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Sample records for barley root growth

  1. HvEXPB7, a novel β-expansin gene revealed by the root hair transcriptome of Tibetan wild barley, improves root hair growth under drought stress.

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    He, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Jianbin; Cao, Fangbin; Ahmed, Imrul Mosaddek; Zhang, Guoping; Vincze, Eva; Wu, Feibo

    2015-12-01

    Tibetan wild barley is a treasure trove of useful genes for crop improvement including abiotic stress tolerance, like drought. Root hair of single-celled structures plays an important role in water and nutrition uptake. Polyethylene-glycol-induced drought stress hydroponic/petri-dish experiments were performed, where root hair morphology and transcriptional characteristics of two contrasting Tibetan wild barley genotypes (drought-tolerant XZ5 and drought-sensitive XZ54) and drought-tolerant cv. Tadmor were compared. Drought-induced root hair growth was only observed in XZ5. Thirty-six drought tolerance-associated genes were identified in XZ5, including 16 genes specifically highly expressed in XZ5 but not Tadmor under drought. The full length cDNA of a novel β-expansin gene (HvEXPB7), being the unique root hair development related gene in the identified genes, was cloned. The sequence comparison indicated that HvEXPB7 carried both DPBB_1 and Pollon_allerg_1 domains. HvEXPB7 is predominantly expressed in roots. Subcellular localization verified that HvEXPB7 is located in the plasma membrane. Barley stripe mosaic virus induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) of HvEXPB7 led to severely suppressed root hairs both under control and drought conditions, and significantly reduced K uptake. These findings highlight and confer the significance of HvEXPB7 in root hair growth under drought stress in XZ5, and provide a novel insight into the genetic basis for drought tolerance in Tibetan wild barley.

  2. Effect of cadmium on germination, coleoptile and root growth of barley seeds in the presence of gibberellic acid and kinetin.

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    Munzuroglu, Omer; Zengin, Fikriye Kirbag

    2006-10-01

    Effect of cadmium on barley seeds treated with kinetin and gibberellic acid was investigated. As usual, cadmium has inhibited seed germination, and showed important inhibitory effects on roots and coleoptile growth after germination. In general, increase in cadmium concentration caused a greater inhibition of germination, root and coleoptile growth. The adverse effect of cadmium on root and coleoptile growth was more pronounced than that on germination. While testa was pierced by radicle (an indication of germination), no root or coleoptile development was observed above at concentration of 3-9.5 mM CdCl2xH2O. Low concentrations of cadmium have inhibited the root growth more than it did on coleoptile growth. Treatment of seeds with gibberellic acid and kinetin did not show any significant difference on the effect of cadmium in germination. However, inhibition of coleoptile elongation by cadmium has decreased a very much after kinetin application. The same result, although with lower rates when compared to kinetin, has been obtained for GA3 as well. In addition, the inhibitory effect of cadmium on root growth increased even more after kinetin application. The results have been found statistically significant through the least significant different (LSD) test at levels ofp < 0.05 and p < 0.01.

  3. Unique and Conserved Features of the Barley Root Meristem

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    Gwendolyn K. Kirschner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant root growth is enabled by root meristems that harbor the stem cell niches as a source of progenitors for the different root tissues. Understanding the root development of diverse plant species is important to be able to control root growth in order to gain better performances of crop plants. In this study, we analyzed the root meristem of the fourth most abundant crop plant, barley (Hordeum vulgare. Cell division studies revealed that the barley stem cell niche comprises a Quiescent Center (QC of around 30 cells with low mitotic activity. The surrounding stem cells contribute to root growth through the production of new cells that are displaced from the meristem, elongate and differentiate into specialized root tissues. The distal stem cells produce the root cap and lateral root cap cells, while cells lateral to the QC generate the epidermis, as it is typical for monocots. Endodermis and inner cortex are derived from one common initial lateral to the QC, while the outer cortex cell layers are derived from a distinct stem cell. In rice and Arabidopsis, meristem homeostasis is achieved through feedback signaling from differentiated cells involving peptides of the CLE family. Application of synthetic CLE40 orthologous peptide from barley promotes meristem cell differentiation, similar to rice and Arabidopsis. However, in contrast to Arabidopsis, the columella stem cells do not respond to the CLE40 peptide, indicating that distinct mechanisms control columella cell fate in monocot and dicot plants.

  4. Unique and Conserved Features of the Barley Root Meristem.

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    Kirschner, Gwendolyn K; Stahl, Yvonne; Von Korff, Maria; Simon, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    Plant root growth is enabled by root meristems that harbor the stem cell niches as a source of progenitors for the different root tissues. Understanding the root development of diverse plant species is important to be able to control root growth in order to gain better performances of crop plants. In this study, we analyzed the root meristem of the fourth most abundant crop plant, barley (Hordeum vulgare). Cell division studies revealed that the barley stem cell niche comprises a Quiescent Center (QC) of around 30 cells with low mitotic activity. The surrounding stem cells contribute to root growth through the production of new cells that are displaced from the meristem, elongate and differentiate into specialized root tissues. The distal stem cells produce the root cap and lateral root cap cells, while cells lateral to the QC generate the epidermis, as it is typical for monocots. Endodermis and inner cortex are derived from one common initial lateral to the QC, while the outer cortex cell layers are derived from a distinct stem cell. In rice and Arabidopsis, meristem homeostasis is achieved through feedback signaling from differentiated cells involving peptides of the CLE family. Application of synthetic CLE40 orthologous peptide from barley promotes meristem cell differentiation, similar to rice and Arabidopsis. However, in contrast to Arabidopsis, the columella stem cells do not respond to the CLE40 peptide, indicating that distinct mechanisms control columella cell fate in monocot and dicot plants.

  5. Endophytic colonization of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots by the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia reveals plant growth promotion and a general defense and stress transcriptomic response.

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    Larriba, Eduardo; Jaime, María D L A; Nislow, Corey; Martín-Nieto, José; Lopez-Llorca, Luis Vicente

    2015-07-01

    Plant crop yields are negatively conditioned by a large set of biotic and abiotic factors. An alternative to mitigate these adverse effects is the use of fungal biological control agents and endophytes. The egg-parasitic fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia has been traditionally studied because of its potential as a biological control agent of plant-parasitic nematodes. This fungus can also act as an endophyte in monocot and dicot plants, and has been shown to promote plant growth in different agronomic crops. An Affymetrix 22K Barley GeneChip was used in this work to analyze the barley root transcriptomic response to P. chlamydosporia root colonization. Functional gene ontology (GO) and gene set enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in stress response were enriched in the barley transcriptome under endophytism. An 87.5% of the probesets identified within the abiotic stress response group encoded heat shock proteins. Additionally, we found in our transcriptomic analysis an up-regulation of genes implicated in the biosynthesis of plant hormones, such as auxin, ethylene and jasmonic acid. Along with these, we detected induction of brassinosteroid insensitive 1-associated receptor kinase 1 (BR1) and other genes related to effector-triggered immunity (ETI) and pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Our study supports at the molecular level the growth-promoting effect observed in plants endophytically colonized by P. chlamydosporia, which opens the door to further studies addressing the capacity of this fungus to mitigate the negative effects of biotic and abiotic factors on plant crops.

  6. Effects of ethylene on root elongation in barley and rice

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    John, A.; Hall, M.A.; Crossett, R.N.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of rice and barley to growth inhibition by ethylene. The mechanism of growth inhibition was investigated at the cellular level and a detailed comparison was made between the responses of the two species. The following measurements were made on intact plants in short (up to 200 minutes), medium (up to 3 days) or long (up to 10 days) experiments: the rate of extension growth of main root axes; the final cell length and number of elongating cells produced; and the extensibility of the apical growing region. Results indicate that the effects of ethylene on the elongation of roots of rice and barley plants are different. In barley there is a rapid inhibition of root extension which persists with prolonged exposure to the gas but with little effect on the production of growing cells. However, rice roots exhibit no rapid growth inhibition response, but a reduction does occur after prolonged exposure. Low concentrations promote extension rice roots. The inhibition of root growth is reflected in a reduced extensibility of the apical growing region.

  7. Quantifying relationships between rooting traits and water uptake under drought in Mediterranean barley and durum wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro Carvalho; Sayed AzamAli; M. John Foulkes

    2014-01-01

    In Mediterranean regions drought is the major factor limiting spring barley and durum wheat grain yields. This study aimed to compare spring barley and durum wheat root and shoot responses to drought and quantify relationships between root traits and water uptake under terminal drought. One spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Rum) and two durum wheat Mediterranean cultivars (Triticum turgidum L. var durum cvs Hourani and Karim) were examined in soil-column experi-ments under wel watered and drought conditions. Root system architecture traits, water uptake, and plant growth were measured. Barley aerial biomass and grain yields were higher than for durum wheat cultivars in wel watered conditions. Drought decreased grain yield more for barley (47%) than durum wheat (30%, Hourani). Root-to-shoot dry matter ratio increased for durum wheat under drought but not for barley, and root weight increased for wheat in response to drought but decreased for barley. The critical root length density (RLD) and root volume density (RVD) for 90%available water capture for wheat were similar to (cv. Hourani) or lower than (cv. Karim) for barley depending on wheat cultivar. For both species, RVD accounted for a slightly higher proportion of phenotypic variation in water uptake under drought than RLD.

  8. Morphological responses of barley roots to soil compaction and modified supply of oxygen

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    A. SIMOJOKI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes in barley roots in response to soil compaction and hypoxia were quantified by image analysis. Based on the assumption that these soil stresses increase endogenous ethylene production in plants, changes indicating higher construction costs for roots, such as decreased specific root length, were expected. The hypothesis was found to be only partly correct. Most morphological changes of barley roots were probably a reaction to increased soil mechanical impedance. Examples of this are root width, which was increased by compaction apart from in wet soil, as well as increased width and specific volume, and a decreased specific length of roots in the deepest layer of well-aerated loose soil. However, in loose moist soil hypoxia prevented root growth, but did not change root morphology. The results suggest that severe hypoxia lessens the possibilities of roots to adapt to the hypoxic soil by reducing root growth and by preventing the formation of aerenchyma. ;

  9. The role of root hairs in cadmium acquisition by barley

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    Zheng Ruilun; Li Huafen [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions of the Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Jiang Rongfeng, E-mail: rfjiang@cau.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions of the Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Roemheld, Volker [Institute of Plant Nutrition, University of Hohenheim, D-70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Zhang Fusuo [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions of the Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Zhao Fangjie [Soil Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The role of root hairs in Cd acquisition from soil was investigated in three pot experiments using a root hairless mutant (bald root barley, brb) and its wild-type (WT) cultivar of barley (Hordeum vulgare). brb had significantly lower concentrations and lower total amounts of Cd in shoots than WT. The Cd uptake efficiency based on total root length was 8-45% lower in brb than in WT. The difference between brb and WT increased with increasing extractable Cd in soil under the experimental conditions used. Additions of phosphate to soil decreased Cd extractability. Both soil and foliar additions of phosphate decreased root length, and root hair formation in WT. These effects resulted in decreased Cd uptake with increasing P supply. Cd uptake in WT correlated significantly with root length, root hair length and density, and soil extractable Cd. Root hairs contribute significantly to Cd uptake by barley. - Research highlights: The Cd uptake efficiency was significantly lower in brb than in WT. Additions of phosphate to soil decreased Cd extractability and Cd uptake. Both soil and foliar additions of phosphate decreased root length, and root hair formation in WT. Root hairs contribute significantly to Cd uptake by barley. - The Cd uptake efficiency based on total root length was 8-45% lower in a barley root hairless mutant than in its wild-type, indicating an important role of root hairs in Cd acquisition.

  10. Root cortical senescence decreases root respiration, nutrient content, and radial water and nutrient transport in barley.

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    Schneider, Hannah M; Wojciechowski, Tobias; Postma, Johannes A; Brown, Kathleen M; Lücke, Andreas; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2017-02-06

    The functional implications of root cortical senescence (RCS) are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that RCS in barley: (1) reduces the respiration and nutrient content of root tissue; (2) decreases radial water and nutrient transport; (3) is accompanied by increased suberization to protect the stele. Genetic variation for RCS exists between modern germplasm and landraces. Nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency increased the rate of RCS. Maximal RCS, defined as the disappearance of the entire root cortex, reduced root nitrogen content by 66%, phosphorus content by 63%, and respiration by 87% compared to root segments with no RCS. Roots with maximal RCS had 90%, 92%, and 84% less radial water, nitrate, and phosphorus transport, respectively compared to segments with no RCS. The onset of RCS coincided with 30% greater aliphatic suberin in the endodermis. These results support the hypothesis that RCS reduces root carbon and nutrient costs and may therefore have adaptive significance for soil resource acquisition. By reducing root respiration and nutrient content, RCS could permit greater root growth, soil resource acquisition, and resource allocation to other plant processes. RCS merits investigation as a trait for improving the performance of barley, wheat, triticale, and rye under edaphic stress.

  11. Genomic Regions Influencing Seminal Root Traits in Barley

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    Hannah Robinson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water availability is a major limiting factor for crop production, making drought adaptation and its many component traits a desirable attribute of plant cultivars. Previous studies in cereal crops indicate that root traits expressed at early plant developmental stages, such as seminal root angle and root number, are associated with water extraction at different depths. Here, we conducted the first study to map seminal root traits in barley ( L.. Using a recently developed high-throughput phenotyping method, a panel of 30 barley genotypes and a doubled-haploid (DH population (ND24260 × ‘Flagship’ comprising 330 lines genotyped with diversity array technology (DArT markers were evaluated for seminal root angle (deviation from vertical and root number under controlled environmental conditions. A high degree of phenotypic variation was observed in the panel of 30 genotypes: 13.5 to 82.2 and 3.6 to 6.9° for root angle and root number, respectively. A similar range was observed in the DH population: 16.4 to 70.5 and 3.6 to 6.5° for root angle and number, respectively. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL for seminal root traits (root angle, two QTL; root number, five QTL were detected in the DH population. A major QTL influencing both root angle and root number (/ was positioned on chromosome 5HL. Across-species analysis identified 10 common genes underlying root trait QTL in barley, wheat ( L., and sorghum [ (L. Moench]. Here, we provide insight into seminal root phenotypes and provide a first look at the genetics controlling these traits in barley.

  12. Allelopathic effects of barley straw on germination and seedling growth of corn, sugar beet and sunflower

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    mohamad taghi naseri poor yazdi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathic effects of barley straw and root on germination and growth of maize, sugar beet, and sunflower were investigated under glasshouse and laboratory experiments in Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 2006. The glasshouse experiment was designed based on randomized complete block design with three replications, treatments included: 0, 200, 400, 600 g/m² of grounded barley straw and also 0 and 50 g/m2 barley root. A laboratory experiment was carried out in order to study the effect of different concentrations of barley water extracts on germination and seedling characteristics of corn, sugar beet and sunflower. Treatments in laboratory trial included 0, 33, 50 and 100 percent of barley extracts. Results showed that leaf area of corn was significantly affected by barley straw treatments. Shoot dry matter and seed weight per plant in corn , leaf and tuber weight in sugar beet and leaf , stem weights , plant per plant in corn , leaf and tuber weight in sugar beet and leaf, stem weights, plant height, head diameter, head weight and seed weight in sunflower were significantly higher in treatment of 50g/m² barley roots. Crop seed germination decreased with increasing the amount of barley straw. The best germination response to barley extract was observed in corn. Maize radicle weight was significantly decreased with increasing concentration of barley water extract.

  13. Use of Co speciation and soil properties to explain variation in Co toxicity to root growth of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in different soils.

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    Micó, C; Li, H F; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2008-12-01

    The influence of soil properties on the bioavailability and toxicity of Co to barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) root elongation was investigated. Ten soils varying widely in soil properties were amended with seven doses of CoCl2. Soil properties greatly influenced the expression of Co toxicity. The effective concentration of added Co causing 50% inhibition (EC50) ranged from 45 to 863 mg kg(-1), representing almost 20-fold variation among soils. Furthermore, we investigated Co toxicity in relation to Co concentrations and free Co2+ activity in soil solution. The EC50 values showed variation among soils of 17- and 29-fold, based on the Co concentration in soil solution and free Co2+ activity, respectively. Single regressions were carried out between Co toxicity threshold values and selected soil properties. Models obtained showed that soil effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) and exchangeable calcium were the most consistent single predictors of the EC50 values based on soil added Co.

  14. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment and drought stress modify root exudation of barley.

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    Calvo, Olga C; Franzaring, Jürgen; Schmid, Iris; Müller, Matthias; Brohon, Nolwenn; Fangmeier, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Rising CO2 concentrations associated with drought stress is likely to influence not only aboveground growth, but also belowground plant processes. Little is known about root exudation being influenced by elements of climate change. Therefore, this study wanted to clarify whether barley root exudation responds to drought and CO2 enrichment and whether this reaction differs between an old and a recently released malting barley cultivar. Barley plants were grown in pots filled with sand in controlled climate chambers at ambient (380 ppm) or elevated (550 ppm) atmospheric [CO2 ] and a normal or reduced water supply. Root exudation patterns were examined at the stem elongation growth stage and when the inflorescences emerged. At both dates, root exudates were analyzed for different compounds such as total free amino acids, proline, potassium, and some phytohormones. Elevated [CO2 ] decreased the concentrations in root exudates of some compounds such as total free amino acids, proline, and abscisic acid. Moreover, reduced water supply increased proline, potassium, electric conductivity, and hormone concentrations. In general, the modern cultivar showed higher concentrations of proline and abscisic acid than the old one, but the cultivars responded differentially under elevated CO2 . Plant developmental stage had also an impact on the root exudation patterns of barley. Generally, we observed significant effects of CO2 enrichment, watering levels, and, to a lesser extent, cultivar on root exudation. However, we did not find any mitigation of the adverse effects of drought by elevated CO2 . Understanding the multitude of relationships within the rhizosphere is an important aspect that has to be taken into consideration in the context of crop performance and carbon balance under conditions of climate change.

  15. The composite water and solute transport of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots: effect of suberized barriers.

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    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kim, Yangmin X; Wassmann, Friedrich; Kreszies, Tino; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2017-03-01

    Roots have complex anatomical structures, and certain localized cell layers develop suberized apoplastic barriers. The size and tightness of these barriers depend on the growth conditions and on the age of the root. Such complex anatomical structures result in a composite water and solute transport in roots. Development of apoplastic barriers along barley seminal roots was detected using various staining methods, and the suberin amounts in the apical and basal zones were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS). The hydraulic conductivity of roots ( Lp r ) and of cortical cells ( Lp c ) was measured using root and cell pressure probes. When grown in hydroponics, barley roots did not form an exodermis, even at their basal zones. However, they developed an endodermis. Endodermal Casparian bands first appeared as 'dots' as early as at 20 mm from the apex, whereas a patchy suberin lamellae appeared at 60 mm. The endodermal suberin accounted for the total suberin of the roots. The absolute amount in the basal zone was significantly higher than in the apical zone, which was inversely proportional to the Lp r . Comparison of Lp r and Lp c suggested that cell to cell pathways dominate for water transport in roots. However, the calculation of Lp r from Lp c showed that at least 26 % of water transport occurs through the apoplast. Roots had different solute permeabilities ( P sr ) and reflection coefficients ( σ sr ) for the solutes used. The σ sr was below unity for the solutes, which have virtually zero permeability for semi-permeable membranes. Suberized endodermis significantly reduces Lp r of seminal roots. The water and solute transport across barley roots is composite in nature and they do not behave like ideal osmometers. The composite transport model should be extended by adding components arranged in series (cortex, endodermis) in addition to the currently included components arranged in parallel (apoplastic, cell to cell pathways).

  16. Root Hair Mutations Displace the Barley Rhizosphere Microbiota.

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    Senga, Robertson-Albertyn; Alegria Terrazas, Senga; Balbirnie, Katharin; Blank, Manuel; Janiak, Agnieszka; Szarejko, Iwona; Chmielewska, Beata; Karcz, Jagna; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; George, Timothy S; Bulgarelli, Davide

    2017-01-01

    The rhizosphere, the thin layer of soil surrounding and influenced by plant roots, defines a distinct and selective microbial habitat compared to unplanted soil. The microbial communities inhabiting the rhizosphere, the rhizosphere microbiota, engage in interactions with their host plants which span from parasitism to mutualism. Therefore, the rhizosphere microbiota emerges as one of the determinants of yield potential in crops. Studies conducted with different plant species have unequivocally pointed to the host plant as a driver of the microbiota thriving at the root-soil interface. Thus far, the host genetic traits shaping the rhizosphere microbiota are not completely understood. As root hairs play a critical role in resource exchanges between plants and the rhizosphere, we hypothesized that they can act as a determinant of the microbiota thriving at the root-soil interface. To test this hypothesis, we took advantage of barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant lines contrasting for their root hair characteristics. Plants were grown in two agricultural soils, differentiating in their organic matter contents, under controlled environmental conditions. At early stem elongation rhizosphere specimens were collected and subjected to high-resolution 16S rRNA gene profiling. Our data revealed that the barley rhizosphere microbiota is largely dominated by members of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, regardless of the soil type and the root hair characteristics of the host plant. Conversely, ecological indices calculated using operational taxonomic units (OTUs) presence, abundance, and phylogeny revealed a significant impact of root hair mutations on the composition of the rhizosphere microbiota. In particular, our data indicate that mutant plants host a reduced-complexity community compared to wild-type genotypes and unplanted soil controls. Congruently, the host genotype explained up to 18% of the variation in ecological distances computed for the rhizosphere samples

  17. Root Hair Mutations Displace the Barley Rhizosphere Microbiota

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    Robertson-Albertyn Senga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The rhizosphere, the thin layer of soil surrounding and influenced by plant roots, defines a distinct and selective microbial habitat compared to unplanted soil. The microbial communities inhabiting the rhizosphere, the rhizosphere microbiota, engage in interactions with their host plants which span from parasitism to mutualism. Therefore, the rhizosphere microbiota emerges as one of the determinants of yield potential in crops. Studies conducted with different plant species have unequivocally pointed to the host plant as a driver of the microbiota thriving at the root–soil interface. Thus far, the host genetic traits shaping the rhizosphere microbiota are not completely understood. As root hairs play a critical role in resource exchanges between plants and the rhizosphere, we hypothesized that they can act as a determinant of the microbiota thriving at the root–soil interface. To test this hypothesis, we took advantage of barley (Hordeum vulgare mutant lines contrasting for their root hair characteristics. Plants were grown in two agricultural soils, differentiating in their organic matter contents, under controlled environmental conditions. At early stem elongation rhizosphere specimens were collected and subjected to high-resolution 16S rRNA gene profiling. Our data revealed that the barley rhizosphere microbiota is largely dominated by members of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, regardless of the soil type and the root hair characteristics of the host plant. Conversely, ecological indices calculated using operational taxonomic units (OTUs presence, abundance, and phylogeny revealed a significant impact of root hair mutations on the composition of the rhizosphere microbiota. In particular, our data indicate that mutant plants host a reduced-complexity community compared to wild-type genotypes and unplanted soil controls. Congruently, the host genotype explained up to 18% of the variation in ecological distances computed for the

  18. Changes of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Root/Shoot Ratio of Durum Wheat and Barley in Relation to Nitrogen Availability and Mercury Exposure

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    Giovanna Angelino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to verify, on whole plant level and during all the plant cycle, the hypothesis that nitrogen deficiency reduces root hydraulic conductivity through the water channels (aquaporins activity, and that the plant reacts by changing root/shoot ratio. Root hydraulic conductivity, plant growth, root/shoot ratio and plant water status were assessed for durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L., as influenced by nitrogen availability and HgCl2 treatment. On both species during the plant cycle, nitrogen deficiency induced lower root hydraulic conductivity (-49 and -66% respectively for barley and wheat and lower plant growth. On wheat was also observed cycle delay, lower plant nitrogen content, but not lower leaf turgor pressure and epidermic cell dimension. The lower plant growth was due to lower plant dimension and lower tillering. Root /shoot ratio was always higher for nitrogen stressed plants, whether on dry matter or on surface basis. This was due to lower effect of nitrogen stress on root growth than on shoot growth. On wheat HgCl2 treatment determined lower plant growth, and more than nitrogen stress, cycle delay and higher root/shoot ratio. The mercury, also, induced leaf rolling, lower turgor pressure, lower NAR, higher root cell wall lignification and lower epidermic cell number per surface unity. In nitrogen fertilized plants root hydraulic conductivity was always reduced by HgCl2 treatment (-61 and 38%, respectively for wheat and barley, but in nitrogen unfertilized plants this effect was observed only during the first plant stages. This effect was higher during shooting and caryopsis formation, lower during tillering. It is concluded that barley and durum wheat react to nitrogen deficiency and HgCl2 treatment by increasing the root/shoot ratio, to compensate water stress due to lower water root conductivity probably induced by lower aquaporin synthesis or inactivation. However, this

  19. Mitochondrial complex II-derived superoxide is the primary source of mercury toxicity in barley root tip.

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    Tamás, Ladislav; Zelinová, Veronika

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced superoxide generation and significant inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity followed by a strong reduction of root growth were detected in barley seedlings exposed to a 5μM Hg concentration for 30min, which increased further in an Hg dose-dependent manner. While at a 25μM Hg concentration no cell death was detectable, a 50μM Hg treatment triggered cell death in the root meristematic zone, which was markedly intensified after the treatment of roots with 100μM Hg and was detectable in the whole root tips. Generation of superoxide and H2O2 was a very rapid response of root tips occurring even after 5min of exposure to Hg. Application of an NADPH oxidase inhibitor or the inhibition of electron flow in mitochondria by the inhibition of complex I did not influence the Hg-induced H2O2 production. Treatment of roots with thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a non-competitive inhibitor of SDH, markedly reduced root growth and induced both superoxide and H2O2 production in a dose dependent manner. Similar to results obtained in intact roots, Hg strongly inhibited SDH activity in the crude mitochondrial fraction and caused a considerable increase of superoxide production, which was markedly reduced by the competitive inhibitors of SDH. These results indicate that the mitochondrial complex II-derived superoxide is the primary source of Hg toxicity in the barley root tip.

  20. A Quantitative Profiling Method of Phytohormones and Other Metabolites Applied to Barley Roots Subjected to Salinity Stress

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    Cao, Da; Lutz, Adrian; Hill, Camilla B.; Callahan, Damien L.; Roessner, Ute

    2017-01-01

    As integral parts of plant signaling networks, phytohormones are involved in the regulation of plant metabolism and growth under adverse environmental conditions, including salinity. Globally, salinity is one of the most severe abiotic stressors with an estimated 800 million hectares of arable land affected. Roots are the first plant organ to sense salinity in the soil, and are the initial site of sodium (Na+) exposure. However, the quantification of phytohormones in roots is challenging, as they are often present at extremely low levels compared to other plant tissues. To overcome this challenge, we developed a high-throughput LC-MS method to quantify ten endogenous phytohormones and their metabolites of diverse chemical classes in roots of barley. This method was validated in a salinity stress experiment with six barley varieties grown hydroponically with and without salinity. In addition to phytohormones, we quantified 52 polar primary metabolites, including some phytohormone precursors, using established GC-MS and LC-MS methods. Phytohormone and metabolite data were correlated with physiological measurements including biomass, plant size and chlorophyll content. Root and leaf elemental analysis was performed to determine Na+ exclusion and K+ retention ability in the studied barley varieties. We identified distinct phytohormone and metabolite signatures as a response to salinity stress in different barley varieties. Abscisic acid increased in the roots of all varieties under salinity stress, and elevated root salicylic acid levels were associated with an increase in leaf chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the landrace Sahara maintained better growth, had lower Na+ levels and maintained high levels of the salinity stress linked metabolite putrescine as well as the phytohormone metabolite cinnamic acid, which has been shown to increase putrescine concentrations in previous studies. This study highlights the importance of root phytohormones under salinity stress and

  1. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

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    Nilsson Lena

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing vectors based on Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV are used extensively in cereals to study gene function, but nearly all studies have been limited to genes expressed in leaves of barley and wheat. However since many important aspects of plant biology are based on root-expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species have created a need for tools to study gene function in these species. Results Here we demonstrate the successful BSMV-mediated virus induced gene silencing (VIGS of three different genes in barley roots, i.e. the barley homologues of the IPS1, PHR1, and PHO2 genes known to participate in Pi uptake and reallocation in Arabidopsis. Attempts to silence two other genes, the Pi transporter gene HvPht1;1 and the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene HvCel1, in barley roots were unsuccessful, probably due to instability of the plant gene inserts in the viral vector. In B. distachyon leaves, significant silencing of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (BdPDS gene was obtained as shown by photobleaching as well as quantitative RT-PCR analysis. On the other hand, only very limited silencing of the oat AsPDS gene was observed in both hexaploid (A. sativa and diploid (A. strigosa oat. Finally, two modifications of the BSMV vector are presented, allowing ligation-free cloning of DNA fragments into the BSMV-γ component. Conclusions Our results show that BSMV can be used as a vector for gene silencing in barley roots and in B. distachyon leaves and possibly roots, opening up possibilities for using VIGS to study cereal root biology and to exploit the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too

  2. Aluminum-induced cell death of barley-root border cells is correlated with peroxidase- and oxalate oxidase-mediated hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, L; Budíková, S; Huttová, J; Mistrík, I; Simonovicová, M; Siroká, B

    2005-06-01

    The function of root border cells (RBC) during aluminum (Al) stress and the involvement of oxalate oxidase, peroxidase and H(2)O(2) generation in Al toxicity were studied in barley roots. Our results suggest that RBC effectively protect the barley root tip from Al relative to the situation in roots cultivated in hydroponics where RBC are not sustained in the area surrounding the root tip. The removal of RBC from Al-treated roots increased root growth inhibition, Al and Evans blue uptake, inhibition of RBC production, the level of dead RBC, peroxidase and oxalate oxidase activity and the production of H(2)O(2). Our results suggest that even though RBC actively produce active oxygen species during Al stress, their role in the protection of root tips against Al toxicity is to chelate Al in their dead cell body.

  3. Allelopathic potential of Chrozophora tinctoria on early growth of Barley and Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Aliloo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory bioassay was conducted to investigate the allelopathic effects of Chrozophora tinctoria on germination and seedling growth of barley and wheat. Aqueous leave extracts of C. tinctoria at 5, 10, 15 and 20 % concentrations were prepared and distilled water was used as a control. Results showed that germination percentage of two species decreased with increasing the extract concentrations; however, wheat germination was relatively resistant to allelochemicals than barley. In contrast to germination behavior, seedling traits showed different responses. The extracts improved seedling dry weights, particularly barley, whereas seedling lengths were inhibited. Roots of both species were more affected than shoots by extracts. The extracts reduced seed reserve mobilization significantly (p≤0.05. It was concluded that the used extract had inhibitory effects on seed germination of the crops; however, at seedling stages the effects were severely reduced.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic effects of salinity on in vitro growth of barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Demirkiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological, physiological and molecular changes were investigated in in vitro salt-stressed barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Tokak. Mature embryos were cultured in Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0 (control, 50 and 100 mM NaCl for 20 days. Both concentrations inhibited shoot growth, decreased fresh weight and protein content, and increased SOD (EC 1.15.1.1 activity in a dose-dependent manner. The lower concentration increased root growth. Salinity caused nucleotide variations in roots, but did not affect shoot DNAs. The higher concentration caused methylation changes, mainly hypermethylation in shoots. This is the first study on genetic and epigenetic effects of salinity in barley.

  5. Colonization of barley roots by endophytic fungi and their reduction of take-all caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciá-Vicente, Jose G; Jansson, Hans-Börje; Mendgen, Kurt; Lopez-Llorca, Luis V

    2008-08-01

    Fungal root endophytes obtained from natural vegetation were tested for antifungal activity in dual culture tests against the root pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. Fifteen isolates, including Acremonium blochii, Acremonium furcatum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cylindrocarpon sp., Cylindrocarpon destructans, Dactylaria sp., Fusarium equiseti, Phoma herbarum, Phoma leveillei, and a sterile mycelium, selected based on the dual culture test, were inoculated on barley roots in growth tubes under axenic conditions, both in the absence and presence of G. graminis var. tritici. All isolates colonized the rhizosphere and very often the root cortex without causing disease symptoms and without affecting plant growth. Eight isolates significantly reduced the symptoms caused by G. graminis var. tritici, and 6 of them reduced its presence in the roots.

  6. Root border cell development is a temperature-insensitive and Al-sensitive process in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Wei; Ye, Dan; Wang, Li-Ling; Hua, Jing; Zhao, Gu-Feng; Pan, Wei-Huai; Han, Ning; Zhu, Mu-Yuan

    2004-06-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that border cell (BC) survival was dependent on root tip mucigel in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Hang 981). In aeroponic culture, BC development was an induced process in barley, whereas in hydroponic culture, it was a kinetic equilibrium process during which 300-400 BCs were released into water daily. The response of root elongation to temperatures (10-35 degrees C) was very sensitive but temperature changes had no great effect on barley BC development. At 35 degrees C, the root elongation ceased whereas BC production still continued, indicating that the two processes might be regulated independently under high temperature (35 degrees C) stress. Fifty microM Al could inhibit significantly BC development by inhibiting pectin methylesterase activity in the root cap of cv. 2000-2 (Al-sensitive) and cv. Humai 16 (Al-tolerant), but 20 microM Al could not block BC development in cv. Humai 16. BCs and their mucigel of barley had a limited role in the protection of Al-induced inhibition of root elongation, but played a significant role in the prevention of Al from diffusing into the meristems of the root tip and the root cap. Together, these results suggested that BC development was a temperature-insensitive but Al-sensitive process, and that BCs and their mucigel played an important role in the protection of root tip and root cap meristems from Al toxicity.

  7. THE EFFECT OF WATER STRESS ON SOME TRAITS OF WINTER BARLEY CULTIVARS DURING EARLY STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiljana Goreta Ban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted research on the effects of exposing barley plants to short water stress deficiency through their early growth stage. The measurements and parallel analyses of relative water content (RWC, the mass of the whole plant, leaf mass, root percentage, total root length and length of root fractions with plants exposed to stress (water deficit and with plants which were not exposed to water deficit have been conducted. Ten varieties were included in this research. The overall average of relative water content (RWC measured in winter barley varieties was 97.5% under non-stressful conditions, and 66.1% under stressful conditions. An average difference between non-stressful and stressful conditions of plant mass was 61.2 mg, leaf mass 42.5 mg, RWC 31.4%, root mass 18.5 mg and total root length 129 cm. Relative losses under effect of water stress were lower at smaller (finer root fractions. Significant differences among the examined barley varieties cultivated under or without the water stress were found for plant mass, leaf mass, root mass, total root length and root fractions. Varieties with the lowest losses in leaf and plant mass are Titan, Arturio and Bingo. Also, the varieties Titan, Bingo and Rex had the lowest losses of root length and mass under water stress during the early growth stage.

  8. Variation in activity of root extracellular phytase between genotypes of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Mohammad Farouq

    1997-01-01

    Barley genotypes grown in nutrient solution under P nutrient stress and sterile conditions were compared in activity of root-associated and root-released extracellular phytase. The activity of root-associated phytase of all genotypes was about 10 times higher than that of root-released phytase...... and the genotypes performed differently with regard to the activity of the enzymes. The winter barley genotype, Marinka had the highest activity of root-associated extracellular phytase which differed significantly from Alexis and Senate, but not from Regatta. Alexis showed the lowest activity of root......-released extracellular phytase which differed significantly from those of Marinka and Regatta, but not from Senate. Generally, there was a significant correlation between the activity of root-associated and released extracellular phytase....

  9. Comparative phytohormone profiles, lipid kinase and lipid phosphatase activities in barley aleurone, coleoptile, and root tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meringer, Maria V; Villasuso, Ana L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Giusto, Norma M; Machado, Estela E; Racagni, Graciela E

    2012-09-01

    We analyzed lipid kinase and lipid phosphatase activities and determined endogenous phytohormone levels by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in root and coleoptile tissues following germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seeds. The enzymes showing highest activity in aleurone cells were diacylglycerol kinase (DAG-k, EC 2.7.1.107) and phosphatidate kinase (PA-k). The ratio of gibberellins (GAs) to abscisic acid (ABA) was 2-fold higher in aleurone than in coleoptile or root tissues. In coleoptiles, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4-k, EC 2.7.1.67) showed the highest enzyme activity, and jasmonic acid (JA) level was higher than in aleurone. In roots, activities of PI4-k, DAG-k, and PA-k were similar, and salicylic acid (SA) showed the highest concentration. In the assays to evaluate the hydrolysis of DGPP (diacylglycerol pyrophosphate) and PA (phosphatidic acid) we observed that PA hydrolysis by LPPs (lipid phosphate phosphatases) was not modified; however, the diacylglycerol pyrophosphate phosphatase (DGPPase) was strikingly higher in coleoptile and root tissues than to aleurone. Relevance of these findings in terms of signaling responses and seedling growth is discussed.

  10. Transfer of N and P from intact or decomposing roots of pea to barley interconnected by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in the transfer of N and P between pea (Pisum sativum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants was studied in a controlled environment. The plants were grown together in PVC containers, either in symbiosis with Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith or as non......-mycorrhizal controls, and with their root systems separated by an intermediate buffer zone (2 cm), confined by fine nylon mesh. The pea donor plants were supplied simultaneously with N-15 and P-32, using a split-root labelling technique, in order to follow the flow of N and P to the barley receiver plants during 60 d...... of growth. In half of the containers, the donor-plant shoot was removed 42 d after the start of labelling and the roots were left in the soil to decompose. The reverse transfer of N and P, from barley donor to pea receiver plants was also measured to allow calculation of the net transfer through hyphae...

  11. Structure and function of the bacterial root microbiota in wild and domesticated barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, Davide; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Münch, Philipp C; Weiman, Aaron; Dröge, Johannes; Pan, Yao; McHardy, Alice C; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-03-11

    The microbial communities inhabiting the root interior of healthy plants, as well as the rhizosphere, which consists of soil particles firmly attached to roots, engage in symbiotic associations with their host. To investigate the structural and functional diversification among these communities, we employed a combination of 16S rRNA gene profiling and shotgun metagenome analysis of the microbiota associated with wild and domesticated accessions of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Bacterial families Comamonadaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, and Rhizobiaceae dominate the barley root-enriched microbiota. Host genotype has a small, but significant, effect on the diversity of root-associated bacterial communities, possibly representing a footprint of barley domestication. Traits related to pathogenesis, secretion, phage interactions, and nutrient mobilization are enriched in the barley root-associated microbiota. Strikingly, protein families assigned to these same traits showed evidence of positive selection. Our results indicate that the combined action of microbe-microbe and host-microbe interactions drives microbiota differentiation at the root-soil interface.

  12. Structure and Function of the Bacterial Root Microbiota in Wild and Domesticated Barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, Davide; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Münch, Philipp C.; Weiman, Aaron; Dröge, Johannes; Pan, Yao; McHardy, Alice C.; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary The microbial communities inhabiting the root interior of healthy plants, as well as the rhizosphere, which consists of soil particles firmly attached to roots, engage in symbiotic associations with their host. To investigate the structural and functional diversification among these communities, we employed a combination of 16S rRNA gene profiling and shotgun metagenome analysis of the microbiota associated with wild and domesticated accessions of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Bacterial families Comamonadaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, and Rhizobiaceae dominate the barley root-enriched microbiota. Host genotype has a small, but significant, effect on the diversity of root-associated bacterial communities, possibly representing a footprint of barley domestication. Traits related to pathogenesis, secretion, phage interactions, and nutrient mobilization are enriched in the barley root-associated microbiota. Strikingly, protein families assigned to these same traits showed evidence of positive selection. Our results indicate that the combined action of microbe-microbe and host-microbe interactions drives microbiota differentiation at the root-soil interface. PMID:25732064

  13. [The radiation-increased synthesis of phytochelatins in roots of gamma-irradiated barley seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilin, I A; Dikarev, V G; Geras'kin, S A

    2004-01-01

    It was shown that gamma-irradiation and cadmium nitrate increased synthesis of phytochelatins in roots of barley seedlings. The stimulation of synthesis of phytochelatins in gamma-irradiated plants was shown for the first time. The results obtained indicate more important role of phytochelatins in intercellular metabolism than heavy-metal-binding.

  14. Temporal and spatial distribution of roots and competition for nitrogen in pea-barley intercrops - a field study employing P-32 technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Ambus, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    Root system dynamics, productivity and N use were studied in inter- and sole crops of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on a temperate sandy loam. A P-32 tracer placed at a depth of 12.5, 37.5, 62.5 or 87.5 cm was employed to determine root system dynamics...... by sampling crop leaves at 0, 15, 30 and 45 cm lateral distance. N-15 addition was used to estimate N-2 fixation by pea, using sole cropped barley as reference crop. The Land Equivalent Ratio (LER), which is defined as the relative land area under sole crops that is required to produce the yields achieved...... in intercropping, were used to compare the crop growth in intercrops relative to the respective sole crops. The P-32 appearance in leaves revealed that the barley root system grows faster than that of pea. P uptake by the barley root system during early growth stages was approximately 10 days ahead...

  15. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Vera L; Temperton, Vicky M; Nagel, Kerstin A; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm(-3)) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g(-1)) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24-340 seeds m(-2)) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0-10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4-1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m(-2) suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  16. Some Root Traits of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. as Affected by Mycorrhizal Symbiosis under Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bayani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drought stress and mycorrhizal symbiosis on the colonization, root and leaf phosphorous content, root and leaf phosphatase activity, root volume and area as well as shoot dry weight of a variety of hulless barley were evaluated using a completely randomized experimental design (CRD with 3 replications. Treatments were three levels of drought stress of 30, 60 and 90% field capacity and two levels of mycorrhizal with and without inoculation. According to the results, the highest value of leaf phosphorous (1.54 mg/g was observed at mycorrhizal symbiosis against severe drought treatment. Root phosphatase activity was highest (297.9 OD min -1 FW-1 at severe drought stress with mycorrhizal symbiosis which in comparison with mild stress in the presence of mycorrhiza showed 16.6 fold increasing. The control and non-mycorrhizal symbiosis treatments had highest root dry weight (0.091 g. The lowest root volume (0.016 cm2 observed at mycorrhizal symbiosis × severe drought treatment. Generally, Inoculation of barley seed with mycorrhiza at severe water stress could transport more phosphorous to shoot, especially leaf via inducing of leaf and root phosphatase activity. Also, in addition to supply of nutrient sources especially phosphorous for plant, mycorrhizal symbiosis could play an important role in withstanding water stress in plant via increasing of root dry weight and area.

  17. Dwarf alleles differentially affect barley root traits influencing nitrogen acquisition under low nutrient supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karley, A J; Valentine, T A; Squire, G R

    2011-07-01

    Sustainable food production depends critically on the development of crop genotypes that exhibit high yield under reduced nutrient inputs. Rooting traits have been widely advocated as being able to influence optimal plant performance, while breeding-based improvements in yield of spring barley suggest that this species is a good model crop. To date, however, molecular genetics knowledge has not delivered realistic plant ideotypes, while agronomic trials have been unable to identify superior traits. This study explores an intermediate experimental system in which root traits and their effect on plant performance can be quantified. As a test case, four modern semi-dwarf barley varieties, which possess either the ari-e.GP or the sdw1 dwarf allele, were compared with the long-stemmed old variety Kenia under two levels of nutrient supply. The two semi-dwarf types differed from Kenia, exhibiting smaller stem mass and total plant nitrogen (N), and improved partitioning of mass and N to grain. Amongst the semi-dwarfs, the two ari-e.GP genotypes performed better than the two sdw1 genotypes under standard and reduced nutrient supply, particularly in root mass, root investment efficiency, N acquisition, and remobilization of N and mass to grain. However, lack of between-genotype variation in yield and N use efficiency indicated limited potential for exploiting genetic variation in existing varieties to improve barley performance under reduced nutrient inputs. Experimental approaches to test the expression of desirable root and shoot traits are scrutinized, and the potential evaluated for developing a spring barley ideotype for low nutrient conditions.

  18. Huge increases in bacterivores on freshly killed barley roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.; Griffiths, B.; Ekelund, Flemming

    1992-01-01

    Adding fresh roots to intact soil cores resulted in marked increases in microbial and microfaunal activity at the resource islands. Microbial activity increased in two phases following root addition. Respiratory activity and concentration of respiratory enzyme (dehydrogenase) in soil adhering to ...

  19. Bipolaris sorokiniana (teleomorph Cochliobolus Sativus: Causer of barley leaf lesions and root rot in Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karov Ilija K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased barley plants (Hordeum vulgare, were noticed in the area of Kumanovo, Bitola, Probistip, Skopje and Kocani, at the beginning of March, 2006. Our investigations were carried out in the period from 2006 to 2009. The plants were highly diseased, probably in the stage of germination, dwarfed with necrotic leaves and with poorly developed root. A rotten root collar was noticed notice in some plants, which could be easily pulled out from the soil. Plants infected in a later developing stage became yellow from the top of the leaf, and many brown-olive, oval shape lesions were noticed. Conidia of Bipolaris sorokiniana (Sacc. Shoen., were isolated from symptomatic lesions. Pseudothecia with asci and ascospores from teleomorph Cochliobolus sativus, were found on the barley straw in the same field the previous year.

  20. Cell-type-specific H+-ATPase activity in root tissues enables K+ retention and mediates acclimation of barley (Hordeum vulgare) to salinity stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabala, Lana; Zhang, Jingyi; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    While the importance of cell type specificity in plant adaptive responses is widely accepted, only a limited number of studies have addressed this issue at the functional level. We have combined electrophysiological, imaging, and biochemical techniques to reveal the physiological mechanisms...... compared with the mature zone, mature root cells accumulated more cytosolic and vacuolar Na(+), suggesting that the higher sensitivity of apical cells to salt is not related to either enhanced Na(+) exclusion or sequestration inside the root. Rather, the above differential sensitivity between the two zones...... conferring higher sensitivity of apical root cells to salinity in barley (Hordeum vulgare). We show that salinity application to the root apex arrests root growth in a highly tissue- and treatment-specific manner. Although salinity-induced transient net Na(+) uptake was about 4-fold higher in the root apex...

  1. A Simple Method for Assessing Severity of Common Root Rot on Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Imad Eddin Arabi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Common root rot caused by Cochliobolus sativus is a serious disease of barley. A simple and reliable method for assessing this disease would enhance our capacity in identifying resistance sources and developing resistant barley cultivars. In searching for such a method, a conidial suspension of C. sativus was dropped onto sterilized elongated subcrown internodes and incubated in sandwich filter paper using polyethylene transparent envelopes. Initial disease symptoms were easily detected after 48h of inoculation. Highly significant correlation coefficients were found in each experiment (A, B and C between sandwich filter paper and seedling assays, indicating that this testing procedure was reliable. The method presented facilitates a rapid pre-selection under uniform conditions which is of importance from a breeder’s point of view.

  2. Growth curve registration for evaluating salinity tolerance in barley

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Rui

    2017-03-23

    Background: Smarthouses capable of non-destructive, high-throughput plant phenotyping collect large amounts of data that can be used to understand plant growth and productivity in extreme environments. The challenge is to apply the statistical tool that best analyzes the data to study plant traits, such as salinity tolerance, or plant-growth-related traits. Results: We derive family-wise salinity sensitivity (FSS) growth curves and use registration techniques to summarize growth patterns of HEB-25 barley families and the commercial variety, Navigator. We account for the spatial variation in smarthouse microclimates and in temporal variation across phenotyping runs using a functional ANOVA model to derive corrected FSS curves. From FSS, we derive corrected values for family-wise salinity tolerance, which are strongly negatively correlated with Na but not significantly with K, indicating that Na content is an important factor affecting salinity tolerance in these families, at least for plants of this age and grown in these conditions. Conclusions: Our family-wise methodology is suitable for analyzing the growth curves of a large number of plants from multiple families. The corrected curves accurately account for the spatial and temporal variations among plants that are inherent to high-throughput experiments.

  3. The Roots of Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synder, Agnes

    1973-01-01

    Effective planning for child growth through the curriculum takes into account three things: 1) the pace at which children grow, 2) the individuality of every child, and 3) the need for guidance in meeting the problems of living. (ST)

  4. Barley Seed Germination/Root Elongation Toxicity Test For Evaluation Of Sludge Pre-Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Barrett Sørensen, Mie

    Application of sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on agricultural land is an approach for nutrient recycling that rise challenges due to recalcitrant and harmful pollutants. In this study we assessed the feasibility of a seed germination test to evaluate sludge ecotoxicity and compared...... germination responses from two test parameters, root elongation and seed germination (sprouts elongation) of the barley (Hordeum vulgare). 2nd objective was to evaluate sewage sludge pre-treatments at batch-scale of sludge samples from two WWTPs using anaerobic digestion, and thermal and ozonation pre...

  5. Effects of fenpropimorph on bacteria and fungi during decomposition of barley roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirup, L.; Johnsen, K.; Torsvik, V.

    2001-01-01

    not affected. The succession of the two bacterial subgroups differed considerably, so, whereas Pseudomonas peaked in the early decomposition stages, actinomycetes were most abundant after 2 months, and on the very first sampling day. Thus, the present findings suggest a possible effect of fenpropimorph on soil...... fertility. The diversity of total bacterial DNA measured by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was unaffected by fenpropimorph treatment, there being a clear and highly reproducible succession in bacterial diversity during decomposition of the barley roots. The diversity in the hotspot...

  6. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32°C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30°C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32°C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14°C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32°C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase. PMID:16665545

  7. Plant growth-promoting bacteria facilitate the growth of barley and oats in salt-impacted soil: implications for phytoremediation of saline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pearl; Gerhardt, Karen E; Huang, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Xiao-Ming; Glick, Bernard R; Gerwing, Perry D; Greenberg, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) strains that contain the enzyme 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase can lower stress ethylene levels and improve plant growth. In this study, ACC deaminase-producing bacteria were isolated from a ) salt-impacted ( 50 dS/m) farm field, and their ability to promote plant growth of barley 1): and oats in saline soil was investigated in pouch assays (1% NaCI), greenhouse trials (9.4 dS/m), and field trials (6-24 dS/m). A mix of previously isolated PGPB strains UW3 (Pseudomonas sp.) and UW4 (P. sp.) was also tested for comparison. Rhizobacterial isolate CMH3 (P. corrugata) and UW3+UW4 partially alleviated plant salt stress in growth pouch assays. In greenhouse trials, CMH3 enhanced root biomass of barley and oats by 200% and 50%, respectively. UW3+UW4, CMH3 and isolate CMH2 also enhanced barley and oat shoot growth by 100%-150%. In field tests, shoot biomass of oats tripled when treated with UW3+UW4 and doubled with CHM3 compared with that of untreated plants. PGPB treatment did not affect salt uptake on a per mass basis; higher plant biomass led to greater salt uptake, resulting in decreased soil salinity. This study demonstrates a method for improving plant growth in marginal saline soils. Associated implications for salt

  8. Contrasting phosphate acquisition of mycorrhizal fungi with that of root hairs using the root hairless barley mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, I.; Chen, B.D.; Munkvold, L.

    2005-01-01

    colonization structures and a radioactive tracer confirmed P transport by the extraradical mycelium. This is the first direct evaluation of the relative effectiveness of root hairs and mycorrhizas. Mycorrhizas effectively substituted root hairs in P uptake, whereas the additional P was most often used less......Comparisons between plant species or cultivars differing in root hair length have indicated a major impact of root hairs on the mycorrhizal dependency of plants with respect to phosphate (P) uptake. The current study aimed to investigate this relationship by comparing directly the mycorrhizal...... effectively in promoting plant growth than P provided by root hairs....

  9. Effects of Seed Priming on Root Characteristics of Two Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cultivars in Different Levels of Salinity Stress by using Gel Chamber Technique

    OpenAIRE

    H. R Khazaei; A Nezami; B Saadatian; O Armand Pishe

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of seed priming on root growth of two barley cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) under salinity stress was performed in phytogel. The treatments included two cultivars of barely (Yusuf and Maquie), levels of seed priming (control, hydro-priming and priming with 4.35 g l-1 of urea) and four levels of NaCl salinity stress (0, 0.2, 0.3 M). The experiment was conducted in Factorial experiment based on a completely randomized design (CRD) with three replic...

  10. Healthiness and fungus composition of barley roots under organic, integrated and conventional farming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baturo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The researched material was healthiness of roots and fungus composition of spring barley cultivated under organic, integrated and conventional farming systems. The studies were carried out in 1998-2001 on experimental fields in Osiny near Puławy, south-eastern Poland. In the emergence stage the roots health status was the lowest in organic system however in the end of vegetation season, in dough maturity stage the most disease symptoms were stated in conventional system. The mycological analyses revealed the occurrence of two important pathogens: Bipolaris sorokiniana and Fusarium spp. Despite of root healthiness macroscopic analyses showed their lower health status in organic system only in emergence stage and the most quantity of plants with disease symptoms in dough maturity stage were observed in conventional system, but pathogens like Bipolaris sorokiniana and Fusarium spp. were mostly isolated in organic system in both phases. It can suggest that disease symptoms in conventional system can be caused by different than fungus factors. The lowest percent of mentioned pathogens was stated in integrated system. It is worth to notice that organic conditions could be favourable to Gliocladium roseum. Because of growing interest in ecology, giving up of using pesticides and more and more popular biological disease control, these fungi of Gliocladium genus be used in this system due to their antagonistic properties.

  11. Salinity Stress in Roots of Contrasting BarleyGenotypes Reveals Time-Distinct and Genotype-Specific Patterns for Defined Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most severe abiotic stress factors threatening agriculture worldwide. Hence,particular interest exists in unraveling mechanisms leading to salt tolerance and improved crop plant performance onsaline soils. Barley is considered to be one of the most salinity-tolerant crops, but varying levels of tolerance are wellcharacterized. A proteomic analysis of the roots of two contrasting cultivars (cv. Steptoe and cv. Morex) is presented.Young plants were exposed to a period of 1, 4, 7, or 10 d at 0, 100, or 150mM NaCI. The root proteome was analyzedbased on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A number of cultivar-specific and salinity stress-responsive proteins wereidentified. Mass spectrometry-based identification was successful for 74 proteins, and a hierarchical clustering analysisgrouped these into five clusters based on similarity of expression profile. The rank product method was applied to sta-tistically access the early and late responses, and this delivered a number of new candidate proteins underlying salinitytolerance in barley. Among these were some germin-like proteins, some pathogenesis-related proteins, and numerousas-yet uncharacterized proteins. Notably, proteins involved in detoxification pathways and terpenoid biosynthesis weredetected as early responsive to salinity and may function as a means of modulating growth-regulating mechanisms andmembrane stability via fine tuning of phytohormone and secondary metabolism in the root.

  12. Barley Leaf Area and Leaf Growth Rates Are Maximized during the Pre-Anthesis Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Alqudah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf developmental traits are an important component of crop breeding in small-grain cereals. Surprisingly, little is known about the genetic basis for the differences in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. leaf development. The two barley row-type classes, i.e., two- and six-rowed, show clear-cut differences in leaf development. To quantify these differences and to measure the genetic component of the phenotypic variance for the leaf developmental differences in both row-type classes we investigated 32 representative spring barley accessions (14 two- and 18 six-rowed accessions under three independent growth conditions. Leaf mass area is lower in plants grown under greenhouse (GH conditions due to fewer, smaller, and lighter leaf blades per main culm compared to pot- and soil-grown field plants. Larger and heavier leaf blades of six-rowed barley correlate with higher main culm spike grain yield, spike dry weight, and harvest index; however, smaller leaf area (LA in two-rowed barley can be attributed to more spikes, tillers, and biological yield (aboveground parts. In general, leaf growth rate was significantly higher between awn primordium and tipping stages. Moderate to very high broad-sense heritabilities (0.67–0.90 were found under all growth conditions, indicating that these traits are predominantly genetically controlled. In addition, our data suggests that GH conditions are suitable for studying leaf developmental traits. Our results also demonstrated that LA impacts single plant yield and can be reconsidered in future breeding programs. Six-rowed spike 1 (Vrs1 is the major determinate of barley row-types, the differences in leaf development between two- and six-rowed barleys may be attributed to the regulation of Vrs1 in these two classes, which needs further testing.

