WorldWideScience

Sample records for barotrauma

  1. Barotrauma in Boeing 737 cabin crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortschot, H W; Oosterveld, W J

    1993-01-01

    Several aircrew members of a Boeing 737 aircraft were referred to our department because they suffered from a barotrauma. The fast rate of pressure change during the descent of a Boeing 737 aircraft, as compared to the Boeing 747, DC-10 and Airbus 310 aircrafts, is most likely the cause of the development of the barotraumata.

  2. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components.

  3. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    OpenAIRE

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a pa...

  4. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenal Nitin Gulve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components.

  5. Barotrauma ocular durante mergulho autônomo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Abalem de Sá

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Relato de um caso de barotrauma ocular bilateral relacionado ao mergulho autônomo, com hemorragia conjuntival e periocular. Alguns conceitos de física e cuidados durante o mergulho são reportados para um melhor entendimento da fisiopatogenia do quadro, de modo que se possa melhor orientar os pacientes quanto à prevenção.

  6. Upper respiratory infections and barotrauma among commercial pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, Nina Monrad; Klokker, Mads

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health incapacitation is a serious threat to flight safety. Therefore, a study conducted 10 yr ago examined the incidents of ear-nose-throat (ENT) barotrauma and upper respiratory infection (URI) among commercial pilots and found that a large number continued to carry out their duties...

  7. Delayed Diagnosis of Pharyngeal Perforation following Exploding Tyre Blast Barotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Field

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pharyngoesophageal perforation secondary to barotrauma is a rare phenomenon that can have serious complications if identified late. It is challenging to detect due to nonspecific symptoms. We present a case in which detection proved difficult leading to delayed diagnosis. Case Report. A 27-year-old mechanic presented with haemoptysis, dysphonia, and odynophagia after a car tyre exploded in his face. Flexible nasoendoscopy (FNE revealed blood in the pharynx, thought to represent mucosal haemorrhage. Initial treatment consisted of IV dexamethasone and antibiotics. After 3 days, odynophagia persisted prompting a CT scan. This revealed a defect in the posterior hypopharynx and surgical emphysema in the deep neck tissues. Contrast swallow confirmed posterior hypopharyngeal leak. NG feeding was commenced until repeated contrast swallow confirmed resolution of the defect. Discussion. Prompt nonsurgical management of pharyngoesophageal perforation has good outcomes but untreated perforation can have serious complications. FNE should be performed routinely, but only a contrast swallow can diagnose a functional perforation. Clinicians should have a high index of clinical suspicion when patients present with barotrauma and odynophagia. Patients should be kept nil by mouth until perforation has been excluded. Conclusion. When faced with cases of facial barotrauma, clinicians should have a low threshold for further imaging to exclude pharyngoesophageal perforation.

  8. The effects of barotrauma on five species of South African line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the effects of barotrauma on five commercially important species: roman Chrysoblephus laticeps, silver kob Argyrosomus inodorus, hottentot Pachymetopon blochii, santer Cheimerius nufar and carpenter Argyrozona argyrozona. A classification of the external signs of barotrauma was developed and ...

  9. [Massive pneumoperitoneum in a newborn with mechanical ventilation in apparent absence of barotrauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Naharro, J; Ayuso Velasco, R; Blesa Sánchez, E

    2014-10-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is usually secondary to perforation of gastrointestinal tract. Sometimes it is a barotrauma, especially in newborn infants undergoing mechanical ventilation, causing lung rupture and passage of air from airway into the peritoneum through the mediastinum. It seems less likely that the pneumoperitoneum occurs in a patient undergoing mechanical ventilation, in the absence of a demonstrable barotrauma and a bowel perforation. We present a preterm patient who, on her third day of life, while being subjected to mechanical ventilation, reports a massive pneumoperitoneum with the apparent absence of barotrauma. After the drainage of the peritoneal cavity, the pneumoperitoneum disappears in two days, without laparotomy. The subsequent evolution is favourable.

  10. Safety of Performing Percutaneous Dilational Tracheostomy in Patients with Preexisting Barotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau-Chyun Sheu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1985 by Ciaglia et al, percutaneous dilational tracheostomy (PDT has gradually become the procedure of choice in establishing a long-term airway in many intensive care units (ICU. However, the safety of performing PDT in patients with barotrauma is still unknown and has never been reported. We present the case of a 35-year-old man with AIDS, who was admitted to our medical ICU for pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. He developed subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum as complications of mechanical ventilation. After stabilization of the barotrauma, he underwent PDT with the standard Ciaglia Blue Rhino technique. However, rapid and extensive progression of preexisting barotrauma occurred shortly after PDT. This severe complication was nearly fatal. The prolonged procedure during which the susceptible lung was exposed to longer duration of high airway pressure was thought to be the mechanism of rapid deterioration of the preexisting barotrauma. With aggressive supportive care, the patient survived. To prevent further deterioration of preexisting barotrauma during and after PDT in future cases, we propose some principles that should be strictly followed. Under administration of these principles, we safely performed PDT in another case with preexisting barotrauma 1 month later.

  11. Vulnerability of larval and juvenile white sturgeon to barotrauma: can they handle the pressure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S.; Cook, Katrina V.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Johnson, Rachelle C.; McLellan, Jason; Linley, Timothy J.; Gao, Yong; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Dowell, Frederick E.; Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.

    2013-07-01

    Techniques were developed to determine which life stages of fish are vulnerable to barotrauma from expansion of internal gases during decompression. Eggs, larvae and juvenile hatchery-reared white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus; up to 91 days post hatch; dph), were decompressed to assess vulnerability to barotrauma and identify initial swim bladder inflation. Barotrauma related injury and mortality were first observed 9 dph, on the same day as initial exogenous feeding. However, barotrauma related injury did not occur again until swim bladder inflation 75 dph (visible from necropsy and x-ray radiographs). Swim bladder inflation was not consistent among individuals, with only 44% being inflated 91 dph. Additionally, swim bladder inflation did not appear to be size dependent among fish ranging in total length from 61-153 mm at 91 dph. The use of a combination of decompression tests and x-ray radiography was validated as a method to determine initial swim bladder inflation and vulnerability to barotrauma. Extending these techniques to other species and life history stages would help to determine fish susceptibility to hydroturbine passage and aid in fish conservation.

  12. Middle ear barotrauma causing transient facial nerve paralysis after scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Matthew Lee; Boyev, K Paul

    2016-12-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is a well known entity with typical injury occurring when diving or ascending in a commercial jetliner. Patients often present with symptoms of acute onset otalgia, hearing loss and sometimes haemotympanum (with or without tympanic membrane perforation). On rare occasions, facial nerve paralysis can occur when the tympanic segment of the facial nerve is dehiscent within the middle ear. We present a case of spontaneously resolving facial nerve palsy associated with middle ear barotrauma following a brief, shallow dive. Prompt and astute diagnosis leads to proper management with simple myringotomy and can prevent unnecessary testing and other misguided treatments.

  13. Barodontalgias, dental and orofacial barotraumas: a survey in Swiss divers and caisson workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotta, Cristina; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Nussberger, Peter; Waltimo, Tuomas; Filippi, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Changing ambient pressure can lead to medical conditions in body cavities filled with air. Intraoral pain elicited by changes in pressure is referred to as barodontalgia. Dental barotraumas are defined as pressure-induced damages of teeth and restorations. The pathophysiologic background so far is not completely clear. The present study deals with dental and orofacial symptoms which can occur as a result of pressure variations. With the aid of cantonal administrations, diving associations, and tunnel construction firms, 520 pressure-exposed individuals (499 scuba/ professional divers, 21 caisson workers operating at excess pressure) were questioned regarding dental problems. A personal interview was conducted with affected individuals. Problems in the dental area were experienced by 15% of all respondents. Toothaches were suffered by 10.2% of the participants. Tooth injuries occurred in 6.3% of all interviewees (26 fractured amalgam restorations, 4 crown fractures, 3 losses of tooth fragments). A proportion of 11.3% among the respondents complained about temporomandibular joint problems or mucosal irritations (for example aphthae) related to the mouthpieces. Barotraumas outside the dental area were incurred by 31.9% of the divers. Of these, 69.9% concerned the ears and 65.6% occurred during the descent. Based on the results obtained from the survey and taking into account the current literature, recommendations for the prevention of barotraumas in divers and caisson workers were prepared. Diagnostic exclusion of dental pathologies and avoidance of retentive reconstruction materials are important factors for the prevention of barodontalgias and dental barotraumas.

  14. Cardioplegia cristalóide, barotrauma e função endotelial: considerações experimentais Crystalloid cardioplegia, barotrauma and endothelium function: experimental considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto B Évora

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente ensaio experimental estudou o efeito da infusão de solução cardioplégica cristalóide a altas pressões sobre a função endotelial de artérias epicárdicas de cães. Não se encontraram alterações a nível de receptores (curvas dose-respostas à ACH e ADP; da transdução do sinal iniciado nos receptores/sitema de G-proteínas (fluoreto de sódio e nos processos intracelulares da produção de EDRF/ NO (fosfolipase C e ionóforo do cálcio A23187. A função da musculatura lisa vascular não foi afetada quando se analisaram as respostas relaxantes (nitroprussiato de sódio e isoproterenol e contrateis (KCI e prostaglandina 2alfa. Estes achados permitem as seguintes considerrações especulativas: a O barotrauma produzido pela infusão da cardioplegia cristalóide a altas pressões ocorreria apenas em circulações coronarianas previamente doentes? b Uma vez que as infusões duraram de 2 a 3 minutos, seria o barotrauma coronariano um fenômeno dependente do tempo de infusão? c Para que ocorra o barotrauma seriam necessários níveis mais elevados de potássio? d Questionar a existência do fenômeno do barotrauma coronariano produzido pela infusão de soluções cadioplégicas pelo menos nas condições experimentais utilizadas, e A metodologia empregada estuda apenas as reatividades vasculares de artérias coronárias epicárdicas. Estas artérias seriam menos sensíveis aos efeitos da pressão de infusão da cardioplegia do que a microcirculação coronariana? f Seria a circulação coronária do cão menos sensível a altas pressões do que do homem? Estas observações experimentais sugerem que a infusão de cardioplegia cristalóide, moderadamente hipocalêmica, a altas pressõe em um tempo de 2 a 3 minutos, não interfere com a produção de EDRF/NO pelo endotélio de coronárias epicárdicas do cão.Experiments were performed in "organ chambers" to investigate if high pressures infusions of crystalloid cardioplegia

  15. Understanding barotrauma in fish passing hydro structures: a global strategy for sustainable development of water resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Boys, Craig A.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Silva, Luiz G.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Phonekhampeng, Oudom; Thorncraft, Garry; Singhanouvong, Douangkham

    2014-03-24

    Freshwater fishes are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates and species declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic influences. This is alarming as the diversity and stability of populations are at risk. In addition, freshwater fish serve as important protein sources, particularly in developing countries. One of the focal activities thought to influence freshwater fish population declines is water resource development, which is anticipated to increase over the next several decades. For fish encountering hydro structures, such as passing through hydroturbines, there may be a rapid decrease in pressure which can lead to injuries commonly referred to as barotraumas. The authors summarize the research to date that has examined the effects of rapid pressure changes on fish and outline the most important factors to consider (i.e., swim bladder morphology, depth of acclimation, migration pattern and life stage) when examining the susceptibility of barotraumas for fish of interest.

  16. Gastro-esophageal barotrauma in diving: similarities with Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novomeský, F

    1999-01-01

    Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) is a well-defined entity in clinical medicine. However, the development of such a syndrome as a result of overpressure barotrauma of the stomach after repeated shallow-water scuba dives is rare. Also rare is the delayed onset of the MWS, approximately 20 hours after the dives. The causes of development of MWS in connection with scuba diving are discussed. The main causes seem to be the repeated changes of gas volume in the stomach with subsequent pressure forces toward the cardia in the course of repeated dives. The possibility of serious diving accident due to overpressure barotrauma of gastro-intestinal system is also pointed out.

  17. A Preliminary Assessment of Barotrauma Injuries and Acclimation Studies for Three Fish Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walker, Ricardo W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Fish that pass hydro structures either through turbine passage, deep spill, or other deep pathways can experience rapid decreases in pressure that can result in barotrauma. In addition to morphology and physiology of the fish’s swim bladder, the severity of barotrauma is directly related to the volume of undissolved gas in fish prior to rapid decompression and the lowest pressure the fish experience as they pass hydro structures (termed the “nadir”). The volume of undissolved gas in fish is influenced by the depth of acclimation (the pressure at which the fish is neutrally buoyant); therefore, determining the depth where fish are neutrally buoyant is a critical precursor to determining the relationship between pressure changes and injury or mortality.

  18. Comparative Study of Barotrauma Risk during Fish Passage through Kaplan Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Hydrology Group; Romero-Gomez, Pedro [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Hydrology Group; Serkowski, John A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Hydrology Group; Rakowski, Cynthia L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Hydrology Group; Graf, Michael J. [Voith Hydro, York, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Rapid pressure changes in hydroelectric turbine flows can cause barotrauma that can be hazardous to the passage of fish, in particular migratory juvenile salmonids. Although numerous laboratory tests have evaluated the effect of rapid decompression in fish species of relevance, numerical modeling studies offer the advantage of predicting, for new turbine designs, the potential risks of mortality and injury from rapid pressure change during turbine passage. However, rapid pressure change is only one of several hydraulic risks encountered by fish during turbine passage in addition to blade strike, shear, and turbulence. To better understand the role of rapid pressure changes, the present work focuses on the application of a computational fluid dynamics based method for evaluating the risk of pressure-related mortality to fish passing through an early 1960s era original hydroelectric Kaplan turbine at Wanapum Dam (Columbia River, Washington), and a modern advanced Kaplan turbine installed in 2005. The results show that the modeling approach acceptably reproduced the nadir pressure distributions compared to field data previously collected at the site using an autonomous sensor. Our findings show that the new advanced-design unit performs better, in terms of reduced barotrauma risk to fish from exposure to low pressures, than the original turbine unit. The outcomes allow for comparative analyses of turbine designs and operations prior to installation, an advantage that can potentially be integrated in the process of designing new turbine units to achieve superior environmental performance. Overall, the results show that modern turbine designs can achieve the multiple objectives of increasing power generation, lowering cavitation potential, and reducing barotrauma risks to passing fish.

  19. Effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep release on postrelease mortality of Lake Trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elizabeth L.; Fredericks, Jim P.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Unaccounted postrelease mortality violates assumptions of many fisheries studies, thereby biasing parameter estimates and reducing efficiency. We evaluated effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep-release treatment on postrelease mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Lake trout were captured at depths up to 65 m with gill nets in Priest Lake, Idaho, and held in a large enclosure for 10–12 d. Postrelease mortality was the same for surface-release–and deep-release–treated fish (41%). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of intrinsic and environmental factors on the probability of mortality. Presence of gill-net trauma and degree of barotrauma were associated with increased probability of postrelease mortality. Smaller fish were also more likely to suffer postrelease mortality. On average, deep-release treatment did not reduce postrelease mortality, but effectiveness of treatment increased with fish length. Of the environmental factors evaluated, only elapsed time between lifting the first and last anchors of a gill-net gang (i.e., lift time) was significantly related to postrelease mortality. Longer lift times, which may allow ascending lake trout to acclimate to depressurization, were associated with lower postrelease mortality rates. Our study suggests that postrelease mortality may be higher than previously assumed for lake trout because mortality continues after 48 h. In future studies, postrelease mortality could be reduced by increasing gill-net lift times and increasing mesh size used to increase length of fish captured.

  20. A double-blind comparison between oral pseudoephedrine and topical oxymetazoline in the prevention of barotrauma during air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J S; Sheffield, W; White, L J; Bloom, M A

    1998-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of two decongestants (oral pseudoephedrine versus topical oxymetazoline) in the prevention of middle ear barotrauma during air travel, 150 adult volunteers with a history of ear pain during air travel were entered into a randomized, double-blind study conducted at two commercial airports. Each subject received 120 mg pseudoephedrine, oxymetazoline hydrochloride (0.05%), or a double placebo (capsule and nasal spray) administered 30 minutes before flight departure. After arrival at their final destinations, volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire and return it by mail to investigators. Questions included the intensity and duration of otologic symptoms experienced while flying and possible drug side effects. A total of 124 subjects completed the study; 41 received 120 mg of pseudoephedrine, 42 received oxymetazoline nasal spray, and 41 received a double placebo (capsule and nasal spray). The three treatment groups were similar with regard to age, sex, medical history, and flight profile. Symptoms of barotrauma were reported by 34% of those receiving pseudoephedrine versus 71% of the control group, for a relative risk reduction of 52% (95% confidence interval [CI] 33% to 71%). In contrast, 64% of the oxymetazoline group reported symptoms of barotrauma, for a relative risk reduction of 10% (95% CI, 3% to 17%). These results suggest that treatment with 120 mg pseudoephedrine at least 30 minutes before flying appears to decrease the incidence of barotrauma. Oxymetazoline nasal spray is little more effective than placebo in reducing ear pain and discomfort associated with changing ambient pressures.

  1. Ear barotrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as flying, scuba diving, or driving in the mountains. If you have a congested nose from allergies, ... to Contact a Medical Professional Try home care measures first. Call your provider if the discomfort does ...

  2. Nasopharyngeal cancer mimicking otitic barotrauma in a resource-challenged center: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adekunle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nasopharyngeal cancer commonly manifests with cervical lymphadenopathy, recurrent epistaxis and progressive nasal obstruction. Neuro-ophthalmic and otologic manifestations can also occur. Isolated otologic presentations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare and the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer may not be foremost in the list of differentials. Case presentation We present the case of a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with bilateral conductive hearing loss and tinnitus after air travel. There were no other symptoms. The persistence of the symptoms after adequate treatment for otitic barotrauma necessitated re-evaluation, which led to a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer. Conclusion Isolated otologic manifestations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare in regions with low incidence of the disease. There is a need for it to be considered as a possible differential in patients presenting with bilateral serous otitis media.

  3. Death from Barotrauma Due to Compressed Air: A Medico-legal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Pasquale; Massoni, Francesco; Crisci, Antonello; Ricci, Serafino

    2016-11-01

    Lesions of the digestive tract due to barotrauma resulting from compressed air application are not common, are rarely lethal, and largely affect the sigmoid and descending colon. Moreover, their pathogenic mechanism is a topic of discussion because these lesions have multiple characteristics. Here, the authors describe an autoptic case of death from lesions of the ascending and transverse segments, with perforations and bleeding suffusions as well as ischemic areas covered the colonic wall that was extremely thinned, congested, and hemorrhagic, with considerable flattening leading to disappearance of the mucosal folds and with numerous petechial hemorrhages. The pathological framework of lung congestion made it possible to identify the mechanism responsible for this death as depletion of the heart's pumping function, which contributed significantly to the acute respiratory failure due to respiratory distress as well as to reduced mobility of the diaphragm due to intestinal distension. Acute heart failure played an important role in this death. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Barotrauma em peixes em usinas hidrelétricas: ferramentas para o estudo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do Vale Beirao, Bernardo; Castelo Branco Marciano, Natlia; de Souza Dias, Luma; Carvalho Falco, Ricardo; Wander Dias, Edson; Leite Fabrino, Daniela; Barreira Martinez, Carlos; Martins Da Silva, Luiz Gustavo; Walker, Ricardo W.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2015-09-30

    The main source of electric power generation in Brazil comes from hydropower plants, nevertheless, the installed power is expected to raise 56.8%, reaching a total of 116,000 MW at the year 2020. The increase at the hydroelectric sector will be responsible for a series of fish community impacts. One of the impacts over the fish community is related to fish kills due to downstream passage through turbines or fish entrance at the draft tube from the tailrace. Usually when there is a maneuver and the turbine stops, fish get attracted and enter the draft tube and, just as the downstream passage through a turbine, when the turbine starts, a rapid decompression occurs and can cause barotrauma. When such events happen, according to Boyle’s law (P1V1=P2V2), swim bladder volume expands at the same rate that the pressure decreases, which can lead to the organ’s rupture.

  5. Peripheral neuropathy may increase the risk for asymptomatic otic barotrauma during hyperbaric oxygen therapy: research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzanowski, Christopher; Perdrizet, George A

    2014-01-01

    Otic barotrauma (OBT) is an adverse event seen in patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy. After encountering a case of painless tympanic perforation during HBO2 therapy of a diabetic patient with the diagnosis of neuropathic Wagner Grade III foot ulcer, we hypothesized that peripheral neuropathy of the lower extremity may be associated with an increased risk of asymptomatic OBT during HBO2 therapy. The medical records of all HBO2 patients during a one-year period of time were reviewed. Subjects were selected based on otoscopic documentation of OBT and divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of lower extremity peripheral neuropathy. Time to therapeutic compression, presence or absence of ear-related symptoms and modified Teed (mTeed) scores were compared between the two groups. A total of 38 patients with OBT, 18 neuropathic and 20 non-neuropathic, were identified. Asymptomatic OBT occurred more frequently in the neuropathic vs. non-neuropathic group (56% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). mTeed scores were significantly greater in the neuropathic vs. non-neuropathic group (mTeed 1, 30% vs. 61%; mTeed 2, 65% vs. 36%; mTeed 3, 4% vs. 3%; p = 0.032). Mean compression times were shorter in the neuropathic vs. non-neuropathic group (10. 5 +/- 1.8 vs. 14.4 +/- 3.3 minutes, p < 0.001). The presence of peripheral neuropathy of the lower extremity may be associated with a significantly greater incidence of asymptomatic otic barotrauma during HBO2 therapy.

  6. Ruptura gástrica por barotrauma Barogenic rupture of the stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Severo de Camargo Pereira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A ruptura gástrica por barotrauma é uma causa rara de abdome agudo perfurativo, sendo geralmente tratada por laparotomia e rafia primária da lesão. Nas reanimações cardiopulmonares pode ocorrer 9 a 12% de lesões de mucosa gástrica. RELATO DO CASO: Mulher no 5º dia de puerpério necessitou intubação orotraqueal devido à pneumonia hospitalar. Após procedimento evoluiu com distensão abdominal importante, associada a sinais de choque séptico. Após radiografia simples de abdome foi constado pneumoperitôneo. Submetida à laparotomia exploradora evidenciou-se ruptura de pequena curvatura gástrica de 7 cm. O tratamento da lesão foi com sutura primária. Recebeu alta no 14º do pós operatório após término do tratamento para pneumonia. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar de rara, a ruptura gástrica por barotrauma deve ser sempre aventada quando após reanimação cardiopulmonar houver distensão abdominal refratária à sondagem naso-gástrica.BACKGROUND: Barogenic rupture of the stomach is a rare cause of acute perforated abdomen generally treated by laparotomy and primary wound suture. The lesion of gastric mucosa may occur during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in 9 to 12% of cases. CASE REPORT: Woman was intubated in the fifth day of delivery due to nosocomial pneumonia. She underwent to abdominal distension associated to septic shock signs after the procedure. The abdominal X-ray showed pneumoperitoneum. She was submitted to laparotomy and a 7 cm rupture in the gastric small curvature was found. The lesion was treated by primary suture. The patient was discharged 14 days after the surgery, in the ending of pneumonia treatment. CONCLUSION: Besides rare, barogenic gastric rupture must be inquired when after cardiopulmonary resuscitation the patient presents abdominal distension ovenproof to nasogastric tube.

  7. Unilateral optic neuropathy from possible sphenoidal sinus barotrauma after recreational scuba diving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, David J; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 35-year-old woman who developed a progressive right optic neuropathy while surfacing from a series of four recreational dives on the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. The patient reported severe sudden onset blurred vision in the right eye associated with a mild headache and epistaxis on surfacing from diving. The patient had her first medical review the day after returning from her trip. At this time visual acuity in the right eye was 20/80, with left eye 20/20. There was a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. A high-resolution computed tomography scan showed fluid in the right sphenoid sinus. Computed perimetry revealed patchy visual field loss in the right eye. The provisional diagnosis of sphenoidal sinus barotrauma-induced optic neuropathy was made. Over 10 days of observation, the visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye and visual field changes resolved. This case highlights a very unusual cause of visual loss associated with diving.

