreement between individual households. This study proposes the evaluation system for a rain barrel sharing network (RBSN) considering three performance criteria of reliability, resiliency, and vulnerability, under plausible climate change scenarios. First, this study shows how the system can be improved in terms of the performance criteria using historical daily rainfall data based on the storage-reliability-yield rel...

  10. New material equations for electromagnetism with toroid polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written. (author)

  11. A radiation-resistant epoxy resin system for toroidal field and other superconducting coil fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid-epoxy resin system with high resistance to 4-K reactor radiation (neutron plus gamma) has been developed that meets all ITER and BPX requirements: pot life longer than 12 h at ambient temperatures; viscosity less than 1000 cP over its entire pot life; cure below 150 degrees C; low shrinkage; no volatiles upon curing; excellent penetration; and good wetting of fibers, stainless steels, and nickel-based steels. The strength of the epoxy resin system, CTD-101, was tested with and without S-2 Glass fiber reinforcement at 295, 76 and 4 K. Specimens were then irradiated at two dose levels (2.9 x 107 and 1.6 x 108 Gy) at temperatures below 6 K. Virtually no deterioration in interlaminar shear strength at 76 K was observed after the lower dose level, which is the end-of-life dose level for ITER. After the higher dose level, the material had degraded, but its strength was still well above the BPX requirement (14 MPa in shear) at the end-of-life dose level of 1 x 108 Gy

  12. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit kτρbi much-lt 1, where ρbi is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented

  13. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  14. Chiral Anomaly in Toroidal Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, K.

    2001-01-01

    It is pointed out that the chiral anomaly in 1+1 dimensions should be observed in toroidal carbon nanotubes on a planar geometry with varying magnetic field. We show that the chiral anomaly is closely connected with the persistent current in a one-dimensional metallic ring.

  15. Toroidal groups line bundles, cohomology and quasi-Abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Kopfermann, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Toroidal groups are the connecting link between torus groups and any complex Lie groups. Many properties of complex Lie groups such as the pseudoconvexity and cohomology are determined by their maximal toroidal subgroups. Quasi-Abelian varieties are meromorphically separable toroidal groups. They are the natural generalisation of the Abelian varieties. Nevertheless, their behavior can be completely different as the wild groups show.

  16. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  17. Mechanical design and construction qualification program on ITER correction coils structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foussat, A., E-mail: arnaud.foussat@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Weiyue, Wu; Jing, Wei; Shuangsong, Du [Academy of Science Institute of Plasma Physics, PO 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sgobba, S. [European Center for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hongwei, Li [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Ministry of Science and Technology, 15B Fuxing Rd., Beijing 100862 (China); Libeyre, Paul; Jong, Cornelis; Klofac, Kamil; Mitchell, Neil [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-04-01

    The ITER Magnet system consists of 4 main coils sub-systems, i.e. 18 toroidal field coils (TFC), a central solenoid (CS), 6 poloidal field coils (PF) and 3 sets of correction coils (CC). The ITER fusion project has selected the stainless steel 316LN as main material for the magnet structure. The CC contribute to reducing the range of magnetic error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the other coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. During plasma operation, a large number of loading condition scenarios have been considered and structural analysis performed on key items like Cable-In-Conduit Conductor and the coil case. The results obtained are used for both static and fatigue structural assessment defining the present baseline design. For the construction of the structural cases, welding techniques such as GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and techniques resulting in low distortion and shrinkage like EBW (Electron Beam Welding) or Laser Beam Welding (LBW) with filler metal wire have been selected. Those methods are considered for future qualifications to guarantee proper weld parameters and specified weld properties. In order to determine the strength and fracture toughness of 316LN stainless steel welds with respect to design criteria, some mechanical tests have been carried out at 7 K (or 77 K), and room temperature.

  18. Diagnostic system for a 20 TESLA single turn coil magnet prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT) has designed, fabricated, and is testing a prototype 20 T on-axis, single turn, toroidal field TF) coil. The purpose of this Ignition Technology Demonstration (ITD) is to prove the feasibility of the single-turn coil powered by homopolar generators (HPGs). A scaling factor of 0.06 was selected based on the current capability of CEM-UT's 60 MJ HPG power supply. The Balcones HPG power supply consists of six, 10 MJ HPGs, each rated at 1.5 MA at 100 V. When connected in a parallel configuration to the prototype TF coil they provide a 9 MA, 100 ms, critically damped current pulse. The objective of the diagnostic system for the prototype 20 T, TF coil is to determine displacements, temperatures, and magnetic fields at various locations in the coil. The values are then compared to predictions by the electromagnetic (EM) analysis to validate computational results. Operating conditions for instrumentation in a 20 T, cryogenically-cooled magnet are rather severe. Electromechanical simulations show that the 0.06 scale IGNITEX TF prototype will experience localized temperature rise from liquid-nitrogen temperature (-196 degrees C) to approximately 200 degrees C in less than 100 ms. Close to the inner leg of the coil where stresses and temperatures are maximum, the instrumentation experiences a 30 T field rise in 26 ms

  19. A high-performance OH coil for the Los Alamos CPRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-performance Ohmic Heating (OH) magnet has been designed for the Confinement Physics Research Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The magnet has an outside radius at its throat of 1.00 meters. At maximum current, the maximum current density is 40 amperes per square millimetre, at which point it generates 38.32 webers, single swing (or 76.6 webers, double swing), and generates a central field of 17.37 teslas. The maximum von Miess stress is 408.6 MPa (59.26 ksi). The magnet stores 637 megajoules, with a time constant of 8.30 seconds. The magnet consists of two zones: a central hour-glass-shaped coil, and an outer coil gallery of trimming coils. The central stack is built of bandsawed spirals, the construction technique which was pioneered at MIT for the OH coils for Alcater A and C. the coil uses 42 spirals, each of which is sawed from a 5-cm-thick plate of either MZC, Elbrodur, SSC-155, or OFE copper, depending on the maximum ambient stress. The inner radius of every plate is 0.60 m, and the outside radius is tangent to a toroid whose major radius is 2.00 m and whose minor radius is 1.00 m. The pitch of each spiral is adjusted to minimize the field error. The outer trimming coils are built of high-conductivity aluminum (Alloy 1350). For ease of fabrication, all but the outermost pair of trimming coils lie in a single ''coil-gallery'' plane and carry the same current density, so that all can be wound from a single continuous strip. The trimming coils are positioned within this gallery to yield a field error of less than 7 gauss throughout a toroidal volume centered at R/sub T/ = 2.00 meters, and whose minor radius is r/sub p/ = 0.80 meters. The current density in the trimming coils is so low that vertical diagnostic access can be provided by boring 15-cm holes through the windings themselves

  20. Team one (GA/MCA) effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. Progress report for the quarter ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic mission of this effort is to demonstrate the feasibility of, and establish an engineering data base for utilizing bath cooled NbTi alloy to generate a peak toroidal field of 12 tesla in a tokamak reactor. The FY-1980 effort has been concentrated upon four major tasks: completion of the conceptual design of an ETF reactor compatible TF-coil employing helium bath cooled NbTi alloy conductor, procurement of conductor for the coil to be tested at the LLNL HFTF during FY-1982, design of the test coil, and a series of relevant tests using the GA High Field Test Facility

  1. LCT-coil design: Mechanical interaction between composite winding and steel casing under various test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finite element computations for the structural design of the large superconducting toroidal field coil contributed by EURATOM to the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at ORNL, USA were performed at KfK, using the ASKA code. The layout of the coil must consider different types of requirements: firstly, an optimal D-shaped contour minimizing circumferential stress gradients under normal operation in the toroidal arrangement must be defined. Secondly, the three-dimensional real design effects due to the actual support conditions, manufacturing tolerances etc. must be mastered for different basic operational and failure load cases. And, thirdly, the design must stand a single coil qualification test in the TOSKA-facility at KfK, Karlsruhe, FRG, before it is plugged into the LCTF. The emphasis of the paper is three-pronged according to these requirements: i) the 3D magnetic body forces as well as the underlying magnetic fields as computed by the HEDO-code are described. ii) The mechanical interaction between casing and winding as given elsewhere in terms of high stress regions, gaps, slide movements and contact forces for various load cases representing the LCTF test conditions is illustrated here by a juxtaposition of the operational deformations and stresses within the LCTF and the TOSKA. iii) Particular effects like the restraint imposed by a corset-type reinforcement of the coil in the TOSKA test facility to limit the breathing deformation are parametrically studied. Moreover, the possibilities to derive scaling laws which make essential results transferable to larger coils by extracting a 1D mechanical response from the 3D finite element model is also demonstrated. (orig./GG)