  13. Influence of Aluminum and Cadmium Stresses on Mineral Nutrition and Root Exudates in Two Barley Cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUO Tian-Rong; ZHANG Guo-Ping; ZHOU Mei-Xue; WU Fei-Bo; CHEN Jin-Xin

    2007-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to study the effect of aluminum (Al) and cadmium (Cd) on Al and mineral nutrient contents in plants and Al-induced organic acid exudation in two barley varieties with different Al tolerance. Al-sensitive cv. Shang 70-119 had significantly higher Al content and accumulation in plants than Al-tolerant cv. Gebeina, especially in roots, when subjected to low pH (4.0) and Al treatments (100 μmol L-1 Al and 100 μmol L-1 Al +1.0 μmol L-1 Cd). Cd addition increased Al content in plants exposed to Al stress. Both low pH and Al treatments caused marked reduction in Ca and Mg contents in all plant parts, P and K contents in the shoots and leaves, Fe, Zn and Mo contents in the leaves, Zn and B contents in the shoots, and Mn contents both in the roots and leaves. Moreover, changes in nutrient concentrations were greater in the plants exposed to both Al and Cd than in those exposed only to Al treatment. A dramatic enhancement of malate, citrate, and succinate was found in the plants exposed to 100 μmol L-1 Al relative to the control, and the Al-tolerant cultivar had a considerable higher exudation of these organic acids than the Al-sensitive one, indicating that Al-induced enhancement of these organic acids is very likely to be associated with Al tolerance.

  14. Intercropping effect on root growth and nitrogen uptake at different nitrogen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Javier; Martens, Helle Juel; Quemada, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    or RLD; however, increasing topsoil N favored the proliferation of vetch roots in the intercropping at deep soil layers, with the barley:vetch root ratio ranging from 25 at N0 to 5 at N2. The N uptake of the barley was enhanced in the intercropping at the expense of the vetch (from ~100mg plant−1 to 200...... the interactions in intercrops as well as for planning cover cropping strategies. The aim of this work was (i) to determine if different levels of N in the topsoil influence root depth (RD) and intensity of barley and vetch as sole crops or as an intercropped mixture and (ii) to test if the choice of a mixture...... or the N availability in the topsoil will influence the N uptake by deep roots.Methods In this study, we combined rhizotron studies with root extraction and species identification by microscopy with studies of growth, N uptake and 15N uptake from deeper soil layers, for studying the root interactions...

  15. The influence of barley straw extract addition on the growth of duckweed (Lemna valdiviana Phil. under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pęczuła W.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to forming dense mats in small waterbodies, duckweeds are often considered as nuisance plants in some freshwaters. Up to now, few techniques had been tested aiming towards managing duckweeds, but all of them had appeared to have some disadvantages. As an attempt to find a new effective management tool, a laboratory experiment assessing the influence of barley straw (BS extract addition – a substance used in algal bloom control, upon the growth of the duckweed Lemna valdiviana, was performed. Reaction on two various concentrations of BS extract were quantified by measurements of changes in duckweed biomass and root length. The results showed that plants which have received the extract increased their biomass slower than that of the control, however only those with the addition of smaller amounts of BS differed significantly from the controls. Furthermore, BS addition stimulated the root growth in both experimental tanks. This implies that the mean roots length was higher, although the statistical differences were insignificant. As possible explanation for the observed changes we suggest that: (1 the growth inhibition of Lemna valvidiana under exposition to BS extract might be induced by an uptake of organic compounds from which some (phenolic substances are (probably toxic; (2 competitive interactions with the microbial communities developed upon the duckweed roots might play a role as well.

  16. Overexpression, purification and enzymatic characterization of a recombinant plastidial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Nure) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardi, Manuela; Chibani, Kamel; Castiglia, Daniela; Cafasso, Donata; Pizzo, Elio; Rouhier, Nicolas; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Esposito, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In plant cells, the plastidial glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (P2-G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) represents one of the most important sources of NADPH. However, previous studies revealed that both native and recombinant purified P2-G6PDHs show a great instability and a rapid loss of catalytic activity. Therefore it has been difficult to describe accurately the catalytic and physico-chemical properties of these isoforms. The plastidial G6PDH encoding sequence from barley roots (Hordeum vulgare cv. Nure), devoid of a long plastidial transit peptide, was expressed as recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, either untagged or with an N-terminal his-tag. After purification from both the soluble fraction and inclusion bodies, we have explored its kinetic parameters, as well as its sensitivity to reduction. The obtained results are consistent with values determined for other P2-G6PDHs previously purified from barley roots and from other land plants. Overall, these data shed light on the catalytic mechanism of plant P2-G6PDH, summarized in a proposed model in which the sequential mechanism is very similar to the mammalian cytosolic G6PDH. This study provides a rational basis to consider the recombinant barley root P2-G6PDH as a good model for further kinetic and structural studies.

  17. Effect of Soil Erosion on Spring Barley Growth in East Anglia,England:Preliminary Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUXI-XI; Y.BIOT

    1994-01-01

    The effect of soil erosion on spring barley growth was studied on a deep loamy soil in East Anglia,England,in 1992,Soil erosion was simulated by three levels of soil desurfacing,7.5,18and 30cm with three replicates.Significant differences in crop height,ground cover and crop yield were observed between the three levels of desurfacing.Soil desurfacing also has a singnificant effect on soil moisture at the 20cm depth.The interaction between soil removal and crop performance affected soil moisture at the depths of 50 and 100cm,No significant differences were found in runoff and sediment etween the three topsoil removals due to very dry growing season.Regression equations were developed between spring barley yield and soil desurfacing Spring barley grain yield declined by 97.6kg/ha per cm soil desurfacing.

  18. Impact of Low Concentration of Cadmium on Photosynthesis and Growth of Pea and Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Januškaitienė

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic gas exchange and growth characteristics were examined in pea and barley plants using 1 mM Cd treatment. Plants were sown into neutral peat substrate and at a leaf development stage were treated with 1 mM cadmium concentration solution. Gas exchange parameters (photosynthetic rate; intercellular CO2 concentration; transpiration rate; water use efficiency were measured with portable photosynthesis system LI-6400 on the fifth day after Cd treatment. Under Cd stress the photosynthetic rate of pea and barley plants decreased by 16.7 % (p 2 concentration decreased by 27.4 % (p 2 reduction processes of Cd treated pea leaves increased (because intercellular CO2 concentration decreased, but that had no positive effect on a photosynthetic rate, and the photosynthetic rate of pea decreased by 4 % more than that of barley. The changes of dry biomass of cadmium treated plants were weak and statistically insignificant.

  19. Exposure of barley plants to low Pi leads to rapid changes in root respiration that correlate with specific alterations in amino acid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexova, Ralitza; Nelson, Clark J; Jacoby, Richard P; Millar, A Harvey

    2015-04-01

    The majority of inorganic phosphate (Pi ) stress studies in plants have focused on the response after growth has been retarded. Evidence from transcript analysis, however, shows that a Pi -stress specific response is initiated within minutes of transfer to low Pi and in crop plants precedes the expression of Pi transporters and depletion of vacuolar Pi reserves by days. In order to investigate the physiological and metabolic events during early exposure to low Pi in grain crops, we monitored the response of whole barley plants during the first hours following Pi withdrawal. Lowering the concentration of Pi led to rapid changes in root respiration and leaf gas exchange throughout the early phase of the light course. Combining amino and organic acid analysis with (15) N labelling we show a root-specific effect on nitrogen metabolism linked to specific substrates of respiration as soon as 1 h following Pi withdrawal; this explains the respiratory responses observed and was confirmed by stimulation of respiration by exogenous addition of these respiratory substrates to roots. The rapid adjustment of substrates for respiration in roots during short-term Pi -stress is highlighted and this could help guide roots towards Pi -rich soil patches without compromising biomass accumulation of the plant. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Effects of catch crop type and root depth on nitrogen leaching and yield of spring barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapkota, Tek Bahadur; Askegaard, Margrethe; Lægdsmand, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    [chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)] and their effect on soil mineral N (NO3− and NH4+) in different soil layers by using the FASSET model. The simulated results of catch crop biomass and root growth and mineral N in the soil...

  1. Additive effects of Na+ and Cl- ions on barley growth under salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Fatehi, Foad; Coventry, Stewart; Rengasamy, Pichu; McDonald, Glenn K

    2011-03-01

    Soil salinity affects large areas of the world's cultivated land, causing significant reductions in crop yield. Despite the fact that most plants accumulate both sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) ions in high concentrations in their shoot tissues when grown in saline soils, most research on salt tolerance in annual plants has focused on the toxic effects of Na(+) accumulation. It has previously been suggested that Cl(-) toxicity may also be an important cause of growth reduction in barley plants. Here, the extent to which specific ion toxicities of Na(+) and Cl(-) reduce the growth of barley grown in saline soils is shown under varying salinity treatments using four barley genotypes differing in their salt tolerance in solution and soil-based systems. High Na(+), Cl(-), and NaCl separately reduced the growth of barley, however, the reductions in growth and photosynthesis were greatest under NaCl stress and were mainly additive of the effects of Na(+) and Cl(-) stress. The results demonstrated that Na(+) and Cl(-) exclusion among barley genotypes are independent mechanisms and different genotypes expressed different combinations of the two mechanisms. High concentrations of Na(+) reduced K(+) and Ca(2+) uptake and reduced photosynthesis mainly by reducing stomatal conductance. By comparison, high Cl(-) concentration reduced photosynthetic capacity due to non-stomatal effects: there was chlorophyll degradation, and a reduction in the actual quantum yield of PSII electron transport which was associated with both photochemical quenching and the efficiency of excitation energy capture. The results also showed that there are fundamental differences in salinity responses between soil and solution culture, and that the importance of the different mechanisms of salt damage varies according to the system under which the plants were grown.

  2. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacak, Andrzej; Geisler, Katrin; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2010-01-01

    -expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species) have created...

  3. Winter Wheat Root Growth and Nitrogen Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Irene Skovby

    Root growth is an essential parameter regarding nitrogen (N) uptake efficiency, as more and deeper roots may improve the uptake from deeper soil layers and reduce nitrate leaching losses. During this PhD project, it was studied how different agronomic practices influence root growth and N relations...... in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L). Field experiments on the effect of sowing date, N fertilization and cultivars were conducted on a sandy loam soil in Taastrup, Denmark. The root studies were conducted by means of the minirhizotron method. Also, a field experiment on the effect of defoliation and N...... fertilization was conducted in Canberra, Australia. Here the root studies were done by means of the core-break method and root washing....

  4. Winter Wheat Root Growth and Nitrogen Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Irene Skovby

    Root growth is an essential parameter regarding nitrogen (N) uptake efficiency, as more and deeper roots may improve the uptake from deeper soil layers and reduce nitrate leaching losses. During this PhD project, it was studied how different agronomic practices influence root growth and N relations...... in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L). Field experiments on the effect of sowing date, N fertilization and cultivars were conducted on a sandy loam soil in Taastrup, Denmark. The root studies were conducted by means of the minirhizotron method. Also, a field experiment on the effect of defoliation and N...... fertilization was conducted in Canberra, Australia. Here the root studies were done by means of the core-break method and root washing....

  5. Growth of legume and nonlegume catch crops and residual-N effects in spring barley on coarse sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Margrethe; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Askegaard, M. and Eriksen, E. 2007. Growth of legume and nonlegume catch crops and residual-N effects in spring barley on coarse sand. J. Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 170, 733-780.......Askegaard, M. and Eriksen, E. 2007. Growth of legume and nonlegume catch crops and residual-N effects in spring barley on coarse sand. J. Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 170, 733-780....

  6. The effect of interspecies interactions and water deficit on spring barley and red clover biomass accumulation at successive growth stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jastrzębska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in Olsztyn, Poland, in the period 2010–2012. The aim of the study was to examine whether soil water deficit would change biomass volume and distribution of pure sown spring barley and red clover as well as growth rate during their joint vegetation and mutual interactions. The interactions between spring barley and red clover were of a competitive character, and the cereal was the stronger crop. The strength of this competition increased in time with the growing season. Through most of the growing season, the competition was poorer in water deficit conditions. The impact of clover on barley before the heading stage showed facilitation symptoms. Interspecific competition reduced the rate of barley biomass accumulation and decreased stem and leaf biomass towards the end of the growing season. Intensified translocation of assimilates from the vegetative parts to grain minimized the decrease in spike biomass. Water deficit stress had a more inhibitory effect on the biomass and growth rate of barley than competition, and competition did not exacerbate the adverse influence of water deficit stress on barley. Competition from barley significantly reduced the biomass and biomass accumulation rate of clover. Water deficit stress did not exacerbate barley’s competitive effect on clover, but it strongly inhibited the growth of aboveground biomass in pure-sown clover.

  7. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacak, Andrzej; Geisler, Katrin; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2010-01-01

    -expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species) have created...... the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too weak to be of practical use. The new BSMV vectors modified for ligation-free cloning will allow rapid insertion of plant gene fragments for future experiments....

  8. Response of barley seedlings to oxidative stress generated by treatments with growth hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Zenovia Olteanu; Elena Truta; Lacramiora Oprica; Maria Magdalena Zamfirache

    2009-01-01

    The effects induced by growth hormone regulators on soluble protein level and some oxidoreductases in Hordeum vulgare cv. Madalin seedlings were investigated. The study of superoxide dismutase, catalyse and peroxidase behaviour and of protein synthesis was realized in dynamics to evaluate the response of barley seedlings to oxidative stress generated by exposure to hormone factors. During experiments, peroxidase registered smaller limits of variability than superoxide dismutase an...

  9. Transgenic sweet potato expressing thionin from barley gives resistance to black rot disease caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata in leaves and storage roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoko; Shimamura, Takashi; Mitsukawa, Norihiro; Hori, Etsuko; Koda, Katsunori; Otani, Motoyasu; Hirai, Masana; Nakamura, Kenzo; Imaeda, Takao

    2012-06-01

    Black rot of sweet potato caused by pathogenic fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata severely deteriorates both growth of plants and post-harvest storage. Antimicrobial peptides from various organisms have broad range activities of killing bacteria, mycobacteria, and fungi. Plant thionin peptide exhibited anti-fungal activity against C. fimbriata. A gene for barley α-hordothionin (αHT) was placed downstream of a strong constitutive promoter of E12Ω or the promoter of a sweet potato gene for β-amylase of storage roots, and introduced into sweet potato commercial cultivar Kokei No. 14. Transgenic E12Ω:αHT plants showed high-level expression of αHT mRNA in both leaves and storage roots. Transgenic β-Amy:αHT plants showed sucrose-inducible expression of αHT mRNA in leaves, in addition to expression in storage roots. Leaves of E12Ω:αHT plants exhibited reduced yellowing upon infection by C. fimbriata compared to leaves of non-transgenic Kokei No. 14, although the level of resistance was weaker than resistance cultivar Tamayutaka. Storage roots of both E12Ω:αHT and β-Amy:αHT plants exhibited reduced lesion areas around the site inoculated with C. fimbriata spores compared to Kokei No. 14, and some of the transgenic lines showed resistance level similar to Tamayutaka. Growth of plants and production of storage roots of these transgenic plants were not significantly different from non-transgenic plants. These results highlight the usefulness of transgenic sweet potato expressing antimicrobial peptide to reduce damages of sweet potato from the black rot disease and to reduce the use of agricultural chemicals.

  10. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes: II. Intrinsic Protein Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C R

    1987-07-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32 degrees C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30 degrees C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32 degrees C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14 degrees C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32 degrees C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase.

  11. Low-phytic acid barley improves calcium and phosphorus utilization and growth performance in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veum, T L; Ledoux, D R; Bollinger, D W; Raboy, V; Cook, A

    2002-10-01

    Thirty-five crossbred barrows averaging 13.5 kg starting BW were used in a 35-d experiment to compare the availability of P and the nutritional value of two near-isogenic progeny of the barley cultivar 'Harrington'. Low-phytic acid barley (LPB, 0.35% total P, 0.14% phytic acid P) was homozygous for the low-phytic acid 1-1 allele, and the normal barley (NB, 0.35% total P, 0.24% phytic acid P) was homozygous for the normal allele of that gene. Pigs were fed individually twice daily in metabolism pens. Barley was the only source of phytate in semipurified diets, 1 to 3. Diet 1 contained 75% NB, 0.14% estimated available P (aP), and 0.50% Ca. Diet 2 contained 75% LPB, 0.22% aP, and 0.50% Ca. No inorganic P (iP) was added to Diets 1 and 2 in order to measure the animal response to the different concentrations of aP in these cultivars. Diet 3 was NB Diet 1 supplemented with iP to equal the concentration of aP in LPB Diet 2. Practical barley-soybean meal (SBM)-type diets, NB Diet 4 and LPB Diet 5, were formulated to meet all minimum nutrient requirements, and contained 0.30% aP and 0.65% Ca. For the semipurified diets, pigs fed LPB Diet 2 had higher (P or = 0.3) in growth performance, fresh bone weight, fat-free dry bone weight, bone ash, bone breaking strength, or N utilization. This indicates that LPB and NB were equal in nutritional value after supplementation of NB with iP to equal the estimated aP in LPB. For the practical barley-SBM diets, there were no differences (P > or = 0.4) between pigs fed NB Diet 4 or LPB Diet 5 for growth performance, fresh bone weight, bone breaking strength, the percentages of P and Ca utilization, or N, DE, and ME utilization. The use of LPB in pig diets reduced P excretion in swine waste by 55% and 16% in our semipurified and practical diets, respectively, compared with NB. Using our in vitro procedure designed to mimic the digestive system of the pig, the availability of P for pigs was estimated at 52% for LPB and 32% for NB.

  12. Stochastic roots of growth phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; De Siena, S.; Giorno, V.

    2014-05-01

    We show that the Gompertz equation describes the evolution in time of the median of a geometric stochastic process. Therefore, we induce that the process itself generates the growth. This result allows us further to exploit a stochastic variational principle to take account of self-regulation of growth through feedback of relative density variations. The conceptually well defined framework so introduced shows its usefulness by suggesting a form of control of growth by exploiting external actions.

  13. Research Progress of Root Rot Disease in Barley%大麦根腐病研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰国防; 张凤英; 包海柱; 武海明; 刘志萍

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most serious worldwide disease affecting the yield and quality of barley,Root Rot Disease was widely distribu-ted in the Daxinganling mountain area and the Yangtze River basin in China. Root Rot Disease in Barely is the fungal disease caused by Biplaris sorokiniana and its pathogenic bacteria can be parasitized and also can be saprophyticed with strong adaptability. This paper mainly reviewed the cause of root rot disease,its biological characteristics,host range,disease symptoms,identification of the disea-ses,genetics of resistance,and measures on how to control this disease as well as the outlook of the research prospects in root rot dis-ease in barley.%大麦根腐病是严重危害大麦产量和品质的世界性病害之一,在我国的大兴安岭西麓和长江流域分布广泛。大麦根腐病是由根腐离蠕孢菌( Biplaris sorokiniana)引起的真菌性病害,其致病菌可寄生也可腐生,适应性极强。本文主要从大麦根腐病的病原及其生物学特性、寄主范围、病害症状、病害鉴定、抗性遗传和防治方法等方面进行了综述,并展望了大麦根腐病的研究前景。

  14. Effect of lead on root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Mouna; Laplaze, Laurent; Bendaou, Najib; Hocher, Valerie; Mzibri, Mohamed El; Bogusz, Didier; Smouni, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminant in soils. It is highly toxic to living organisms. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to Pb exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i) by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops Pb entering (ii) through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii) by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development.

  15. Effect of lead on root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Mouna; Laplaze, Laurent; Bendaou, Najib; Hocher, Valerie; Mzibri, Mohamed El; Bogusz, Didier; Smouni, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminant in soils. It is highly toxic to living organisms. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to Pb exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i) by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops Pb entering (ii) through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii) by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development. PMID:23750165

  16. Quest for Continual Growth Takes Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdey, Mary M.; Hashey, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the quest for continual growth has taken its root at Vestal Central School district. Located at the heart of upstate New York, educators at Vestal Central School district have created a spirit of "kaizen," a Japanese word meaning the relentless quest for continual improvement and higher-quality…

  17. The effect of temperature and rainfall on participation of the pathogens causing root and stem rot in spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Łacicowa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments conducted in the years 1990-1995 were localized at the Plaiit Cultivation Station, Ulhówek to repeat the cultivation of spring barley cultivars Roland and Lot. In conditions of monoculture, Bipolaris sorokiniana and Fusarium culmorum were of the foremost importance in causing root and stem rot. The proportion of infected plants did not increase with time. Depending on the period of vegetation and the cultivar, the percentage of seedlings with necrosis symptoms ranged from 6% to 53,5% and that of stem base rot from 14% to 59%. In the case of both cultivars. root and stem rot was especially intensive in the third successive season of vegetation, i, e,. in 1992. That season was characterized by warm and wet weather conditions. favourable for the infection of seedlings by B.sorokiniane during the period of six weeks after the sowing of grain. Bipolaris sorokiniana always had the greatest proportion in the infction of spring barley but not in the seasons distinguished by hot and dry weather conditions. On the other hand, during dry and hot weather conditions the only or the dominating fungus obtained from the infcted stem base after the heading of spring barley was F. culmorum. In conditions of monoculture, favourable for root and stem rot of spring barley, the temperature and rainfalls clearly distinguished the proportion of B. sorokiniana and F. culmorum in plant infection.

  18. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserinelactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eGoetz-Roesch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS. N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs are the QS signalling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signalling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance towards radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants’ pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters.We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL, N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L. as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers towards AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different

  19. Effect of biofilm forming plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on salinity tolerance in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedad A. Kasim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of biofilm under varying stress conditions is a significant strategy adopted by bacterial strains for their successful survival in plant rhizosphere. In this study, the activity of biofilm formation of 20 isolates and strains of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR was determined under different salt concentrations. The results indicated that all of the 20 PGPRs have the activity of biofilm formation under 0.0, 250, 500 or 1000 mM NaCl which was increased with increasing salt concentration. PGPR strains with the highest activity of biofilm formation were selected and used to coat barley grains. The coated grains were sown in clay/sandy soil and left to grow for 25 days. The results showed that bacterial inoculation was effective in alleviating the deleterious effect of salinity on some growth criteria (seedling length, fresh and dry masses as well as relative water content, compared with the control. The isolate HM6 (B6, which showed the highest activity of biofilm formation at all the studied NaCl concentrations, was identified using 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplification and sequencing of the PCR product. The similarity sequence analysis indicated that HM6 isolate has 97.4% similar sequence identity to Bacillus amyloliquifaciens. It could be speculated that the bacterial activity of biofilm formation is helpful for improving salt stress tolerance of barley.

  20. Rhizodeposition of N by pea and barley and its effect on soil N dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Rhizodeposition of N during plant growth influences the microbial activity in the rhizosphere and constitutes a source of labile organic N, but has not been quantified to the same degree as the rhizodeposition of C. The rhizodeposition of N, defined as root-derived N present in the soil after...... removal of visible roots and root fragments, was determined during field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth in a sandy soil at a low concentration of mineral N using a continuous split-root N-15-labelling technique. The N rhizodeposition constituted 15 and 48...... plant(-1) (20% of total plant N) for barley. Incubation of soils, after removal of roots, showed that the N rhizodeposits were labile; 79% of the pea and 48% of the barley root-derived N present in soil at 7 WAP were mineralizable. The root-derived N present in soil at maturity was less labile, since...

  1. The effects of salt stress cause a diversion of basal metabolism in barley roots: possible different roles for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardi, Manuela; Castiglia, Daniela; Ferrara, Myriam; Guerriero, Gea; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effects of salt stress and nitrogen assimilation have been investigated in roots of hydroponically-grown barley plants exposed to 150 mM NaCl, in presence or absence of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. Salt stress determines a diversion of root metabolism towards the synthesis of osmolytes, such as glycine betaine and proline, and increased levels of reduced glutathione. The metabolic changes triggered by salt stress result in a decrease in both activities and protein abundance of key enzymes, namely GOGAT and PEP carboxylase, and in a slight increase in HSP70. These variations would enhance the requirement for reductants supplied by the OPPP, consistently with the observed increase in total G6PDH activity. The involvement and occurrence of the different G6PDH isoforms have been investigated, and the kinetic properties of partially purified cytosolic and plastidial G6PDHs determined. Bioinformatic analyses examining co-expression profiles of G6PDHs in Arabidopsis and barley corroborate the data presented. Moreover, the gene coding for the root P2-G6PDH isoform was fully sequenced; the biochemical properties of the corresponding protein were examined experimentally. The results are discussed in the light of the possible distinct roles and regulation of the different G6PDH isoforms during salt stress in barley roots.

  2. Influence of silicon on microdistribution of mineral ions in roots of salt-stressed barley as associated with salt tolerance in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Yongchao(梁永超); DING; Ruixing(丁瑞兴)

    2002-01-01

    Two contrasting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars: Kepin No.7 (salt sensitive), and Jian 4 (salt tolerant) were grown hydroponically to investigate the microdistribution of mineral ions in roots as affected by silicon (Si) with respect to salt tolerance. The experiment was undertaken consisting of two treatments with 3 replicates: (i) 120 mmol@L?1 NaCl alone (referred to as Si(NaCl+), (ii) 120 mmol@L?1 NaCl + 1.0 mmol@L?1 Si (as potassium silicate) (referred to as Si+NaCl+). Plant root tips were harvested for microanalysis using an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer (EDX) 30 d after transplanting. Higher Cl and Na X-ray peaks were recorded in the root epidermal, cortical and stelar cells of roots for the treatment Si(NaCl+ with the majorities of Na and Cl being accumulated in epidermal and cortical cells, while relatively low K peaks were observed regardless of the barley cultivars used. By contrast, considerably higher K peaks were detected in the epidermal, cortical and stelar cells of the roots for the treatment Si+NaCl+, but lower Cl and Na peaks were also observed for this treatment with both Na and Cl ions being evenly distributed in the epidermal, cortical and stelar cells. These findings directly support our previous finding, which showed that Si depressed the uptake of sodium but enhanced the uptake of potassium by salt-stressed barley. We believe that one of the possible mechanisms involved in Si-enhancement of salt tolerance in barley is attributed to the Si-induced changes in the uptake and microdistribution of mineral ions in plants.

  3. Quantitative trait loci affecting growth-related traits in wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) grown under different levels of nutrient supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elberse, I.A.M.; Vanhala, T.K.; Turin, J.H.B.; Stam, P.; Van Damme, J.M.M.; van Tienderen, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity of relative growth rate (RGR), its components and associated morphological traits was studied in relation to nutrient limitation. In all, 140 F3 lines from a cross, made between two Hordeum spontaneum (wild barley) accessions sampled in Israel, were subject

  4. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem.

  5. Analysis of genome-wide gene expression in root of wheat hybrid and its parents using Barley1 GeneChip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yinhong; NI Zhongfu; YAO Yingyin; ZHAO Jun; SUN Qixin

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that differential gene expression between hybrids and their parents is responsible for the heterosis. In this paper, we report genome-wide gene expression analysis in roots of a highly heterotic inter-specific hybrid 3338/2463 and its parental inbreds using Barley GeneChip. A total of 1187 genes displayed difference in gene expressions between hybrid 3338/2463 and its parents, and they can be clustered into eight differential expression patterns. Further analysis revealed that among these 1187 genes, 975genes showed high sequence similarity to the GenBank entries, and represented diverse functional categories, such as metabolism, cell growth and maintenance, signal transduction, response to stress, transcription regulation and others. Fourteen genes were selected for RT-PCR analysis and expression patterns of 9 (64.29%) genes were confirmed. Remarkably, 380 differentially expressed genes could be mapped on the Chinese Spring deletion bins, and with the number of genes in seven homoeologous groups being 158, 148, 121, 140,132, 94 and 127 respectively. It is concluded that a combination of systematic identification of differentially expressed genes with comparative mapping would provide further insight into understanding of molecular basis of heterosis.

  6. MES buffer affects Arabidopsis root apex zonation and root growth by suppressing superoxide generation in root apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko eKagenishi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species. MES, 2-(N-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8. However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone. Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the reactive oxygen species (ROS homeostasis in root apex.

  7. Supplementary Material for: Growth curve registration for evaluating salinity tolerance in barley

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Smarthouses capable of non-destructive, high-throughput plant phenotyping collect large amounts of data that can be used to understand plant growth and productivity in extreme environments. The challenge is to apply the statistical tool that best analyzes the data to study plant traits, such as salinity tolerance, or plant-growth-related traits. Results We derive family-wise salinity sensitivity (FSS) growth curves and use registration techniques to summarize growth patterns of HEB-25 barley families and the commercial variety, Navigator. We account for the spatial variation in smarthouse microclimates and in temporal variation across phenotyping runs using a functional ANOVA model to derive corrected FSS curves. From FSS, we derive corrected values for family-wise salinity tolerance, which are strongly negatively correlated with Na but not significantly with K, indicating that Na content is an important factor affecting salinity tolerance in these families, at least for plants of this age and grown in these conditions. Conclusions Our family-wise methodology is suitable for analyzing the growth curves of a large number of plants from multiple families. The corrected curves accurately account for the spatial and temporal variations among plants that are inherent to high-throughput experiments.

  8. Retention and growth performance of chicks given low-phytate conventional or hull-less barleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four low-phytate, hulled lines, M2 422 (now referred to as barley lpa1-1), M2 635 (now referred to as barley lpa3-1), M2 955 and M2 1070 (now referred to as barley lpa2-1), and a "hulless" version of M2 422, were evaluated in a chick feeding experiment. The diets were provided in meal form, with the...

  9. Biochar amendment to coarse sandy subsoil improves root growth and increases water retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Petersen, C. T.; Hansen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Crop yields and yield potentials on Danish coarse sandy soils are strongly limited due to restricted root growth and poor water and nutrient retention. We investigated if biochar amendment to subsoil can improve root development in barley and significantly increase soil water retention. Spring...... barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Anakin) was grown in soil columns (diameter: 30 cm) prepared with 25 cm topsoil, 75 cm biochar-amended subsoil, and 30 cm un-amended subsoil lowermost placed on an impervious surface. Low-temperature gasification straw-biochar (at 0, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 wt%) and slow...... pyrolysis hardwood-biochar (at 2 wt%) were investigated. One wt% can be scaled up to 102 Mg/ha of char. After full irrigation and drainage, the in-situ moisture content at 30-80 cm depth increased linearly (R2 = 0.99) with straw-biochar content at a rate corresponding to 0.029 m3/m3/%. The lab determined...

  10. The levels of boron-uptake proteins in roots are correlated with tolerance to boron stress in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient required for plant growth and development. Recently, two major B-uptake proteins, BOR1 and NIP5;1 have been identified and partially characterized. BOR1 is a high-affinity B transporter involved in xylem loading in roots, and NIP5;1 acts is a major boric-acid ...

  11. Growth, Nitrogen Uptake and Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Barley Genotypes Grown under Saline Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurdali Fawaz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different salinity levels of irrigation water (ECw range 1-12 dS/m on dry matter yield, nitrogen uptake, fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency (%NUE, stomatal conductance and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C‰ in three barley genotypes originating from different geographic areas (Arabi.Abiad, Syria; Pk-30-136, Pakistan and WI-2291, Australia was investigated in a pot experiment. An increase in salinity resulted in a decrease in Δ13C in all the genotypes. Increasing salinity reduced leaf stomatal conductance which was less pronounced in WI-2291 comparing to other genotypes. At high salinity level, the reduction in Δ13C corresponded to a considerable decrease in the ratio (Ci/Ca of intercellular (Ci and atmospheric (Ca partial pressures of CO2 in all the genotypes indicating that such a decrease was mainly due to the stomatal closure. Moreover, since the reduction in dry matter yield in all the genotypes grown at 12 dS/m did not exceed 50% in comparison with their controls, the photosynthetic apparatus of all studied genotypes seemed to be quit tolerant to salinity. At the moderate salinity level (8 dS/m, the enhancement of leaf dry matter yield in the WI2291 genotype might have been due to positive nutritional effects of the salt as indicated by a significant increase in nitrogen uptake and NUE. Thus, the lower Ci/Ca ratio could result mainly from higher rates of photosynthetic capacity rather than stomatal closure. On the other hand, relationships between dry matter yield or NUE and Δ13C seemed to be depending on plant genotype, plant organ and salinity level. Based on growth, nutritional and Δ13C data, selection of barley genotypes for saline environments was affected by salinity level. Therefore, such a selection must be achieved for each salinity level under which the plants have been grown.

  12. Effect of salinity stress on chlorophyll content, proline, water soluble carbohydrate, germination, growth and dry weight of three seedling barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Movafegh S.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a serious environmental constraint to crop production in many parts of the world and the development of crops with improved salt tolerance is proposed as part of solution to this problem. This research was performed out in order to study the effects of different salinity levels on germination, growth, dry weight, proline, water soluble carbohydrate and chlorophyll content of three barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cultivars named Jonoob (INC-54, Reyhan (INC-45 & Nosrat (INC -47.The experiment was carried out using factorial based on completely randomized design with three replications.Seven old seedlings after germination were transferred to Hoagland nutrient solution under the effect of salinity levels (0, 50, 150 and 250 mM NaClin during seven days. Data variance analysis showed that seed germination of three barley cultivars was significantly (PReyhan>Nosrat. The results showed that, increasing in salinity decreased all growth parameters. Salinity stress decreased shoot and root length, root dry weight and chlorophyll contents in every three cultivars. But decreasing of chlorophyll was less in Nosrat compared to two other items. Proline content and soluble carbohydrate were increased in all of the three cultivars with enhance of NaCl concentration. By increasing of salinity stress accumulation of proline and soluble sugar content in leaves of Nosrat cultivar was more than other cultivars.As saltiness increases resistance natural responses in this plant gets better considering less decrease in chlorophyll amount and strategy of more production about praline and sugar solution compared to two other items.

  13. Growth, Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Nitrogen Uptake in Silicon and/or Potassium Fed barley Grown under Two Watering Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurdali, Fawaz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present pot experiment was an attempt to monitor the beneficial effects of silicon (Si and/or potassium (K applications on growth and nitrogen uptake in barley plants grown under water (FC1 and non water (FC2 stress conditions using 15N and 13C isotopes. Three fertilizer rates of Si (Si50, Si100 and Si200 and one fertilizer rate of K were used. Dry matter (DM and N yield (NY in different plant parts of barley plants was affected by Si and/ or K fertilization as well as by the watering regime level under which the plants have been grown. Solely added K or in combination with adequate rate of Si (Si 100 were more effective in alleviating water stress and producing higher yield in barley plants than solely added Si. However, the latter nutrient was found to be more effective than the former in producing higher spike's N yield. Solely added Si or in combination with K significantly reduced leaves ∆13 C reflecting their bifacial effects on water use efficiency (WUE, particularly in plants grown under well watering regime. This result indicated that Si might be involved in saving water loss through reducing transpiration rate and facilitating water uptake; consequently, increasing WUE. Although the rising of soil humidity generally increased fertilizer nitrogen uptake (Ndff and its use efficiency (%NUE in barley plants, applications of K or Si fertilizers to water stressed plants resulted in significant increments of these parameters as compared with the control. Our results highlight that Si or K is not only involved in amelioration of growth of barley plants, but can also improve nitrogen uptake and fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency particularly under water deficit conditions.

  14. Quantifying biological nitrogen fixation of different catch crops, and residual effects of roots and tops on nitrogen uptake in barley using in-situ 15N labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Sørensen, Peter; Li, F C

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of legume-based catch crops (LBCCs) to succeeding cereals may be significant. We quantified biological N fixation (BNF) and residual N effects of contrasting CC tops and roots. Methods BNF of three LBCCs (red clover, winter vetch, perennial ryegrass-red clover mixture) was quantified...... in microplots by 15N labelling. Their residual effects on spring barley were tested against two non-LBCCs (perennial ryegrass, fodder radish) after spring incorporation of CC tops or roots in monoliths. Total N accumulated in LBCCs was 153–226 kg N ha−1, of which 62–66 % was derived from BNF in tops and 31......–46 % in macro-roots (0–18 cm soil). Macro-roots represented 31–50 % of total plant N. LBCCs showed similar capacity for soil N extraction as non-LBCCs. After incorporation of LBCC residues, the dry matter and N yields of spring barley were comparable to the effect of 50 kg N fertilisation ha−1, whereas no extra...

  15. Phene synergism between root hair length and basal root growth angle for phosphorus acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Magalhaes Amade; Postma, Johannes Auke; Lynch, Jonathan Paul

    2015-04-01

    Shallow basal root growth angle (BRGA) increases phosphorus acquisition efficiency by enhancing topsoil foraging because in most soils, phosphorus is concentrated in the topsoil. Root hair length and density (RHL/D) increase phosphorus acquisition by expanding the soil volume subject to phosphorus depletion through diffusion. We hypothesized that shallow BRGA and large RHL/D are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition, meaning that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects. To evaluate this hypothesis, phosphorus acquisition in the field in Mozambique was compared among recombinant inbred lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) having four distinct root phenotypes: long root hairs and shallow basal roots, long root hairs and deep basal roots, short root hairs and shallow basal roots, and short root hairs and deep basal roots. The results revealed substantial synergism between BRGA and RHL/D. Compared with short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes, long root hairs increased shoot biomass under phosphorus stress by 89%, while shallow roots increased shoot biomass by 58%. Genotypes with both long root hairs and shallow roots had 298% greater biomass accumulation than short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes. Therefore, the utility of shallow basal roots and long root hairs for phosphorus acquisition in combination is twice as large as their additive effects. We conclude that the anatomical phene of long, dense root hairs and the architectural phene of shallower basal root growth are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition. Phene synergism may be common in plant biology and can have substantial importance for plant fitness, as shown here.

  16. Effects of fenpropimorph on bacteria and fungi during decomposition of barley roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirup, L.; Johnsen, K.; Torsvik, V.

    2001-01-01

    in a concentration realistically achieved in field topsoil when using the recommended dose. Over a 56-day period we measured the length of active fungal hyphae, the abundance of total culturable bacteria, the abundance of two culturable subgroups relevant to the soil environment (hyphae-forming actinomycetes...... and non-treated root samples. The number of total culturable bacteria was significantly lowered by fenpropimorph at day 17 and stimulated at day 56, indicating a possible indirect effect of the fungicide on the culturable bacteria as a whole. Nevertheless, culturable Pseudomonas and actinomycetes were...... not affected. The succession of the two bacterial subgroups differed considerably, so, whereas Pseudomonas peaked in the early decomposition stages, actinomycetes were most abundant after 2 months, and on the very first sampling day. Thus, the present findings suggest a possible effect of fenpropimorph on soil...

  17. [Effects nutrients on the seedlings root hair development and root growth of Poncirus trifoliata under hydroponics condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiu; Xia, Ren-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Shu, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Ahydroponics experiment was conducted to study the effects of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn) deficiency on the length of primary root, the number of lateral roots, and the root hair density, length, and diameter on the primary root and lateral roots of Poncirus trifoliata seedlings. Under the deficiency of each test nutrient, root hair could generate, but was mainly concentrated on the root base and fewer on the root tip. The root hair density on lateral roots was significantly larger than that on primary root, but the root hair length was in adverse. The deficiency of each test nutrient had greater effects on the growth and development of root hairs, with the root hair density on primary root varied from 55.0 to 174.3 mm(-2). As compared with the control, Ca deficiency induced the significant increase of root hair density and length on primary root, P deficiency promoted the root hair density and length on the base and middle part of primary root and on the lateral roots significantly, Fe deficiency increased the root hair density but decreased the root hair length on the tip of primary root significantly, K deficiency significantly decreased the root hair density, length, and diameter on primary root and lateral roots, whereas Mg deficiency increased the root hair length of primary root significantly. In all treatments of nutrient deficiency, the primary root had the similar growth rate, but, with the exceptions of N and Mg deficiency, the lateral roots exhibited shedding and regeneration.

  18. Nematode assemblages in the rhizosphere of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) depended on fertilisation and plant growth phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette Vestergård

    2004-01-01

    rhizosphere; nitrogen and phosphorus fertilisation; nematode assemblages; plant parasites; barley......rhizosphere; nitrogen and phosphorus fertilisation; nematode assemblages; plant parasites; barley...

  19. Effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on root morphology of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-03

    Oct 3, 2011 ... fertilizers, are highly effective in improving root morphology and growth in safflower. .... made by Duncan's Multiple Range Test (Duncan, 1955). ... In case of cv. Saif-32 ..... Previous studies showed that plant growth promotion.

  20. Interactive effects of salinity and phosphorus availability on growth, water relations, nutritional status and photosynthetic activity of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi Zribi, O; Abdelly, C; Debez, A

    2011-11-01

    The interactive effects of salinity and phosphorus availability on growth, water relations, nutritional status and photosynthetic activity were investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Manel). Seedlings were grown hydroponically under low or sufficient phosphorus (P) supply (5 or 180 μmol KH(2) PO(4) plant(-1) week(-1) , respectively), with or without 100 mm NaCl. Phosphorus deficiency or salinity significantly decreased whole plant growth, leaf water content, leaf osmotic potential and gas exchange parameters, with a more marked impact of P stress. The effect of both stresses was not additive since the response of plants to combined salinity and P deficiency was similar to that of plants grown under P deficiency alone. In addition, salt-treated plants exposed to P deficiency showed higher salt tolerance compared to plants grown with sufficient P supply. This was related to plant ability to significantly increase root:shoot DW ratio, root length, K(+)/Na(+) ratio, leaf proline and soluble sugar concentrations and total non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, together with restricting Na(+) accumulation in the upper leaves. As a whole, our results indicate that under concomitant exposure to both salt and P deficiency, the impact of the latter constraint is pre-dominant.

  1. Growth and cell wall changes in rice roots during spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Tanimoto, Eiichi

    2003-08-01

    We analyzed the changes in growth and cell wall properties of roots of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) grown for 68.5, 91.5, and 136 h during the Space Shuttle STS-95 mission. In space, most of rice roots elongated in a direction forming a constant mean angle of about 55 degrees with the perpendicular base line away from the caryopsis in the early phase of growth, but later the roots grew in various directions, including away from the agar medium. In space, elongation growth of roots was stimulated. On the other hand, some of elasticity moduli and viscosity coefficients were higher in roots grown in space than on the ground, suggesting that the cell wall of space-grown roots has a lower capacity to expand than the controls. The levels of both cellulose and the matrix polysaccharides per unit length of roots decreased greatly, whereas the ratio of the high molecular mass polysaccharides in the hemicellulose fraction increased in space-grown roots. The prominent thinning of the cell wall could overwhelm the disadvantageous changes in the cell wall mechanical properties, leading to the stimulation of elongation growth in rice roots in space. Thus, growth and the cell wall properties of rice roots were strongly modified under microgravity conditions during spaceflight.

  2. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  3. QTL mapping of root traits in phosphorus-deficient soils reveals important genomic regions for improving NDVI and grain yield in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xue; McDonald, Glenn

    2017-06-07

    Major QTLs for root rhizosheath size are not correlated with grain yield or yield response to phosphorus. Important QTLs were found to improve phosphorus efficiency. Root traits are important for phosphorus (P) acquisition, but they are often difficult to characterize and their breeding values are seldom assessed under field conditions. This has shed doubts on using seedling-based criteria of root traits to select and breed for P efficiency. Eight root traits were assessed under controlled conditions in a barley doubled-haploid population in soils differing in P levels. The population was also phenotyped for grain yield, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), grain P uptake and P utilization efficiency at maturity (PutEGY) under field conditions. Several quantitative traits loci (QTLs) from the root screening and the field trials were co-incident. QTLs for root rhizosheath size and root diameter explained the highest phenotypic variation in comparison to QTLs for other root traits. Shared QTLs were found between root diameter and grain yield, and total root length and PutEGY. A common major QTL for rhizosheath size and NDVI was mapped to the HvMATE gene marker on chromosome 4H. Collocations between major QTLs for NDVI and grain yield were detected on chromosomes 6H and 7H. When results from BIP and MET were combined, QTLs detected for grain yield were also those QTLs found for NDVI. QTLs qGY5H, qGY6H and qGY7Hb on 7H were robust QTLs in improving P efficiency. A selection of multiple loci may be needed to optimize the breeding outcomes due to the QTL x Environment interaction. We suggest that rhizosheath size alone is not a reliable trait to predict P efficiency or grain yield.

  4. The Root Cap Determines Ethylene-Dependent Growth and Development in Maize Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Achim Hahn; Roman Zimmermann; Dierk Wanke; Klaus Harter; Hans G.Edelmann

    2008-01-01

    Besides providing protection against mechanical damage to the root tip,the root cap is involved in the perception and processing of diverse external and internal stimuli resulting in altered growth and development.The transduction of these stimuli includes hormonal signaling pathways such as those of auxin,ethylene and cytokinin.Here,we show that the root cap is essential for the ethylene-induced regulation of elongation growth and root hair formation in maize.Exogenously applied ethylene is no longer able to inhibit elongation growth when the root cap has been surgically removed prior to hormone treatment.Reconstitution of the cap positively correlates with the developing capacity of the roots to respond to ethylene again.In contrast,the removal of the root cap does not per se affect growth inhibition controlled by auxin and cytokinin.Furthermore,our semi-quantitative RT-PCR results support earlier findings that the maize root cap is a site of high gene expression activity with respect to sensing and responding to hormones such as ethylene.From these data,we propose a novel function of the root cap which is the establishment of competence to respond to ethylene in the distal zones of the root.

  5. Plant development in space: Observations on root formation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.; Kann, R. P.; Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1990-01-01

    Root growth in space is discussed and observations on root production from plants flown as part of the Chromex project that were defined as to their origin, stage of development and physiological status, are presented. Roots were generated from fully differentiated, aseptically maintained individuals of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae) under spaceflight conditions. Results are compared for tissue culture generated plantlets and comparably sized seedling clone individuals, both of which had their roots trimmed on Earth before they were loaded into NASA's plant growth unit and subjected to a 5 day shuttle flight (STS-29). Asepsis was maintained throughout the experiment. Overall root production was 40 to 50 percent greater under spaceflight conditions than during ground control tests. However, root formation slowed down towards the end of the flight. This decrease in new roots did not occur in the ground controls that sought to simulate flight except for microgravity.

  6. Cytokinin and growth of excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1971-02-01

    Excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum require for growth both auxin and cytokinin. This is demonstrated by the poor growth of 2-mm root tips in a basal medium of mineral salts, sucrose, and vitamins supplemented with either an auxin or a cytokinin, and much better growth when the basal medium is supplemented with both auxin and cytokinin. However, both substances are synthesized by the root, as is demonstrated by the growth of large inocula (dry wt 6-7 mg) through many successive passages in a medium limited to mineral salts, sugar, and vitamins.

  7. Root Growth and Water distribution in living walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars

    walls; the vertical orientation of the growing medium, plants are growing vertically above or below each other in a limited rooting volume; there is an increased exposure to weather and the plants can react differently to water conditions and competition from other plants. Plant growth is the core......Living walls is a way of bringing plants and green areas into cities, and offer both positive environmental and aesthetical effects. A prerequisite for optimal performance of a living wall is that the plant cover is properly established why the individual plant should have optimal conditions...... for root growth. This thesis investigates the correlations between the growing media and root and shoots growth, and studies root growth patterns of different plant species and effects of planting position and root interactions of plants growing in living walls. There are a number of challenges with living...

  8. Growth, Nitrogen Uptake and Flow in Maize Plants Affected by Root Growth Restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-zheng Xu; Jun-fang Niu; Chun-jian Li; Fu-suo Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of a reduced maize root-system size on root growth and nitrogen (N) uptake and flow within plants. Restriction of shoot-borne root growth caused a strong decrease in the absorption of root: shoot dry weight ratio and a reduction in shoot growth. On the other hand, compensatory growth and an increased N uptake rate in the remaining roots were observed. Despite the limited long-distance transport pathway in the mesocotyl with restriction of shoot-borne root growth, N cycling within these plants was higher than those in control plants, implying that xylem and phloem flow velocities via the mesocotyl were considerably higher than in plants with an intact root system. The removal of the seminal roots in addition to restricting shoot-borne root development did not affect whole plant growth and N uptake, except for the stronger compensatory growth of the primary roots. Our results suggest that an adequate N supply to maize plant is maintained by compensatory growth of the remaining roots, increased N uptake rate and flow velocities within the xylem and phloem via the mesocotyl, and reduction in the shoot growth rate.

  9. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  10. 冷胁迫下大麦幼苗根质膜水通道蛋白基因的表达%Expression of RootHvPIPsof Barley Seedling under Chilling Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段瑞君; 熊辉岩; 且原真木

    2014-01-01

    The plant plasma membrane aquaporin (plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, PIPs) is a kind of mem-brane intrinsic proteins which has high selectivity and water transport. They play important roles in many phys-iological activities in plant growth and development. In this study, seedlings of barley variety ‘Haruna-nijo’ were treated with chilling stress. Expression of water channel protein PIPs of root in two processes which were stress period (4℃, 48 h) and recovery period (16℃, 48 h) were analyzed with quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). And root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr), root length and seedling height were ana-lyzed at the same time. The results showed that: after 4℃ and 48 h stress, the growth of the barley seedlings was signiifcantly inhibited, but root growth was no signiifcant changed; after 16℃, 48 h recovery, shoot height of stressed-seedling caught up that of control seedlings and root growth did not change signiifcantly; root hy-draulic conductivity decreased in the period of chilling stress and increased rapidly in recovery period but there were no significant difference. The results of qRT-PCR showed: the highest expression were HvPIP1;2 and HvPIP1;3, the lowest expressionwereHvPIP1;1 andHvPIP2;3. Compared with the control group,HvPIPsex-pression were decreased in all after cold treatment, in which HvPIP1;2, HvPIP1;3, HvPIP1;4, HvPIP1;5, HvPIP2;1,HvPIP2;2 were down-regulated signiifcantly. In recovery period, most ofHvPIPs expression were increased, espeacallyHvPIP1;1,HvPIP1;2, HvPIP1;5,HvPIP2;3were up-regulated significantly, but HvPIP1;4, HvPIP2;5 were down-regulated. This study found thatHvPIPs expressions of barley root were down-regulated overall in chilling stress and in recovery growth mostHvPIPs were up-regulated. Combined with changes of root hydraulic conductivity and plant growth, the role of barleyHvPIPs in chilling resistance reaction speculated thatHvPIPs effected water absorption were different in

  11. Evaluation of Toxic Effects and Bioaccumulation of Cadmium and Copper in Spring Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Žaltauskaitė

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analysis of toxic effects of cadmium and copper on the growth of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cultivated in hydroponics. The seedlings of barley were treated with four different concentrations of cadmium and copper, ranging from 0.1 to 10 mg L-1. The aim of the study was to assess toxic effects of cadmium (Cd and copper (Cu on the growth of spring barley, and to determine metal accumulation in above-ground and underground parts of the plant. The impact of Cu and Cd on photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, b, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA, and the essential micronutrients (Mn, Fe were examined. Metal treatment reduced the growth of roots (by 60%, shoots (Cd – 48 %, Cu – 57% and dry weight (Cd – 47 %, Cu – 52% of barley. Exposure to metals altered the content of photosynthetic pigments and caused lipid peroxidation. Regression analysis revealed that there was significant negative relationship between MDA content and biomass of barley treated with Cu (r=-0.99, p=0.01. The examined heavy metals were accumulated mainly in the roots and bioconcentration of Cu there was higher than that of Cd, indicating that roots tended to accumulate higher amounts of Cu than Cd. Though translocation of Cd from roots to above-ground tissues was higher, higher levels of Cd were observed in leaves.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.64.2.1951

  12. Rhizopus oligosporus and yeast co-cultivation during barley tempeh fermentation--nutritional impact and real-time PCR quantification of fungal growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin Mei; Passoth, Volkmar; Eklund-Jonsson, Charlotte; Alminger, Marie Larsson; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-06-01

    Barley tempeh was produced by fermenting barley kernels with Rhizopus oligosporus. The potential of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae (three strains), S. boulardii (one strain), Pichia anomala (one strain) and Kluyveromyces lactis (one strain) to grow together with R. oligosporus during barley tempeh fermentation was evaluated. All yeast strains grew during the fermentation and even during cold storage of tempeh (P<0.01). The growth of yeasts slightly increased the ergosterol contents, but did not influence amino acid contents and compositions, and did not reduce phytate contents. Slight increases of vitamins B(6) and niacinamide, and slight decreases of B(1) and biotin were observed. Quantification of fungal growth is difficult during mixed species fermentations because ergosterol is found in all fungal species, and colony-forming-unit (cfu) estimations are not reliable for R. oligosporus and other sporulating fungi. Therefore, we developed a quantitative real-time PCR method for individually quantifying S. cerevisiae and R. oligosporus growth in barley tempeh. The PCR results were highly correlated with the ergosterol content of R. oligosporus and with the number of cfu of S. cerevisiae. Thus, real-time PCR is a rapid and selective method to quantify yeasts and R. oligosporus during mixed species fermentation of inhomogenous substrate such as barley tempeh.

  13. Growth and development of the root apical meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Serena; Di Mambro, Riccardo; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2012-02-01

    A key question in plant developmental biology is how cell division and cell differentiation are balanced to modulate organ growth and shape organ size. In recent years, several advances have been made in understanding how this balance is achieved during root development. In the Arabidopsis root meristem, stem cells in the apical region of the meristem self-renew and produce daughter cells that differentiate in the distal meristem transition zone. Several factors have been implicated in controlling the different functional zones of the root meristem to modulate root growth; among these, plant hormones have been shown to play a main role. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of hormone signaling and transcriptional networks in regulating root development.

  14. Enhancing auxin accumulation in maize root tips improves root growth and dwarfs plant height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Xinrui; Zhao, Yajie; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Guangfeng; Peng, Zhenghua; Zhang, Juren

    2017-05-12

    Maize is a globally important food, feed crop and raw material for the food and energy industry. Plant architecture optimization plays important roles in maize yield improvement. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are important for regulating auxin spatiotemporal asymmetric distribution in multiple plant developmental processes. In this study, ZmPIN1a overexpression in maize increased the number of lateral roots and inhibited their elongation, forming a developed root system with longer seminal roots and denser lateral roots. ZmPIN1a overexpression reduced plant height, internode length and ear height. This modification of the maize phenotype increased the yield under high-density cultivation conditions, and the developed root system improved plant resistance to drought, lodging and a low-phosphate environment. IAA concentration, transport capacity determination and application of external IAA indicated that ZmPIN1a overexpression led to increased IAA transport from shoot to root. The increase in auxin in the root enabled the plant to allocate more carbohydrates to the roots, enhanced the growth of the root and improved plant resistance to environmental stress. These findings demonstrate that maize plant architecture can be improved by root breeding to create an ideal phenotype for further yield increases. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Anchorage of mature conifers: resistive turning moment, root-soil plate geometry and root growth orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Tor; Jonas, Tobias; Stöckli, Veronika; Ammann, Walter

    2007-09-01

    Eighty-four mature Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), silver fir (Abies alba Mill) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees were winched over to determine the maximum resistive turning moment (M(a)) of the root-soil system, the root-soil plate geometry, the azimuthal orientation of root growth, and the occurrence of root rot. The calculation of M(a), based on digital image tracking of stem deflection, accounted not only for the force application and its changing geometry, but also for the weight of the overhanging tree, representing up to 42% of M(a). Root rot reduced M(a) significantly and was detected in 25% of the Norway spruce and 5% of the silver fir trees. Excluding trees with root rot, differences in M(a) between species were small and insignificant. About 75% of the variance in M(a) could be explained by one of the four variables--tree mass, stem mass, stem diameter at breast height squared times tree height, and stem diameter at breast height squared. Among the seven allometric variables assessed above ground, stem diameter at breast height best described the root-soil plate dimensions, but the correlations were weak and the differences between species were insignificant. The shape of the root-soil plate was well described by a depth-dependent taper model with an elliptical cross section. Roots displayed a preferred azimuthal orientation of growth in the axis of prevailing winds, and the direction of frequent weak winds matched the orientation of growth better than that of rare strong winds. The lack of difference in anchorage parameters among species probably reflects the similar belowground growth conditions of the mature trees.