  8. Inner Ear Barotrauma After Underwater Pool Competency Training Without the Use of Compressed Air Case and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Sean; Boujie, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear barotrauma can occur when the gas-filled chambers of the ear have difficulty equalizing pressure with the outside environment after changes in ambient pressure. This can transpire even with small pressure changes. Hypobaric or hyperbaric environments can place significant stress on the structures of the middle and inner ear. If methods to equalize pressure between the middle ear and other connected gas-filled spaces (i.e., Valsalva maneuver) are unsuccessful, middle ear overpressurization can occur. This force can be transmitted to the fluid-filled inner ear, making it susceptible to injury. Damage specifically to the structures of the vestibulocochlear system can lead to symptoms of vertigo, hearing loss, and tinnitus. This article discusses the case of a 23-year-old male Marine who presented with symptoms of nausea and gait instability after performing underwater pool competency exercises to a maximum depth of 13 feet, without breathing compressed air. Diagnosis and management of inner ear barotrauma are reviewed, as is differentiation from inner ear decompression sickness. 2016.

  9. Assessment of Barotrauma Resulting from Rapid Decompression of Depth Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radio Telemetry Transmitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Theriault, Marie-Helene

    2007-09-06

    A multifactor study was conducted by Battelle for the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess the significance of the presence of a radio telemetry transmitter on the effects of rapid decompression from simulated hydro turbine passage on depth acclimated juvenile run-of-the-river Chinook salmon. Study factors were: (1) juvenile chinook salmon age;, subyearling or yearling, (2) radio transmitter present or absent, (3) three transmitter implantation factors: gastric, surgical, and no transmitter, and (4) four acclimation depth factors: 1, 10, 20, and 40 foot submergence equivalent absolute pressure, for a total of 48 unique treatments. Exposed fish were examined for changes in behavior, presence or absence of barotrauma injuries, and immediate or delayed mortality. Logistic models were used to test hypotheses that addressed study objectives. The presence of a radio transmitter was found to significantly increase the risk of barotrauma injury and mortality at exposure to rapid decompression. Gastric implantation was found to present a higher risk than surgical implantation. Fish were exposed within 48 hours of transmitter implantation so surgical incisions were not completely healed. The difference in results obtained for gastric and surgical implantation methods may be the result of study design and the results may have been different if tested fish had completely healed surgical wounds. However, the test did simulate the typical surgical-release time frame for in-river telemetry studies of fish survival so the results are probably representative for fish passing through a turbine shortly following release into the river. The finding of a significant difference in response to rapid decompression between fish bearing radio transmitters and those not implies a bias may exist in estimates of turbine passage survival obtained using radio telemetry. However, the rapid decompression (simulated turbine passage) conditions used for the study represented near worst case exposure

  10. Trans-anal barotrauma by compressed air leading to sigmoid perforation due to a dangerous practical joke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Kumar, Awanish; Srivastava, Rohit; Rai, Anurag

    2012-08-01

    To present a case report of trans-anal barotrauma by high-pressure compressed air jet as a dangerous practical joke, that is, playful insufflation of high-pressure air jet through the anal orifice resulting in sigmoid perforation. The patient presented to emergency a day later with complaints of severe pain in the abdomen and abdominal distension following insufflation of high-pressure air jet through the anus. On examination, he had signs suggestive of perforation peritonitis and x-ray of the abdomen showed gas under the diaphragm. An emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed which revealed a 4-cm perforation in the sigmoid colon. Resection of the segment containing perforation along with the surrounding devitalised part was done with double-barrel colostomy. Reversal of colostomy was done after 8 weeks. Follow-up was uneventful.

  11. Divergent expression of α-ENaC in middle ear mucosa in the course of otitis media with effusion induced by barotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji; Zong, Yu; Li, Xiangcui; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    Gene transcription and protein expression of α-ENaC showed a divergent expression in association with the development of OME induced by barotrauma. ENaC was identified to mediate the fluid absorption through epithelia of the middle ear. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of ENaC in otitis media with effusion (OME) induced by barotrauma. A rat model of otitis media with effusion was established using a pressure cabin. The dynamic expression of α-ENaC was detected by Real time-PCR and western blot in the course of otitis media. Compared with the control, the volume of α-ENaC mRNA and protein increased significantly by 3.18-fold and 2.8-fold on the 3(rd) day, respectively, while decreased by 0.54-fold and 0.32-fold on the 7(th) day, respectively.

  12. Use of the nine-step inflation/deflation test and resting middle-ear pressure range as predictors of middle-ear barotrauma in aircrew members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A; Abousetta, A

    2014-07-01

    To explore the role of the nine-step inflation/deflation tympanometric test and resting middle-ear pressure range as predictors of barotrauma in aircrew members. A prospective, non-randomised study was conducted on 100 aircrew members. Resting middle-ear pressure was measured and the nine-step inflation/deflation test performed on all subjects before flights. Subjects were allocated to two groups according to resting middle-ear pressure range (group A, within the range of +26 to +100 and -26 to -100 mmH2O; group B, -25 to +25 mmH2O). All aircrew members were assessed after flights regarding the presence and the grade of barotrauma. In both groups, the sensitivity and specificity values of the entire post-inflation/deflation test were close to those of the post-deflation part of the test. The post-deflation test had a higher negative predictive value than the post-inflation test. Ears with resting middle-ear pressure lower than -55 mmH2O experienced barotrauma, regardless of good or poor post-inflation or post-deflation test results. In an aircrew member, a resting middle-ear pressure within the range of -55 and +50 mmH2O, together with good post-deflation test results, are considered reliable predictors for fitness to fly.

  13. Barotrauma pulmonar no intra-operatório de procedimento cirúrgico oftalmológico: relato de caso Barotrauma pulmonar en el intraoperatorio de procedimiento quirúrgico oftalmológico: relato de caso Intraoperative pulmonary barotrauma during ophthalmologic surgery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affonso Henrique Zugliani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Acidentes anestésicos graves por mau funcionamento de ventiladores mecânicos tornaram-se raros nos tempos atuais. Porém, detalhes técnicos, mesmo em aparelhos de fabricação recente, podem resultar em armadilhas para o anestesiologista e ameaçar a segurança do paciente. O objetivo deste relato de caso foi enfatizar a necessidade de análise criteriosa do material em uso, assim como de detectar e tratar o pneumotórax hipertensivo intra-operatório. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino, 16 anos, estado físico ASA I, submetida a recobrimento conjuntival de córnea sob anestesia geral. A manutenção foi feita com isoflurano e ventilação controlada mecânica. A anestesia transcorreu sem anormalidades. Na fase final do procedimento cirúrgico, após mobilização do aparelho de anestesia para o início do procedimento de despertar, observou-se quadro de hipóxia, hipotensão arterial e dificuldade ventilatória. Retirados os campos cirúrgicos, evidenciou-se importante enfisema subcutâneo, envolvendo a face, o pescoço e o membro superior. Procedeu-se à troca da cânula traqueal, observando-se a presença de sangue em seu interior. A radiografia de tórax confirmou o diagnóstico de pneumotórax, que foi prontamente drenado. A inspeção no equipamento revelou acotovelamento da mangueira que liga a região inferior do canister ao corpo do aparelho, em função da mobilização do braço articulado, bloqueando o fluxo normal de gases e levando a barotrauma pulmonar. CONCLUSÕES: O pneumotórax hipertensivo durante anestesia geral com ventilação com pressão positiva deve ser sempre um acidente a ser considerado. Múltiplos fatores podem precipitá-lo, o que exige alto grau de suspeição sempre que estiverem envolvidos no ato anestésico-cirúrgico. O equipamento de anestesia deve ser cuidadosamente examinado para que sejam detectadas potenciais causas de acidentes anestésicos.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS

  14. AFSC/ABL: Rockfish Barotrauma

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Because rockfish (Sebastes spp.) are physoclystic, i.e. their gas bladders are closed off from the gut, they often suffer internal injuries from rapid, internal air...

  15. Description of an eye barotrauma in scuba diving with clinical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Barreiros

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report and discuss a scuba diving accident caused by compression of the mask at a depth of 9.1 m resulting in conjunctiva haemorrhage of both eyes in a 21-year-old male. After five weeks and benefiting from immediate post-accident medical attention and medication followed by ophthalmologic examinations the patient recovered with no chronic effects neither in vision nor in the eyes.

  16. [Abdominal compartment syndrome by tension pneumoperitoneum secondary to barotrauma. Presentation case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santos, Esther; Puerto-Puerto, Alejandro; Sánchez-García, Susana; Ruescas-García, Francisco Javier; Alberca-Páramo, Ana; Martín-Fernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is defined as the existence of extraluminal air in the abdominal cavity. In 80-90% of cases is due to perforation of a hollow organ. However, in 10-15% of cases, it is nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum. The case of a patient undergoing mechanical ventilation, developing abdominal compartment syndrome tension pneumoperitoneum is reported. Female, 75 years old asking for advise due to flu of long term duration. Given her respiratory instability, admission to the Intensive Care Unit is decided. It is then intubated and mechanically ventilated. Chest x-ray revealed a large pneumoperitoneum but no pneumothorax neither mediastinum; and due to the suspicion of viscera perforation with clinical instability secondary to intra-abdominal hypertension box, emergency surgery was decided. When discarded medical history as a cause of pneumoperitoneum, it is considered that ventilation is the most common cause. Benign idiopathic or nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum, can be be treated conservatively if the patient agrees. But if intraabdominal hypertension prevails, it can result in severe respiratory and hemodynamic deterioration, sometimes requiring abdominal decompression to immediately get lower abdominal pressure and thus improve hemodynamic function. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiological and Biochemical Neuroprotection in Cetaceans: Are Some Marine Mammal Species Safeguarded From Emboli Formation and Barotrauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    carrying globin proteins (hemoglobin, cytoglobin and neuroglobin) in the brain (both sensory and cognitive areas) of a wide variety of terrestrial...trained bottlenose dolphins during sedentary and active periods underwater. Together these studies will enable us to determine if some marine mammal...tests. Tests with bottlenose dolphins trained to dive at varying depths and during different exercise states are assessing the variability in

  18. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  19. CURRENT APPROACH TO SINUSITIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Viral infection. Allergy. Barotrauma. Deviated nasal septum. Nasal polyps. Tumour. Nasal packing. Nasogastric tube. Foreign bodies. Table II. Factors predisposing to sinusitis. Allergy. Smoking. Asthma and aspirin sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus. Immotile cilia, i.e. Kartagener's syndrome. Cystic fibrosis. Immunodeficiency.

  20. An unusual presentation of Boerhaave Syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Kelly, Fardod; Lim, Kheng Tian; Cooke, Fiachra; Ravi, Narayanasamy

    2009-01-01

    We present a unique case of Boerhaave Syndrome that may highlight the spectrum of barotrauma from a Mallory-Weiss tear to full-thickness perforation. In this case, perforation only became evident following air insufflation at endoscopy. PMID:19830042

  1. Neuromuscular paralysis for newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cools, F.; Offringa, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilated newborn infants breathing in asynchrony with the ventilator are at risk for complications during mechanical ventilation, such as pneumothorax or intraventricular hemorrhage, and are exposed to more severe barotrauma, which consequently could impair their clinical outcome.

  2. Long-lasting airplane headache in a patient with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Z; Trauninger, A; Szanyi, I; Illes, Z

    2010-04-01

    The authors report long-lasting airplane headache in a patient with non-allergic, chronic rhinosinusitis. Association of mucosal inflammation with compromised sinonasal ventilation and sinus barotrauma created a base for not only the pain but also for the prolongation of symptoms. Effective therapy with antihistamine and nasal decongestant supports the theory that sinonasal barotrauma plays a triggering role in the pathophysiology of airplane headache.

  3. Scuba diving death: Always due to drowning? Two forensic cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, I; Pepe, F; Manno, M; Frati, P; Gratteri, S; Fineschi, V; Ricci, P

    2018-03-01

    Scuba diving is an increasingly common recreational activity. We describe the physiopathology of barotrauma in two cases where death was caused by pulmonary barotrauma while diving. An inspection and autopsy were carried out in both cases. The autopsy data were supported by post-mortem radiological investigation. Histological and toxicological analyses were also carried out, and dive computer and tank manometer analysis performed. In both cases, the cause of death was attributable to arterial gas embolism, resulting from pulmonary barotrauma subsequent to pulmonary over-distension. The dive computer analysis and the tank manometer allowed us to understand what happened underwater. In our opinion, a multidisciplinary approach is crucial in order to clarify the cause of death. Some pathological conditions and risk factors should be considered before diving.

  4. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Alveolar Hemorrhage After Scuba Diving: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  6. Shallow Water Diving - The NASA Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel; Kelsey-Seybold

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the problems and solutions that personnel have experienced during sessions in the Neutral Bu0yancy Lab (NBL). It reviews the standard dive that occurs at the NBL, Boyles and Henry's laws as they relate to the effects of diving. It then reviews in depth some of the major adverse physiologic events that happen during a diving session: Ear and Sinus Barotrauma, Decompression Sickness, (DCS), Pulmonary Barotrauma (i.e., Arterial Gas Embolism (AGE). Mediastinal Emphysema, Subcutaneous Emphysema, and Pneumothorax) Oxygen Toxicity and Hypothermia. It includes information about the pulmonary function in NBL divers. Also included is recommendations about flying after diving.

  7. Cancer mortality after nasopharyngeal radium irradiation in the Netherlands: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronckers, C. M.; Land, C. E.; Verduijn, P. G.; Hayes, R. B.; Stovall, M.; van Leeuwen, F. E.

    2001-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal radium irradiation (NRI) was used widely from 1940 through 1970 to treat otitis serosa in children and barotrauma in airmen and submariners. We assessed whether NRI-exposed individuals were at higher risk for cancer-related deaths than were nonexposed individuals. We conducted a

  8. Evaluation of lung function changes before and after surfactant application during artificial ventilation in newborn rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Scheffers; H. IJsselstijn (Hanneke); R. Tenbrinck (Robert); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); J.C. Molenaar; D. Tibboel (Dick)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractPatients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) have unilateral or bilateral hypoplasia of the lungs including delayed maturation of the terminal air sacs. Because these lungs are highly susceptible to barotrauma and oxygen toxicity, even in full-term newborns, continued research

  9. Training Supplement Winter 2010 Journal of Special Operations Medicine. A Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    9 Anaphylactic Reaction 11 Asthma (Reactive Airway Disease )--------------------------------------- 12 Back Pain 13 Barotrauma...perforated ulcer, and diverticulitis . 2. Consider constipation/ fecal impaction as a potential cause of abdominal pain. DISPOSITION: 1. Observation and re...12h. B. Do not use in HACE; the drop in blood pressure will worsen the symptoms of this disease . C. Administer supplemental oxygen, if available

  10. Intensive care unit ventilation for the non-intensivist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    called volume support modes simply automate the adjustment of the supporting pressure to achieve a set tidal volume. Spontaneous effort is only of benefit if the patient effort is synchronous with the ventilator. If patients “fight” the ventilator, inadequate ventilation, barotrauma, and the need for excessive sedation occur.

  11. Tympanic membrane bleeding complications during hyperbaric oxygen treatment in patients with or without antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijen, Valerie A.; Westerweel, Peter E.; van Ooij, Pieter Jan A. M.; van Hulst, Rob A.

    2016-01-01

    Middle ear barotrauma (MEBt) is a frequently occurring complication of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT). High-grade MEBt may involve tympanic membrane (TM) haemorrhaging. Although many patients undergoing HBOT use antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs, it is unknown whether these drugs increase the

  12. Ear Disorders in Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called “diving medicine” was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas, and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers.

  13. Facial baroparesis: a critical differential diagnosis for scuba diving accidents--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, E V; Iakovlev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve baroparesis is a rare and potentially under-reported complication of scuba diving. A diver, after surfacing from a shallow dive, developed isolated left-sided facial palsy accompanied by pain and decreased hearing in the left ear. No other signs or symptoms attributable to a scuba diving accident were detected. Forty minutes later, he heard a "pop" in the affected ear, after which all symptoms quickly resolved. Repeat neurological and ear examinations were normal. He showed no residual or new symptoms 24 hours later. The differential diagnosis of facial neurological deficit after diving includes decompression sickness, cerebral air embolism due to pulmonary barotrauma, facial nerve barotrauma and common conditions such as stroke and Bell's palsy. It is important to recognize the condition since recompression treatment can further damage the facial nerve.

  14. Cerebral Air Embolism in a Patient with a Tuberculous-Destroyed Lung during Commercial Air Travel: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Seok; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Pusdan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    A cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of stroke, but may occur in patients undergoing invasive cardiac and pulmonary procedures, as well as in divers suffering pulmonary barotrauma from rapid ascent. A cerebral air embolism due to other causes, especially a change of air pressure from air travel, is particularly rare. Here, we report a case of cerebraenr embolism during commercial air travel in a patient with an tuberculous-destroyed lung.

  15. Do recruitment maneuvers simply improve oxygenation?

    OpenAIRE

    Valenza, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment maneuvers have been the subject of intense investigation. Their role in the acute care setting is debated given the lack of information on their influence on clinical outcomes. Oxygenation improvement is often a striking effect, together with changes of respiratory mechanics. However, hemodynamic compromise is frequently associated with the maneuver, sometimes even barotrauma. Another possible downside is bacterial translocation secondary to lung overdistention, as suggested by ex...

  16. Liquid nitrogen ingestion followed by gastric perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrizbeitia, Luis D; Calello, Diane P; Dhir, Nisha; O'Reilly, Colin; Marcus, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Ingestion of liquid nitrogen is rare but carries catastrophic complications related to barotrauma to the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of ingestion of liquid nitrogen followed by gastric perforation and respiratory insufficiency and discuss the mechanism of injury and management of this condition. Liquid nitrogen is widely available and is frequently used in classroom settings, in gastronomy, and for recreational purposes. Given the potentially lethal complications of ingestion, regulation of its use, acquisition, and storage may be appropriate.

  17. How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Boys

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Egg and larval fish that drift downstream are likely to encounter river infrastructure and consequently rapid decompression, which may result in significant injury. Pressure-related injury (or barotrauma has been shown in juvenile fishes when pressure falls sufficiently below that at which the fish has acclimated. There is a presumption that eggs and larvae may be at least as, if not more, susceptible to barotrauma injury because they are far less-developed and more fragile than juveniles, but studies to date report inconsistent results and none have considered the relationship between pressure change and barotrauma over a sufficiently broad range of pressure changes to enable tolerances to be properly determined. To address this, we exposed eggs and larvae of three physoclistic species to rapid decompression in a barometric chamber over a broad range of discrete pressure changes. Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested. At exposure pressures below ∼40 kPa, or ∼40% of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species. None of these injuries killed the fish within 24 h, but subsequent mortality cannot be excluded. Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40% or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.

  18. Diving dentistry: a review of the dental implications of scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y; Drucker, S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the overwhelming popularity of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, general dental practitioners should be prepared to address complications arising as a result of diving and to provide patients with accurate information. The aim of this article was to introduce the concepts of diving medicine and dentistry to the dentist, and to supply the dental practitioner with some diagnostic tools as well as treatment guidelines. The literature was reviewed to address diving barotrauma (pressure-induced injury related to an air space) to the head, face and oral regions, as well as scuba mouthpiece-related oral conditions. The relevant conditions for dentists who treat divers include diving-associated headache (migraine, tension-type headache), barosinusitis and barotitis-media (sinus and middle ear barotrauma, respectively), neuropathy, trigeminal (CN V) or facial (CN VII) nerve baroparesis (pressure-induced palsy), dental barotrauma (barometric-related tooth injury), barodontalgia (barometric-related dental pain), mouthpiece-associated herpes infection, pharyngeal gag reflex and temporomandibular joint disorder (dysfunction). For each condition, a theoretical description is followed by practical recommendations for the dental practitioner for the prevention and management of the condition. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  19. How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boys, Craig A.; Robinson, Wayne; Miller, Brett; Pflugrath, Brett; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Navarro, Anna; Brown, Richard; Deng, Zhiqun

    2016-05-26

    Egg and larval fish that drift downstream are likely to encounter river infrastructure and consequently rapid decompression, which may result in significant injury. In juvenile fish, pressure-related injury (or barotrauma) occurs when pressures fall sufficiently below the pressure at which the fish has acclimated. Because eggs and larvae are less-developed and more fragile than juveniles, there is a presumption that they may be at least as, if not more, susceptible to barotrauma injury, but studies to date report inconsistent results and none have considered the relationship between pressure change and barotrauma over a sufficiently broad range of pressure changes to enable detrimental levels to be properly determined. To address this, we exposed eggs and larvae of three physoclistic species to rapid decompression in a barometric chamber over a broad range of discrete pressure changes. Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested. At exposure pressures below ~40 kPa, or ~40% of atmospheric pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species. None of these injuries killed the fish within 24 hours, but subsequent mortality cannot be excluded. Consequently, if larval drift is expected, it seems prudent to maintain exposure pressures at river infrastructure at 40% or more of the pressure to which a drifting larvae has acclimated.

  20. A piecewise regression approach for determining biologically relevant hydraulic thresholds for the protection of fish at river infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boys, Craig A.; Robinson, Wayne; Miller, Brett; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Navarro, Anna; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2016-05-13

    Barotrauma injury can occur when fish are exposed to rapid decompression during downstream passage through river infrastructure. A piecewise regression approach was used to objectively quantify barotrauma injury thresholds in two physoclistous species (Murray cod Maccullochella peelii and silver perch Bidyanus bidyanus) following simulated infrastructure passage in barometric chambers. The probability of injuries such as swim bladder rupture; exophthalmia; and haemorrhage and emphysema in various organs increased as the ratio between the lowest exposure pressure and the acclimation pressure (ratio of pressure change RPCE/A) fell. The relationship was typically non-linear and piecewise regression was able to quantify thresholds in RPCE/A that once exceeded resulted in a substantial increase in barotrauma injury. Thresholds differed among injury types and between species but by applying a multi-species precautionary principle, the maintenance of exposure pressures at river infrastructure above 70% of acclimation pressure (RPCE/A of 0.7) should sufficiently protect downstream migrating juveniles of these two physoclistous species. These findings have important implications for determining the risk posed by current infrastructures and informing the design and operation of new ones.

  1. Barotite média em tripulantes da aviação civil Barotitis media in crewmembers of commercial airlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Geórgia Davim Bastos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O barotrauma da orelha média ou barotite média (BM é definido, segundo Armstrong & Hein, como uma inflamação traumática aguda ou crônica causada por alterações da pressão atmosférica. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é analisar os aspectos clínicos relacionados ao barotrauma da orelha média em tripulantes da aviação civil. DESENHO DO ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 17 casos de BM no período de dezembro de 2002 a setembro de 2003, entre tripulantes atendidos no ambulatório de ORL do serviço médico da Fundação Ruben Berta/RJ (FRB/RJ. Em revisão dos prontuários foram colhidos e analisados dados relacionados ao sexo, idade, quadro clínico, evolução e tratamento. RESULTADOS: No total dos casos, 11 eram homens e 6 mulheres; idade média de 37,3 anos. Todos apresentaram otalgia durante a descida do avião. Catorze pacientes (82,4% apresentavam queixa de plenitude aural. Zumbidos ocorreram em 2 pacientes. No momento do vôo, onze pacientes (64,7% apresentavam quadro sugestivo de infecção de vias aéreas superiores associada. O barotrauma foi de grau 1 de Teed em 17,6% dos casos, grau 2 em 58,8% dos casos e 23,6% grau 3. Nenhum paciente apresentou BM grau 4. O tratamento foi conservador em todos os casos, sendo preferida à utilização de antibióticos, corticosteróides e descongestionantes, por via oral. CONCLUSÃO: A BM é uma doença peculiar à medicina aeroespacial e a otorrinolaringologia. A compreensão da fisiopatologia e mecanismos de prevenção do barotrauma da orelha média é fundamental para manejo adequado destes pacientes.Barotitis media (BM is defined, by Armstrong & Hein, as a chronic or acute traumatic inflammation caused by variations of atmospheric pressure. AIM: The purpose of the present study was to analyze clinical aspects related to BM in crewmembers of commercial airlines. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical retrospective. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A group of 17 patients with BM

  2. Influence of repetitive diving in freshwater on pressure equalization and Eustachian tube function in recreational scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Stefanie; Boor, Manuela; Meyer, Moritz F; Pracht, Eberhard D; Volland, Ruth; Klünter, Heinz D; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Beutner, Dirk; Grosheva, Maria

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effect of repetitive pressure exposure during freshwater dives on Eustachian tube function and the middle ear, assessed by the Eustachian tube function test (ETFT). This prospective observational cohort study included 23 divers over three consecutive days of diving in freshwater lakes in Nordhausen, Germany. Participants underwent otoscopy and ETFT before the first dive, between each dive and after the last dive. ETFT included regular tympanometry (R-tymp), tympanometry after Valsalva (V-tymp) and after swallowing (S-tymp). The peak pressure difference between the R-tymp and the V-tymp (R-V dP ) defined effectiveness of pressure equalization after Valsalva manoeuvres. We evaluated the change in compliance and peak pressure and correlated the results to the otoscopic findings and diving experience. Twenty-three divers performed 144 dives. Middle ear barotrauma was assessed using the Edmonds modification of the TEED scoring system. In the ETFT, the R-tymp peak pressure displayed a negative shift from day one to three (P = 0.001) and differed significantly between the experience groups (P = 0.01). R-V dP did not change significantly on any of the three days of diving (all P > 0.05). Participants without MEBt showed significantly lower R-tymp values than did those with barotrauma (P = 0.019). Repetitive pressure exposure during three consecutive days of freshwater diving led to a negative shift of the peak pressure in the middle ear. Less experienced divers showed significantly higher middle ear peak pressure and higher pressure differences after equalization manoeuvres. Higher middle ear peak pressure was also associated with a higher prevalence of barotrauma. Copyright: This article is the copyright of the authors who grant Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine a non-exclusive licence to publish the article in printed and other forms.