  2. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  3. Analysis of spiky net toroidal current in the magnetized toroidal plasma from the point of view of helicity conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that 'runaway oscillations' in the toroidal current of the magnetized resistive toroidal plasma may cause continuous tearing activity, resulting in 'spiky' net toroidal current and modulation of toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields of the plasma with a definite phase relationship, depending upon the magnitude of vertical magnetic field. The present experimental results on current decay and recovery are explained from the point of view of helicity conservation. (author)

  4. Installation of CMS EB (ECAL Barrel) Supermodules 5 and 13 inside HB+ (HCAL Barrel) on 26/27 April 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the CMS experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system.

  5. A barrel-related interneuron in layer 4 of rat somatosensory cortex with a high intra-barrel connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Koelbl, C.; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Lübke, Joachim; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic connections between identified fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, and excitatory spiny neurons in layer 4 (L4) of the barrel cortex were investigated using patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Three distinct clusters of FS L4 interneurons were identified based on their axonal morphology relative to the barrel column suggesting that these neurons do not constitute a homogeneous interneuron population. One L4 FS interneuron type had an axon...

  6. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  7. Test Results of a 1.2 kg/s Centrifugal Liquid Helium Pump for the ATLAS Superconducting Toroid Magnet System

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The toroid superconducting magnet of ATLAS-LHC experiment at CERN will be indirectly cooled by means of forced flow of liquid helium at about 4.5 K. A centrifugal pump will be used, providing a mass flow of 1.2 kg/s and a differential pressure of 40 kPa (ca. 400 mbar) at about 4300 rpm. Two pumps are foreseen, one for redundancy, in order to feed in parallel the cooling circuits of the Barrel and the two End-Caps toroid magnets. The paper describes the tests carried out at CERN to measure the characteristic curves, i.e. the head versus the mass flow at different rotational speeds, as well as the pump total efficiency. The pump is of the "fullemission" type, i.e. with curved blades and it is equipped with an exchangeable inducer. A dedicated pump test facility has been constructed at CERN, which includes a Coriolis-type liquid helium mass flow meter. This facility is connected to the helium refrigerator used for the tests at CERN of the racetrack magnets of the Barrel and of the End-Cap toroids.

  8. Modeling of a poloidally symmetric toroidal field divertor in a reversed--field-pinch plasma machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic divertors have been shown to be successful in minimizing plasma-wall interactions and in leading to high confinement regimes in Tokamaks. This leads to the hope that similar benefits may occur in an Reversed-Field-Pinch (RPF) fitted with a divertor. Previous experiments using divertors in a RFP have used a poloidal field divertor configuration such as is used in Tokamaks. This study investigates another approach; namely a toroidal field divertor. In this study a simple model of a poloidally symmetric toroidal field divertor is developed and used in a study of stochastic effects due to the divertor and in a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code to study the response of the plasma to the large poloidal m = 0 perturbations caused by the divertor coils. It is found that the topology of the RFP-divertor system is much more complex than had been expected. Stochasticity is enhanced in the outer edge region of the plasma because of this geometrical complexity. The way of the RFP reaches an equilibrium in this complex system is investigated with the 3-D relaxation code, DEBS (authored by Dalton Schnack). This code showed that the divertor will not hinder the formation of a reversed toroidal field in the plasma, and that the dynamics of its formation is altered when toroidal effects are considered. The plasma develops flows and currents in the throat of the divertor in response to the vacuum-like divertor fields. These flows and currents help to restore the force free character of the plasma

  9. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  10. Effect of a TBM on the Toroidal Magnetic Field Ripple in the ITER and Measures to Reduce the Ripple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Young Dug; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Suk Kwon; Hong, Bong Guen

    2008-11-15

    The ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) tokamak has 18 toroidal magnetic field (TF) coils, and the discreteness of these TF coils causes toroidally non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. It is called a TF ripple and could lead to losses of high-energy particles, and an unfavorable heat load on the plasma facing components. In the ITER design, a ferromagnetic insert (FI) is employed to reduce the TF ripple, and an optimization of the FI design is ongoing. Also, since test blanket modules (TBMs) will be installed in the ITER, which are made of a ferromagnetic material, they also affect the TF ripple. We assessed the effects of the thickness of the FIs on the TF ripple in order to optimize the FI. And we analyzed how the TBMs distort the TF, and calculated the TF ripple for various amounts of a ferromagnetic material and the positions of the TBMs. A simple correction coil was adopted in order to reduce the TBM induced TF ripple to the required value of 0.3 %. We proposed technically available measures to reduce the TF ripple to the required value.

  11. Effect of a TBM on the Toroidal Magnetic Field Ripple in the ITER and Measures to Reduce the Ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) tokamak has 18 toroidal magnetic field (TF) coils, and the discreteness of these TF coils causes toroidally non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. It is called a TF ripple and could lead to losses of high-energy particles, and an unfavorable heat load on the plasma facing components. In the ITER design, a ferromagnetic insert (FI) is employed to reduce the TF ripple, and an optimization of the FI design is ongoing. Also, since test blanket modules (TBMs) will be installed in the ITER, which are made of a ferromagnetic material, they also affect the TF ripple. We assessed the effects of the thickness of the FIs on the TF ripple in order to optimize the FI. And we analyzed how the TBMs distort the TF, and calculated the TF ripple for various amounts of a ferromagnetic material and the positions of the TBMs. A simple correction coil was adopted in order to reduce the TBM induced TF ripple to the required value of 0.3 %. We proposed technically available measures to reduce the TF ripple to the required value

  12. Development of compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls has been investigated. The compact toroids injection can fuel particles directly into the core of the plasma and modify the plasma profiles at the desired locations. The acceleration tests of the compact toroids have been conducted at Himeji Institute of Technology. The tests showed that the hydrogen compact toroid was accelerated up to 80km/s and the plasma density of the compact toroid was compressed to 1.2 x 1021m-3. (orig.)

  13. Dynamic allostery of protein alpha helical coiled-coils

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, R. J.; Mcleish, T.C.B.

    2005-01-01

    Alpha helical coiled-coils appear in many important allosteric proteins such as the dynein molecular motor and bacteria chemotaxis transmembrane receptors. As a mechanism for transmitting the information of ligand binding to a distant site across an allosteric protein, an alternative to conformational change in the mean static structure is an induced change in the pattern of the internal dynamics of the protein. We explore how ligand binding may change the intramolecular vibrational free ener...