  16. Root Growth Optimizer with Self-Similar Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxian He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most nature-inspired algorithms simulate intelligent behaviors of animals and insects that can move spontaneously and independently. The survival wisdom of plants, as another species of biology, has been neglected to some extent even though they have evolved for a longer period of time. This paper presents a new plant-inspired algorithm which is called root growth optimizer (RGO. RGO simulates the iterative growth behaviors of plant roots to optimize continuous space search. In growing process, main roots and lateral roots, classified by fitness values, implement different strategies. Main roots carry out exploitation tasks by self-similar propagation in relatively nutrient-rich areas, while lateral roots explore other places to seek for better chance. Inhibition mechanism of plant hormones is applied to main roots in case of explosive propagation in some local optimal areas. Once resources in a location are exhausted, roots would shrink away from infertile conditions to preserve their activity. In order to validate optimization effect of the algorithm, twelve benchmark functions, including eight classic functions and four CEC2005 test functions, are tested in the experiments. We compared RGO with other existing evolutionary algorithms including artificial bee colony, particle swarm optimizer, and differential evolution algorithm. The experimental results show that RGO outperforms other algorithms on most benchmark functions.

  17. Barley seed coating with free and immobilized alkaline phosphatase to improve P uptake and plant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Izquierdo, María Concepción; Ortega Santamaría, Natividad; Pérez Mateos, Manuel; Busto Núñez, Mª Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Coating barley seeds with free and immobilized alkaline phosphatase was investigated as a potential means to enhance plant utilization of accumulated soil phosphorus (P). Two coating techniques were studied: film-coating and pelleting. The highest phosphatase activity retention in the coating layer, ranging from 0·48 to 0·67, was observed when seeds were film-coated with phosphatase–polyresorcinol complex (PPC). The germination of seeds film-coated or pelleted with alkaline phosph...

  18. The effect of application of micromycetes on plant growth, as well as soybean and barley yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Lyudmila; Brazhnikova, Yelena; Berzhanova, Ramza; Mukasheva, Togzhan

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of application of micromycetes (strains Penicillium bilaiae Pb14, Aureobasidium pullulans YA05 and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa YR07) to increase yields of soybean (Glycine max cv Almaty) and barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Arna) was estimated. It was shown that the most positive effect on germination energy and seed germination after seed treatment with liquid culture, supernatant and filtrate, is achieved at 1:5 dilution. In studying the influence of cell-associated and extracellular biologically active compounds of micromycetes (liquid culture and supernatant) on biometric parameters of seedlings, the maximum stimulating effect was observed in the variants with liquid culture. These strains of micromycetes were used as a bases for various compositions of preparations - application of each strain separately and application of micromycetes mixes. In microfield experiments, the increase of soybean yield ranged from 4.5 to 9.4 quintal/ha, barley - from 2.9 to 5.9 quintal/ha. A significant increase in various parameters of structure of the yield was shown in all experimental variants when compared to the control. It was found that an increase in soybean and barley yields and yield components was higher in the variant with a mix of micromycetes when compared to the separate application of each strain. The most efficient mixture was based on the mix of fungal strains (culture filtrate of P. bilaiae Pb14 diluted 1:5 + liquid cultures of A. pullulans YA05 and Rh. mucilaginosa YR07 in a 1:5 dilution).

  19. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan eVacheron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and development of root hairs. PGPR also modify root functioning, improve plant nutrition and influence the physiology of the whole plant. Recent results provided first clues as to how PGPR signals could trigger these plant responses. Whether local and/or systemic, the plant molecular pathways involved remain often unknown. From an ecological point of view, it emerged that PGPR form coherent functional groups, whose rhizosphere ecology is influenced by a myriad of abiotic and biotic factors in natural and agricultural soils, and these factors can in turn modulate PGPR effects on roots. In this paper, we address novel knowledge and gaps on PGPR modes of action and signals, and highlight recent progress on the links between plant morphological and physiological effects induced by PGPR. We also show the importance of taking into account the size, diversity and gene expression patterns of PGPR assemblages in the rhizosphere to better understand their impact on plant growth and functioning. Integrating mechanistic and ecological knowledge on PGPR populations in soil will be a prerequisite to develop novel management strategies for sustainable agriculture.

  20. (52)Fe translocation in barley as monitored by a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS): evidence for the direct translocation of Fe from roots to young leaves via phloem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takashi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Uchida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2009-01-01

    The real-time translocation of iron (Fe) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Ehimehadaka no. 1) was visualized using the positron-emitting tracer (52)Fe and a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS). PETIS allowed us to monitor Fe translocation in barley non-destructively under various conditions. In all cases, (52)Fe first accumulated at the basal part of the shoot, suggesting that this region may play an important role in Fe distribution in graminaceous plants. Fe-deficient barley showed greater translocation of (52)Fe from roots to shoots than did Fe-sufficient barley, demonstrating that Fe deficiency causes enhanced (52)Fe uptake and translocation to shoots. In the dark, translocation of (52)Fe to the youngest leaf was equivalent to or higher than that under the light condition, while the translocation of (52)Fe to the older leaves was decreased, in both Fe-deficient and Fe-sufficient barley. This suggests the possibility that the mechanism and/or pathway of Fe translocation to the youngest leaf may be different from that to the older leaves. When phloem transport in the leaf was blocked by steam treatment, (52)Fe translocation from the roots to older leaves was not affected, while (52)Fe translocation to the youngest leaf was reduced, indicating that Fe is translocated to the youngest leaf via phloem in addition to xylem. We propose a novel model in which root-absorbed Fe is translocated from the basal part of the shoots and/or roots to the youngest leaf via phloem in graminaceous plants.

  1. Comparative kinetics and reciprocal inhibition of nitrate and nitrite uptake in roots of uninduced and induced barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Travis, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate and NO2- transport by roots of 8-day-old uninduced and induced intact barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) seedlings were compared to kinetic patterns, reciprocal inhibition of the transport systems, and the effect of the inhibitor, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Net uptake of NO3- and NO2- was measured by following the depletion of the ions from the uptake solutions. The roots of uninduced seedlings possessed a low concentration, saturable, low Km, possibly a constitutive uptake system, and a linear system for both NO3- and NO2-. The low Km system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and approached saturation between 40 and 100 micromolar, whereas the linear system was detected between 100 and 500 micromolar. In roots of induced seedlings, rates for both NO3- and NO2- uptake followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and approached saturation at about 200 micromolar. In induced roots, two kinetically identifiable transport systems were resolved for each anion. At the lower substrate concentrations, less than 10 micromolar, the apparent low Kms of NO3- and NO2- uptake were 7 and 9 micromolar, respectively, and were similar to those of the low Km system in uninduced roots. At substrate concentrations between 10 and 200 micromolar, the apparent high Km values of NO3- uptake ranged from 34 to 36 micromolar and of NO2- uptake ranged from 41 to 49 micromolar. A linear system was also found in induced seedlings at concentrations above 500 micromolar. Double reciprocal plots indicated that NO3- and NO2- inhibited the uptake of each other competitively in both uninduced and induced seedlings; however, Ki values showed that NO3- was a more effective inhibitor than NO2-. Nitrate and NO2- transport by both the low and high Km systems were greatly inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, whereas the linear system was only slightly inhibited.

  2. Growth parameters and resistance against Drechslera teres of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Scarlett) grown at elevated ozone and carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessl, M; Heller, W; Payer, H-D; Elstner, E F; Habermeyer, J; Heiser, I

    2005-11-01

    Spring barley ( Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Scarlett) was grown at two CO2 levels (400 vs. 700 ppm) combined with two ozone regimes (ambient vs. double ambient) in climate chambers for four weeks, beginning at seedling emergence. Elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased aboveground biomass, root biomass, and tiller number, whereas double ambient ozone significantly decreased these parameters. These ozone-induced reductions in growth parameters were strongly overridden by 700 ppm CO2. The elevated CO2 level increased C : N ratio of the leaf tissue and leaf starch content but decreased leaf protein levels. Exposure to double ambient ozone did not affect protein content and C : N ratio but dramatically increased leaf starch levels at 700 ppm CO2. Resistance against Drechslera teres (Sacc.) Shoemaker was increased in leaves grown at double ambient ozone but was less obvious at 700 ppm than at 400 ppm CO2. Constitutive activities of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase were significantly higher in leaves grown at double ambient ozone compared to ambient ozone levels. The sum of methanol-soluble and alkali-released cell wall-bound aromatic metabolites (i.e., C-glycosylflavones and several structurally unidentified metabolites) and lignin contents did not show any treatment-dependent differences.

  3. The Effects of Sound Stimulation on Allium cepa Root Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sound stimulation on mitosis, the extent of mitotic activity, and the characteristics of chromosomes and nuclei during mitosis in Allium cepa (onion root tips were studied. Growing chambers were designed to allow one group of onion roots to grow with regular exposure to sound at a frequency of 5,000 Hz and an intensity of 75.9 dB. Another group of onions were grown without sound stimulation and served as the control group. It was shown that exposure to sound had adverse effects on Allium cepa root growth and mitotic activity. Sound-stimulated onions grew fewer and shorter roots and retained less mass. Analysis of mitotic abnormalities found in sound-stimulated root cells showed that sound exposure interfered with normal chromosome activity during mitosis, suggesting mitotic instability.

  4. Correlations between polyamine ratios and growth patterns in seedling roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The levels of putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine and spermine were determined in seedling roots of pea, tomato, millet and corn, as well as in corn coleoptiles and pea internodes. In all roots, putrescine content increased as elongation progressed, and the putrescine/spermine ratio closely paralleled the sigmoid growth curve up until the time of lateral root initiation. Spermidine and spermine were most abundant near the apices and declined progressively with increasing age of the cells. In the zone of differentiation of root hairs in pea roots, putrescine rose progressively with increasing age, while cadaverine declined. In both pea internodes and corn coleoptiles, the putrescine/spermidine ratio rises with increasing age and elongation. Thus, a block in the conversion of the diamine putrescine to the triamine spermidine may be an important step in the change from cell division to cell elongation.

  5. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants: quantitative analysis of root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, Peter

    2008-03-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe growth of plant roots is very easy to measure and is particularly straightforward in Arabidopsis thaliana, because the increase in organ size is essentially restricted to one dimension. The precise measurement of root apical growth can be used to accurately determine growth activity (the rate of growth at a given time) during development in mutants, transgenic backgrounds, or in response to experimental treatments. Root growth is measured in a number of ways, the simplest of which is to grow the seedlings in a Petri dish and record the position of the advancing root tip at appropriate time points. The increase in root length is measured with a ruler and the data are entered into Microsoft Excel for analysis. When dealing with large numbers of seedlings, however, this procedure can be tedious, as well as inaccurate. An alternative approach, described in this protocol, uses "snapshots" of the growing plants, which are taken using gel-documentation equipment (i.e., a video camera with a frame-grabber unit, now commonly used to capture images from ethidium-bromide-stained electrophoresis gels). The images are analyzed using publicly available software (NIH-Image), which allows the user simply to cut and paste data into Microsoft Excel.

  6. Effect of replacing corn with hulled and hulless or low-amylose hulless barley varieties on growth performance and carcass quality of Italian growing-finishing pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandini, A; Sigolo, S; Giuberti, G; Moschini, M; Marchetto, G; Della Casa, G

    2015-02-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of diets based on hulled or hulless (normal- and low-amylose) barley varieties on growth performance and carcass characteristics in heavy growing-finishing pigs for the production of protected designation of origin (PDO) Italian products. The study was performed with 40 gilts and 40 barrows (Italian Duroc × Italian Large White). Four diets were formulated: 1) corn-based diet (control), 2) control diet with 80% of a normal-amylose hulled barley variety named Cometa (Cometa), 3) control diet with 80% of a normal-amylose hulless barley variety named Astartis (Astartis), and 4) control diet with 80% of a low-amylose hulless barley variety named Alamo (Alamo). The diets were formulated according to 3 growth phases (P1, 40 to 80 kg BW; P2, 80 to 120 kg BW; and P3, 120 to 170 kg BW), with the same Lys:DE ratio (2.60, 2.20, and 1.80, respectively in P1, P2, and P3) according to the NRC requirements for P1 and P2 and according to requirements for high-performing pigs for P3. The diets were analyzed for their in vitro starch digestion potentials (predicted glycemic index, pGI) and for their resistant starch (RS) contents. In P1, P2, and P3, the Alamo diet had the numerically lowest RS contents and greatest pGI values, whereas the control diet had the numerically greatest RS contents and the lowest pGI values. Throughout the study, the pigs fed Cometa and Alamo diets grew faster (P 0.05). This study showed that diets based both on hulled and hulless barley might be suitable for the heavy pig breeding intended to the production of Italian PDO products. In addition, hulled or low-amylose hulless barley could be valuable to support maximum pig growth performance without affecting carcass composition.

  7. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

  8. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  9. AUXIN AND GROWTH OF EXCISED ROOTS OF Bryophyllum calycinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1969-10-01

    Exogenous auxin (alpha-naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid, or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was essential for the growth of single excised root tips of Bryophyllum calycinum in 50 ml of a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with vitamins. Large inocula with a dry weight of 2.0 mg or more grew with no auxin added to the medium. Evidence for the synthesis of auxin by the excised roots grown from the larger inocula is presented. Leaching of auxin from single root tips cultivated in 15 or 50 ml of basal medium is considered to account for their failure to grow.

  10. Tungsten disrupts root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana by PIN targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2014-08-15

    Tungsten is a heavy metal with increasing concern over its environmental impact. In plants it is extensively used to deplete nitric oxide by inhibiting nitrate reductase, but its presumed toxicity as a heavy metal has been less explored. Accordingly, its effects on Arabidopsis thaliana primary root were assessed. The effects on root growth, mitotic cell percentage, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide levels, the cytoskeleton, cell ultrastructure, auxin and cytokinin activity, and auxin carrier distribution were investigated. It was found that tungsten reduced root growth, particularly by inhibiting cell expansion in the elongation zone, so that root hairs emerged closer to the root tip than in the control. Although extensive vacuolation was observed, even in meristematic cells, cell organelles were almost unaffected and microtubules were not depolymerized but reoriented. Tungsten affected auxin and cytokinin activity, as visualized by the DR5-GFP and TCS-GFP expressing lines, respectively. Cytokinin fluctuations were similar to those of the mitotic cell percentage. DR5-GFP signal appeared ectopically expressed, while the signals of PIN2-GFP and PIN3-GFP were diminished even after relatively short exposures. The observed effects were not reminiscent of those of any nitric oxide scavengers. Taken together, inhibition of root growth by tungsten might rather be related to a presumed interference with the basipetal flow of auxin, specifically affecting cell expansion in the elongation zone.

  11. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. © The Author 2015. Published by

  12. Regeneration of roots from callus reveals stability of the developmental program for determinate root growth in Sonoran Desert Cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkova, Svetlana; García-Mendoza, Edith; Castillo-Díaz, Vicente; Moreno, Norma E; Arellano, Jesús; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    In some Sonoran Desert Cactaceae the primary root has a determinate root growth: the cells of the root apical meristem undergo only a few cell division cycles and then differentiate. The determinate growth of primary roots in Cactaceae was found in plants cultivated under various growth conditions, and could not be reverted by any treatment tested. The mechanisms involved in root meristem maintenance and determinate root growth in plants remain poorly understood. In this study, we have shown that roots regenerated from the callus of two Cactaceae species, Stenocereus gummosus and Ferocactus peninsulae, have a determinate growth pattern, similar to that of the primary root. To demonstrate this, a protocol for root regeneration from callus was established. The determinate growth pattern of roots regenerated from callus suggests that the program of root development is very stable in these species. These findings will permit future analysis of the role of certain Cactaceae genes in the determinate pattern of root growth via the regeneration of transgenic roots from transformed calli.

  13. Potassium channels in barley: cloning, functional characterization and expression analyses in relation to leaf growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscari, Alexandre; Clément, Mathilde; Volkov, Vadim; Golldack, Dortje; Hybiak, Jolanta; Miller, Anthony J; Amtmann, Anna; Fricke, Wieland

    2009-12-01

    It is not known how the uptake and retention of the key osmolyte K(+) in cells are mediated in growing leaf tissue. In the present study on the growing leaf 3 of barley, we have cloned the full-length coding sequence of three genes which encode putative K(+) channels (HvAKT1, HvAKT2, HvKCO1/HvTPK1), and of one gene which encodes a putative K(+) transporter (HvHAK4). The functionality of the gene products of HvAKT1 and HvAKT2 was tested through expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Both are inward-rectifying K(+) channels which are inhibited by Cs(+). Function of HvAKT1 in oocytes requires co-expression of a calcineurin-interacting protein kinase (AtCIPK23) and a calcineurin B-like protein (AtCBL9) from Arabidopsis, showing cross-species complementation of function. In planta, HvAKT1 is expressed primarily in roots, but is also expressed in leaf tissue. HvAKT2 is expressed particularly in leaf tissue, and HvHAK4 is expressed particularly in growing leaf tissue. Within leaves, HvAKT1 and HvAKT2 are expressed predominantly in mesophyll. Expression of genes changes little in response to low external K(+) or salinity, despite major changes in K(+) concentrations and osmolality of cells. Possible contributions of HvAKT1, HvAKT2, HvKCO1 and HvHAK4 to regulation of K(+) relations of growing barley leaf cells are discussed.

  14. Root growth studies of willow cuttings using Rhizoboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarova, Dinara; Lammeranner, Walter; Florineth, Florin

    2014-05-01

    Riparian forests (Tugay forests) in Central Asia (Kazakhstan) play a significant in soil protection. However, unadapted forest use leads to damage and loss of these fragile ecosystems. Willows have a crucial function in the ecosystem of these riparian forests. Willows facilitate the colonization with other important tree species and furthermore they protect the soil from wind and water erosion. To propagate willows and to estimate the beneficial effects of these plants it is important to know the root growth development. The research design is planned as model experiment with rhizoboxes. Rhizoboxes are non-invasive investigation methods which offer the possibility to survey the root system growth dynamics in time and space. A total of 33 rhizoboxes in size of 50cm x 75 cm x 5 cm will be constructed. The rhizoboxes will be tilted by 45 degrees using the gravitropism of the roots. The willow cuttings (Salix purpurea) will be planted in three different soil types. Each test series (growth period) will take three months. Investigated parameters will be root architecture, dynamic of root growth and above and below ground biomass allocation. Data will be drawn from photographic surveys which will be performed once a week. The contribution will present the methodology of these rhizobox investigations.

  15. Microtubules guide root hair tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Esseling, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to establish cell polarity is crucial to form and function of an individual cell. Polarity underlies critical processes during cell development, such as cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and cell signalling. Interphase cytoplasmic microtubules in tip-growing fission yeast

  16. Microtubules guide root hair tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Esseling, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to establish cell polarity is crucial to form and function of an individual cell. Polarity underlies critical processes during cell development, such as cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and cell signalling. Interphase cytoplasmic microtubules in tip-growing fission yeast

  17. Expression patterns of HvCKX genes indicate their role in growth and reproductive development of barley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Zalewski

    Full Text Available Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase proteins (CKX are encoded by a multigene family of CKX genes with a varying number of members depending on species. For some of the genes, spectacular effects on grain production in selected cereals have been observed. Despite the fact that partial or full length sequences of most HvCKX genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare have already been published, in most cases their specific biological functions have not been reported. Detailed expression patterns for five HvCKX genes in different organs/tissues of developing barley plants coupled with analysis of RNAi silent for two genes are presented to test the hypothesis that these expression profiles might indicate their function. Elevated expression for four of them - HvCKX1, HvCKX9, HvCKX4, and HvCKX11 - was found in developing kernels of wild-type plants compared to other tissues. HvCKX5 was mainly expressed in leaf tissue. Lower expression was noted for HvCKX1 in seedling roots and for HvCKX9 in leaves. The documented effect of RNAi silencing of HvCKX1 and a trend for HvCKX9 was higher plant productivity, and the trait was inherited through four generations. Higher plant yield was determined by higher numbers of seeds and spikes. Increased productivity was significantly greater in HvCKX1 silenced plants showing higher relative expression of HvCKX1 in developing kernels of wild-type plants compared to the expression of HvCKX9. Both HvCKX1 silenced T1 seedlings of cv. Golden Promise and the newly transformed breeding line STH7308 showed greater root mass, but this trait was not inherited in the next generation. Similarly HvCKX9 silenced T1 seedlings exhibited greater plant height without inheritance in the next generation. It is suggested that these effects were not inherited because of compensation by other genes co-ordinately regulating reproductive development. One line with untypically changed, inherited phenotype, which was selected from several dozen silenced lines

  18. Seminal, adventitious and lateral root growth and physiological responses in rice to upland conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玲; 郑炳松; 毛传澡; 易可可; 吴运荣; 吴平; 陶勤南

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the growth and physiological responses of rice to upland conditions would be helpful for designing treatments to improve the tolerance of rice under a rainfed system. The objective of this study was to investigate the initiation,elongation and membrane stability of seminal, lateral and adventitious roots of upland rice after 9-d upland condition treatment. Compared with control roots under waterlogged conditions, upland water deficiency conditions favor seminal and lateral root growth over adventitious root growth by accelerating seminal root elongation, promoting lateral root initiation and elongation, and reducing the elongation and number of adventitious roots. Enhanced total root number and length resulted in increase of total root dry weight and thereby increasing the root-to-shoot ratio. Organic compound leakage from seminal root tips and adventitious roots increased progressively to some extent with upland culture duration, while significant increases in seminal root tips were the consequence of loss of membrane integrity caused by the upland-condition enhanced growth.

  19. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo Salvador

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H, guaiacyl (G, and syringyl (S lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth.

  20. Root Growth and Water distribution in living walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars

    walls; the vertical orientation of the growing medium, plants are growing vertically above or below each other in a limited rooting volume; there is an increased exposure to weather and the plants can react differently to water conditions and competition from other plants. Plant growth is the core...

  1. ROOT-GROWTH AND FUNCTIONING UNDER ATMOSPHERIC CO2 ENRICHMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STULEN, [No Value; DENHERTOG, J

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which atmospheric CO2 enrichment may influence growth of plant roots and function in terms of uptake of water and nutrients, and carbon allocation towards symbionts. It is concluded that changes in dry matter allocation greatly depend on the experimental conditions

  2. Flavonoids modify root growth and modulate expression of SHORT-ROOT and HD-ZIP III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Danilo Miralha; Silva, Eder Marques; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Adachi, Sérgio Akira; Schley, Thayssa Rabelo; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; Dokkedal, Anne Ligia; Nogueira, Fabio Tebaldi Silveira; Rolim de Almeida, Luiz Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Flavonoids are a class of distinct compounds produced by plant secondary metabolism that inhibit or promote plant development and have a relationship with auxin transport. We showed that, in terms of root development, Copaifera langsdorffii leaf extracts has an inhibitory effect on most flavonoid components compared with the application of exogenous flavonoids (glycosides and aglycones). These compounds alter the pattern of expression of the SHORT-ROOT and HD-ZIP III transcription factor gene family and cause morpho-physiological alterations in sorghum roots. In addition, to examine the flavonoid auxin interaction in stress, we correlated the responses with the effects of exogenous application of auxin and an auxin transport inhibitor. The results show that exogenous flavonoids inhibit primary root growth and increase the development of lateral roots. Exogenous flavonoids also change the pattern of expression of specific genes associated with root tissue differentiation. These findings indicate that flavonoid glycosides can influence the polar transport of auxin, leading to stress responses that depend on auxin.

  3. Root Growth Patterns and Morphometric Change Based on the Growth Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric R.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots skew with minimal waving in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Root skewing and root waving have been studied on the ground as well as in spaceflight, but often using different media types. In this study, Arabidopsis seedlings were grown on nutrient media plates that were comprised of various gelling agents with varied hardness in order to better assess these media for spaceflight research experiments. ImageJ was used to quantify the root morphology of 8-dayold seedlings, while R was used to perform statistical analyses. Root growth was drastically different between Difco agar, agarose, and Phytagel. Additionally, root waving masked skewing in certain media. Regression analysis revealed overall patterns when organized by hardness but also revealed that differences in media type had more of an impact on root growth than hardness itself. Different arrangements of media around the root tip revealed that roots grown on the media surface were longer and had fewer waves per millimeter than roots grown embedded in media. The implications for spaceflight research are discussed.

  4. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Inhibition of seed germination and root growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Daohui [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China); Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.edu

    2007-11-15

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50 mg/L for radish, and about 20 mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. - Engineered nanoparticles can inhibit the seed germination and root growth.

  5. Postembryonic control of root meristem growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali

    2014-02-01

    Organ development in multicellular organisms is dependent on the proper balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. In the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, meristem growth is the result of cell divisions in the proximal meristem and cell differentiation in the elongation and differentiation zones. Hormones, transcription factors and small peptides underpin the molecular mechanisms governing these processes. Computer modeling has aided our understanding of the dynamic interactions involved in stem cell maintenance and meristem activity. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of postembryonic root stem cell maintenance and control of meristem size. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flooding, root temperature, physiology and growth of two Annona species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Maritza; Schaffer, Bruce; Davies, Frederick S

    2004-09-01

    The effects of root zone temperature (RZT) and flooding on physiology and growth of Annona glabra L. (pond apple) and A. muricata L. (soursop) were investigated. Trees planted in containers were exposed to RZTs of 5, 10, 20, 25 or 35 degrees C in controlled root temperature chambers. Trees at each RZT were either non-flooded (control) or continuously flooded. There were four replications over time for each treatment combination. Pond apple was more flood-tolerant than soursop. A combination of flooding and RZTs of 5 and 10 degrees C resulted in tree mortality of both species by Week 4. Only trees that appeared to develop morphological adaptations survived continuous flooding. In both species, net CO2 assimilation (A) decreased to nearly zero within 1 week following exposure to RZTs of 5 or 10 degrees C and became consistently negative over the remaining experimental period. Flooding reduced leaf chlorophyll index (measured with a SPAD meter), A and plant growth, and increased root electrolyte leakage from soursop. Optimum growth occurred at RZTs of 25 to 35 degrees C for non-flooded pond apple trees and at 20 to 25 degrees C for flooded trees. Soursop exhibited maximum growth at RZTs of 35 degrees C under non-flooded conditions and at 25 degrees C under flooded conditions.

  7. Isolation and characterization of altered root growth behavior and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezedom Theresa

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... 3Department of Rice, Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-3, India. ..... in crops like maize (Miller and Moore, 1990), barley .... rice breeding line via doubled haploid.

  8. A Simple Technique for Recording Root and Shoot Growth in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Philip J.; Bristow, Andrew W.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a simple method of recording root growth which can be used in schools. A slant board system was designed to facilitate access to roots to enable measurements to be made, essentially forcing the roots to grow in a two-dimensional form which allows each student to observe and record root growth over several weeks. (AIM)

  9. Impact of root growth and root hydraulic conductance on water availability of young walnut trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerszurki, Daniela; Couvreur, Valentin; Hopmans, Jan W.; Silva, Lucas C. R.; Shackel, Kenneth A.; de Souza, Jorge L. M.

    2015-04-01

    Walnut (Juglans regia L.) is a tree species of high economic importance in the Central Valley of California. This crop has particularly high water requirements, which makes it highly dependent on irrigation. The context of decreasing water availability in the state calls for efficient water management practices, which requires improving our understanding of the relationship between water application and walnut water availability. In addition to the soil's hydraulic conductivity, two plant properties are thought to control the supply of water from the bulk soil to the canopy: (i) root distribution and (ii) plant hydraulic conductance. Even though these properties are clearly linked to crop water requirements, their quantitative relation remains unclear. The aim of this study is to quantitatively explain walnut water requirements under water deficit from continuous measurements of its water consumption, soil and stem water potential, root growth and root system hydraulic conductance. For that purpose, a greenhouse experiment was conducted for a two month period. Young walnut trees were planted in transparent cylindrical pots, equipped with: (i) rhizotron tubes, which allowed for non-invasive monitoring of root growth, (ii) pressure transducer tensiometers for soil water potential, (iii) psychrometers attached to non-transpiring leaves for stem water potential, and (iv) weighing scales for plant transpiration. Treatments consisted of different irrigation rates: 100%, 75% and 50% of potential crop evapotranspiration. Plant responses were compared to predictions from three simple process-based soil-plant-atmosphere models of water flow: (i) a hydraulic model of stomatal regulation based on stem water potential and vapor pressure deficit, (ii) a model of plant hydraulics predicting stem water potential from soil-root interfaces water potential, and (iii) a model of soil water depletion predicting the water potential drop between the bulk soil and soil-root interfaces

  10. Comparative effect of salinity on ion accumulation, grain yield and stability salt tolerance degree of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. in different growth stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdennaceur Ben Khaled

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semi-arid regions of the world, excess salts in agricultural land can limit crop production. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. is one of the most salt tolerant crop species. This study was conducted to determine the effects of salinity on seed germination, mineral content and yield production of 14 barley accessions from two regions in the Southern Tunisia. First experiment was conducted in laboratory to test the effect of nine levels of NaCl concentrations in different germination parameter. Second experiments were conducted in a greenhouse. The accessions were grown in soil and exposed to three salinity levels. Salinity decreased significantly the germination rate and the germination rate index for all accessions. Na+ content, total dry matter and grain yield vary significantly with increasing salinity levels. The degree of tolerance varies between accessions in the different growth stage. A significant correlation were observed between ranking using grain yield and multivariate parameter. The tolerance degree based in germination rate and Na+ content don’t present significant correlation with yield ranking. Therefore, ranking using multivariate parameter can be the appropriate method to analysis the tolerance degree of barley under saline conditions. The differences response between accessions of local population of barley “Ardhaoui” reflected an important internal genetic variability against the salinity. This variability could be more explored and used for the barley breeding program. The accessions Ettalah, Chneni Tatouine and Elhezma showed more salt tolerance at 13 dS/m as indicated by the multivariate ranking using germination rate, Na+ content and grain yield.

  11. Nitric Oxide is Required for Homeostasis of Oxygen and Reactive Oxygen Species in Barley Roots under Aerobic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Kruger, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen, the terminal electron acceptor for mitochondrial electron transport, is vital for plants because of its role in the production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. While photosynthetic oxygen production contributes to the oxygen supply in leaves, reducing the risk of oxygen limitation...... of mitochondrial metabolism under most conditions, root tissues often suffer oxygen deprivation during normal development due to the lack of an endogenous supply and isolation from atmospheric oxygen. Since changes in oxygen concentration have multiple effects on metabolism and energy production (Geigenberger......), but the extent to which NO might also play a role in the energy metabolism of roots under normal aerobic conditions is unknown. Mitochondria, whose functions are central to aerobic metabolism, are the major source of NO in plants, and potential targets for NO include cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial...

  12. Growth and metabolism of selected strains of probiotic bacteria, in maize porridge with added malted barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Merete H; Wicklund, Trude; Narvhus, Judith A

    2004-03-15

    A fermented probiotic maize porridge with high energy density and low viscosity was prepared, using maize flour and barley malt. The porridge was fermented with four probiotic strains (grown separately): Lactobacillus reuteri, Lb. acidophilus (LA5 and 1748) and Lb. rhamnosus GG. These strains were inoculated at two levels; to obtain approx. 7 or 6 log cfu g(-1) in the porridge at 0 h. The porridge was fermented for 24 h at 37 degrees C, and analysed for viable cell count, pH, organic acids, volatile aromatic compounds and sugar content. The inoculated cell concentration was shown to be particularly important during the first hours of the fermentation period, showing a delayed production of most metabolites in porridge inoculated with approx. 6 log cfu g(-1). Most strains reached maximum cell count after 12-h fermentation (7.2-8.2 log cfu g(-1)), with a pH below 4.0. Depending on the strain, lactic acid was produced in amounts ranging from 1360 to 4000 mg kg(-1). Lb. reuteri metabolised succinate, while pyruvate and small amounts of diacetyl were detected in porridge inoculated with Lb. acidophilus LA5 and Lb. acidophilus 1748. High amounts of diacetyl (6 mg kg(-1)) and acetoin (27 mg kg(-1)) were detected in porridge inoculated with Lb. rhamnosus GG. Porridge inoculated with Lb. acidophilus LA5 and Lb. acidophilus 1748, contained acetaldehyde, while both Lb. reuteri and Lb. rhamnosus GG reduced the acetaldehyde to ethanol. Lb. reuteri utilised both maltose and glucose as carbohydrate sources, while Lb. acidophilus LA5, Lb. acidophilus 1748 and Lb. rhamnosus GG utilised only glucose.

  13. Plant hormone cross-talk: the pivot of root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Elena; Polverari, Laura; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2015-02-01

    Root indeterminate growth and its outstanding ability to produce new tissues continuously make this organ a highly dynamic structure able to respond promptly to external environmental stimuli. Developmental processes therefore need to be finely tuned, and hormonal cross-talk plays a pivotal role in the regulation of root growth. In contrast to what happens in animals, plant development is a post-embryonic process. A pool of stem cells, placed in a niche at the apex of the meristem, is a source of self-renewing cells that provides cells for tissue formation. During the first days post-germination, the meristem reaches its final size as a result of a balance between cell division and cell differentiation. A complex network of interactions between hormonal pathways co-ordinates such developmental inputs. In recent years, by means of molecular and computational approaches, many efforts have been made aiming to define the molecular components of these networks. In this review, we focus our attention on the molecular mechanisms at the basis of hormone cross-talk during root meristem size determination. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: inhibition of seed germination and root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-11-01

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50mg/L for radish, and about 20mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles.

  15. Suppression of Zn stress on barley by irradiated chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, N.; Mitomo, H. [Gunma Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Kiryu, Gunma (Japan); Ha, P.T.L. [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Watanabe, S.; Ito, T.; Takeshita, H.; Yoshii, F.; Kume, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Chitosan was irradiated up to 1000 kGy in solid state. Irradiation of chitosan caused the reduction of molecular weight. The molecular weight of the chitosan reduced from ca. 4 x 10{sup 5} to ca. 6 x 10{sup 3} by irradiation at 1000 kGy. For the barley growth promotion, irradiated chitosan showed the significant effect and 1000 kGy irradiated chitosan improved 20% of growth. Using the positron emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS), the effect of chitosan on uptake and transportation of {sup 62}Zn in barley were investigated. It was found that the transportation of Zn from root to shoot and the damage of plant by Zn were suppressed with irradiated chitosan. (author)

  16. Vigorous root growth is a better indicator of early nutrient uptake than root hair traits in spring wheat grown under low fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaosheng; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-01-01

    . Vigorous root growth, however, was a better indicator of early nutrient acquisition than RHL and RHD. Vigorous root growth and long and dense root hairs ensured efficient acquisition of macro- and micronutrients during early growth and a high root length to shoot dry matter ratio favored high macronutrient...

  17. Response of Barley Seedlings to Microwaves at 2.45 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Iuliana Crețescu; Rodica Căpriță; Giancarla Velicevici; Sorina Ropciuc; Genoveva Buzamat

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the present study was to investigate the changes induced upon germination and growth rate, expressed by vigor index of barley seeds exposed to microwave (MW) treatment. As a microwave source was used a magnetron MWG20H, which emits radiation with a frequency of 2.45 GHz. In the experiment, barley seeds were exposed for 0s, 10s and 20s. The germination energy (GE) and germination (G), cotyledon length (CL), leaves length (LL) and roots length (RL) in cm were determine...

  18. Proteomic Profiling of the Microsomal Root Fraction: Discrimination of Pisum sativum L. Cultivars and Identification of Putative Root Growth Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Legumes are a large and economically important family, containing a variety of crop plants. Alongside different cereals, some fruits, and tropical roots, a number of leguminosae evolved for millennia as crops with human society. One of these legumes is Pisum sativum L., the common garden pea. In the past, breeding has been largely selective on improved above-ground organs. However, parameters, such as root-growth, which determines acquisition of nutrients and water, have largely been underestimated. Although the genome of P. sativum is still not fully sequenced, multiple proteomic studies have been published on a variety of physiological aspects in the last years. The presented work focused on the connection between root length and the influence of the microsomal root proteome of four different pea cultivars after five days of germination (cultivar Vroege, Girl from the Rhineland, Kelvedon Wonder, and Blauwschokker). In total, 60 proteins were identified to have significantly differential abundances in the four cultivars. Root growth of five-days old seedlings and their microsomal proteome revealed a similar separation pattern, suggesting that cultivar-specific root growth performance is explained by differential membrane and ribosomal protein levels. Hence, we reveal and discuss several putative root growth protein markers possibly playing a key role for improved primary root growth breeding strategies. PMID:28257117

  19. MICROPHENOLOGICAL PHASES OF BARLEY SEED GERMINATION: DESCRIPTION, TIME OF START AND DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kasakova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.  The purpose of present study was to propose improved full scale of morphologically distinct phases of germinating barley seeds and on the bases of that scale to determine each phase time of start and its duration.Methods. Seeds of five spring and five winter varieties have been germinated under optimal condition от paper in plastic bags. Morphology of each seed was registered during seven 24-hour-periods (until seed full germination with 2 hours interval. On the bases of obtained data we made the description of each phase and calculated the time of its commencement and duration.Results. New improved scale of germinating barley seeds phases, which we named “microphenological phases of seed germination” (MPPSG, is created and each phase is described. The scale consists of eight phases, both well-known (dry seed, start of seed imbibition, radicle emergence, coleoptile emergence and seedling coming-to-be and three new phases of roots growth (Roots1 of “fork”, Roots2 of “short roots” and Roots3 or “long roots”. The time of each phase commencement and its duration were calculated. It was shown that full time of germinating seed roots growth (R1 + R2 + R3 occupies about 50 % of germination time.Practical implications. Improved scale of MPPSG of barley may be used to study processes of physiology, biochemistry, genetics and others in germinating seeds phase by phase, and then to discuss obtained data as it was process in individual barley seed. Also this MPPSG scale may be used in practical seed farming to evaluate seed lots and in plant breeding to compere barley varieties.

  20. Barley germination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daneri-Castro, Sergio N.; Svensson, Birte; Roberts, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    conditions continue to be key to discovering the roles of individual protein forms and posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation. Activity-based proteomics, particularly in combination with new gene editing technologies, has great potential to elucidate the network of enzymes in barley...

  1. Stimulation of Armillaria rhizomorph growth by oak root fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one different genera of fungi were isolated from the wood of roots of 5O·year·old oak (Quercus robur. The most frequently isolated fungi were: Mycelium radicis atrovirens alpha (MRAA, Clonostachys sp. and Penicillium daleae, Beauveria bassiana, Clonostachys sp., Cryplosporiopsis rodicicolo, Geotrichum candidum, Mortierella vinacea, MRAA, P. daleae, P. janczewskii P. spinulosum, Sporothrix schenckii and Tolypocladium niveum significantly enhanced Armillaria mellea rhizomorph initiation and growth from oak branch segments in vitro. The biggest stimulation effect was noticed when the dematiaceous hyphomycetes, e.g. MRAA, P. dimorphospora and S. schenckii were studied.

  2. Alleviation of Al Toxicity in Barley by Addition of Calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Tian-rong; CHEN Ying; ZHANG Yan-hua; JIN Ye-fei

    2006-01-01

    The potential mechanism by which Ca alleviates Al toxicity was investigated in barley seedlings. It was found that 100 μM Al-alone treatment inhibited barley plant growth and thereby reduced shoot height and root length, and dry weights of root, shoot and leaf; promoted Al accumulation but inhibited Ca absorption in plant tissues; and induced an increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) and in the level of lipid peroxidation (MDA content) in leaves. Except for the increase in Ca concentration in plant tissues, treatment with 0.5 mM Ca in the absence of Al had less effect on the above-mentioned parameters, compared with the control. Addition of Ca efficiently reduced Al toxicity, which is reflected by the promotion of plant growth, reduction in Al concentration and MDA content,increase in Ca concentration and in SOD, POD, and CAT activities compared with the Al-alone-treatment; with increase in Ca level (3.0 mM), the ameliorative effect became more dominant. This indicated that the alleviation of aluminum toxicity in barley seedlings with Ca supplementation could be associated with less absorption of Al and the enhancement of the protective ability of the cell because of increased activity of the antioxidative enzyme.

  3. Effect of indole-3-acetic acid on pea root growth, peroxidase profiles and hydroxyl radical formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukavica Biljana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in growth, peroxidase profiles, and hydroxyl radical formation were examined in IAA (0.5-10 mg/l treated pea plants grown hydroponically and in isolated roots in liquid in vitro culture. IAA inhibited root elongation, both in hydroponically grown pea plants and in isolated roots in vitro. A remarkable increase in the number of POD iso­forms was noticed in isolated roots grown in vitro, compared to the roots from plants grown hydroponically. IAA induced both disappearance of several root POD isoforms and hydroxyl radical formation in the root and the root cell wall.

  4. Improving root-zone soil moisture estimations using dynamic root growth and crop phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Minoo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Crow, Wade T.; Kustas, William P.

    2015-12-01

    Water Energy Balance (WEB) Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) modelling can be used to estimate soil moisture by forcing the model with observed data such as precipitation and solar radiation. Recently, an innovative approach that assimilates remotely sensed thermal infrared (TIR) observations into WEB-SVAT to improve the results has been proposed. However, the efficacy of the model-observation integration relies on the model's realistic representation of soil water processes. Here, we explore methods to improve the soil water processes of a simple WEB-SVAT model by adopting and incorporating an exponential root water uptake model with water stress compensation and establishing a more appropriate soil-biophysical linkage between root-zone moisture content, above-ground states and biophysical indices. The existing WEB-SVAT model is extended to a new Multi-layer WEB-SVAT with Dynamic Root distribution (MWSDR) that has five soil layers. Impacts of plant root depth variations, growth stages and phenological cycle of the vegetation on transpiration are considered in developing stages. Hydrometeorological and biogeophysical measurements collected from two experimental sites, one in Dookie, Victoria, Australia and the other in Ponca, Oklahoma, USA, are used to validate the new model. Results demonstrate that MWSDR provides improved soil moisture, transpiration and evaporation predictions which, in turn, can provide an improved physical basis for assimilating remotely sensed data into the model. Results also show the importance of having an adequate representation of vegetation-related transpiration process for an appropriate simulation of water transfer in a complicated system of soil, plants and atmosphere.

  5. Glucose and auxin signaling interaction in controlling Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings root growth and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuwaneshwar S Mishra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant root growth and development is highly plastic and can adapt to many environmental conditions. Sugar signaling has been shown to affect root growth and development by interacting with phytohormones such as gibberellins, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Auxin signaling and transport has been earlier shown to be controlling plant root length, number of lateral roots, root hair and root growth direction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Increasing concentration of glucose not only controls root length, root hair and number of lateral roots but can also modulate root growth direction. Since root growth and development is also controlled by auxin, whole genome transcript profiling was done to find out the extent of interaction between glucose and auxin response pathways. Glucose alone could transcriptionally regulate 376 (62% genes out of 604 genes affected by IAA. Presence of glucose could also modulate the extent of regulation 2 fold or more of almost 63% genes induced or repressed by IAA. Interestingly, glucose could affect induction or repression of IAA affected genes (35% even if glucose alone had no significant effect on the transcription of these genes itself. Glucose could affect auxin biosynthetic YUCCA genes family members, auxin transporter PIN proteins, receptor TIR1 and members of a number of gene families including AUX/IAA, GH3 and SAUR involved in auxin signaling. Arabidopsis auxin receptor tir1 and response mutants, axr2, axr3 and slr1 not only display a defect in glucose induced change in root length, root hair elongation and lateral root production but also accentuate glucose induced increase in root growth randomization from vertical suggesting glucose effects on plant root growth and development are mediated by auxin signaling components. CONCLUSION: Our findings implicate an important role of the glucose interacting with auxin signaling and transport machinery to control seedling root growth and development in changing nutrient

  6. Interaction of salinity and cadmium stresses on mineral nutrients, sodium, and cadmium accumulation in four barley genotypes*

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, You-zong; Wei, Kang; Yang, Juan; Dai, Fei; Zhang, Guo-ping

    2007-01-01

    Interaction of salinity (NaCl) and cadmium (Cd) on growth, mineral nutrients, Na and Cd accumulation in four barley genotypes differing in salt tolerance was studied in a hydroponic experiment. Cd, NaCl and their combined stresses reduced Ca and Mg concentrations in roots and shoots, K concentration in shoots, increased K and Cu concentrations in roots relative to control, but had non-significant effect on micronutrients Cu, Fe and Mn concentrations in shoot. The three stresses reduced accumu...

  7. Effect of seed pelleting with biocontrol agents on growth and colonisation of roots of mungbean by root-infecting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Nadia; Noreen, Nayara; Perveen, Zahida; Shahzad, Saleem

    2016-08-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) is a leguminous pulse crop that is a major source of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Root-infecting fungi produce severe plant diseases like root rot, charcoal rot, damping-off and stem rot. The soil-borne pathogens can be controlled by chemicals, but these chemicals have several negative effects. Use of microbial antagonist such as fungi and bacteria is a safe, effective and eco-friendly method for the control of many soil-borne pathogens. Biological control agents promote plant growth and develop disease resistance. Application of bacteria and fungi as seed dressing suppressed the root-infecting fungi on leguminous crops. Seeds of mungbean were pelleted with different biocontrol agents to determine their effect on plant growth and colonisation of roots by root-infecting fungi, viz. Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. Treatment of mungbean seeds with fungal antagonists showed more shoot and root length as compared to bacterial antagonists, whereas seed treated with bacterial antagonists showed maximum shoot and root weight. Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis were the best among all the biocontrol agents since they provided the highest plant growth and greater reduction in root colonisation by all root-infecting fungi. Bacillus cereus, Trichoderma virens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus varians were also effective against root-infecting fungi but to a lesser extent. T. harzianum, T. virens, B. subtilis and P. fluorescens were found to be best among all biocontrol agents. The root-infecting fungi can be controlled by pelleting seeds with biocontrol agents as it is safe and effective method. Additionally, plant growth was promoted more by this method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Perception mechanism of gravity stimuli in hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-10-01

    We reported that elongation growth of plant shoots and roots is suppressed by hypergravity, with the rate decreasing in proportion to logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. In hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of shoots, graviperception is supposed to be independent of that in gravitropism and to involve mechanoreceptors. However, the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is not known. In the present study, we compared the mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots with that in gravitropism. The removal of root cap did not influence hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots, although the gravitropic curvature was completely inhibited. Hypergravity had no effects on growth of azuki bean roots in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium, which are blockers of mechanoreceptors. On the contrary, lanthanum or gadolinium at the same concentration did not influence gravitropism of roots. These results suggest that the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is independent of that in gravitropism. Hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots was observed irrespective of the direction of stimuli, which disappeared in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. Thus, in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition, roots may perceive the gravity signal by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane independently of the direction of stimuli, and may utilize it to regulate their growth rate.

  9. Root growth dynamics linked to aboveground growth in walnuts (Juglans regia L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Aims: Examination of belowground plant responses to canopy and soil moisture manipulation is scant compared to that aboveground but needed to understand whole plant responses to environmental factors. Plasticity in the seasonal timing and vertical distribution of root growth in respon...

  10. Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida for Promoting Growth of Jatropha curcas Seedling Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sumarsih

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida are Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR that can produce growth hormone. The objective of this study is to know the effects of those two combined species of PGPR on seedling root growth of Jatropha curcas. The condition of the seedling root determines the success of dry land cultivation. The root which has wider coverage, is larger in number, and is bigger in diameter makes seedling more resistant to stress in dry land environment. In the experiment, two kinds of plant materials are used for seedling, the Jatropha seed and stem material, which are treated in a mixed culture of PGPR. For the Jatropha seed, this mixed culture of PGPR is given at the same time of cultivating the sprout on the seedling medium. For the stem cutting, the PGPR is poured in together during the first watering of the seedling cultivation medium. In the fourthweek, the observed growth parameters are root length, root diameter, primary and secondary lateral root numbers, Root Length Density (RLD, Frequency of Lateral Root (FLR, and Specific Root Length (SRL. These data are analyzed using analysis of variant with DMRT test at 0.05 level of significance. The result of this study shows that PGPR tend to reduce FLR values on the seedling root made from seeds. On the seedling root made from stem cutting, PGPR increase the root length, primary and secondary lateral root numbers, root diameter, FLR and SRL values as well.

  11. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality.

  12. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley A. Judd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain.

  13. Nonfumigant Nematicides for Control of Root-knot Nematode to Protect Carrot Root Growth in Organic Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrain, T C; Belair, G; Martel, P

    1979-10-01

    Greenhouse tests were conducted to determine the effects of two kinds of Meloidogyne hapla inoculum on the growth and quality of carrot roots, and the protection afforded in each case by nonfumigant nematicides in organic soils. For all treatments the percentage of carrots damaged was greater with larvae alone as inoculum than with larvae and eggs, indicating that most of the damage occurs early during formation of the taproot. Fosthietan, aldicarb, and oxamyl at 4 and 6 kg ai/ha protected the roots during formation and gave a lasting control of root-knot nematode. There was some nematode damage to the roots with phenamiphos and carbofuran at 4 and 6 kg ai/ha. Isazophos, diflubenzuron, and fenvalerate gave little protection to carrot roots and did not control root-knot nematode effectively.

  14. Boron Stress Responsive MicroRNAs and Their Targets in Barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhuner, Esma; Eldem, Vahap; Ipek, Arif; Okay, Sezer; Sakcali, Serdal; Zhang, Baohong; Boke, Hatice; Unver, Turgay

    2013-01-01

    Boron stress is an environmental factor affecting plant development and production. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be involved in several plant processes such as growth regulation and stress responses. In this study, miRNAs associated with boron stress were identified and characterized in barley. miRNA profiles were also comparatively analyzed between root and leave samples. A total of 31 known and 3 new miRNAs were identified in barley; 25 of them were found to respond to boron treatment. Several miRNAs were expressed in a tissue specific manner; for example, miR156d, miR171a, miR397, and miR444a were only detected in leaves. Additionally, a total of 934 barley transcripts were found to be specifically targeted and degraded by miRNAs. In silico analysis of miRNA target genes demonstrated that many miRNA targets are conserved transcription factors such as Squamosa promoter-binding protein, Auxin response factor (ARF), and the MYB transcription factor family. A majority of these targets were responsible for plant growth and response to environmental changes. We also propose that some of the miRNAs in barley such as miRNA408 might play critical roles against boron exposure. In conclusion, barley may use several pathways and cellular processes targeted by miRNAs to cope with boron stress. PMID:23555702

  15. 大麦种质资源苗期根腐病抗性鉴定%Assessment of Root Rot Resistance in a Collection of Barley Germplasm at the Seedling Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕二锁; 张凤英; 蔺瑞明; 包海柱; 刘志萍

    2015-01-01

    试验采用孢子悬浮液喷雾接种法,对国内外205份大麦种质资源材料进行实验室苗期根腐病抗性筛选、鉴定。结果表明,有11份材料高抗根腐病,35份材料中抗根腐病,156份材料中感或高感根腐病;以发病严重度为分析变量做品种抗病性聚类分析,取欧式距离为2.14时,品种抗病性可分为两大类,第一类抗病材料(包括高抗与中抗)总共有46份,占供试鉴定材料的22.44%;第二类感病材料(包括中感与高感)总共有156份,占供试鉴定材料的77.09%;获得的抗病材料可作为抗病育种亲本材料,为丰富和拓展我国大麦抗病育种种质资源奠定基础。%This study assessed root rot resistance in a collection of 205 samples of barley germplasm originating domestically and inter-nationally using the method of sprays for inoculating the spore suspension of the pathogen. As a result, 11 and 35 barley samples had high and medium resistance, respectively, to root rot disease, while 156 samples were moderately or highly susceptible to the disease. A clustering analysis was conducted using disease severity as the variable with Euclidean distance of 2. 14, which divided these samples into two groups based on their disease resistance. The first group was considered disease-resistant materials, which comprised 46 sam-ples with medium or high resistance to root rot disease, accounting for 22. 44% of all collected samples. The second group was consid-ered disease-susceptible materials, which consisted of 156 samples with moderate or high susceptibility to the disease, constituting 77. 09% of all samples. The samples resistant to the disease can be used as parental materials for breeding disease-resistant barley varieties. Therefore, the current study laid a foundation for enriching disease-resistant barley germplasm resources in China.

  16. Response of Barley Seedlings to Microwaves at 2.45 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Crețescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of the present study was to investigate the changes induced upon germination and growth rate, expressed by vigor index of barley seeds exposed to microwave (MW treatment. As a microwave source was used a magnetron MWG20H, which emits radiation with a frequency of 2.45 GHz. In the experiment, barley seeds were exposed for 0s, 10s and 20s. The germination energy (GE and germination (G, cotyledon length (CL, leaves length (LL and roots length (RL in cm were determined on the 3th, 7th and 14th day after irradiation in order to estimate the influence of microwave treatment on them. The hypothesis was that seeds exposed to MW will behave differently than those unexposed. It was observed that the best results in terms of GE, G and vigor index (SVI were obtained in barley seeds for the treatment with output microwaves power of 400W for 20s.

  17. AtOPR3 specifically inhibits primary root growth in Arabidopsis under phosphate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongyan; Pan, Xiaoying; Deng, Yuxia; Wu, Huamao; Liu, Pei; Li, Xuexian

    2016-01-01

    The primary root plays essential roles in root development, nutrient absorption, and root architectural establishment. Primary root growth is generally suppressed by phosphate (P) deficiency in A. thaliana; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely elusive to date. We found that AtOPR3 specifically inhibited primary root growth under P deficiency via suppressing root tip growth at the transcriptional level, revealing an important novel function of AtOPR3 in regulating primary root response to the nutrient stress. Importantly, AtOPR3 functioned to down-regulate primary root growth under P limitation mostly by its own, rather than depending on the Jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Further, AtOPR3 interacted with ethylene and gibberellin signaling pathways to regulate primary root growth upon P deficiency. In addition, the AtOPR3's function in inhibiting primary root growth upon P limitation was also partially dependent on auxin polar transport. Together, our studies provide new insights into how AtOPR3, together with hormone signaling interactions, modulates primary root growth in coping with the environmental stress in Arabidopsis.