  3. Can mechanical ventilation strategies reduce chronic lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2003-12-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) continues to be a significant complication in newborn infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. Although the aetiology of CLD is multifactorial, specific factors related to mechanical ventilation, including barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma, have been implicated as important aetiologic mechanisms. This article discusses the ways in which these factors might be manipulated by various mechanical ventilatory strategies to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury. These include continuous positive airway pressure, permissive hypercapnia, patient-triggered ventilation, volume-targeted ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, high-frequency ventilation and real-time monitoring.

  4. Can asthmatic subjects dive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yochai Adir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recreational diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba has grown in popularity. Asthma is a common disease with a similar prevalence in divers as in the general population. Due to theoretical concern about an increased risk for pulmonary barotrauma and decompression sickness in asthmatic divers, in the past the approach to asthmatic diver candidates was very conservative, with scuba disallowed. However, experience in the field and data in the current literature do not support this dogmatic approach. In this review the theoretical risk factors of diving with asthma, the epidemiological data and the recommended approach to the asthmatic diver candidate will be described.

  5. Reducing Bat Fatalities From Interactions with Operating Wind Turbines (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, M.

    2013-11-01

    One of the biggest advantages of wind energy is that, overall, it has fewer negative impacts on the environment than fossil fuel-generated energy. Most professionals in the wind industry would like to reduce the impact of energy generation on plants, animals, and their habitats. This is why the industry is highly motivated to find out why migrating bats have unexpectedly high fatality rates near operating wind farms. New research has provided quantitative data that indicates barotrauma is not a major cause of bat deaths around operating turbines.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Wal, A W; Van Ooij, P J A M; De Ru, J A

    2016-11-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers may be caused by either inner-ear barotrauma or inner-ear decompression sickness. There is no consensus on the best treatment option. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic value of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers. A literature review and three cases of divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy are presented. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in hearing improvement in 80 per cent of patients: 39 per cent had hearing improvement and 41 per cent had full recovery. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved hearing in divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  7. Marine and Other Aquatic Dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Surg Capt Jandhyala; Deo, Surg Cdr Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    Occupational and recreational aquatic activity predisposes our population to a wide variety of dermatoses. Sunburn, urticaria, jellyfish stings, and contact dermatitis to rubber equipment are common allergies that are encountered in the aquatic environment. Among the infections, tinea versicolor, intertrigo, and verruca vulgaris are widespread. Swimmer's itch may occur due to skin penetration by schistosome cercariae, while free-floating nematocysts of marine coelenterates may precipitate seabather's eruption. "Suit squeeze" due to cutaneous barotrauma and lymphoedematous peau d'orange due to decompression are rare, described entities. This review serves as a ready reckoner for Indian dermatologists and medical practitioners to identify and manage these conditions.

  8. Marine and other aquatic dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandhyala Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational and recreational aquatic activity predisposes our population to a wide variety of dermatoses. Sunburn, urticaria, jellyfish stings, and contact dermatitis to rubber equipment are common allergies that are encountered in the aquatic environment. Among the infections, tinea versicolor, intertrigo, and verruca vulgaris are widespread. Swimmer's itch may occur due to skin penetration by schistosome cercariae, while free-floating nematocysts of marine coelenterates may precipitate seabather's eruption. “Suit squeeze” due to cutaneous barotrauma and lymphoedematous peau d'orange due to decompression are rare, described entities. This review serves as a ready reckoner for Indian dermatologists and medical practitioners to identify and manage these conditions.

  9. Sinusoplastía con balón en seno frontal: Experiencia en 8 pacientes

    OpenAIRE

    Nazar S,Rodolfo; Pardo J,Javiera; Kühnel,Thomas; Simmen,Daniel  

    2010-01-01

    Introducción: La sinusoplastia con balón es una técnica cada vez más usada en patología sinusal, ya que previene el trauma, conserva la anatomía, evita la instrumentación del seno frontal, preserva la mucosa del receso frontal, con un alto grado de seguridad. Dentro de sus principales indicaciones se encuentra la patología de seno frontal, como es el caso de sinusitis aislada, osteítis focalizada, sinusitis posoperatoria y barotrauma. Las controversias se relacionan con sus indicaciones limit...

  10. Some infant ventilators do not limit peak inspiratory pressure reliably during active expiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpalani, H; Santos-Lyn, R; Roberts, R

    1988-09-01

    In order to minimize barotrauma in newborn infants with respiratory failure, peak inspiratory pressures should not exceed those required for adequate gas exchange. We examined whether four commonly used pressure-limited, constant flow ventilators limit pressure reliably during simulated active expiration against the inspiratory stroke of the ventilator. Three machines of each type were tested at 13 different expiratory flow rates (2 to 14 L/min). Flow-dependent pressure overshoot above a dialed pressure limit of 20 cm H2O was observed in all machines. However, the magnitude differed significantly between ventilators from different manufacturers (p = .0009). Pressure overshoot above 20 cm H2O was consistently lowest in the Healthdyne (0.8 cm H2O at 2 L/min, 3.6 cm H2O at 14 L/min) and highest in the Bourns BP200 (3.0 cm H2O at 2 L/min, 15.4 cm H2O at 14 L/min). We conclude that peak inspiratory pressure overshoots on pressure-limited ventilators occur during asynchronous expiration. This shortcoming may contribute to barotrauma in newborn infants who "fight" positive-pressure ventilation.

  11. Barodontalgia: what have we learned in the past decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Yehuda

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge regarding barodontalgia, a barometric pressure-related oral (dental and other) pain. Contemporary classification, prevalence, and incidence, features, etiology, and diagnosis of this entity are presented regarding flight and diving conditions. Summarizing the past decade data, three-fourths of episodes were described as severe, sharp, and localized pain. Barodontalgia affects 11.9% of divers and 11.0% of military aircrews with a rate of 5 episodes/1,000 flight-years. Upper and lower dentitions were affected equally in flight, but more upper than lower dentition were affected in diving. The most prevalent etiologic pathologies for in-flight dental pain were faulty dental restorations (including dental barotrauma) and dental caries without pulp involvement (29.2%), necrotic pulp/periapical inflammation (27.8%), vital pulp pathology (13.9%), recent dental treatment (11.1%), and barosinusitis (9.7%). This review refutes 3 generally accepted conventions: According to the results, the current in-flight barodontalgia incidence is similar to the incidence in the first half of the 20th century, the weighted incidence of barodontalgia among aircrews are similar to the weighted incidence among divers, and the role of facial barotrauma in the etiology of in-flight barodontalgia is minor. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Colorectal injury by compressed air: the rule of conservative therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labib Al-Ozaibi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of colorectal injury caused by a jet of compressed air directed from a distance towards the anus. The patient mentioned that it happened accidentally while his colleague was cleaning his clothes using compressed air. The patient presented with acute abdominal pain and distension. A contrast CT study did not show any free air or leakage. The patient was treated conservatively, progressed well and was discharged from the hospital on the fourth day. Resumo: Descrevemos um caso de lesão colorretal causada por um jato de ar comprimido direcionado para o ânus, a certa distância. O paciente mencionou que o ocorrido foi acidental, enquanto um colega estava limpando suas roupas com ar comprimido. O paciente se apresentou com dores abdominais agudas e distensão. Um estudo de TC contrastado não demonstrou ar livre, nem vazamento. O paciente foi tratado conservadoramente, teve boa evolução e recebeu alta hospitalar no quarto dia. Keywords: Compressed air colon injury, Colon barotrauma, Pneumatic bowel injury, Palavras-chave: Lesão de colon por ar comprimido, Barotrauma de colon, Lesão intestinal pneumática

  13. Otorhinolaryngology and Diving-Part 1: Otorhinolaryngological Hazards Related to Compressed Gas Scuba Diving: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Matt; Sutton, Liam; Fishman, Jonathan M; Kaylie, David M; Moon, Richard E; Masterson, Liam; Klingmann, Christoph; Birchall, Martin A; Lund, Valerie J; Rubin, John S

    2018-03-01

    Scuba diving is becoming increasingly popular. However, scuba diving is associated with specific risks; 80% of adults and 85% of juvenile divers (aged 6-17 years) have been reputed to have an ear, nose, or throat complaint related to diving at some point during their diving career. Divers frequently seek advice from primary care physicians, diving physicians, and otorhinolaryngologists, not only in the acute setting, but also related to the long-term effects of diving. The principles underpinning diving-related injuries that may present to the otorhinolaryngologist rely on gas volume and gas saturation laws, and the prevention of these injuries requires both that the diver is skilled and that their anatomy allows for pressure equalization between the various anatomical compartments. The overlapping symptoms of middle ear barotrauma, inner ear barotrauma, and inner ear decompression sickness can cause a diagnostic conundrum, and a thorough history of both the diver's symptoms and the dive itself are required to elucidate the diagnosis. Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment result in a more timely return to safe diving. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of otorhinolaryngological complications during diving. With the increasing popularity of diving and the frequency of ear, nose, or throat-related injuries, it could be expected that these injuries will become more common and this review provides a resource for otorhinolaryngologists to diagnose and treat these conditions.

  14. Jet Ventilation during Rigid Bronchoscopy in Adults: A Focused Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Putz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The indications for rigid bronchoscopy for interventional pulmonology have increased and include stent placements and transbronchial cryobiopsy procedures. The shared airway between anesthesiologist and pulmonologist and the open airway system, requiring specific ventilation techniques such as jet ventilation, need a good understanding of the procedure to reduce potentially harmful complications. Appropriate adjustment of the ventilator settings including pause pressure and peak inspiratory pressure reduces the risk of barotrauma. High frequency jet ventilation allows adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal even in cases of tracheal stenosis up to frequencies of around 150 min−1; however, in an in vivo animal model, high frequency jet ventilation along with normal frequency jet ventilation (superimposed high frequency jet ventilation has been shown to improve oxygenation by increasing lung volume and carbon dioxide removal by increasing tidal volume across a large spectrum of frequencies without increasing barotrauma. General anesthesia with a continuous, intravenous, short-acting agent is safe and effective during rigid bronchoscopy procedures.

  15. Effect of cannabis smoking on lung function and respiratory symptoms: a structured literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Luis IG; Ind, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    As cannabis use increases, physicians need to be familiar with the effects of both cannabis and tobacco on the lungs. However, there have been very few long-term studies of cannabis smoking, mostly due to legality issues and the confounding effects of tobacco. It was previously thought that cannabis and tobacco had similar long-term effects as both cause chronic bronchitis. However, recent large studies have shown that, instead of reducing forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity (FVC), marijuana smoking is associated with increased FVC. The cause of this is unclear, but acute bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects of cannabis may be relevant. Bullous lung disease, barotrauma and cannabis smoking have been recognised in case reports and small series. More work is needed to address the effects of cannabis on lung function, imaging and histological changes. PMID:27763599

  16. A case of pneumothorax due to non-invasive mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Koç

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emphysema is enlargement of alveolus, alveolary ducts and destruction of alveolary wall. One of complications of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV is barotrauma of damaged lung. Here we present a 75 years old male who had Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, emphysema for 5 years and suffered from pneumothorax after NIMV. During treatment with NIMV his general condition deteriorated and oxygen saturation decreased immediately. Chest X-ray and tomography revealed pneumothorax. Chest tube inserted under local anesthesia. Although NIMV might seem like innocent, in patients whose general condition immediately worsens, oxygen saturation decreases, has emphysema and bullous lesions pneumothorax must be excluded. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 469-471

  17. "Bong lung" in cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauser Jenny

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Marijuana or "bong" lung has been recently described. Subjects typically develop large peripheral paraseptal lung bullae and are predisposed to spontaneous pneumothoraces. The underlying mechanism for bullae formation is uncertain, but probably relates to direct lung toxicity and repeated barotrauma as the smoker performs frequent valsalva manoeuvres in an attempt to derive a greater drug effect. Case presentation We describe a case of probable "bong lung" occurring in a 23-year-old Caucasian man with cystic fibrosis who had a history of recurrent pneumothoraces and unusual findings on sputum cytology. Conclusion Our case highlights the importance of questioning young adult cystic fibrosis patients about illicit drug use and the utility of sputum cytology and computed tomography scanning when patients present with pneumothoraces and deteriorations in clinical status.

  18. The risks of scuba diving: a focus on Decompression Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or "off-gassed," resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport.

  19. Otologic Hazards Related to Scuba Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Tiffany A; Telian, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    As of 2015, more than 23 million scuba diver certifications have been issued across the globe. Given the popularity of scuba diving, it is incumbent on every physician to know and understand the specific medical hazards and conditions associated with scuba diving. Sources were obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, and EBSCO databases from 1956 onward and ranged from diverse fields including otologic reviews and wilderness medicine book chapters. Clinical review. Level 5. Otologic hazards can be categorized into barotrauma-related injuries or decompression sickness. When combined with a high index of suspicion, the physician can recognize these disorders and promptly initiate proper treatment of the potentially hazardous and irreversible conditions related to scuba diving.

  20. Non-barotraumatic tooth fracture during scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunepin, Mathieu; Zadik, Yehuda; Derache, Florence; Dychter, Leon

    2013-06-01

    When dental pain or tooth fracture occurs during diving, variations in atmospheric pressure are usually considered as etiology. We present a case of a military diver referred for dental pain which appeared during diving. Diagnoses suggested by the diving medical specialist were barodontalgia and dental barotrauma. The dental exam, however, highlighted a tooth fracture due to the in-diving use of an inappropriate mouth regulator which yielded excessive occlusal pressure on a tooth with pre-existing extensive dental restoration. This case highlights the importance of the use of an adapted mouthpiece by divers, and the need for awareness of physicians and dentists who treat divers of the implications of scuba diving on dental and oral medicine.

  1. Mixed Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised adult patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerle, Clémence; Ivanov, Vadim; Mercier, Cédric; Costello, Régis; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-11-29

    Community-acquired meningitis is a monomicrobial infection caused by either viruses or bacteria in the vast majority of patients. We report here one exceptional case of a patient with mixed bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the case of a 68-year-old immunocompromised Caucasian man suffering from otitis and then meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. Bacteria were undistinguishable by direct microscopic examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. He responded well to treatment with cefotaxime and dexamethasone, with no sequelae observed at the 4-month follow-up. This first reported case of mixed S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes meningitis illustrates the life-threatening consequences of barotrauma in immunocompromised patients suffering from otorhinolaryngeal infections.

  2. Relevance of postmortem radiology to the diagnosis of fatal cerebral gas embolism from compressed air diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A J; Griffiths, D; Lavender, S; Summers, P; Rich, K

    2006-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that artefact caused by postmortem off-gassing is at least partly responsible for the presence of gas within the vascular system and tissues of the cadaver following death associated with compressed air diving. Controlled experiment sacrificing sheep after a period of simulated diving in a hyperbaric chamber and carrying out sequential postmortem computed tomography (CT) on the cadavers. All the subject sheep developed significant quantities of gas in the vascular system within 24 hours, as demonstrated by CT and necropsy, while the control animals did not. The presence of gas in the vascular system of human cadavers following diving associated fatalities is to be expected, and is not necessarily connected with gas embolism following pulmonary barotrauma, as has previously been claimed.

  3. Global surgery in a postconflict setting - 5-year results of implementation in the Russian North Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunze, Fatima I.; Lunze, Karsten; Tsorieva, Zemfira M.; Esenov, Constantin T.; Reutov, Alexandr; Eichhorn, Thomas; Offergeld, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Collaborations for global surgery face many challenges to achieve fair and safe patient care and to build sustainable capacity. The 2004 terrorist attack on a school in Beslan in North Ossetia in the Russian North Caucasus left many victims with complex otologic barotrauma. In response, we implemented a global surgery partnership between the Vladikavkaz Children's Hospital, international surgical teams, the North Ossetian Health Ministry, and civil society organizations. This study's aim was to describe the implementation and 5-year results of capacity building for complex surgery in a postconflict, mid-income setting. Design We conducted an observational study at the Children's Hospital in Vladikavkaz in the autonomous Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, part of the Russian Federation. We assessed the outcomes of 15 initial patients who received otologic surgeries for complex barotrauma resulting from the Beslan terrorism attack and for other indications, and report the incidence of intra- and postoperative complications. Results Patients were treated for trauma related to terrorism (53%) and for indications not related to violence (47%). None of the patients developed peri- or postoperative complications. Three patients (two victims of terrorism) who underwent repair of tympanic perforations presented with re-perforations. Four junior and senior surgeons were trained on-site and in Germany to perform and teach similar procedures autonomously. Conclusions In mid-income, postconflict settings, complex surgery can be safely implemented and achieve patient outcomes comparable to global standards. Capacity building can build on existing resources, such as operation room management, nursing, and anesthesia services. In postconflict environments, substantial surgical burden is not directly attributable to conflict-related injury and disease, but to health systems weakened by conflicts. Extending training and safe surgical care to include specialized

  4. Global surgery in a postconflict setting--5-year results of implementation in the Russian North Caucasus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunze, Fatima I; Lunze, Karsten; Tsorieva, Zemfira M; Esenov, Constantin T; Reutov, Alexandr; Eichhorn, Thomas; Offergeld, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Collaborations for global surgery face many challenges to achieve fair and safe patient care and to build sustainable capacity. The 2004 terrorist attack on a school in Beslan in North Ossetia in the Russian North Caucasus left many victims with complex otologic barotrauma. In response, we implemented a global surgery partnership between the Vladikavkaz Children's Hospital, international surgical teams, the North Ossetian Health Ministry, and civil society organizations. This study's aim was to describe the implementation and 5-year results of capacity building for complex surgery in a postconflict, mid-income setting. We conducted an observational study at the Children's Hospital in Vladikavkaz in the autonomous Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, part of the Russian Federation. We assessed the outcomes of 15 initial patients who received otologic surgeries for complex barotrauma resulting from the Beslan terrorism attack and for other indications, and report the incidence of intra- and postoperative complications. Patients were treated for trauma related to terrorism (53%) and for indications not related to violence (47%). None of the patients developed peri- or postoperative complications. Three patients (two victims of terrorism) who underwent repair of tympanic perforations presented with re-perforations. Four junior and senior surgeons were trained on-site and in Germany to perform and teach similar procedures autonomously. In mid-income, postconflict settings, complex surgery can be safely implemented and achieve patient outcomes comparable to global standards. Capacity building can build on existing resources, such as operation room management, nursing, and anesthesia services. In postconflict environments, substantial surgical burden is not directly attributable to conflict-related injury and disease, but to health systems weakened by conflicts. Extending training and safe surgical care to include specialized interventions such as microsurgery are integral

  5. Global surgery in a postconflict setting - 5-year results of implementation in the Russian North Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima I. Lunze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Collaborations for global surgery face many challenges to achieve fair and safe patient care and to build sustainable capacity. The 2004 terrorist attack on a school in Beslan in North Ossetia in the Russian North Caucasus left many victims with complex otologic barotrauma. In response, we implemented a global surgery partnership between the Vladikavkaz Children's Hospital, international surgical teams, the North Ossetian Health Ministry, and civil society organizations. This study's aim was to describe the implementation and 5-year results of capacity building for complex surgery in a postconflict, mid-income setting. Design: We conducted an observational study at the Children's Hospital in Vladikavkaz in the autonomous Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, part of the Russian Federation. We assessed the outcomes of 15 initial patients who received otologic surgeries for complex barotrauma resulting from the Beslan terrorism attack and for other indications, and report the incidence of intra- and postoperative complications. Results: Patients were treated for trauma related to terrorism (53% and for indications not related to violence (47%. None of the patients developed peri- or postoperative complications. Three patients (two victims of terrorism who underwent repair of tympanic perforations presented with re-perforations. Four junior and senior surgeons were trained on-site and in Germany to perform and teach similar procedures autonomously. Conclusions: In mid-income, postconflict settings, complex surgery can be safely implemented and achieve patient outcomes comparable to global standards. Capacity building can build on existing resources, such as operation room management, nursing, and anesthesia services. In postconflict environments, substantial surgical burden is not directly attributable to conflict-related injury and disease, but to health systems weakened by conflicts. Extending training and safe surgical care to include

  6. Efficacy of a novel fluoroscopy-free endovascular balloon device with pressure release capabilities in the setting of uncontrolled junctional hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Kyle K; Black, George E; Shawhan, Robert; Marko, Shannon T; Eckert, Matthew J; Tran, Nam T; Starnes, Benjamin W; Martin, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has emerged as an alternative to gauze packing (GP) in the setting of noncompressible torso hemorrhage. Our objective was to describe placement and physiologic impact of a novel REBOA device during uncontrolled junctional hemorrhage. We hypothesized that REBOA could be deployed without fluoroscopic guidance or intra-aortic barotrauma and could increase survival in the setting of profound shock physiology. Fourteen adult swine (35-50 kg) underwent a hemorrhage and ischemia/reperfusion injury protocol to produce shock physiology and dilutional coagulopathy and randomized to REBOA (n = 8) or standard GP (n = 6) groups. A complex contralateral groin soft tissue and vascular injury was then created, followed by 30 seconds of free bleeding and GP for 5 minutes. The REBOA group had the aortic balloon inflated in aortic Zone III until the pressure release valve opened, followed by 45-minute postpacking survival, after which native and balloon-exposed aortae were harvested for histologic analysis. Control and REBOA groups had similar baseline hemodynamics (mean arterial pressure, 32 mm Hg vs. 43 mm Hg; p = 0.228), levels of coagulopathy (international normalized ratio, 1.3 vs. 1.2, p = 0.476; fibrinogen, 108 vs. 135 mg/dL, p = 0.747), and hemorrhage/ischemia/reperfusion insult (lactate, 7 vs. 7, p = 0.950; base deficit, 9 vs. 5, p = 0.491). No histologic barotrauma was identified, and 88% of the REBOA devices were successfully deployed into the Zone III of the aorta. The REBOA group had significantly decreased hemorrhage volumes (0.5 L vs. 0.2 L, p = 0.014) and increased survival times (45 minutes vs. 8 minutes, p the setting of noncompressible torso hemorrhage and is the first to show that this specific REBOA device can be blindly guided into the appropriate zone of the aorta without generating aortic wall injury during unmeasured balloon inflation.

  7. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation - volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2-4 hours and 48 hours. Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2-4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P0.05). Vital signs during 2-4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2-4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (Pvariables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining a low peak inspiratory pressure. PRVC can reduce pulmonary barotrauma risk, making it a safer protective ventilation mode than synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation - volume control.