  14. Study for Manufacturing of ITER TF Coil Radial Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the previous design phase of ITER the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) has been built to verify the TF coil concept of ITER and to proof the feasibility of an industrial fabrication of such a coil. In April 2004, Forschungszentrum and BNG, started a Manufacturing Study for the full scale Radial Plates (RP) of the TF Coils in the frame of an EFDA task. The main part of the Study was to develop feasible concepts of the technology for the manufacturing of the Full Scale Radial Plates starting with the raw material until final testing. The Feasibility Study has covered all manufacturing steps that are necessary for production of the RP. It has included as well a basic layout for the manufacturing process. During the work several proposals for the single manufacturing work steps have been developed. After that an evaluation of the found proposals has taken place. The most feasible proposals have been combined to manufacturing concepts. Finally two main Concepts were elaborated and evaluated: Concept 1 includes the premachining of segments with grooves, the welding of the segments and the final machining of the RP. Concept 2 includes the welding of not machined small segments to the D-shape of the RP and the following machining of the surface and grooves. Both Concepts will be described in detail with a comparison of tooling and manufacturing details, achievement of technological requirements as well as with the requirements coming from the overall time schedule. Based on the results of the assessment of the different concepts and manufacturing techniques Concept 1 shows some advantages compared to Concept 2. These will be described in the paper. In addition a proposal about additional R(and)D in front of the later manufacturing will be made. (author)

  15. Engineering design and integration of in-vessel single turn segmental coil in vacuum vessel of SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SST-1 tokamak is having the error field due to unsymmetrical positioning of Toroidal field (TF) coils which displace the plasma to inboard side from its major radius of 1100 mm, hence it is required to install the In-vessel Coil (PF6) at a radial location of 1350 mm and elevation of 350 mm above and below the mid-plane of the toroidal field coils for proper plasma positioning. The In-Vessel coil was decided to make in eight segments for futuristic use, to control the individual localized error field correction by supplying the different current. A single turn, eight segments, copper conductor with 18 mm diameter with GFRP insulation and housed in SS304 L casing to carry 8000 Ampere current for 10 sec duration was designed, fabricated and installed in vacuum vessel of SST-1. This paper will present the design drivers, material selection, advantages and constraints of the in-vessel coils, its conceptual and engineering design, CAD models, finite element analysis using ANSYS, its fabrication, quality assurance/control and assembly/integration aspects inside vacuum vessel of SST-1. (author)

  16. ASTROMAG coil cooling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG is a planned particle astrophysics magnetic facility. Basically it is a large magnetic spectrometer outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended period of time in orbit on a space station. A definition team summarized its scientific objectives assumably related to fundamental questions of astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Since magnetic induction of about 7 Tesla is desired, it is planned to be a superconducting magnet cooled to liquid helium 2 temperatures. The general structure of ASTROMAG is based on: (1) two superconducting magnetic coils, (2) dewar of liquid helium 2 to provide cooling capability for the magnets; (3) instrumentation, matter-anti matter spectrometer (MAS) and cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS); and (4) interfaces to the shuttle and space station. Many configurations of the superconducting magnets and the dewar were proposed and evaluated, since those are the heart of the ASTROMAG. Baseline of the magnet configuration and cryostat as presented in the phase A study and the one kept in mind while doing the present study are presented. ASTROMAG's development schedule reflects the plan of launching to the space station in 1995.

  17. TEST RESULTS OF 60-cm BORE Nb3Sn TEST MODULE COIL (TMC-I) IN THE CLUSTER TEST FACILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, T; Shimamoto, S.; T. Hiyama; Tsuji, H; Takahashi, Y.; Nishi, M; Tada, E.; Yoshida, K; Okuno, K.; Koizurmi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakajima, H; Takahashi, O; Oshikiri, M.; Yasukochi, K.

    1984-01-01

    An extended test of a 60-cm-bore Nb3Sn coil (TMC-I), constructed as a development of superconducting toroidal coil in tokamak machine, has been carried out in the cluster test facility. A 192-cm-length (one turn) normal zone, nucleated by a heat-input in the innermost turn, is recovered to superconducting state at 6 kA and 10 T. For the manual dump with a decay time constant of 6.6 sec (B = 1.0 T/sec), no damage is found on the TMC-I. In addition, a out-of-plane force mode operation, using on...

  18. Contributions to the design and to the fabrication of the magnet of the toroidal field of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a collection of published papers in French and in English about the design and the qualification of the magnet of the toroidal field of Tore Supra. The development test programme, the controls during conductor manufacturing and the acceptance tests have shown to be the bases for achieving a very low level of rejection for the whole production. A systematic study of the performances correlated to the fabrication conditions has provided valuable informations for the optimization of the manufacturing processes of superconductors. The tests of single coils have enabled the commissioning of a monitoring and protection system specially adapted for this magnet of 18 coils cooled in a superfluid helium bath. After the accident caused by an arcing in one coil of the Torus, and the replacement of the faulty coil, the monitoring and safety discharge system have been adapted. The current in the magnet has been increased up to 1 455 A for 9.3 T on the conductors (nominal values 1 400 A and 9 T). During the last three years (1989-1991) only one transition to normal state has been observed in one coil strongly irradiated after a severe plasma disruption. In these conditions the protection system acted very well and as expected

  19. Conical coils counter-current chromatography for preparative isolation and purification of tanshinones from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junling; Meng, Jie; Guo, Mengzhe; Yang, Zhi; Wu, Shihua

    2013-05-01

    Modern counter-current chromatography (CCC) originated from the helical coil planet centrifuge. Recently, spiral coils were found to possess higher separation efficiency in both the retention of stationary phase and solutes resolution than other CCC coils like the helical and toroidal coils used on type-J CCC and cross-axis CCC. In this work, we built a novel conical coil CCC for the preparative isolation and purification of tanshinones from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The conical coils were wound on three identical upright tapered holders in head-to-tail and left-handed direction and connected in series. Compared with helical and spiral coil CCC, conical coil CCC not only placed CCC column in a two-dimensional centrifugal field, but also provided a potential centrifugal force gradient both in axial and radial directions. The extra centrifugal gradient made mobile phase move faster and enabled CCC much higher retention of stationary phase and better resolution. As a result, higher efficiency has been obtained with the solvent system of hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (HEMWat) with the volume ratio of 5:5:7:3 by using conical coil CCC apparatus. Four tanshinones, including cryptotanshinone (1), tanshinone I (2), 1,2-dihydrotanshinquinone (3) and tanshinone IIA (4), were well resolved from 500mg to 1g crude samples with high purity. Furthermore, the conical coil CCC can make a much higher solid phase retention, which makes it to be a powerful separation tool with high throughput. This is the first report about conical coil CCC for separation of tanshinones and it may also be an important advancement for natural products isolation. PMID:23541654

  20. The Segmented Bifilar Contrawound Toroidal Helical Antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanvoorhies, Kurt Louis

    The segmented bifilar contrawound toroidal helical antenna, a.k.a. QuadContra antenna creates a toroidal magnetic current whose radiated electromagnetic fields emulate those of an electric dipole located normal to the plane of the toroidal helix. This antenna is a magnetic dual of the constant current electric loop antenna. Its principal advantages of reduced size and low profile result from both its circular geometry and from the velocity factor of its slow wave contrawound helical structure. This antenna is constructed by winding two conductors in contrawound relation to each other on a toroidal form, dividing the winding into an even number of segments, and reversing the pitch sense of each conductor from one segment to another. Feed ports are located on the conductors at the segment boundaries, and are connected in alternate phase to a central signal terminal via balanced and tuned transmission line elements. At resonance, each winding segment supports a quarter-wave sinusoidal current distribution. Toroidal electric current components are canceled, and poloidal current components are enhanced in the resulting anti-symmetric mode current distribution. This study measured and simulated the velocity factor, input impedance, bandwidth and simulated the radiation gain and pattern for a variety of linear and toroidal structures. The velocity factor, modeled as a power function of the ratio of axial winding length to wire length, was two to three times slower for the anti-symmetric mode contrawound helix than for a comparable monofilar helix. The radiation characteristics of the antenna were simulated using the OSU ESP4 Moment Method based program, after making extensive improvements to accommodate a wide variety of antenna configurations and to automatically find resonant frequencies. The simulated QuadContra antenna radiates with vertically polarization in a dipole-like pattern having a gain about 2 dB less than the dipole. The gain falls off dramatically for

  1. Stochastization of Magnetic Field Surfaces in Tokamaks by an Inner Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3-D code has been developed in order to simulate the magnetic field lines in circular cross-section tokamaks. The toroidal magnetic field can be obtained from the individual fields of circular coils arranged around the torus, or alternatively, as a ripple-less field. The poloidal field is provided by a given toroidal current density profile. Proposing initial conditions for a magnetic filed line, it is integrated along the toroidal angle coordinate, and Poincare maps can be obtained at any desired cross section plane. Following this procedure, the code allows the mapping of magnetic field surfaces for the axisymmetric case. For this work, the density current profile is chosen to be bell-shaped, so that realistic safety factor profiles can be obtained. This code is used in order to study the braking up of external surfaces when the symmetry is broken by an inner coil with tilted circular loops, with the purpose of modelling the behaviour of ergodic divertors, such as those devised for TEXTOR

  2. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  3. Embedded optical microfiber coil resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fei; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    The embedding of an optical microfiber coil resonator in Teflon is demonstrated. Resonances in excess of 9dB and Q-factors greater than 6000 have been observed. The device is compact, robust and portable.