  18. Effect of Treated MSWC Leachate with Different Salts on Growth Parameters, Chemical Composition of Barley Plant and Soil Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Astaraei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural organic wastes contain considerable amounts of nutritional elements. The availability and uptake of nutrient elements in soil especially in alkali and calcareous soils increase due to high content of organic matter, and reduce the micro-elements deficiencies. Organic wastes have pathogenic contaminations that come from waste type and transmitted by microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, etc. This research was conducted to study the effect of MSWC leachate treated with three salts, 1 cupper sulphate, 2 iron chloride and 3 sodium benzoate each with two levels of 40 and 80 mg.l-1 on growth parameters of barley and soil properties in a completely randomized design (factorial with three replications under laboratory and pot conditions in college of agriculture, Ferdowsi university of Mashhad during 2009-2010 cropping season. Results showed that plant total dry weight in three different salts were not significant. Maximum N and K concentrations in plant were observed in cupper sulphate treated MSWC leachate and plant P concentration in cupper sulphate and iron chloride treated MSWC leachate treatments. The effect of sodium benzoate, due to its positive impact and benzoic acid produced, as plant metabolite was superior to iron chloride. Increasing amount of salt from 40 to 80 mg.l-1, increased soil ECe, reduced plant height and total dry weight, N and P concentrations. Plant height, total dry weight, plant P and K concentrations were maximum and N concentration ranked second in 40 mg.l-1 cupper sulphate salt. Maximum reduction in plant height and total dry weight was noted in iron chloride with increasing salt amount, and minimum N concentration was noted in this treatment. Soil ECe in cupper sulphate ranked third and soil total N in sodium benzoate 80 and cupper sulphate 40 mg.l-1 treatments ranked first and soil available K in cupper sulphate 40 mg.l-1 ranked second. Our results showed that cupper sulphate 40 mg.l-1 treatment is suitable

  19. Effects of Feeding Barley Naturally Contaminated with Fusarium Mycotoxins on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, and Blood Chemistry of Gilts and Growth Recoveries by Feeding a Non-contaminated Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of feeding barley naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on growth performance, vulva swelling, and digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein of gilts and the recovery of gilts fed normal diets immediately after the exposure to contaminated diets by measuring growth performance and vulva swelling. In Exp. 1, four diets were prepared to contain 0%, 15%, 30%, or 45% contaminated barley containing 25.7 mg/kg deoxynivalenol and 26.0 μg/kg zearalenone. Sixteen gilts with an initial body weight (BW of 33.3 kg (standard deviation = 3.0 were individually housed in a metabolism crate and assigned to 4 diets with 4 replicates in a randomized complete block design based on BW. During the 14-d feeding trial, individual BW and feed consumption were measured weekly and the vertical and horizontal lengths of vulva were measured every 3 d. From d 10, feces were collected by the maker-to-marker method for 4 d. Blood samples were collected on d 14. During the overall period, the average daily gain, average daily feed intake, and gain:feed of pigs linearly decreased (p<0.01 as the dietary concentration of contaminated barley increased. However, the digestibility of crude protein was linearly increased (p = 0.011 with the increasing amounts of contaminated barley. Increasing dietary Fusarium mycotoxin concentrations did not influence vulva size, blood characteristic as well as immunoglobulin level of pigs. In the Exp. 2, a corn-soybean meal-based diet was formulated as a recovery diet. Pigs were fed the recovery diet immediately after completion of the Exp. 1. During the 14-d of recovery period, the individual BW and feed consumption were measured weekly and the vertical and horizontal length of vulva were measured every 3 d from d 0. On d 7, the feed intake of pigs previously fed contaminated diets already reached that of pigs fed a diet with 0% contaminated barley and no

  20. Systemic responses of barley to the 3-hydroxy-decanoyl-homoserine lactone producing plant beneficial endophyte Acidovorax radicis N35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengcai Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing auto-inducers of the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL type produced by Gram-negative bacteria have different effects on plants including stimulation on root growth and/or priming or acquirement of systemic resistance in plants. In this communication the influence of AHL production of the plant growth promoting endophytic rhizosphere bacterium Acidovorax radicis N35 on barley seedlings was investigated. A. radicis N35 produces 3-hydroxy-C10-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C10-HSL as the major AHL compound. To study the influence of this QS autoinducer on the interaction with barley, the araI-biosynthesis gene was deleted. The comparison of inoculation effects of the A. radicis N35 wild type and the araI mutant resulted in remarkable differences. While the N35 wild type colonized plant roots effectively in microcolonies, the araI mutant occurred at the root surface as single cells. Furthermore, in a mixed inoculum the wild type was much more prevalent in colonization than the araI mutant documenting that the araI mutation affected root colonization. Nevertheless, a significant plant growth promoting effect could be shown after inoculation of barley with the wild type and the araI mutant in soil after two months cultivation. While A. radicis N35 wild type showed only a very weak induction of early defense responses in plant RNA expression analysis, the araI mutant caused increased expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes. This was corroborated by the accumulation of several flavonoid compounds such as saponarin and lutonarin in leaves of root inoculated barley seedlings. Thus, although the exact role of the flavonoids in this plant response is not clear yet, it can be concluded, that the synthesis of AHLs by A. radicis has implications on the perception by the host plant barley and thereby contributes to the establishment and function of the bacteria-plant interaction.

  1. Systemic Responses of Barley to the 3-hydroxy-decanoyl-homoserine Lactone Producing Plant Beneficial Endophyte Acidovorax radicis N35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shengcai; Li, Dan; Trost, Eva; Mayer, Klaus F.; Vlot, A. Corina; Heller, Werner; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Rothballer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing auto-inducers of the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) type produced by Gram-negative bacteria have different effects on plants including stimulation on root growth and/or priming or acquirement of systemic resistance in plants. In this communication the influence of AHL production of the plant growth promoting endophytic rhizosphere bacterium Acidovorax radicis N35 on barley seedlings was investigated. A. radicis N35 produces 3-hydroxy-C10-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C10-HSL) as the major AHL compound. To study the influence of this QS autoinducer on the interaction with barley, the araI-biosynthesis gene was deleted. The comparison of inoculation effects of the A. radicis N35 wild type and the araI mutant resulted in remarkable differences. While the N35 wild type colonized plant roots effectively in microcolonies, the araI mutant occurred at the root surface as single cells. Furthermore, in a mixed inoculum the wild type was much more prevalent in colonization than the araI mutant documenting that the araI mutation affected root colonization. Nevertheless, a significant plant growth promoting effect could be shown after inoculation of barley with the wild type and the araI mutant in soil after 2 months cultivation. While A. radicis N35 wild type showed only a very weak induction of early defense responses in plant RNA expression analysis, the araI mutant caused increased expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes. This was corroborated by the accumulation of several flavonoid compounds such as saponarin and lutonarin in leaves of root inoculated barley seedlings. Thus, although the exact role of the flavonoids in this plant response is not clear yet, it can be concluded, that the synthesis of AHLs by A. radicis has implications on the perception by the host plant barley and thereby contributes to the establishment and function of the bacteria-plant interaction. PMID:28018401

  2. Systemic Responses of Barley to the 3-hydroxy-decanoyl-homoserine Lactone Producing Plant Beneficial Endophyte Acidovorax radicis N35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shengcai; Li, Dan; Trost, Eva; Mayer, Klaus F; Vlot, A Corina; Heller, Werner; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Rothballer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing auto-inducers of the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) type produced by Gram-negative bacteria have different effects on plants including stimulation on root growth and/or priming or acquirement of systemic resistance in plants. In this communication the influence of AHL production of the plant growth promoting endophytic rhizosphere bacterium Acidovorax radicis N35 on barley seedlings was investigated. A. radicis N35 produces 3-hydroxy-C10-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C10-HSL) as the major AHL compound. To study the influence of this QS autoinducer on the interaction with barley, the araI-biosynthesis gene was deleted. The comparison of inoculation effects of the A. radicis N35 wild type and the araI mutant resulted in remarkable differences. While the N35 wild type colonized plant roots effectively in microcolonies, the araI mutant occurred at the root surface as single cells. Furthermore, in a mixed inoculum the wild type was much more prevalent in colonization than the araI mutant documenting that the araI mutation affected root colonization. Nevertheless, a significant plant growth promoting effect could be shown after inoculation of barley with the wild type and the araI mutant in soil after 2 months cultivation. While A. radicis N35 wild type showed only a very weak induction of early defense responses in plant RNA expression analysis, the araI mutant caused increased expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes. This was corroborated by the accumulation of several flavonoid compounds such as saponarin and lutonarin in leaves of root inoculated barley seedlings. Thus, although the exact role of the flavonoids in this plant response is not clear yet, it can be concluded, that the synthesis of AHLs by A. radicis has implications on the perception by the host plant barley and thereby contributes to the establishment and function of the bacteria-plant interaction.

  3. Disentangling the intertwined genetic bases of root and shoot growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteillé, Marie; Rolland, Gaëlle; Balsera, Crispulo; Loudet, Olivier; Muller, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Root growth and architecture are major components of plant nutrient and water use efficiencies and these traits are the matter of extensive genetic analysis in several crop species. Because root growth relies on exported assimilate from the shoot, and changes in assimilate supply are known to alter root architecture, we hypothesized (i) that the genetic bases of root growth could be intertwined with the genetic bases of shoot growth and (ii) that the link could be either positive, with alleles favouring shoot growth also favouring root growth, or negative, because of competition for assimilates. We tested these hypotheses using a quantitative genetics approach in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana and the Bay-0 × Shahdara recombinant inbred lines population. In accordance with our hypothesis, root and shoot growth traits were strongly correlated and most root growth quantitative trait loci (QTLs) colocalized with shoot growth QTLs with positive alleles originating from either the same or the opposite parent. In order to identify regions that could be responsible for root growth independently of the shoot, we generated new variables either based on root to shoot ratios, residuals of root to shoot correlations or coordinates of principal component analysis. These variables showed high heritability allowing genetic analysis. They essentially all yielded similar results pointing towards two regions involved in the root--shoot balance. Using Heterogeneous Inbred Families (a kind of near-isogenic lines), we validated part of the QTLs present in these two regions for different traits. Our study thus highlights the difficulty of disentangling intertwined genetic bases of root and shoot growth and shows that this difficulty can be overcome by using simple statistical tools.

  4. Disentangling the intertwined genetic bases of root and shoot growth in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouteillé

    Full Text Available Root growth and architecture are major components of plant nutrient and water use efficiencies and these traits are the matter of extensive genetic analysis in several crop species. Because root growth relies on exported assimilate from the shoot, and changes in assimilate supply are known to alter root architecture, we hypothesized (i that the genetic bases of root growth could be intertwined with the genetic bases of shoot growth and (ii that the link could be either positive, with alleles favouring shoot growth also favouring root growth, or negative, because of competition for assimilates. We tested these hypotheses using a quantitative genetics approach in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana and the Bay-0 × Shahdara recombinant inbred lines population. In accordance with our hypothesis, root and shoot growth traits were strongly correlated and most root growth quantitative trait loci (QTLs colocalized with shoot growth QTLs with positive alleles originating from either the same or the opposite parent. In order to identify regions that could be responsible for root growth independently of the shoot, we generated new variables either based on root to shoot ratios, residuals of root to shoot correlations or coordinates of principal component analysis. These variables showed high heritability allowing genetic analysis. They essentially all yielded similar results pointing towards two regions involved in the root--shoot balance. Using Heterogeneous Inbred Families (a kind of near-isogenic lines, we validated part of the QTLs present in these two regions for different traits. Our study thus highlights the difficulty of disentangling intertwined genetic bases of root and shoot growth and shows that this difficulty can be overcome by using simple statistical tools.

  5. The Equilibrium and Growth Stability of Winter Wheat Root and Shoot Under Different Soil Water Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi-hong; CHEN Xiao-yuan; LUO Yuan-pei

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium between root, shoot and growth stability under different soil water conditions were investigated in a tube experiment of winter wheat. The water supplying treatments included: sufficient irrigation at whole growth phase, moderate deficiency irrigation at whole growth phase, serious deficiency irrigation at whole growth phase, sufficient irrigation at jointing stage, tillering stage, flowering stage, and fillering respectively, after moderate and serious water deficit during their previous growth stage. Root and shoot biomass were measured. On the basis of the cooperative root-shoot interactions model, the equilibrium and growth stability were studied on the strength of the kinetics system theory. There was only one varying equilibrium point between the root and shoot over the life time of the winter wheat plant. Water stress prolonged the duration of stable growth, the more serious the water deficit, the longer the period of stable growth.The duration of stable growth was shortened and that of unstable growth was prolonged after water recovery. The growth behavior of the plants exposed to moderate water deficit shifted from stable to unstable until the end of the growth,after rewatering at flowering. In the life-time of the crop, the root and shoot had been adjusting themselves in structure and function so as to maintain an equilibrium, but could not achieve the equilibrium state for long. They were always in an unbalanced state from the beginning to the end of growth. This was the essence of root-shoot equilibrium. Water stress inhibited the function of root and shoot, reduced root shoot interactions, and as a result, the plant growth gradually tended to stabilize. Rewatering enhanced root shoot interactions, prolonged duration of instable growth. Rewatering at flowering could upset the inherent relativity during the long time of stable growth from flowering to filling stage, thus leading to unstable growth and enhanced dry matter accumulating rate

  6. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA regulates root growth by controlling the size of the root meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkena Srilakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana gene SPATULA (SPT, encoding a bHLH transcription factor, was originally identified for its role in pistil development. SPT is necessary for the growth and development of all carpel margin tissues including the style, stigma, septum and transmitting tract. Since then, it has been shown to have pleiotropic roles during development, including restricting the meristematic region of the leaf primordia and cotyledon expansion. Although SPT is expressed in roots, its role in this organ has not been investigated. Results An analysis of embryo and root development showed that loss of SPT function causes an increase in quiescent center size in both the embryonic and postembryonic stem cell niches. In addition, root meristem size is larger due to increased division, which leads to a longer primary root. spt mutants exhibit other pleiotropic developmental phenotypes, including more flowers, shorter internodes and an extended flowering period. Genetic and molecular analysis suggests that SPT regulates cell proliferation in parallel to gibberellic acid as well as affecting auxin accumulation or transport. Conclusions Our data suggest that SPT functions in growth control throughout sporophytic growth of Arabidopsis, but is not necessary for cell fate decisions except during carpel development. SPT functions independently of gibberellic acid during root development, but may play a role in regulating auxin transport or accumulation. Our data suggests that SPT plays a role in control of root growth, similar to its roles in above ground tissues.

  7. Colonization of Greek olive cultivars' root system by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus: root morphology, growth, and mineral nutrition of olive plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Chatzistathis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rooted leafy cuttings of three Greek olive (Olea europaea L. cultivars (Koroneiki, Kothreiki and Chondrolia Chalkidikis were grown for six months in three soil types, in an experimental greenhouse, in order to investigate: i if their root system was colonized by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF genus and, ii if genotypic differences concerning growth and mineral nutrition of olive plants existed. Gigaspora sp. colonized the root system of the three cultivars studied, while Glomus sp. colonized only the root system of 'Koroneiki'. Furthermore, in most cases root colonization by AMF differed among cultivars and soil types. The maximum root colonization, in all soils, was found in 'Chondrolia Chalkidikis'. In the three soils studied, the ratio shoot dry weight (SDW/ root dry weight (RDW was higher in 'Chondrolia Chalkidikis' than in the other two cultivars. Furthermore, root system morphology of the three olive cultivars was completely different, irrespectively of soil type. Leaf Mn, Fe, Zn, Ca, Mg, K and P concentrations, as well as total per plant nutrient content and nutrient use efficiency, differed among cultivars under the same soil conditions. These differences concerning root morphology, SDW/RDW, as well as nutrient uptake and use efficiency, could be possibly ascribed to the differential AMF colonization by Glomus sp. and Gigaspora sp.

  8. Root plasma membrane transporters controlling K+/Na+ homeostasis in salt-stressed bBarley1[C][W]

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhonghua; Pottosin, Igor I.; Cuin, Tracey A.;

    2007-01-01

    Plant salinity tolerance is a polygenic trait with contributions from genetic, developmental, and physiological interactions, in addition to interactions between the plant and its environment. In this study, we show that in salt-tolerant genotypes of barley (Hordeum vulgare), multiple mechanisms ...

  9. Characterization of the growth and auxin physiology of roots of the tomato mutant, diageotropica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muday, G. K.; Lomax, T. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Roots of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant (diageotropica (dgt) exhibit an altered phenotype. These roots are agravitropic and lack lateral roots. Relative to wild-type (VFN8) roots, dgt roots are less sensitive to growth inhibition by exogenously applied IAA and auxin transport inhibitors (phytotropins), and the roots exhibit a reduction in maximal growth inhibition in response to ethylene. However, IAA transport through roots, binding of the phytotropin, tritiated naphthylphthalamic acid ([3H]NPA), to root microsomal membranes, NPA-sensitive IAA uptake by root segments, and uptake of [3H]NPA into root segments are all similar in mutant and wild-type roots. We speculate that the reduced sensitivity of dgt root growth to auxin-transport inhibitors and ethylene is an indirect result of the reduction in sensitivity to auxin in this single gene, recessive mutant. We conclude that dgt roots, like dgt shoots, exhibit abnormalities indicating they have a defect associated with or affecting a primary site of auxin perception or action.

  10. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I; Ong, Chin K; Deans, J Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-02-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing belowground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. We investigated the effects of tree root pruning on shoot growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (H.B. & K.), Casuarina equisetifolia L., Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br., Maesopsis eminii Engl. and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most species were competing strongly with crops. Tree roots were pruned 41 months after planting by cutting and back-filling a trench to a depth of 0.3 m, at a distance of 0.3 m from the trees, on one side of the tree row. The trench was reopened and roots recut at 50 and 62 months after planting. We assessed the effects on tree growth and root distribution over a 3 year period, and crop yield after the third root pruning at 62 months. Overall, root pruning had only a slight effect on aboveground tree growth: height growth was unaffected and diameter growth was reduced by only 4%. A substantial amount of root regrowth was observed by 11 months after pruning. Tree species varied in the number and distribution of roots, and C. equisetifolia and M. lutea had considerably more roots per unit of trunk volume than the other species, especially in the surface soil layers. Casuarina equisetifolia and M. eminii were the tree species most competitive with crops and G. robusta and M. lutea the least competitive. Crop yield data provided strong evidence of the redistribution of root activity following root pruning, with competition increasing on the unpruned side of tree rows. Thus, one-sided root pruning will be useful in only a few circumstances.

  11. Effects of water and nutrient availability on fine root growth in eastern Amazonian forest regrowth, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tâmara Thaiz Santana; Miranda, Izildinha Souza; Vasconcelos, Steel Silva

    2010-08-01

    *Fine root dynamics is widely recognized as an important biogeochemical process, but there are few data on fine root growth and its response to soil resource availability, especially for tropical forests. *We evaluated the response of fine root dynamics to altered availability of soil water and nutrients in a 20-yr-old forest regrowth in eastern Amazonia. In one experiment the dry season reduction in soil moisture was alleviated by irrigation. In the other experiment, nutrient supply was reduced by litter removal. We used the ingrowth core technique to measure fine root mass growth, length growth, mortality and specific root length. *Dry-season irrigation had no significant effect on mass and length of live and dead roots, whereas litter removal reduced mass and length of live roots. For both irrigation and litter removal experiments, root growth was significantly greater in the dry season than in the wet season. *Increased root growth was associated with decreased soil water availability. However, root growth did not increase in response to nutrient reduction in litter removal plots. Overall, our results suggest that belowground allocation may differ according to the type of soil resource limitation.

  12. Role of Ascorbate in the Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Root Growth by Phosphate Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Tyburski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis root system responds to phosphorus (P deficiency by decreasing primary root elongation and developing abundant lateral roots. Feeding plants with ascorbic acid (ASC stimulated primary root elongation in seedlings grown under limiting P concentration. However, at high P, ASC inhibited root growth. Seedlings of ascorbate-deficient mutant (vtc1 formed short roots irrespective of P availability. P-starved plants accumulated less ascorbate in primary root tips than those grown under high P. ASC-treatment stimulated cell divisions in root tips of seedlings grown at low P. At high P concentrations ASC decreased the number of mitotic cells in the root tips. The lateral root density in seedlings grown under P deficiency was decreased by ASC treatments. At high P, this parameter was not affected by ASC-supplementation. vtc1 mutant exhibited increased lateral root formation on either, P-deficient or P-sufficient medium. Irrespective of P availability, high ASC concentrations reduced density and growth of root hairs. These results suggest that ascorbate may participate in the regulation of primary root elongation at different phosphate availability via its effect on mitotic activity in the root tips.

  13. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Selected beneficial Pseudomonas spp. strains have the ability to influence root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting primary root elongation and promoting lateral root and root hair formation. A crucial role for auxin in this long-term (1week), long-distance plant-microbe interaction has been demonstrated. Arabidopsis seedlings were cultivated in vitro on vertical plates and inoculated with pathogenic strains Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), as well as Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu) and Escherichia coli (Eco). Root hair lengths were measured after 24 and 48h of direct exposure to each bacterial strain. Several Arabidopsis mutants with impaired responses to pathogens, impaired ethylene perception and defects in the exocyst vesicle tethering complex that is involved in secretion were also analysed. Arabidopsis seedling roots infected with Psm or Pst responded similarly to when infected with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; root hair growth was stimulated and primary root growth was inhibited. Other plant- and soil-adapted bacteria induced similar root hair responses. The most compromised root hair growth stimulation response was found for the knockout mutants exo70A1 and ein2. The single immune pathways dependent on salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and PAD4 are not directly involved in root hair growth stimulation; however, in the mutual cross-talk with ethylene, they indirectly modify the extent of the stimulation of root hair growth. The Flg22 peptide does not initiate root hair stimulation as intact bacteria do, but pretreatment with Flg22 prior to Psm inoculation abolished root hair growth stimulation in an FLS2 receptor kinase-dependent manner. These early response phenomena are not associated with changes in auxin levels, as monitored with the pDR5::GUS auxin reporter. Early stimulation of root hair growth is an effect of an unidentified component of living plant pathogenic bacteria. The root

  14. Adaptive growth of tree root systems in response to wind action and site conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Bruce C.; Ray, Duncan

    1996-01-01

    Soil-root plate dimensions and structural root architecture were examined on 46-year-old Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) trees that had been mechanically uprooted. Rooting depth was restricted by a water table, and root system morphology had adapted to resist the wind movement associated with shallow rooting. The spread of the root system and the ratio of root mass to shoot mass (root/shoot ratio) were both negatively related to soil-root plate depth. Root systems had more structural root mass on the leeward side than the windward side of the tree relative to the prevailing wind direction. Cross sections of structural roots were obtained at distances of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 m from the tree center. Buttressed parts of roots had greater lateral and vertical secondary thickening above rather than below the biological center. This uneven growth, which produced a shape similar in cross section to a T-beam, was greater on the leeward side of the tree, and was greatest at 0.5 m from the tree center of shallow rooted trees. Further from the tree, particularly on the windward side, many roots developed eccentric cross-sectional shapes comparable to I-beams, which would efficiently resist vertical flexing. Roots became more ovoid in shape with increasing distance from the tree, especially on deep rooted trees where lateral roots tapered rapidly to a small diameter. We conclude that these forms of adaptive growth in response to wind movement improve the rigidity of the soil-root plate and counteract the increasing vulnerability to windthrow as the tree grows.

  15. Brewing with fractionated barley

    OpenAIRE

    Donkelaar, van, CC René

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental impact. Raw barley, however, contains less endogenous enzymes and more undesired components for the use of beer brewing, compared to malted barley.  The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate how ba...

  16. Constitutively activated barley ROPs modulate epidermal cell size, defense reactions and interactions with fungal leaf pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Indira Priyadarshini; Zellerhoff, Nina; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Eichmann, Ruth; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2008-12-01

    RHO-like monomeric G-proteins of plants (ROPs, also called RACs), are involved in plant development and interaction with the environment. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) ROP protein HvRACB has been shown to be required for entry of the biotrophic powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh) into living host cells. To get a deeper insight into evolutionarily conserved functions of ROPs in cell polarity and pathogen responses, we stably expressed constitutively activated (CA) mutant variants of different barley ROPs (HvRACB, HvRAC1, HvRAC3) in barley. CA HvROPs induced epidermal cell expansion and/or abolished polarity in tip growing root hairs. All three CA HvROPs enhanced susceptibility of barley to penetration by Bgh whereas only CA HvRAC1 supported whole cell H(2)O(2) production in non-penetrated cells. Despite increasing penetration by Bgh, CA HvRAC1 promoted callose deposition at sites of fungal attack and resistance to penetration by Magnaporthe oryzae. The data show an involvement of ROPs in polar growth processes of the monocot barley and in responses to fungal pathogens with different life style.

  17. Review:Aluminium tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.): physiological mechanisms, genetics and screening methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun-ping; RAMAN Harsh; ZHANG Guo-ping; MENDHAM Neville; ZHOU Mei-xue

    2006-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity is one of the major limiting factors for barley production on acid soils. It inhibits root cell division and elongation, thus reducing water and nutrient uptake, consequently resulting in poor plant growth and yield. Plants tolerate Al either through external resistance mechanisms, by which Al is excluded from plant tissues or internal tolerance mechanisms, conferring the ability of plants to tolerate Al ion in the plant symplasm where Al that has permeated the plasmalemma is sequestered or converted into an innocuous form. Barley is considered to be most sensitive to Al toxicity among cereal species. Al tolerance in barley has been assessed by several methods, such as nutrient solution culture, soil bioassay and field screening. Genetic and molecular mapping research has shown that Al tolerance in barley is controlled by a single locus which is located on chromosome 4H. Molecular markers linked with Al tolerance loci have been identified and validated in a range of diverse populations. This paper reviews the (1) screening methods for evaluating Al tolerance, (2) genetics and (3) mechanisms underlying Al tolerance in barley.

  18. Time-lapse fluorescence imaging of Arabidopsis root growth with rapid manipulation of the root environment using the RootChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Meier, Matthias; Cartwright, Heather N; Sosso, Davide; Quake, Stephen R; Ehrhardt, David W; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-07-07

    The root functions as the physical anchor of the plant and is the organ responsible for uptake of water and mineral nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfate and trace elements that plants acquire from the soil. If we want to develop sustainable approaches to producing high crop yield, we need to better understand how the root develops, takes up a wide spectrum of nutrients, and interacts with symbiotic and pathogenic organisms. To accomplish these goals, we need to be able to explore roots in microscopic detail over time periods ranging from minutes to days. We developed the RootChip, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)- based microfluidic device, which allows us to grow and image roots from Arabidopsis seedlings while avoiding any physical stress to roots during preparation for imaging(1) (Figure 1). The device contains a bifurcated channel structure featuring micromechanical valves to guide the fluid flow from solution inlets to each of the eight observation chambers(2). This perfusion system allows the root microenvironment to be controlled and modified with precision and speed. The volume of the chambers is approximately 400 nl, thus requiring only minimal amounts of test solution. Here we provide a detailed protocol for studying root biology on the RootChip using imaging-based approaches with real time resolution. Roots can be analyzed over several days using time lapse microscopy. Roots can be perfused with nutrient solutions or inhibitors, and up to eight seedlings can be analyzed in parallel. This system has the potential for a wide range of applications, including analysis of root growth in the presence or absence of chemicals, fluorescence-based analysis of gene expression, and the analysis of biosensors, e.g. FRET nanosensors(3).

  19. Touch and gravitropic set-point angle interact to modulate gravitropic growth in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, G. D.; Gilroy, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plant roots must sense and respond to a variety of environmental stimuli as they grow through the soil. Touch and gravity represent two of the mechanical signals that roots must integrate to elicit the appropriate root growth patterns and root system architecture. Obstacles such as rocks will impede the general downwardly directed gravitropic growth of the root system and so these soil features must be sensed and this information processed for an appropriate alteration in gravitropic growth to allow the root to avoid the obstruction. We show that primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis do appear to sense and respond to mechanical barriers placed in their path of growth in a qualitatively similar fashion. Both types of roots exhibited a differential growth response upon contacting the obstacle that directed the main axis of elongation parallel to the barrier. This growth habit was maintained until the obstacle was circumvented, at which point normal gravitropic growth was resumed. Thus, the gravitational set-point angle of the primary and lateral roots prior to encountering the barrier were 95 degrees and 136 degrees respectively and after growing off the end of the obstacle identical set-point angles were reinstated. However, whilst tracking across the barrier, quantitative differences in response were observed between these two classes of roots. The root tip of the primary root maintained an angle of 136 degrees to the horizontal as it traversed the barrier whereas the lateral roots adopted an angle of 154 degrees. Thus, this root tip angle appeared dependent on the gravitropic set-point angle of the root type with the difference in tracking angle quantitatively reflecting differences in initial set-point angle. Concave and convex barriers were also used to analyze the response of the root to tracking along a continuously varying surface. The roots maintained the a fairly fixed angle to gravity on the curved surface implying a constant resetting of this tip angle

  20. Touch and gravitropic set-point angle interact to modulate gravitropic growth in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, G D; Gilroy, S

    2003-01-01

    Plant roots must sense and respond to a variety of environmental stimuli as they grow through the soil. Touch and gravity represent two of the mechanical signals that roots must integrate to elicit the appropriate root growth patterns and root system architecture. Obstacles such as rocks will impede the general downwardly directed gravitropic growth of the root system and so these soil features must be sensed and this information processed for an appropriate alteration in gravitropic growth to allow the root to avoid the obstruction. We show that primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis do appear to sense and respond to mechanical barriers placed in their path of growth in a qualitatively similar fashion. Both types of roots exhibited a differential growth response upon contacting the obstacle that directed the main axis of elongation parallel to the barrier. This growth habit was maintained until the obstacle was circumvented, at which point normal gravitropic growth was resumed. Thus, the gravitational set-point angle of the primary and lateral roots prior to encountering the barrier were 95 degrees and 136 degrees respectively and after growing off the end of the obstacle identical set-point angles were reinstated. However, whilst tracking across the barrier, quantitative differences in response were observed between these two classes of roots. The root tip of the primary root maintained an angle of 136 degrees to the horizontal as it traversed the barrier whereas the lateral roots adopted an angle of 154 degrees. Thus, this root tip angle appeared dependent on the gravitropic set-point angle of the root type with the difference in tracking angle quantitatively reflecting differences in initial set-point angle. Concave and convex barriers were also used to analyze the response of the root to tracking along a continuously varying surface. The roots maintained the a fairly fixed angle to gravity on the curved surface implying a constant resetting of this tip angle

  1. Morpho-anatomical structure of the leaf apparatus of spring barley under the influence of herbicide and plant growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy P. Karpenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that the number of epidermal cells of spring barley leaf apparatus on the surface unit of the leaf decreases while their size increases under the application of herbicide «Calibre 75» at the rates of 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 g/ha in mixtures with «Agat - 25K» which is consistent with the formation of anatomic structure of the leaf apparatus belonging to mesomorphic type.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide modulates abscisic acid signaling in root growth and development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Ling; ZHOU Yun; ZHANG XiaoRan; SONG ChunPeng; Gao MingQing

    2007-01-01

    Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) can inhibit root growth and promote formation of more root hairs in the root tip of Arabidopsis. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie root ABA signaling are largely unknown. We report here that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduces the root growth of wild type,and the phenotype of H2O2 on the root growth is similar to ABA response. Meanwhile ABA-induced changes in the morphology of root system can be partly reversed by ascorbic acid in wild type and abolished in NADPH oxidase defective mutant atrbohF and atrbohC. Further, ABA can induce H2O2 accumulation in the root cells and enhance transcription level of OXI1, which is necessary for many more AOS-dependent processes such as root hair growth in Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that H2O2 as an important signal molecule is required for the ABA-regulated root growth and development in Arabidopsis.

  3. Root cooling strongly affects diel leaf growth dynamics, water and carbohydrate relations in Ricinus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiré, Richard; Schneider, Heike; Thorpe, Michael R; Kuhn, Arnd J; Schurr, Ulrich; Walter, Achim

    2010-03-01

    In laboratory and greenhouse experiments with potted plants, shoots and roots are exposed to temperature regimes throughout a 24 h (diel) cycle that can differ strongly from the regime under which these plants have evolved. In the field, roots are often exposed to lower temperatures than shoots. When the root-zone temperature in Ricinus communis was decreased below a threshold value, leaf growth occurred preferentially at night and was strongly inhibited during the day. Overall, leaf expansion, shoot biomass growth, root elongation and ramification decreased rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root were diminished and carbohydrate contents of both root and shoot increased. Further, transpiration rate was not affected, yet hydrostatic tensions in shoot xylem increased. When root temperature was increased again, xylem tension reduced, leaf growth recovered rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root increased, and carbohydrate pools were depleted. We hypothesize that the decreased uptake of water in cool roots diminishes the growth potential of the entire plant - especially diurnally, when the growing leaf loses water via transpiration. As a consequence, leaf growth and metabolite concentrations can vary enormously, depending on root-zone temperature and its heterogeneity inside pots.

  4. Manganese Toxicity Inhibited Root Growth by Disrupting Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Huichun; Pan, Xiangliang; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mn toxicity inhibits both primary root (PR) growth and lateral root development. However, the mechanism underlying Mn-mediated root growth inhibition remains to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of auxin in Mn-mediated inhibition of PR growth in Arabidopsis using physiological and genetic approaches. Mn toxicity inhibits PR elongation by reducing meristematic cell division potential. Mn toxicity also reduced auxin levels in root tips by reducing IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN4 and PIN7. Loss of function pin4 and pin7 mutants showed less inhibition of root growth than col-0 seedlings. These results indicated that this inhibitory effect of Mn toxicity on PR growth was mediated by affecting auxin biosynthesis and the expression of auxin efflux transporters PIN4 and PIN7. PMID:28316607

  5. Auxin increases the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) root tips while inhibiting root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanchenko, Maria G; den Os, Désirée; Monshausen, Gabriele B; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Bednárová, Andrea; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-10-01

    The hormone auxin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate root elongation, but the interactions between the two pathways are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate how auxin interacts with ROS in regulating root elongation in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Wild-type and auxin-resistant mutant, diageotropica (dgt), of tomato (S. lycopersicum 'Ailsa Craig') were characterized in terms of root apical meristem and elongation zone histology, expression of the cell-cycle marker gene Sl-CycB1;1, accumulation of ROS, response to auxin and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of ROS-related mRNAs. The dgt mutant exhibited histological defects in the root apical meristem and elongation zone and displayed a constitutively increased level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the root tip, part of which was detected in the apoplast. Treatments of wild-type with auxin increased the H2O2 concentration in the root tip in a dose-dependent manner. Auxin and H2O2 elicited similar inhibition of cell elongation while bringing forth differential responses in terms of meristem length and number of cells in the elongation zone. Auxin treatments affected the expression of mRNAs of ROS-scavenging enzymes and less significantly mRNAs related to antioxidant level. The dgt mutation resulted in resistance to both auxin and H2O2 and affected profoundly the expression of mRNAs related to antioxidant level. The results indicate that auxin regulates the level of H2O2 in the root tip, so increasing the auxin level triggers accumulation of H2O2 leading to inhibition of root cell elongation and root growth. The dgt mutation affects this pathway by reducing the auxin responsiveness of tissues and by disrupting the H2O2 homeostasis in the root tip.

  6. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D

    2015-01-01

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribute...... to next generation. The main goal of this study was to see the potential of using genomic prediction in a commercial Barley breeding program. The data used in this study was from Nordic Seed company which is located in Denmark. Around 350 advanced lines were genotyped with 9K Barely chip from Illumina...

  7. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  8. Grazing and nitrogen on the growth of roots in the mixture of oat and ryegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo von Linsingen Piazzetta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of grazing and its absence, and the nitrogen on the morphology of roots of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. mixed with Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.. The experimental design was a randomized block design in split-split, the main portion was study the effects of grazing and its absence, in the subplots the nitrogen doses of 75 and 150 kg ha-1 and in the sub-subplots were at sampling period. There was used the cylinder method to collect the root, being measured the length, surface area, mean diameter and volume by image analysis system Win / MacRizho (4.1c. Determined the dry mass of roots and shoot, and estimated the density of the root tissue and shoot:root ratio. From these results we determined the rate of root growth relative (RGR, relative root expansion rate (RRER and rate of accumulation of dry matter daily (RADM. In the first period, was higher RGR, RRER, the second period there was a reduction of the same, probably due to the period of drought and plant senescence. There was also reduced due to grazing RADM. With grazing, the length, surface area, mean diameter and root volume were higher, indicating that there was greater root growth of plants grazed compared to ungrazed. The systems studied had no effect on the dry weight of roots. There were found greater specific mass and shot:root ratio in the system without grazing. There was no significant difference between the nitrogen studied. At mixed of black oat and ryegrass, the grazing and nitrogen dose until 150 kg ha-1 little affect root growth. The nitrogen dose changed a little the growth rates and expansion of the roots. On the other hand, the grazing favored the length, area, volume and root diameter.

  9. The influence of calcium and pH on growth in primary roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and pH on root elongation in Zea mays L. cv. B73 x Missouri 17 and cv. Merit. Seedlings were raised to contain high levels of Ca2+ (HC, imbibed and raised in 10 mM CaCl2) or low levels of Ca2+ (LC, imbibed and raised in distilled water). In HC roots, lowering the pH (5 mM MES/Tris) from 6.5 to 4.5 resulted in strong, long-lasting growth promotion. Surprisingly, increasing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 also resulted in strong growth promotion. In LC roots acidification of the medium (pH 6.5 to 4.5) resulted in transient growth stimulation followed by a gradual decline in the growth rate toward zero. Exposure of LC roots to high pH (pH shift from 6.5 to 8.5) also promoted growth. Addition of EGTA resulted in strong growth promotion in both LC and HC roots. The ability of EGTA to stimulate growth appeared not to be related to H+ release from EGTA upon Ca2+ chelation since, 1) LC roots showed a strong and prolonged response to EGTA, but only a transient response to acid pH, and 2) promotion of growth by EGTA was observed in strongly buffered solutions. We also examined the pH dependence of the release of 45Ca2+ from roots of 3-day-old seedlings grown from grains imbibed in 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ from the root into agar blocks placed on the root surface was greater the more acidic the pH of the blocks. The results indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary for the acid growth response in roots.

  10. Root temperature effects on growth and bud break of Rosa hybrida in relation to cytokinin concentrations in xylem sap.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Kuiper, D.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of three divergent root temperatures (11°C, 20°C and 26°C) on growth and bud break of Rosa hybrida were studied. Root morphology was changed considerably with root temperature. Roots at 11°C were white, succulent, short and sparsely branched, whereas at 26°C roots were long, brown, thin

  11. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-08-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops.

  12. Nitrogen source interacts with ROP signalling in root hair tip-growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Daria; Monshausen, Gabriele; Singer, Meromit; Gilroy, Simon; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    Root hairs elongate in a highly polarized manner known as tip growth. Overexpression of constitutively active Rho of Plant (ROP)/RAC GTPases mutants induces swelling of root hairs. Here, we demonstrate that Atrop11(CA)-induced swelling of root hairs depends on the composition of the growth medium. Depletion of ammonium allowed normal root hair elongation in Atrop11(CA) plants, induced the development of longer root hairs in wild-type plants and suppressed the effect of Atrop11(CA) expression on actin organization and reactive oxygen species distribution, whereas membrane localization of the protein was not affected. Ammonium at concentrations higher than 1 mM and the presence of nitrate were required for induction of swelling. Oscillations in wall and cytoplasmic pH are known to accompany tip growth in root hairs, and buffering of the growth medium decreased Atrop11(CA)-induced swelling. Fluorescence ratio imaging experiments revealed that in wild-type root hairs, the addition of NH₄NO₃ to the growth medium induced an increase in the amplitude of extracellular and intracellular pH oscillations and an overall decrease in cytoplasmic pH at the cell apex. Based on these results, we suggest a model in which ROP GTPases and nitrogen-dependent pH oscillations function in parallel pathways, creating a positive feedback loop during root hair growth.

  13. Kinetics of Growth and Nutrient Consumption in the Culture of Trichosanthes kirilowii Hairy Root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭志刚; 郑明智; 刘瑞芝

    2003-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins in Trichosanthes kirilowii having high anti-HIV activity can be efficiently obtained by culturing Trichosanthes kirilowii hairy root. A hairy root line from Trichosanthes kirilowii was cultivated in flasks and in a 5-L bioreactor. The results show that a logistic equation can be used to describe the relationship between the hairy root biomass and the culture time. The medium conductivity decrease is linearly related to the biomass amount. In the suspension culture, the hairy root growth is closely related to the nutrient consumption. The biomass to nitrate yield is 0.352 g/mmol. The growth rate of the hairy root in the bioreactor is higher than that in the flasks, and after a 12-day culture its growth rate enters a high-speed period when the growth rate is 0.738 g/(L * d).

  14. Nitric oxide is involved in the oxytetracycline-induced suppression of root growth through inhibiting hydrogen peroxide accumulation in the root meristem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing-Xiang; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Yunlong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2017-02-01

    Use of antibiotic-contaminated manure in crop production poses a severe threat to soil and plant health. However, few studies have studied the mechanism by which plant development is affected by antibiotics. Here, we used microscopy, flow cytometry, gene expression analysis and fluorescent dyes to study the effects of oxytetracycline (OTC), a widely used antibiotic in agriculture, on root meristem activity and the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in the root tips of tomato seedlings. We found that OTC caused cell cycle arrest, decreased the size of root meristem and inhibited root growth. Interestingly, the inhibition of root growth by OTC was associated with a decline in H2O2 levels but an increase in NO levels in the root tips. Diphenyliodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of H2O2 production, showed similar effects on root growth as those of OTC. However, exogenous H2O2 partially reversed the effects on the cell cycle, meristem size and root growth. Importantly, cPTIO (the NO scavenger) and tungstate (an inhibitor of nitrate reductase) significantly increased H2O2 levels in the root tips and reversed the inhibition of root growth by OTC. Out results suggest that OTC-induced NO production inhibits H2O2 accumulation in the root tips, thus leading to cell cycle arrest and suppression of root growth.

  15. Genetic analysis of aluminum tolerance in Brazilian barleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minella Euclydes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is a major factor limiting barley growth in acid soils, and genotypes with adequate level of tolerance are needed for improving barley adaptation in Brazil. To study the inheritance of Al tolerance in Brazilian barleys, cultivars Antarctica 1, BR 1 and FM 404 were crossed to sensitive Kearney and PFC 8026, and intercrossed. Parental, F1, F2 and F6 generations were grown in nutrient solution containing 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07 mM of Al and classified for tolerance by the root tip hematoxylin staining assay. Tolerant by sensitive F2 progenies segregated three tolerant to one sensitive, fitting the 3:1 ratio expected for a single gene. The F6 populations segregated one tolerant to one sensitive also fitting a monogenic ratio. The F2 seedlings from crosses among tolerant genotypes scored the same as the parents. Since the population size used would allow detection of recombination as low as 7%, the complete absence of Al sensitive recombinants suggests that tolerance in these cultivars is most probably, controlled by the same gene. Thus, the potential for improving Al tolerance through recombination of these genotypes is very low and different gene sources should be evaluated.

  16. Aluminium localization and toxicity symptoms related to root growth inhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M N Alvim; F T Ramos; D C Oliveira; R M S Isaias; M G C França

    2012-12-01

    We correlated root growth inhibition with aluminium (Al3+) localization and toxicity symptoms in rice roots using seedlings of two genotypes (tolerant and sensitive) that were exposed to different AlCl3 concentrations. Al3+ localization was evaluated by hematoxylin in primary roots and by morin in cross-sections of the root tips. Neutral invertase enzyme activity and callose (1$\\to$3, -D-glucan) accumulation were observed and compared with Al3+ accumulation sites. Root growth was inhibited by Al3+ in a concentration-specific manner and proportional to the increase of hematoxylin staining, being more pronounced in the sensitive genotype. Morin staining showed the presence of Al3+ deep within the roots of the sensitive genotype, indicating that the metal was able to penetrate beyond the first few cell layers. In the tolerant genotype, Al3+ penetration was restricted to the first two cell layers. Ruptures in exodermis and epidermis layers by lateral root protrusions in both genotypes allowed Al3+ to enter into the roots. More intense activity of invertase in roots of the tolerant genotype was also observed, which could be related to greater root growth of this cultivar when submitted to Al3+ stress. Moreover, Al3+-induced callose accumulation was a late response occurring in the same areas where Al3+ was present.

  17. [Effects of cinnamic acid and vanillin on grafted eggplant root growth and physiological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Li; Zhou, Bao-Li; Lin, Shan-Shan; Li, Xia; Ye, Xue-Ling

    2010-06-01

    Choosing Solanum torvum as rootstock and cultivated Xi'anlü eggplant as scion, a pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of autotoxic substances (cinnamic acid and vanillin) on the root growth, antioxidase activity, and osmoregulation substances content of grafted eggplant, own-rooted eggplant, and rootstock eggplant. Cinnamic acid and vanillin had allelopathic effects on the root system of test eggplants, with low concentration promoting and higher concentration inhibiting the root growth and physiological metabolism. For own-rooted eggplant, the critical concentration of cinnamic acid and vanillin for promotion or inhibition was 0.1 mmol x kg(-1) and 0.5 mmol x kg(-1), respectively; whereas for grafted and rootstock eggplants, it was 0.5 mmol x kg(-1) and 1 mmol x kg(-1), respectively. The root resistance to autotoxic substances was in the order of root-stock eggplant > grafted eggplant > own-rooted eggplant. Higher concentration cinamic acid (0.5-4 mmol x kg(-1)) and vanillin (1-4 mmol x kg(-1)) enhanced the SOD enzyme activity and the proline and soluble sugar contents of grafted eggplant root by 8.50%-24.50%; 9.39%-27.64%, and 12.77%-81.81%, respectively, compared with own-rooted eggplant. The soluble protein content, fresh mass, dry mass, and root activity of grafted eggplant roots were significantly higher than those of own-rooted eggplant, suggesting that grafted eggplant had a strong resistance of rootstocks to autotoxic substances, which alleviated the negative effect of autotoxic substances on root growth.

  18. Low temperature inhibits root growth by reducing auxin accumulation via ARR1/12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Wang, Wen-Shu; Gong, Wen; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Hong-Guo; Xu, Heng-Hao; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-04-01

    Plants exhibit reduced root growth when exposed to low temperature; however, how low temperature modulates root growth remains to be understood. Our study demonstrated that low temperature reduces both meristem size and cell number, repressing the division potential of meristematic cells by reducing auxin accumulation, possibly through the repressed expression of PIN1/3/7 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes, although the experiments with exogenous auxin application also suggest the involvement of other factor(s). In addition, we verified that ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (ARR1) and ARR12 are involved in low temperature-mediated inhibition of root growth by showing that the roots of arr1-3 arr12-1 seedlings were less sensitive than wild-type roots to low temperature, in terms of changes in root length and meristem cell number. Furthermore, low temperature reduced the levels of PIN1/3 transcripts and the auxin level to a lesser extent in arr1-3 arr12-1 roots than in wild-type roots, suggesting that cytokinin signaling is involved in the low-temperature-mediated reduction of auxin accumulation. Taken together, our data suggest that low temperature inhibits root growth by reducing auxin accumulation via ARR1/12.

  19. Effect of N Fertilizers on Root Growth and Endogenous Hormones in Strawberry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; LAI Tao; HUANG Qi-Wei; YANG Xing-Ming; SHEN Qi-Rong

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous hormones play an important role in the growth and development of roots. The objective of this research was to study the effect of four types of N fertilizers on the root growth of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duchesne) and the endogenous enzymes of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA), and isopentenyl adenosine (iPA) in its roots and leaves using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Application of all types of N fertilizers significantly depressed (P ≤ 0.05) root growth at 20 d after transplanting. Application of organic-inorganic fertilizer (OIF) as basal fertilizer had a significant negative effect (P ≤ 0.05) on root growth. The application of OIF and urea lowered the lateral root frequency in strawberry plants at 60 d (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the application of two organic fertilizers (OFA and OFB) and the control (CK). With the fertilizer treatments, there were the same concentrations of IAA and ABA in both roots and leaves at the initial growth stage (20 d), lower levels of IAA and ABA at the later stage (60 d), and higher iPA levels at all seedling stages as compared to those of CK. Thus, changes in the concentrations of endogenous phytohormones in strawberry plants could be responsible for the morphological changes of roots due to fertilization.

  20. Vertical gradient in soil temperature stimulates development and increases biomass accumulation in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllner, K; Temperton, V M; Rascher, U; Jahnke, S; Rist, R; Schurr, U; Kuhn, A J

    2012-05-01

    We have detailed knowledge from controlled environment studies on the influence of root temperature on plant performance, growth and morphology. However, in all studies root temperature was kept spatially uniform, which motivated us to test whether a vertical gradient in soil temperature affected development and biomass production. Roots of barley seedlings were exposed to three uniform temperature treatments (10, 15 or 20°C) or to a vertical gradient (20-10°C from top to bottom). Substantial differences in plant performance, biomass production and root architecture occurred in the 30-day-old plants. Shoot and root biomass of plants exposed to vertical temperature gradient increased by 144 respectively, 297%, compared with plants grown at uniform root temperature of 20°C. Additionally the root system was concentrated in the upper 10cm of the soil substrate (98% of total root biomass) in contrast to plants grown at uniform soil temperature of 20°C (86% of total root biomass). N and C concentrations in plant roots grown in the gradient were significantly lower than under uniform growth conditions. These results are important for the transferability of 'normal' greenhouse experiments where generally soil temperature is not controlled or monitored and open a new path to better understand and experimentally assess root-shoot interactions.

  1. Root growth inhibition by aluminum is probably caused by cell death due to peroxidase-mediated hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonovicová, M; Huttová, J; Mistrík, I; Siroká, B; Tamás, L

    2004-10-01

    The effect of aluminum on hydrogen peroxide production and peroxidase-catalyzed NADH oxidation was studied in barley roots germinated and grown between two layers of moistened filter paper. Guaiacol peroxidase activity significantly increased after 48 h and was approximately two times higher after 72 h in Al-treated roots. The oxidation of NADH was also significantly increased and, like guaiacol peroxidase activity, it was two times higher in A1-treated roots than in controls. Elevated H2O2 production was observed both 48 and 72 h after the onset of imbibition in the presence of A1. Separation on a cation exchange column allowed the detection of two peaks with NADH peroxidase and H2O2 production activity. However, a difference between control and Al-treated plants was found only in one fraction, in which four times higher guaiacol peroxidase activity and five times higher NADH peroxidase activity were expressed and about three times more H2O2 was produced. One anionic peroxidase and three cationic peroxidases were detected in this fraction by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The anionic peroxidase was activated in the Al-treated root tips and also oxidized NADH but was detectable only after a long incubation time. Two of the cationic peroxidases were capable of oxidizing NADH and producing a significant amount of H2O2, but only one of these was activated by A1 stress. The role of these peroxidases during A1 stress in barley root tips is discussed.

  2. Experimental observations of root growth in a controlled photoelastic granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barés, Jonathan; Mora, Serge; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel root observation apparatus capable of measuring the mechanical evolution of both the root network and the surrounding granular medium. The apparatus consists of 11 parallel growth frames, two of them being shearable, where the roots grow inside a photo-elastic or glass granular medium sandwiched between two pieces of glass. An automated system waters the plant and image each frame periodically in white light and between crossed polarisers. This makes it possible to follow (i) the root tips and (ii) the grain displacements as well as (iii) their inner pressure. We show how a root networks evolve in a granular medium and how it can mechanically stabilize it. This constitutes a model experiment to move forward in the understanding of the complex interaction between root growth and surrounding soil mechanical evolution.

  3. Consequences of insect herbivory on grape fine root systems with different growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, T L; Eissenstat, D M; Granett, J; Gardner, D M; Smart, D R

    2007-07-01

    Herbivory tolerance has been linked to plant growth rate where plants with fast growth rates are hypothesized to be more tolerant of herbivory than slower-growing plants. Evidence supporting this theory has been taken primarily from observations of aboveground organs but rarely from roots. Grapevines differing in overall rates of new root production, were studied in Napa Valley, California over two growing seasons in an established vineyard infested with the sucking insect, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). The experimental vineyard allowed for the comparison of two root systems that differed in rates of new root tip production (a 'fast grower', Vitis berlandieri x Vitis rupestris cv. 1103P, and a slower-growing stock, Vitis riparia x Vitis rupestris cv. 101-14 Mgt). Each root system was grafted with a genetically identical shoot system (Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot). Using minirhizotrons, we did not observe any evidence of spatial or temporal avoidance of insect populations by root growth. Insect infestations were abundant throughout the soil profile, and seasonal peaks in phylloxera populations generally closely followed peaks in new root production. Our data supported the hypothesis that insect infestation was proportional to the number of growing tips, as indicated by similar per cent infestation in spite of a threefold difference in root tip production. In addition, infested roots of the fast-growing rootstock exhibited somewhat shorter median lifespans (60 d) than the slower-growing rootstock (85 d). Lifespans of uninfested roots were similar for the two rootstocks (200 d). As a consequence of greater root mortality of younger roots, infested root populations in the fast-growing rootstock had an older age structure. While there does not seem to be a trade-off between potential growth rate and relative rate of root infestation in these cultivars, our study indicates that a fast-growing root system may more readily shed infested roots that are

  4. Effects of lanthanum on abscisic acid regulation of root growth in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建荣; 王蕾; 胡婷; 李文超; 薛绍武

    2014-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) were reported to have adverse biology effects on plant growth and production. However, whether REEs are involved in plant hormone abscisic acid signal is not clear. Here we reported that REE lanthanum (La) interacted with abscisic acid (ABA) in the regulation of seed germination and root growth in model plant Arabidopsis. La3+at a concentration of 10 µmol/L alleviated ABA depression of seed germination and reversed ABA inhibition of root elongation growth in Arabidopsis. Previous studies showed that ABA could promote root hair development. In the present study, La3+inhibited root hair development promoted by ABA. Moreover, La3+inhibited H2O2 generation induced by ABA in root cells. Therefore we inferred that La3+might interact with ABA upstream of H2O2 generation.

  5. Auxin, the organizer of the environmental/hormonal signals for root hair growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Taeg eCho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The root hair development is controlled by diverse factors such as fate-determining developmental cues, auxin-related environmental factors, and hormones. In particular, the soil environmental factors are important as they maximize their absorption by modulating root hair development. These environmental factors affect the root hair developmental process by making use of diverse hormones. These hormonal factors interact with each other to modulate root hair development in which auxin appears to form the most intensive networks with the pathways from environmental factors and hormones. Moreover, auxin action for root hair development is genetically located immediately upstream of the root hair-morphogenetic genes. These observations suggest that auxin plays as an organizing node for environmental/hormonal pathways to modulate root hair growth.

  6. Genetic Variation in Deep Root Growth of North-European Winter Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Nanna Karkov

    Increased rooting depth in crops is known to enhance nitrogen use from deep soil layers and increase drought tolerance. Both parameters are known to increase productivity when natural occurring topsoil resources are scarce and input to the agricultural system is limited. Problems with nitrogen...... and scientists wish to develop screening methods that allow breeding for genotypes with increased deep root growth for effective N uptake. The study revealed that tube rhizotrons allows for screening of root traits in close-to-field conditions. It is important to perform the screening in relevant seasons...... and environments, as the interaction between genotypes and environment is substantial for most root traits. Root quantification with the line intersect method can be optimized by choosing the right strategy when scoring the root traits. For example, by adapting counting grids to match specific root densities, data...

  7. Modeling Root Growth, Crop Growth and N Uptake of Winter Wheat Based on SWMS_2D: Model and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Simulations for root growth, crop growth, and N uptake in agro-hydrological models are of significant concern to researchers. SWMS_2D is one of the most widely used physical hydrologically related models. This model solves equations that govern soil-water movement by the finite element method, and has a public access source code. Incorporating key agricultural components into the SWMS_2D model is of practical importance, especially for modeling some critical cereal crops such as winter wheat. We added root growth, crop growth, and N uptake modules into SWMS_2D. The root growth model had two sub-models, one for root penetration and the other for root length distribution. The crop growth model used was adapted from EU-ROTATE_N, linked to the N uptake model. Soil-water limitation, nitrogen limitation, and temperature effects were all considered in dry-weight modeling. Field experiments for winter wheat in Bouwing, the Netherlands, in 1983-1984 were selected for validation. Good agreements were achieved between simulations and measurements, including soil water content at different depths, normalized root length distribution, dry weight and nitrogen uptake. This indicated that the proposed new modules used in the SWMS_2D model are robust and reliable. In the future, more rigorous validation should be carried out, ideally under 2D situations, and attention should be paid to improve some modules, including the module simulating soil N mineralization.

  8. Root responses to soil physical conditions; growth dynamics from field to cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Bransby, M Fraser; Hans, Joachim; McKenna, Stephen J; Roberts, Tim J; Valentine, Tracy A

    2006-01-01

    Root growth in the field is often slowed by a combination of soil physical stresses, including mechanical impedance, water stress, and oxygen deficiency. The stresses operating may vary continually, depending on the location of the root in the soil profile, the prevailing soil water conditions, and the degree to which the soil has been compacted. The dynamics of root growth responses are considered in this paper, together with the cellular responses that underlie them. Certain root responses facilitate elongation in hard soil, for example, increased sloughing of border cells and exudation from the root cap decreases friction; and thickening of the root relieves stress in front of the root apex and decreases buckling. Whole root systems may also grow preferentially in loose versus dense soil, but this response depends on genotype and the spatial arrangement of loose and compact soil with respect to the main root axes. Decreased root elongation is often accompanied by a decrease in both cell flux and axial cell extension, and recent computer-based models are increasing our understanding of these processes. In the case of mechanical impedance, large changes in cell shape occur, giving rise to shorter fatter cells. There is still uncertainty about many aspects of this response, including the changes in cell walls that control axial versus radial extension, and the degree to which the epidermis, cortex, and stele control root elongation. Optical flow techniques enable tracking of root surfaces with time to yield estimates of two-dimensional velocity fields. It is demonstrated that these techniques can be applied successfully to time-lapse sequences of confocal microscope images of living roots, in order to determine velocity fields and strain rates of groups of cells. In combination with new molecular approaches this provides a promising way of investigating and modelling the mechanisms controlling growth perturbations in response to environmental stresses.