  8. Influence of repetitive diving in saltwater on pressure equalization and Eustachian tube function in recreational scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Moritz F; Boor, Manuela; Jansen, Stefanie; Pracht, Eberhard D; Felsch, Moritz; Klünter, Heinz D; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Beutner, Dirk; Grosheva, Maria

    2017-12-01

    We investigated in a prospective, observational trial the feasibility of using the Eustachian tube function test (ETFT) to measure the effect of repetitive pressure exposure during open seawater dives on Eustachian tube function. The study included 28 adult divers during six consecutive days of diving in the Red Sea. Participants underwent otoscopy and ETFT before the first dive, between each dive and after the last dive. ETFT included regular tympanometry (R-tymp), tympanometry after Valsalva (V-tymp) and after swallowing (S-tymp). The R-tymp was obtained as 'baseline' peak pressure. After a Valsalva, the peak pressure should shift (positively), revealing a positive shift of the tympanic membrane. This pressure shift is defined here as R-V dP . The changes in compliance and peak pressure were recorded and correlated with otoscopic findings and diving experience. Middle ear barotrauma was scored using the Edmonds modified TEED scale. The 28 participants performed 437 dives. Positive shift of pressure in the middle ear was evident with significant changes from day one to day three (P Diving experience significantly correlated with R-tymp peak pressure and prevalence of middle ear barotrauma. Significant changes in middle ear pressure and pressure equalization from repeated pressure exposure in saltwater were seen using ETFT. Repetitive, multi-day diving led to significantly decreased compliance and increased R-tymp peak pressure (overpressure) in the middle ear. Most profound changes were observed in less and intermediate experienced divers. Copyright: This article is the copyright of the authors who grant Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine a non-exclusive licence to publish the article in printed and other forms.

  9. A peculiar blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall complicated by extensive subcutaneous emphysema: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzymska-Grala, Iwona; Palczewski, Piotr; Błaż, Marcin; Zmorzyński, Michał; Gołębiowski, Marek; Wanyura, Hubert

    2012-04-01

    Blow-out fracture of the orbit is a common injury. However, not many cases are associated with massive subcutaneous emphysema. Even fewer cases are caused by minor trauma or are associated with barotrauma to the orbit due to sneezing, coughing, or vomiting. The authors present a case of blow-out fracture complicated by extensive subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema that occurred without any obvious traumatic event. A 43-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with a painful right-sided exophthalmos that he had noticed in the morning immediately after waking up. The patient also complained of diplopia. Physical examination revealed exophthalmos and crepitations suggestive of subcutaneous emphysema. The eye movements, especially upward gaze, were impaired. CT showed blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall with a herniation of the orbital soft tissues into the maxillary sinus. There was an extensive subcutaneous emphysema in the head and neck going down to the mediastinum. The patient did not remember any significant trauma to the head that could explain the above mentioned findings. At surgery, an inferior orbital wall fracture with a bony defect of 3×2 centimeter was found and repaired. Blow-out fractures of the orbit are usually a result of a direct trauma caused by an object with a diameter exceeding the bony margins of the orbit. In 50% of cases, they are complicated by orbital emphysema and in 4% of cases by herniation of orbital soft tissues into paranasal sinuses. The occurrence of orbital emphysema without trauma is unusual. In some cases it seems to be related to barotrauma due to a rapid increase in pressure in the upper airways during sneezing, coughing, or vomiting, which very rarely leads to orbital wall fracture. Computed tomography is the most accurate method in detecting and assessing the extent of orbital wall fractures.

  10. Migration depth and residence time of juvenile salmonids in the forebays of hydropower dams prior to passage through turbines or juvenile bypass systems: implications for turbine-passage survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun D; Brown, Richard S; Fu, Tao; Martinez, Jayson J; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Skalski, John R; Townsend, Richard L; Trumbo, Bradly A; Ahmann, Martin L; Renholds, Jon F

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the three-dimensional depth distributions in rivers of individually marked fish that are in close proximity to hydropower facilities. Knowledge of the depth distributions of fish approaching dams can be used to understand how vulnerable fish are to injuries such as barotrauma as they pass through dams. To predict the possibility of barotrauma injury caused by pressure changes during turbine passage, it is necessary to understand fish behaviour relative to acclimation depth in dam forebays as they approach turbines. A guiding study was conducted using high-resolution three-dimensional tracking results of salmonids implanted with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System transmitters to investigate the depth distributions of subyearling and yearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) passing two dams on the Snake River in Washington State. Multiple approaches were evaluated to describe the depth at which fish were acclimated, and statistical analyses were performed on large data sets extracted from ∼28 000 individually tagged fish during 2012 and 2013. Our study identified patterns of depth distributions of juvenile salmonids in forebays prior to passage through turbines or juvenile bypass systems. This research indicates that the median depth at which juvenile salmonids approached turbines ranged from 2.8 to 12.2 m, with the depths varying by species/life history, year, location (which dam) and diel period (between day and night). One of the most enlightening findings was the difference in dam passage associated with the diel period. The amount of time that turbine-passed fish spent in the immediate forebay prior to entering the powerhouse was much lower during the night than during the day. This research will allow scientists to understand turbine-passage survival better and enable them to assess more accurately the effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival.

  11. Recruitment manoeuvres for adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Carol; Goligher, Ewan C; Young, Meredith E; Keating, Jennifer L; Holland, Anne E; Romero, Lorena; Bradley, Scott J; Tuxen, David

    2016-11-17

    Recruitment manoeuvres involve transient elevations in airway pressure applied during mechanical ventilation to open ('recruit') collapsed lung units and increase the number of alveoli participating in tidal ventilation. Recruitment manoeuvres are often used to treat patients in intensive care who have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the effect of this treatment on clinical outcomes has not been well established. This systematic review is an update of a Cochrane review originally published in 2009. Our primary objective was to determine the effects of recruitment manoeuvres on mortality in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome.Our secondary objective was to determine, in the same population, the effects of recruitment manoeuvres on oxygenation and adverse events (e.g. rate of barotrauma). For this updated review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, EBSCO), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) and the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry from inception to August 2016. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adults who were mechanically ventilated that compared recruitment manoeuvres versus standard care for patients given a diagnosis of ARDS. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria for this review (n = 1658 participants). We found five trials to be at low risk of bias and five to be at moderate risk of bias. Six of the trials included recruitment manoeuvres as part of an open lung ventilation strategy that was different from control ventilation in aspects other than the recruitment manoeuvre (such as mode of ventilation, higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration and lower tidal volume or plateau

  12. Low Tidal Volume versus Non-Volume-Limited Strategies for Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkey, Allan J; Goligher, Ewan C; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Hodgson, Carol L; Adhikari, Neill K J; Wunsch, Hannah; Meade, Maureen O; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Hess, Dean; Talmor, Daniel S; Thompson, B Taylor; Brower, Roy G; Fan, Eddy

    2017-10-01

    Trials investigating use of lower tidal volumes and inspiratory pressures for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have shown mixed results. To compare clinical outcomes of mechanical ventilation strategies that limit tidal volumes and inspiratory pressures (LTV) to strategies with tidal volumes of 10 to 15 ml/kg among patients with ARDS. This is a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials investigating LTV mechanical ventilation strategies. We used random effects models to evaluate the effect of LTV on 28-day mortality, organ failure, ventilator-free days, barotrauma, oxygenation, and ventilation. Our primary analysis excluded trials for which the LTV strategy was combined with the additional strategy of higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), but these trials were included in a stratified sensitivity analysis. We performed metaregression of tidal volume gradient achieved between intervention and control groups on mortality effect estimates. We used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to determine the quality of evidence. Seven randomized trials involving 1,481 patients met eligibility criteria for this review. Mortality was not significantly lower for patients receiving an LTV strategy (33.6%) as compared with control strategies (40.4%) (relative risk [RR], 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-1.08; heterogeneity statistic I 2  = 46%), nor did an LTV strategy significantly decrease barotrauma or ventilator-free days when compared with a lower PEEP strategy. Quality of evidence for clinical outcomes was downgraded for imprecision. Metaregression showed a significant inverse association between larger tidal volume gradient between LTV and control groups and log odds ratios for mortality (β, -0.1587; P = 0.0022). Sensitivity analysis including trials that protocolized an LTV/high PEEP cointervention showed lower mortality associated with LTV (nine trials and 1

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao; Chen, Hongju; Luo, Rong; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-10-13

    minor-grade ear barotrauma events. Investigators found significant differences between groups in total number of side effect events (Peto odds ratio (OR) 3.87, 95% CI 1.53 to 9.82) and in the number of children who experienced side effects (Peto OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.33 to 14.48). To date, there is no evidence that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves core symptoms and associated symptoms of ASD. It is important to note that adverse effects (minor-grade ear barotrauma events) can occur. Given the absence of evidence of effectiveness and the limited biological plausibility and possible adverse effects, the need for future RCTs of hyperbaric oxygen therapy must be carefully considered.

  14. Transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue: advantages and disadvantages of different ablative techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenasa, M; Willems, S; Chen, X; Fromer, M; Borggrefe, M

    1992-06-01

    Transcatheter ablation techniques are emerging as an alternative therapeutical tool in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. Catheter ablation was initially introduced as the last resort to ablate the atrioventricular nodal conduction in patients with atrial fibrillation and uncontrolled ventricular response and in patients with drug refractory ventricular tachycardias. Direct current energy was used as the sole source of energy, but because of potential significant complications and early and late mortality, presumably mostly due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, other sources of energy were sought. Radiofrequency current which does not produce barotrauma and does not require general anesthesia rapidly replaced direct current ablation in many centers. Early results with radiofrequency current ablation of the atrioventricular node and accessory atrioventricular pathways are very encouraging. The results of radiofrequency as well as direct current ablation for atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia, where the components of reentry circuit are less defined, are not as favorable as those of AV junctional tachycardias. However, improvement of catheter and generatory technology and better understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular tachycardias and characteristics of the target site will enhance the results of catheter ablation in ventricular tachcardias. The procedures are still considered investigational, and mostly done by very experienced groups at tertiary referral hospitals with surgical teams available in case of serious complications. Larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods are required before these techniques expand to community hospitals and to patients with minimal symptoms or asymptomatic individuals as a prophylaxis therapy.

  15. Identifying eustachian tube dysfunction prior to hyperbaric oxygen therapy: Who is at risk for intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jason E; Pfeiffer, Michael; Patel, Niki; Sataloff, Robert T; McKinnon, Brian J

    Determine whether specific risk factors, symptoms and clinical examination findings are associated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) intolerance and subsequent tympanotomy tube placement. A retrospective case series with chart review was conducted from 2007 to 2016 of patients undergoing HBOT clearance at a tertiary care university hospital in an urban city. Eighty-one (n=81) patient charts were reviewed for risk factors, symptoms and clinical examination findings related to HBOT eustachian tube dysfunction and middle ear barotrauma. Relative risk was calculated for each variable to determine risk for HBOT intolerance and need for tympanotomy tube placement. Risk factor, symptom, physical examination and HBOT complication-susceptibility scores were calculated for each patient. Mean risk factor, clinical and HBOT complication-susceptibility scores were significantly higher in patients who did not tolerate HBOT compared to patients who tolerated HBOT. Patients reporting a history of otitis media, tinnitus, and prior ear surgery were at a higher risk for HBOT intolerance. Patients reporting a history of pressure intolerance and prior ear surgery were more likely to undergo tympanotomy tube placement. Patients noted to have otologic findings prior to HBOT were at a higher risk for both HBOT intolerance and tympanotomy tube placement. A thorough otolaryngological evaluation can potentially predict and identify patients at risk for HBOT intolerance and tympanotomy tube placement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Mijacika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise. In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition. According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  17. Anesthetic considerations for interventional pulmonary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, John

    2013-02-01

    To discuss the anesthetic considerations of various procedures now performed by the interventional pulmonologist. With recent technological advances, many of these procedures represent acceptable alternatives to the invasive surgical procedures. For example, the placement of endobronchial valves can substitute for lung reduction surgery and can greatly reduce the postoperative recovery period. However, many of these complex procedures require anesthesia services. The nature and indication for the procedure as well as the patient's overall health will have an impact on the anesthetic choice. New studies have documented common complications from interventional pulmonology procedures and recent ways to avoid these complications have been suggested. Strategies to avoid obstruction, bleeding, pneumothorax and air embolism are discussed in this article. Potential benefits of high frequency jet ventilation in reducing airway pressures and, perhaps, barotraumas are cited. Novel interventional pulmonary procedures are described. As the array of diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary interventions is expanding, the types of anesthetic techniques and ventilatory modes are varying to fit the procedural requirements. Some pulmonary procedures are best accomplished in the lightly sedated patient, who is breathing spontaneously, whereas procedures that use the working channel of a rigid bronchoscope are better performed in the patient under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation that often use jet ventilation to minimize respiratory movements.

  18. [Diving accidents. Emergency treatment of serious diving accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S; Lier, H; Wiese, S

    2004-11-01

    Decompression injuries are potentially life-threatening incidents mainly due to a rapid decline in ambient pressure. Decompression illness (DCI) results from the presence of gas bubbles in the blood and tissue. DCI may be classified as decompression sickness (DCS) generated from the liberation of gas bubbles following an oversaturation of tissues with inert gas and arterial gas embolism (AGE) mainly due to pulmonary barotrauma. People working under hyperbaric pressure, e.g. in a caisson for general construction under water, and scuba divers are exposed to certain risks. Diving accidents can be fatal and are often characterized by organ dysfunction, especially neurological deficits. They have become comparatively rare among professional divers and workers. However, since recreational scuba diving is gaining more and more popularity there is an increasing likelihood of severe diving accidents. Thus, emergency staff working close to areas with a high scuba diving activity, e.g. lakes or rivers, may be called more frequently to a scuba diving accident. The correct and professional emergency treatment on site, especially the immediate and continuous administration of normobaric oxygen, is decisive for the outcome of the accident victim. The definitive treatment includes rapid recompression with hyperbaric oxygen. The value of adjunctive medication, however, remains controversial.

  19. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R; Wung, J T

    1998-01-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in small infants. This applies to the care of the preterm infants with immature lungs, and also to treatment of the preterm or full term infants with specific diseases that are associated with respiratory failure. Respiratory distress of the newborn continues to account for significant morbidity in the intensive care unit. The spectrum of disease ranges from mild distress to severe respiratory failure requiring varying degrees of support. The current modalities of ventilatory assistance range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to conventional mechanical ventilation, and on to high frequency ventilation. It is a reasonable supposition that the type of ventilatory assistance provided to these infants should be graded according to the severity of the disease. However, the principal objective in selecting the mode of respiratory support should be to use a modality which results in minimal volo- or barotrauma to the infant. The following detailed description on CPAP explains its physiological effects, delivery system, indications for use, application, maintenance, and associated complications. The equipment described is simple to use, has a greater cost benefit, and has a more universal application, which is of help to smaller units including those in the developing parts of the world. We have also included our institutional clinical experience of CPAP usage in very low birth weight infants from the periods before and after commercial availability of surfactant in the United States.

  20. Correlation among cytokines, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and modality of ventilation in preterm newborns: improvement with melatonin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Eloisa; Reiter, Russel J; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Romeo, Carmelo; Gitto, Placido; Buggé, Concetta; Trimarchi, Giuseppe; Barberi, Ignazio

    2005-10-01

    Improved survival because of advances in neonatal care has resulted in an increased number of infants at risk for chronic lung disease. Even though the etiology of lung injury is multifactorial, recent animal and clinical data indicate that pulmonary damage depends in large part on the ventilatory strategies used. Ventilator-associated lung injury was believed to result from the use of high pressure, thus, the term barotraumas. This trauma is believed to involve free-radical damage. Oxidant injury is a serious cause of lung injury. In the present study, 110 newborns with respiratory distress syndrome were studied; 55 were treated with melatonin and the other 55 with placebo. All the subjects were mechanically ventilated with or without guaranteed volume. Proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] were measured in tracheobronchial aspirate and the clinical outcome was evaluated. Melatonin treatment reduced the proinflammatory cytokines and improved the clinical outcome. The beneficial action of melatonin presumably related to its antioxidative actions.

  1. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models.

  2. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue.

  3. Chest computed tomography in children undergoing extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation: a 9-year single-centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Susie J.; Calder, Alistair D. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Randle, Elise; Iguchi, Akane; Brown, Katherine; Hoskote, Aparna [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiac Intensive Care and ECMO, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings, indications, technique and clinical impact in children who had undergone chest CT while undergoing extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Radiology and ECMO databases were searched to identify all 19 children who had undergone chest CT (20 scans in total) while on ECMO at our institution between May 2003 and May 2012. We reviewed all CT scans for imaging findings. Chest CT is performed in a minority of children on ECMO (4.5% in our series). Timing of chest CT following commencement of ECMO varied among patient groups but generally it was performed earlier in the neonatal group. Clinically significant imaging findings were found in the majority of chest CT scans. Many scans contained several findings, with most cases demonstrating parenchymal or pleural abnormalities. Case examples illustrate the spectrum of imaging findings, including underlying pathology such as necrotising pneumonia and severe barotrauma, and ECMO-related complications such as tension haemothoraces and cannula migration. The results of chest CT led to a change in patient management in 16 of 19 children (84%). There were no adverse events related to patient transfer. An understanding of scan technique and awareness of potential findings is important for the radiologist to provide prompt and optimal image acquisition and interpretation in appropriate patients. (orig.)

  4. Predicting performance in competitive apnea diving. Part III: deep diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schagatay, Erika

    2011-12-01

    The first of these reviews described the physiological factors defining the limits of static apnea, while the second examined performance in apneic distance swimming. This paper reviews the factors determining performance in depth disciplines, where hydrostatic pressure is added to the stressors associated with apnea duration and physical work. Apneic duration is essential for performance in all disciplines, and is prolonged by any means that increases gas storage or tolerance to asphyxia or reduces metabolic rate. For underwater distance swimming, the main challenge is to restrict metabolism despite the work of swimming, and to redirect blood flow to allow the most vital functions. Here, work economy, local tissue energy and oxygen stores, anaerobic capacity of the muscles, and possibly technical improvements will be essential for further development. In the depth disciplines, direct pressure effects causing barotrauma, the narcotic effects of gases, decompression sickness (DCS) and possibly air embolism during ascent need to be taken into account, as does the risk of hypoxia when the dive cannot be rapidly interrupted before the surface is reached again. While in most deep divers apneic duration is not the main limitation thus far, greater depths may call for exceptionally long apneas and slower ascents to avoid DCS. Narcotic effects may also affect the ultimate depth limit, which the divers currently performing 'constant weight with fins' dives predict to be around 156 metres' sea water. To reach these depths, serious physiological challenges have to be met, technical developments needed and safety procedures developed concomitantly.

  5. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Renata Rocha de; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson; Souza, Luciana Soares de; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Mancano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with 'crack lung', those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. (author)

  6. Use of dynamic CT in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with comparison of positive and negative pressure ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Emma; Babyn, Paul [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Talakoub, Omid; Alirezaie, Javad [Ryerson University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grasso, Francesco; Engelberts, Doreen; Kavanagh, Brian P. [Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, Departments of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine and the Program in Pulmonary and Experimental Medicine, Toronto (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Negative pressure ventilation via an external device ('iron lung') has the potential to provide better oxygenation with reduced barotrauma in patients with ARDS. This study was designed to see if oxygenation differences between positive and negative ventilation could be explained by CT. Six anaesthetized rabbits had ARDS induced by repeated saline lavage. Rabbits were ventilated with positive pressure ventilation (PPV) and negative pressure ventilation (NPV) in turn. Dynamic CT images were acquired over the respiratory cycle. A computer-aided method was used to segment the lung and calculate the range of CT densities within each slice. Volumes of ventilated lung and atelectatic lung were measured over the respiratory cycle. NPV was associated with an increased percentage of ventilated lung and decreased percentage of atelectatic lung. The most significant differences in ventilation and atelectasis were seen at mid-inspiration and mid-expiration (ventilated lung NPV=61%, ventilated lung PPV=47%, p<0.001; atelectatic lung NPV=10%, atelectatic lung PPV 19%, p<0.001). Aeration differences were not significant at end-inspiration. Dynamic CT can show differences in lung aeration between positive and negative ventilation in ARDS. These differences would not be appreciated if only static breath-hold CT was used. (orig.)

  7. Noise exposure under hyperbaric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Objective evidence exists that divers demonstrate a hearing deficit greater than would be expected from ageing effects alone. Deafness in divers may be caused by a number of factors other than exposure to excessive noise levels, eg barotrauma, ear infection etc. This review concentrates on the concern that exposure of commercial divers to noise while at work may cause a hearing deficit. Sound pressure levels recorded both underwater and in diving chambers often exceed those allowable to workers onshore. However, the sound perceived by the diver is modified both in amplitude and in frequency when he is either underwater or in pressurised chambers. Broadly the effect of this modification is to attenuate the sound and thus offer some protection from high noise levels. The degree of attentuation varies with the frequency of the sound, however it is also possible under specific conditions associated with gas density for the sensitivity to particular frequencies to be amplified above that for normal atmospheric air. The levels of sound observed from some underwater tools are of concern even after allowing for a significant de-sensitisation of the divers` hearing. Reports of tinnitus and temporary hearing loss following a dive are sure signs that the noise levels have been harmful. It is not possible at present to describe risk criteria for hearing damage due to noise exposure associated with diving. (author)

  8. Renal oxidative stress, oxygenation, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Fredrik; Nordquist, Lina

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is closely associated with progressive kidney dysfunction, manifested as glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, proteinuria, and eventually declining glomerular filtration. The postulated mechanism for development of glomerulosclerosis is barotrauma caused by increased capillary pressure, but the reason for development of interstitial fibrosis and the subsequently reduced kidney function is less clear. However, it has been hypothesized that tissue hypoxia induces fibrogenesis and progressive renal failure. This is very interesting, since recent reports highlight several different mechanisms resulting in altered oxygen handling and availability in the hypertensive kidney. Such mechanisms include decreased renal blood flow due to increased vascular tone induced by ANG II that limits oxygen delivery and increases oxidative stress, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxygen usage, increased oxygen usage for tubular electrolyte transport, and shunting of oxygen from arterial to venous blood in preglomerular vessels. It has been shown in several studies that interventions to prevent oxidative stress and to restore kidney tissue oxygenation prevent progression of kidney dysfunction. Furthermore, inhibition of ANG II activity, by either blocking ANG II type 1 receptors or angiotensin-converting enzyme, or by preventing oxidative stress by administration of antioxidants also results in improved blood pressure control. Therefore, it seems likely that tissue hypoxia in the hypertensive kidney contributes to progression of kidney damage, and perhaps also persistence the high blood pressure.

  9. Headache attributed to airplane travel: diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Sebastian Bao Dinh; Gazerani, Parisa

    2017-08-16

    Headache attributed to airplane travel, also named "airplane headache" (AH) is a headache that occurs during take-off and landing. Today, there are still uncertainties about the pathophysiology and treatment of AH. This systematic review was performed to facilitate identification of the existing literature on AH in order to discuss the current evidence and areas that remain to be investigated in AH. The systematic literature search was performed in 3 relevant medical databases; PubMed, Scopus, and Embase. The search yielded 220 papers and the papers were sorted based on inclusion and exclusion criteria established for this study. This systematic review included 39 papers. Main findings revealed that AH attacks are clinically stereotyped and appear mostly during landing phases. The headache presents as a severe painful headache that often disappears within 30 min. The pain is unilateral and localized in the fronto-orbital region. Sinus barotrauma has been considered as the main cause of AH. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans have been taken by passengers with AH, to relieve the headache. Based on this systematic review, further studies seem required to investigate underlying mechanisms in AH and also to investigate the biological effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans for alleviating of AH. These studies would advance our understanding of AH pathogenesis and potential use of treatments that are not yet established.

  10. Diagnosis and management of headache attributed to airplane travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Federico; Maggioni, Ferdinando; Lisotto, Carlo; Zanchin, Giorgio

    2013-03-01

    The headache attributed to airplane travel, also named "airplane headache", is characterized by the sudden onset of a severe head pain exclusively in relation to airplane flights, mainly during the landing phase. Secondary causes, such as upper respiratory tract infections or acute sinusitis, must be ruled out. Although its cause is not thoroughly understood, sinus barotrauma should be reasonably involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms. Furthermore, in the current International Classification of Headache Disorders, rapid descent from high altitude is not considered as a possible cause of headache, although the onset of such pain in airplane travellers or aviators has been well known since the beginning of the aviation era. On the basis of a survey we conducted with the courteous cooperation of people who had experienced this type of headache, we proposed diagnostic criteria to be added to the forthcoming revision of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Their formal validation would favour further studies aimed at improving knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and at implementing preventative measures.