  4. Coil for LEAR extraction septum

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    Which way does the current flow ? This intriguing object is the coil for the LEAR extraction septum. There were two septa, first a thin one, then this one, not so thin, somewhat on the borderline between septum and bending magnet.

  5. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn3 conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended

  6. Status of European manufacture of Toroidal Field conductor and strand for JT-60SA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the JT-60SA project, part of the Broader Approach (BA) agreement, EURATOM provides to Japan, the Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system, consisting of 18 superconducting coils. The procurement of the conductor for the TF coils is managed by Fusion for Energy, acting as EU representative in the BA agreement. The TF conductor procurement is split into two contracts, one dedicated to the production of Niobium Titanium (NbTi) and Cu strand and the other to TF conductor production through strand cabling and cable jacketing operations. The TF conductor is a rectangular-shaped cable-in-conduit conductor formed by 486 (0.81 mm diameter) strands (2/3 NbTi–1/3 Cu) wrapped in a stainless steel foil and embedded into a stainless steel jacket. The 18 TF coils require (including spares) 115 ‘Unit Lengths’ (UL) of such conductor, each 240 m long for a total of about 28 km. Correspondingly about 10,000 km for NbTi and 5000 km for Cu strand are produced. The Japanese company Furukawa Electric Co. (FEC) is in charge of TF strand manufacture while the Italian company Italian Consortium for Applied Superconductivity (ICAS) is in charge of cabling and jacketing of TF conductor ULs. In the paper, we provide information on the production stages presently achieved in TF strand and conductor contracts

  7. Movable coil type magnetic drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In movable coil type magnetic drives suitable to reactor control element drives, if it is intended to increase the retaining force thereof, there has been a problem that the size of the device is increased. Then in electromagnetic coils surrounding a plunger mounted to a driving shaft, auxiliary annular poles are disposed to each of inner ends of poles at both ends of the coils so as to cover almost of the surface on the side of the plunger. As a result, the magnetic bonding force between the electromagnetic coils and the plunger is enhanced, and the retaining force for the driving shaft can be increased by a small sized device without increasing current supplied to the electromagnetic coils and the number of the electromagnetic coils. The present invention is not limited to reactor control element drives, but it can be applied to various kinds of fields such as a driving device for moving materials in contactless manner, for example, in a case of removing drum cans containing radioactive materials or harmful materials. (N.H.)

  8. Dynamics of liquid rope coiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mehdi; Maleki, Maniya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ribe, Neil M.; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    We present a combined experimental and numerical investigation of the coiling of a liquid “rope” falling on a solid surface, focusing on three little-explored aspects of the phenomenon: The time dependence of “inertio-gravitational” coiling, the systematic dependence of the radii of the coil and the rope on the experimental parameters, and the “secondary buckling” of the columnar structure generated by high-frequency coiling. Inertio-gravitational coiling is characterized by oscillations between states with different frequencies, and we present experimental observations of four distinct branches of such states in the frequency-fall height space. The transitions between coexisting states have no characteristic period, may take place with or without a change in the sense of rotation, and usually (but not always) occur via an intermediate “figure of eight” state. We present extensive laboratory measurements of the radii of the coil and of the rope within it, and show that they agree well with the predictions of a “slender-rope” numerical model. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to reveal a systematic variation of the critical column height for secondary buckling as a function of (dimensionless) flow rate and surface tension parameters.

  9. Muon dynamics in a toroidal sector magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present scenario for the cooling channel in a high brightness muon collider calls for a quasi-continuous solenoidal focusing channel. The beam line consists of a periodic array of hydrogen absorbers immersed in a solenoid with alternating focusing field and rf linacs at the zero field points. Solenoids and toroidal sectors have a natural place in muon collider design given the large emittance of the beam and consequently, the large transverse momentum of the initial pion beam or the decay muon beam. Bent solenoids as shown were studied for use at the front end of the machine, as part of the capture channel and more recently as part of a diagnostic setup to measure the position and momentum of muons. The authors present a Hamiltonian formulation of muon dynamics in toroidal sector solenoids (bent solenoid)

  10. Anomalous transport theory for toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous transport coefficients in toroidal helical plasmas are studied, based on the innovative theoretical method. The self-sustained turbulence is analyzed by balancing the nonlinear growth due to the current diffusivity with the nonlinear damping by the ion viscosity and thermal conductivity. Interchange and ballooning mode turbulence is investigated, and the geometrical dependence of the anomalous transport coefficient is clarified. Variation of transport owing to the geometrical difference in toroidal helical plasmas is illustrated. The mechanism for confinement improvement is searched for. To verify the nonlinear destabilization and the self-sustained state, the nonlinear simulation of the interchange mode turbulence is performed in a sheared slab. It is demonstrated that the nonlinear enhancement of the growth rate occurs when the fluctuation amplitude exceeds the critical level. In the saturation stage, the fluctuation level becomes higher associated with the enhanced nonlinear growth. (author)

  11. Diffusiophoresis of a charged toroidal polyelectrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Hsu, Yen-Rei; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Considering recent application of concentration driven motion of charged nanoparticles in sensing technology, we model the diffusiophoresis of an isolated toroidal polyelectrolyte (PE) for the first time. Choosing an aqueous KCl solution for illustration, its behavior under various conditions is simulated by varying the double layer thickness, the size of toroid, and its softness and fixed charge density. We show that the behavior of the present PE can be different both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of the corresponding spherical PE. This arises from the competition of the hydrodynamic force and the electric force acting on a PE. The geometry and the nature of a PE can also influence appreciably its behavior, yielding complicated and interesting results. PMID:26970033

  12. HELMHOLTZ COILS FOR MEASURING MAGNETIC MOMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Dobrodeyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal configuration of the double Helmholtz coils for measuring of the magnetic dipole moments was defined. It was determined that measuring coils should have round shape and compensative coils – the square one. Analytically confirmed the feasibility of the proposed configuration of these coils as primary transmitters of magnetic dipole moments.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lazaridis, Themis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or ...

  14. Kinetic Damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.Y. Fu; H.L. Berk; A. Pletzer

    2005-05-03

    The damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in JET plasmas is investigated by using a reduced kinetic model. Typically no significant damping is found to occur near the center of the plasma due to mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. In contrast, continuum damping from resonance near the plasma edge may be significant, and when it is, it gives rise to damping rates that are compatible with the experimental observations.