  9. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental impact. Raw

  10. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental impact. Raw

  11. Involvement of PME activity in regulation of Al toxic sensitivity in the root tips of barley%果胶甲基酯酶PME参与调控大麦根尖铝毒敏感性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘伟槐; 郑仲仲; 郭天荣; 王超; 寿建昕; 潘建伟

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that Aluminum(Al) accumulation on cell walls of root tips is the primary prerequisite of toxic effects of Al on root tips in plants. In this study, pectin methylesterase(PME) regulation of Al toxicity sensitivity and Al accumulation on cell walls were investigated in the root tips of two barley cultivars significantly different in Al resistance. Morin fluorescent staining showed that the fluorescence signal of root tips was much stronger in Al-sensitive cultivar 2000-2 than in Al-resistant Humai 16 after Al treatments, indicating that more Al was accumulated on the root tip of cv. 2000-2 than cv. Humai 16. Aluminon spectrophotometric assay further confirmed that the Al content in primary root tips was significantly higher in the Al-sensitive cultivar than in the Al-resistant one (ttest, p<0.05 or 0.01). Compared with individual controls, a significant increase of PME activity in root tips was observed in cv. 2000-2 after 4 h Al treatments, but after 24 h Al treatments, its PME activity significantly decreased. However, in cv. Humai 16, the significant alteration of PME activity was not observed over A1 treatments. These data together demonstrate that there exists a close correlation between Al accumulation and the change in PME activity on cell walls of the root tip, and therefore PME activity is involved in the regulation of Al sensitivity in the root tips of barley.%利用大麦耐铝品种和敏感品种来分析根尖果胶甲基酯酶(PME)在大麦铝毒敏感性中的调控作用.通过对耐铝性差异极其显著的2个大麦明品种2000-2与沪麦16经铝处理后的Morin荧光检测,观察到2000-2根尖荧光明显比沪麦16强,铝试剂比色法测定结果进一步表明,敏感品种根尖细胞壁上铝积累量比耐铝品种高,达到极显著差异(p<0.05或0.01).对根尖PME活性分析结果表明,与对照相比,铝处理4 h的2000-2根尖PME活性显著上升,但处理24 h后PME活性又显著下降;而沪麦16

  12. Genetic Improvement of Root Growth Contributes to Efficient Phosphorus Acquisition in maize (Zea mays L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-kai; CHEN Fan-jun; CHEN Xiao-chao; LONG Li-zhi; GAO Kun; YUAN Li-xing; ZHANG Fu-suo; MI Guo-hua

    2013-01-01

    Maize plants adapt to low phosphorus (P) stress by increasing root growth. It is of importance to know the extent to which genetic improvement of root growth can enhance P acquisiton. In the present study, the contribution of root growth improvement to efficient P acquisition was evaluated in two soils using T149 and T222, a pair of near isogenic maize testcrosses which were derived from a backcross BC4F3 population. T149 and T222 showed no difference in shoot biomass and leaf area under normal growth conditions, but differed greatly in root growth. T149 had longer lateral roots and a larger root surface area compared to T222. In calcareous soil, when P was insufficient, i.e., when P was either supplied as KH2PO4 at a concentration of 50 mg P kg-1 soil, or in the form of Phy-P, Ca3-P or Ca10-P, a 43%increase in root length in T149 compared to T222 resulted in an increase in P uptake by 53%, and shoot biomass by 48%. In acid soil, however, when P supply was insufficient, i.e., when P was supplied as KH2PO4 at a concentration of 100 mg P kg-1 soil, or in the form of Phy-P, Fe-P or Al-P, a 32%increase in root length in T149 compared to T222 resulted in an increase in P uptake by only 12%, and shoot biomass by 7%. No significant differences in the exudation of organic acids and APase activity were found between the two genotypes. It is concluded that genetic improvement of root growth can efficiently increase P acquisition in calcareous soils. In acid soils, however, improvements in the physiological traits of roots, in addition to their size, seem to be required for efficient P acquisition.

  13. Linking root traits to potential growth rate in six temperate tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comas, L.H.; Bouma, T.J.; Eissenstat, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    There is an extremely limited understanding of how plants of different potential growth rate vary in root traits, especially in woody species. We contrasted fine root morphology, physiology, and elemental construction between a fast- and a slow-growing species in each of three families: Aceraceae (m

  14. Soil CO2 concentration does not affect growth or root respiration in bean or citrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Lynch, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Contrasting effects of soil CO2 concentration on root respiration rates during short-term CO2 exposure, and on plant growth during long-term CO2 exposure, have been reported, Here we examine the effects of both short-and long-term exposure to soil CO2 on the root respiration of intact plants and on

  15. Soil acidification effects on fine root growth of Douglas-fir on sandy soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsthoorn, A.F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The ammonium sulphate deposited in forest ecosystems in the Netherlands as a result of air pollution currently exceeds 80 kg N ha -1yr -1locally. To study the influence of this air pollution on fine root density and its dynamics, fine root growth was monitored for three years i

  16. Summer dormancy and winter growth: root survival strategy in a perennial monocotyledon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Michael W; McCully, Margaret E; Canny, Martin J; Pate, John S; Ngo, Hai; Mathesius, Ulrike; Cawthray, Gregory R; Lambers, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Here, we tested the alternation of root summer dormancy and winter growth as a critical survival strategy for a long-lived monocotyledon (Restionaceae) adapted to harsh seasonal extremes of Mediterranean southwest Western Australia. Measurements of growth and the results of comparative studies of the physiology, water content, metabolites, osmotic adjustments, and proteomics of the dormant and growing perennial roots of Lyginia barbata (Restionaceae) were assessed in field-grown plants. Formation of dormant roots occurred before the onset of summer extremes. They resumed growth (average 2.3 mm d(-1)) the following winter to eventually reach depths of 2-4 m. Compared with winter-growing roots, summer dormant roots had decreased respiration and protein concentration and c. 70% water content, sustained by sand-sheaths, osmotic adjustment and presumably hydraulic redistribution. Concentrations of compatible solutes (e.g. sucrose and proline) were significantly greater during dormancy, presumably mitigating the effects of heat and drought. Fifteen root proteins showed differential abundance and were correlated with either winter growth or summer dormancy. None matched currently available libraries. The specific features of the root dormancy strategy of L. barbata revealed in this study are likely to be important to understanding similar behaviour in roots of many long-lived monocotyledons, including overwintering and oversummering crop species.

  17. Root growth of perennials in vertical growing media for use in green walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars; Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The vertical orientation of green walls causes a risk of uneven water distribution within the growing medium, and thereby stress on the plant roots. Therefore it was studied how the root and top growth of different species were affected by the water holding characteristics of the growing media...

  18. Growth and microtubule orientation of Zea mays roots subjected to osmotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work has shown that microtubule (MT) reorientation follows the onset of growth inhibition on the lower side of graviresponding roots, indicating that growth reduction can occur independently of MT reorientation. To test this observation further, we examined whether the reduction in growth in response to osmotic stress is correlated with MT reorientation. The distribution and rate of growth in maize roots exposed to 350 mOsm sorbitol and KCl or 5 mM Mes/Tris buffer were measured with a digitizer. After various times roots were processed for indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Application of sorbitol or KCl had no effect on the organization of MTs in the apical 2 mm of the root but resulted in striking and different effects in the basal region of the root. Sorbitol treatment caused rapid appearance of oval to circular holes in the microtubular array that persisted for at least 9 h. Between 30 min and 4 h of submersion in KCl, MTs in cortical cells 4 mm and farther from the quiescent center began to reorient oblique to the longitudinal axis. After 9 h, the alignment of MTs had shifted to parallel to the root axis but MTs of the epidermal cells remained transverse. In KCl-treated roots MT reorientation appeared to follow a pattern of development similar to that in controls but without elongation. Our data provide additional evidence that MT reorientation is not the cause but a consequence of growth inhibition.

  19. Phenotypic plasticity of fine root growth increases plant productivity in pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grissom James E

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plastic response of fine roots to a changing environment is suggested to affect the growth and form of a plant. Here we show that the plasticity of fine root growth may increase plant productivity based on an experiment using young seedlings (14-week old of loblolly pine. We use two contrasting pine ecotypes, "mesic" and "xeric", to investigate the adaptive significance of such a plastic response. Results The partitioning of biomass to fine roots is observed to reduce with increased nutrient availability. For the "mesic" ecotype, increased stem biomass as a consequence of more nutrients may be primarily due to reduced fine-root biomass partitioning. For the "xeric" ecotype, the favorable influence of the plasticity of fine root growth on stem growth results from increased allocation of biomass to foliage and decreased allocation to fine roots. An evolutionary genetic analysis indicates that the plasticity of fine root growth is inducible, whereas the plasticity of foliage is constitutive. Conclusions Results promise to enhance a fundamental understanding of evolutionary changes of tree architecture under domestication and to design sound silvicultural and breeding measures for improving plant productivity.

  20. Phytotoxic cyanamide affects maize (Zea mays) root growth and root tip function: from structure to gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Szajko, Katarzyna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Cyanamide (CA) is a phytotoxic compound produced by four Fabaceae species: hairy vetch, bird vetch, purple vetch and black locust. Its toxicity is due to complex activity that involves the modification of both cellular structures and physiological processes. To date, CA has been investigated mainly in dicot plants. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of CA in the restriction of the root growth of maize (Zea mays), representing the monocot species. CA (3mM) reduced the number of border cells in the root tips of maize seedlings and degraded their protoplasts. However, CA did not induce any significant changes in the organelle structure of other root cells, apart from increased vacuolization. CA toxicity was also demonstrated by its effect on cell cycle activity, endoreduplication intensity, and modifications of cyclins CycA2, CycD2, and histone HisH3 gene expression. In contrast, the arrangement of microtubules was not altered by CA. Treatment of maize seedlings with CA did not completely arrest mitotic activity, although the frequency of dividing cells was reduced. Furthermore, prolonged CA treatment increased the proportion of endopolyploid cells in the root tip. Cytological malformations were accompanied by an induction of oxidative stress in root cells, which manifested as enhanced accumulation of H2O2. Exposure of maize seedlings to CA resulted in an increased concentration of auxin and stimulated ethylene emission. Taken together, these findings suggested that the inhibition of root growth by CA may be a consequence of stress-induced morphogenic responses.

  1. Auxin, ethylene and the regulation of root growth under mechanical impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar; Santisree, Parankusam; Nongmaithem, Sapana; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju

    2012-07-01

    Among the multitude functions performed by plant roots, little information is available about the mechanisms that allow roots to overcome the soil resistance, in order to grow in the soil to obtain water and nutrient. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings grown on horizontally placed agar plates showed a progressive decline in the root length with the increasing impedance of agar media. The incubation with 1-methylcyclopropane (1-MCP), an inhibitor of ethylene perception, led to aerial growth of roots. In contrast, in absence of 1-MCP control roots grew horizontally anchored to the agar surface. Though 1-MCP-treated and control seedlings showed differential ability to penetrate in the agar, the inhibition of root elongation was nearly similar for both treatments. While increased mechanical impedance also progressively impaired hypocotyl elongation in 1-MCP treated seedlings, it did not affect the hypocotyl length of control seedlings. The decline in root elongation was also associated with increased expression of DR5::GUS activity in the root tip signifying accumulation of auxin at the root tip. The increased expression of DR5::GUS activity in the root tip was also observed in 1-MCP treated seedlings, indicating independence of this response from ethylene signaling. Our results indicate operation of a sensing mechanism in root that likely operates independently of ethylene but involves auxin to determine the degree of impedance of the substratum.

  2. Alterations in plant growth and in root hormone levels of lodgepole pines inoculated with rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, E; Tuzun, S; Chanway, C P; Enebak, S

    2001-09-01

    The presence of other soil microorganisms might influence the ability of rhizobacterial inoculants to promote plant growth either by reducing contact between the inoculant and the plant root or by interfering with the mechanism(s) involved in rhizobacterially mediated growth promotion. We conducted the following experiments to determine whether reductions in the extent of growth promotion of lodgepole pine mediated by Paenibacillus polymyxa occur in the presence of a forest soil isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens M20) and whether changes in plant growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa (i) are related to changes in P. polymyxa density in the rhizosphere or (ii) result from alterations in root hormone levels. The extent of plant growth, P. polymyxa rhizosphere density, and root hormone concentrations were determined for lodgepole pine treated with (i) a single growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain (P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2) or (ii) a combination of bacteria: strain L6 + strain M20 or strain Pw-2 + strain M20. There was no difference in the growth of pines inoculated with strain L6 and those inoculated with strain L6 + strain M20. However, seedlings inoculated with strain Pw-2 had more lateral roots and greater root mass at 12 weeks after inoculation than plants inoculated with strain Pw-2 + strain M20. The extent of growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa L6 and Pw-2 in each treatment was not correlated to the average population density of each strain in the rhizosphere. Bacterial species-specific effects were observed in root hormone levels: indole-3-acetic acid concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2, while dihydrozeatin riboside concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. fluorescens M20.

  3. Intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor induces gliogenesis in sensory ganglia, dorsal root, and within the dorsal root entry zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Pizzo, Donald P; Morrissette, Debbi A; Winkler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100β revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root.

  4. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Nerve Growth Factor Induces Gliogenesis in Sensory Ganglia, Dorsal Root, and within the Dorsal Root Entry Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes C. M. Schlachetzki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100β revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root.

  5. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  6. The Effects of Sound Stimulation on Allium cepa Root Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Han

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sound stimulation on mitosis, the extent of mitotic activity, and the characteristics of chromosomes and nuclei during mitosis in Allium cepa (onion) root tips were studied. Growing chambers were designed to allow one group of onion roots to grow with regular exposure to sound at a frequency of 5,000 Hz and an intensity of 75.9 dB. Another group of onions were grown without sound stimulation and served as the control group. It was shown that exposure to sound had adverse effect...

  7. Bioactive phytochemicals in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Idehen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that regular consumption of whole grain barley reduces the risk of developing chronic diseases. The presence of barley fiber, especially β-glucan in whole grain barley, has been largely credited for these health benefits. However, it is now widely believed that the actions of the fiber component alone do not explain the observed health benefits associated with the consumption of whole grain barley. Whole grain barley also contains phytochemicals including phenolic acids, flavonoids, lignans, tocols, phytosterols, and folate. These phytochemicals exhibit strong antioxidant, antiproliferative, and cholesterol lowering abilities, which are potentially useful in lowering the risk of certain diseases. Therefore, the high concentration of phytochemicals in barley may be largely responsible for its health benefits. This paper reviews available information regarding barley phytochemicals and their potential to combat common nutrition-related diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity.

  8. Root growth and plant biomass in Lolium perenne exploring a nutrient-rich patch in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ryoji; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2008-11-01

    We investigated soil exploration by roots and plant growth in a heterogeneous environment to determine whether roots can selectively explore a nutrient-rich patch, and how nutrient heterogeneity affects biomass allocation and total biomass before a patch is reached. Lolium perenne L. plants were grown in a factorial experiment with combinations of fertilization (heterogeneous and homogeneous) and day of harvest (14, 28, 42, or 56 days after transplanting). The plant in the heterogeneous treatment was smaller in its mean total biomass, and allocated more biomass to roots. The distributions of root length and root biomass in the heterogeneous treatment did not favor the nutrient-rich patch, and did not correspond to the patchy distribution of inorganic nitrogen. Specific root length (length/biomass) was higher and root elongation was more extensive both laterally and vertically in the heterogeneous treatment. These characteristics may enable plants to acquire nutrients efficiently and increase the probability of encountering nutrient-rich patches in a heterogeneous soil. However, heterogeneity of soil nutrients would hold back plant growth before a patch was reached. Therefore, although no significant selective root placement in the nutrient-rich patch was observed, plant growth before reaching nutrient-rich patches differed between heterogeneous and homogeneous environments.

  9. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Nerve Growth Factor Induces Gliogenesis in Sensory Ganglia, Dorsal Root, and within the Dorsal Root Entry Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C.M.; Pizzo, Donald P.; Debbi A. Morrissette; Jürgen Winkler

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia...

  10. Effect of Irrigation Timing on Root Zone Soil Temperature, Root Growth and Grain Yield and Chemical Composition in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High air temperatures during the crop growing season can reduce harvestable yields in major agronomic crops worldwide. Repeated and prolonged high night air temperature stress may compromise plant growth and yield. Crop varieties with improved heat tolerance traits as well as crop management strategies at the farm scale are thus needed for climate change mitigation. Crop yield is especially sensitive to night-time warming trends. Current studies are mostly directed to the elevated night-time air temperature and its impact on crop growth and yield, but less attention is given to the understanding of night-time soil temperature management. Delivering irrigation water through drip early evening may reduce soil temperature and thus improve plant growth. In addition, corn growers typically use high-stature varieties that inevitably incur excessive respiratory carbon loss from roots and transpiration water loss under high night temperature conditions. The main objective of this study was to see if root-zone soil temperature can be reduced through drip irrigation applied at night-time, vs. daytime, using three corn hybrids of different above-ground architecture in Uvalde, TX where day and night temperatures during corn growing season are above U.S. averages. The experiment was conducted in 2014. Our results suggested that delivering well-water at night-time through drip irrigation reduced root-zone soil temperature by 0.6 °C, increase root length five folds, plant height 2%, and marginally increased grain yield by 10%. However, irrigation timing did not significantly affect leaf chlorophyll level and kernel crude protein, phosphorous, fat and starch concentrations. Different from our hypothesis, the shorter, more compact corn hybrid did not exhibit a higher yield and growth as compared with taller hybrids. As adjusting irrigation timing would not incur an extra cost for farmers, the finding reported here had immediate practical implications for farm

  11. Fe-Chlorophyllin Promotes the Growth of Wheat Roots Associated with Nitric Oxide Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Jiang; Yong Ren; Liefeng Zhang; Yifan Wang; Min Tong

    2010-01-01

    : Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from...

  12. Comparative effects of auxin and abscisic acid on growth, hydrogen ion efflux and gravitropism in primary roots of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. L.; Mulkey, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to test the idea that auxin action on root growth may be mediated by H(+) movement, the correlation of auxin action on growth and H(+) movement in roots was examined along with changes in H(+) efflux patterns associated with the asymmetric growth which occurs during gravitropism. The effects of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (AbA) on growth, H(+) secretion, and gravitropism in roots were compared. Results show a close correlation existent between H(+) efflux and growth in maize roots. In intact roots there is strong H(+) efflux from the elongation zone. Growth-promoting concentrations of IAA stimulate H(+) efflux. During gravitropism the H(+) efflux from the elongation zone becomes asymmetric; the evidence indicates that auxin redistribution contributes to the development of acid efflux asymmetry. That AbA stimulates root growth is reflected in its ability to stimulate H(+) efflux from apical root segments.

  13. Methylobacterium Species Promoting Rice and Barley Growth and Interaction Specificity Revealed with Whole-Cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Akio; Sahin, Nurettin; Fujitani, Yoshiko; Kato, Akiko; Sato, Kazuhiro; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Methylobacterium species frequently inhabit plant surfaces and are able to utilize the methanol emitted from plants as carbon and energy sources. As some of the Methylobacterium species are known to promote plant growth, significant attention has been paid to the mechanism of growth promotion and the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. By screening our Methylobacterium isolate collection for the high growth promotion effect in vitro, we selected some candidates for field and pot growth tests for rice and barley, respectively. We found that inoculation resulted in better ripening of rice seeds, and increased the size of barley grains but not the total yield. In addition, using whole-cell matrix-assister laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis, we identified and classified Methylobacterium isolates from Methylobacterium-inoculated rice plants. The inoculated species could not be recovered from the rice plants, and in some cases, the Methylobacterium community structure was affected by the inoculation, but not with predomination of the inoculated species. The isolates from non-inoculated barley of various cultivars grown in the same field fell into just two species. These results suggest that there is a strong selection pressure at the species level of Methylobacterium residing on a given plant species, and that selection of appropriate species that can persist on the plant is important to achieve growth promotion.

  14. Methylobacterium Species Promoting Rice and Barley Growth and Interaction Specificity Revealed with Whole-Cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Tani

    Full Text Available Methylobacterium species frequently inhabit plant surfaces and are able to utilize the methanol emitted from plants as carbon and energy sources. As some of the Methylobacterium species are known to promote plant growth, significant attention has been paid to the mechanism of growth promotion and the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. By screening our Methylobacterium isolate collection for the high growth promotion effect in vitro, we selected some candidates for field and pot growth tests for rice and barley, respectively. We found that inoculation resulted in better ripening of rice seeds, and increased the size of barley grains but not the total yield. In addition, using whole-cell matrix-assister laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS analysis, we identified and classified Methylobacterium isolates from Methylobacterium-inoculated rice plants. The inoculated species could not be recovered from the rice plants, and in some cases, the Methylobacterium community structure was affected by the inoculation, but not with predomination of the inoculated species. The isolates from non-inoculated barley of various cultivars grown in the same field fell into just two species. These results suggest that there is a strong selection pressure at the species level of Methylobacterium residing on a given plant species, and that selection of appropriate species that can persist on the plant is important to achieve growth promotion.

  15. Low Root Zone Temperature Limits Nutrient Effects on Cucumber Seedling Growth and Induces Adversity Physiological Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Qiu-yan; DUAN Zeng-qiang; MAO Jing-dong; LI Xun; DONG Fei

    2013-01-01

    Effects of root-zone temperatures (RZT) (12°C-RZT and 20°C-RZT) and different N, P, and K nutrient regimes on the growth, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant enzyme in cucumber seedlings were investigated in hydroponics. Strong interactions were observed between RZT and nutrient on the dry weight (P=0.001), root length (P=0.001) and leaf area (P=0.05). Plant dry weights were suppressed at low RZT of 12°C, while higher biomass and growth of cucumber seedlings were produced at elevated RZT of 20°C under each nutrient treatment. Growth indexes (plant height, internode length, root length, and leaf area) at 12°C-RZT had less difference among nutrient treatments, but greater response was obtained for different nutrients at high RZT. RZT had larger effects (P=0.001) on cucumber seedling growth than nutrients. In addition, N was more effective nutrients to plant growth than P and K under low root temperature to plant growth. Higher hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar (SS) contents in leaves were observed at 12°C-RZT in all nutrient treatments than those at 20°C-RZT, indicating the chilling adversity damaged to plant growth. In general, antioxidant enzyme had larger response under low root-zone temperature. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were higher in both leaves and roots while peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) showed large different action in leaves and roots at both the two root-zone temperature.

  16. Growth of plant root cultures in liquid- and gas-dispersed reactor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, S A; Gehrig, J A; Hollar, K A; Curtis, W R

    1993-01-01

    The growth of Agrobacterium transformed "hairy root" cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus was examined in various liquid- and gas-dispersed bioreactor configurations. Reactor runs were replicated to provide statistical comparisons of nutrient availability on culture performance. Accumulated tissue mass in submerged air-sparged reactors was 31% of gyratory shake-flask controls. Experiments demonstrate that poor performance of sparged reactors is not due to bubble shear damage, carbon dioxide stripping, settling, or flotation of roots. Impaired oxygen transfer due to channeling and stagnation of the liquid phase are the apparent causes of poor growth. Roots grown on a medium-perfused inclined plane grew at 48% of gyratory controls. This demonstrates the ability of cultures to partially compensate for poor liquid distribution through vascular transport of nutrients. A reactor configuration in which the medium is sprayed over the roots and permitted to drain down through the root tissue was able to provide growth rates which are statistically indistinguishable (95% T-test) from gyratory shake-flask controls. In this type of spray/trickle-bed configuration, it is shown that distribution of the roots becomes a key factor in controlling the rate of growth. Implications of these results regarding design and scale-up of bioreactors to produce fine chemicals from root cultures are discussed.

  17. Artificial Plant Root System Growth for Distributed Optimization: Models and Emergent Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant root foraging exhibits complex behaviors analogous to those of animals, including the adaptability to continuous changes in soil environments. In this work, we adapt the optimality principles in the study of plant root foraging behavior to create one possible bio-inspired optimization framework for solving complex engineering problems. This provides us with novel models of plant root foraging behavior and with new methods for global optimization. This framework is instantiated as a new search paradigm, which combines the root tip growth, branching, random walk, and death. We perform a comprehensive simulation to demonstrate that the proposed model accurately reflects the characteristics of natural plant root systems. In order to be able to climb the noise-filled gradients of nutrients in soil, the foraging behaviors of root systems are social and cooperative, and analogous to animal foraging behaviors.

  18. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome.

  19. [Effect of NO3- supply on lateral root growth in maize plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Fen; Mi, Guo-Hua; Chen, Fan-Jun; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2005-02-01

    Growth of lateral roots is regulated by both environmental factors and nitrate (NO(-)(3)) content of the plant. The mechanism involved is not clearly understood. Two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines (478 and Wu312) were used to study the effect of different nitrate supply on lateral root (LR) growth by a whole plants agar culture. The results showed that increasing NO(-)(3)concentration in nutrient solution from 0.01 to 1.0 mmol/L significantly increased the LR length and root biomass. Lateral root density changed little with NO(-)(3) increase up to 5x10(-3) mol/L (for Wu312) - 10x10(-3) mol/L (for 478), then decreased significantly with increasing NO(-)(3). The inhibitory effect of high NO(-)(3) on root growth was weaker in 478 than in Wu312. The growth of lateral roots in Wu312 was completely inhibited by NO(-)(3) at a concentration of 10x10(-3) mol/L, whereas LR density of 478 could reach 30% (axial) and 50% (radicle) of its maximum even at NO(-)(3) 20x10(-3) mol/L. Both the shoot total N and shoot nitrate content increased with increasing NO(-)(3) level. They had similar mathematic functions with shoot/root ratio (Exponential Decay), LR density (Gaussian) and LR length (Parabola). When shoot N content exceed about 1.6 mol/kg and NO(-)(3) content exceed 0.22 mol/kg, shoot/root ratio increased rapidly; when the shoot N content exceed about 1.5 and NO(-)(3) exceed 0.16 mol/kg, LR densities began to decrease; when shoot N content reached about 1 mol/kg and NO(-)(3) content reached 0.10 mol/kg, the LR lengths began to decrease. The possible relationship between shoot NO(-)(3) content and lateral root growth was discussed.

  20. Effect of bacterial polysaccharides on the growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasík, J; Stanĕk, M; Vancura, V; Wurst, M

    1979-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. and related species which in the soil and in the rhizosphere of wheat accompany the fungus Gaemannomyces graminis var. tritici and cause take-all of the wheat roots produced polysaccharides in pure cultures (glucans, mannoglucans and galactomannoglucans). These polysaccharides were utilized better by the mycelium of G. graminis than glucose and polysaccharides of plant origin that occurred on the surface of wheat roots (the so-called mucigel). At lower concentrations these bacterial polysaccharides stimulated growth of wheat roots, higher concentrations (more than 0.1%) were inhibitory. Bacteria inoculated on the surface of wheat first inhibited and then stimulated the development of the plants and their growth. Changes in the growth rate of wheat, the rhizosphere of which was colonized by bacteria simultaneously with the fungus G. graminis and also some changes in the course of the disease of wheat roots caused by the fungus can be explained by the inhibitory or stimulatory effect of polysaccharides of accompanying bacteria.

  1. Impact of different culture media on hairy roots growth of Valeriana officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali PAKDIN PARIZI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transformed hairy root cultures of Valeriana officinalis were established by infection with Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834. To determine the effect of different media on the growth of V. officinalis hairy roots, MS, B5 media (1.0X and 0.5X strength, N6 medium and a modified MS medium without phytohormones were used. In addition, different NH4+ to NO3- ratios in MS medium were studied. The effects of these treatments were evaluated after 21 days of culture in relation to hairy root growth. B5 and ½ B5 media were the best basal media for hairy root growth. MS medium supplemented with a 20:20 ratio (mM of NH4+ to NO3- displayed highest growth rates and biomass yield in hairy root cultures. The present study demonstrated that the composition of culture medium and the ratio of different nitrogen sources have significant impact on the growth of V. officinalis hairy roots.

  2. A Novel Rice Gene, NRR Responds to Macronutrient Deficiency and Regulates Root Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Man Zhang; Xiao-Ying Chen; Yong-Sheng Yan; Li-Na Wang; Kun Yang; Na Xiao; Yun-Feng Liu; Ya-Ping Fu; Zong-Xiu Sun; Rong-Xiang Fang

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the response of rice to nutrient stress,we have taken a systematic approach to identify rice genes that respond to deficiency of macronutrients and affect rice growth.We report here the expression and biological functions of a previously uncharacterized rice gene that we have named NRR (nutrition response and root growth).NRR is alternatively spliced,producing two 5′-coterminal transcripts,NRRa and NRRb,encoding two proteins of 308 and 223 aa,respectively.Compared to NRRb,NRRa possesses an additional CCT domain at the C-terminus.Expression of NRR in rice seedling roots was significantly influenced by deficiency of macronutrients.Knock-down of expression of NRRa or NRRb by RNA interference resulted in enhanced rice root growth.By contrast,overexpression of NRRa in rice exhibited significantly retarded root growth.These results revealed that both NRRa and NRRb played negative regulatory roles in rice root growth.Our findings suggest that NRRa and NRRb,acting as the key components,modulate the rice root architecture with the availability of macronutrients.

  3. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced dental pulp stem cell migration. The root segment model in present study simulated clinical scenario and indicated that the current irrigation protocol released a significant amount of TGF-β1 but not bFGF. The growth factors released into root canal space induced dental pulp stem cell migration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aphid effects on rhizosphere microorganisms and microfauna depend more on barley growth phase than on soil fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette Vestergård; Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Christensen, Søren

    2004-01-01

    . Contrary to this, 1 week after spike emergence numbers of bacteria, fungal feeding nematodes and Protozoa were higher in rhizospheres of plants subjected to aphids probably because aphids enhanced root mortality and root decomposition. Protozoa and bacterial feeding nematodes were stimulated at different...... experimental conditions with nematodes being the dominant bacterial grazers at N fertilization and Protozoa in the NP treatment before spike emergence....

  5. Protein palmitoylation is critical for the polar growth of root hairs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ling; Li, En; Feng, Qiang-Nan; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Ge, Fu-Rong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha

    2015-02-13

    Protein palmitoylation, which is critical for membrane association and subcellular targeting of many signaling proteins, is catalyzed mainly by protein S-acyl transferases (PATs). Only a few plant proteins have been experimentally verified to be subject to palmitoylation, such as ROP GTPases, calcineurin B like proteins (CBLs), and subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. However, emerging evidence from palmitoyl proteomics hinted that protein palmitoylation as a post-translational modification might be widespread. Nonetheless, due to the large number of genes encoding PATs and the lack of consensus motifs for palmitoylation, progress on the roles of protein palmitoylation in plants has been slow. We combined pharmacological and genetic approaches to examine the role of protein palmitoylation in root hair growth. Multiple PATs from different endomembrane compartments may participate in root hair growth, among which the Golgi-localized PAT24/TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) plays a major role while the tonoplast-localized PAT10 plays a secondary role in root hair growth. A specific inhibitor for protein palmitoylation, 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), compromised root hair elongation and polarity. Using various probes specific for cellular processes, we demonstrated that 2-BP impaired the dynamic polymerization of actin microfilaments (MF), the asymmetric plasma membrane (PM) localization of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2), the dynamic distribution of RabA4b-positive post-Golgi secretion, and endocytic trafficking in root hairs. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches and using root hairs as a model, we show that protein palmitoylation, regulated by protein S-acyl transferases at different endomembrane compartments such as the Golgi and the vacuole, is critical for the polar growth of root hairs in Arabidopsis. Inhibition of protein palmitoylation by 2-BP disturbed key intracellular activities in root hairs. Although some of these effects are likely

  6. Mechanoreceptors rather than sedimentable amyloplasts perceive the gravity signal in hypergravity-induced inhibition of root growth in azuki bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2005-01-01

    Elongation of primary roots of azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) was suppressed under hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation, such that the growth rate decreased in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of the gravity. The removal of the root cap did not influence the hypergravity-induced inhibition of root growth, although it completely inhibited the gravitropic root curvature. Lanthanum and gadolinium, blockers of mechanoreceptors, nullified the growth-inhibitory effect of hypergravity. These results suggest that the gravity signal for the hypergravity-induced inhibition of root growth is perceived independently from that of gravitropism, which involves amyloplasts as statoliths. Horizontal and basipetal hypergravity suppressed root growth as did acropetal hypergravity, all of which were nullified by the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. These findings suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane perceive the gravity signal independently of the direction of the stimuli and roots may utilise it to regulate their growth rate.

  7. Elevated CO[sub 2] alters deployment of roots in small growth containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berntson, G.M.; McConnaughay, K.D.M.; Bazzaz, F.A. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology)

    1993-07-01

    Previously the authors examined how limited rooting space and nutrient supply influenced plant growth under elevated atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations. To gain insight into how elevated CO[sub 2] atmospheres affect how plants utilize available belowground space, when rooting space and nutrient supply are limited, they measured the deployment of roots within pots through time. Contrary to aboveground responses, patterns of belowground deployment were most strongly influenced by elevated CO[sub 2] in pots of different volume and shape. Further, elevated CO[sub 2] conditions interacted differently with limited belowground space for the two species studied, Abutilon theophrasti, a C[sub 3] dicot with a deep taproot, and Setaria faberii, a C4 monocot with a shallow fibrous root system. For Setaria, elevated CO[sub 2] increased the size of the largest region of low root density at the pot surface in larger rooting volumes independent of nutrient content, thereby decreasing their efficiency of deployment. For Abutilon, plants responded to elevated CO[sub 2] concentrations by equalizing the pattern of deployment in all the pots. Nutrient concentration, and not pot size or shape, greatly influenced the density of root growth. Root densities for Abutilon and Setaria were similar to those observed in field conditions, for annual dicots and monocots respectively, suggesting that studies using pots may successfully mimic natural conditions.

  8. Root growth of tomato seedlings intensified by humic substances from peat bogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Christofaro Silva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Peats are an important reserve of humified carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. The interest in the use of humic substances as plant growth promoters is continuously increasing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity of alkaline soluble humic substances (HS, humic (HA and fulvic acids (FA isolated from peats with different decomposition stages of organic matter (sapric, fibric and hemic in the Serra do Espinhaço Meridional, state of Minas Gerais. Dose-response curves were established for the number of lateral roots growing from the main plant axis of tomato seedlings. The bioactivity of HA was greatest (highest response in lateral roots at lowest concentration while FA did not intensify root growth. Both HS and HA stimulated root hair formation. At low concentrations, HS and HA induced root hair formation near the root cap, a typical hormonal imbalance effect in plants. Transgenic tomato with reporter gene DR5::GUS allowed the observation that the auxin-related signalling pathway was involved in root growth promotion by HA.

  9. Determination of zinc oxide nanoparticles toxicity in root growth in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Meppaloor G; Chung, Ill Min

    2016-09-01

    The effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) was studied in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings under in vitro exposure conditions. To avoid precipitation of nanoparticles, the seedlings were grown in half strength semisolid Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. Analysis of zinc (Zn) content showed significant increase in roots. In vivo detection using fluorescent probe Zynpyr-1 indicated accumulation of Zn in primary and lateral root tips. All concentrations of ZnONPs significantly reduced root growth. However, significant decrease in shoot growth was observed only after exposure to 400 and 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. The reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation levels significantly increased in roots. Significant increase in cell-wall bound peroxidase activity was observed after exposure to 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. Histochemical staining with phloroglucinol-HCl showed lignification of root cells upon exposure to 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. Treatment with propidium iodide indicated loss of cell viability in root tips of wheat seedlings. These results suggest that redox imbalances, lignification and cell death has resulted in reduction of root growth in wheat seedlings exposed to ZnONPs nanoparticles.

  10. EFFECTS OF GROWTH REGULATORS ON ROOTING CUTTINGS OF SYRINGA (PHILADELPHUS L.,PHILADELPHACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grekova I. V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased range of Syringa in landscaping is a topical issue. They are very decorative shrubs, more and more widely used in landscape design. Study of vegetative propagation of plants, with the use of growth regulators, was conducted to identify the most perspective stimulator and to reduce the terms of the finished product. Syringa refers to bad rooting cultures. However, the methods of green propagation of cuttings with the use of growth stimulators not only propagate a culture, but also increase the yield of landing products. The article considers the technology propagation by cuttings of this promising shrub. It also shows the effect of growth stimulators: radifarma and HB-101, used for soaking of cuttings. According to the research, we have found an apparent benefits effect of the processing of cuttings with the stimulators on growth and development of root system. The analysis of the tables of rooting rate of cuttings shows the positive development of cuttings in the processing of the growth regulators. We have obtained the experimental data allowing to define which varieties distinguished by the greatest rooting and duration rooting among all the studied cultivars. Thus, the studies show that the use of growth stimulators with propagation of Syringa cuttings is an effective way of reproduction

  11. CARRY-OVER EFFECTS OF OZONE ON ROOT GROWTH AND CARBOHYDRATE CONCENTRATIONS OF PONDEROSA PINE SEEDLINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone exposure decreases belowground carbon allocation and root growth of plants;however,the extent to which these effects persist and the cumulative impact of ozone stress on plant growth are poorly understood.To evaluate the potential for plant compensation,we followed the prog...

  12. Growth response of cottonwood roots to varied NH4:NO3 ratios in enriched patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter T.M. Woolfolk; Alexander L. Friend

    2003-01-01

    Maximization of short-rotation forest plantation yields requires frequent applications of nutriends, especially nitrogen(N). Whole-plant growth is known to be sensitive to teh proportion of ammonium to nitrate (NH4:NO3). However, the extent to which N form affects root growth, branching and morphology is poorly understood...

  13. The Effect of Chitosan and Sodium Alginate on the Root Growth and Enzyme Activity of Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The resaerch examined the effect of the two oceanic materials as coating materials on the soybean growth. The results showed chitosan and sodium alginate seed coating can enhance the growth of seedling root,increase the nodule mumber,root activity and the growth of underground. The suggested coating ratios were 0. 5~ 1.0g/kgseed,the same as chitosan. The two materials could increase the contents of CAT and NR in soybean leaves ,decrease the contents of POD in soybean leaves.

  14. Trichoderma-Induced Acidification Is an Early Trigger for Changes in Arabidopsis Root Growth and Determines Fungal Phytostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Esparza-Reynoso, Saraí; Garnica-Vergara, Amira; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are common rhizosphere inhabitants widely used as biological control agents and their role as plant growth promoting fungi has been established. Although soil pH influences several fungal and plant functional traits such as growth and nutrition, little is known about its influence in rhizospheric or mutualistic interactions. The role of pH in the Trichoderma–Arabidopsis interaction was studied by determining primary root growth and lateral root formation, root meristem status and cell viability, quiescent center (QC) integrity, and auxin inducible gene expression. Primary root growth phenotypes in wild type seedlings and STOP1 mutants allowed identification of a putative root pH sensing pathway likely operating in plant–fungus recognition. Acidification by Trichoderma induced auxin redistribution within Arabidopsis columella root cap cells, causing root tip bending and growth inhibition. Root growth stoppage correlated with decreased cell division and with the loss of QC integrity and cell viability, which were reversed by buffering the medium. In addition, stop1, an Arabidopsis mutant sensitive to low pH, was oversensitive to T. atroviride primary root growth repression, providing genetic evidence that a pH root sensing mechanism reprograms root architecture during the interaction. Our results indicate that root sensing of pH mediates the interaction of Trichoderma with plants. PMID:28567051

  15. [Responses of wheat seedlings root growth and leaf photosynthesis to drought stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fu-Ju; Li, Dan-Dan; Cai, Jian; Jiang, Dong; Cao, Wei-Xing; Dai, Ting-Bo

    2012-03-01

    Taking drought-sensitive wheat cultivar Wangshuibai and drought-tolerance cultivar Luohan 7 as test materials, a hydroponic experiment was conducted to study the effects of drought stress on root system morphology, physiological characteristics and leaf photosynthesis of wheat seedlings, aimed to elucidate the adaptation mechanisms to drought stress. Under drought stress, the root vitality of the cultivars increased markedly, but the root number and root surface area decreased. Drought stress decreased relative water content and increased the ratio of bound water to free water in leaves of Wangshuibai, but had less effects on Luohan 7. Drought stress decreased, the leaf chlorophyll content, Pn g(s), Ci, and transpiration rate of the two cultivars, but had no significant effects on leaf chlorophyll content and Pn of Luohan 7. Drought stress decreased the leaf area of the two cultivars and the root biomass, shoot biomass, and plant biomass of Wangshuibai, but had no significant effects on Luohan 7. The results indicated that under drought stress, drought-tolerant wheat cultivar was able to compensate decreased root absorption area and retain higher root water uptake capability via enhancing root vitality and maintaining higher root biomass, and further, to keep higher leaf photosynthetic area and Pn to mitigate the inhibition of drought on wheat seedlings growth.

  16. Effects of Soil Water Content on Cotton Root Growth and Distribution Under Mulched Drip Irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-tang; CHEN Hu; WANG Jing; MENG Xiao-bin; CHEN Fu-hong

    2009-01-01

    The relation between soil water content and the growth of cotton root was studied for the scheme of field water and cotton yield under mulched drip irrigation.Based on the field experiments,three treatments of soil water content were conducted with 90%θf,75%θf,and 60%θf (θf is field water capacity).Cotton roots and root-shoot ratio were studied with digging method,and the soil moisture was observed with TDR (time domain reflector),and cotton yield was measured.The results indicated that the growth of cotton root accorded with Logistic growth curve in the three treatments,the cotton root grew quickly and its weight was very high under 75%θf because of the suitable soil water condition,while grew slowly and its weight was lower under 90%θf due to water moisture beyond the suitable condition,and the root weight was in between under 60%θf.For the three water treatments,the cotton root weight decreased with soil depth,and decreased more significantly in deeper soil layer with the soil moisture increasing.And the ratio of cotton root weight in 0-30 cm soil layer to the total root weight was the highest under 75%θf.The cotton root system was distributed mainly in the soil of narrow row and wide row mulched with plastic film,and little in the soil outside plastic film.The weight of cotton root was the highest in the soil of narrow row or wide row mulched with plastic film under 75%θf.Root-shoot ratio decreased with the soil moisture increasing.The soil water content affected cotton yields,and cotton yield was the highest under 75%θf.The higher soil moisture level is unfavorable to the growth of cotton root system and yield of cotton under mulched drip irrigation.

  17. Plant responses to heterogeneous salinity: growth of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia is determined by the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2012-11-01

    Soil salinity is generally spatially heterogeneous, but our understanding of halophyte physiology under such conditions is limited. The growth and physiology of the dicotyledonous halophyte Atriplex nummularia was evaluated in split-root experiments to test whether growth is determined by: (i) the lowest; (ii) the highest; or (iii) the mean salinity of the root zone. In two experiments, plants were grown with uniform salinities or horizontally heterogeneous salinities (10-450 mM NaCl in the low-salt side and 670 mM in the high-salt side, or 10 mM NaCl in the low-salt side and 500-1500 mM in the high-salt side). The combined data showed that growth and gas exchange parameters responded most closely to the root-weighted mean salinity rather than to the lowest, mean, or highest salinity in the root zone. In contrast, midday shoot water potentials were determined by the lowest salinity in the root zone, consistent with most water being taken from the least negative water potential source. With uniform salinity, maximum shoot growth was at 120-230 mM NaCl; ~90% of maximum growth occurred at 10 mM and 450 mM NaCl. Exposure of part of the roots to 1500 mM NaCl resulted in an enhanced (+40%) root growth on the low-salt side, which lowered root-weighted mean salinity and enabled the maintenance of shoot growth. Atriplex nummularia grew even with extreme salinity in part of the roots, as long as the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone was within the 10-450 mM range.

  18. In Vitro Growth and Rooting of Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. on Medium with Different Concentrations of Plant Growth Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAUZIYAH HARAHAP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of mangosteen is challenging for many reasons, including limited seed set, slow rate of seedling growth, and difficulty with root formations. The objective of this research was to find the best combination of medium and plant growth regulator for in vitro growth and rooting of mangosteeen seed. Various types of explant (a whole seed; seed divided into 2, 3, and 4 cross sections; seed divided into 2, 3, and 4 longitudinal sections were treated with five concentrations of benzyl amino purine (BAP; 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 mg/L for shoot induction in ½ Nitrogen (N Murashige and Skoog (MS medium. The shoots were rooted on MS and woody plant medium (WPM media with several combinations of indole butyric acid (IBA and naphtalene acetic acid (NAA. Treatments for root induction were applied as follows: (i low dose, given during induction of rooting, (ii soaking the base of the shoots in medium treated with a high dose of auxin for 5 days, and then growing the shoots in MS ½ N with 1 mg/L NAA + 1 mg/L BAP medium. Our result show that BAP positively affected mangosteen bud growth. The best medium for mangosteen shoot regeneration was found to be MS ½ N + 5 mg/L BAP. This medium induced the highest number of shoots from the seed explant cut into four cross sections. We found the best medium to induce in vitro rooting of mangosteen shoot was MS ½ N + 3 mg/L indole butiric acid (IBA + 4 mg/L NAA medium. Some treatment negatively affected growth. Soaking the mangosteen shoot base in a medium with an overly high dose of auxin seemed to disrupt and inhibit growth of the mangosteen shoot.

  19. Root secretion stimulating ash growth in larch-ash mixed forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴俊民; 刘广平; 王晓水; 吴保国

    2000-01-01

    Allelopathic effect of larch (Larix gmelini ) on the ash growth (Fraximus mandshurica) was studied in artificial cultivation tests. The results revealed that the larch root secretion obviously stimulated the ash growth. In order to determine the main stimulation allelochemicals, the chemical composition was analyzed. By contrasting the contents of carbohydrate and aminoacid in root secretion of larch and ash, it was concluded that the carbohydrate and aminoacid were not important stimulation allelochemicals. The organic acid and other components in root secretion of larch and ash were analyzed by GC and GC-MS analysis. The sand culture tests were carried out with selected model compounds. The results showed that benzeneacetic acid, benzenepropionic acid and phenolic acids in root secretion of larch were the main stimulation allelochemicals.

  20. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Barrada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth.

  1. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  2. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-08-19

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth.

  3. Influence of Microgravity Environment on Root Growth, Soluble Sugars, and Starch Concentration of Sweetpotato Stem Cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, Desmond G.; Bonsi, Conrad K.; Hill, Walter A.; Morris, Carlton E.; Williams, Carol S.; Davis, Ceyla F.; Williams, John W.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Petersen, Barbara V.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2009-01-01

    Because sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] stem cuttings regenerate very easily and quickly, a study of their early growth and development in microgravity could be useful to an understanding of morphological changes that might occur under such conditions for crops that are propagated vegetatively. An experiment was conducted aboard a U.S. Space Shuttle to investigate the impact of microgravity on root growth, distribution of amyloplasts in the root cells, and on the concentration of soluble sugars and starch in the stems of sweetpotatoes. Twelve stem cuttings of ‘Whatley/Loretan’ sweetpotato (5 cm long) with three to four nodes were grown in each of two plant growth units filled with a nutrient agarose medium impregnated with a half-strength Hoagland solution. One plant growth unit was flown on Space Shuttle Colombia for 5 days, whereas the other remained on the ground as a control. The cuttings were received within 2 h postflight and, along with ground controls, processed in ≈45 min. Adventitious roots were counted, measured, and fixed for electron microscopy and stems frozen for starch and sugar assays. Air samples were collected from the headspace of each plant growth unit for postflight determination of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and ethylene levels. All stem cuttings produced adventitious roots and growth was quite vigorous in both ground-based and flight samples and, except for a slight browning of some root tips in the flight samples, all stem cuttings appeared normal. The roots on the flight cuttings tended to grow in random directions. Also, stem cuttings grown in microgravity had more roots and greater total root length than ground-based controls. Amyloplasts in root cap cells of ground-based controls were evenly sedimented toward one end compared with a more random distribution in the flight samples. The concentration of soluble sugars, glucose, fructose, and sucrose and total starch concentration were all substantially greater in the stems of

  4. The effects of cotton root exudates on the growth and development of Verticillium dahliae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxiang WU; Weiping FANG; Shuijin ZHU; Kuiying JIN; Daofan JI

    2008-01-01

    The effects of upland cotton root exudates on the growth and development of Verticillium dahliae were studied, through the compared analysis of the root exudates components between the resistant and suscept-ive cotton materials, using a pair of resistant and sus-ceptive isogenic lines to Verticillium wilt, Z5629 and Z421, as well as 4 other upland cotton cultivars with different resistant levels of Verticillium wilt. The results showed that the amino acids in the root exudates of the resistant cultivars were much less than that of the sus-ceptible ones. Compared with the susceptible ones, there were a lack of aspartic acid, threonine, glutamic acid, alanine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, lysine and proline in the root exudates from the resistant cul-tivars. On the contrary, arginine was lacking in the sus-ceptive cultivars. The saccharide types in the root exudates were no different between the two kinds of cultivars, but the contents of glucose, fructose and suc-rose in the root exudates of the susceptible varieties were much higher than those in the resistant ones. The experiment of Verticillium dahliae culture showed that the cotton root exudates from resistant cultivars can effectively restrain the spore germination and mycelium growth of Verticillium dahliae, and the argi-nine was the leading amino acid in this inhibitory action, besides the nutrition of the root exudates. However, the cotton root exudates from the susceptive cotton cultivars can improve the growth and develop-ment of Verticillium dahliae effectively; among the amino acid in the exudates, alanine was the most active one in this stimulating function.

  5. Ethylene regulates root growth through effects on auxin biosynthesis and transport-dependent auxin distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In plants, each developmental process integrates a network of signaling events that are regulated by different phytohormones, and interactions among hormonal pathways are essential to modulate their effect. Continuous growth of roots results from the postembryonic activity of cells within the root meristem that is controlled by the coordinated action of several phytohormones, including auxin and ethylene. Although their interaction has been studied intensively, the molecular and cellular mech...

  6. Flooding Tolerance of Sugarcane in Relation to Growth, Physiology and Root Structure

    OpenAIRE

    HIDAKA, Tetsushi; KARIM, Md. Abdul

    2007-01-01

    Different abiotic stresses, such as typhoon, excess water from the torrential rains, flooding during summer in the low lying areas and drought hinder sugarcane productivity. This study was initiated to analyze flooding induced changes in growth, physiology and root structure of sugarcane. A Japanese sugarcane variety, NiF8, was grown in pots inside a glasshouse under natural light and flooded for one month. Flooding increased root, leaf, stalk and total dry weight. Three different kinds of ro...

  7. Phytoglobins Improve Hypoxic Root Growth by Alleviating Apical Meristem Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Mohamed M; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxic root growth in maize (Zea mays) is influenced by the expression of phytoglobins (ZmPgbs). Relative to the wild type, suppression of ZmPgb1.1 or ZmPgb1.2 inhibits the growth of roots exposed to 4% oxygen, causing structural abnormalities in the root apical meristems. These effects were accompanied by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), possibly through the transcriptional induction of four Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs TUNEL-positive nuclei in meristematic cells indicated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) in the process. These cells also accumulated nitric oxide and stained heavily for ethylene biosynthetic transcripts. A sharp increase in the expression level of several 1-aminocyclopropane synthase (ZmAcs2, ZmAcs6, and ZmAcs7), 1-aminocyclopropane oxidase (Aco15, Aco20, Aco31, and Aco35), and ethylene-responsive (ZmErf2 and ZmEbf1) genes was observed in hypoxic ZmPgb-suppressing roots, which overproduced ethylene. Inhibiting ROS synthesis with diphenyleneiodonium or ethylene perception with 1-methylcyclopropene suppressed PCD, increased BAX inhibitor-1, an effective attenuator of the death programs in eukaryotes, and restored root growth. Hypoxic roots overexpressing ZmPgbs had the lowest level of ethylene and showed a reduction in ROS staining and TUNEL-positive nuclei in the meristematic cells. These roots retained functional meristems and exhibited the highest growth performance when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of Pgbs in protecting root apical meristems from hypoxia-induced PCD through mechanisms initiated by nitric oxide and mediated by ethylene via ROS. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Enhanced lignin monomer production caused by cinnamic Acid and its hydroxylated derivatives inhibits soybean root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Barbosa Lima

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid and its hydroxylated derivatives (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids are known allelochemicals that affect the seed germination and root growth of many plant species. Recent studies have indicated that the reduction of root growth by these allelochemicals is associated with premature cell wall lignification. We hypothesized that an influx of these compounds into the phenylpropanoid pathway increases the lignin monomer content and reduces the root growth. To confirm this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids on soybean root growth, lignin and the composition of p-hydroxyphenyl (H, guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S monomers. To this end, three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in nutrient solution with or without allelochemical (or selective enzymatic inhibitors of the phenylpropanoid pathway in a growth chamber for 24 h. In general, the results showed that 1 cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids reduced root growth and increased lignin content; 2 cinnamic and p-coumaric acids increased p-hydroxyphenyl (H monomer content, whereas p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids increased guaiacyl (G content, and sinapic acid increased sinapyl (S content; 3 when applied in conjunction with piperonylic acid (PIP, an inhibitor of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, C4H, cinnamic acid reduced H, G and S contents; and 4 when applied in conjunction with 3,4-(methylenedioxycinnamic acid (MDCA, an inhibitor of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, 4CL, p-coumaric acid reduced H, G and S contents, whereas caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids reduced G and S contents. These results confirm our hypothesis that exogenously applied allelochemicals are channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway causing excessive production of lignin and its main monomers. By consequence, an enhanced stiffening of the cell wall restricts soybean root growth.

  9. Multilayered Organization of Jasmonate Signalling in the Regulation of Root Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Gasperini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical damage can strongly affect plant growth, reducing the biomass of developing organs situated at a distance from wounds. These effects, previously studied in leaves, require the activation of jasmonate (JA signalling. Using a novel assay involving repetitive cotyledon wounding in Arabidopsis seedlings, we uncovered a function of JA in suppressing cell division and elongation in roots. Regulatory JA signalling components were then manipulated to delineate their relative impacts on root growth. The new transcription factor mutant myc2-322B was isolated. In vitro transcription assays and whole-plant approaches revealed that myc2-322B is a dosage-dependent gain-of-function mutant that can amplify JA growth responses. Moreover, myc2-322B displayed extreme hypersensitivity to JA that totally suppressed root elongation. The mutation weakly reduced root growth in undamaged plants but, when the upstream negative regulator NINJA was genetically removed, myc2-322B powerfully repressed root growth through its effects on cell division and cell elongation. Furthermore, in a JA-deficient mutant background, ninja1 myc2-322B still repressed root elongation, indicating that it is possible to generate JA-responses in the absence of JA. We show that NINJA forms a broadly expressed regulatory layer that is required to inhibit JA signalling in the apex of roots grown under basal conditions. By contrast, MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 displayed cell layer-specific localisations and MYC3 and MYC4 were expressed in mutually exclusive regions. In nature, growing roots are likely subjected to constant mechanical stress during soil penetration that could lead to JA production and subsequent detrimental effects on growth. Our data reveal how distinct negative regulatory layers, including both NINJA-dependent and -independent mechanisms, restrain JA responses to allow normal root growth. Mechanistic insights from this work underline the importance of mapping JA signalling

  10. Effects of Lanthanum on Root Growth and Senescence of GF43(Prunus domestica) Plantlet in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋卫平; 顾福根; 于佳; 沈叶; 溪群华; 刘佳佳

    2004-01-01

    The effect and the action mechanism of lanthanum on GF43 plantlet in vitro were studied. The results of experiments show that root growth rate and dry weight of GF43 by LaCl3 treatments increase. The activities of antioxidant enzymes in root system such as superoxide dismutase(SOD),catalase(CAT) and peroxidase(POD) apparently enhance. Moreover *O-2 and malond ialdehyde(MDA) contents and cell membrane permeability of GF43 are decreased by LaCl3. The relatively stable membrane structure of cell could also be maintained and the root ageing of GF43 plantlet in vitro delays.

  11. Analysis of Puerarin and Chemical Compositions Changes in Kudzu Root during Growth Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kudzu root is one of the earliest medicinal plants listed in traditional Chinese medicine. In this paper, chemical compositions changes of kudzu roots from one year old to five years old were analyzed with respect to puerarin, acid-insoluble polysaccharides, acid-soluble polysaccharides, reducing sugar, protein, free amino acids, and lipid. In addition, the puerarin content was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. The results showed that acid-soluble polysaccharides content of kudzu root increased with each growth period. In contrast, the acid-insoluble polysaccharides decreased significantly. The contents of reducing sugar and puerarin in kudzu root decreased significantly during its growth period. Beyond that, the contents of protein, free amino acids, and lipid in kudzu root ranged from 31.8 to 45.8 g/kg, 2.21 to 4.33 g/kg, and 32.2 to 76.9 g/kg, respectively. The trend of protein content coincided with the total content of free amino acids, in contrast to lipid. This paper provides a set of data and the select of kudzu root for the processing and development of new products of kudzu root.