  11. Rotura de un aneurisma de arteria esplénica. A propósito de un caso y revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Perelló

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available La prevalencia de aneurismas esplénicos en la población general es del 0,8%, siendo más alta en mujeres que en hombres. El embarazo, la fibrodisplasia arterial y la hipertensión portal, con o sin esplenomegalia asociada, son factores de riesgo conocidos asociados al desarrollo de aneurismas esplénicos. Se presenta el caso clínico de una paciente nulípara de 24 años, sin factores de riesgo vasculares y con antecedentes de paludismo, que acudió al servicio de urgencias de nuestro centro por presentar dolor abdominal tras un vuelo en avión de larga distancia. La exploración física y las pruebas complementarias realizadas mostraron un shock hipovolémico por hemoperitoneo. A pesar del tratamiento de apoyo, la paciente falleció antes de su entrada en quirófano. La necropsia mostró la rotura de un aneurisma sacular de la arteria esplénica como causa de muerte. Se discute la posibilidad de que un barotrauma pueda haber sido la causa de rotura aneurismática.

  12. BPD: old and new problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Fabio; Colnaghi, Mariarosa; Fumagalli, Monica

    2011-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is still one of the main long term complication of preterm birth, and it is the most common chronic respiratory disease in infants. Due to advances in perinatal care and neonatal respiratory therapy the clinical characteristics and the natural history of infants affected by BPD have widely changed in the last decades. The sever presentation of the old form of BPD has been replaced by a milder clinical form, without or with mild respiratory distress syndrome in the first days of life, that responds rapidly to surfactant therapy and instead requires prolonged ventilator support because of poor respiratory effort. "Old" and "new" BPD, are also histologically different, being two morphologic outcomes of variable combinations of factors injuring lungs of differing maturity. New BPD is characterized by diffusely reduced alveolar development, with airway injury, inflammation and fibrosis that are usually milder than in old form. Such "new" form of BPD is interpreted as a developmental disorder. The development of BPD is a multifactorial process with pathogenesis being linked to immature lung tissue, barotrauma and volutrauma resulting from mechanical ventilation, oxidant injury, and proinflammatory mediators.and inflammatory regulation may also have a role in the development of the new form. There is growing evidence that BPD results from an imbalance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, with a persistent imbalance that favors proinflammatory mechanisms. Reduction of the incidence and severity of BPD may be possible through a reduction of the amount of injury induced by respiratory support interventions.

  13. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  14. Safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in chronic wound management: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggleton P

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Paul Eggleton,1 Alexandra J Bishop,2 Gary R Smerdon21Institute of Biomedical & Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, 2DDRC Healthcare, Plymouth, UKAbstract: The breathing of pure oxygen under pressure to treat tissue damage has been employed for almost 45 years and has been investigated in prospective, retrospective, and randomized controlled trials. The physiological effects of oxygen treatment on wound tissue are profound, and include activation of immune cells, changes in cytokine production, and modulation of inflammatory and bactericidal mediators. Hyperbaric oxygen influences the biochemistry of whole cells, altering cell proliferation, angiogenesis, clotting, and tissue regeneration. The precise effects of hyperbaric oxygen on individual cell types and tissues are only beginning to be revealed in both animal and human studies. Many independent studies using hyperbaric oxygen adjunctively with standard wound care have observed improved healing, in particular for diabetic foot ulcers, and can result in a significant reduction in major amputations. Side effects occur infrequently, but myopia, ear barotrauma, and rarely oxygen toxicity have been reported. As antibiotics become less available, and clinician time and complex dressings become more expensive, use of hyperbaric oxygen as a means of treating a variety of wound types may become an increasingly appropriate option for treatment.Keywords: clinical trials, foot ulceration, non-healing wounds, oxygen

  15. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings

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    Renata Rocha de Almeida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease.Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors.Results:In 8 patients (36.4%, the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%, barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each.Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings.

  16. Lung compliance, airway resistance, and work of breathing in children after inhalation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcak, R; Cortiella, J; Desai, M; Herndon, D

    1997-01-01

    Pathophysiologic changes associated with inhalation injury make mechanical ventilation in children a challenge. Decreased lung compliance and increased airway resistance after inhalation injury may lead to elevated airway pressures and barotrauma. Previous studies have shown significant decreases in the incidence of pneumonia and death in adult patients with inhalation injury treated with high-frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) as compared with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). No studies to date have compared lung compliance, airway resistance, or work of breathing in children being treated with HFPV versus CMV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung compliance, airway resistance, and work of breathing in pediatric patients with inhalation injury who required mechanical ventilation. Ten children with bronchoscopically identified inhalation injury requiring mechanical ventilation were studied. Five children received CMV and five children received HFPV. All patients were treated according to our standard inhalation injury protocol. Based on our data and patient population, children receiving ventilation with the HFPV have a significant decrease in the work of breathing as compared with CMV.

  17. Delayed pneumothorax after laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy in a patient without underlying lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richie K Huynh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of a delayed pneumothorax occurring approximately 72 h post-operatively in a patient without any underlying lung disease who had undergone laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection. The patient was in her mid-40s with a body mass index of 28.0 and had no history of smoking. Her spontaneous pneumothorax manifested without any precipitating events or complications during recovery. There was no evidence of any infectious process. There were no central line attempts and all ports were placed intra-peritoneally, and there was no evidence of any subcutaneous emphysema. One possible mechanism of injury that we propose is barotrauma from an extended period of time in Trendelenburg position. Notably, the only abnormal finding throughout the entire post-operative period preceding the delayed pneumothorax was a PO 2 desaturation the day before. This case highlights the necessity to examine and investigate any desaturation post-operatively and deliberate its possible significance. Furthermore, it demonstrates that, even during a normal recovery period for a patient without any underlying lung disease or risk factors, spontaneous pneumothorax could still develop in a delayed fashion multiple days post-operatively from a laparoscopic procedure.

  18. SCUBA Diving and Asthma: Clinical Recommendations and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Christopher A; Adams, Karla E; Webb, Charles N

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding asthma and SCUBA (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) diving. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to asthma and SCUBA diving using the following keywords: asthma, allergy, and SCUBA diving. SCUBA diving is a popular sport with more than 9 million divers in the USA. SCUBA diving can be a dangerous sport. Bronchospasm can develop in asthmatic patients and cause airway obstruction. Airway obstruction may be localized to the distal airway which prevents gas elimination. Uncontrolled expansion of the distal airway may result in pulmonary barotrauma. There is also the risk of a gas embolism. Asthmatic divers can also aspirate seawater which may induce bronchospasm. Pollen contamination of their oxygen tank may exacerbate atopic asthma in patients. Diving may be hazardous to the lung function of patients with asthma. Despite the risks of SCUBA diving, many asthmatic individuals can dive without serious diving events. Diving evaluations for asthmatic patients have focused on a thorough patient history, spirometry, allergy testing, and bronchial challenges. For patients that wish to dive, their asthma should be well controlled without current chest symptoms. Patients should have a normal spirometry. Some diving societies recommend that an asthmatic patient should successfully pass a bronchial provocation challenge. Recommendations also state that exercise-, emotion-, and cold-induced asthmatics should not dive. Asthmatic patients requiring rescue medication within 48 h should not dive.

  19. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome associated with scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Naoharu; Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Kitajima, Seiji

    2017-06-01

    A 28-year-old female diver presented with dizziness and difficulty clearing her left ear whilst scuba diving. Her pure-tone audiometry and tympanometry were normal. Testing of Eustachian tube function revealed tubal stenosis. Video-oculography revealed a predominantly torsional nystagmus while the patient was in the lordotic position. Fistula signs were positive. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone revealed a diagnosis of bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCDS). Cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) testing showed that the amplitude of the cVEMP measured from her left ear was larger than that from the right. In electronystagmography (ENG), nose-pinched Valsalva manoeuvres caused eye movements to be mainly directed counterclockwise with a vertical component. Tullio phenomenon was also positive for both ears. SCDS patients tend to be misdiagnosed and misunderstood; common misdiagnoses in these cases are alternobaric vertigo (AV), inner ear barotrauma, and inner-ear decompression sickness. It is difficult to diagnose vertigo attacks after scuba diving as SCDS; however, when the patient develops sound- and/or pressure-induced vertical-torsional nystagmus, HRCT should be conducted to confirm a diagnosis of SCDS.

  20. The effect of scuba diving on airflow obstruction in divers with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Christopher H D; Chen, Isobel Y D

    2016-03-01

    People with asthma are an under-represented group amongst scuba divers. Many may avoid or are advised against diving due to the potential risks, including bronchoconstriction, pulmonary barotrauma and arterial gas embolism. The aim of this study was to establish whether divers with asthma were more likely to experience reversible airways obstruction following typical scuba diving than divers without asthma. All divers with a history of asthma attending Operation Wallacea in Honduras were identified and peak expiratory flow rates (PEF) were measured pre and immediately post dive. All dives were boat dives in tropical sea water. Scuba dives were defined as those lasting between 40 and 55 minutes to a depth of between 10 and 18 metres. Of the 356 divers attending, 22 were identified as having asthma, of whom 19 were suitable for testing. They were classified by treatment regimen: five on no treatment, 11 on salbutamol only and three on regular preventative treatment. Twenty-four divers without a history of asthma acted as a control group. Open-water scuba diving caused a small decrease in PEF in all populations (median decrease 4.4%, P scuba diving. Differences to previous studies are likely due to environmental conditions, including dive depth.

  1. The epidemiology of injury in scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzacott, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology of injury associated with recreational scuba diving is reviewed. A search of electronic databases and reference lists identified pertinent research. Barotrauma, decompression sickness and drowning-related injuries were the most common morbidities associated with recreational scuba diving. The prevalence of incidents ranged from 7 to 35 injuries per 10,000 divers and from 5 to 152 injuries per 100,000 dives. Recreational scuba diving fatalities account for 0.013% of all-cause mortality aged ≥ 15 years. Drowning was the most common cause of death. Among treated injuries, recovery was complete in the majority of cases. Dive injuries were associated with diver-specific factors such as insufficient training and preexisting medical conditions. Environmental factors included air temperature and flying after diving. Dive-specific factors included loss of buoyancy control, rapid ascent and repetitive deep diving. The most common event to precede drowning was running out of gas (compressed air). Though diving injuries are relatively rare prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to quantify the effects of known risk factors and, indeed, asymptomatic injuries (e.g. brain lesions). Dive injury health economics data also remains wanting. Meanwhile, health promotion initiatives should continue to reinforce adherence to established safe diving practices such as observing depth/time limits, safety stops and conservative ascent rates. However, there is an obvious lack of evaluated diving safety interventions. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Scuba diving and otology: a systematic review with recommendations on diagnosis, treatment and post-operative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Devon M; Smith, Kristine A; Lange, Beth

    2017-06-01

    Scuba diving is a popular recreational and professional activity with inherent risks. Complications related to barotrauma and decompression illness can pose significant morbidity to a diver's hearing and balance systems. The majority of dive-related injuries affect the head and neck, particularly the outer, middle and inner ear. Given the high incidence of otologic complications from diving, an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of otic pathology is a necessity. We performed a systematic and comprehensive literature review including the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of otologic pathology related to diving. This included inner, middle, and outer ear anatomic subsites, as well as facial nerve complications, mal de debarquement syndrome, sea sickness and fitness to dive recommendations following otologic surgery. Sixty-two papers on diving and otologic pathology were included in the final analysis. We created a set of succinct evidence-based recommendations on each topic that should inform clinical decisions by otolaryngologists, dive medicine specialists and primary care providers when faced with diving-related patient pathology.

  3. Diagnosis of arterial gas embolism in SCUBA diving: modification suggestion of autopsy techniques and experience in eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadesús, Josep M; Aguirre, Fernando; Carrera, Ana; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Serrando, Maria T; Reina, Francisco

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to suggest modifications of autopsy techniques in order to improve post-mortem diagnosis of arterial gas embolism (AGE) based on multidisciplinary investigation of SCUBA diving fatalities. Five adult human cadavers from the voluntary donation program of the Human Anatomy Laboratory, and eight judicial autopsied bodies of SCUBA divers from the Forensic Pathology Service were assessed. Before performing any autopsies, we accessed the diving plan and the divers' profiles for each case. We then introduced a new dissection procedure that included identification, isolation, and manipulation of carotid, vertebral and thoracic arterial systems. The dissected vascular structures that allowed optimall isolation of the systemic arterial circulation were identified and ligated. In three of the eight judicial cases, we had a strongly suggestive history of arterial gas embolism following pulmonary barotrauma (PBt/AGE). In these cases, the additional arterial dissection allowed us to clearly diagnose AGE in one of them. The autopsy of the rest of the cases showed other causes of death such as asphyxia by drowning and heart attack. In all cases we were able to reject decompression sickness, and in some of them we showed the presence of artefacts secondary to decomposition and resuscitation maneuvers. These results allow us to suggest a specific autopsy technique divided into four steps, aimed at confirming or excluding some evidence of dysbaric disorders according to a re-enactment of the incident. We have demonstrated the presence of large volumes of intravascular air, which is typical of PBt/AGE.

  4. Safety of antimalarial medications for use while scuba diving in malaria Endemic Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kyle; Regis, David P

    2016-01-01

    Recreational diving occurs annually in areas of the world where malaria is endemic. The safety and efficacy of antimalarials for travelers in a hyperbaric environment is unknown. Of particular concern would be medications with adverse effects that could either mimic diving related illnesses such as barotrauma, decompression sickness (DCS) and gas toxicities, or increase the risk for such illnesses. We conducted a review of PubMed and Cochrane databases to determine rates of neurologic adverse effects or other effects from antimalarials that may be a problem in the diving environment. One case report was found on diving and mefloquine. Multiple case reports and clinical trials were found describing neurologic adverse effects of the major chemoprophylactic medications atovaquone/proguanil, chloroquine, doxycycline, mefloquine, and primaquine. Of the available literature, atovaquone/proguanil and doxycycline are most likely the safest agents and should be preferred; atovaquone/proguanil is superior due to reduced rates of sunburn in the marine environment. Primaquine also appears to be safe, but has reduced efficacy against P. falciparum ; mefloquine possesses the highest rate of neurologic side effects and therefore these agents should be limited to extreme cases of patients intolerant to other agents. Chloroquine appears unsafe in the hyperbaric environment and should be avoided. More studies are required to include database reviews of returned divers traveling to malaria endemic areas and randomized controlled trials in the hyperbaric environments.

  5. The O'Neill grading system for evaluation of the tympanic membrane: A practical approach for clinical hyperbaric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Owen J; Weitzner, Erica D

    2015-01-01

    Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) and middle ear barotrauma (MEB) are the two most common complications of clinical hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) treatment. The current grading system, the Teed's Classification, was first described in 1944 with modifications to this system over the years, but none are specific for the evaluation and treatment of patients undergoing clinical HBO2 therapy. Currently, the standard of care is a baseline otoscopic examination performed prior to starting HBO2 therapy. Repeat otoscopy is required for patients having ETD, pain or other symptoms during the compression and/or decompression phase of the treatment. Results from these examinations are used to determine the proper course of treatment for the ETD or MEB. The Teed's classification was not intended to correlate with the consistency of diagnosis, the clinical approach to relieving symptoms or the treatment of the inflicted trauma. It is not a practical tool for the modern hyperbaric team. We describe a newer grading system, the O'Neill Grading System (OGS), which allows simple, practical and consistent classification of ETD and MEB by all members of the clinical hyperbaric medicine team. Based on the O'Neill Grade assigned, evidence supported suggestions for appropriate actions and medical interventions are offered.

  6. Electronystagmography versus videonystagmography in diagnosis of vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Pepaś, Renata; Sułkowski, Wiesław J; Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna; Olszewski, Jurek

    2012-03-01

    Vertigo is a very common symptom mainly caused by the lesion of vestibular system (peripheral or central) and often accompanied by some work-related diseases and occupational intoxications. The aim of this study was to assess the value of electronystagmography (ENG) and videonystagmography (VNG) for diagnosing vertigo of various origin. The study included four groups, 25 subjects each, of patients suffering from vestibular disorders of peripheral, central and mixed origin versus healthy controls. All were examined by means of ENG and VNG, using the bithermal caloric test with 30°C and 44°C air irrigations of the ears. The findings (frequency of induced nystagmus FRQ, its slow phase velocity SPV, canal paresis CP, directional preponderance DP, vestibular excitability VE) were analysed and compared. In all patients with vertigo due to vestibular neuritis, barotrauma and kinetosis, significant CP, the important sign of peripheral site of vestibular lesion was identified both in ENG and VNG. None of the patients with central origin disorders showed CP in VNG; in the majority of cases DP was observed. However, in ENG we found CP in 5 patients with central origin disorders. There were no essential differences between ENG and VNG in measurements of FRQ and SPV except for higher values in VNG in controls and patients with mixed vertigo. The results suggest that the VNG should be recommended in preference as the valuable method to assess vertigo and to discriminate between the peripheral and the central vestibular lesions.

  7. Blast Injuries: From Improvised Explosive Device Blasts to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Ditkofsky, Noah G; York, John D; Abujudeh, Hani H; Avery, Laura A; Brunner, John F; Sodickson, Aaron D; Lev, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Although most trauma centers have experience with the imaging and management of gunshot wounds, in most regions blast wounds such as the ones encountered in terrorist attacks with the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are infrequently encountered outside the battlefield. As global terrorism becomes a greater concern, it is important that radiologists, particularly those working in urban trauma centers, be aware of the mechanisms of injury and the spectrum of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury patterns. Primary blast injuries are caused by barotrauma from the initial increased pressure of the explosive detonation and the rarefaction of the atmosphere immediately afterward. Secondary blast injuries are caused by debris carried by the blast wind and most often result in penetrating trauma from small shrapnel. Tertiary blast injuries are caused by the physical displacement of the victim and the wide variety of blunt or penetrating trauma sustained as a result of the patient impacting immovable objects such as surrounding cars, walls, or fences. Quaternary blast injuries include all other injuries, such as burns, crush injuries, and inhalational injuries. Radiography is considered the initial imaging modality for assessment of shrapnel and fractures. Computed tomography is the optimal test to assess penetrating chest, abdominal, and head trauma. The mechanism of blast injuries and the imaging experience of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are detailed, as well as musculoskeletal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary injury patterns from blast injuries. ©RSNA, 2016.

  8. Development of an Ex-Situ Limb Perfusion System for a Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Emre; Alghanem, Fares; Moon, Ruth; Guy, Erin; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H; Ozer, Kagan

    2018-03-26

    Ex-situ perfusion (ESP) is a promising method in preserving vascularized composite tissue allografts (VCAs) with potential to widen donor procurement to larger geographic areas. To optimize the method of preservation, we developed a small animal model to conduct biomolecular investigations. Twenty rat hind limbs (18.2 ± 1.3 g) were procured and connected to our custom-made ESP system. Perfusion pressure and flow parameters were measured with hourly blood gas analysis under near-normothermic (30-35˚C) conditions. Perfusate was prepared with swine hemoglobin (6-9 g/dL) and STEEN Solution. After 6 hours of perfusion, gastrocnemius muscles were evaluated for their histology and metabolomic profiling. Following 3 sets of experiments, perfusion was maintained at an average flow of 0.9 ± 0.24 mL/min and resulted in lactate levels of 3.78 ± 1.02 mmol/L. Metabolomic analysis revealed maintained cellular energy stores (total adenylates perfusion 0.698 ± 0.052 versus baseline 0.685 ± 0.091 umols/ug, p = 0.831), and histologic analysis revealed no evidence of barotrauma or myodegeneration. Rat hind limbs were viable after 6 hours of ESP on our miniaturized ESP system. This study is the first to document the ex-situ hind limb perfusion platform on a rodent model. These experimental findings have potential to guide future research to extend the viable duration of VCA preservation.

  9. Exercise after SCUBA diving increases the incidence of arterial gas embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Dennis; Lozo, Mislav; Dujic, Zeljko; Ljubkovic, Marko

    2013-09-01

    Arterialization of gas bubbles after decompression from scuba diving has traditionally been associated with pulmonary barotraumas or cardiac defects, such as the patent foramen ovale. Recent studies have demonstrated the right-to-left passage of bubbles through intrapulmonary arterial-venous anastamoses (IPAVA) that allow blood to bypass the pulmonary microcirculation. These passages open up during exercise, and the aim of this study is to see if exercise in a postdiving period increases the incidence of arterialization. After completing a dive to 18 m for 47 min, patent foramen ovale-negative subjects were monitored via transthoracic echocardiography, within 10 min after surfacing, for bubble score at rest. Subjects then completed an incremental cycle ergometry test to exhaustion under continuous transthoracic echocardiography observation. Exercise was suspended if arterialization was observed and resumed when the arterialization cleared. If arterialization was observed a second time, exercise was terminated, and oxygen was administered. Out of 23 subjects, 3 arterialized at rest, 12 arterialized with exercise, and 8 did not arterialize at all even during maximal exercise. The time for arterialization to clear with oxygen was significantly shorter than without. Exercise after diving increased the incidence of arterialization from 13% at rest to 52%. This study shows that individuals are capable of arterializing through IPAVA, and that the intensity at which these open varies by individual. Basic activities associated with SCUBA diving, such as surface swimming or walking with heavy equipment, may be enough to allow the passage of venous gas emboli through IPAVA.

  10. Diving medicine in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Lars; Leyk, Dieter

    2015-02-27

    Diving is a popular sport, and some recreational divers have medical risk factors. Their health can be endangered by high extracorporeal (ambient) pressure and its many systemic effects. We review relevant publications on free (breath-hold) diving, scuba diving, medical evaluation for diving, barotrauma, decompression sickness, and diving with medical risk factors, which were retrieved by a selective search of PubMed. Free diving or scuba diving, even at seemingly innocuous depths, puts considerable stress on the cardio - vascular system, ears, and lungs. Unexpected events while diving, diminished functional reserve, and pre-existing medical illnesses increase the risk of a diving accident. An international survey revealed that minor incidents occur in 1.3% of all dives, and decompression accidents in 2 of every 10 000 dives. A properly conducted medical examination to determine diving fitness, followed by appropriate counseling, can make a life-threatening diving accident less likely. To be able to certify diving fitness and give competent medical advice about diving, physicians must be well informed about the physical and physiological changes of diving and the associated risks to health, and they need to know how to perform a medical evaluation of prospective divers. In Germany, any licensed physician may judge a person fit to dive. It is recommended that this be done in adherence to the relevant evaluation standards and recommendations of the medical specialty associations. Randomized controlled trials on the effect of preventive behavior would be desirable, as would a central registry of diving accidents.

  11. Diving medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Alfred A

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to the undersea environment has unique effects on normal physiology and can result in unique disorders that require an understanding of the effects of pressure and inert gas supersaturation on organ function and knowledge of the appropriate therapies, which can include recompression in a hyperbaric chamber. The effects of Boyle's law result in changes in volume of gas-containing spaces when exposed to the increased pressure underwater. These effects can cause middle ear and sinus injury and lung barotrauma due to lung overexpansion during ascent from depth. Disorders related to diving have unique presentations, and an understanding of the high-pressure environment is needed to properly diagnose and manage these disorders. Breathing compressed air underwater results in increased dissolved inert gas in tissues and organs. On ascent after a diving exposure, the dissolved gas can achieve a supersaturated state and can form gas bubbles in blood and tissues, with resulting tissue and organ damage. Decompression sickness can involve the musculoskeletal system, skin, inner ear, brain, and spinal cord, with characteristic signs and symptoms. Usual therapy is recompression in a hyperbaric chamber following well-established protocols. Many recreational diving candidates seek medical clearance for diving, and healthcare providers must be knowledgeable of the environmental exposure and its effects on physiologic function to properly assess individuals for fitness to dive. This review provides a basis for understanding the diving environment and its accompanying disorders and provides a basis for assessment of fitness for diving.

  12. Occupational hearing loss in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-12-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases exceeding exposure limit among workplace hazards. NIHL is the most common occupational disease except work-related disease such as musculoskeletal disorders and cerebrovascular diseases, and NIHL prevalence is thought to be much higher than reported in official publications. Noise affecting hearing comes from various sources such as workplaces, military settings, areas with exposure to high noise, and specific noise sources. There is also occupational hearing loss by non-noise including chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals, barotrauma, and trauma due to welding spark. Noise affects daily life through audiological effects such as hearing loss and tinnitus, non-audiological physical effects (e.g., cardiovascular), and psychosocial and behavioral effects. Development of systematic and comprehensive hearing conservation programs for lowering the noise level in workplaces and preventing the NIHL, and preparation of technological, administrative system for its settlement at workplace are urgently needed.