  15. Toroidal geometry subroutines for MORSE-CG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equations, coding, and procedures that are required to include a torus in the Combinatorial Geometry subroutines of the MORSE-CG code are described. The derivation and solutions of the quartic equation that describes a torus along with additional subroutines and the modifications to existing subroutines required to carry out the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in toroidal geometry are presented. The input requirements and a sample problem are included

  16. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  17. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  18. The impact of acceleration on barrel/launch package design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the impact of launch acceleration on the design of electromagnetic launcher barrels and on the design of associated launch packages. This is of particular interest because launch package size and mass directly affect the overall armament system size and mass. A common design approach is to use as the peak launch acceleration, the maximum acceleration which the projectile can be designed to withstand. While this approach will minimize barrel length, it may also yield an excessively large overall system size and mass, especially for the long, slender projectile configurations which are desired for high aero-thermal and terminal ballistics performance. An alternate design approach is described which balances the goals of reducing barrel length with reducing launch package mass. Results illustrate the benefits of this balanced design approach on overall armament system size and mass

  19. Electron accelerator based system for assay of transuranic waste barrels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete assay system for 208-liter barrels contianing transuranic wastes has been developed. The system consists of an 8-MeV commercial electron accelerator, neutron moderating cavity housing the waste barrel and containing neutron detectors, high resolution germanium gamma spectrometer, and x-ray radiography camera (both film and real time). The electron linac is used to produce bremsstrahlung and high-intensity pulsed neutron flux, both of which are used to interrogate the fissionable materials. The Differential Dieaway Technique is used to assay the amounts of fissile and fertile materials. The neutron flux is also used in the Prompt Gamma Activation Assay to determine and to quantify the matrix elements present in the barrels. This information is then used to correct the assay of fissionable material. The bremsstrahlung too, is also used by x-ray radiography system to further identify the matrix

  20. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Treatment Method for Fermi Barrel Sodium Metal Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermi barrels are 55-gallon drums that once contained bulk sodium metal from the shutdown Fermi 1 breeder reactor facility, and now contain residual sodium metal and other sodium/air reaction products. This report provides a residual sodium treatment method and proposed quality assurance steps that will ensure that all residual sodium is deactivated and removed from the Fermi barrels before disposal. The treatment method is the application of humidified carbon dioxide to the residual sodium followed by a water wash. The experimental application of the treatment method to six Fermi barrels is discussed, and recommendations are provided for further testing and evaluation of the method. Though more testing would allow for a greater refinement of the treatment technique, enough data has been gathered from the tests already performed to prove that 100% compliance with stated waste criteria can be achieved

  2. First two barrel ECAL supermodules inserted in CMS HCAL

    CERN Multimedia

    K.Bell

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" for the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system. The barrel ECAL will consist of 36 supermodules, many of which have already been produced (see CERN Bulletin 17-18, 2006). Team from CMS ECAL, CMS Integration and CEA-DAPNIA were involved in the insertion, with the production/integration of the supermodules themselves involving many technicians, engineers and physicists from many institutes. From left to right: Olivier Teller, Maf Alidra and Lucien Veillet.

  3. Toroidal sensor of superconducting quantum magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensor has a high sensitivity achieved by the 100-times higher suppression of external electromagnetic disturbances as compared with sensors used so far. This is given by the design of the sensor which consists of a superconducting induction loop, electrically closed by a superconducting weak junction and made of one single piece of superconducting material in which there is an O-shaped cavity. In the space defined by this cavity there are two coaxial openings for the insertion of the superconducting junction. The parts of the cavity are interconnected with a planar slot. Also inserted in the cavity are two coils - a field coil and a signal coil. The superconducting weak junction is either of a bridge or point type. The sensor may be used in all areas where the measurement of very small variables may be converted to the measurement of magnetic field. (J.B.) 5 figs

  4. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Landreman, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The properties of curl-free magnetic fields allow magnetic field distributions to be ranked in order of their difficulty of production from a distance. Plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may be difficult to support, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may be efficiently supported by distant coils. Two measures of difficulty, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally-produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix y...

  5. European cryogenic material testing program for ITER coils and intercoil structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following materials were characterized for the use in the magnet structures of ITER: 1) Type 316LN cast materials having a modified chemistry used for a Model of the TF (Toroidal Field) outer intercoil structure were investigated with respect to tensile, fracture, fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), and fatigue life behavior between 7 and 4 K. 2) For Type 316LN 80 mm thick plate used for the TFMC (Toroidal Field Model Coil) structure a complete cryogenic mechanical materials characterization was established. 3) For full size coil case mockups, repair weld properties of 240 mm thick narrow-gap welds were investigated to determine their tensile and fracture behavior. 4) For CSMC (Center Solenoid Model Coil) superconductor jackets, the fatigue lives of orbital butt welds made of Incoloy 908 and Type 316LN (aged and unaged) materials were determined up to one million cycles at 7 K. The results reveal to date that the FCGR of aged Type 316LN is inferior to Incoloy 908 material, whilst the fatigue life properties are comparable. However, for Type 316LN jacket structure considerable improvement of FCGR could be achieved by a solution heat treatment process. In addition, tensile and fatigue life tests performed with a new cryogenic mechanical test facility (630 kN capacity) are presented

  6. Toroidal rotation and halo current produced by disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Henry; Sugiyama, Linda; Paccagnella, Roberto; Breslau, Joshua; Jardin, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    In several experiments including JET, it was observed that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal rotation. There is a concern that there may be a resonance between rotating toroidal perturbations and the resonant frequencies of the ITER vacuum vessel, causing enhanced damage. MHD simulations with M3D demonstrate that disruptions produce toroidal rotation. The toroidal velocity can produce several rotations of the sideways force during a disruption. Edge localized modes (ELMs) also produce poloidal and toroidal rotation. A theory of rotation produced by MHD activity will be presented. In the case of ELMs, the theory gives toroidal rotation Alfven Mach number, Mϕ ~10-2βN . This is consistent with a scaling for intrinsic toroidal rotation in H mode tokamaks. It was also discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal variation of the plasma current Iϕ. From ∇ . j = 0 , the toroidal current variation ΔIϕ is proportional to the 3D halo current, ∮Jn Rdl , where Jn is the normal current density at the wall. The 3D halo current is calculated analytically and computationally. A bound on ΔIϕ /Iϕ is found, proportional to the halo current fraction and toroidal peaking factor. Supported by USDOE and ITER.

  7. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S., E-mail: gunsu@postech.ac.kr; Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. K. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  8. Application of articulated absolute co-ordinate measuring machine for quality control in manufacturing of ELM control coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under India-EU collaboration, Institute for Plasma Research had undertaken an engineering feasibility initiative aimed at developing a 1:1 prototype Edge Localized Modes control coils (ELM CC) for Joint European Torus (JET). The ELM coils comprised of winding pack made of CuCrZr conductor encased in Inconel 625 casing. The ELM control coils are designed in saddle coil configuration having toroidal and poloidal curves similar to that of JET vacuum vessel. ELM coil are in-vessels coils forming the primary boundary with torus vacuum which demands stringent requirement for its quality aspects. The dimensional accuracies of winding pack and casing are critical for its encasing and remote assembly inside vacuum vessel. The articulated arm co-ordinate measuring machine (AACMM) has been extensively used for dimensional metrology of ELM CC from winding to its encasing. The inspection methodology and procedures using noncontact technique for ELM CC with AACMM has been developed and established with extensive trials. The winding pack, their formers and final ELM control coils has been systematically investigated for their dimensional accuracies with AACMM. The effectiveness of AACMM based evaluation for quality control in fabrication of 1:1 prototype of ELM CC has been presented in this paper. (author)

  9. RWM control studies on RFX-mod with a limited set of active coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the results of resistive wall mode (RWM) control experiments using several sets of active coils are presented. The control effectiveness as a function of coil number and covered torus surface is studied in the RFX-mod device, thanks to the powerful and flexible MHD active control system. Active control is tried using similar coil number and size both in the reversed field pinch (RFP) and in the tokamak configurations, giving a good experimental set to exploit the differences between the two cases. The experimental results are compared with predictions by a new integrated simulator for closed loop RWM growth. The numerical tool couples, in a self-consistent way, a full 3D finite element description of the machine boundaries, a 2D toroidal model of RFP plasma stability and a model of the RFX-mod control system, producing an overall dynamic model cast in the state variable space. In this way a full dynamic flight simulator of RWM control experiments is implemented, where coil coverage and experimental proportional–integral–derivative gains are explored in simulations. Both in the performed experiments and in simulations wall mode active control is proven to be possible in both the configurations with a very reduced set of active control coils. (paper)