  12. Effect of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced adaptive response of root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chenguang; Wang, Ting; Wu, Jingjing; Xu, Wei; Li, Huasheng; Liu, Min; Wu, Lijun; Lu, Jinying; Bian, Po

    2017-02-01

    Space particles have an inevitable impact on organisms during space missions; radio-adaptive response (RAR) is a critical radiation effect due to both low-dose background and sudden high-dose radiation exposure during solar storms. Although it is relevant to consider RAR within the context of microgravity, another major space environmental factor, there is no existing evidence as to its effects on RAR. In the present study, we established an experimental method for detecting the effects of gamma-irradiation on the primary root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which RAR of root growth was significantly induced by several dose combinations. Microgravity was simulated using a two-dimensional rotation clinostat. It was shown that RAR of root growth was significantly inhibited under the modeled microgravity condition, and was absent in pgm-1 plants that had impaired gravity sensing in root tips. These results suggest that RAR could be modulated in microgravity. Time course analysis showed that microgravity affected either the development of radio-resistance induced by priming irradiation, or the responses of plants to challenging irradiation. After treatment with the modeled microgravity, attenuation in priming irradiation-induced expressions of DNA repair genes (AtKu70 and AtRAD54), and reduced DNA repair efficiency in response to challenging irradiation were observed. In plant roots, the polar transportation of the phytohormone auxin is regulated by gravity, and treatment with an exogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) prevented the induction of RAR of root growth, suggesting that auxin might play a regulatory role in the interaction between microgravity and RAR of root growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ammonium inhibits primary root growth by reducing the length of meristem and elongation zone and decreasing elemental expansion rate in the root apex in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of ammonium on primary root growth has been well documented; however the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms are still controversial. To avoid ammonium toxicity to shoot growth, we used a vertical two-layer split plate system, in which the upper layer contained nitrate and the lower layer contained ammonium. In this way, nitrogen status was maintained and only the apical part of the root system was exposed to ammonium. Using a kinematic approach, we show here that 1 mM ammonium reduces primary root growth, decreasing both elemental expansion and cell production. Ammonium inhibits the length of elongation zone and the maximum elemental expansion rate. Ammonium also decreases the apparent length of the meristem as well as the number of dividing cells without affecting cell division rate. Moreover, ammonium reduces the number of root cap cells but appears to affect neither the status of root stem cell niche nor the distal auxin maximum at the quiescent center. Ammonium also inhibits root gravitropism and concomitantly down-regulates the expression of two pivotal auxin transporters, AUX1 and PIN2. Insofar as ammonium inhibits root growth rate in AUX1 and PIN2 loss-of-function mutants almost as strongly as in wild type, we conclude that ammonium inhibits root growth and gravitropism by largely distinct pathways.

  14. The function of stilt roots in the growth strategy of Socratea exorrhiza (Arecaceae) at two neotropical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Gregory R; Zahawi, Rakan A

    2007-01-01

    Arboreal palms have developed a variety of structural root modifications and systems to adapt to the harsh abiotic conditions of tropical rain forests. Stilt roots have been proposed to serve a number of functions including the facilitation of rapid vertical growth to the canopy and enhanced mechanical stability. To examine whether stilt roots provide these functions, we compared stilt root characteristics of the neotropical palm tree Socratea exorrhiza on sloped (>20 degrees) and flat locations at two lowland neotropical sites. S. exorrhiza (n=80 trees) did not demonstrate differences in number of roots, vertical stilt root height, root cone circumference, root cone volume, or location of roots as related to slope. However, we found positive relationships between allocation to vertical growth and stilt root architecture including root cone circumference, number of roots, and root cone volume. Accordingly, stilt roots may allow S. exorrhiza to increase height and maintain mechanical stability without having to concurrently invest in increased stem diameter and underground root structure. This strategy likely increases the species ability to rapidly exploit light gaps as compared to non-stilt root palms and may also enhance survival as mature trees approach the theoretical limits of their mechanical stability.

  15. Exaggerated root respiration accounts for growth retardation in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Katrin; Hörmiller, Imke; Nägele, Thomas; Heyer, Arnd G

    2014-07-01

    The knock-out mutation of plastidial phosphoglucomutase (pgm) causes a starchless phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana, and results in a severe growth reduction of plants cultivated under diurnal conditions. It has been speculated that high soluble sugar levels accumulating during the light phase in leaf mesophyll might cause a reduction of photosynthetic activity or that shortage of reduced carbon during the night is the reason for the slow biomass gain of pgm. Separate simultaneous measurements of leaf net photosynthesis and root respiration demonstrate that photosynthetic activity per unit fresh weight is not reduced in pgm, whereas root respiration is strongly elevated. Comparison with a mutant defective in the dominating vacuolar invertase (AtβFruct4) revealed that high sucrose concentration in the cytosol, but not in the vacuole, of leaf cells is responsible for elevated assimilate transport to the root. Increased sugar supply to the root, as observed in pgm mutants, forces substantial respiratory losses. Because root respiration accounts for 80% of total plant respiration under long-day conditions, this gives rise to retarded biomass formation. In contrast, reduced vacuolar invertase activity leads to reduced net photosynthesis in the shoot and lowered root respiration, and affords an increased root/shoot ratio. The results demonstrate that roots have very limited capacity for carbon storage but exert rigid control of supply for their maintenance metabolism. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Genetic Variation in Deep Root Growth of North-European Winter Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Nanna Karkov

    traits were found to vary between modern North-European winter wheat cultivars including variation in depth penetration rate and root density in the deepest part of the root system. Wheat was shown to be capable of using deep N resources. After three to six weeks of root proliferation in the N rich...... subsoil, 21 to 39 % of the deep N was utilized for shoot growth. Furthermore, the tested cultivars indicated variation in root response to deep N and in N uptake. Increased root density at depth improved N content in the shoot at moderate to high subsoil N levels (3.2 to 12.5 mg N mg-1 soil). However...... the total N content of the shoots. Overall the results show, that variation exists for deeper root traits in existing elite germplasm adapted to North Europe. This opens the way for wider screening to assess the value in breeding for deeper roots in winter wheat. Deeper rooting, but not necessarily higher...

  17. Genome-wide SNPs and re-sequencing of growth habit and inflorescence genes in barley: implications for association mapping in germplasm arrays varying in size and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muehlbauer Gary J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerations in applying association mapping (AM to plant breeding are population structure and size: not accounting for structure and/or using small populations can lead to elevated false-positive rates. The principal determinants of population structure in cultivated barley are growth habit and inflorescence type. Both are under complex genetic control: growth habit is controlled by the epistatic interactions of several genes. For inflorescence type, multiple loss-of-function alleles in one gene lead to the same phenotype. We used these two traits as models for assessing the effectiveness of AM. This research was initiated using the CAP Core germplasm array (n = 102 assembled at the start of the Barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP. This array was genotyped with 4,608 SNPs and we re-sequenced genes involved in morphology, growth and development. Larger arrays of breeding germplasm were subsequently genotyped and phenotyped under the auspices of the CAP project. This provided sets of 247 accessions phenotyped for growth habit and 2,473 accessions phenotyped for inflorescence type. Each of the larger populations was genotyped with 3,072 SNPs derived from the original set of 4,608. Results Significant associations with SNPs located in the vicinity of the loci involved in growth habit and inflorescence type were found in the CAP Core. Differentiation of true and spurious associations was not possible without a priori knowledge of the candidate genes, based on re-sequencing. The re-sequencing data were used to define allele types of the determinant genes based on functional polymorphisms. In a second round of association mapping, these synthetic markers based on allele types gave the most significant associations. When the synthetic markers were used as anchor points for analysis of interactions, we detected other known-function genes and candidate loci involved in the control of growth habit and inflorescence type. We

  18. Non-reciprocal interactions between K+ and Na+ ions in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Szczerba, Mark W.; Schulze, Lasse M.; Britto, Dev T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of sodium and potassium ions in the context of the primary entry of Na+ into plant cells, and the subsequent development of sodium toxicity, has been the subject of much recent attention. In the present study, the technique of compartmental analysis with the radiotracers 42K+ and 24Na+ was applied in intact seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to test the hypothesis that elevated levels of K+ in the growth medium will reduce both rapid, futile Na+ cycling at the plasma membrane, and Na+ build-up in the cytosol of root cells, under saline conditions (100 mM NaCl). We reject this hypothesis, showing that, over a wide (400-fold) range of K+ supply, K+ neither reduces the primary fluxes of Na+ at the root plasma membrane nor suppresses Na+ accumulation in the cytosol. By contrast, 100 mM NaCl suppressed the cytosolic K+ pool by 47–73%, and also substantially decreased low-affinity K+ transport across the plasma membrane. We confirm that the cytosolic [K+]:[Na+] ratio is a poor predictor of growth performance under saline conditions, while a good correlation is seen between growth and the tissue ratios of the two ions. The data provide insight into the mechanisms that mediate the toxic influx of sodium across the root plasma membrane under salinity stress, demonstrating that, in the glycophyte barley, K+ and Na+ are unlikely to share a common low-affinity pathway for entry into the plant cell. PMID:18562445

  19. Modeling and optimization of hairy root growth in fed-batch process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairet, Francis; Villon, Pierre; Boitel-Conti, Michèle; Shakourzadeh, Khalil

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a feeding strategy based on a kinetic model to enhance hairy roots growth. A new approach for modeling hairy root growth is used, considering that there is no nutrient limitation thanks to an appropriate feeding, and the intracellular pools are supposed to be always saturated. Thus, the model describes the specific growth rate from extracellular concentration of the major nutrients and nutrient uptakes depend on biomass growth. An optimized feeding strategy was determined thanks to the model to maintain the major nutrient levels at their optimum assuming optimal initial concentrations. The optimal feed rate is computed in open loop using kinetic model prediction or in closed loop using conductivity measurements to estimate biomass growth. Datura innoxia was chosen as the model culture system. Shake flask cultures were used to calibrate the model. Finally, cultures in bioreactor were performed to validate the model and the control laws. Copyright 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  20. There's a World Going on Underground: Imaging Technologies to Understand Root Growth Dynamics and Rhizosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, C. N.

    2016-12-01

    Our ability to harness the power of plant genomics for basic and applied science depends on how well and how fast we can quantify the phenotypic ramifications of genetic variation. Plants can be considered from many vantage points: at scales from cells to organs, over the course of development or evolution, and from biophysical, physiological, and ecological perspectives. In all of these ways, our understanding of plant form and function is greatly limited by our ability to study subterranean structures and processes. The limitations to accessing this knowledge are well known - soil is opaque, roots are morphologically complex, and root growth can be heavily influenced by a myriad of environmental factors. Nonetheless, recent technological innovations in imaging science have generated a renewed focus on roots and thus new opportunities to understand the plant as a whole. The Topp Lab is interested in crop root system growth dynamics and function in response to environmental stresses such as drought, rhizosphere interactions, and as a consequence of artificial selection for agronomically important traits such as nitrogen uptake and high plant density. Studying roots requires the development of imaging technologies, computational infrastructure, and statistical methods that can capture and analyze morphologically complex networks over time and at high-throughput. The lab uses several imaging tools (optical, X-ray CT, PET, etc.) along with quantitative genetics and molecular biology to understand the dynamics of root growth and physiology. We aim to understand the relationships among root traits that can be effectively measured both in controlled laboratory environments and in the field, and to identify genes and gene networks that control root, and ultimately whole plant architectural features useful for crop improvement.

  1. Soil contamination with silver nanoparticles reduces Bishop pine growth and ectomycorrhizal diversity on pine roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, M. J.; Singleton, I.

    2015-11-01

    Soil contamination by silver nanoparticles (AgNP) is of potential environmental concern but little work has been carried out on the effect of such contamination on ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF). EMF are essential to forest ecosystem functions as they are known to enhance growth of trees by nutrient transfer. In this study, soil was experimentally contaminated with AgNP (0, 350 and 790 mg Ag/kg) and planted with Bishop pine seedlings. The effect of AgNP was subsequently measured, assessing variation in pine growth and ectomycorrhizal diversity associated with the root system. After only 1 month, the highest AgNP level had significantly reduced the root length of pine seedlings, which in turn had a small effect on above ground plant biomass. However, after 4 months growth, both AgNP levels utilised had significantly reduced both pine root and shoot biomass. For example, even the lower levels of AgNP (350 mg Ag/kg) soil, reduced fresh root biomass by approximately 57 %. The root systems of the plants grown in AgNP-contaminated soils lacked the lateral and fine root development seen in the control plants (no AgNP). Although, only five different genera of EMF were found on roots of the control plants, only one genus Laccaria was found on roots of plants grown in soil containing 350 mg AgNP/kg. At the higher levels of AgNP contamination, no EMF were observed. Furthermore, extractable silver was found in soils containing AgNP, indicating potential dissolution of silver ions (Ag+) from the solid AgNP.

  2. Soil contamination with silver nanoparticles reduces Bishop pine growth and ectomycorrhizal diversity on pine roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, M. J., E-mail: m.sweet@derby.ac.uk [University of Derby, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre, College of Life and Natural Sciences (United Kingdom); Singleton, I. [Newcastle University, School of Biology (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Soil contamination by silver nanoparticles (AgNP) is of potential environmental concern but little work has been carried out on the effect of such contamination on ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF). EMF are essential to forest ecosystem functions as they are known to enhance growth of trees by nutrient transfer. In this study, soil was experimentally contaminated with AgNP (0, 350 and 790 mg Ag/kg) and planted with Bishop pine seedlings. The effect of AgNP was subsequently measured, assessing variation in pine growth and ectomycorrhizal diversity associated with the root system. After only 1 month, the highest AgNP level had significantly reduced the root length of pine seedlings, which in turn had a small effect on above ground plant biomass. However, after 4 months growth, both AgNP levels utilised had significantly reduced both pine root and shoot biomass. For example, even the lower levels of AgNP (350 mg Ag/kg) soil, reduced fresh root biomass by approximately 57 %. The root systems of the plants grown in AgNP-contaminated soils lacked the lateral and fine root development seen in the control plants (no AgNP). Although, only five different genera of EMF were found on roots of the control plants, only one genus Laccaria was found on roots of plants grown in soil containing 350 mg AgNP/kg. At the higher levels of AgNP contamination, no EMF were observed. Furthermore, extractable silver was found in soils containing AgNP, indicating potential dissolution of silver ions (Ag+) from the solid AgNP.

  3. Growth of etiolated barley plants in weak static and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields tuned to calcium ion cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazur, Alexander; Rassadina, Valentina; Dandler, Jörg; Zoller, Jutta

    2006-01-01

    Background The effects of weak magnetic and electromagnetic fields in biology have been intensively studied on animals, microorganisms and humans, but comparably less on plants. Perception mechanisms were attributed originally to ferrimagnetism, but later discoveries required additional explanations like the "radical pair mechanism" and the "Ion cyclotron resonance" (ICR), primarily considered by Liboff. The latter predicts effects by small ions involved in biological processes, that occur in definite frequency- and intensity ranges ("windows") of simultaneously impacting magnetic and electromagnetic fields related by a linear equation, which meanwhile is proven by a number of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Methods Barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare, L. var. Steffi) were grown in the dark for 5 and 6 days under static magnetic and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields matching the ICR conditions of Ca2+. Control cultures were grown under normal geomagnetic conditions, not matching this ICR. Morphology, pigmentation and long-term development of the adult plants were subsequently investigated. Results The shoots of plants exposed to Ca2+-ICR exposed grew 15–20% shorter compared to the controls, the plant weight was 10–12% lower, and they had longer coleoptiles that were adhering stronger to the primary leaf tissue. The total pigment contents of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) and carotenoids were significantly decreased. The rate of PChlide regeneration after light irradiation was reduced for the Ca2+-ICR exposed plants, also the Shibata shift was slightly delayed. Even a longer subsequent natural growing phase without any additional fields could only partially eliminate these effects: the plants initially exposed to Ca2+-ICR were still significantly shorter and had a lower chlorophyll (a+b) content compared to the controls. A continued cultivation and observation of the adult plants under natural conditions without any artificial electromagnetic fields showed a

  4. Growth response of Casuarina equisetifolia Forst. rooted stem cuttings to Frankia in nursery and field conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Karthikeyan; K Chandrasekaran; M Geetha; R Kalaiselvi

    2013-11-01

    Casuarina equisetifolia Forst. is a tree crop that provides fuel wood, land reclamation, dune stabilization, and scaffolding for construction, shelter belts, and pulp and paper production. C. equisetifolia fixes atmospheric nitrogen through a symbiotic relationship with Frankia, a soil bacterium of the actinobacteria group. The roots of C. equisetifolia produce root nodules where the bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen, which is an essential nutrient for all plant metabolic activities. However, rooted stem cuttings of elite clones of C. equisetifolia by vegetative propagation is being planted by the farmers of Pondicherry as costeffective method. As the vegetative propagation method uses inert material (vermiculite) for rooting there is no chance for Frankia association. Therefore after planting of these stocks the farmers are applying 150 kg of di-ammonium phosphate (DAP)/acre/year. To overcome this fertilizer usage, the Frankia-inoculated rooted stem cuttings were propagated under nursery conditions and transplanted in the nutrient-deficient soils of Karaikal, Pondicherry (India), in this study. Under nursery experiments the growth and biomass of C. equisetifolia rooted stem cuttings inoculated with Frankia showed 3 times higher growth and biomass than uninoculated control. These stocks were transplanted and monitored for their growth and survival for 1 year in the nutrient-deficient farm land. The results showed that the rooted stem cuttings of C. equisetifolia significantly improved growth in height (8.8 m), stem girth (9.6 cm) and tissue nitrogen content (3.3 mg g−1) than uninoculated controls. The soil nutrient status was also improved due to inoculation of Frankia.

  5. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ≤ 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes.

  6. Effect of planting density on root lodging resistance and its relationship to nodal root growth characteristics in maize (Zea mays L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Shengqun; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Fulai

    2012-01-01

    Increase of planting density has been widely used to increase grain yield in maize. However, it may lead to higher risk of root lodging hence causing significant yield loss of the crop. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of planting density on maize nodal root growth...

  7. Estimating root lifespan of two grasses at contrasting elevation in a salt marsh by applying vitality staining on roots from in-growth cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Hengst, K.; Koutstaal, B.P.; Van Soelen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Contrasting soil conditions caused by different inundation frequencies require different root growth strategies along the elevational gradient of coastal salt marshes. The objective of this study was to examine (1) if root lifespan was shorter in Elymus pycnanthus, a relatively fast-growing

  8. Estimating root lifespan of two grasses at contrasting elevation in a salt marsh by applying vitality staining on roots from in-growth cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Hengst, K.; Koutstaal, B.P.; Van Soelen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Contrasting soil conditions caused by different inundation frequencies require different root growth strategies along the elevational gradient of coastal salt marshes. The objective of this study was to examine (1) if root lifespan was shorter in Elymus pycnanthus, a relatively fast-growing competit

  9. Microfilament Dynamics is Required for Root Growth under Alkaline Stress in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Zhou; Zijun Yang; Guangqin Guo; Yan Guo

    2010-01-01

    The microfilament (MF) cytoskeleton has crucial functions in plant development. Recent studies have revealed the function of MFs in diverse stress response. Alkaline stress is harmful to plant growth;however, it remains unclear whether the MFs play a role in alkaline stress. In the present study, we find that blocking MF assembly with latrunculin B (Lat B) leads to inhibition of plant root growth, and stabilization of MFs with phalloidin does not significantly affect plant root growth under normal conditions. In high external pH conditions, MF de-polymerization is induced and that associates with the reduction of root growth; phalloidin treatment partially rescues this reduction. Moreover, Lat B treatment further decreases the survival rate of seedlings growing in high external pH conditions. However, a high external pH (8.0) does not affect MF stability in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that alkaline stress may trigger a signal that leads the dynamics of MFs and in turn regulates root growth.

  10. Influence of gamma radiation on the biosynthesis of indoles and gibberellins in barley. The action of zinc on the restitution of growth substance level in irradiated plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutacek, M.; Masev, N.; Oplistilova, K.; Bulgakov, R.

    1966-01-01

    Investigations were made on the effect of exposing barley seeds to gamma-radiation (5-10kR), alone and in combination with the application of zinc (soaking the seeds in solutions containing 5.10/sup -5/ - 5.10/sup -1/% Zn for 12 hours before sowing) on growth and on the content of tryptophan, indole auxins and gibberellin-like substances in seven-day plants. Radiation decreased both growth and the content of tryptophan (e.g. by about 53% at 30 kR), of indole auxins (by about 60% auxin in the zone of IAA on the chromatogram at 30 kR), and also the content of gibberellin-like substances (by about 67% gibberellin content in the zone of GA, on the chromatogram) of plants. The irradiation of standard samples of tryptophan, indolylacetic acid and gibberellic acid alone with many times greater doses (up to 1000 kR) did not lead to marked radiochemical degradation of these substances. It can be assumed that radiation damages the enzyme systems synthesizing natural growth substances in plants. The damaging effect of radiation on auxins is already displayed in the synthesis of tryptophan, which is inhibited. Zinc interacts with the damaging effect of radiation on growth. Optimum concentrations of zinc (5.10/sup -/number% Zn) counteract the effect of radiation, up to doses of about 12 kR, on the growth in height in 7-day plants so that it is equal to the controls. Normal content of tryptophan and auxin in the position of indolylacetic acid on chromatograms can only be reached by the addition of zinc when the dose of radiation was not greater than about 8 kR, which is less than the influence exerted by zinc on the restitution of growth. On the other hand, the biosynthesis of gibberellin-like substances at the position of gibberellic acid on chromatograms can be restored by zinc to their original level to doses of up to 30 kR. 18 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  11. [Study on the growth characteristics and root exudates of three wetlands plants at different culture conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Song-Liu; Hu, Hong-Ying; Sun, Ying-Xue; Yang, Jia

    2009-07-15

    Wetland plants are the important component of constructed wetlands and their root exudates provide the interior hydrocarbon for denitrification. In this study, the growth characteristics and root exudates of Canna indica, Zizania caduciflora and Lythrum salicari in different culture conditions were researched. The results showed that the average biomass initial/biomass in 120 days growth of Canna indica, Zizania caduciflora and Lythrum salicari were 9.1, 3.7, and 4.7, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the root exudates and the biomass of plants, but the release rate of root exudates decreased with the biomass increase. The root exudates release rates of unit biomass were 0.92, 0.47, 0.43 mg x (g x d)(-1) for Lythrum salicari, Canna indica and Zizania caduciflora, respectively. And the root exudates of those three plants are mainly organic acids and arylprotein based on the three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum analysis. The results ofthis study also indicate that Canna indiea and Lythrum salicari are befitting wetlands plants.

  12. PIV as a method for quantifying root cell growth and particle displacement in confocal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Hans, Joachim; Bransby, M Fraser; Valentine, Tracy A

    2010-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) quantifies displacement of patches of pixels between successive images. We evaluated PIV as a tool for microscopists by measuring displacements of cells and of a surrounding granular medium in confocal laser scanning microscopy images of Arabidopsis thaliana roots labeled with cell-membrane targeted green fluorescent protein. Excellent accuracy (e.g., displacement standard deviation PIV-predicted and actual displacements (r(2) > 0.83). Root mean squared error for these distorted images was 0.4-1.1 pixels, increasing at higher magnification factors. Cell growth and rhizosphere deformation were tracked with good temporal (e.g., 1-min interval) and spatial resolution, with PIV patches located on recognizable cell features being tracked more successfully. Appropriate choice of GFP-label was important to decrease small-scale biological noise due to intracellular motion. PIV of roots grown in stiff 2% versus 0.7% agar showed patterns of cell expansion consistent with physically impeded roots of other species. Roots in glass ballotini underwent rapid changes in growth direction on a timescale of minutes, associated with localized arching of ballotini. By tracking cell vertices, we monitored automatically cell length, width, and area every minute for 0.5 h for cells in different stages of development. In conclusion, PIV measured displacements successfully in images of living root cells and the external granular medium, revealing much potential for use by microscopists.

  13. Microbial growth and carbon use efficiency in the rhizosphere and root-free soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    Plant-microbial interactions alter C and N balance in the rhizosphere and affect the microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE)-the fundamental characteristic of microbial metabolism. Estimation of CUE in microbial hotspots with high dynamics of activity and changes of microbial physiological state from dormancy to activity is a challenge in soil microbiology. We analyzed respiratory activity, microbial DNA content and CUE by manipulation the C and nutrients availability in the soil under Beta vulgaris. All measurements were done in root-free and rhizosphere soil under steady-state conditions and during microbial growth induced by addition of glucose. Microorganisms in the rhizosphere and root-free soil differed in their CUE dynamics due to varying time delays between respiration burst and DNA increase. Constant CUE in an exponentially-growing microbial community in rhizosphere demonstrated the balanced growth. In contrast, the CUE in the root-free soil increased more than three times at the end of exponential growth and was 1.5 times higher than in the rhizosphere. Plants alter the dynamics of microbial CUE by balancing the catabolic and anabolic processes, which were decoupled in the root-free soil. The effects of N and C availability on CUE in rhizosphere and root-free soil are discussed.

  14. Microbial growth and carbon use efficiency in the rhizosphere and root-free soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Blagodatskaya

    Full Text Available Plant-microbial interactions alter C and N balance in the rhizosphere and affect the microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE-the fundamental characteristic of microbial metabolism. Estimation of CUE in microbial hotspots with high dynamics of activity and changes of microbial physiological state from dormancy to activity is a challenge in soil microbiology. We analyzed respiratory activity, microbial DNA content and CUE by manipulation the C and nutrients availability in the soil under Beta vulgaris. All measurements were done in root-free and rhizosphere soil under steady-state conditions and during microbial growth induced by addition of glucose. Microorganisms in the rhizosphere and root-free soil differed in their CUE dynamics due to varying time delays between respiration burst and DNA increase. Constant CUE in an exponentially-growing microbial community in rhizosphere demonstrated the balanced growth. In contrast, the CUE in the root-free soil increased more than three times at the end of exponential growth and was 1.5 times higher than in the rhizosphere. Plants alter the dynamics of microbial CUE by balancing the catabolic and anabolic processes, which were decoupled in the root-free soil. The effects of N and C availability on CUE in rhizosphere and root-free soil are discussed.

  15. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J L; Wolverton, C; Ishikawa, H; Hangarter, R P; Evans, M L

    2002-09-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  16. Maize Fungal Growth Control with Scopoletin of Cassava Roots Produced in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiatou Ba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical contamination of food is among the main public health issues in developing countries. With a view to find new natural bioactive products against fungi responsible for chemical contamination of staple food such as maize, the antifungal activity tests of scopoletin extracted from different components of the cassava root produced in Benin were carried out. The dosage of scopoletin from parts of the root (first skin, second skin, whole root, and flesh was done by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. The scopoletin extract was used to assess the activity of 12 strains (11 strains of maize and a reference strain. The presence of scopoletin was revealed in all components of the cassava root. Scopoletin extracted from the first skin cassava root was the most active both as inhibition of sporulation (52.29 to 87.91% and the mycelial growth (36.51–80.41%. Scopoletin extract from the cassava root skins showed significant inhibitory activity on the tested strains with fungicide concentration (MFC between 0.0125 mg/mL and 0.1 mg/mL. The antifungal scopoletin extracted from the cassava root skins may be well beneficial for the fungal control of the storage of maize.

  17. Maize Fungal Growth Control with Scopoletin of Cassava Roots Produced in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Rafiatou; Alfa, Teou; Gbaguidi, Fernand; Novidzro, Kosi Mawuéna; Dotse, Kokouvi; Koudouvo, Koffi; Houngue, Ursula; Donou Hounsode, Marcel T.; Koumaglo, Kossi Honoré; Ameyapoh, Yaovi

    2017-01-01

    The chemical contamination of food is among the main public health issues in developing countries. With a view to find new natural bioactive products against fungi responsible for chemical contamination of staple food such as maize, the antifungal activity tests of scopoletin extracted from different components of the cassava root produced in Benin were carried out. The dosage of scopoletin from parts of the root (first skin, second skin, whole root, and flesh) was done by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. The scopoletin extract was used to assess the activity of 12 strains (11 strains of maize and a reference strain). The presence of scopoletin was revealed in all components of the cassava root. Scopoletin extracted from the first skin cassava root was the most active both as inhibition of sporulation (52.29 to 87.91%) and the mycelial growth (36.51–80.41%). Scopoletin extract from the cassava root skins showed significant inhibitory activity on the tested strains with fungicide concentration (MFC) between 0.0125 mg/mL and 0.1 mg/mL. The antifungal scopoletin extracted from the cassava root skins may be well beneficial for the fungal control of the storage of maize. PMID:28197207

  18. Root growth of Lotus corniculatus interacts with P distribution in young sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schulin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Large areas of land are restored with un-weathered soil substrates following mining activities in eastern Germany and elsewhere. In the initial stages of colonization of such land by vegetation, plant roots may become key agents in generating soil formation patterns by introducing gradients in chemical and physical soil properties. On the other hand, such patterns may be influenced by root growth responses to pre-existing substrate heterogeneities. In particular, the roots of many plants were found to preferentially proliferate into nutrient-rich patches. Phosphorus (P is of primary interest in this respect because its availability is often low in unweathered soils, limiting especially the growth of leguminous plants. However, leguminous plants occur frequently among the pioneer plant species on such soils as they only depend on atmospheric nitrogen (N fixation as N source. In this study we investigated the relationship between root growth allocation of the legume Lotus corniculatus and soil P distribution on recently restored land. As test sites the experimental Chicken Creek Catchment (CCC in eastern Germany and a nearby experimental site (ES with the same soil substrate were used. We established two experiments with constructed heterogeneity, one in the field on the experimental site and the other in a climate chamber. In addition we conducted high-density samplings on undisturbed soil plots colonized by L. corniculatus on the ES and on the CCC. In the field experiment, we installed cylindrical ingrowth soil cores (4.5×10 cm with and without P fertilization around single two-month-old L. corniculatus plants. Roots showed preferential growth into the P-fertilized ingrowth-cores. Preferential root allocation was also found in the climate chamber experiment, where single L. corniculatus plants were grown in containers filled with ES soil and where a lateral portion of the containers was additionally supplied with a range of different P

  19. Root growth of Lotus corniculatus interacts with P distribution in young sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Felderer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Large areas of land are restored with unweathered soil substrates following mining activities in eastern Germany and elsewhere. In the initial stages of colonization of such land by vegetation, plant roots may become key agents in generating soil formation patterns by introducing gradients in chemical and physical soil properties. On the other hand, such patterns may be influenced by root growth responses to pre-existing substrate heterogeneities. In particular, the roots of many plants were found to preferentially proliferate into nutrient-rich patches. Phosphorus (P is of primary interest in this respect because its availability is often low in unweathered soils, limiting especially the growth of leguminous plants. However, leguminous plants occur frequently among the pioneer plant species on such soils, as they only depend on atmospheric nitrogen (N fixation as N source. In this study we investigated the relationship between root growth allocation of the legume Lotus corniculatus and soil P distribution on recently restored land. As test sites, the experimental Chicken Creek Catchment (CCC in eastern Germany and a nearby experimental site (ES with the same soil substrate were used. We established two experiments with constructed heterogeneity, one in the field on the experimental site and the other in a climate chamber. In addition, we conducted high-density samplings on undisturbed soil plots colonized by L. corniculatus on the ES and on the CCC. In the field experiment, we installed cylindrical ingrowth soil cores (4.5 × 10 cm with and without P fertilization around single two-month-old L. corniculatus plants. Roots showed preferential growth into the P-fertilized ingrowth-cores. Preferential root allocation was also found in the climate chamber experiment, where single L. corniculatus plants were grown in containers filled with ES soil and where a lateral portion of the containers was additionally supplied with a range of different P

  20. Root growth of Lotus corniculatus interacts with P distribution in young sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderer, B.; Boldt-Burisch, K. M.; Schneider, B. U.; Hüttl, R. F. J.; Schulin, R.

    2013-03-01

    Large areas of land are restored with unweathered soil substrates following mining activities in eastern Germany and elsewhere. In the initial stages of colonization of such land by vegetation, plant roots may become key agents in generating soil formation patterns by introducing gradients in chemical and physical soil properties. On the other hand, such patterns may be influenced by root growth responses to pre-existing substrate heterogeneities. In particular, the roots of many plants were found to preferentially proliferate into nutrient-rich patches. Phosphorus (P) is of primary interest in this respect because its availability is often low in unweathered soils, limiting especially the growth of leguminous plants. However, leguminous plants occur frequently among the pioneer plant species on such soils, as they only depend on atmospheric nitrogen (N) fixation as N source. In this study we investigated the relationship between root growth allocation of the legume Lotus corniculatus and soil P distribution on recently restored land. As test sites, the experimental Chicken Creek Catchment (CCC) in eastern Germany and a nearby experimental site (ES) with the same soil substrate were used. We established two experiments with constructed heterogeneity, one in the field on the experimental site and the other in a climate chamber. In addition, we conducted high-density samplings on undisturbed soil plots colonized by L. corniculatus on the ES and on the CCC. In the field experiment, we installed cylindrical ingrowth soil cores (4.5 × 10 cm) with and without P fertilization around single two-month-old L. corniculatus plants. Roots showed preferential growth into the P-fertilized ingrowth-cores. Preferential root allocation was also found in the climate chamber experiment, where single L. corniculatus plants were grown in containers filled with ES soil and where a lateral portion of the containers was additionally supplied with a range of different P concentrations. In

  1. The effect of ethylene on root growth of Zea mays seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, M. C.; Feldman, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The control of primary root growth in Zea mays cv. Merit by ethylene was examined. At applied concentrations of ethylene equal to or greater than 0.1 microliter L-1, root elongation during 24 h was inhibited. The half-maximal response occurred at 0.6 microliter L-1 and the response saturated at 6 microliters L-1. Inhibition of elongation took place within 20 min. However, after ethylene was removed, elongation recovered to control values within 15 min. Root elongation was also inhibited by green light. The inhibition caused by a 24-h exposure to ethylene was restricted to the elongating region just behind the apex, with inhibition of cortical cell elongation being the primary contributor to the effect. Based on use of 2,5-norbornadiene, a gaseous competitive inhibitor of ethylene, it was concluded that endogenous ethylene normally inhibits root elongation.

  2. [Effects of water storage in deeper soil layers on the root growth, root distribution and economic yield of cotton in arid area with drip irrigation under mulch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong-Hai; Zhang, Hong-Zhi; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhang, Wang-Feng

    2012-02-01

    Taking cotton cultivar Xinluzao 13 as test material, a soil column culture expenment was conducted to study the effects of water storage in deeper (> 60 cm) soil layer on the root growth and its relations with the aboveground growth of the cultivar in arid area with drip irrigation under mulch. Two levels of water storage in 60-120 cm soil layer were installed, i. e., well-watered and no watering, and for each, the moisture content in 0-40 cm soil layer during growth period was controlled at two levels, i.e., 70% and 55% of field capacity. It was observed that the total root mass density of the cultivar and its root length density and root activity in 40-120 cm soil layer had significant positive correlations with the aboveground dry mass. When the moisture content in 0-40 cm soil layer during growth season was controlled at 70% of field capacity, the total root mass density under well-watered and no watering had less difference, but the root length density and root activity in 40-120 cm soil layer under well-watered condition increased, which enhanced the water consumption in deeper soil layer, increased the aboveground dry mass, and finally, led to an increased economic yield and higher water use efficiency. When the moisture content in 0-40 cm soil layer during growth season was controlled at 55% of field capacity and the deeper soil layer was well-watered, the root/shoot ratio and root length density in 40-120 cm soil layer and the root activity in 80-120 cm soil layer were higher, the water consumption in deeper soil layer increased, but it was still failed to adequately compensate for the negative effects of water deficit during growth season on the impaired growth of roots and aboveground parts, leading to a significant decrease in the economic yield, as compared with that at 70% of field capacity. Overall, sufficient water storage in deeper soil layer and a sustained soil moisture level of 65% -75% of field capacity during growth period could promote the

  3. Multiscale systems analysis of root growth and development: modeling beyond the network and cellular scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Leah R; Fozard, John A; Godin, Christophe; Jensen, Oliver E; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, John R

    2012-10-01

    Over recent decades, we have gained detailed knowledge of many processes involved in root growth and development. However, with this knowledge come increasing complexity and an increasing need for mechanistic modeling to understand how those individual processes interact. One major challenge is in relating genotypes to phenotypes, requiring us to move beyond the network and cellular scales, to use multiscale modeling to predict emergent dynamics at the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we highlight recent developments in multiscale modeling, illustrating how these are generating new mechanistic insights into the regulation of root growth and development. We consider how these models are motivating new biological data analysis and explore directions for future research. This modeling progress will be crucial as we move from a qualitative to an increasingly quantitative understanding of root biology, generating predictive tools that accelerate the development of improved crop varieties.

  4. The impact of light and gravity on growth directions in a root system of Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Otręba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While each individual root responds to such environmental factors as light or gravity the question arises how these reactions subordinate to the whole root system, which is supposed to maintain its primary functions. Data presented here confirm that in cucumber the gravity and light modulate the growth direction of the lateral roots subunits of the system. Another important factor affecting behavior of lateral roots is an orientation of the main root. These facts all together suggest that the root system functions as an integrated entity, capable of adapting its architecture to changing environmental conditions. Its flexibility, based on unknown signaling network, guarantees optimal functioning of the system.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of the Dynamics of Shoot-Root Interactions and Resource Partitioning in Plant Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystel Feller

    Full Text Available Plants are highly plastic in their potential to adapt to changing environmental conditions. For example, they can selectively promote the relative growth of the root and the shoot in response to limiting supply of mineral nutrients and light, respectively, a phenomenon that is referred to as balanced growth or functional equilibrium. To gain insight into the regulatory network that controls this phenomenon, we took a systems biology approach that combines experimental work with mathematical modeling. We developed a mathematical model representing the activities of the root (nutrient and water uptake and the shoot (photosynthesis, and their interactions through the exchange of the substrates sugar and phosphate (Pi. The model has been calibrated and validated with two independent experimental data sets obtained with Petunia hybrida. It involves a realistic environment with a day-and-night cycle, which necessitated the introduction of a transitory carbohydrate storage pool and an endogenous clock for coordination of metabolism with the environment. Our main goal was to grasp the dynamic adaptation of shoot:root ratio as a result of changes in light and Pi supply. The results of our study are in agreement with balanced growth hypothesis, suggesting that plants maintain a functional equilibrium between shoot and root activity based on differential growth of these two compartments. Furthermore, our results indicate that resource partitioning can be understood as the emergent property of many local physiological processes in the shoot and the root without explicit partitioning functions. Based on its encouraging predictive power, the model will be further developed as a tool to analyze resource partitioning in shoot and root crops.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of the Dynamics of Shoot-Root Interactions and Resource Partitioning in Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Chrystel; Favre, Patrick; Janka, Ales; Zeeman, Samuel C; Gabriel, Jean-Pierre; Reinhardt, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Plants are highly plastic in their potential to adapt to changing environmental conditions. For example, they can selectively promote the relative growth of the root and the shoot in response to limiting supply of mineral nutrients and light, respectively, a phenomenon that is referred to as balanced growth or functional equilibrium. To gain insight into the regulatory network that controls this phenomenon, we took a systems biology approach that combines experimental work with mathematical modeling. We developed a mathematical model representing the activities of the root (nutrient and water uptake) and the shoot (photosynthesis), and their interactions through the exchange of the substrates sugar and phosphate (Pi). The model has been calibrated and validated with two independent experimental data sets obtained with Petunia hybrida. It involves a realistic environment with a day-and-night cycle, which necessitated the introduction of a transitory carbohydrate storage pool and an endogenous clock for coordination of metabolism with the environment. Our main goal was to grasp the dynamic adaptation of shoot:root ratio as a result of changes in light and Pi supply. The results of our study are in agreement with balanced growth hypothesis, suggesting that plants maintain a functional equilibrium between shoot and root activity based on differential growth of these two compartments. Furthermore, our results indicate that resource partitioning can be understood as the emergent property of many local physiological processes in the shoot and the root without explicit partitioning functions. Based on its encouraging predictive power, the model will be further developed as a tool to analyze resource partitioning in shoot and root crops.

  7. Auxin transport is sufficient to generate a maximumand gradient guiding root growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieneisen, V.; Xu, J.; Marée, A.F.M.; Hogeweg, P.; Scheres, B.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    The plant growth regulator auxin controls cell identity, cell division and cell expansion. Auxin efflux facilitators (PINs) are associated with auxin maxima in distal regions of both shoots and roots. Here we model diffusion and PIN-facilitated auxin transport in and across cells within a structured

  8. Electroacupuncture upregulated platelet derived growth factor expression in spared dorsal root ganglion of cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xifeng Wang; Lianshuang Zhang; Xiaobo Xu; Wei Zhao; Guixiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    A bilateral spared dorsal root ganglion model was established in healthy adult cats by bilateral resection of L1-5 and L7-S2 dorsal root ganglia. L6 dorsal root ganglia were spared. Zusanli (ST36) and Xuanzhong (BL39) or Futu (ST32) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) were alternatively electro-stimulated on the right leg. Immunohistochemical staining of anti-serum platelet-derived growth factor demonstrated that the number of total neurons and medium-small sized platelet-derived growth factor positive neurons was significantly decreased on the 7th day following injury. After 7 days of acupuncture, the total number of positive and large neurons staining for platelet-derived growth factor on the acupuncture side significantly increased compared to the non-acupuncture side. After acupuncture for 14 days, the total positive and medium-small sized neurons significantly increased compared with the non-acupuncture side. Results indicate that acupuncture promoted the synthesis of platelet-derived growth factor in spared dorsal root ganglia.

  9. Growth and rutin production in hairy root cultures of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum M.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Young; Cho, Soo-In; Park, Min-Hee; Kim, Yong-Kyung; Choi, Jae-Eul; Park, Sang-Un

    2007-01-01

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) is a potentially important source of rutin, a natural flavonoid with antihyperglycemic, antihypertensive, and antioxidative properties. To examine in vitro production of rutin, we established a hairy root culture of buckwheat by infecting leaf explants with Agrobacterium rhizogenes R1000, and tested the growth conditions and rutin production rates of these cultures. Ten hairy root clones were established; their growth and rutin production rates ranged from 233 to 312 (mg dry wt per 30 mL flask, and 0.8 to 1.2 (mg/g dry wt), respectively. Clone H8, which had high growth and rutin production rates (312 mg dry wt per 30 mL flask and 1.2 mg/g dry wt, respectively), was selected for further experiments. H8 showed maximal growth and rutin content at 30 days in culture in MS medium. Of four tested culture media, half-strength MS medium was found to induce the highest levels of growth (378 mg dry wt per 30 mL flask) and rutin production (1.4 mg/g dry wt) by clone H8. In contrast, supplementation with auxins (0.1-1 mg/l IAA, IBA and NAA) increased the growth rate, but had no significant effect on rutin production by H8. Collectively, these findings indicate that hairy root cultures of buckwheat culture could be a valuable alternative approach for rutin production.

  10. The Effects of Different Amounts of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Root Growth and the Filling Rate in Winter Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Li; Jingtian Yang; Liyuan Yan; Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the fertilizer use efficiency and yield in winter wheat, the effects of controlled release fertilizer on the root growth and the filling rate in winter wheat by applying different amounts of controlled release fertilizer had been studied in open field. The results indicated that conventional complex fertilizer and controlled release fertilizer could cause corresponding changes of the wheat root activity, dry root weight, root-shoot ratio and filling rate, but the fertiliz...

  11. The Effects of Different Amounts of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Root Growth and the Filling Rate in Winter Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Li; Jingtian Yang; Liyuan Yan; Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the fertilizer use efficiency and yield in winter wheat, the effects of controlled release fertilizer on the root growth and the filling rate in winter wheat by applying different amounts of controlled release fertilizer had been studied in open field. The results indicated that conventional complex fertilizer and controlled release fertilizer could cause corresponding changes of the wheat root activity, dry root weight, root-shoot ratio and filling rate, but the fertiliz...

  12. Decreased mitochondrial activities of malate dehydrogenase and fumarase in tomato lead to altered root growth and architecture via diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Osorio, Sonia; Moritz, Thomas; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2009-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants in which either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase was antisense inhibited have previously been characterized to exhibit altered photosynthetic metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that these manipulations also resulted in differences in root growth, with both transgenics being characterized by a dramatic reduction of root dry matter deposition and respiratory activity but opposite changes with respect to root area. A range of physiological, molecular, and biochemical experiments were carried out in order to determine whether changes in root morphology were due to altered metabolism within the root itself, alterations in the nature of the transformants' root exudation, consequences of alteration in the efficiency of photoassimilate delivery to the root, or a combination of these factors. Grafting experiments in which the transformants were reciprocally grafted to wild-type controls suggested that root length and area were determined by the aerial part of the plant but that biomass was not. Despite the transgenic roots displaying alteration in the expression of phytohormone-associated genes, evaluation of the levels of the hormones themselves revealed that, with the exception of gibberellins, they were largely unaltered. When taken together, these combined experiments suggest that root biomass and growth are retarded by root-specific alterations in metabolism and gibberellin contents. These data are discussed in the context of current models of root growth and biomass partitioning.

  13. [Difference of anti-fracture mechanical characteristics between lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots of four plant species in vigorous growth period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-fei; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Hong-hui; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ge; Li, You-fang; Su, Yu; Wang, Chen-jia

    2016-01-01

    Taking four plant species, Caragana korshinskii, Salix psammophila, Hippophae rhamnides and Artemisia sphaerocephala, which were 3-4 years old and in vigorous growth period, as test materials, the anti-fracture forces of lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots were measured with the self-made fixture and the instrument of TY 8000. The lateral-root branches were vital and the diameters were 1-4 mm. The results showed that the anti-fracture force and anti-fracture strength of lateral-root branches were lesser than those of the adjacent upper straight roots even though the average diameter of lateral-root branches was greater. The ratios of anti-fracture strength of lateral-root branches to the adjacent upper straight roots were 71.5% for C. korshinskii, 62.9% for S. psammophila, 45.4% for H. rhamnides and 35.4% for A. sphaerocephala. For the four plants, the anti-fracture force positively correlated with the diameter in a power function, while the anti-fracture strength negatively correlated with diameter in a power function. The anti-fracture strengths of lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots for the four species followed the sequence of C. korshinskii (33.66 and 47.06 MPa) > S. psammophila (17.31 and 27.54 MPa) > H. rhamnides (3.97 and 8.75 MPa) > A. sphaerphala (2.18 and 6.15 MPa).

  14. Root-associated bacteria promote grapevine growth: from the laboratory to the field

    KAUST Repository

    Rolli, Eleonora

    2016-08-18

    Background and Aims: Laboratory and greenhouse experiments have shown that root-associated bacteria have beneficial effects on grapevine growth; however, these effects have not been tested in the field. Here, we aimed to demonstrate whether bacteria of different geographical origins derived from different crop plants can colonize grapevine to gain a beneficial outcome for the plant leading to promote growth at the field scale. Methods: To link the ecological functions of bacteria to the promotion of plant growth, we sorted fifteen bacterial strains from a larger isolate collection to study in vitro Plant Growth Promoting (PGP) traits. We analysed the ability of these strains to colonise the root tissues of grapevine and Arabidopsis using green-fluorescent-protein-labelled strain derivatives and a cultivation independent approach. We assessed the ability of two subsets randomly chosen from the 15 selected strains to promote grapevine growth in two field-scale experiments in north and central Italy over two years. Parameters of plant vigour were measured during the vegetative season in de novo grafted vine cuttings and adult productive plants inoculated with the bacterial strains. Results: Beneficial bacteria rapidly and intimately colonized the rhizoplane and the root system of grapevine. In the field, plants inoculated with bacteria isolated from grapevine roots out-performed untreated plants. In both the tested vineyards, bacteria-promotion effects largely rely in the formation of an extended epigeal system endowed of longer shoots with larger diameters and more nodes than non-inoculated plants. Conclusions: PGP bacteria isolated in the laboratory can be successfully used to promote growth of grapevines in the field. The resulting larger canopy potentially increased the photosynthetic surface of the grapevine, promoting growth.

  15. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, R; van der Werf, A; Lambers, H

    1989-09-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major.

  16. Effects of Tebuconazole and Triadimefon on Germination and Seedling Growth of Barley%戊唑醇和三唑酮拌种抑制大麦苗期生长试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘猛道; 赵加涛; 字尚永; 朱丽梅

    2011-01-01

    分别选用4种不同浓度6%戊唑醇FS和3种不同浓度15%三唑酮WP对“云大麦2号”进行拌种,研究其对大麦苗期生长的影响.结果表明:6%戊唑醇FS处理大麦种子,用药0.25~0.75mL/kg对大麦发芽、成苗和苗期生长无影响,用药1.00mL/kg有一定抑制作用;15%三唑酮WP处理大麦种子对大麦发芽、成苗和苗期生长有显著抑制作用,生产上应慎用.%Four different concentrations of tebuconazole (6% ) and three different concentrations of triadimefon (15% ) were used to examine effects of tebuconazole and triadimefon on germination and seedling growth of barley. The results showed that the mixture of seeds with tebuconazole of 0. 25 -0. 75mL/kg had no the effects on the germination and seedling growth of barley, but the mixture of seeds with tebuconazole of 1.00mL/kg inhibited the germination and seedling growth. On the other hand, regardless of concentration, triadimefon significantly inhibited the germination and seedling growth of barley. Thus, triadimefon should be applied in agricultural production with care.

  17. The MicroRNA390/TAS3 Pathway Mediates Symbiotic Nodulation and Lateral Root Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobecker, Karen Vanesa; Reynoso, Mauricio Alberto; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Crespi, Martín; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, María Eugenia

    2017-08-01

    Legume roots form two types of postembryonic organs, lateral roots and symbiotic nodules. Nodule formation is the result of the interaction of legumes with rhizobia and requires the mitotic activation and differentiation of root cells as well as an independent, but coordinated, program that allows infection by rhizobia. MicroRNA390 (miR390) is an evolutionarily conserved microRNA that targets the Trans-Acting Short Interference RNA3 (TAS3) transcript. Cleavage of TAS3 by ARGONAUTE7 results in the production of trans-acting small interference RNAs, which target mRNAs encoding AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2 (ARF2), ARF3, and ARF4. Here, we show that activation of the miR390/TAS3 regulatory module by overexpression of miR390 in Medicago truncatula promotes lateral root growth but prevents nodule organogenesis, rhizobial infection, and the induction of two key nodulation genes, Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1) and NSP2 Accordingly, inactivation of the miR390/TAS3 module, either by expression of a miR390 target mimicry construct or mutations in ARGONAUTE7, enhances nodulation and rhizobial infection, alters the spatial distribution of the nodules, and increases the percentage of nodules with multiple meristems. Our results revealed a key role of the miR390/TAS3 pathway in legumes as a modulator of lateral root organs, playing opposite roles in lateral root and nodule development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Identification of three LRR-RKs involved in perception of root meristem growth factor in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Hidefumi; Mori, Ayaka; Yasue, Naoko; Sumida, Kumiko; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2016-04-05

    A peptide hormone, root meristem growth factor (RGF), regulates root meristem development through the PLETHORA (PLT) stem cell transcription factor pathway, but it remains to be uncovered how extracellular RGF signals are transduced to the nucleus. Here we identified, using a combination of a custom-made receptor kinase (RK) expression library and exhaustive photoaffinity labeling, three leucine-rich repeat RKs (LRR-RKs) that directly interact with RGF peptides in Arabidopsis These three LRR-RKs, which we named RGFR1, RGFR2, and RGFR3, are expressed in root tissues including the proximal meristem, the elongation zone, and the differentiation zone. The triple rgfr mutant was insensitive to externally applied RGF peptide and displayed a short root phenotype accompanied by a considerable decrease in meristematic cell number. In addition, PLT1 and PLT2 protein gradients, observed as a gradual gradient decreasing toward the elongation zone from the stem cell area in wild type, steeply declined at the root tip in the triple mutant. Because RGF peptides have been shown to create a diffusion-based concentration gradient extending from the stem cell area, our results strongly suggest that RGFRs mediate the transformation of an RGF peptide gradient into a PLT protein gradient in the proximal meristem, thereby acting as key regulators of root meristem development.

  19. Nitrogen fertilization and root growth dynamics of durum wheat for a sustainable production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato De Giorgio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In an area of the Apulian Tavoliere (southern Italy, the effects of three levels of nitrogen fertilization (0, 50 and 100 kg N ha–1 on root development, growth analysis and yield parameters of durum wheat were evaluated. The research was conducted over a four-year period (1994-97. The non-destructive mini-rhizotron method was used to study the root system at stem extension and at the beginning of heading and ripening stages. At the end of tillering and at boot and flowering stages, samples of wheat biomass were taken and subjected to growth analysis. Yield data and the main biometric parameters were collected at harvest time. The doses of nitrogen (N fertilizer 50 and 100 kg N ha–1 had a greater effect on root development in the 20-30 cm soil layer and on epigeal biomass than the control test (N0 without nitrogen fertilization. In the test (N0 the growth of root and epigeal biomass was slower during the first vegetative phases, however, afterwards both of them recovered and the root system was mainly developed in the 30-40 cm soil layer. A better development of root system in deeper soil layers, without nitrogen supply, has allowed the plant to overcome more easily the water-deficit and thermal stresses during the ripening stage. The results of this research have shown that the production of grain with 50 kg ha–1 of N is similar to those of 100 kg ha–1 of N doses and higher than the test without nitrogen fertilization. In this kind of environment can be recommended a nitrogen dose of 50 kg ha–1 for obtaining an increase in grain production with low costs and reduced agricultural sources of pollution.

  20. Clonostachys rosea reduces spot blotch in barley by inhibiting pre-penetration growth and sporulation of Bipolaris sorokiniana without inducing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Lübeck, Peter S; Jørgensen, Hans Jørgen Lyngs

    2016-01-01

    to control barley leaf pathogens and the mechanisms behind the inhibition emphasising induced resistance. RESULTS: Under controlled conditions, spray application of C. rosea isolate IK726 to barley leaves reduced Bipolaris sorokiniana severity up to 70% when applied 24 h before or simultaneously...... as a protectant against three barley leaf pathogens. B. sorokiniana was directly inhibited by IK726 whereas induced resistance appeared not to be involved. Quantitative microscopy is a powerful tool for elucidating mechanisms involved in disease control.......BACKGROUND: Several diseases threaten cereal production and fungicides are therefore widely used. Biological control is an environmentally friendly alternative and the fungus Clonostachys rosea is a versatile antagonist, effective against several plant diseases. We studied the ability of C. rosea...

  1. Fe-chlorophyllin promotes the growth of wheat roots associated with nitric oxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Min; Zhang, Liefeng; Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from 0.01 to 10 mg/L. At the relatively lower Fe-chlorophyllin concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the activity of IAA oxidase displayed a remarkable decrease, being 40.1% lower than the control. Meanwhile, Fe-chlorophyllin treatment could increase the activities of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), as determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that Fe-chlorophyllin contributes to the growth of wheat root associated with nitric oxide generation.

  2. Fe-Chlorophyllin Promotes the Growth of Wheat Roots Associated with Nitric Oxide Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available : Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from 0.01 to 10 mg/L. At the relatively lower Fe-chlorophyllin concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the activity of IAA oxidase displayed a remarkable decrease, being 40.1% lower than the control. Meanwhile, Fe-chlorophyllin treatment could increase the activities of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD, as determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that Fe-chlorophyllin contributes to the growth of wheat root associated with nitric oxide generation.

  3. Impact of different culture media on hairy roots growth of Valeriana officinalis L.

    OpenAIRE

    Pakdin Parizi, Ali; Farsi, Mohammad; Nematzadeh, Ghorban-Ali; Amin MIRSHAMSI

    2015-01-01

    Transformed hairy root cultures of Valeriana officinalis were established by infection with Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834. To determine the effect of different media on the growth of V. officinalis hairy roots, MS, B5 media (1.0X and 0.5X strength), N6 medium and a modified MS medium without phytohormones were used. In addition, different NH4+ to NO3- ratios in MS medium were studied. The effects of these treatments were evaluated after 21 days of culture in relation to hairy roo...