  13. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Renata Rocha de; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Radiologia; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Petropolis, Petropolis, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Luciana Soares de [Ultra-X, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dep. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mancano, Alexandre Dias [Hospital Anchieta, Taguatinga, DF (Brazil); Nobre, Luiz Felipe [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with 'crack lung', those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. (author)

  14. Infant ventilator design: performance during expiratory limb occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M W; Peevy, K J

    1983-01-01

    We examined the specifications and design of the inspiratory pressure regulating valve of 8 continuous flow, pressure-limited infant ventilators. Two pressure regulating designs are currently available; one placing the primary pressure regulating valve on the inspiratory limb, the other placing it on the expiratory limb. Seven ventilators incorporate the latter design to limit inspiratory pressure and must have a safety pressure-relief valve located on the inspiratory limb to vent pressure in case of circuit occlusion. These pressure-relief valves are generally set by the manufacturer far in excess of pressures normally used for infant ventilation. Alarm systems are often absent or inadequate to warn of high pressure conditions during circuit obstruction. A case report detailing the fatal complication of prolonged excessive airway pressure during circuit occlusion is presented. Improvements in the pressure-relief valve designs currently available are possible, and may be necessary to provide adequate protection from barotrauma. The majority of infant ventilators currently available expose the patient to unnecessary excessive airway pressures in the case of expiratory limb occlusion, and the lack of alarm systems may leave the operator unaware of malfunction.

  15. CESAR: conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugford Miranda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 350 adults develop severe, but potentially reversible respiratory failure in the UK annually. Current management uses intermittent positive pressure ventilation, but barotrauma, volutrauma and oxygen toxicity can prevent lung recovery. An alternative treatment, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, uses cardio-pulmonary bypass technology to temporarily provide gas exchange, allowing ventilator settings to be reduced. While extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is proven to result in improved outcome when compared to conventional ventilation in neonates with severe respiratory failure, there is currently no good evidence from randomised controlled trials to compare these managements for important clinical outcomes in adults, although evidence from case series is promising. Methods/Design The aim of the randomised controlled trial of Conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure (CESAR is to assess whether, for patients with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation will increase the rate of survival without severe disability ('confined to bed' and 'unable to wash or dress' by six months post-randomisation, and be cost effective from the viewpoints of the NHS and society, compared to conventional ventilatory support. Following assent from a relative, adults (18–65 years with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure (Murray score ≥ 3.0 or hypercapnea with pH Discussion Analysis will be based on intention to treat. A concurrent economic evaluation will also be performed to compare the costs and outcomes of both treatments.

  16. Diaphragm Dysfunction in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dot, Irene; Pérez-Teran, Purificación; Samper, Manuel-Andrés; Masclans, Joan-Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Muscle involvement is found in most critical patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Diaphragmatic muscle alteration, initially included in this category, has been differentiated in recent years, and a specific type of muscular dysfunction has been shown to occur in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. We found this muscle dysfunction to appear in this subgroup of patients shortly after the start of mechanical ventilation, observing it to be mainly associated with certain control modes, and also with sepsis and/or multi-organ failure. Although the specific etiology of process is unknown, the muscle presents oxidative stress and mitochondrial changes. These cause changes in protein turnover, resulting in atrophy and impaired contractility, and leading to impaired functionality. The term 'ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction' was first coined by Vassilakopoulos et al. in 2004, and this phenomenon, along with injury cause by over-distention of the lung and barotrauma, represents a challenge in the daily life of ventilated patients. Diaphragmatic dysfunction affects prognosis by delaying extubation, prolonging hospital stay, and impairing the quality of life of these patients in the years following hospital discharge. Ultrasound, a non-invasive technique that is readily available in most ICUs, could be used to diagnose this condition promptly, thus preventing delays in starting rehabilitation and positively influencing prognosis in these patients. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Extracorporeal gas exchange--an alternative to ventilation of the premature newborn infant with respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Dudenhausen, J W; Langner, K; Laiblin, C; Saling, E

    1984-01-01

    In spite of improvements in its prophylaxis and therapy the membrane syndrome is still one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in newborns. In many perinatal centers in the United States extracorporeal gas exchange via an artificial lung is the ultimate step in therapy for this group of patients today. As a result of our own research work we are able to introduce an extracorporeal circulation system which is especially suited to the particular situation of the immature newborn and which enables a complete immobilization of the lung to avoid baro-trauma with alveolar oxygen diffusion and CO2-removal through the membrane lung. Using appropriate dimensions the system can be housed in a newborn incubator. With low total resistance the perfusion in the newborn is performed via an arterio-venous shunt of the umbilical vessels alternatively with and without a mechanical pump. We tested this perfusion system on premature lambs with a gestational age of 128 to 130 days. During a test period of from 6 to 8 hours at a low blood flow rate (200 ml/min) we achieved a sufficient CO2-removal via the membrane lung with enough oxygen supply through the non-ventilated lung. By means of suitable materials, and using CO2 gas priming procedure and employing prostacyclin analogons to inhibit thrombocyte aggregation, it was possible to lower the heparine dosage to a minimum.

  18. Ear Problems in Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear, otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane.

  19. Activation of thiazide-sensitive co-transport by angiotensin II in the cyp1a1-Ren2 hypertensive rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ashek

    Full Text Available Transgenic rats with inducible expression of the mouse Ren2 gene were used to elucidate mechanisms leading to the development of hypertension and renal injury. Ren2 transgene activation was induced by administration of a naturally occurring aryl hydrocarbon, indole-3-carbinol (100 mg/kg/day by gastric gavage. Blood pressure and renal parameters were recorded in both conscious and anesthetized (butabarbital sodium; 120 mg/kg IP rats at selected time-points during the development of hypertension. Hypertension was evident by the second day of treatment, being preceded by reduced renal sodium excretion due to activation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride co-transporter. Renal injury was evident after the first day of transgene induction, being initially limited to the pre-glomerular vasculature. Mircoalbuminuria and tubuloinsterstitial injury developed once hypertension was established. Chronic treatment with either hydrochlorothiazide or an AT1 receptor antagonist normalized sodium reabsorption, significantly blunted hypertension and prevented renal injury. Urinary aldosterone excretion was increased ≈ 20 fold, but chronic mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone neither restored natriuretic capacity nor prevented hypertension. Spironolactone nevertheless ameliorated vascular damage and prevented albuminuria. This study finds activation of sodium-chloride co-transport to be a key mechanism in angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. Furthermore, renal vascular injury in this setting reflects both barotrauma and pressure-independent pathways associated with direct detrimental effects of angiotensin II and aldosterone.

  20. [Clinical management of bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachinger, H; Frank, H D; Schmid, H

    1984-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is caused by several factors. Avoidance of bronchopulmonary dysplasia is directed at its causes and should always attempt the rapid weaning of the patient from the respirator. Some of the preventive measures include a) avoiding an oxygen injury; b) prevention of barotrauma; 3) sufficient moisturization and warming of the respiratory gases; d) regular cleaning of the respiratory tract and bacterial controls of the tracheal secretion; e) administration of vitamin E; f) reconsideration (restricting the use) of parenteral nutrition. Assistance in the weaning from the respiratory means a) avoidance of an open ductus arteriosus; b) paced reduction of FiO2, respiratory pressure and frequency up to intermittent mandatory ventilation and final transition to spontaneous respiration with increased mean respiratory pressure; c) avoidance of cardiac insufficiency; d) administration of corticosteroids; e) theophyllin, and f) physical therapy. The number of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia has remained the same in the last six years. However, the mortality until 1979 round about 50% has been reduced to 1/3, in the years 1980/81.

  1. A reanimação do prematuro extremo em sala de parto: controvérsias Controversies about the resuscitation of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Branco de Almeida

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar as principais controvérsias quanto aos procedimentos atualmente realizados na reanimação de recém-nascidos de extremo baixo peso na sala de parto. FONTES DOS DADOS: Revisão sistemática dos artigos incluídos em MEDLINE, SciELO e Cochrane Library e dos temas livres publicados em congressos internacionais e nacionais, utilizando-se as palavras-chave reanimação, asfixia e recém-nascido. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: As principais controvérsias incluem aspectos relacionados à oxigenação e à ventilação do prematuro de extremo baixo peso ao nascimento. Os efeitos da administração de oxigênio em concentrações entre 21% e 100% precisam ser investigados. Os parâmetros adequados de pressão inspiratória, volume pulmonar e pressão expiratória final positiva necessitam ser estabelecidos com a finalidade de minimizar o barotrauma e o volutrauma. Os benefícios da aplicação da pressão positiva contínua de vias aéreas por via nasal também precisam ser bem determinados através de ensaios clínicos randomizados. Além disso, reanimadores manuais devem ser desenvolvidos para otimizar a administração desses parâmetros e minimizar a lesão pulmonar no início da vida extra-uterina. Estudos clínicos sobre a administração ao nascimento de adrenalina, expansores de volume e bicarbonato de sódio são inexistentes em prematuros de muito baixo peso. Adicionalmente, o principal dilema ético envolve a decisão conjunta entre os profissionais e os pais de não iniciar a reanimação na dependência da idade gestacional. CONCLUSÕES: A conduta atualmente vigente poderá ser modificada a partir dos resultados de ensaios clínicos randomizados e controlados, em conjunto com a avaliação do desenvolvimento, realizados em recém-nascidos de extremo baixo peso submetidos à reanimação na sala de parto.OBJECTIVE: To describe the main controversies about resuscitation procedures performed in extremely low birth weight infants in

  2. Low Tidal Volume Reduces Lung Inflammation Induced by Liquid Ventilation in Piglets With Severe Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijun; Feng, Huizhen; Chen, Xiaofan; Liang, Kaifeng; Ni, Chengyao

    2017-05-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) is an alternative treatment for severe lung injury. High tidal volume is usually required for TLV to maintain adequate CO 2 clearance. However, high tidal volume may cause alveolar barotrauma. We aim to investigate the effect of low tidal volume on pulmonary inflammation in piglets with lung injury and under TLV. After the establishment of acute lung injury model by infusing lipopolysaccharide, 12 piglets were randomly divided into two groups, TLV with high tidal volume (25 mL/kg) or with low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) for 240 min, respectively. Extracorporeal CO 2 removal was applied in low tidal volume group to improve CO 2 clearance and in high tidal volume group as sham control. Gas exchange and hemodynamic status were monitored every 30 min during TLV. At the end of the study, pulmonary mRNA expression and plasmatic concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by collecting lung tissue and blood samples from piglets. Arterial blood pressure, PaO 2 , and PaCO 2 showed no remarkable difference between groups during the observation period. Compared with high tidal volume strategy, low tidal volume resulted in 76% reduction of minute volume and over 80% reduction in peak inspiratory pressure during TLV. In addition, low tidal volume significantly diminished pulmonary mRNA expression and plasmatic level of IL-6 and IL-8. We conclude that during TLV, low tidal volume reduces lung inflammation in piglets with acute lung injury without compromising gas exchange. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of actin remodeling and endomembrane trafficking in alveolar epithelial type I cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Lindsay M; Vergen, Jorge; Prakash, Y S; Pagano, Richard E; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2011-04-01

    Alveolar epithelial type I cell (ATI) wounding is prevalent in ventilator-injured lungs and likely contributes to pathogenesis of "barotrauma" and "biotrauma." In experimental models most wounded alveolar cells repair plasma membrane (PM) defects and survive insults. Considering the force balance between edge energy at the PM wound margins and adhesive interactions of the lipid bilayer with the underlying cytoskeleton (CSK), we tested the hypothesis that subcortical actin depolymerization is a key facilitator of PM repair. Using real-time fluorescence imaging of primary rat ATI transfected with a live cell actin-green fluorescent protein construct (Lifeact-GFP) and loaded with N-rhodamine phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), we examined the spatial and temporal coordination between cytoskeletal remodeling and PM repair following micropuncture. Membrane integrity was inferred from the fluorescence intensity profiles of the cytosolic label calcein AM. Wounding led to rapid depolymerization of the actin CSK near the wound site, concurrent with accumulation of endomembrane-derived N-rhodamine PE. Both responses were sustained until PM integrity was reestablished, which typically occurs between ∼10 and 40 s after micropuncture. Only thereafter did the actin CSK near the wound begin to repolymerize, while the rate of endomembrane lipid accumulation decreased. Between 60 and 90 s after successful PM repair, after translocation of the actin nucleation factor cortactin, a dense actin fiber network formed. In cells that did not survive micropuncture injury, actin remodeling did not occur. These novel results highlight the importance of actin remodeling in ATI cell repair and suggest molecular targets for modulating the repair process.

  4. Current diagnostic procedures for diagnosing vertigo and dizziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo is a multisensory syndrome that otolaryngologists are confronted with every day. With regard to the complex functions of the sense of orientation, vertigo is considered today as a disorder of the sense of direction, a disturbed spatial perception of the body. Beside the frequent classical syndromes for which vertigo is the leading symptom (e.g. positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Menière’s disease), vertigo may occur as main or accompanying symptom of a multitude of ENT-related diseases involving the inner ear. It also concerns for example acute and chronic viral or bacterial infections of the ear with serous or bacterial labyrinthitis, disorders due to injury (e.g. barotrauma, fracture of the oto-base, contusion of the labyrinth), chronic-inflammatory bone processes as well as inner ear affections in the perioperative course. In the last years, diagnostics of vertigo have experienced a paradigm shift due to new diagnostic possibilities. In the diagnostics of emergency cases, peripheral and central disorders of vertigo (acute vestibular syndrome) may be differentiated with simple algorithms. The introduction of modern vestibular test procedures (video head impulse test, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials) in the clinical practice led to new diagnostic options that for the first time allow a complex objective assessment of all components of the vestibular organ with relatively low effort. Combined with established methods, a frequency-specific assessment of the function of vestibular reflexes is possible. New classifications allow a clinically better differentiation of vertigo syndromes. Modern radiological procedures such as for example intratympanic gadolinium application for Menière’s disease with visualization of an endolymphatic hydrops also influence current medical standards. Recent methodical developments significantly contributed to the possibilities that nowadays vertigo can be better and more quickly clarified in particular in

  5. The impact of a pulmonary recruitment maneuver to reduce post-laparoscopic shoulder pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kyoungho; Choi, Wonjun; Shim, Jaegeum; Song, Taejong

    2017-01-01

    A pulmonary recruitment maneuver (PRM) can effectively reduce post-laparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP). However, a high-pressure PRM may cause pulmonary barotrauma. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a PRM using two different maximum inspiratory pressures (40 and 60cmH 2 O) for reducing PLSP. Patients undergoing gynecologic laparoscopy were randomly allocated to a control group (n=30), a 40 cmH 2 O PRM group (n=30), and a 60 cmH 2 O PRM group (n=30). In the control group, residual carbon dioxide was removed by passive exsufflation through the port site. In the two intervention groups, the PRM consisting of five manual pulmonary inflations was performed at the end of surgery with a maximum pressure of 40 cmH 2 O or 60 cmH 2 O, respectively. Shoulder pain and wound pain were recorded using a visual analogue scale at 24 and 48h postoperatively. Wound pain scores at 24 and 48h post-surgery were not different between the three groups. The PLSP scores in the two intervention groups were significantly lower than that seen in the control group at 24 and 48h postoperatively (P=0.006 and P<0.001, respectively). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the PLSP scores between the two intervention groups. A low-pressure PRM (40cmH 2 O) is as effective as a high-pressure PRM (60cmH 2 O) for removing residual gas from the peritoneal cavity. PRM using a maximal inspiratory pressure of 40cmH 2 O is safe and efficacious for the reduction of PLSP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pressure- and flow-controlled media perfusion differently modify vascular mechanics in lung decellularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Palma, Renata K; Campillo, Noelia; Uriarte, Juan J; Oliveira, Luis V F; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2015-09-01

    Organ biofabrication is a potential future alternative for obtaining viable organs for transplantation. Achieving intact scaffolds to be recellularized is a key step in lung bioengineering. Perfusion of decellularizing media through the pulmonary artery has shown to be effective. How vascular perfusion pressure and flow vary throughout lung decellularization, which is not well known, is important for optimizing the process (minimizing time) while ensuring scaffold integrity (no barotrauma). This work was aimed at characterizing the pressure/flow relationship at the pulmonary vasculature and at how effective vascular resistance depends on pressure- and flow-controlled variables when applying different methods of media perfusion for lung decellularization. Lungs from 43 healthy mice (C57BL/6; 7-8 weeks old) were investigated. After excision and tracheal cannulation, lungs were inflated at 10 cmH2O airway pressure and subjected to conventional decellularization with a solution of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Pressure (PPA) and flow (V'PA) at the pulmonary artery were continuously measured. Decellularization media was perfused through the pulmonary artery: (a) at constant PPA=20 cmH2O or (b) at constant V'PA=0.5 and 0.2 ml/min. Effective vascular resistance was computed as Rv=PPA/V'PA. Rv (in cmH2O/(ml/min)); mean±SE) considerably varied throughout lung decellularization, particularly for pressure-controlled perfusion (from 29.1±3.0 in baseline to a maximum of 664.1±164.3 (pmechanics throughout decellularization provides information relevant for optimizing the process time while ensuring that vascular pressure is kept within a safety range to preserve the organ scaffold integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Case control study: Hyperbaric oxygen treatment of mild traumatic brain injury persistent post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G Harch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI persistent post-concussion syndrome (PPCS and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD are epidemic in United States Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans. Treatment of the combined diagnoses is limited. The aim of this study is to assess safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen treatments (HBOT for mild TBI PPCS and PTSD. Thirty military subjects aged 18–65 with PPCS with or without PTSD and from one or more blast-induced mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries that were a minimum of 1 year old and occurred after 9/11/2001 were studied. The measures included symptom lists, physical exam, neuropsychological and psychological testing on 29 subjects (1 dropout and SPECT brain imaging pre and post HBOT. Comparison was made using SPECT imaging on 29 matched Controls. Side effects (30 subjects experienced due to the HBOT: reversible middle ear barotrauma (n = 6, transient deterioration in symptoms (n = 7, reversible bronchospasm (n = 1, and increased anxiety (n = 2; not related to confinement; unrelated to HBOT: ureterolithiasis (n = 1, chest pain (n = 2. Significant improvement (29 subjects was seen in neurological exam, symptoms, intelligence quotient, memory, measures of attention, dominant hand motor speed and dexterity, quality of life, general anxiety, PTSD, depression (including reduction in suicidal ideation, and reduced psychoactive medication usage. At 6-month follow-up subjects reported further symptomatic improvement. Compared to Controls the subjects' SPECT was significantly abnormal, significantly improved after 1 and 40 treatments, and became statistically indistinguishable from Controls in 75% of abnormal areas. HBOT was found to be safe and significantly effective for veterans with mild to moderate TBI PPCS with PTSD in all four outcome domains: clinical medicine, neuropsychology, psychology, and SPECT imaging. Veterans also experienced a significant reduction in suicidal ideation and

  8. First Aid Oxygen Treatment for Decompression Illness in the Goat After Simulated Submarine Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, Geoff A M; Seddon, Fiona M; Jurd, Karen M; Thacker, Julian C; Fisher, Arran S

    2015-12-01

    Personnel responding to a distressed submarine incident require information on likely casualty levels and the severity and progression of decompression illness (DCI). Recompression may not be immediately available. First aid oxygen (FAo₂) can be administered; however, there is no direct evidence of its efficacy in this scenario. Trials were conducted between 2004 and 2006. Goats exposed to raised pressure for 24 h ('saturation') were either returned directly to atmospheric pressure (Phase A, N = 40) or exposed to simulated submarine escape at a depth of 656 ft (200 m; assumed seawater density = 1019.72 kg · m(-3); Phase B, N = 39). The pressure during saturation was selected to provoke 50% DCI. Cases of DCI were randomly assigned to receive FAo₂or air. DCI cases were: limb pain in 39 subjects, neurological in 6, respiratory in 4, and pulmonary barotrauma in 1 subject. In Phase A, 5/12 subjects in the FAo₂group and 0/11 in the air control group achieved permanent resolution of DCI. In Phase B, 6/8 subjects in the FAo₂group and 5/8 in the air control group achieved permanent resolution. In both Phases, levels of venous gas bubbles reduced sooner with FAo₂. Of three cases of neurological DCI receiving FAo₂, two showed permanent resolution. In total, four cases of respiratory DCI occurred; none of these resolved, with three being treated with FAo₂and one in the air control. Oxygen can be an effective first aid measure for DCI following submarine escape. However, it should not be used as a replacement for recompression therapy.

  9. Impact of breath holding on cardiovascular respiratory and cerebrovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujic, Zeljko; Breskovic, Toni

    2012-06-01

    Human underwater breath-hold diving is a fascinating example of applied environmental physiology. In combination with swimming, it is one of the most popular forms of summer outdoor physical activities. It is performed by a variety of individuals ranging from elite breath-hold divers, underwater hockey and rugby players, synchronized and sprint swimmers, spear fishermen, sponge harvesters and up to recreational swimmers. Very few data currently exist concerning the influence of regular breath holding on possible health risks such as cerebrovascular, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. A literature search of the PubMed electronic search engine using keywords 'breath-hold diving' and 'apnoea diving' was performed. This review focuses on recent advances in knowledge regarding possibly harmful physiological changes and/or potential health risks associated with breath-hold diving. Available evidence indicates that deep breath-hold dives can be very dangerous and can cause serious acute health problems such a collapse of the lungs, barotrauma at descent and ascent, pulmonary oedema and alveolar haemorrhage, cardiac arrest, blackouts, nitrogen narcosis, decompression sickness and death. Moreover, even shallow apnoea dives, which are far more frequent, can present a significant health risk. The state of affairs is disturbing as athletes, as well as recreational individuals, practice voluntary apnoea on a regular basis. Long-term health risks of frequent maximal breath holds are at present unknown, but should be addressed in future research. Clearly, further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms related to the possible development or worsening of different clinical disorders in recreational or competitive breath holding and to determine the potential changes in training/competition regimens in order to prevent these adverse events.

  10. Performance of manual hyperinflation: consistency and modification of the technique by intensive care unit nurses during physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Diane M; Duncan, Christine N; Pinder, Mary; Budgeon, Charley A; Jacob, Wendy J

    2016-08-01

    To assess the consistency and safety of manual hyperinflation delivery by nurses of variable clinical experience using a resuscitator bag during physiotherapy treatment. Manual hyperinflation involves the delivery of larger than normal gas volumes to intubated patients and is routinely used by nurses in collaboration with physiotherapists for the management of retained sputum. The aim is to deliver slow deep breaths with an inspiratory hold without unsafe airway pressures, lung volumes or haemodynamic changes. In addition, nursing staff should be able to 'feel' differences in resistance and adjust their technique accordingly. Prospective observational study utilising the simulation of a mechanically ventilated patient. Thirty-three nurses delivered manual hyperinflation to a SimMan3G mannequin who had three distinct lung scenarios applied (normal; asthma; Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome) in randomised order during simulated physiotherapy treatment. Respiratory rate, tidal volume (Vt ), mean inspiratory flow rate (Vt /Ti), and peak airway pressure data were generated. Over all scenarios, mean respiratory rate = 12·3 breaths/minute, mean Vt  = 638·6 mls, mean inflation time = 1·3 seconds and peak airway pressure exceeded 40 cm H2 O in 41% of breaths, although only in 10% of breaths during the 'normal' lung scenario. Experienced nurses were able to manually hyperinflate 'normal' patients in a simulated setting safely. Despite their knowledge of barotrauma, unsafe airway pressures were delivered in some scenarios. Training with regard to safe airway pressures, breath hold and adequate volumes is recommended for all nurses undertaking the procedure. Nurses and physiotherapists must closely monitor the patient's condition during manual hyperinflation thereby recognising changes with regard to lung compliance and airway resistance, with nurses responding by altering their technique. The addition of a pressure manometer in the circuit may improve patient

  11. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF COMBAT INJURIES OF THE EAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Egorov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors  discuss specifics of the  wound  process in modern  combat  injury of the  ear, significance  and  specifics of diagnosis  of gunshot ear injury related to individual characteristics of gunshot  wounds  with consideration of the  accepted anatomical classification of the injured zones. Typical complications of ear injuries are described that  can result in death. The authors  analyze an approach  to  surgical treatment of traumatic  ear injuries based on their own experience, including non-conventional choice  of the  type  of surgery. They proposed an algorithm to assess the auditory and  vestibular  analyzers in the  injured based  on their analysis of date obtained from 772 patients, determine types of pure-tone audiograms  typical for acoustic  and  barotrauma,  and  underline  the informative  value  of optokinetic  nystagmus   assessment. Various types of conservative  management of the sequelae of the mine-blast ear trauma are discussed  aimed at potential  minimization of the  post-traumatic reactions  of the  auditory  and vestibular  analyzers.  The  authors  draw attention to the importance of early treatment, the highest effectiveness of combination therapy and plasmapheresis. They propose  their  experience  of care for the above mentioned traumatic injuries to improve treatment efficacy.