  10. Inductive Eigenmodes of a resistive toroidal surface in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it has been studied the Electro-Magnetic (EM) Eigenmodes, sufficiently slow as to legitimate the pre-Maxwell approximation of Maxwell's system (or inductive Eigenmodes), of a given smooth, toroidal-unknotted, electrically resistive surface Τ with given smooth (surface) resistivity 0 degree 3. Within the above limitations (to be made more precise), the geometry of Τ is arbitrary. With the eigenvalue associated with the generic Eigenmode being defined as the opposite of its logarithmic time-derivative, one expects that the resulting spectrum be discrete and strictly positive. It shall be interested into the degenerate case where Τ be cut (i.e. electrically broken) along one or more of its irreducible cycles. This case will be analyzed autonomously, rather than as a limit (for ρdegree → ∞ along the cuts) of the regular case. Without cuts, the Eigenproblem under consideration is nothing but the two-dimensional (2-dim) generalization of the classical case of a smooth, unknotted, electrically conductive, simple coil in infinite vacuum. Its analysis hinges on the classical potential theory, and turns out to be a special application of the linear, integrodifferential (elliptic) equation theory on a compact, multiply connected, 2-dim manifold. The attention and approach will be confined to strong (or classical) solutions, both in Τ and C Τ = R3 / Τ. This study is divided in two parts: a General Part (Sects 1 divided 4) is devoted to the case of generic Τ and ρdegree (within the convenient smoothness requirements), whereas a Special Part (Sects 5 divided 7) deals with the (more or less formal) discussion of a couple of particular cases (Τ ≡ a canonical torus), both of which with uniform ρdegree. Some propaedeutical/supplementary information is provided in a number of Appendices

  11. Optimal design of HTS magnets for a modular toroid-type 2.5 MJ SMES using multi-grouped particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is one of the promising power system applications of superconducting technology and has been actively researched and developed worldwide. Generally, there are three types of SMES-solenoid, multiple solenoid, and toroid. Among these types, toroid type seems to require more wires than solenoid type and multiple solenoid type at the same operating current. However toroid type reduces normal field in the wire and stray field dramatically because magnetic field is confined inside the coil. So, the total length of wire in the toroid type can be reduced in comparison with that in the solenoid type by increasing operating current. In this paper, a 2.5 MJ class SMES with HTS magnets of single solenoid, multiple solenoid and modular toroid type were optimized using a recently developed multi-modal optimization technique named multi-grouped particle swarm optimization (MGPSO). The objective of the optimization was to minimize the total length of HTS superconductor wires satisfying some equality and inequality constraints. The stored energy and constraints were calculated using 3D magnetic field analysis techniques and an automatic tetrahedral mesh generator. Optimized results were verified by 3D finite element method (FEM).

  12. Optimal design of HTS magnets for a modular toroid-type 2.5 MJ SMES using multi-grouped particle swarm optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Kwak, S.Y.; Seo, J.H. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.Y.; Park, S.H. [Korea Polytechnic University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, W.S. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.K. [Woosuk University (Korea, Republic of); Bae, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Sim, K.D.; Seong, K.C. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Jung, H.K. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Choi, K., E-mail: choidal@kpu.ac.k [Korea Polytechnic University (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, S. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is one of the promising power system applications of superconducting technology and has been actively researched and developed worldwide. Generally, there are three types of SMES-solenoid, multiple solenoid, and toroid. Among these types, toroid type seems to require more wires than solenoid type and multiple solenoid type at the same operating current. However toroid type reduces normal field in the wire and stray field dramatically because magnetic field is confined inside the coil. So, the total length of wire in the toroid type can be reduced in comparison with that in the solenoid type by increasing operating current. In this paper, a 2.5 MJ class SMES with HTS magnets of single solenoid, multiple solenoid and modular toroid type were optimized using a recently developed multi-modal optimization technique named multi-grouped particle swarm optimization (MGPSO). The objective of the optimization was to minimize the total length of HTS superconductor wires satisfying some equality and inequality constraints. The stored energy and constraints were calculated using 3D magnetic field analysis techniques and an automatic tetrahedral mesh generator. Optimized results were verified by 3D finite element method (FEM).

  13. Optimal design of HTS magnets for a modular toroid-type 2.5 MJ SMES using multi-grouped particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.; Kwak, S. Y.; Seo, J. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Park, S. H.; Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. K.; Bae, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sim, K. D.; Seong, K. C.; Jung, H. K.; Choi, K.; Hahn, S.

    2009-10-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is one of the promising power system applications of superconducting technology and has been actively researched and developed worldwide. Generally, there are three types of SMES-solenoid, multiple solenoid, and toroid. Among these types, toroid type seems to require more wires than solenoid type and multiple solenoid type at the same operating current. However toroid type reduces normal field in the wire and stray field dramatically because magnetic field is confined inside the coil. So, the total length of wire in the toroid type can be reduced in comparison with that in the solenoid type by increasing operating current. In this paper, a 2.5 MJ class SMES with HTS magnets of single solenoid, multiple solenoid and modular toroid type were optimized using a recently developed multi-modal optimization technique named multi-grouped particle swarm optimization (MGPSO). The objective of the optimization was to minimize the total length of HTS superconductor wires satisfying some equality and inequality constraints. The stored energy and constraints were calculated using 3D magnetic field analysis techniques and an automatic tetrahedral mesh generator. Optimized results were verified by 3D finite element method (FEM).

  14. Targeted polymer therapeutics with a coiled coil motif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert; Ulbrich, Karel; Bednárová, Lucie; Maloň, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Kabešová, Martina; Kovář, Marek

    Heraklion : University of Crete, 2012. s. 28. [BIONANOTOX 2012 - "Biomaterials and Bionanomaterials: Recent Problems and Safety Issues", Russian-Hellenic Symposium with International Participation and Young Scientists School /3./, Advanced Research Workshop on Nanotechnologies & Bioanalytical Advances for Improved Public Security and Enviromental Safety and Health. 06.05.2012-13.05.2012, Heraklion] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : drug carriers * coiled coil * HPMA Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  15. An overview on research developments of toroidal continuously variable transmissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As environmental protection agencies enact new regulations for automotive fuel economy and emission, the toroidal continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) keep on contribute to the advent of system technologies for better fuel consumption of automobiles with internal combustion engines (ICE). Toroidal CVTs use infinitely adjustable drive ratios instead of stepped gears to achieve optimal performance. Toroidal CVTs are one of the earliest patents to the automotive world but their torque capacities and reliability have limitations in the past. New developments and implementations in the control strategies, and several key technologies have led to development of more robust toroidal CVTs, which enables more extensive automotive application of toroidal CTVs. This paper concerns with the current development, upcoming and progress set in the context of the past development and the traditional problems associated with toroidal CVTs.

  16. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Savinov, V; Zheludev, N I

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving toroidal multipoles have been predicted to produce vector potential in the absence of electromagnetic fields. Existence of the toroidal response in metamaterials was recently demonstrated and is now a growing field of research. However, no direct analytical link has yet been established between the transmission and reflection of macroscopic electromagnetic media and toroidal dipole excitations. To address this essential gap in electromagnetic theory we have developed an analytical approach linking microscopic and macrosc...

  17. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    OpenAIRE

    Savinov, V.; Fedotov, V. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving...

  18. ATLAS barrel hadron tile calorimeter: spacers plates mass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we expose the main problems of the mass production of the so-called 'spacer plates' for the ATLAS Barrel Hadron Tile Calorimeter. We describe all practical solutions of these problems. Particularly we present the measurement procedures and calculation schemes we used for the spacers dimensions determination. The results of the calculations are presented

  19. Measurement Technology on 200 Liters Barrels of Radioactive Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Lei; SHAO; Jie-wen; LIU; Da-ming; LIU; Hong-bin; CHENG; Yi-mei; HE; Li-xia; ZHU; Li-qun

    2012-01-01

    <正>The measurement device on 200 liters barrel of radioactive waste is designed following the rule of orderly measurement automatically, by using the technology of non-destructive to measure the mass of radioactive waste produced from fuel cycle. Device objects as shown in Fig. 1, which consists of the

  20. Acquired double-barrel oesophagus in epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, R B; Warner, T F; Gilbert, E. F.; Pellet, J R

    1980-01-01

    An unusual case of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica with extensive stenosis, high perforation, and dissection of the oesophagus forming a "double-barrel" structure is described. Gastric epithelium found in the upper oesophagus is thought to be of metaplastic origin and caused by repeated minor trauma with repair.