  4. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND AGROECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF CADMIUM INTERACTIONS WITH BARLEY PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A VASSILEV

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is a review of author’s previous publications, unpublished results as well as available literature on barley responses to Cd contamination. The physiological backgrounds of the acute Cd toxicity in barley plants are briefly described. Some data characterizing the chronic Cd toxicity in barley have been also provided in relation to its possible use for seed production and Cd phytoextraction on Cd-contaminated agricultural soils. Information about the main physiological factors limiting growth of Cd-exposed barley plants and grain yield, seedling quality as well as Cd phytoextraction capacity of barley grown in Cd-contaminated soils is presented.

  5. Contribution of Root Proliferation in Nutrient-Rich Soil Patches to Nutrient Uptake and Growth of Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Bo; ZHANG Fu-Suo; SHEN Jian-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Root proliferation can be stimulated in a heterogeneous nutrient patch; however,the functions of the root proliferation in the nutrient-rich soil patches are not fully understood.In the present study,a two-year field experiment was conducted to examine the comparative effects of localized application of ammonium and phosphorus (P) at early or late stages on root growth,nutrient uptake,and biomass of maize (Zea mays L.) on a calcareous soil in an intensive farming system.Localized supply of ammonium and P had a more evident effect on shoot and root growth,and especially stimulated fine root development at the early seedling stage,with most of the maize roots being allocated to the nutrient-rich patch in the topsoil.Although localized ammonium and P supply at the late stage also enhanced the fine root growth,the plant roots in the patch accounted for a low proportion of the whole maize roots in the topsoil at the flowering stage.Compared with the early stage,fine root length in the short-lived nutrient patch decreased by 44%-62% and the shoot dry weight was not different between heterogeneous and homogeneous nutrient supply at the late growth stage.Localized supply of ammonium and P significantly increased N and P accumulation by maize at 35 and 47 days after sowing (DAS); however,no significant difference was found among the treatments at 82 DAS and the later growth stages.The increased nutrient uptake and plant growth was related to the higher proportion of root length in the localized nutrient-enriched patch.The results indicated that root proliferation in nutrient patches contributed more to maize growth and nutrient uptake at the early than late stages.

  6. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash; Singh, Harminder Pal; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 microW cm(-2); 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at > or =2 h), and radicle and plumule growths (> or =1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H(2)O(2) accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  7. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Department of Zoology, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Singh, Harminder Pal, E-mail: hpsingh_01@yahoo.com [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani [Department of Botany, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 {mu}W cm{sup -2}; 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at {>=}2 h), and radicle and plumule growths ({>=}1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  8. Contrasts between whole-plant and local nutrient levels determine root growth and death in Ailanthus altissima (Simaroubaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fengqin; Mou, Paul P; Weiner, Jacob; Li, Shuo

    2014-05-01

    • There is an ongoing debate about the importance of whole-plant control vs. local modular mechanisms for root growth. We conducted a split-root experiment with different patch/background levels of nitrogen to examine whether local root growth and death are controlled by local resource levels or at the whole-plant level.• Three microrhizotrons with 0, 10, and 100 µg N/g growth medium levels (74 g growth medium each) were attached to pots of high or low soil N in which one Ailanthus altissima individual was growing. One fine root was guided into each of the microrhizotrons and photographed every 4 d. Plants were harvested after 28 d; root growth and mortality in the microrhizotrons were recorded. Changes in root length, number of laterals, and interlateral length were determined from the photos and analyzed.• While overall plant growth was influenced by background N level, both patch and background N levels influenced root growth and mortality in patches. Local roots proliferated most when the patch N level was high and background level low, and they proliferated least and showed highest mortality when patch N was low and the background level high.• The fate of roots growing in a patch is influenced by the resource environment of the plant's other roots as well as the resource levels in the patch itself. Thus, the growth and death of roots in patches is determined by both modular and whole-plant mechanisms. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  9. Putting theory to the test: which regulatory mechanisms can drive realistic growth of a root?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Vos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a 'Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule' (ULSR was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the

  10. Putting theory to the test: which regulatory mechanisms can drive realistic growth of a root?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Dirk; Vissenberg, Kris; Broeckhove, Jan; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-10-01

    In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a 'Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule' (ULSR) was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR) to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the value of

  11. Putting Theory to the Test: Which Regulatory Mechanisms Can Drive Realistic Growth of a Root?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Dirk; Vissenberg, Kris; Broeckhove, Jan; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a ‘Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule’ (ULSR) was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR) to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the value of

  12. Distribution of linear growth rates in different directions in root apical meristems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Nakielski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth of apical meristems in plants may be well described by the growth tensor method. Hejnowicz (Envir. Exp. Bot. 1989, 29 determined growth tensors for roots: one with a minimum and the other with a maximum of the relative elemental growth rate in volume and used them for the description of two types of apices: one with an apical cell and merophytes (I, and the other with files of cells converging towards a quiescent centre, CQ (II. In the present paper the same cases are considered from the point of view of a spatial and directional variation of the relative elemental rate of growth in length, RERG1. Maps of the RERG1 in two planes: axial and tangential, the latter determined by periclinal-longitudinal (PL and periclinal-tangential (PT principal growth directions, are shown. In an apical part of apex i where there is maximum volumetric growth, there also occurs a maximum of RERG1 for all directions. In regions other than this RERG1 decreases although RERG1 in the PL direction predominates everywhere. In apex II RERG1 for all directions has a minimum in CQ and becomes increasingly larger with increasing distance from it - the maximum is in the PL direction in the cylindrical part of the apex. In peripheral parts of both apices, in the place of the root/cap junction, RERG, in the anticlinal direction is significantly small.

  13. [Allelopathy autotoxicity effects of aquatic extracts from rhizospheric soil on rooting and growth of stem cuttings in Pogostemon cablin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kun; Li, Ming; Dong, Shan; Li, Yun-qi; Huang, Jie-wen; Li, Long-ming

    2014-06-01

    To study the allelopathy effects of aquatic extracts from rhizospheric soil on the rooting and growth of stem cutting in Pogostemon cablin, and to reveal its mechanism initially. The changes of rhizogenesis characteristics and physic-biochemical during cutting seedlings were observed when using different concentration of aquatic extracts from rhizospheric soil. Aquatic extracts from rhizospheric soil had significant inhibitory effects on rooting rate, root number, root length, root activity, growth rate of cutting with increasing concentrations of tissue extracts; The chlorophyll content of cutting seedlings were decreased, but content of MDA were increased, and activities of POD, PPO and IAAO in cutting seedlings were affected. Aquatic extracts from rhizospheric soil of Pogostemon cablin have varying degrees of inhibitory effects on the normal rooting and growth of stem cuttings.

  14. A Markovian Growth Dynamics on Rooted Binary Trees Evolving According to the Gompertz Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landim, C.; Portugal, R. D.; Svaiter, B. F.

    2012-08-01

    Inspired by biological dynamics, we consider a growth Markov process taking values on the space of rooted binary trees, similar to the Aldous-Shields (Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 79(4):509-542, 1988) model. Fix n≥1 and β>0. We start at time 0 with the tree composed of a root only. At any time, each node with no descendants, independently from the other nodes, produces two successors at rate β( n- k)/ n, where k is the distance from the node to the root. Denote by Z n ( t) the number of nodes with no descendants at time t and let T n = β -1 nln( n/ln4)+(ln2)/(2 β). We prove that 2- n Z n ( T n + nτ), τ∈ℝ, converges to the Gompertz curve exp(-(ln2) e - βτ ). We also prove a central limit theorem for the martingale associated to Z n ( t).

  15. Effects of Phlomis umbrosa Root on Longitudinal Bone Growth Rate in Adolescent Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghun; Kim, Young-Sik; Song, Jungbin; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Hyun Jung; Guo, Hailing; Kim, Hocheol

    2016-04-07

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of Phlomis umbrosa root on bone growth and growth mediators in rats. Female adolescent rats were administered P. umbrosa extract, recombinant human growth hormone or vehicle for 10 days. Tetracycline was injected intraperitoneally to produce a glowing fluorescence band on the newly formed bone on day 8, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected to label proliferating chondrocytes on days 8-10. To assess possible endocrine or autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, we evaluated insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in response to P. umbrosa administration in either growth plate or serum. Oral administration of P. umbrosa significantly increased longitudinal bone growth rate, height of hypertrophic zone and chondrocyte proliferation of the proximal tibial growth plate. P. umbrosa also increased serum IGFBP-3 levels and upregulated the expressions of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in growth plate. In conclusion, P. umbrosa increases longitudinal bone growth rate by stimulating proliferation and hypertrophy of chondrocyte with the increment of circulating IGFBP-3. Regarding the immunohistochemical study, the effect of P. umbrosa may also be attributable to upregulation of local IGF-1 and BMP-2 expressions in the growth plate, which can be considered as a GH dependent autocrine/paracrine pathway.

  16. Effects of Phlomis umbrosa Root on Longitudinal Bone Growth Rate in Adolescent Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghun Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of Phlomis umbrosa root on bone growth and growth mediators in rats. Female adolescent rats were administered P. umbrosa extract, recombinant human growth hormone or vehicle for 10 days. Tetracycline was injected intraperitoneally to produce a glowing fluorescence band on the newly formed bone on day 8, and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine was injected to label proliferating chondrocytes on days 8–10. To assess possible endocrine or autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, we evaluated insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 in response to P. umbrosa administration in either growth plate or serum. Oral administration of P. umbrosa significantly increased longitudinal bone growth rate, height of hypertrophic zone and chondrocyte proliferation of the proximal tibial growth plate. P. umbrosa also increased serum IGFBP-3 levels and upregulated the expressions of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in growth plate. In conclusion, P. umbrosa increases longitudinal bone growth rate by stimulating proliferation and hypertrophy of chondrocyte with the increment of circulating IGFBP-3. Regarding the immunohistochemical study, the effect of P. umbrosa may also be attributable to upregulation of local IGF-1 and BMP-2 expressions in the growth plate, which can be considered as a GH dependent autocrine/paracrine pathway.

  17. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery.

  18. [Effects of nighttime warming on winter wheat root growth and soil nutrient availability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Qian; Chen, Jin; Guo, Jia; Tian, Yun-Lu; Yang, Shi-Jia; Zhang, Li; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jian

    2013-02-01

    Climate warming has an obvious asymmetry between day and night, with a greater increment of air temperature at nighttime than at daytime. By adopting passive nighttime warming (PNW) system, a two-year field experiment of nighttime warming was conducted in the main production areas of winter wheat in China (Shijiazhuang of Hebei Province, Xuzhou of Jiangsu Province, Xuchang of Henan Province, and Zhenjiang of Jiangsu Province) in 2009 and 2010, with the responses of soil pH and available nutrient contents during the whole growth periods and of wheat root characteristics at heading stage determined. As compared with the control (no nighttime warming), nighttime warming decreased the soil pH and available nutrient contents significantly, and increased the root dry mass and root/shoot ratio to a certain extent. During the whole growth period of winter wheat, nighttime warming decreased the soil pH in Shijiazhuang, Xuzhou, Xuchang, and Zhenjiang averagely by 0.4%, 0.4%, 0.7%, and 0.9%, the soil alkaline nitrogen content averagely by 8.1%, 8.1%, 7.1%, and 6.0%, the soil available phosphorus content averagely by 15.7%, 12.1%, 19.6%, and 25.8%, and the soil available potassium content averagely by 11.5%, 7.6%, 7.6% , and 10.1%, respectively. However, nighttime warming increased the wheat root dry mass at heading stage in Shijiazhuang, Xuzhou, and Zhenjiang averagely by 31. 5% , 27.0%, and 14.5%, and the root/shoot ratio at heading stage in Shijiazhuang, Xuchang, and Zhenjiang averagely by 23.8%, 13.7% and 9.7%, respectively. Our results indicated that nighttime warming could affect the soil nutrient supply and winter wheat growth via affecting the soil chemical properties.

  19. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Marie Waters

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized or dead (sterilized substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in Fragaria vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from by the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging.

  20. [Effects of wheat root exudates on cucumber growth and soil fungal community structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Min; Cao, Peng; Ma, Ya-Fei; Wang, Li-Li

    2014-10-01

    With wheat as the donor plant and cucumber as the receptor plant, this study investigated the effects of root exudates from wheat cultivars with different allelopathic potentials (positive or negative) and companion cropping with wheat on soil fungal community structure by PCR-DGGE method and cucumber growth. Results showed that the wheat root exudates with positive allelopathic potential increased height and stem diameter of cucumber seedlings significantly, compared to the control seedlings (W) after 6 days and 12 days treatment, respectively. Also, wheat root exudates with both positive and negative allelopathic potential increased the seedling height of cucumber significantly after 18 days treatment. The wheat root exudates with different allelopathic potentials decreased the band number, Shannon and evenness indices of soil fungal community significantly in cucumber seedling rhizosphere, and those in the soil with the control seedlings (W) were also significantly higher than that in the control soil without seedlings (Wn) after 6 days treatment. The band number, Shannon and evenness indices in all the treatments were significantly higher than those in the control soil without seedlings (Wn) after 18 days treatment. Companion cropping with negative allelopathic potential wheat decreased the Shannon and evenness indices of soil fungi community significantly in the cucumber seedling rhizosphere, suggesting the wheat root exudates and companion cropping with wheat changed soil fungal community structure in the cucumber seedling rhizosphere. The results of DGGE map and the principal component analysis showed that companion cropping with wheat cultivars with different allelopathic potentials changed soil fungal community structure in cucumber seedling rhizosphere.

  1. Tall or short? Slender or thick? A plant strategy for regulating elongation growth of roots by low concentrations of gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Eiichi

    2012-07-01

    Since the plant hormone gibberellin (GA) was discovered as a fungal toxin that caused abnormal elongation of rice shoots, the physiological function of GA has mainly been investigated in relation to the regulation of plant height. However, an indispensable role for GA in root growth has been elucidated by using severely GA-depleted plants, either with a gene mutation in GA biosynthesis or which have been treated by an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis. The molecular sequence of GA signalling has also been studied to understand GA functions in root growth. This review addresses research progress on the physiological functions of GA in root growth. Concentration-dependent stimulation of elongation growth by GA is important for the regulation of plant height and root length. Thus the endogenous level of GA and/or the GA sensitivity of shoots and roots plays a role in determining the shoot-to-root ratio of the plant body. Since the shoot-to-root ratio is an important parameter for agricultural production, control of GA production and GA sensitivity may provide a strategy for improving agricultural productivity. The sequence of GA signal transduction has recently been unveiled, and some component molecules are suggested as candidate in planta regulatory sites and as points for the artificial manipulation of GA-mediated growth control. This paper reviews: (1) the breakthrough dose-response experiments that show that root growth is regulated by GA in a lower concentration range than is required for shoot growth; (2) research on the regulation of GA biosynthesis pathways that are known predominantly to control shoot growth; and (3) recent research on GA signalling pathways, including GA receptors, which have been suggested to participate in GA-mediated growth regulation. This provides useful information to suggest a possible strategy for the selective control of shoot and root growth, and to explain how GA plays a role in rosette and liana plants with tall or short, and slender

  2. Formulation of Indigenous Rhizobacterial Isolates from Healthy Soybean’s Root, which Ability to Promote Growth and Yield of Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Trimurti Habazar; Yulmira Yanti; Cahaya Ritonga

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are a group of bacteria, that actively colonize plant roots, induce the resistance of plant to pathogen, increase plant growth and yield. Our previous research had showed, that one of rhizobacterial isolates from soybean root effective to promote growth and yield of soybean. To maintain the effectivity of this bacterial isolate during storage, transportation and application, so need to be formulated. The aim of this research was to get the best carrier for...

  3. Growth of eucalyptus rooted cuttings in toxic organic waste compost of textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila F. de Souza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBiodegradation techniques may help contaminated organic wastes to become useful for plant production. The current study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of composting in the biodegradation of toxic residues from the textile industry and its use as substrate in saplings production. Cotton cloths contaminated with oil and grease, used in loom maintenance, were composted in a mixture with cattle manure. The composted material replaced coconut fiber in the substrate for the production of eucalyptus rooted cuttings: mixture of vermiculite, carbonized rice husk and coconut fiber in the ratio of 2:1:1 (v/v and using it as control. Thus, the amount of rice husks remained unchanged and the amount of vermiculite and compost varied. The compost proportion in the tested substrates were 0, 19, 37, 56 and 75%. The compost produced from textile wastes showed high nutrient levels and low levels of heavy metals. In general, the survival, growth and some growth indices of rooted cuttings produced on substrates with 19 and 37% compost were similar to those of rooted cuttings grown in commercial substrate. Composting is efficient and the material is useful for rooted cuttings production.

  4. Effect of Lanthanum on Rice Growth and Physiological Parameters with Split-Root Nutrient Solution Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢祖彬; 朱建国; 褚海燕; 张雅丽; 高人; 曾青; 曹志洪

    2003-01-01

    Split-root solution culture was used to study the promoting effect of lanthanum on rice (Oryza sativa) growth and its physiological mechanisms. Results show that low concentration (0.05~1.5 mg*L-1) increases rice yield and grain numbers. High concentration depresses grain formation (9~30 mg*L-1) and root elongation (1.5~30 mg*L-1). No significant influence on straw dry weight was found over the whole concentration range except the 0.05 mg*L-1 treatment. With the increase of La concentration from 0.05 to 0.75 mg*L-1, catalase (CAT) activity in the first fully expandeing leaves and roots decreases. When La concentration is greater than 0.75 mg*L-1 or less than 9 mg*L-1, it significantly decreases superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in the leaves and roots. No significant effects were found on chlorophyll, protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Possible mechanisms of La′s promoting effect on rice growth and reduction effect of *O-2 were discussed.

  5. Shoot Photosynthesis and Root Growth of Hybrid and Conventional Rice Cultivars as Affected by N and K Levels in the Root Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGXIAOE; V.ROEMHELD; 等

    1997-01-01

    Root box experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of N and NK levels in the root zone on shoot photosynthesis and root growth of hybrid an cultivar of rice (Oryza sativa L.) on two paddy soils (clayey and silty).The results showed that dry matter yields in the hybrid and the cultivar were considerably increased by NK supply,bu the effect was greater for the hybrid.Supply of NK in the root zone significantly increased photosynthetic rate of the lower position leaf and the active green leaf area per plant,in which the effects were much more obvious in the hybrid rice than in the cultivar.High NK supply in the root zone stimulated the root growth,and decreased pH and increased the oxidation zone in the rhizosphere in both entries,but to a greater extent in the hybrid .The results indicated that higher NK levels were needed to maintain higher root activity and shoot photosynthetic capacity in rice,particularly in hybrid rice.

  6. Genome Size Is a Strong Predictor of Root Meristem Growth Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gruner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in genome size (GS has been linked to several facets of the plant phenotype. Recently it was shown that GS is significantly correlated with cell size and the duration of the cell cycle. Here we test the hypothesis that GS might also be a predictor of apical root meristem growth rate (RMGR. We studied eight species of eudicots with varying GS using time-lapse microscopic image analysis. A significant negative exponential relationship was observed between GS and RMGR. Our results show significantly decreased RMGR for large genome species. This relationship represents a significant consequence of GS expansion in plants and may partly explain why genome sizes tend to be small in eudicots. Interestingly, parasitic plants, which do not rely on root growth as much, often have large genomes.

  7. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality.

  8. The role of auxin and ethylene for gravitropic differential growth of coleoptiles and roots of rye- and maize seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, H. G.; Sabovljevic, A.; Njio, G.; Roth, U.

    The relevance of auxin and ethylene for differential gravitropic growth has been analyzed both in shoots and roots of etiolated rye- and maize seedlings. As previously demonstrated for indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA), incubation of coleoptiles in dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) resulted in a two- to threefold length increase compared to water controls. In spite of this immense effect on elongation growth, gravi-curvature was similar to water controls. In contrast, inhibition of ethylene synthesis prevented differential growth of abraded coleoptiles as well as of roots without a significant inhibiting effect on elongation. Inhibition of ethylene perception in horizontally stimulated maize roots growing on surfaces eliminated the capacity of the roots to adapt growth to the surface and a vertical orientation of the root tip. This effect is accompanied by up- and down-regulation of a number of proteins as detected with the 2D-MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight) method. Exogenous ethylene inhibited growth but enhanced gravitropic curvature in roots that were "freely" gravistimulated in a horizontal position, exhibiting a pronounced "waving" behavior. Together the data challenge the regulatory relevance of IAA-redistribution for gravitropic differential growth. They corroborate the crucial regulatory relevance of ethylene for gravitropic growth, in both roots and coleoptiles.

  9. Low humic acids promote in vitro lily bulblet enlargement by enhancing roots growth and carbohydrate metabolism * #

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Xia, Yi-ping; Zhang, Jia-ping; Du, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Yi-di; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Bulblet development is a problem in global lily bulb production and carbohydrate metabolism is a crucial factor. Micropropagation acts as an efficient substitute for faster propagation and can provide a controllable condition to explore bulb growth. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of humic acid (HA) on bulblet swelling and the carbohydrate metabolic pathway in Lilium Oriental Hybrids ‘Sorbonne’ under in vitro conditions. HA greatly promoted bulblet growth at 0.2, 2.0, and 20.0 mg/L, and pronounced increases in bulblet sucrose, total soluble sugar, and starch content were observed for higher HA concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) within 45 d after transplanting (DAT). The activities of three major starch synthetic enzymes (including adenosine 5'-diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase, granule-bound starch synthase, and soluble starch synthase) were enhanced dramatically after HA application especially low concentration HA (LHA), indicating a quick response of starch metabolism. However, higher doses of HA also caused excessive aboveground biomass accumulation and inhibited root growth. Accordingly, an earlier carbon starvation emerged by observing evident starch degradation. Relative bulblet weight gradually decreased with increased HA doses and thereby broke the balance between the source and sink. A low HA concentration at 0.2 mg/L performed best in both root and bulblet growth. The number of roots and root length peaked at 14.5 and 5.75 cm, respectively. The fresh bulblet weight and diameter reached 468 mg (2.9 times that under the control treatment) and 11.68 mm, respectively. Further, sucrose/starch utilization and conversion were accelerated and carbon famine was delayed as a result with an average relative bulblet weight of 80.09%. To our knowledge, this is the first HA application and mechanism research into starch metabolism in both in vitro and in vivo condition in bulbous crops. PMID:27819136

  10. Genome Size Is a Strong Predictor of Root Meristem Growth Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Gruner; Nathan Hoverter; Tylia Smith; Charles A. Knight

    2010-01-01

    Variation in genome size (GS) has been linked to several facets of the plant phenotype. Recently it was shown that GS is significantly correlated with cell size and the duration of the cell cycle. Here we test the hypothesis that GS might also be a predictor of apical root meristem growth rate (RMGR). We studied eight species of eudicots with varying GS using time-lapse microscopic image analysis. A significant negative exponential relationship was observed between GS and RMGR. Our results sh...

  11. N, P and K limitation of fine root growth along an elevation transect in tropical mountain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graefe, Sophie; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2010-11-01

    It is generally assumed that tree growth in tropical low-elevation forests is primarily limited by phosphorus while nitrogen limitation is more prominent in tropical montane forests where temperature is lower and the soils are poorly developed. We tested this hypothesis in mountain rainforests of South Ecuador by investigating the growth response of tree fine roots to N, P and K fertilization in ingrowth cores exposed at 1050 m (pre-montane) and 3060 m (upper montane) elevation. Root growth into unfertilized ingrowth cores (control treatment) was about 10 times slower at 3060 m than at 1050 m. At 1050 m, root growth was stimulated not only by P, but also by N and K. In contrast, N was the only element to promote root growth at 3060 m. The N concentration in fine root biomass dropped to nearly a third between 1050 and 3060 m, those of P, K, Ca and Mg decreased as well, but to a lesser degree. According to a 15NO 315NH 4 tracer study along the slope, tree fine roots accumulated nitrate and ammonium in root biomass at similar rates between 1050 and 3060 m, despite lower temperatures higher upslope. We conclude that the nature of nutrient limitation of tree fine root growth changes with elevation from an apparent co-limitation by P together with N and K at 1050 m to predominant N limitation at 3060 m, which is also reflected by low foliar N concentrations. Increasing N limitation may have caused the high fine root biomass and root/shoot ratio in the high elevation forest, while the capability of the roots to acquire mineral N apparently was not affected by lower temperatures at high elevations.

  12. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Murayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH, a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control, a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in “itch-scratch” animal models is under investigation.

  13. Drought tolerance, growth partitioning and vigor in eucalypt seedlings and rooted cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T J; Filho, W S

    1988-12-01

    To clarify the physiological basis of productivity differences among rooted cuttings and seedlings of eucalypt species, relationships between morphology and water relations were examined in 4-month-old seedlings of Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. urophylla S.T. Blake and E. cloeziana F. Muell. and in 4-month-old rooted cuttings of three E. grandis cultivars. Four-month-old seedlings had greater dry weights, lower leaf area/root dry weight (LA/RDW) ratios and lower shoot/root dry weight (S/R) ratios than 4-month-old rooted cuttings. For all cultivars of E. grandis, tall rooted cuttings, as defined by height at age 4 weeks, had greater dry weights by age 4 months and lower LA/RDW and S/R ratios than short rooted cuttings. There were differences in height growth, dry matter productivity and relative shoot and root development among cuttings of different E. grandis cultivars, but these differences were not as great as the differences between short and tall grades of the same cultivar and between seedlings and cuttings. Consistent with the differences in LA/RDW and S/R ratios, seedlings had higher daytime water potentials (Psi(x)) than cuttings, and tall cuttings had higher daytime values of Psi(x) than short cuttings. Differences in Psi(x) were also related to stomatal conductance (g(wv)), which was up to 300% greater in short cuttings than in tall cuttings. Among seedlings, those of E. cloeziana, which had the smallest dry weight at age 4 months, had the highest g(wv), whereas those of E. grandis, which had the greatest dry weight at age 4 months, had the lowest g(wv). Unlike seedlings and the tall cuttings, short cuttings lost turgor when subjected to drought. The differences observed in susceptibility to water stress may account in part for the associated differences in dry matter production. Xylem pressure potential and relative water deficit at zero turgor did not differ significantly among the types of plants studied, which suggests that differences in

  14. Arabidopsis root growth movements and their symmetry: progress and problems arising from recent work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Fernando; Fortunati, Alessio; Tassone, Paola

    2009-03-01

    Over the last fifteen years, an increasing number of plant scientists have become interested in the Arabidopsis root growth pattern, that is produced on the surface of an agar plate, inclined from the vertical. In this situation, the roots wave intensely and slant preferentially towards one side, showing torsions in the epidermal cell files alternately right-and left handed. In addition, the pattern switches to the formation of large or strict coils when the plate is set horizontally. After this finding, different hypotheses were advanced attempting to explain the forces that shape these patterns. These basically appear to be gravitropism, circumnutation and negative thigmotropism. With regard to the symmetry, the coils and the slanting in the wild-type are essentially right-handed, but mutants were also reported which show a left-handed symmetry, while some do not show a regular growth pattern at all. This review article discusses the earlier as well as the most recent findings on the topic, and investigates the possibility of describing the different mechanisms shaping the root growth patterns via unifying hypothesis.

  15. Plant growth, phosphorus nutrition, and root morphological responses to arbuscular mycorrhizas, phosphorus fertilization, and intraspecific density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, M S; Janos, D P

    2005-05-01

    We examined the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), phosphorus fertilization, intraspecific density, and their interaction, on the growth, phosphorus uptake, and root morphology of three facultative mycotrophic crops (Capsicum annuum, Zea mays, and Cucurbita pepo). Plants were grown in pots with or without AM at three densities and four phosphorus availabilities for 10 weeks. AM colonization, plant weight, and shoot phosphorus concentration were measured at harvest. Root morphology was assessed for C. annuum and Z. mays. Phosphorus fertilization reduced but did not eliminate AM colonization of all species. AM, phosphorus, and density interacted significantly to modify growth of C. annuum and C. pepo such that increased density and phosphorus diminished beneficial effects of AM. Increased density reduced positive effects of AM on C. annuum and C. pepo shoot phosphorus concentrations. AM altered both Z. mays and C. annuum root morphology in ways that complemented potential phosphorus uptake by mycorrhizas, but increased density and phosphorus diminished these effects. We infer that increased density predominantly influenced plant responses by affecting whether or not carbon (photosynthate) or phosphorus limited plant growth. By exacerbating carbon limitation, high density reduced the benefit/cost ratio of mycorrhizas and minimized their effects.

  16. The role of alpha-glucosidase in germinating barley grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Duncan; Rejzek, Martin; Naested, Henrik; Smedley, Mark; Otero, Sofía; Fahy, Brendan; Thorpe, Frazer; Nash, Robert J; Harwood, Wendy; Svensson, Birte; Denyer, Kay; Field, Robert A; Smith, Alison M

    2011-02-01

    The importance of α-glucosidase in the endosperm starch metabolism of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is poorly understood. The enzyme converts maltose to glucose (Glc), but in vitro studies indicate that it can also attack starch granules. To discover its role in vivo, we took complementary chemical-genetic and reverse-genetic approaches. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of a recombinant form of an α-glucosidase previously discovered in barley endosperm (ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE97 [HvAGL97]), and applied four of them to germinating grains. All four decreased the Glc-to-maltose ratio in the endosperm 10 d after imbibition, implying inhibition of maltase activity. Three of the four inhibitors also reduced starch degradation and seedling growth, but the fourth did not affect these parameters. Inhibition of starch degradation was apparently not due to inhibition of amylases. Inhibition of seedling growth was primarily a direct effect of the inhibitors on roots and coleoptiles rather than an indirect effect of the inhibition of endosperm metabolism. It may reflect inhibition of glycoprotein-processing glucosidases in these organs. In transgenic seedlings carrying an RNA interference silencing cassette for HvAgl97, α-glucosidase activity was reduced by up to 50%. There was a large decrease in the Glc-to-maltose ratio in these lines but no effect on starch degradation or seedling growth. Our results suggest that the α-glucosidase HvAGL97 is the major endosperm enzyme catalyzing the conversion of maltose to Glc but is not required for starch degradation. However, the effects of three glucosidase inhibitors on starch degradation in the endosperm indicate the existence of unidentified glucosidase(s) required for this process.

  17. Seed ageing-induced inhibition of germination and post-germination root growth is related to lower activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsdóttir, Hólmfrídur; Yan, Feng; Zhu, Yiyong; Peiter-Volk, Tina; Schubert, Sven

    2009-01-30

    Seeds of most crops can be severely damaged and lose vigor when stored under conditions of high humidity and temperature. The aged seeds are characterized by delayed germination and slow post-germination growth. To date, little is known about the physiological mechanisms responsible for slow root growth of seedlings derived from aged seeds. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is a universal H(+) pump in plant cells and is involved in various physiological processes including the elongation growth of plant cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a mild seed ageing treatment on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity of seedling roots. Maize (Zea mays L.) seeds with 17% water content were aged at 45 degrees C for 30h. The aged seeds showed a 20% reduction in germination. Seedlings from aged seeds grew slowly during an experimental period of 120h after imbibition. Plasma membranes of maize seedling roots were isolated for investigation in vitro. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.3.6) activity was 14% lower for seedling roots developed from aged seeds as compared to control seeds. Protein gel immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that the reduced activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase was attributed to a decrease in steady-state protein concentration of this enzyme. In conclusion, seed ageing causes a lower steady-state enzyme concentration of the H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane, which is related to slow germination and post-germination growth of seedling roots.

  18. Metabolic analysis of two contrasting wild barley genotypes grown hydroponically reveals adaptive strategies in response to low nitrogen stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiaoyan; Qian, Qiufeng; Ye, Zhilan; Zeng, Jianbin; Han, Zhigang; Zhang, Guoping

    2016-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient for plants. The increasingly severe environmental problems caused by N fertilizer application urge alleviation of N fertilizer dependence in crop production. In previous studies, we identified the Tibetan wild barley accessions with high tolerance to low nitrogen (LN). In this study, metabolic analysis was done on two wild genotypes (XZ149, tolerant and XZ56, sensitive) to understand the mechanism of LN tolerance, using a hydroponic experiment. Leaf and root samples were taken at seven time points within 18 d after LN treatment, respectively. XZ149 was much less affected by low N stress than XZ56 in plant biomass. A total of 51 differentially accumulated metabolites were identified between LN and normal N treated plants. LN stress induced tissue-specific changes in carbon and nitrogen partitioning, and XZ149 had a pattern of energy-saving amino acids accumulation and carbon distribution in favor of root growth that contribute to its higher LN tolerance. Moreover, XZ149 is highly capable of producing energy and maintaining the redox homeostasis under LN stress. The current results revealed the mechanisms underlying the wild barley in high LN tolerance and provided the valuable references for developing barley cultivars with LN tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in barley in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, M; Nakamura, T; Han, S Y; Takabe, T

    1995-01-01

    When subjected to salt stress or drought, some vascular plants such as barley respond with an increased accumulation of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (betaine), being the last step of betaine synthesis catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). We report here cloning and characterization of BADH cDNA from barley, a monocot, and the expression pattern of a BADH transcript. An open reading frame of 1515 bp encoded a protein which showed high homology to BADH enzymes present in other plants (spinach and sugar-beet) and in Escherichia coli. Transgenic tobacco plants harboring the clone expressed high levels of both BADH protein and its enzymatic activity. Northern blot analyses indicated that BADH mRNA levels increased almost 8-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in leaves and roots of barley plants grown in high-salt conditions, and that these levels decreased upon release of the stress, whereas they did not decrease under continuous salt stress. BADH transcripts also accumulate in response to water stress or drought, indicating a common response of the plant to osmotic changes that affect its water status. The addition of abscisic acid (ABA) to plants during growth also increased the levels of BADH transcripts dramatically, although the response was delayed when compared to that found for salt-stressed plants. Removal of plant roots before transferring the plants to high-salt conditions reduced only slightly the accumulation of BADH transcripts in the leaves.

  20. [Influence of drought on leaf photosynthetic capacity and root growth of soybeans at grain filling stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-jin; Yang, Kai-min; Huo, Jin; Zhou, Yong-hang; Wang, Yan-ping; Li, Gui-quan

    2015-05-01

    A drought-resistant soybean cultivar Jinda 70 and a drought-sensitive soybean cultivar Jindou 26 were taken as test materials. At the grain filling stage, the cultivars were subject to three water treatments including sufficient water supply, light drought stress, and severe drought stress by using pot experiments for research on influence of drought on leaf photosynthetic capacity and root growth of soybeans. The results showed that as the degree of drought stress was aggravated, all of the indices including leaf area, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rates (Pn), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate (Tr), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), plant mass, plant height, seed yield, and harvest index in the two cultivars declined. The root length and root mass increased under light drought stress, and decreased under severe drought stress. Root-shoot ratio ascended as the degree of drought stress was aggravated. Under severe drought stress, the increase of root-shoot ratio of the drought-resistant soybean cultivar Jinda 70 was up to 135.7%, which was higher than the that (116.7%) of the drought-sensitive soybean cultivar Jindou 26. Simultaneously, leaf area and chlorophyll content in Jinda 70 were respectively 69.3% and 85.5% of those in the control, which were better than those of Jindou 26. g(s) and Pn of Jinda 70 respectively declined 67.9% and 77.9%, but still lower than those of Jindou 26. Therefore, the decline range of harvest index of Jinda 70 was 43.8%, which was lower than the range of 78.8% of Jindou 26. The Biplot revealed that under different dry treatments, there were significant positive correlations among the six indexes including leaf area, chlorophyll content, Pn, g(s), Tr, and Ci of the two cultivars. There were also significant positive correlations among the six indices including plant mass, plant height, root length, root mass, seed yield, and harvest index. Root-shoot ratio only had significant positive correlation with root

  1. The effect of antibacterial monomer MDPB on the growth of organisms associated with root caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Clark, Douglas T; Brailsford, Susan R; Beighton, David; Watson, Timothy F; Imazato, Satoshi; Momoi, Yasuko

    2007-05-01

    MDPB, 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide, was tested for its ability to inhibit the growth of organisms associated with active root caries lesions and to modify the growth characteristics of these organisms at sub-MICs. MICs and MBCs of MDPB for independent isolates (n=5) of the following taxa: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces gerensceriae, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Lactobacillus spp., and Candida albicans were determined, and the effects at sub-MIC on microbial growth kinetics were assessed. All isolates were sensitive to inhibition by MDPB. The median MICs and MBCs of MDPB for these organisms were in the range of 3.13 to 25.0 microg/ml and 6.25 to 50.0 microg/ml, respectively. As for the influence of pH, inhibition was sensitive to acidic pH. Even at sub-MICs, the growth of all strains, measured as cell yield and doubling time, was significantly reduced. Based on the results of this study, MDPB exhibited the potential to inhibit the growth of microbiota associated with active root caries lesions.

  2. Open-air fumigation of winter barley with sulphur dioxide: Effects on growth of the flag leaf and enzymes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montiel-Canobra, P.O.; Bradbeer, J.W. (King' s Coll. London (UK)); Darrall, N.M. (National Power Technology and Environmental Centre, Leatherhead (UK))

    1991-01-01

    The effects SO{sub 2} on flag leaf growth and on a number of enzymes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism in leaves of winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Igri) were investigated. Plant material was obtained from an open-air fumigation experiment operated at Littlehampton, West Sussex, U.K., throughout two growing seasons (1985-1986 and 1986-1987). In 1985-1986 samples were compared from an ambient plot and the highest SO{sub 2} treatment plot. In 1986-1987 samples from the ambient SO{sub 2} plot and the two highest treatments were sampled. The flag leaf was studied in particular because of its considerable contribution to grain filling. Significant reduction in flag leaf dry weight and flag leaf area were found in the highest SO{sub 2} treatment in both seasons. In 1986-1987, delays in flag leaf emergence and senescence in both the 0.028 and 0.038 microliter l{sup {minus}1} SO{sub 2} treatments were observed. Leaf extracts were used to assay the following enzymes: stromal phosphoribulokinase and NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. No effects of SO{sub 2} were detected on the total activity of any of the stromal enzymes, or on the activation status of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase. Significant reductions in the post-anthesis activity of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were recorded for the highest SO{sub 2} treatment (0.038 microliter l{sup {minus}1}) and provided a preliminary indication that these levels of SO{sub 2} could affect the flow of fixed carbon in leaves and could thereby affect the availability of photoassimilate for export from source leaves. Both the reduction in size of the flag leaf and decreased levels of activity of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase may have important implications for the process of grain filling. 7 figs., 42 refs., 1 tab.

  3. STUDIES ON SYNBIOTIC BARLEY GRAIN EXTRACT AGAINST SOME HUMAN PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sheela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated that effect of prebiotic food containing oligosaccharide to enhance the growth and activity of probiotic strains. Barley grains probioticated using different strains of probiotics are Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Candida kefir,and saccharomyces boluradii. To select a suitable prebiotics like inulin for the development of Synbiotic barley and tested for antibacterial activity against diarrhoea causing pathogen such as Esherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella paratyphi A, Shigella dysenteriae, Vibrio cholerae. Analysis of identified compound from synbiotic barley grain using GC-MS.

  4. Hydrologic control on the root growth of Salix cuttings at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau', Valentina; Calliari, Baptiste; Perona, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Riparian plant roots contribute to the ecosystem functioning and, to a certain extent, also directly affect fluvial morphodynamics, e.g. by influencing sediment transport via mechanical stabilization and trapping. There is much both scientific and engineering interest in understanding the complex interactions among riparian vegetation and river processes. For example, to investigate plant resilience to uprooting by flow, one should quantify the probability that riparian plants may be uprooted during specific flooding event. Laboratory flume experiments are of some help to this regard, but are often limited to use grass (e.g., Avena and Medicago sativa) as vegetation replicate with a number of limitations due to fundamental scaling problems. Hence, the use of small-scale real plants grown undisturbed in the actual sediment and within a reasonable time frame would be particularly helpful to obtain more realistic flume experiments. The aim of this work is to develop and tune an experimental technique to control the growth of the root vertical density distribution of small-scale Salix cuttings of different sizes and lengths. This is obtained by controlling the position of the saturated water table in the sedimentary bed according to the sediment size distribution and the cutting length. Measurements in the rhizosphere are performed by scanning and analysing the whole below-ground biomass by means of the root analysis software WinRhizo, from which root morphology statistics and the empirical vertical density distribution are obtained. The model of Tron et al. (2015) for the vertical density distribution of the below-ground biomass is used to show that experimental conditions that allow to develop the desired root density distribution can be fairly well predicted. This augments enormously the flexibility and the applicability of the proposed methodology in view of using such plants for novel flow erosion experiments. Tron, S., Perona, P., Gorla, L., Schwarz, M., Laio, F

  5. High temperatures limit plant growth but hasten flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus) independently of vernalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Vandoorne, Bertrand; Descamps, Christophe; Périlleux, Claire; Dielen, Vincent; Van Herck, Jean-Claude; Quinet, Muriel

    2014-01-15

    An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a major crop in northern Europe, and it is cultivated as a source of inulin. This polysaccharide is stored in the tap root during the first growing season when the plant grows as a leafy rosette, whereas bolting and flowering occur in the second year after winter vernalisation. The impact of heat stress on plant phenology, water status, photosynthesis-related parameters, and inulin content was studied in the field and under controlled phytotron conditions. In the field, plants of the Crescendo cultivar were cultivated under a closed plastic-panelled greenhouse to investigate heat-stress conditions, while the control plants were shielded with a similar, but open, structure. In the phytotrons, the Crescendo and Fredonia cultivars were exposed to high temperatures (35°C day/28°C night) and compared to control conditions (17°C) over 10 weeks. In the field, heat reduced the root weight, the inulin content of the root and its degree of polymerisation in non-bolting plants. Flowering was observed in 12% of the heat stressed plants during the first growing season in the field. In the phytotron, the heat stress increased the total number of leaves per plant, but reduced the mean leaf area. Photosynthesis efficiency was increased in these plants, whereas osmotic potential was decreased. High temperature was also found to induced flowering of up to 50% of these plants, especially for the Fredonia cultivar. In conclusion, high temperatures induced a reduction in the growth of root chicory, although photosynthesis is not affected. Flowering was also induced, which indicates that high temperatures can partly substitute for the vernalisation requirement for the flowering of root chicory.

  6. Alleviation of chromium toxicity by hydrogen sulfide in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafaqat; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Abbasi, G H; Zhang, Guoping

    2013-10-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to examine the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) in alleviating chromium (Cr) stress in barley. A 2-factorial design with 6 replications was selected, including 3 levels of NaHS (0 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) and 2 levels of Cr (0 μM and 100 μM) as treatments. The results showed that NaHS addition enhances plant growth and photosynthesis slightly compared with the control. Moreover, NaHS alleviated the inhibition in plant growth and photosynthesis by Cr stress. Higher levels of NaHS exhibited more pronounced effects in reducing Cr concentrations in roots, shoots, and leaves. Ultrastructural examination of plant cells supported the facts by indication of visible alleviation of cell disorders in both root and leaf with exogenous application of NaHS. An increased number of plastoglobuli, disintegration, and disappearance of thylakoid membranes and starch granules were visualized inside the chloroplast of Cr-stressed plants. Starch accumulation in the chloroplasts was also noticed in the Cr-treated cells, with the effect being much less in Cr + NaHS-treated plants. Hence, it is concluded that H2 S produced from NaHS can improve plant tolerance under Cr stress.

  7. Effect of IAA on in vitro growth and colonization of Nostoc in plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Anwar; Shah, Syed T.; Rahman, Hazir; Irshad, Muhammad; Iqbal, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Nostoc is widely known for its ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen and the establishment of symbiotic relationship with a wide range of plants from various taxonomic groups. Several strains of Nostoc produce phytohormones that promote growth of its plant partners. Nostoc OS-1 was therefore selected for study because of the presence of putative ipdC gene that encodes a key enzyme to produce Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The results indicated that both cellular and released IAA was found high with increasing incubation time and reached to a peak value (i.e., 21 pmol mg-1ch-a) on the third week as determined by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Also the Nostoc OS-1 strain efficiently colonized the roots and promoted the growth of rice as well as wheat under axenic conditions and induced ipdC gene that suggested the possible involvement of IAA in these phenotypes. To confirm the impact of IAA on root colonization efficiency and plant promoting phenotypes of Nostoc OS-1, an ipdC knockout mutant was generated by homologous recombinant method. The amount of releasing IAA, in vitro growth, root colonization, and plant promoting efficiency of the ipdC knockout mutant was observed significantly lower than wild type strain under axenic conditions. Importantly, these phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels when the ipdC knockout mutant was complemented with wild type ipdC gene. These results together suggested that ipdC and/or synthesized IAA of Nostoc OS-1 is required for its efficient root colonization and plant promoting activity. PMID:25699072

  8. Barley peroxidase isozymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugesen, Sabrina; Bak-Jensen, Kristian Sass; Hägglund, Per; Henriksen, Anette; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Thirteen peroxidase spots on two-dimensional gels were identified by comprehensive proteome analysis of the barley seed. Mass spectrometry tracked multiple forms of three different peroxidase isozymes: barley seed peroxidase 1, barley seed-specific peroxidase BP1 and a not previously identified putative barley peroxidase. The presence of multiple spots for each of the isozymes reflected variations in post-translational glycosylation and protein truncation. Complete sequence coverage was achieved by using a series of proteases and chromatographic resins for sample preparation prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Distinct peroxidase spot patterns divided the 16 cultivars tested into two groups. The distribution of the three isozymes in different seed tissues (endosperm, embryo, and aleurone layer) suggested the peroxidases to play individual albeit partially overlapping roles during germination. In summary, a subset of three peroxidase isozymes was found to occur in the seed, whereas products of four other barley peroxidase genes were not detected. The present analysis documents the selective expression profiles and post-translational modifications of isozymes from a large plant gene family.

  9. Synchronous high-resolution phenotyping of leaf and root growth in Nicotiana tabacum over 24-h periods with GROWMAP-plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruts Tom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root growth is highly responsive to temporal changes in the environment. On the contrary, diel (24 h leaf expansion in dicot plants is governed by endogenous control and therefore its temporal pattern does not strictly follow diel changes in the environment. Nevertheless, root and shoot are connected with each other through resource partitioning and changing environments for one organ could affect growth of the other organ, and hence overall plant growth. Results We developed a new technique, GROWMAP-plant, to monitor growth processes synchronously in leaf and root of the same plant with a high resolution over the diel period. This allowed us to quantify treatment effects on the growth rates of the treated and non-treated organ and the possible interaction between them. We subjected the root system of Nicotiana tabacum seedlings to three different conditions: constant darkness at 22°C (control, constant darkness at 10°C (root cooling, and 12 h/12 h light–dark cycles at 22°C (root illumination. In all treatments the shoot was kept under the same 12 h/12 h light–dark cycles at 22°C. Root growth rates were found to be constant when the root-zone environment was kept constant, although the root cooling treatment significantly reduced root growth. Root velocity was decreased after light-on and light-off events of the root illumination treatment, resulting in diel root growth rhythmicity. Despite these changes in root growth, leaf growth was not affected substantially by the root-zone treatments, persistently showing up to three times higher nocturnal growth than diurnal growth. Conclusion GROWMAP-plant allows detailed synchronous growth phenotyping of leaf and root in the same plant. Root growth was very responsive to the root cooling and root illumination, while these treatments altered neither relative growth rate nor diel growth pattern in the seedling leaf. Our results that were obtained simultaneously in growing

  10. Effect of feeding cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) root meal on growth performance, hydrocyanide intake and haematological parameters of broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akapo, Abiola Olajetemi; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Bamgbose, Adeyemi Mustapha; Sanwo, Kehinde A; Jegede, Adebayo Vincent; Sobayo, Richard Abayomi; Idowu, Olusegun Mark; Fan, Juexin; Li, Lili; Olorunsola, Rotimi A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of feeding cassava root meal on growth performance, hydrocyanide intake, haematological indices and serum thiocyanate concentration of broiler chicks was investigated using 300-day-old male broilers. There were five dietary treatments arranged in a 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement of two processing methods of cassava root (peeled and unpeeled) included at two levels (100 and 200 g/kg) plus a control diet (maize-based diet, containing no cassava root). Each treatment was replicated six times with ten birds per replicate. The feeding trial lasted for 28 days. Control-fed birds had the highest overall (P cassava root meal (PCRM) had the least (P cassava root meal had higher (P cassava root meal. Dietary inclusion of peeled cassava root meal (PCRM) for broiler chicks resulted in increased final liveweight (P cassava root meal (UCRM). The least (P cassava root resulted in significant increase (P cassava root poses a threat on growth and health status of broiler chicks.

  11. Potential involvement of drought-induced Ran GTPase CLRan1 in root growth enhancement in a xerophyte wild watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Kinya; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Kajikawa, Masataka; Hanada, Kouhei; Kosaka, Rina; Kato, Atsushi; Katoh, Akira; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Yokota, Akiho

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced root growth is known as the survival strategy of plants under drought. Previous proteome analysis in drought-resistant wild watermelon has shown that Ran GTPase, an essential regulator of cell division and proliferation, was induced in the roots under drought. In this study, two cDNAs were isolated from wild watermelon, CLRan1 and CLRan2, which showed a high degree of structural similarity with those of other plant Ran GTPases. Quantitative RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays suggested that CLRan1 was expressed mainly in the root apex and lateral root primordia, whereas CLRan2 was more broadly expressed in other part of the roots. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed that the abundance of CLRan proteins was elevated in the root apex region under drought stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing CLRan1 showed enhanced primary root growth, and the growth was maintained under osmotic stress, indicating that CLRan1 functions as a positive factor for maintaining root growth under stress conditions.

  12. SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW regulate leaf growth in Arabidopsis by stimulating S-phase progression of the cell cycle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Coppens, F.; Winter, F. de; Swarup, K.; Merks, R.M.H.; Inze, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Beemster, G.T.S.

    2010-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are required for stem cell maintenance in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root meristem, ensuring its indeterminate growth. Mutation of SHR and SCR genes results in disorganization of the quiescent center and loss of stem cell activity, resulting in the ce

  13. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  14. Influences of Root Zone Restriction and Nitrogen Nutrition on Hybrid Wheat Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGRONGIAN; SHENZHENGUO; 等

    1997-01-01

    To study the physiological effects of small root zone,plants of a hybrid wheat variety(Triticum aestivum L.cv.Meiyou 4) were grown in small pots(1 litre)or large pots(8 litre) with low nitrogen(50 mg kg-1 soil) and high nitrogen(200 mg kg-1 soil).Restricting root zone decreased dry weight of plants at the stages of stem elongation and flowering ,compared to those of control plants grown in the large pots(P<0.01).Spraying of 6-benzylaminopurine(50 μmol L01) increased dry weight of plants and chlorophyll concentration in leaves. restriction of root zone decreased the concentrations of total nitrogen,chlorophyll and soluble protein in the flag leaf and accelerated senescence of the leaves,Supply of high nitrogen delayed senescence of the flag leaf.The results suggested that the shortage of nutrients ,especially nitrogen deficiency,was the primary reason for the decreased growth of plant in the treatment of root zone restriction.

  15. Effect of partial root drying on growth and photosynthesis of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Slađana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato plants were grown in commercial compost with the root system divided equally in two parts (PRD technique. At the end of vegetative and during generative stage of development, half of the root system was exposed to drought, while the remainder of the root system was irrigated. One PRD treatment took c.10 days and during this period the soil water content in the dry root side was reduced to 30%. After this, the treatment was reversed, allowing the previously dry compartment to be well-watered and the well-watered compartment to dry down. In control plants both compartments were watered daily to drip point throughout the experimental period. During experimental period the following measurements were done: plant height, leaf number and area, number of flower trusses, number and diameter of fruit leaf gas exchange (photosynthesis and transpiration, leaf water potential leaf apoplastic pH and water-use efficiency (WUE. Obtained results of plants height and leaf number and area showed that, as a consequence of PRD treatment, the growth of whole plants was reduced, but not fruit, although WUE was increased. These results pointed out that with PRD technique it is possible to reduce irrigation water without significant reduction effect on tomato yield.

  16. Catechol, a major component of smoke, influences primary root growth and root hair elongation through reactive oxygen species-mediated redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Schoettner, Matthias; Xu, Shuqing; Paetz, Christian; Wilde, Julia; Baldwin, Ian T; Groten, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Nicotiana attenuata germinates from long-lived seedbanks in native soils after fires. Although smoke signals have been known to break seed dormancy, whether they also affect seedling establishment and root development remains unclear. In order to test this, seedlings were treated with smoke solutions. Seedlings responded in a dose-dependent manner with significantly increased primary root lengths, due mainly to longitudinal cell elongation, increased numbers of lateral roots and impaired root hair development. Bioassay-driven fractionations and NMR were used to identify catechol as the main active compound for the smoke-induced root phenotype. The transcriptome analysis revealed that mainly genes related to auxin biosynthesis and redox homeostasis were altered after catechol treatment. However, histochemical analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the inability of auxin applications to rescue the phenotype clearly indicated that highly localized changes in the root's redox-status, rather than in levels of auxin, are the primary effector. Moreover, H2 O2 application rescued the phenotype in a dose-dependent manner. Chemical cues in smoke not only initiate seed germination, but also influence seedling root growth; understanding how these cues work provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which plants adapt to post-fire environments.

  17. A Pseudomonas strain isolated from date-palm rhizospheres improves root growth and promotes root formation in maize exposed to salt and aluminum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrouk, Izzeddine Zakarya; Benchabane, Messaoud; Khelifi, Lakhdar; Yokawa, Ken; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Pseudomonas fluorescens 002 (P.f.002.), isolated from the rhizosphere of date palms from the Ghardaia region in the Algerian Sahara, to promote root growth of two varieties of maize under conditions of salt and aluminum stress. Primary roots of 5-day-old seedlings were inoculated with P.f.002., and seedlings were then grown under both control and stressed conditions. Primary, lateral, and seminal root lengths and numbers, as well as root dry mass, were evaluated. P.f.002 increased all parameters measured under both salt and aluminum stress. Hence, the use of P.f.002 may represent an important biotechnological approach to decrease the impact of salinity and acidity in crops.

  18. S-index and soybean root growth in different soil textural classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro D. de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study tested the hypothesis that the limiting values of S-index, proposed in the literature can not be used to determine the degradation condition of soils under soybean cultivation in the state of Pará, Brazil. The objective was to determine limiting values of S-index using soil physical attributes and validate it with soybean root growth, in soils with different textural classes. For the experimental design, the following treatments were established: five compaction levels for sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils and three levels for clayey and very clayey soils. The following physical parameters were analysed: particle-size distribution, soil bulk density, critical soil bulk density, degree of compaction, soil-water retention curve, S-index and relative root length of soybean. The limiting values of S-index varied according to soil textural class and were equal to 0.037, 0.020 and 0.056 for sandy loam, sandy clay loam and clay, respectively. The S-index does not apply to soils with clay content > 71%, because it does not vary with the degree of compaction of the soil or the root growth of the evaluated crop.

  19. Graphene oxide modulates root growth of Brassica napus L. and regulates ABA and IAA concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Liu, Yu-Feng; Lu, Guang-Yuan; Zhang, Xue-Kun; Xie, Ling-Li; Yuan, Cheng-Fei; Xu, Ben-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Researchers have proven that nanomaterials have a significant effect on plant growth and development. To better understand the effects of nanomaterials on plants, Zhongshuang 11 was treated with different concentrations of graphene oxide. The results indicated that 25-100mg/l graphene oxide treatment resulted in shorter seminal root length compared with the control samples. The fresh root weight decreased when treated with 50-100mg/l graphene oxide. The graphene oxide treatment had no significant effect on the Malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Treatment with 50mg/l graphene oxide increased the transcript abundance of genes involved in ABA biosynthesis (NCED, AAO, and ZEP) and some genes involved in IAA biosynthesis (ARF2, ARF8, IAA2, and IAA3), but inhibited the transcript levels of IAA4 and IAA7. The graphene oxide treatment also resulted in a higher ABA content, but a lower IAA content compared with the control samples. The results indicated that graphene oxide modulated the root growth of Brassica napus L. and affected ABA and IAA biosynthesis and concentration.