  12. Comparison of physician staffed emergency teams with paramedic teams assisted by telemedicine--a randomized, controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rörtgen, Daniel; Bergrath, Sebastian; Rossaint, Rolf; Beckers, Stefan K; Fischermann, Harold; Na, In-Sik; Peters, David; Fitzner, Christina; Skorning, Max

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMSs) vary considerably. While some are physician staffed, most systems are run by paramedics. The objective of this randomized, controlled simulation study was to compare the emergency care between physician staffed EMS teams (control group) and paramedic teams that were supported telemedically by an EMS physician (telemedicine group). Overall 16 teams (1 EMS physician, 2 paramedics) were randomized to the control group or the telemedicine group. Telemedical functionalities included two-way audio communication, transmission of vital data (numerical values and curves) and video streaming from the scenario room to the remotely located EMS physician. After a run-in scenario all teams completed four standardized scenarios, in which no highly invasive procedures (e.g. thoracic drain) were required, two using high-fidelity simulation (burn trauma, intoxication) and two using standardized patients (renal colic, barotrauma). All scenarios were videotaped and analyzed by two investigators using predefined scoring items. Non case-specific items (31 vs. 31 scenarios): obtaining of 'symptoms', 'past medical history' and 'events' were carried out comparably, but in the telemedicine group 'allergies' (17 vs. 28, OR 7.69, CI 2.1-27.9, p=0.002) and 'medications' (17 vs. 27, OR 5.55, CI 1.7-18.0, p=0.004) were inquired more frequently. No significant differences were found regarding the case-specific items and in both groups no potentially dangerous mistreatments were observed. Telemedically assisted paramedic care was feasible and at least not inferior compared to standard EMS teams with a physician on-scene in these scenarios. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. First aid in the air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, E; Pearn, J

    1996-07-01

    First aid is commonly required during commercial aircraft flights, especially during international flights. An intimidating and sometimes threatening array of in-flight medical emergencies challenge the doctor, flight attendants and other passengers in such medical emergencies. Cramped conditions, difficulties of access to the victim, lack of privacy, cultural and language differences and noise and vibration all compound to increase the difficulties of the normal first aid drills which are required in the management of in-cabin emergencies. Doctors who fly as passengers are liable to be called upon to render first aid in the air. We provide an analysis of the types of medical emergencies encountered during commercial air travel. We have reviewed all consecutive in-flight medical incident reports for QANTAS international flights for 1993. All incidents requiring the attention of a doctor were included. A total of 454 significant medical incidents occurred. These included, in rank order, syncope (35%), angina and cardiac emergencies (23%), gastrointestinal conditions (13%), respiratory tract infections and asthma (9%) and anxiety and panic reactions warranting medical intervention (5%). Syncope, the management of gastrointestinal symptoms and problems of angina comprise over half (58%) of the presenting symptoms which confront a fellow traveller who may coincidentally be a medical practitioner. Problems of anxiety, sleeplessness, airport bustle, immobility, barotrauma, alcohol abuse and mild hypoxia are discussed in the context of precipitating factors which may trigger an in-flight emergency. Psychological problems are very common and challenge the first aider, whether or not he or she is medically trained. We emphasize the necessity for doctors and nurses to be trained in first aid, as a distinct profession in its own right and a series of drills and skills which are distinctive from those of surgery-based health care. The 5% annual increase in air

  14. How to mitigate impacts of wind farms on bats? A review of potential conservation measures in the European context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peste, Filipa; Paula, Anabela; Silva, Luís P. da; Bernardino, Joana; Pereira, Pedro; Mascarenhas, Miguel; Costa, Hugo; Vieira, José; Bastos, Carlos; Fonseca, Carlos; Pereira, Maria João Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Wind energy is growing worldwide as a source of power generation. Bat assemblages may be negatively affected by wind farms due to the fatality of a significant number of individuals after colliding with the moving turbines or experiencing barotrauma. The implementation of wind farms should follow standard procedures to prevent such negative impacts: avoid, reduce and offset, in what is known as the mitigation hierarchy. According to this approach avoiding impacts is the priority, followed by the minimisation of the identified impacts, and finally, when residual negative impacts still remain, those must be offset or at least compensated. This paper presents a review on conservation measures for bats and presents some guidelines within the compensation scenario, focusing on negative impacts that remain after avoidance and minimisation measures. The conservation strategies presented aim at the improvement of the ecological conditions for the bat assemblage as a whole. While developed under the European context, the proposed measures are potentially applicable elsewhere, taking into consideration the specificity of each region in terms of bat assemblages present, landscape features and policy context regarding nature and biodiversity conservation and management. An analysis of potential opportunities and constraints arising from the implementation of offset/compensation programmes and gaps in the current knowledge is also considered. - Highlights: • Wind energy impacts bat populations in ways not yet fully understood. • As the use of windfarms is growing worldwide greater impacts on bat populations are also expected. • Mitigation hierarchy provides a way to reduce impacts from new wind farm facilities. • Compensation measures may be used to reduce the residual effects on bat populations. • Identify bats ecological needs and compensate according to the existing surroundings

  15. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthys Heinrich

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax, sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient. Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST, which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists including mechanical aids to

  16. Traumatic lung injury attributed to tornadic activity-induced barometric pressure changes in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Brandy N; Dugat, Danielle R; Snider, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old castrated male Italian Greyhound (dog 1) and an approximately 1-year-old female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were evaluated because of respiratory distress 8 and 10 days, respectively, after a tornado. CLINICAL FINDINGS No obvious external injuries were identified auscultation revealed decreased bronchovesicular sounds in the affected hemithorax of both dogs. Clinicopathologic changes were mild, with evidence of inflammation in both dogs. Thoracic radiography of both dogs revealed pneumothorax and pleural effusion with effacement of the diaphragm; findings on CT included severe pulmonary atelectasis of affected lung lobes with normal bronchial tree configurtion and no evidence of diaphragmatic hernia. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Exploratory thoracotomy of both dogs confirmed CT findings Pulmonary parenchymal damage consistent with a large rupture was found in both patients. A large hematoma was adhered to the ruptured lung lobe of dog 1. Grossly affected lung tissue was removed; histologic examination revealed atelectasis, pulmonary fib osis, thrombosis, and minimal (dog 1) to marked (dog 2) inflammation Microbial culture of lung tissue yielded no growth for dog 1 and Streptococcus spp and Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for dog 2. Dog 1 had a recurrence of pneumothorax treated by drainage with a thoracostomy tube 1 month after surgery. Eighteen months after surgery, both dogs were reportedly doing well. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Development of clinical signs after a tornado, together with clinical, diagnostic imaging, surgical, and histologic findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary barotrauma for both dogs. Long-term outcome for these dogs, treated at a referral hospital, was good.

  17. How to mitigate impacts of wind farms on bats? A review of potential conservation measures in the European context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peste, Filipa, E-mail: filipapeste@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) (Portugal); Department of Biology, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Paula, Anabela [Bioinsight - Ambiente e Biodiversidade, Lda. Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, Luís P. da [Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) (Portugal); Department of Biology, University of Aveiro (Portugal); MARE and CEF, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Bernardino, Joana; Pereira, Pedro [Bio3 - Estudos e Projectos em Biologia e Recursos Naturais, Lda. Almada (Portugal); Mascarenhas, Miguel [Bioinsight - Ambiente e Biodiversidade, Lda. Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Hugo [Bio3 - Estudos e Projectos em Biologia e Recursos Naturais, Lda. Almada (Portugal); Vieira, José; Bastos, Carlos [Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics / IEETA, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Fonseca, Carlos [Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) (Portugal); Department of Biology, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Maria João Ramos [Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) (Portugal); PPGBAN, Department of Zoology, Institute of Biosciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); PPGEC, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    Wind energy is growing worldwide as a source of power generation. Bat assemblages may be negatively affected by wind farms due to the fatality of a significant number of individuals after colliding with the moving turbines or experiencing barotrauma. The implementation of wind farms should follow standard procedures to prevent such negative impacts: avoid, reduce and offset, in what is known as the mitigation hierarchy. According to this approach avoiding impacts is the priority, followed by the minimisation of the identified impacts, and finally, when residual negative impacts still remain, those must be offset or at least compensated. This paper presents a review on conservation measures for bats and presents some guidelines within the compensation scenario, focusing on negative impacts that remain after avoidance and minimisation measures. The conservation strategies presented aim at the improvement of the ecological conditions for the bat assemblage as a whole. While developed under the European context, the proposed measures are potentially applicable elsewhere, taking into consideration the specificity of each region in terms of bat assemblages present, landscape features and policy context regarding nature and biodiversity conservation and management. An analysis of potential opportunities and constraints arising from the implementation of offset/compensation programmes and gaps in the current knowledge is also considered. - Highlights: • Wind energy impacts bat populations in ways not yet fully understood. • As the use of windfarms is growing worldwide greater impacts on bat populations are also expected. • Mitigation hierarchy provides a way to reduce impacts from new wind farm facilities. • Compensation measures may be used to reduce the residual effects on bat populations. • Identify bats ecological needs and compensate according to the existing surroundings.

  18. Headache attributed to airplane travel ('airplane headache'): clinical profile based on a large case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, F; Lisotto, C; Maggioni, F; Zanchin, G

    2012-06-01

    The 'headache attributed to airplane travel', also named 'airplane headache' (AH), is a recently described headache disorder that appears exclusively in relation to airplane flights, in particular during the landing phase. Based on the stereotypical nature of the attacks in all reported cases, we proposed provisional diagnostic criteria for AH in a previously published paper. Up to now 37 cases have been described in the literature. After our paper was disseminated via the Internet, we received several email messages from subjects around the world who had experienced such a peculiar headache. Their cooperation, by completing a structured questionnaire and allowing the direct observation of three subjects, enabled us to carry out a study on a total of 75 patients suffering from AH. Our survey confirmed the stereotypical nature of the attacks, in particular with regard to the short duration of the pain (lasting less than 30 minutes in up to 95% of the cases), the clear relationship with the landing phase, the unilateral pain, the male preponderance, and the absence of accompanying signs and/or symptoms. It is conceivable to consider barotrauma as one of the main mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AH. The observation that the pain appears inconstantly in the majority of cases, without any evident disorder affecting the paranasal sinuses, could be consistent with a multimodal pathogenesis underlying this condition, possibly resulting in the interaction between anatomic, environmental and temporary concurrent factors. This is by far the largest AH case series ever reported in the literature. The diagnostic criteria that we previously proposed proved to be valid when applied to a large number of patients suffering from this condition. We support its recognition as a new form of headache, to be included in the forthcoming update of the International Headache Society Classification, within '10. Headache attributed to disorder of homoeostasis'. Its formal

  19. Case control study: hyperbaric oxygen treatment of mild traumatic brain injury persistent post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harch, Paul G; Andrews, Susan R; Fogarty, Edward F; Lucarini, Juliette; Van Meter, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) persistent post-concussion syndrome (PPCS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are epidemic in United States Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans. Treatment of the combined diagnoses is limited. The aim of this study is to assess safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen treatments (HBOT) for mild TBI PPCS and PTSD. Thirty military subjects aged 18-65 with PPCS with or without PTSD and from one or more blast-induced mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries that were a minimum of 1 year old and occurred after 9/11/2001 were studied. The measures included symptom lists, physical exam, neuropsychological and psychological testing on 29 subjects (1 dropout) and SPECT brain imaging pre and post HBOT. Comparison was made using SPECT imaging on 29 matched Controls. Side effects (30 subjects) experienced due to the HBOT: reversible middle ear barotrauma ( n = 6), transient deterioration in symptoms ( n = 7), reversible bronchospasm ( n = 1), and increased anxiety ( n = 2; not related to confinement); unrelated to HBOT: ureterolithiasis ( n = 1), chest pain ( n = 2). Significant improvement (29 subjects) was seen in neurological exam, symptoms, intelligence quotient, memory, measures of attention, dominant hand motor speed and dexterity, quality of life, general anxiety, PTSD, depression (including reduction in suicidal ideation), and reduced psychoactive medication usage. At 6-month follow-up subjects reported further symptomatic improvement. Compared to Controls the subjects' SPECT was significantly abnormal, significantly improved after 1 and 40 treatments, and became statistically indistinguishable from Controls in 75% of abnormal areas. HBOT was found to be safe and significantly effective for veterans with mild to moderate TBI PPCS with PTSD in all four outcome domains: clinical medicine, neuropsychology, psychology, and SPECT imaging. Veterans also experienced a significant reduction in suicidal ideation and

  20. The future of mechanical ventilation: lessons from the present and the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Marini, John J; Collino, Francesca; Maiolo, Giorgia; Rapetti, Francesca; Tonetti, Tommaso; Vasques, Francesco; Quintel, Michael

    2017-07-12

    The adverse effects of mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) arise from two main causes: unphysiological increases of transpulmonary pressure and unphysiological increases/decreases of pleural pressure during positive or negative pressure ventilation. The transpulmonary pressure-related side effects primarily account for ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) while the pleural pressure-related side effects primarily account for hemodynamic alterations. The changes of transpulmonary pressure and pleural pressure resulting from a given applied driving pressure depend on the relative elastances of the lung and chest wall. The term 'volutrauma' should refer to excessive strain, while 'barotrauma' should refer to excessive stress. Strains exceeding 1.5, corresponding to a stress above ~20 cmH 2 O in humans, are severely damaging in experimental animals. Apart from high tidal volumes and high transpulmonary pressures, the respiratory rate and inspiratory flow may also play roles in the genesis of VILI. We do not know which fraction of mortality is attributable to VILI with ventilation comparable to that reported in recent clinical practice surveys (tidal volume ~7.5 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) ~8 cmH 2 O, rate ~20 bpm, associated mortality ~35%). Therefore, a more complete and individually personalized understanding of ARDS lung mechanics and its interaction with the ventilator is needed to improve future care. Knowledge of functional lung size would allow the quantitative estimation of strain. The determination of lung inhomogeneity/stress raisers would help assess local stresses; the measurement of lung recruitability would guide PEEP selection to optimize lung size and homogeneity. Finding a safety threshold for mechanical power, normalized to functional lung volume and tissue heterogeneity, may help precisely define the safety limits of ventilating the individual in question. When a mechanical ventilation set cannot

  1. Causes of bat fatalities at wind turbines: Hypotheses and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryan, P.M.; Barclay, R.M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of industrial-scale wind turbines are being built across the world each year to meet the growing demand for sustainable energy. Bats of certain species are dying at wind turbines in unprecedented numbers. Species of bats consistently affected by turbines tend to be those that rely on trees as roosts and most migrate long distances. Although considerable progress has been made in recent years toward better understanding the problem, the causes of bat fatalities at turbines remain unclear. In this synthesis, we review hypothesized causes of bat fatalities at turbines. Hypotheses of cause fall into 2 general categoriesproximate and ultimate. Proximate causes explain the direct means by which bats die at turbines and include collision with towers and rotating blades, and barotrauma. Ultimate causes explain why bats come close to turbines and include 3 general types: random collisions, coincidental collisions, and collisions that result from attraction of bats to turbines. The random collision hypothesis posits that interactions between bats and turbines are random events and that fatalities are representative of the bats present at a site. Coincidental hypotheses posit that certain aspects of bat distribution or behavior put them at risk of collision and include aggregation during migration and seasonal increases in flight activity associated with feeding or mating. A surprising number of attraction hypotheses suggest that bats might be attracted to turbines out of curiosity, misperception, or as potential feeding, roosting, flocking, and mating opportunities. Identifying, prioritizing, and testing hypothesized causes of bat collisions with wind turbines are vital steps toward developing practical solutions to the problem. ?? 2009 American Society of Mammalogists.

  2. [A study of the Eustachian tube function in patients with a scuba diving accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Naoharu; Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Kitajima, Seiji

    2012-12-01

    The scuba diving population has increased very much recently, bringing with it a rise in barotrauma. Ninety-seven patients with scuba diving-related accidents (34 males and 63 females; mean +/- SD: 36.6 +/- 10.3 years) and 39 healthy volunteers (9 males and 30 females; mean +/- SD: 41.1 +/- 16.9 years) without a history of Eustachian tube dysfunction participated in this study. All patients underwent audiometric measurements, including hearing testing, tympanometry, and Eustachian tube function testing (sonotubometry and impedance test). The tympanometry results of the majority of the patients were normal (Jerger A type), however, 83 of 97 patients (85.6%) were diagnosed as having Eustachian tube dysfunction: all patients had tubal stenosis. Compared with healthy volunteers, the Eustachian tube function in scuba diving patients was significantly lower. According to whether the affected parts were one ear or both ears, we classified these patients into 2 types, that is, the unilateral group and the bilateral group. The symptoms in the unilateral group were more serious than those in the bilateral group. In the unilateral group, the Eustachian tube functions of the affected ear did not always show lower than those of the healthy ear, so we thought that excessive positive pressure at the mesotympanum caused by the Valsalva maneuver might have affected not only the affected ear but also the healthy ear and have resulted in healthy ears being severely impaired by excessive positive pressure. To prevent scuba divers from pressure injury, we think that divers should have their Eustachian tube dysfunction accurately evaluated and any problems should be treated well.

  3. Understanding scuba diving fatalities: carbon dioxide concentrations in intra-cardiac gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Vincent; Dominguez, Alejandro; Augsburger, Marc; Lossois, Maisy; Egger, Coraline; Palmiere, Cristian; Vilarino, Raquel; Grabherr, Silke

    2017-06-01

    Important developments in the diagnosis of scuba diving fatalities have been made thanks to forensic imaging tool improvements. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits reliable interpretation of the overall gaseous distribution in the cadaver. However, due to post-mortem delay, the radiological interpretation is often doubtful because the distinction between gas related to the dive and post-mortem decomposition artifactual gases becomes less obvious. We present six cases of fatal scuba diving showing gas in the heart and other vasculature. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) in cardiac gas measured by gas chromatography coupled to thermal conductivity detection were employed to distinguish decomposition from embolism based on the detection of decomposition gases (hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and methane) and to confirm arterial gas embolism (AGE) or post-mortem offgasing diagnoses. A Radiological Alteration Index (RAI) was calculated from the scan. Based on the dive history, the intra-cadaveric gas was diagnosed as deriving from decomposition (one case, minimal RAI of 61), post-mortem decompression artifacts (two cases, intermediate RAI between 60 and 85) and barotrauma/AGE (three cases, maximal RAI between 85 and 100), illustrating a large distribution inside the bodies. MDCT scans should be interpreted simultaneously with compositional analysis of intra-cadaveric gases. Intra-cadaveric gas sampling and analysis may become useful tools for understanding and diagnosing scuba diving fatalities. In cases with short post-mortem delays, the CO₂ concentration of the cardiac gas provides relevant information about the circumstances and cause of death when this parameter is interpreted in combination with the diving profile.

  4. Pleural controversy: optimal chest tube size for drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard W

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, a higher and higher percentage of patients with pleural effusions or pneumothorax are being treated with small-bore (10-14 F) chest tubes rather than large-bore (>20 F). However, there are very few randomized controlled studies comparing the efficacy and complication rates with the small- and large-bore catheters. Moreover, the randomized trials that are available have flaws in their design. The advantages of the small-bore catheters are that they are easier to insert and there is less pain with their insertion while they are in place. The placement of the small-bore catheters is probably more optimal when placement is done with ultrasound guidance. Small-bore chest tubes are recommended when pleurodesis is performed. The success of the small-bore indwelling tunnelled catheters that are left in place for weeks documents that the small-bore tubes do not commonly become obstructed with fibrin. Patients with complicated parapneumonic effusions are probably best managed with small-bore catheters even when the pleural fluid is purulent. Patients with haemothorax are best managed with large-bore catheters because of blood clots and the high volume of pleural fluid. Most patients with pneumothorax can be managed with aspiration or small-bore chest tubes. If these fail, a large-bore chest tube may be necessary. Patients on mechanical ventilation with barotrauma induced pneumothoraces are best managed with large-bore chest tubes. © 2011 The Author. Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. [Magnesium sulphate for the management of preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, P

    2006-01-01

    In case of eclampsia, and especially in case of preeclampsia, no consensus exist in order to treat or to prevent convulsions by routine use of magnesium sulphate, at least in France. However, a large, multicentre, randomised trial compared the efficacy of magnesium sulphate with diazepam or phenytoin in eclamptic women. In this trial, magnesium sulphate was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrent seizures and lower rate of maternal death than that observed with other anticonvulsants. The primary objective of magnesium sulphate prophylaxis in women with preeclampsia is to prevent or reduce the rate of eclampsia and complications associated with eclampsia. There are 3 large randomised controlled trials comparing the use of magnesium sulphate to prevent convulsions in patients with severe preeclampsia: the first one was vs phenytoin, the second vs placebo, and the third vs nimodipine. Patients receiving magnesium sulphate presented a significant lower risk of eclampsia than that observed with other comparison groups, probably by decreasing the cerebral perfusion pressure, thus avoiding a cerebral barotrauma. However, several arguments balance a wide use of magnesium sulphate: the prevalence of eclampsia in the Western world is very low, the use of magnesium sulphate does not affect the neonatal morbidity and mortality, and it is associated with a high rate of side effects, sometimes severe, such as respiratory depression. Thus, the benefit to risk ratio has to guide the use of magnesium sulphate and is directly correlated to the prevalence of eclampsia according to the risk of considered group. 1) The rate of seizures in women with mild preeclampsia not receiving magnesium sulphate is very low. Magnesium sulphate may potentially be associated with a higher number of adverse maternal effects. Therefore, the benefit to risk ratio does not support routine use of magnesium sulphate prophylaxis in this group. 2) On the other hand, the higher rate of

  6. Lesão brônquica e pneumotórax após reintubação usando um cateter para troca da via aérea Lesión brónquica y neumotórax posterior a la reintubación usando un catéter para el cambio de la vía aérea Bronchial injury and pneumothorax after reintubation using an airway exchange catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano P. de Almeida

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Relatamos um caso de pneumotórax causado por perfuração brônquica durante uma reintubação usando um cateter para troca da via aérea (CTVA em um paciente com câncer de cabeça e pescoço. RELATO DE CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 53 anos, com carcinoma de orofaringe, foi internado na UTI com pneumonia grave e síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda (SARA. O paciente foi identificado como sendo de difícil intubação e uma sonda endotraqueal (SET foi inserida através de um broncoscópio. Após uma semana de tratamento, observou-se ruptura do manguito endotraqueal. A troca da sonda endotraqueal foi necessária para obter uma ventilação pulmonar satisfatória. Um cateter para troca da via aérea (Cook, tamanho 14 foi usado para realizar a reintubação. Depois da reintubação, o paciente apresentou piora na saturação de oxigênio e uma radiografia revelou um grande pneumotórax. Um dreno torácico foi inserido e uma melhora imediata na saturação de oxigênio foi observada. A repetição da radiografia confirmou o posicionamento correto do dreno torácico e a reexpansão do pulmão direito. A broncoscopia realizada mostrou uma laceração posterior do brônquio principal direito. O paciente foi extubado no dia seguinte. Depois de quatro dias, o dreno torácico foi removido. A radiografia realizada um dia depois da retirada do dreno revelou um pequeno pneumotórax no lobo superior direito, mas o paciente permaneceu assintomático. CONCLUSÕES: O cateter para troca da via aérea é uma ferramenta valiosa para lidar com pacientes difíceis de intubar. Embora os médicos geralmente concentrem sua atenção em evitar um barotrauma causado pelo suplemento de oxigênio ou ventilação a jato através do CTVA, a preocupação com a técnica de inserção pode minimizar as complicações que ameaçam a vida e aumentar a segurança do CTVA.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Relatamos aquí un caso de neumotórax causado

  7. Relato de caso: anestesia em paciente portador de distrofia torácica asfixiante: Síndrome de Jeune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Saletti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Síndrome de Jeune, ou Distrofia Torácica Asfixiante, é uma doença autossômica recessiva. Esta síndrome é caracterizada por uma displasia óssea com variadas anormalidades: torácica, pancreática, cardíaca, hepática, renal e da retina. A idade em que o quadro clínico dos pacientes se apresenta está correlacionada com a gravidade da doença. Esses pacientes apresentam policondrodistrofia com costelas largas, curtas, horizontais e junções costocondrais irregulares levando a uma caixa torácica rígida e reduzida com grau de injúria respiratória variado. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 4 meses, 7 kg, portador de Distrofia Torácica Asfixiante. Apresentava-se intubado e com caixa torácica reduzida. Ecocardiograma: hipertensão pulmonar leve. Tomografia de tórax: hipoplasia pulmonar. Submetido à toracoplastia bilateral e toracotomia sob anestesia geral. Manutenção da anestesia: infusão contínua de sufentanil e sevoflurano. Parâmetros ventilatórios: ventilação mecânica ciclada à pressão. Com a abertura do tórax, houve melhora dos parâmetros ventilatórios e, após o posicionamento da prótese torácica, observou-se limitação ventilatória. Decidiu-se pela diminuição da prótese torácica com consequente melhora da ventilação. CONCLUSÕES: É imprescindível o diagnóstico de todas as anormalidades presentes para o correto manejo anestésico. Foi necessária observação para adequar ventilação pré- e pós-toracotomia/toracoplastia e para manter o paciente hemodinamicamente estável. A forma mais adequada para ventilação mecânica é a ciclada à pressão para vencer a barreira mecânica. No intraoperatório, é desejável manter o pico de pressão inspiratória o mais baixo possível para minimizar o risco de barotrauma, de impedimento do retorno venoso e diminuição do débito cardíaco.