  1. New results in meson spectroscopy from the crystal barrel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Recent observations by the Crystal Barrel experiment of two scalar resonances, f{sub o}(1365) and a{sub o}(1450) have allowed the authors to clarify the members of the scalar nonet. In addition, a third scalar, f{sub o}(1500), appears to be supernumerary, and is a candidate for the scalar glueball expected near 1500 MeV.

  2. 49 CFR 178.510 - Standards for wooden barrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.510 Standards for wooden barrels. (a) The... the purpose intended. (2) The body and heads must be of a design appropriate to the capacity and... as follows: (1) The wood used must be of good quality, straight-grained, well-seasoned and free...

  3. Deformation of Linked Polymer Coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董朝霞; 李明远; 吴肇亮; 林梅钦

    2003-01-01

    Linked polymer solution (LPS) is defined as the solution of linked polymer coils (LPCs) dispersed in water, composed of low concentration partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and aluminum citrate (crosslinker). In the work, the conformational changes of LPCs under different conditions were investigated by the methods of membrane filtering under low pressure, dynamic light scattering and core flooding experiments. The results showed that in some conditions the LPCs could be compressed mechanically to 1/158.5 of their original volume because of relatively lower HPAM cross-linking. The hydration property of LPCs was similar to that of normal polymer coils. The deformation of LPCs was more restricted than that of ordinary polymer coils under the flow shear stress or the shift of hydration equilibrium caused in the variation of the electrolyte concentration which is responsible for the effective plugging in the throats of porous media when LPCs are used for deep diverting.

  4. Dynamic equilibria and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in toroidal plasmas with non-uniform transport coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futatani, Shimpei; Bos, Wouter J. T. [LMFA-CNRS UMR 5509, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69134 Ecully (France); Morales, Jorge A. [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-05-15

    It can be shown that in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field induced by poloidal coils, combined with the electromagnetic field induced by a central solenoid, no static equilibrium is possible within the MHD description, as soon as non-zero resistivity is assumed. The resulting dynamic equilibrium was previously discussed for the case of spatially homogeneous resisitivity. In the present work, it is shown how a spatial inhomogeneity of the viscosity and resisitivity coefficients influences this equilibrium. Parameters in both the stable, tokamak-like regime and unstable, reversed field pinch-like regime are considered. It is shown that, whereas the magnitudes of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are strongly modified by the spatial variation of the transport coefficients, the qualitative flow behaviour remains largely unaffected.

  5. Design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a heavily contoured and very complex formed vessel that is specifically designed to allow for maximum plasma volume in a pure stellarator arrangement. The design of the facility incorporates an internal vessel that is closely fitted to the two helical field coils following the winding law theta = 1/6phi. Metallic seals have been incorporated throughout the system to minimize impurities. The vessel has been fabricated utilizing a comprehensive set of tooling fixtures specifically designed for the task of forming 6-mm stainless steel plate to the complex shape. Computer programs were used to develop a series of ribs that essentially form an internal mold of the vessel. Plates were press-formed with multiple compound curves, fitted to the fixture, and joined with full-penetration welds. 7 refs., 8 figs

  6. Cooling device of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium

  7. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp3 peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm−1) and that negligible amounts of the sp2 band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films

  8. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzo, G., E-mail: gianluca.spizzo@igi.cnr.it; Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association and Istituto Gas Ionizzati del CNR, Corso Stati Uniti, 4 35127 Padova (Italy); White, R. B. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O. [Institut für Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Cavazzana, R. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti, 4 35127 Padova (Italy); Ciaccio, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli studi di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  9. Electrical disruption in toroidal plasma of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial phase of ionization of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated using zero-dimensional model. The model describes the temporal evolution of plasma by spatial medium of particle density and temperature, on whole plasma volume. The energy and particle (electrons and ions) balance equations are considered. The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss involves ionization, Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating converter gives the initial voltage necessary to disruption. (M.C.K.)

  10. Plasma current resonance in asymmetric toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Catto, Peter J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The well-known singularity in the magnetic differential equation for plasma current in an asymmetric toroidal confinement system is resolved by including in the pressure tensor corrections stemming from finite Larmor radius. The result provides an estimate of the amplitude of spikes in the parallel current that occur on rational magnetic surfaces. Resolution of the singularity is shown to depend on both the ambipolarity condition—the requirement of zero surface-averaged radial current—and the form of the magnetic differential equation near the rational surface.

  11. Electric disruption in a hydrogen toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using a zero-dimensional model the ionizing initial phase of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated. The model consists on describing the plasma time evolution through the density and particle temperature space averaged on the plasma volume. The involved equations are energy and particles balance equations (electrons and ions). The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss is due to ionizing, processes of Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating transformer gives a initial voltage necessary to the breaking

  12. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  13. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  14. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques

  15. Pulsar Wind Nebulae with Thick Toroidal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroida...

  16. Burn control resulting from toroidal field ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhanced transport due to toroidal magnetic field ripple is proposed as a means of averting thermal runaway in a tokamak reactor in the post-ignition stage. A theoretical analysis applied to a typical reactor design reveals that peak-to-average edge ripple of the order of 2% is sufficient to terminate the thermal excursion at reasonable values of β without significantly increasing the difficulty of reaching ignition. These analytic predictions, which are shown to agree well with radial transport code results, suggest that a properly specified ripple is one way of achieving a controlled burn in tokamak reactors. (author)

  17. Continuum damping of ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A perturbation theory based on the two dimensional (2D) ballooning transform is systematically developed for ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). A formula, similar to the Fermi golden rule for decaying systems in quantum mechanics, is derived for the continuum damping rate of the TAE; the decay (damping) rate is expressed explicitly in terms of the coupling of the TAE to the continuum spectrum. Numerical results are compared with previous calculations. It is found that in some narrow intervals of the parameter mε the damping rate varies very rapidly. These regions correspond precisely to the root missing intervals of the numerical solution by Rosenbluth et al

  18. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak and...... communicate parallel with the nearest drift planes using parameterized velocities, the ion sound speed, Cs for the density equation and the Alfvén speed VA for the vorticity equation. Results show that a decrease of Alfvénic interaction of electric potential and current density leads to the expected radial...

  19. Toroidal fusion reactor design based on the reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.

    1978-07-01

    The toroidal reversed-field pinch (RFP) achieves gross equilibrium and stability with a combination of high shear and wall stabilization, rather than the imposition of tokamak-like q-constraints. Consequently, confinement is provided primarily by poloidal magnetic fields, poloidal betas as large as approximately 0.58 are obtainable, the high ohmic-heating (toroidal) current densities promise a sole means of heating a D-T plasma to ignition, and the plasma aspect ratio is not limited by stability/equilibrium constraints. A reactor-like plasma model has been developed in order to quantify and to assess the general features of a power system based upon RFP confinement. An ''operating point'' has been generated on the basis of this plasma model and a relatively detailed engineering energy balance. These results are used to generate a conceptual engineering model of the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR) which includes a general description of a 750 MWe power plant and the preliminary consideration of vacuum/fueling, first wall, blanket, magnet coils, iron core, and the energy storage/transfer system.

  20. Design of Radioactive Reference Barrels and Simulation Verification of Linear Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Shell source method was used to prepare radioactive reference barrel for the calibration of gamma scan device because filling method in normal ways produces "hot" points easily and decrease the safety in transportation of the barrel.