  20. Soil physical properties and sugarcane root growth in a red oxiso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Euripides Baquero

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane, which involves the use of agricultural machinery in all crop stages, from soil preparation to harvest, is currently one of the most relevant crops for agribusiness in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to investigate soil physical properties and root growth in a eutroferric red Oxisol (Latossolo Vermelho eutroférrico after different periods under sugarcane. The study was carried out in a cane plantation in Rolândia, Paraná State, where treatments consisted of a number of cuts (1, 3, 8, 10 and 16, harvested as green and burned sugarcane, at which soil bulk density, macro and microporosity, penetration resistance, as well as root length, density and area were determined. Results showed that sugarcane management practices lead to alterations in soil penetration resistance, bulk density and porosity, compared to native forest soil. These alterations in soil physical characteristics impede the full growth of the sugarcane root system beneath 10 cm, in all growing seasons analyzed.

  1. Rhizosphere competent Mesorhizobiumloti MP6 induces root hair curling, inhibits Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and enhances growth of Indian mustard (Brassica campestris)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shikha Chandra; Kamlesh Choure; Ramesh C. Dubey; Dinesh K. Maheshwari

    2007-01-01

    .... loti MP6 in rhizosphere due to root exudates of B. campestris. In dual culture technique the strain showed a strong antagonistic effect against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a white rot pathogen of Brassica campestris. The growth of S...

  2. Impact of foliar application of nano micronutrient fertilizers and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the growth and yield components of barley under supplemental irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen JANMOHAMMADI; Tahereh AMANZADEH; Sabaghnia, Naser; Shahryar DASHTI

    2016-01-01

    Nano-fertilizers are new generation of the synthetic fertilizers which contain readily available nutrients in nano scale range. Nano fertilizers are preferred largely due to their efficiency and environment friendly nature compared to conventional chemical fertilizers. To evaluate the effects of foliar spray of micronutrient nano-fertilizer (iron and zinc) and nano-titanium dioxide (nTiO2) solution on grain yield and its components in barley under supplemental irrigation conditions, a field e...

  3. Impact of foliar application of nano micronutrient fertilizers and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the growth and yield components of barley under supplemental irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen JANMOHAMMADI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nano-fertilizers are new generation of the synthetic fertilizers which contain readily available nutrients in nano scale range. Nano fertilizers are preferred largely due to their efficiency and environment friendly nature compared to conventional chemical fertilizers. To evaluate the effects of foliar spray of micronutrient nano-fertilizer (iron and zinc and nano-titanium dioxide (nTiO2 solution on grain yield and its components in barley under supplemental irrigation conditions, a field experiment was carried out in the semi-arid highland region of Maragheh, Iran. Barley plants were separately treated with of chelated nano-scale zinc oxide (ZnO and ferric oxide (Fe2O3 suspensions during tillering stage, booting and milky stages. Results revealed that days to anthesis and maturity significantly increased after application of both nano-fertilizers. Furthermore, a considerable improvement was observed in grain mass, spike length, number of the grains per spike, chlorophyll content, grain yield and harvest index by application of nano-fertilizer. However the impact of nano zinc fertilizer was more prominent than iron. Foliar application of nTiO2 positively affected some morphophysiological characteristics like as days to anthesis, chlorophyll content and straw yield. The results suggest that the delivery of Zn into barley seedling through spray of nano-fertilizer can be an efficient nutrient management strategy in semi-arid regions. Overall, our result indicated that the integration of nanotechnology in fertilizer products can improve fertilizer use efficiency and significantly increase of barley yield. However, plant response to nanoparticles significantly depend on concentration and time of application as well as size, shape, and surface functionalization of the particles.

  4. The effect of beta-glucanase supplementation of barley- and oat-based diets on growth performance and fermentation in broiler chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefiak, D; Rutkowski, A; Jensen, B B; Engberg, R M

    2006-02-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether grain type (barley or oats) and ss-glucanase inclusion influence the performance and the gastrointestinal ecosystem of broiler chickens, taking the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids and lactic acid, pH, ileal viscosity, and the weight of the caeca and liver into consideration. 2. The inclusion of beta-glucanase in the oat-based diet improved body weight gains. Enzyme supplementation of barley-based diets improved feed conversion efficiency and reduced intestinal viscosity. 3. Irrespective of the type of cereal, beta-glucanase supplementation increased the lactic acid concentration and lowered the pH of the crop contents. No such changes in fermentation were observed in the contents of the gizzard and ileum. 4. Larger amounts of total dietary fibre and its fractions (arabinoxylans and beta-glucans) in oats decreased the weight of the caeca. 5. Molar ratios of acetate, propionate and butyrate in the caecal chyme were affected by cereal type but not by enzyme supplementation. The barley-based diet increased the butyrate:propionate ratio but the opposite effect was observed with the oat-based diet.

  5. Auxin increases the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) root tips while inhibiting root growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanchenko, Maria G.; den Os, Desiree; Monshausen, Gabriele B.; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.; Bednarova, Andrea; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-01-01

    The hormone auxin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate root elongation, but the interactions between the two pathways are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate how auxin interacts with ROS in regulating root elongation in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Wild-type and auxi

  6. Auxin increases the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) root tips while inhibiting root growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanchenko, Maria G.; den Os, Desiree; Monshausen, Gabriele B.; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.; Bednarova, Andrea; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-01-01

    The hormone auxin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate root elongation, but the interactions between the two pathways are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate how auxin interacts with ROS in regulating root elongation in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Wild-type and

  7. Enhanced Labeling Techniques to Study the Cytoskeleton During Root Growth and Gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2005-01-01

    Gravity effects the growth and development of all living organisms. One of the most obvious manifestations of gravity's effects on biological systems lies in the ability of plants to direct their growth along a path that is dictated by the gravity vector (called gravitropism). When positioned horizontally, in florescence stems and hypocotyls in dicots, and pulvini in monocots, respond by bending upward whereas roots typically bend downward. Gravitropism allows plants to readjust their growth to maximize light absorption for photosynthesis and to more efficiently acquire water and nutrients form the soil. Despite its significance for plant survival, there are still major gaps in understanding the cellular and molecular processes by which plants respond to gravity. The major aim of this proposal was to develop improved fluorescence labeling techniques to aid in understanding how the cytoskeleton modulated plant responses to gravity.

  8. The effect of tillage intensity on soil structure and winter wheat root/shoot growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Hansen, Elly Møller; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2008-01-01

    of this study was to investigate the effect of tillage intensity on crop growth dynamics and soil structure. A tillage experiment was established in autumn 2002 on two Danish sandy loams (Foulum and Flakkebjerg) in a cereal-based crop rotation. The tillage systems included in this study were direct drilling (D...... with decreasing tillage intensity for the first year winter wheat at Foulum. In general ploughing resulted in the highest grain yields. This study highlights the important interaction between soil structure and crop growth dynamics....... was followed during the growing seasons using spectral reflectance and mini-rhizotron measurements, respectively. A range of soil physical properties were measured. We found decreased early season shoot and root growth with decreasing tillage intensity. Differences diminished later in the growing season...

  9. Dynamics of Microbial Functional Groups in Rhizosphere of Spring Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Stoian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant rhizosphere is the portion of soil which is in direct contact with the plant roots. From the microbiological point of view, this area is characterized by strong dynamic of functional groups with high specificity towards the substrate available. Spring barley is a crop with high requirements to the composition of the microflora in the rhizosphere, disturbances produced by agronomic inputs affecting the stability of rhizospheric contact interfaces and ultimately the plant growth. Analysis of changes within the microbial community was carried out with the purpose of defining the disruptive impact of mineral inputs and potential of zeolite to reduce these disruptions. Microbial functional groups were analyzed on the basis of the CO2 export under the specific conditions of soil inoculation on specific substrates over a time period of incubation. Microresp detection plates allow evaluation of a large number of samples under identical conditions of inoculation and the establishment of dynamics of the entire microbial community. The dynamics of the entire microbial communities (basal respiration is stimulated to increase in case of unilateral application of zeolite and zeolite as a buffer for urea fertilization. General growth trend of microbial communities follows proportional the associated application of zeolite with urea, the most powerful non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation processes being stimulated by this combination of fertilizers. Simultaneously, an increase in the dynamics of denitrifiers was observed, also the decomposition of lignin and cellulose and biological crust formation due to the proliferation of cyanobacteria. Rhizosphere of barley plants is characterized by the presence of actinomycetes as dominant in functional microbial community of all experimental variants analyzed with a high capacity for biological degradation and raised mineralization of organic matter.

  10. Co-regulation of root hair tip growth by ROP GTPases and nitrogen source modulated pH fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Daria; Monshausen, Gabriele; Gilroy, Simon; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-03-01

    Growth of plant cells involves tight regulation of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking by processes including the action of the ROP small G proteins together with pH-modulated cell wall modifications. Yet, little is known on how these systems are coordinated. In a paper recently published in Plant Cell and Environment we show that ROPs/RACs function synergistically with NH4NO3-modulated pH fluctuations to regulate root hair growth. Root hairs expand exclusively at their apical end in a strictly polarized manner by a process known as tip growth. The highly polarized secretion at the apex is maintained by a complex network of factors including the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton, tip-focused ion gradients and by small G proteins. Expression of constitutively active ROP mutants disrupts polar growth, inducing the formation of swollen root hairs. Root hairs are also known to elongate in an oscillating manner, which is correlated with oscillatory H(+) fluxes at the tip. Our analysis shows that root hair elongation in wild type plants and swelling in transgenic plants expressing a constitutively active ROP11 (rop11(CA)) is sensitive to the presence of NH4(+) at concentrations higher than 1 mM and on NO3(-). The NH4(+) and NO3(-) ions did not affect the localization of ROP in the membrane but modulated pH fluctuations at the root hair tip. Actin organization and reactive oxygen species distribution were abnormal in rop11CA root hairs but were similar to wild type root hairs when seedlings were grown on medium lacking NH4(+) and / or NO3(-). These observations suggest that the nitrogen source-modulated pH fluctuations may function synergistically with ROP regulated signaling during root hair tip growth. Interestingly, under certain growth conditions, expression of rop11 (CA) suppressed ammonium toxicity, similar to auxin resistant mutants. In this Addendum article we discuss these findings and their implications.

  11. Root growth, mycorrhization and physiological effects of plants growing on oil tailing sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt-Burisch, Katja M.; Naeth, Anne M.; Schneider, Bernd Uwe; Hüttl, Reinhard F.

    2015-04-01

    Surface mining creates large, intense disturbances of soils and produces large volumes of by-products and waste materials. After mining processes these materials often provide the basis for land reclamation and ecosystem restoration. In the present study, tailing sands (TS) and processed mature fine tailings (pMFT) from Fort McMurray (Alberta, Canada) were used. They represent challenging material for ecosystem rebuilding because of very low nutrient contents of TS and oil residuals, high density of MFT material. In this context, little is known about the interactions of pure TS, respectively mixtures of TS and MFT and root growth, mycorrhization and plant physiological effects. Four herbaceous plant species (Elymus trachycaulus, Koeleria macrantha, Deschampsia cespitosa, Lotus corniculatus) were chosen to investigate root development, chlorophyll fluorescence and mycorrhization intensity with and without application of Glomus mosseae (arbuscular mycorrhizae) on mainly tailing sands. Surprisingly both, plants growing on pure TS and plants growing on TS with additional AM-application showed mycorrhization of roots. In general, the mycorrhization intensity was lower for plants growing on pure tailings sands, but it is an interesting fact that there is a potential for mycorrhization available in tailing sands. The mycorrhizal intensity strongly increased with application of G. mosseae for K. macrantha and L. corniculatus and even more for E. trachycaulus. For D. cespitosa similar high mycorrhiza infection frequency was found for both variants, with and without AM-application. By the application of G. mosseae, root growth of E. trachycaulus and K. macrantha was significantly positively influenced. Analysis of leaf chlorophyll fluorescence showed no significant differences for E. trachycaulus but significant positive influence of mycorrhizal application on the physiological status of L. corniculatus. However, this effect could not be detected when TS was mixed with MFT

  12. Effect of Long-term Drip Fertigation on Root Growth of Lychee and Soil pH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Through field experiment,we explore the impact of long-term drip fertigation on growth and distribution of lychee root and changes of soil pH in different layers of soil in lychee garden.The results show that drip fertigation can significantly promote the growth of lychee roots,and increase the contact area of root and soil;if it experiences six years of drip fertigation successively,the dry weight of root,root length and surface area of root in soil in drip fertigation area,will be 2.29 times,2.17 times and 2.25 times that in non-drip fertigation area,respectively.The lychee root is mainly distributed in 0-40 cm layer of soil,but there is conspicuous difference between drip fertigation area and non-drip fertigation area in terms of root distribution in 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm layer of soil.Drip fertigation is more favorable for the root to go deep inside the soil.Under long-term drip fertigation,the soil acidification in lychee garden is prominent,and in comparison with non-drip fertigation area,there is the greatest decline in soil pH in 10-20 cm layer of soil in drip fertigation area,reaching 1.47 units.

  13. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Dickey, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicultures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different for those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

  14. Immunolocalization of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in the developing root and supporting structures of the murine tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, A K; Kramer, Beverley

    2005-03-01

    Epithelio-mesenchymal interactions are active during the development of the root of the tooth and are regulated by a variety of growth factors, such as fibroblast growth factors. FGF-2, 3, 4, and 8 have all been shown to play a role in the development of the crown of the tooth, but less is known about the factors that govern root formation, particularly FGF-2. The aim of this study was thus to elucidate the spatial and temporal expression of FGF-2 in the root of the developing tooth, as this growth factor is believed to be a mediator of epithelio-mesenchymal interactions. Parasagittal sections of the maxillary and mandibular arches of post-natal mice were utilized and the roots of the molar teeth were studied. Immunocytochemistry utilizing an antibody to FGF-2 was performed on sections of teeth at various stages of development. Intense immunostaining for FGF-2 was observed in differentiating odontoblasts at the apical end of the tooth and in the furcation zone of the developing root at all the stages examined. FGF-2 localization was also observed in cementoblasts on post-natal days 16, 20 and 24. The pattern of localization of FGF-2 in the developing root suggests that this growth factor may participate in the signaling network associated with root development.

  15. Ethylene is critical to the maintenance of primary root growth and Fe homeostasis under Fe stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangjie; Xu, Weifeng; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2015-04-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential microelement but is highly toxic when in excess. The response of plant roots to Fe toxicity and the nature of the regulatory pathways engaged are poorly understood. Here, we examined the response to excess Fe exposure in Arabidopsis wild type and ethylene mutants with a focus on primary root growth and the role of ethylene. We showed that excess Fe arrested primary root growth by decreasing both cell elongation and division, and principally resulteds from direct external Fe contact at the root tip. Pronounced ethylene, but not abscisic acid, evolution was associated with excess Fe exposure. Ethylene antagonists intensified root growth inhibition in the wild type, while the inhibition was significantly reduced in ethylene-overproduction mutants. We showed that ethylene plays a positive role in tissue Fe homeostasis, even in the absence of iron-plaque formation. Ethylene reduced Fe concentrations in the stele, xylem, and shoot. Furthermore, ethylene increased the expression of genes encoding Fe-sequestering ferritins. Additionally, ethylene significantly enhanced root K(+) status and upregulated K(+)-transporter (HAK5) expression. Our findings highlight the important role of ethylene in tissue Fe and K homeostasis and primary root growth under Fe stress in Arabidopsis.

  16. Net root growth and nutrient acquisition in response to predicted climate change in two contrasting heathland species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, M.F.; Merrild, M.P.; Michelsen, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Accurate predictions of nutrient acquisition by plant roots and mycorrhizas are critical in modelling plant responses to climate change.We conducted a field experiment with the aim to investigate root nutrient uptake in a future climate and studied root production by ingrowth cores, mycorrhizal...... to elevated CO2. The species-specific response to the treatments suggests different sensitivity to global change factors, which could result in changed plant competitive interactions and belowground nutrient pool sizes in response to future climate change....... colonization, and fine root N and P uptake by root assay of Deschampsia flexuosa and Calluna vulgaris.Net root growth increased under elevated CO2, warming and drought, with additive effects among the factors. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization increased in response to elevated CO2, while ericoid mycorrhizal...

  17. Histone acetylation inhibitors promote axon growth in adult dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Nazif, Kutaiba; Smith, Alexander; Baas, Peter W; Smith, George M

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms that guide damaged axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury remain poorly understood. Manipulation of posttranslational modifications of key proteins in mature neurons could reinvigorate growth machinery after injury. One such modification is acetylation, a reversible process controlled by two enzyme families, the histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the histone acetyl transferases (HATs), acting in opposition. Whereas acetylated histones in the nucleus are associated with upregulation of growth-promoting genes, deacetylated tubulin in the axoplasm is associated with more labile microtubules, conducive to axon growth. This study investigates the effects of HAT and HDAC inhibitors on cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and shows that inhibition of HATs by anacardic acid or CPTH2 improves axon outgrowth, whereas inhibition of HDACs by TSA or tubacin inhibits axon growth. Anacardic acid increased the number of axons able to cross an inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan border. Histone acetylation but not tubulin acetylation level was affected by HAT inhibitors, whereas tubulin acetylation levels were increased in the presence of the HDAC inhibitor tubacin. Although the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol did not have an effect on the lengths of DRG axons, nocodazole decreased axon lengths. Determining the mechanistic basis will require future studies, but this study shows that inhibitors of HAT can augment axon growth in adult DRG neurons, with the potential of aiding axon growth over inhibitory substrates produced by the glial scar. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Succession of root-associated fungi in Pisum sativum during a plant growth cycle as examined by 454 pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Larsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    was to examine succession patterns of root-associated fungi in pea during a full plant growth cycle. Methods Plants were grown in pots with field soil in a growth chamber under controlled conditions. Fungal communities in pea roots were analyzed at different plant growth stages including the vegetative growth......Purpose Roots are inhabited by a broad range of fungi, including pathogens and mycorrhizal fungi, with functional traits related to plant health and nutrition. Management of these fungi in agroecosystems requires profound knowledge about their ecology. The main objective of this study......, flowering and senescence, using 454 pyrosequencing. Results One hundred and twenty one non-singleton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing fungal species were detected. Pathogenic and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi dominated during the vegetative growth stage, whereas saprotrophic fungi dominated...

  19. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization and root separation on the plant growth and grain yield of maize and its rhizosphere microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Huang, Guo-Qin; Bian, Xin-Min; Zhao, Qi-Guo

    2012-12-01

    A field experiment with root separation was conducted to study the effects of root interaction in maize-soybean intercropping system on the plant growth and grain yield of maize and its rhizosphere microorganisms under different nitrogen fertilization levels (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 g x kg(-1)). Root interaction and nitrogen fertilization had positive effects on the plant height, leaf length and width, and leaf chlorophyll content of maize. Less difference was observed in the root dry mass of maize at maturing stage between the treatments root separation and no root separation. However, as compared with root separation, no root separation under the nitrogen fertilization levels 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 g x kg(-1) increased the biomass per maize plant by 8.8%, 6.3%, 3.6%, and 0.7%, and the economic yield per maize plant by 17.7%, 10.0%, 8.2%, and 0.9%, respectively. No root separation increased the quantity of rhizosphere fungi and azotobacteria significantly, as compared with root separation. With increasing nitrogen fertilization level, the quantity of rhizosphere bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes presented an increasing trend, while that of rhizosphere azotobacteria decreased after an initial increase. The root-shoot ratio of maize at maturing stage was significantly negatively correlated with the quantity of rhizosphere bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes, but less correlated with the quantity of rhizosphere azotobacteria. It was suggested that the root interaction in maize-soybean intercropping system could improve the plant growth of maize and increase the maize yield and rhizosphere microbial quantity, but the effect would be decreased with increasing nitrogen fertilization level.

  20. Modelling the root system architecture of Poaceae. Can we simulate integrated traits from morphological parameters of growth and branching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Loïc; Picon-Cochard, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    Our objective was to calibrate a model of the root system architecture on several Poaceae species and to assess its value to simulate several 'integrated' traits measured at the root system level: specific root length (SRL), maximum root depth and root mass. We used the model ArchiSimple, made up of sub-models that represent and combine the basic developmental processes, and an experiment on 13 perennial grassland Poaceae species grown in 1.5-m-deep containers and sampled at two different dates after planting (80 and 120 d). Model parameters were estimated almost independently using small samples of the root systems taken at both dates. The relationships obtained for calibration validated the sub-models, and showed species effects on the parameter values. The simulations of integrated traits were relatively correct for SRL and were good for root depth and root mass at the two dates. We obtained some systematic discrepancies that were related to the slight decline of root growth in the last period of the experiment. Because the model allowed correct predictions on a large set of Poaceae species without global fitting, we consider that it is a suitable tool for linking root traits at different organisation levels. © 2014 INRA. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Malting barley BRS Borema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclydes Minella

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BRS Borema is an early maturing, two-rowed spring barley registered in 2003 for commercial production inSouthern Brazil, bred by Embrapa Trigo. It combines good yield potential with superior malting quality and a reasonable levelof disease (net blotch, powdery mildew, leaf rust resistance. It is well-adapted to all major production regions of maltingbarley in Brazil.

  2. SUSTITUCIÓN GRADUAL DE LA ALFALFA (Medicago sativa L.) POR EL GERMINADO DE CEBADA (Hordeum vulgare) EN RACIONES DE CUYES (Cavia porcellus L.) EN LA ETAPA DE CRECIMIENTO/MANIFESTATIONS FADED GRADUALLY REPLACEMENT OF ALFALFA (Medicago sativa L.) BY BARLEY (Hordeum vulgare L.) SPROUT IN PORTIONS OF GUINEA PIGS (Cavia porcellus L.) IN THE STAGE OF GROWTH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freddy C Cayllahua; Daisy U D Condori; Alfonso G F Cordero; Miriam L Veliz; José L P Contreras

    2015-01-01

    ...%) of hydroponic barley (CH) in substitution of alfalfa in the feeding male and female guinea pigs of Peru line, in the growth phase, in number of 72, with 18 days of age and 175 g of initial PV means confined for 42 days...

  3. Laser ablation ICP-MS reveals patterns of copper differing from zinc in growth zones of cucumber roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiyan; Gras, Michelle A; Silk, Wendy K

    2009-03-01

    Laser ablation coupled with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to find Cu and Zn concentration in surface tissue along a longitudinal developmental gradient with meristem, rapidly elongating tissue, and nongrowing tissue in a model system of seedling roots of Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber). Tissue metal accumulation was determined for roots of seedlings growing on cellulosic germination paper treated with nutrient solution (controls), and also treated with concentrations of Zn (40 ppm) and Cu (10 ppm) that reduced growth. Cu content of all roots is highest at the apex and falls sharply to lower values by 2 mm from the root tip. In contrast, at moderate Zn availability (0.07 ppm), Zn content rises from the apex to 2 mm then falls throughout the remainder of the growth zone. At high external Zn the spatial pattern resembles that of Cu. Cucumber root growth zones accumulate more of each metal with higher external availability. Metal deposition rates were calculated using a continuity equation with data on local metal content and growth velocity. Deposition rates of both metals are generally highest in the rapidly elongating region, 1.5-3.5 mm, even where metal concentration is decreasing with position and root age and even when the accumulation is inhibitory to growth.

  4. The Growth of Root Rot Disease on Pepper Seed Applied by Trichoderma Harzianum Inoculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sofian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Root rot disease on pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici is one of the most important diseases on pepper. The using of antagonistic fungus of Trichoderma harzianum as a biological control agent of the pathogen is one of the important alternatives in controlling P. capsici without causing negative effects on the environment. The objectives of the research were to study about the ability of T. harzianum inoculum application in inhibiting the development of root-rot disease, influenced the growth of pepper seed, to studythe effective length time application of T. harzianum inoculum in inhibiting the development of root rot disease, and increased the growth of pepper seedlings. This research was arranged in a completely randomized design, with five treatments of length time application of T. harzianum inoculum i.e. control treatment without applicationtime of T. harzianum inoculum (K, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for 0 week (S0, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for 1 week (S1, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for two weeks (S2, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for three weeks (S3, and application time of T. harzianum inoculum for 4 weeks (S4 before planting. Each treatment was repeated15 times. The observed parameterswere disease percentage, the inhibition of antagonistic fungus, disease infection rate, plant height, number of leaves, wet and dry weight of plant, stem and leaves on pepper seed, and P. capsici population density. The result showed that application time of T. harzianum inoculumfor 4 weeks (S4 before planting is the most effective time in inhibiting the development of root rot disease than the other treatment sand also had significant effect on increasing the growth of pepper seed. The antagonism test showed that T. harzianum could inhibit P. capsiciin vitro. This result proves that application time of T. harzianum inoculums

  5. Inhibition of Human Cervical Cancer Cell Growth by Ethanolic Extract of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Punarnava Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indian traditional medicine, Boerhaavia diffusa (punarnava roots have been widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, jaundice, enlargement of spleen, abdominal pain and as an anti-stress agent. Pharmacological evaluation of the crude ethanolic extract of B. diffusa roots has been shown to possess antiproliferative and immunomodulatory properties. The extract of B. diffusa was studied for anti-proliferative effects on the growth of HeLa cells and for its effect on cell cycle. Bio-assays of extracts from B. diffusa root showed that a methanol : chloroform fraction (BDF 5 had an antiproliferative effect on HeLa cells. After 48 h of exposure, this fraction at a concentration of 200 μg mL−1 significantly reduced cell proliferation with visible morphological changes in HeLa cells. Cell cycle analysis suggests that antiproliferative effect of BDF 5 could be due to inhibition of DNA synthesis in S-phase of cell cycle in HeLa cells, whereas no significant change in cell cycle was detected in control cells. The fraction BDF 5 caused cell death via apoptosis as evident from DNA fragmentation and caspase-9 activation. Thus the extract has potential to be evaluated in detail to assess the molecular mechanism-mediated anticancer activities of this plant.

  6. Root growth conditions in the topsoil as affected by tillage intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadziene, Grazina; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Mutegi, James

    2011-01-01

    in the topsoil. Samples were taken from a 7-year tillage experiment on a Danish sandy loam at Foulum, Denmark (56°30′ N, 9°35′ E) in 2008. The main crop was spring barley followed by either dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria L.) or fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cover crops as subtreatment. The tillage...

  7. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    GS activity in root and stem during the vegetative growth stages and an increased GS activity in leaves during senescence compared to wildtype control. Furthermore, during the vegetative growth stages, there were distinct differences in N accumulation and biomass partitioning between transgenic lines...

  8. Root aeration improves growth and nitrogen accumulation in rice seedlings under low nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingwen; Liang, Jing; Xu, Zhihui; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Quansuo; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua

    2015-11-16

    In wetland soils, changes in oxygen (O2) level in the rhizosphere are believed to influence the behaviour of nutrients and their usage by plants. However, the effect of aeration on nitrogen (N) acquisition under different N supply conditions remains largely unknown. In this study, the rice cultivars Yangdao 6 (YD6, with higher root aerenchyma abundance) and Nongken 57 (NK57, with lower root aerenchyma abundance) were used to evaluate the effects of aeration on rice growth and N accumulation. Our results showed that the number of adventitious roots and the root surface area increased significantly, and ethylene production and aerenchyma formation decreased in both cultivars after external aeration (EA). Five N treatments, including no N (-N), 0.125 mM NH4NO3 (LN), 1.25 mM Ca(NO3)2 (NO3-N), 1.25 mM (NH4)2SO4 (NH4-N) and 1.25 mM NH4NO3 (N/N), were applied to YD6 and NK57 for 2 days under internal aeration or EA conditions. External aeration increased the root biomass in both cultivars and the shoot biomass in NK57 by 18-50 %. The total N concentrations in roots of YD6 grown under -N and LN and of NK57 grown under NO3-N were increased by EA. Expression of OsPAD4, one of four putative genes regulating aerenchyma formation, showed a similar pattern alongside changes in the ethylene level in the EA-treated rice irrespective of the N treatments. Furthermore, expression of the high-affinity nitrate transporter gene OsNRT2.1 was increased by EA under -N, LN and NO3-N conditions. Our data provide evidence of an interaction between O2 and the supply of N in ethylene production, aerenchyma formation and N nutrition through modification of the expression of OsPAD4 and OsNRT2.1.

  9. PATTERN OF ROOTING AND GROWTH OF CUTTINGS OF SOME SPECIES OF INSECTICIDAL AND MEDICINAL IMPORTANCE AS AFFECTED BY GROWTH PROMOTING SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obi, E.A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the effects of promoting substances on bud retention, rooting and plantlets survival of rooted cuttings on selected tree species using growth promoting substances. Stem cuttings were treated with rooting-promoting substances, planted in plastic pots filled with top soil and arranged using a completely randomized design (CRD in a screen house. Stem cuttings of pepper fruit, guava, bush mango and cashew were obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. The experiments were conducted in 2010. The effects of growth promoting substances namely indole-3-butyric acid (IBA, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA applied 50 µM concentration and coconut water (50% dilution were evaluated on adventitious root formation, shoot growth (bud retention and survival of plantlets of hard- to semi-hardwood cuttings of tested tree species. The effects of growth promoting substances were significant on emergence of plantlets (rooting, growth and survival of plantlets. Number of sprouts (plantlets produced were highest in guava and pepper fruit followed by bush mango and cashew. The cuttings from guava and pepper fruit treated with coconut water and NAA promoted the survival of plantlets. Coconut water and NAA were found better than IBA and IAA in terms of bud retention and rooting, leaf development and survival of plantlets. In most of the tested species, wilting of leaves commenced 6 weeks after planting (WAP and attained 100% mortality thereafter except for pepper fruit cuttings dipped in coconut water. The treatments modified the rooting response among species by promoting percentages of rooting, reduction in bud abscission and plantlet survival. The results affirmed the possibility of propagating plantlets from stem cuttings of the tested species using growth promoting substances.

  10. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  11. The garlic allelochemical diallyl disulfide affects tomato root growth by influencing cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L., and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. seed germination, root growth, mitotic index and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs, auxin transport genes (SlPINs and expansin genes (EXPs in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM. This result suggests that tomato root growth

  12. Tall fescue cultivar and fungal endophyte combinations influence plant growth and root exudate composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingqi; McCulley, Rebecca L; McNear, David H

    2015-01-01

    Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.)] is a cool-season perennial grass used in pastures throughout the Southeastern United States. The grass can harbor a shoot-specific fungal endophyte (Epichloë coenophiala) thought to provide the plant with enhanced resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Because alkaloids produced by the common variety of the endophyte cause severe animal health issues, focus has been on replacing the common-toxic strain with novel varieties that do not produce the mammal-toxic alkaloids but maintain abiotic and biotic stress tolerance benefits. Little attention has been given to the influence of the plant-fungal symbiosis on rhizosphere processes. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of this relationship on plant biomass production and root exudate composition in tall fescue cultivars PDF and 97TF1, which were either not infected with the endophyte (E-), infected with the common toxic endophyte (CTE+) strain or with one of two novel endophytes (AR542E+, AR584E+). Plants were grown sterile for 3 weeks after which plant biomass, total organic carbon, total phenolic content and detailed chemical composition of root exudates were determined. Plant biomass production and exudate phenolic and organic carbon content were influenced by endophyte status, tall fescue cultivar, and their interaction. GC-TOF MS identified 132 compounds, including lipids, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids. Cluster analysis showed that the interaction between endophyte and cultivar resulted in unique exudate profiles. This is the first detailed study to assess how endophyte infection, notably with novel endophytes, and tall fescue cultivar interact to influence root exudate composition. Our results illustrate that tall fescue cultivar and endophyte status can influence plant growth and root exudate composition, which may help explain the observed influence of this symbiosis on rhizosphere biogeochemical processes.

  13. Tall fescue cultivar and fungal endophyte combinations influence plant growth and root exudate composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqi eGuo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb. is a cool-season perennial grass used in pastures throughout the Southeastern United States. The grass can harbor a shoot-specific fungal endophyte (Epichloë coenophiala thought to provide the plant with enhanced resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Because alkaloids produced by the common variety of the endophyte cause severe animal health issues, focus has been on replacing the common-toxic strain with novel varieties that do not produce the mammal-toxic alkaloids but maintain abiotic and biotic stress tolerance benefits. Little attention has been given to the influence of the plant-fungal symbiosis on rhizosphere processes. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of this relationship on plant biomass production and root exudate composition in tall fescue cultivars PDF and 97TF1, which were either not infected with the endophyte (E-, infected with the common toxic endophyte (CTE+ strain or with one of two novel endophytes (AR542E+, AR584E+. Plants were grown sterile for three weeks after which plant biomass, total organic carbon, total phenolic content and detailed chemical composition of root exudates were determined. Plant biomass production and exudate phenolic and organic carbon content were influenced by endophyte status, tall fescue cultivar, and their interaction. GC-TOF MS identified 132 compounds, including lipids, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids. Cluster analysis showed that the interaction between endophyte and cultivar resulted in unique exudate profiles. This is the first detailed study to assess how endophyte infection, notably with novel endophytes, and tall fescue cultivar interact to influence root exudate composition. Our results illustrate that tall fescue cultivar and endophyte status can influence plant growth and root exudate composition, which may help explain the observed influence of this symbiosis on rhizosphere biogeochemical processes.

  14. Effect of applied synthetic auxin on root growth in plantlet propagation by cuttage and tissue culture; Sashiki to soshiki baiyo ni okeru gosei auxin rui no shiyo koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoji, K.; Yoshihara, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The effect of synthetic plant hormone 4-C1-IAA and TFIBA on root growth in plantlet propagation was clarified by the cuttage and the issue culture of strawberry seedling production. A periwinkle, vine, and azalea are the effect of 4-C1-IAA on root growth, and a promotion effect was recognized for rooting and root elongation. The concentration of 4-C1-IAA in which the growth promotion effect of a root most appears varies depending on the species of a plant. The concentration of a periwinkle was 20 ppm, and that of an azalea was 2000 ppm. The growth promotion effect of a root in 4-C1-IAA and TFIBA was compared with IBA for an azalea. The result showed that 4-C1-IAA is the same in the effect as IBA and that TFIBA is higher than for IBA. The growth of a vine`s terminal bud was promoted by the effect of TFIBA on root growth, and the callus occurring when IBA was treated was not formed. The rooting of a strawberry was promoted by the effect of TFIBA on root growth. The combined use of TFIBA and BA promotes the growth of a side bud and forms a multi-bud plant. However, rooting was inhibited. The callus caused by the effect of BA on root growth could be suppressed through the combined use with TFIBA. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Syntaxin of plant proteins SYP123 and SYP132 mediate root hair tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Mie; Hirano, Tomoko; Enami, Kazuhiko; Fuselier, Taylor; Kato, Naohiro; Kwon, Chian; Voigt, Boris; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Baluška, František; Sato, Masa H

    2014-04-01

    Root hairs are fast-growing tubular protrusions on root epidermal cells that play important roles in water and nutrient uptake in plants. The tip-focused polarized growth of root hairs is accomplished by the secretion of newly synthesized materials to the tip via the polarized membrane trafficking mechanism. Here, we report the function of two different types of plasma membrane (PM) Qa-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors), SYP123 and SYP132, in the growth of root hair in Arabidopsis. We found that SYP123, but not SYP132, localizes in the tip region of root hairs by recycling between the brefeldin A (BFA)-sensitive endosomes and the PM of the expanding tip in an F-actin-dependent manner. The vesicle-associated membrane proteins VAMP721/722/724 also exhibited tip-focused localization in root hairs and formed ternary SNARE complexes with both SYP123 and SYP132. These results demonstrate that SYP123 and SYP132 act in a coordinated fashion to mediate tip-focused membrane trafficking for root hair tip growth.

  16. Growth performance, behaviour, forestomach development and meat quality of veal calves provided with barley grain or ground wheat straw for welfare purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igino Andrighetto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different feeding plans for veal calves were compared in the study: a traditional liquid diet supplemented with 250  g/calf/d of barley grain or with 250 g/calf/d of ground wheat straw. The two solid feeds had different chemical composi-  tion but a similar particle size obtained by grinding the straw in a mill with an 8-mm mesh screen. Twenty-four Polish  Friesian male calves were used in the study and they were housed in individual wooden stalls (0.83 x 1.80 m. The health  status of all the calves was satisfactory for the entire fattening period and no specific medical treatment was required  during the trial. Calves fed wheat straw showed a greater intake of solid feed (196 vs. 139 g/d; P  average daily gain (1288 vs. 1203 g/d; P  not affected by the type of solid feed and no milk refusal episodes were detected. The haemoglobin concentration was  similar in calves receiving the two feeding treatments despite the higher iron intake provided by the wheat straw through-  out the fattening period (2.12 vs. 1.15 g; P  calves’ metabolism. Feeding behaviour was affected by the provision of solid feeds. Eating and chewing were prolonged  in calves receiving ground wheat straw and the same solid feed reduced the frequency of oral stereotypies at the end of  the fattening period. At the slaughterhouse, no differences were observed between the feeding treatments as regards  carcass weight and dressing percentage. The calves fed ground wheat straw had a heavier weight of the empty omasum  (518 vs. 341 g; P  fed barley grain. The incidence of abomasal erosions, ulcers and scars was similar in both treatments; however the index  of abomasal damage, which considers the number and the seriousness of different type of lesions, was higher in calves  receiving barley grain. Therefore, the grinding of straw particles, as opposed to barley grain, can reduce the abrasive-  ness of roughage at the abomasum level. Visual evaluation of the

  17. Growth and Nutrition of Eucalypt Rooted Cuttings Promoted by Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in Commercial Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Mara Martins Gandini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF may improve the adaptation of eucalypts saplings to field conditions and allow more efficient fertilizer use. The effectiveness of EMF inoculum application in promoting fungal colonization, plant growth, nutrient uptake, and the quality of rooted cuttings was evaluated forEucalyptus urophylla under commercial nursery conditions. For inoculated treatments, fertilization of the sapling substrate was reduced by 50 %. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design in a 4 × 4 factorial arrangement, wherein the factors were inoculum application rates of 0 (control, 5, 10, and 15 gel beads of calcium alginate containing the vegetative mycelium of Amanita muscaria, Elaphomyces antracinus, Pisolithus microcarpus, andScleroderma areolatum, plus a non-inoculated treatment without fertilization reduction in the substrate (commercial. Ectomycorrhizal fungi increased plant growth and fungal colonization as well as N and K uptake evenly. The best plant growth and fungal colonization were observed for the highest application rate. The greatest growth and fungal colonization and contents of P, N, and K were observed at the 10-bead rate. Plant inoculation with Amanita muscaria, Elaphomyces anthracinus, and Scleroderma areolatum increased P concentrations and contents in a differential manner. The Dickson Quality Index was not affected by the type of fungi or by inoculum application rates. Eucalypt rooted cuttings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi and under half the amount of commercial fertilization had P, N, and K concentrations and contents greater than or equal to those of commercial plants and have high enough quality to be transplanted after 90 days.

  18. The NAC transcription factors of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael; Holm, Preben Bach; Gregersen, Per L.

    2011-01-01

    ). From these data we have identified not only putative regulators of leaf senescence (HvNAC005, HvNAC027 and HvNAC029), but also possible regulators of secondary wall synthesis (HvNAC033, HvNAC034 and HvNAC039), lateral root formation (HvNAC022) and seed development (HvNAC017, HvNAC018, HvNAC019 and Hv...... genes characterized so far have regulatory functions in a broad range of plant developmental processes and tolerances to both biotic and abiotic stresses. This makes the NAC family highly interesting target genes for plant researchers and breeders. As part of a larger project on the identification...... of Hordeum vulgare (barley) leaf senescence regulators, we have attempted to characterize for the first time all presently available barley NAC genes (HvNACs). By searching the NCBI barley EST database using the tBLASTn function, with all known NAC genes from Brachypodium and rice as input, in combination...

  19. Brassinolide Increases Potato Root Growth In Vitro in a Dose-Dependent Way and Alleviates Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs are steroidal phytohormones that regulate various physiological processes, such as root development and stress tolerance. In the present study, we showed that brassinolide (BL affects potato root in vitro growth in a dose-dependent manner. Low BL concentrations (0.1 and 0.01 μg/L promoted root elongation and lateral root development, whereas high BL concentrations (1–100 μg/L inhibited root elongation. There was a significant (P<0.05 positive correlation between root activity and BL concentrations within a range from 0.01 to 100 μg/L, with the peak activity of 8.238 mg TTC·g−1 FW·h−1 at a BL concentration of 100 μg/L. Furthermore, plants treated with 50 μg/L BL showed enhanced salt stress tolerance through in vitro growth. Under this scenario, BL treatment enhanced the proline content and antioxidant enzymes’ (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase activity and reduced malondialdehyde content in potato shoots. Application of BL maintain K+ and Na+ homeostasis by improving tissue K+/Na+ ratio. Therefore, we suggested that the effects of BL on root development from stem fragments explants as well as on primary root development are dose-dependent and that BL application alleviates salt stress on potato by improving root activity, root/shoot ratio, and antioxidative capacity in shoots and maintaining K+/Na+ homeostasis in potato shoots and roots.

  20. Flexible Microsensor Array for the Root Zone Monitoring of Porous Tube Plant Growth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyan, Sandeep; Kim, Chang-Soo; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Nagle, H. Troy; Brown, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Control of oxygen and water in the root zone is vital to support plant growth in the microgravity environment. The ability to control these sometimes opposing parameters in the root zone is dependent upon the availability of sensors to detect these elements and provide feedback for control systems. In the present study we demonstrate the feasibility of using microsensor arrays on a flexible substrate for dissolved oxygen detection, and a 4-point impedance microprobe for surface wetness detection on the surface of a porous tube (PT) nutrient delivery system. The oxygen microsensor reported surface oxygen concentrations that correlated with the oxygen concentrations of the solution inside the PT when operated at positive pressures. At negative pressures the microsensor shows convergence to zero saturation (2.2 micro mol/L) values due to inadequate water film formation on porous tube surface. The 4-point microprobe is useful as a wetness detector as it provides a clear differentiation between dry and wet surfaces. The unique features of the dissolved oxygen microsensor array and 4-point microprobe include small and simple design, flexibility and multipoint sensing. The demonstrated technology is anticipated to provide low cost, and highly reliable sensor feedback monitoring plant growth nutrient delivery system in both terrestrial and microgravity environments.

  1. Root and bacterial secretions regulate the interaction between plants and PGPR leading to distinct plant growth promotion effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have garnered interest in agriculture due to their ability to influence the growth and production of host plants. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play important roles in plant-microbe interactions by modulating plant root exudation. The present stu...

  2. [Effects of 6-benzylaminopurine and α-naphthaleneacetic acid on growth and isoflavone contents of Pueraria phaseoloides hairy roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hanjie; Shi, Heping

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the effect of phytohormone on growth and isoflavones contents of Pueraria phaseoloides hairy roots, we cultured the hairy roots with different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) alone or in combination with α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Then we determined the effects of 6-BA alone or in combination with NAA on the growth and the contents of isoflavones compounds and levels of antioxidase activities of hairy roots by spectrophotometry. The results show that 6-BA inhibited the growth, and decreased biomass and total isoflavones compounds of P. phaseoloides hairy roots. Furthermore, the inhibition was increased with the concentrations of 6-BA. Compared with the controls, different concentrations of 6-BA in combination with NAA 2.0 mg/L could inhibit the growth of hairy roots and decrease the content of total isoflavone compounds, and also significantly enhanced the contents of soluble protein and levels of peroxidase (POD) activities, but decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD). DNA ladders detected by agarose gel electrophoresis can be observed after hairy roots of P. phaseoloides were cultured with 6-BA alone for 30 days, but can appear on the 20th day after culture with 6-BA in combination with NAA 2.0 mg/L. This result indicates that 6-BA or 6-BA in combination with NAA can both stimulate appearance of programmed cell death (PCD), and NAA may play a synergistic role on PCD.

  3. Apical meristem organization and lack of establishment of the quiescent center in Cactaceae roots with determinate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José Fernando; Shishkova, Svetlana; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2003-10-01

    Some species of Cactaceae from the Sonoran Desert are characterized by a determinate growth pattern of the primary root, which is important for rapid lateral-root formation and seedling establishment. An analysis of the determinate root growth can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of meristem maintenance in plants in general. Stenocereus gummosus (Engelm.) Gibson & Horak and Pachycereus pringlei (S. Watson) Britton & Rose are characterized by an open type of root apical meristem. Immunohistochemical analysis of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into S. gummosus showed that the percentage of cells passing through the S-phase in a 24-h period is the same within the zone where a population of relatively slowly proliferating cells could be established and above this zone in the meristem. This indicated the absence of the quiescent center (QC) in S. gummosus. During the second and the third days of growth, in the distal meristem portion of P. pringlei roots, a compact group of cells that had a cell cycle longer than in the proximal meristem was found, indicating the presence of the QC. However, later in development, the QC could not be detected in this species. These data suggest that during post-germination the absence of the establishment of the QC within the apical meristem and limited proliferative activity of initial cells are the main components of a determinate developmental program and that establishment of the QC is required for maintenance of the meristem and indeterminate root growth in plants.

  4. Dynamic Allocation of Sugars in Barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch, L. C.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B. A.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Lee, S. J.; McKisson, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    Allocation of carbon and nitrogen is a key factor for plant productivity. Measurements are carried out by tracing 11C-tagged sugars using positron emission tomography and coincidence counting. We study the mechanisms of carbon allocation and transport from carbohydrate sources (leaves) to sinks (stem, shoot, roots) under various environmental conditions such as soil nutrient levels and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The data are analyzed using a transfer function analysis technique to model transport and allocation in barley plants. The experimental technique will be described and preliminary results presented. This work was supported in part by USDOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97-ER41033 and DE-SC0005057.

  5. Protecting tree roots and subterranean infrastructure in urban areas by developing self-compacting flowable fills with root growth impeding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felde, Vincent; Simon, Jana; Kimm-Friedenberg, Stefan; Peth, Stephan; Middendorf, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    In urban areas, the installation of cables and disposal lines is still done by open building method. Here, a ditch is being excavated, pipes and lines are laid and subsequently it is filled with and covered by bulk material (e.g. sand or gravel), which is then compacted. Due to the often times limited space that the roots have in the ground and the better supply of water and oxygen in the poorly compacted bulk material, these refilled ditches are areas of preferential root growth of urban trees. The entangling of the pipes and supply lines by these roots leads to severe damage of the tree when maintenance work on the lines is carried out and roots have to be cut. In order to reduce this competition between urban trees and urban subterranean infrastructure, the development of a self-compacting flowable fill with root growth resistance is mandatory. Physico-chemical properties, such as a very high pH-value and a low cation-exchange-capacity, a low root-penetrability, a high packing density and a low porosity, with a poorly connected pore system that impedes gas and water exchange are the characteristic aspects of this flowable fills that could help avoid undesired root penetration into supply lines. The flowable fills are supposed to sheath pipes and lines void-free and without any tension, in order to restrain the root growth in these areas. Trees are of crucial importance for urban ecosystems and are comprising 3% of the total stock of trees in the Federal Republic of Germany, which is why it is fundamental to conserve them. This work therefore targets not only at enabling a balanced coexistence of urban trees and subterranean infrastructure, but also at avoiding costly re-opening of ditches, tree harming cutting of roots and time consuming maintenance work. Further positive side effects are reduced costs for network providers and local municipalities, as well as reduced noise and dust emissions for passersby and local residents. To guarantee the root growth

  6. The Effects of Different Amounts of Controlled Release Fertilizer on the Root Growth and the Filling Rate in Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the fertilizer use efficiency and yield in winter wheat, the effects of controlled release fertilizer on the root growth and the filling rate in winter wheat by applying different amounts of controlled release fertilizer had been studied in open field. The results indicated that conventional complex fertilizer and controlled release fertilizer could cause corresponding changes of the wheat root activity, dry root weight, root-shoot ratio and filling rate, but the fertilizer of conventional fertilizer performed in the pre-stage significantly, controlled release fertilizer performed in the middle and late stage gradually. So mixing conventional fertilizer with controlled release fertilizer can ensure the nutrient supply of whole growth and development of wheat to explore the most appropriate collocation dosage. This will make fertilizer and economic benefits achieve the best.

  7. Tooth root growth impairment after mantle radiation in long-term survivors of Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Hopkins, K.P.; Thompson, E.I.; Hustu, H.O.

    1985-10-01

    The tooth root growth impairment that resulted from 35 to 37 Gy mantle port radiation in 47 long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's disease was quantified and related to specific age groups and categories of teeth. Root measurements of the mandibular permanent canines, first and second premolars, and first and second molars were made from sequential panoramic radiographs taken at the time of radiation therapy and after the closure of root apexes. The severity of root growth impairment was greatest in patients who received radiation during the early stages of odontogenesis. With later stages of odontogenesis, and as the age increased at the time of treatment, less impairment occurred. The potential difficulties of using repeated panoramic radiographs to assess tooth lengths in longitudinal studies also were discussed.

  8. SOYBEAN SEEDLING ROOT GROWTH PROMOTION BY 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE DEAMINASE-PRODUCING PSEUDOMONADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Husen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonad producing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase (E.C.4.1.99.4 has been known to promote plant growth by lowering ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants, which can be induced by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA production. The objective of this study was to examine the ability of IAAproducing Pseudomonas isolated from local soil environment (rhizosphere of soybean grown in Plumbon's agricultural areain Cirebon, West Java, Indonesia to promote soybean root growth in relation to their ACC deaminase activities. The experiments were conducted in growth room and Laboratory of Soil Biology Research, Indonesian Soil Research Institute, Bogor, from January to August 2008. Soybean seeds were inoculated by immersing the seeds for 1 hour in bacterial cell suspension containing approximately 108-109 cells ml-1. The seeds were then germinatedfor 2 days before planting in growth pouches containing sterilized distilled water. All treated and untreated seeds were grown for 7 days in growth room at 24°C with 1300 lux of light intensity for 12-hour followed by a 12-hour dark period at 22°C. ACC deaminase activity of the isolates was assayed based on their ability to grow in Dworkin-Foster’s salt minimal medium containing ammonium sulfate or ACC as a source of nitrogen. Thirteen out of 81 isolates tested significantly increased soybean root length and weight, up to 50% from untreated plants. Of 13 isolates, 11 demonstrated ACC deaminase activities. Two isolates that did not show ACC deaminase activities had lower capacity to produce IAA. The results suggest that the effectiveness of IAA producing Pseudomonas in promoting the growth of the soybean seedlings is associated with their ACC deaminase activities or they produce IAA at low levels.

  9. An evaluation of the impact of the endophyte fungus Piriformospora indica on some traits of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. in drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghabouli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial endophytes, which make one of the most important classes of soil microorganisms, induce genetic, physiological and ecological alterations in their host plant and thus increase its yield and enable its cultivation in saline or dry soils or in climates facing biotic and abiotic stresses. The endophyte fungus Piriformospora indica exhibits a high effect in plant growth and increased resistance against environmental tensions like drought and salinity, as well as against phytopathogens. This work was intended to study the potential of P. indica in enhancing growth and elevating drought resistance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. during 2010. A greenhouse trial of completely randomized design with two fungal treatments (inoculated vs. non-inoculated and three drought levels (F.C., 50% F.C. and 25% F.C. with four repeats was conducted in greenhouse of Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute (Isfahan. The results indicate that the fungus P. indica has accompanied biomass increments of both shoot and root parts in the inoculated plant compared to the control, as in inoculated plant, total shoot dry weight and root dry weight were increased by 39 and 46 percent, respectively. Also, in stress conditions RWC in inoculated plant was greater. In addition to the growth increasing activity, the effective role of the fungus in enhancing barley growth and yield under drought conditions (especially at the 25% F.C. level is evident. According to the results, and to the fact that the fungus can be cultured on artificial (host-plant-free growth medium, this fungus can be contemplated as making a growth stimulating agent and in producing biological fertilizer for use in crops; and it might take a significant role toward a sustainable agriculture. The application of this fungus can also be beneficial in increasing growth and production of crops such as barley and wheat under the dry conditions widely encountered in Iran.

  10. Effects of root pruning on the growth and rhizosphere soil characteristics of short-rotation closed-canopy poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Z. Y.; Xing, S. J.; Ma, B. Y.; Liu, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Wang, Q. H.

    2012-11-01

    When poplar trees planted at a high density are canopy-closed in plantation after 4-5 years of growth, the roots of adjacent trees will inevitably intermingle together, which possibly restricts the nutrient uptake by root system. Root pruning might stimulate the emergence of fine roots and benefit the tree growth of short-rotation poplar at the stage of canopy closing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of root pruning on DBH (diameter at breast height, 1.3 m), tree height, nutrients (N, P and K) and hormones (indoleacetic acid and cytokinin) in poplar leaves, gas exchange variables (photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance), and rhizosphere soil characteristics. Field experiment was carried out with four-yearold poplar (Populus × euramericana cv. ‘Neva’) planted in a fluvo-aquic loam soil in Shandong province, China in early April, 2008. Three root pruning treatments (severe, moderate and light degree) were conducted at the distances of 6, 8 and 10 times DBH on both inter-row sides of the trees to the depth of 30 cm, respectively. The results showed that the growth performance was obtained in the following order of treatments: moderate > light = control > severe. In the rhizophere soil, moderate and light pruning increased the microbial populations, enzymatic activities, and the concentrations of available N, P, K and organic matter. Generally, root pruning to improve tree growth and rhizosphere soil fertility can be recommended in canopy-closed poplar plantation. The appropriate selection of root pruning intensity is a pivotal factor for the effectiveness of this technique. (Author) 35 refs.

  11. Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Maize (Zea mays L.) for Improving Manganese Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Lizhi

    and the interaction between latent Mn deficiency and light stress in maize plants. The obtained results showed that latent Mn deficiency decreased the utilization of photosynthetically active light, inhibited the ability to perform photosynthetic state transitions and the response of net photosynthetic CO2......Manganese (Mn) deficiency is a nutritional problem, causing significant reductions in crop yields and in severe cases resulting in complete loss of crops during winter time. Different plant species and genotypes within the same species vary in their tolerance with respect to growth in soils...... with low Mn availability, a phenomenon referred to as Mn efficiency. Iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1), known to be correlated with Mn uptake capacity and Mn efficiency in barley, was characterized using barley RNAi lines. The obtained results showed that HvIRT1 was involved in uptake and root...

  12. Inhibition effect on the Allium cepa L. root growth when using hexavalent chromium-doped river waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, F R; Szymanski, N; Palácio, S M; Módenes, A N; Rizzutto, M A; Silva, F G; Oliveira, A P; Oro, A C P; Martin, N

    2009-06-01

    The effect of Cr(6+) on Allium cepa root length was studied using both clean and polluted river waters. Seven series of Cr(6+)-doped polluted and non-polluted river waters were used to grow onions. Chromium concentration (Cr(6+)) of 4.2 mg L(-1)(EC(50) value), doped in clean river water caused a 50% reduction of root length, while in organically polluted samples similar root growth inhibition occurred at 12.0 mg Cr(6+) L(-1). The results suggested that there was a dislocation to higher values in toxic chromium concentration in polluted river water due to the eutrophization level of river water.

  13. Structural Sterols Are Involved in Both the Initiation and Tip Growth of Root Hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovečka, Miroslav; Berson, Tobias; Beck, Martina; Derksen, Jan; Šamaj, Jozef; Baluška, František; Lichtscheidl, Irene K.

    2010-01-01

    Structural sterols are abundant in the plasma membrane of root apex cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. They specifically accumulate in trichoblasts during the prebulging and bulge stages and show a polar accumulation in the tip during root hair elongation but are distributed evenly in mature root hairs. Thus, structural sterols may serve as a marker for root hair initiation and growth. In addition, they may predict branching events in mutants with branching root hairs. Structural sterols were detected using the sterol complexing fluorochrome filipin. Application of filipin caused a rapid, concentration-dependent decrease in tip growth. Filipin-complexed sterols accumulated in globular structures that fused to larger FM4-64–positive aggregates in the tip, so-called filipin-induced apical compartments, which were closely associated with the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane appeared malformed and the cytoarchitecture of the tip zone was affected. Trans-Golgi network/early endosomal compartments containing molecular markers, such as small Rab GTPase RabA1d and SNARE Wave line 13 (VTI12), locally accumulated in these filipin-induced apical compartments, while late endo