  8. Translaryngeal jet ventilation and end-tidal PCO2 monitoring during varying degrees of upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K R; Menegazzi, J J; Yealy, D M; Klain, M M; Molner, R L; Goode, J S

    1991-11-01

    To explore the ventilatory adequacy of translaryngeal jet ventilation (TLJV) during partial upper airway obstruction and the usefulness of monitoring end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) during this condition. Prospective, nonrandomized, sequential crossover design. Apneic dog model (five dogs; mean weight, 23 kg). Animals were intubated with a 9.0-mm endotracheal tube with the tip positioned above the cricothyroid membrane. Upper airway obstructions of 40%, 69%, and 80% were created. TLJV was performed through the cricothyroid membrane using a 13-gauge catheter with 100% oxygen, 45 psi, 15 breaths per minute, and 30% inspiratory time for 15 minutes at each upper airway obstruction. Data collected at baseline (no upper airway obstruction) and one-minute intervals included arterial blood pressures, continuous PaCO2 measurements, and PETCO2 at the TLJV catheter tip and above the level of obstruction. Arterial blood gases were obtained at 0 and 15 minutes. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation, analysis of variance, and Turkey's multiple comparisons (significance, P less than .05). Baseline values for all variables did not significantly differ at the onset of each testing phase. Mean pH increased significantly from baseline during 69% upper airway obstruction (7.36 to 7.54, P less than .05) and 80% upper airway obstruction (7.39 to 7.61, P less than .01). Mean PaCO2 decreased significantly from baseline during all upper airway obstructions: 40% upper airway obstruction (39.9 to 33.6 mm Hg, P less than .01), 69% upper airway obstruction (38.3 to 25.6 mm Hg, P less than .001), and 80% upper airway obstruction (36.2 to 18.2 mm Hg, P less than .001). PaCO2, PETCO2, and pH differed significantly between each level of upper airway obstruction (P less than .01). PETCO2 was significantly correlated with PaCO2 (r = .84, P less than .001) and did not significantly differ from PaCO2. No signs of barotrauma were observed in any animal at any degree of upper airway obstruction. TLJV

  9. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  10. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  11. Invasive versus non-invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Annane, Djillali; Orlikowski, David; He, Li; Yang, Mi; Zhou, Muke; Liu, Guan J

    2017-12-04

    Acute respiratory failure is a common life-threatening complication of acute onset neuromuscular diseases, and may exacerbate chronic hypoventilation in patients with neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders. Standard management includes oxygen supplementation, physiotherapy, cough assistance, and, whenever needed, antibiotics and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) via nasal, buccal or full-face devices has become routine practice in many centres. The primary objective of this review was to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation with invasive ventilation in improving short-term survival in acute respiratory failure in people with neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders. The secondary objectives were to compare the effects of NIV with those of invasive mechanical ventilation on improvement in arterial blood gas after 24 hours and lung function measurements after one month, incidence of barotrauma and ventilator-associated pneumonia, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and length of hospital stay. We searched the following databases on 11 September 2017: the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched conference proceedings and clinical trials registries. We planned to include randomised or quasi-randomised trials with or without blinding. We planned to include trials performed in children or adults with acute onset neuromuscular diseases or chronic neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders presenting with acute respiratory failure that compared the benefits and risks of invasive ventilation versus NIV. Two review authors reviewed searches and independently selected studies for assessment. We planned to follow standard Cochrane methodology for data collection and analysis. We did not identify any trials eligible for inclusion in the review. Acute respiratory failure is a life-threatening complication of

  12. Do new anesthesia ventilators deliver small tidal volumes accurately during volume-controlled ventilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller, Patricia R; McDonough, Joseph M; Feldman, Jeffrey M

    2008-05-01

    During mechanical ventilation of infants and neonates, small changes in tidal volume may lead to hypo- or hyperventilation, barotrauma, or volutrauma. Partly because breathing circuit compliance and fresh gas flow affect tidal volume delivery by traditional anesthesia ventilators in volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) mode, pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) using a circle breathing system has become a common approach to minimizing the risk of mechanical ventilation for small patients, although delivered tidal volume is not assured during PCV. A new generation of anesthesia machine ventilators addresses the problems of VCV by adjusting for fresh gas flow and for the compliance of the breathing circuit. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of new anesthesia ventilators to deliver small tidal volumes. Four anesthesia ventilator systems were evaluated to determine the accuracy of volume delivery to the airway during VCV at tidal volume settings of 100, 200, and 500 mL under different conditions of breathing circuit compliance (fully extended and fully contracted circuits) and lung compliance. A mechanical test lung (adult and infant) was used to simulate lung compliances ranging from 0.0025 to 0.03 L/cm H(2)O. Volumes and pressures were measured using a calibrated screen pneumotachograph and custom software. We tested the Smartvent 7900, Avance, and Aisys anesthesia ventilator systems (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI) and the Apollo anesthesia ventilator (Draeger Medical, Telford, PA). The Smartvent 7900 and Avance ventilators use inspiratory flow sensors to control the volume delivered, whereas the Aisys and Apollo ventilators compensate for the compliance of the circuit. We found that the anesthesia ventilators that use compliance compensation (Aisys and Apollo) accurately delivered both large and small tidal volumes to the airway of the test lung under conditions of normal and low lung compliance during VCV (ranging from 95.5% to 106.2% of the set tidal volume

  13. Does postoperative mechanical ventilation predispose to bronchopleural fistula formation in patients undergoing pneumonectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufektzian, Levon; Patris, Vasileios; Sepsas, Evangelos; Konstantinou, Marios

    2015-09-01

    withdraw the effects of the continuous barotrauma on the bronchial stump, although its impact cannot be quantified. Performing pneumonectomy in the presence of infectious conditions may contribute to the development of postoperative BPF, but its role is less well defined. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. High-inflation pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure. Injurious to the lung? No.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, L D

    1996-07-01

    Survival rates in ARDS with conventional ventilation using high oxygen fractions and low PEEP levels have been reported to be less than 10%. In three prospective evaluations of ARDS in the 1980s, mortality rates remained greater than 60%. Early studies using high-level PEEP therapy in severe ARDS by Douglas, Downs, Kirby, and Civetta showed improved survival rates with ranges between 60% and 80%. In 1979 Gallagher reviewed 59 patients with ARDS who were treated with PEEP greater than 15 cm H2O titrated to improve FRC by achieving an intrapulmonary shunt fraction of 15%. The overall survival was 65%, with only 5% of the patients dying secondary to respiratory failure. In the more recent study by Miller in trauma patients and later by DiRusso in a variety of surgical patients, the overall mortality rate for those patients receiving PEEP greater than 15 cm H2O was 20% to 30%. Of the 14 patients who died, only seven (10% of the total) succumbed to respiratory failure. The remaining patients died from the primary underlying disease with normal oxygenation or after significant weaning from high PEEP levels. By using a goal-oriented approach to the management of patients with severe ARDS, we have found that high-level PEEP therapy was effective in lowering the intrapulmonary shunt and improving the SaO2 at acceptable levels of inspired oxygen. All of these patients were ventilated with traditional high tidal volumes (10 to 15 mL/kg) and therefore exhibited high peak inspiratory airway pressures. This support method did not seem to cause lung injury or an excessive amount of barotrauma in these patients, but in fact, was associated with a lower mortality rate (30%) than reported in other studies of patients with lesser degrees of lung oxygenation dysfunction and extrapulmonary organ system dysfunction. Currently available information indicates that increases in mean airway pressure (induced with PEEP or other modes of ventilatory support to restore losses in FRC that occur

  15. Vestibular disorders among adults in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somefun, O A; Giwa, O S; Bamgboye, B A; Okeke-Igbokwe, I Irene; Azeez, A A Abdul

    2010-10-01

    , barotraumas and drug-induced vertigo in 1 (1%), respectively, central vestibular disorders of vascular origin 2 (2%), vertebrobasilar insufficiency in 1 (1%), post-traumatic vertigo in 3 (3%) and unknown in 2 (2%). In conclusion, peripheral vestibular disorders are common of which BPPV is the most prevalent. Pre-referral anti-vertiginous medication is common among general practitioners. The practising ORL/Head neck surgeon and orthopedic surgeons must be conversant with the tools of diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Lesão brônquica e pneumotórax após reintubação usando um cateter para troca da via aérea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano P. de Almeida

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Relatamos um caso de pneumotórax causado por perfuração brônquica durante uma reintubação usando um cateter para troca da via aérea (CTVA em um paciente com câncer de cabeça e pescoço. RELATO DE CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 53 anos, com carcinoma de orofaringe, foi internado na UTI com pneumonia grave e síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda (SARA. O paciente foi identificado como sendo de difícil intubação e uma sonda endotraqueal (SET foi inserida através de um broncoscópio. Após uma semana de tratamento, observou-se ruptura do manguito endotraqueal. A troca da sonda endotraqueal foi necessária para obter uma ventilação pulmonar satisfatória. Um cateter para troca da via aérea (Cook, tamanho 14 foi usado para realizar a reintubação. Depois da reintubação, o paciente apresentou piora na saturação de oxigênio e uma radiografia revelou um grande pneumotórax. Um dreno torácico foi inserido e uma melhora imediata na saturação de oxigênio foi observada. A repetição da radiografia confirmou o posicionamento correto do dreno torácico e a reexpansão do pulmão direito. A broncoscopia realizada mostrou uma laceração posterior do brônquio principal direito. O paciente foi extubado no dia seguinte. Depois de quatro dias, o dreno torácico foi removido. A radiografia realizada um dia depois da retirada do dreno revelou um pequeno pneumotórax no lobo superior direito, mas o paciente permaneceu assintomático. CONCLUSÕES: O cateter para troca da via aérea é uma ferramenta valiosa para lidar com pacientes difíceis de intubar. Embora os médicos geralmente concentrem sua atenção em evitar um barotrauma causado pelo suplemento de oxigênio ou ventilação a jato através do CTVA, a preocupação com a técnica de inserção pode minimizar as complicações que ameaçam a vida e aumentar a segurança do CTVA.

  17. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist compared to other forms of triggered ventilation for neonatal respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas E; Hunt, Katie A; Shetty, Sandeep; Greenough, Anne

    2017-10-27

    Effective synchronisation of infant respiratory effort with mechanical ventilation may allow adequate gas exchange to occur at lower peak airway pressures, potentially reducing barotrauma and volutrauma and development of air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. During neurally adjusted ventilatory assist ventilation (NAVA), respiratory support is initiated upon detection of an electrical signal from the diaphragm muscle, and pressure is provided in proportion to and synchronous with electrical activity of the diaphragm (EADi). Compared to other modes of triggered ventilation, this may provide advantages in improving synchrony. Primary• To determine whether NAVA, when used as a primary or rescue mode of ventilation, results in reduced rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death among term and preterm newborn infants compared to other forms of triggered ventilation• To assess the safety of NAVA by determining whether it leads to greater risk of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), periventricular leukomalacia, or air leaks when compared to other forms of triggered ventilation Secondary• To determine whether benefits of NAVA differ by gestational age (term or preterm)• To determine whether outcomes of cross-over trials performed during the first two weeks of life include peak pressure requirements, episodes of hypocarbia or hypercarbia, oxygenation index, and the work of breathing SEARCH METHODS: We performed searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cohrane Library; MEDLINE via Ovid SP (January 1966 to March 2017); Embase via Ovid SP (January 1980 to March 2017); the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) via EBSCO host (1982 to March 2017); and the Web of Science (1985 to 2017). We searched abstracts from annual meetings of the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) (2000 to 2016); meetings of the European Society of Pediatric Research (published in Pediatric Research); and meetings of the

  18. Penguin lungs and air sacs: implications for baroprotection, oxygen stores and buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; St Leger, J; Scadeng, M

    2015-03-01

    The anatomy and volume of the penguin respiratory system contribute significantly to pulmonary baroprotection, the body O2 store, buoyancy and hence the overall diving physiology of penguins. Therefore, three-dimensional reconstructions from computerized tomographic (CT) scans of live penguins were utilized to measure lung volumes, air sac volumes, tracheobronchial volumes and total body volumes at different inflation pressures in three species with different dive capacities [Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae), king (Aptenodytes patagonicus) and emperor (A. forsteri) penguins]. Lung volumes scaled to body mass according to published avian allometrics. Air sac volumes at 30 cm H2O (2.94 kPa) inflation pressure, the assumed maximum volume possible prior to deep dives, were two to three times allometric air sac predictions and also two to three times previously determined end-of-dive total air volumes. Although it is unknown whether penguins inhale to such high volumes prior to dives, these values were supported by (a) body density/buoyancy calculations, (b) prior air volume measurements in free-diving ducks and (c) previous suggestions that penguins may exhale air prior to the final portions of deep dives. Based upon air capillary volumes, parabronchial volumes and tracheobronchial volumes estimated from the measured lung/airway volumes and the only available morphometry study of a penguin lung, the presumed maximum air sac volumes resulted in air sac volume to air capillary/parabronchial/tracheobronchial volume ratios that were not large enough to prevent barotrauma to the non-collapsing, rigid air capillaries during the deepest dives of all three species, and during many routine dives of king and emperor penguins. We conclude that volume reduction of airways and lung air spaces, via compression, constriction or blood engorgement, must occur to provide pulmonary baroprotection at depth. It is also possible that relative air capillary and parabronchial volumes are

  19. SPATIALLY-EXPLICIT BAT IMPACT SCREENING TOOL FOR WIND TURBINE SITING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versar, Inc.; Exponent, Inc.

    2013-10-28

    As the U.S. seeks to increase energy production from renewable energy sources, development of wind power resources continues to grow. One of the most important ecological issues restricting wind energy development, especially the siting of wind turbines, is the potential adverse effect on bats. High levels of bat fatality have been recorded at a number of wind energy facilities, especially in the eastern United States. The U.S. Department of Energy contracted with Versar, Inc., and Exponent to develop a spatially-explicit site screening tool to evaluate the mortality of bats resulting from interactions (collisions or barotrauma) with wind turbines. The resulting Bat Vulnerability Assessment Tool (BVAT) presented in this report integrates spatial information about turbine locations, bat habitat features, and bat behavior as it relates to possible interactions with turbines. A model demonstration was conducted that focuses on two bat species, the eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) and the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). The eastern red bat is a relatively common tree-roosting species that ranges broadly during migration in the Eastern U.S., whereas the Indiana bat is regional species that migrates between a summer range and cave hibernacula. Moreover, Indiana bats are listed as endangered, and so the impacts to this species are of particular interest. The model demonstration used conditions at the Mountaineer Wind Energy Center (MWEC), which consists of 44 wind turbines arranged in a linear array near Thomas, West Virginia (Tucker County), to illustrate model functions and not to represent actual or potential impacts of the facility. The turbines at MWEC are erected on the ridge of Backbone Mountain with a nacelle height of 70 meters and a collision area of 72 meters (blade height) or 4,071 meters square. The habitat surrounding the turbines is an Appalachian mixed mesophytic forest. Model sensitivity runs showed that bat mortality in the model was most sensitive to

  20. Neuromuscular paralysis for newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, F; Offringa, M

    2005-04-18

    Ventilated newborn infants breathing in asynchrony with the ventilator are at risk for complications during mechanical ventilation, such as pneumothorax or intraventricular hemorrhage, and are exposed to more severe barotrauma, which consequently could impair their clinical outcome. Neuromuscular paralysis, which eliminates spontaneous breathing efforts of the infant, has potential advantages in this respect. However, a number of complications have been reported with muscle relaxation in infants, so that concerns exist regarding the safety of prolonged neuromuscular paralysis in newborn infants. To determine whether routine neuromuscular paralysis of newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation compared with no routine paralysis results in clinically important benefits or harms. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2004), MEDLINE (from 1966 to April 2004) and EMBASE (from 1988 to April 2004) were searched. References of review articles were hand searched. Language restriction was not imposed. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which the routine use of neuromuscular blocking agents during mechanical ventilation was compared to no paralysis or selective paralysis in newborn infants. Methodological quality was assessed blindly and independently by the two authors. Data were abstracted using standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Review Group, with independent evaluation of trial quality, and abstraction and synthesis of data by both authors. Treatment effect was analysed using relative risk, risk difference and weighted mean difference. Ten possibly eligible trials were identified, of which six were included in the review. All the included trials studied preterm infants ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome, and used pancuronium as the neuromuscular blocking agent. In the analysis of the results of all trials, no significant difference was found in

  1. Analyses of potential factors affecting survival of juvenile salmonids volitionally passing through turbines at McNary and John Day Dams, Columbia River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, John; Hansel, Hal; Perry, Russell; Hockersmith, Eric; Sandford, Ben

    2011-01-01

    juvenile steelhead. The negative effect of tag burden in data we examined from yearling Chinook salmon supports the recent findings from laboratory studies of barotrauma effects. A curvilinear (quadratic) effect of turbine unit discharge was weakly supported in data from subyearling Chinook salmon at John Day Dam. The maximum survival from those data was estimated to occur at a discharge of 15.9 thousand cubic feet per second, but the estimate was imprecise (95 percent confidence interval of -1.7-33.7 thousand cubic feet per second). This estimate is within the range of 1 percent of peak turbine operating efficiency (12.0-21.6 thousand cubic feet per second), but is lower than the 17.2 thousand cubic feet per second discharge at peak operating efficiency (at a head of 102 feet near the median in the data we examined). Effects of water temperature were supported in four of the five examined data sets and were strongly supported in all but one. Spill percentage, head, and total discharge received weak or moderate support in some cases. The results are consistent with those of several controlled field experiments of turbine discharge. Studies based on the Hi-Z Turb'N tag (balloon tag) often show small, generally statistically insignificant, differences in survival at different turbine discharge levels. Some studies also show that a quadratic equation can be well fit to the relation of survival and turbine unit discharge. The lack of support for the operational covariates in most of the data sets we examined may be due to the small effect turbine discharge has even in controlled studies, the observational nature of the data we used, and the evaluation method. We assessed support of the data for models of linear and quadratic effects, whereas controlled experiments often statistically compare the point estimates of survival from each operational treatment studied. The results of our analyses suggest tag burden should be minimized or controlled for in analyses of future stu

  2. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Hamman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushank Chadha, BS

    2018-04-01

    significant fat stranding. The image also showed an intraluminal stent traversing the gastric antrum and gastric pylorus with no indication of obstruction. Circumferential mural thickening of the gastric antrum and body were consistent with the patient’s history of gastric adenocarcinoma. The shotty perigastric lymph nodes with associated fat stranding, along the greater curvature of the distal gastric body suggested local regional nodal metastases and possible peritoneal carcinomatosis. The thoracic CT scans showed extensive pneumomediastinum that tracked into the soft tissues of the neck, which given the history of vomiting also raised concern for esophageal perforation. There was still no evidence of mediastinal abscess or fat stranding. Additionally, a left subclavian vein port catheter, which terminates with tip at the cavoatrial junction of the superior vena cava can also be seen on the image. Discussion: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum, also known as Hamman syndrome, is defined by the uncommon incidence of free air in the mediastinum due to the bursting of alveoli, as a result of extended spells of shouting, coughing, or vomiting.1,2 The condition is diagnosed when a clear cause (aerodigestive rupture, barotrauma, infection secondary to gas-forming organisms3 for pneumomediastinum cannot be clearly identified on diagnostic studies. Macklin and Macklin were the first to note the pathogenesis of the syndrome and explained that the common denominator to spontaneous pneumomediastinum was that increased alveolar pressure leads to alveolar rupture.3 Common clinical findings for spontaneous pneumomediastinum include: chest pain, dyspnea, cough, and emesis.4 The condition is not always readily recognized on initial presentation in part for its rare incidence, estimated to be approximately 1 in every 44,500 ED patients3and also because of the non-specific presenting symptoms. For this patient, there was no clear singular cause, and therefore she received care for spontaneous

  3. Comparação entre a ventilação com Volume Corrente baixo e Volume Corrente “tradicional” no Sindroma de Dificuldade Respiratória do Adulto e Lesão Pulmonar Aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-07-01

    H2O e o Vt 4- 12 ml/kg. – No grupo de Vt baixo, este parâmetro era reduzido para 6 ml/kg dentro das primeiras quatro horas e subsequentemente reduzido 1 m1/kg de cada vez até atingir uma pressão plateau igual ou menor que 30 cm H2O, nunca descendo abaixo dos 4 ml/kg. Se a pressão de plateau descesse abaixo de 25 cm H2O, voltava a aumentar-se o Vt até se atingir uma pressão mínima de 25 cm H2O ou um Vt máximo de 6 ml/kg. Neste grupo a pressão de plateau oseilava entre 25-30 em H2O e o Vt 4-6 ml/kg. Foram permitidas pressães de plateau superiores a 50 e a 30 em H2O respectivamente, desde que o Vt não fosse major que 4 ml/kg ou pH <7.15. Durante 28 dias foram avaliados sinais de falência multiorgâniea, e nalguns doentes foi doseada a interleucina-6 plasmática no dia 0 e 3. Os objectivos primários foram a avaliação da mortalidade antes da alta e o número de dias fora do ventilador. Os restantes eram o número de dias sem falência multiorgânica e a ocorrência de barotrauma. O ensaio foi interrompido após a inclusão de 861 doenres pois a mortalidade foi significativamente inferior no grupo tratado com Vt mais baixos (31% vs 39,8% e o número de dias sem ventilação menor neste grupo(10 11 vs 12(11. O Vt foi significativamente menor no grupo de estudo em relação ao grupo de ventilação “tradicional” (6.2 (0.8 vs 11.8 (0.8 ml/kg, o mesmo se passando com a pressão de plateau 25 (6 vs 33 (8 em H2O. Apesar da PaO2 ser semelhante nos dois grupos, a FiO2 e PEEP foram superiores no grupo de baixo Vt nos dias 1 e 3, invenendo-se esta situação no dia 7. A FR e a PaCO2 foram maiores e o pH menor no grupo de baixo Vt. A descida de interleucina-6 plasmática foi mais acentuada no grupo de baixo Vt, no qual os níveis eram mais baixos no dia 3. Os autores concluem que no SORA e LPA a ventilação com Vt mais baixos diminui a