  1. Mouse barrel cortex functionally compensates for deprivation produced by neonatal lesion of whisker follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, P; Crane, A M; Smith, C B

    1993-12-01

    In the murine somatosensory pathway, the metabolic whisker map in barrel cortex derived with the autoradiographic deoxyglucose method is spatially in register with the morphological whisker map represented by the barrels. The barrel cortex of adult mice, in which we had removed three whisker follicles from the middle row of whiskers shortly after birth, contained a disorganized zone surrounded by enlarged barrels with partially disrupted borders. With the fully quantitative autoradiographic deoxyglucose method, we investigated in barrel cortex of such mice the magnitude and the pattern of metabolic responses evoked by the deflection of whiskers. Most remarkably, the simultaneous deflection of six whiskers neighbouring the lesion activated not only the territory of the corresponding barrels, but also the unspecifiable area intercalated between the clearly identified barrels. This metabolic whisker map, unpredictable from the morphological 'barrel' map, may reflect a functional compensation for the deficit in input. PMID:8124517

  2. 百千焦级高温超导环型SMES磁体设计研究%Design of hundred-kilojoule-class HTS toroidal SMES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何清; 窦建中; 周世平; 金涛; 唐跃进; 焦丰顺; 任丽; 李敬东; 石晶

    2012-01-01

    Toroidal SMES is the developing direction of HTS SMES. There have been many conceptual designs of HTS toroidal SMES, but whose energy storage capacities mainly concentrate on more than trillion joules. HTS toroidal SMES which have been constructed and tested in a power system only has an energy storage capacity of several kilo - joules. Considering that the development of HTS toroidal SMES is still at lab stage, this paper researched on the design of HTS toroidal SMES whose energy storage capacity was more the one hundred kilojoules by means of genetic algorithm ( GA) and FEM. The relationship between the number of unit coils n, inner diameter of unit coils d, the inner diameter of the toridal magnet D and the energy storage capacity E were discussed.%高温超导SMES磁体未来的发展方向是环型磁体,目前对高温超导环型SMES磁体的概念设计比较多,但储能量主要集中在兆焦级,真正制作完成并并网实验的储能量只有千焦级.文中立足高温超导环型SMES处于实验室研究阶段的现实,用遗传算法和有限元法结合的方法对百千焦级高温超导环型SMES磁体进行了设计研究,总结出了单元线圈数量n、单元线圈内直径d和环型磁体内直径D影响磁体储能量E的规律.

  3. Structural design and analysis for the ISX-C/ATF tokamak of the vacuum vessel, coil joints, and supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ISX-C/ATF is being designed as a test bed for advanced toroidal concepts. Because of numerous design concepts being evaluated, a flexible, easily changeable structural-design math-model was needed to afford quick evalution of the structural feasibility of the many proposed concepts. To satisfy this need, the NASTRAN Automated Multi-Stage Substructures technique was used to build a quick-changeable math model. This technique was especially needed because all the coils, first wall and diagnostic devices are to be supported by the vacuum vessel, requiring the entire structure to be analyzed as a system. Without the use of the substructuring technique, the required man hours and computer core would have made timely design analysis impossible. To illustrate the technique, the detailed design analysis of the concept Torsatron (with helical coils and T.F. coils) is presented

  4. A Hybrid Heating Method for the HT-7U Coils during Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting tokamak is a full-superconducting magnetically confined fusion device, The toroidal magnet system of HT-7U is a very important part of the device.In VPI (Vacuum-Pressure Impregnation) process the magnet coils must be heated and degassed before impregnating and must be heated to the gel temperature and then the curing temperature,and keep the two kinds of temperatures for a long period of time after impregnating. Thus the heating method of VPI is critical. In this paper, a hybrid method of combining the internal and external heating for the coils is analyzed, especially the possibility of the internal heating method is proved.

  5. Status of the structural design of superconducting magnets for the Large Coil Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reactor designs based on magnetic confinement will require the use of superconducting magnets to make them economically viable. For a tokamak fusion reactor, large magnetic field coils are required to produce a toroidal magnetic confinement volume. Although superconductors have been used for approximately 20 years, several requirements for their application in fusion reactors are beyond demonstrated technology in existing magnets. The Large Coil Program (LCP) is a research, development, and demonstration effort specifically for the advancement of the technologies involved in the production of large superconducting magnets. This paper presents a review of the status of the structural designs, analysis methods, and verification tests being performed by the participating LCP design teams in the US, Switzerland, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany. The significant structural mechanics concerns being investigated with the LCP are presented

  6. Applications of the Integrated-Blanket-Coil concept to the compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design of a compact fusion reactor is proposed based on the reversed field pinch and utilizing the ''Integrated-Blanket-Coil'' (IBC) concept. The IBC is applied to the toroidal field and divertor systems, with liquid metal used for cooling both the first wall and blanket. This simplifies the overall design by requiring only a single coolant cycle. In addition, safety is increased by eliminating any possible lithium-water interaction in the fusion power core. Finally, replacing conventional copper divertor coils with IBC components enhances tritium breeding and energy recovery. A generic problem with liquid metal coolants is their reduced heat transfer capabilities in magnetic fields. In this context, the use of liquid metal coolants may limit the allowable neutron wall loading to a value of 10 MW/m/sup 2/. Above this value it may be necessary to use water cooling for the first wall and divertor surfaces

  7. Shear strength of the ASDEX upgrade TF coil insulation: Rupture, fatigue and creep behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with the interlaminar shear strength of the insulation system for the 16 toroidal field (TF) coils of ASDEX upgrade. The interlaminar shear properties of the glass-epoxy insulation are primarily determined by the resin system (ARALDIT-F, HT 907, DZ 40) and its curing procedure. The pure resin was therefore tested first in tension. The results were taken into account for setting up the method of curing the TF coils. Shear tests of the complete glass-epopxy system were then conducted with tubular torque specimens providing a nearly homogeneous stress distribution. In particular, the influence of the amount of flexibilizer (5, 10, 15 parts of resin weight = PoW) on the rupture and fatigue strengths was assessed at a temperature T=60 C, as also was the temperature dependence of the creep rate (40 C, 60 C, 80 C). The results obtained are not based on safe statistics. Nevertheless, they show clear trends. (orig.)

  8. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Træholt, Chresten; Pedersen, N.F.; Rodriguez Zermeno, Victor Manuel

    An optimization approach of HTS coils in HTS synchronous machines (SM) is presented. The optimization is aimed at high power SM suitable for direct driven wind turbines applications. The optimization process was applied to a general radial flux machine with a peak air gap flux density of ~3T. The...

  9. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  10. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The ofly potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting torgidal magnets. It is found that the two general classificatigls of protectign methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which aldow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed

  11. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  12. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed

  13. Computational simulation of compact toroidal plasma formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following computational efforts are part of the MARAUDER (magnetically accelerated rings to achieve ultra-high directed energy and radiation) research program at the High Energy Plasma Division of the Weapons Laboratory. The program is investigating plasma toroids with magnetic fields similar to those of tokamaks. These fields confine the plasma between a pair of cylindrical conductors. The objective of the research is to first form such toroids and then compress and accelerate them. A 500 kJ capacitor bank will be used for the formation, and the 9 MJ Shiva Star will be used for acceleration. The first set of experiments and current computational work consider only the formation process. The computer program used for these simulations is MACH2. It is a two-dimensional MHD code and was originally developed by Mission Research Corporation under a Weapons Laboratory contract to support z-pinch research. MACH2 is an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code with an adaptive mesh capability. Its diffusion routines use a multigrid technique to accelerate convergence. Recently, a second-order advection scheme has been added

  14. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  15. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  16. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  17. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion with coils is an approximately 20% risk of reopening of the aneurysm as a result of coil impaction, dissolution of thrombus, or growth of the aneurysm and 10% of coiled patients need additional tre...

  18. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  19. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weijia; Campbell, A. M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-06-01

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  20. Performance of a Folded-Strip Toroidally Wound Induction Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Jack, Alan G.; Atkinson, Glynn J.; Mecrow, Barrie C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the measured experimental results from a four-pole toroidally wound induction machine, where the stator is constructed as a pre-wound foldable strip. It shows that if the machine is axially restricted in length, the toroidally wound induction machine can have substantially sho...