WorldWideScience

Sample records for bark

  1. Pyrolysis of Barks from Three Japanese Softwood

    OpenAIRE

    Umemura, Aki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Kounosu, Taku; Orihashi, Ken; Kato, Yoshiaki; Kojima, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Along with Japanese cedar bark, fir bark and Japanese larch bark were pyrolyzed to estimate the possibility of utilizing these softwood barks as resources for fine chemicals by comparing the pyrolysis product compositions. The three softwood barks contained higher ash content and yielded lower amount of volatiles when compared with cedar heartwood. The major pyrolysis products from their barks were similar to those previously reported from softwood trunks. Levoglucosan was a major pyrolysis p...

  2. Molluscicidal activity of Nerium indicum bark

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    Sushma Singh

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The molluscicidal activity of Nerium indicum bark against Lymnaea acuminata snails was studied. The toxicity of different bark preparations was both time and dose dependent. The 24-h LC50 of the lyophilized aqueous extract of bark was 34.5 mg/l whereas that of lyophilized boiled water extract was 42.5 mg/l. Low concentrations of vacuum-dried ethanolic extract (24-h LC50: 4.9 mg/l and purified bark (24-h LC50: 0.87 mg/l were effective in killing the test snails.

  3. Pharmacognostic evaluation of Nyctanthes arbortristis bark

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Ashokrao Nirmal; Subodh Chandra Pal; Subhash Chandra Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study detailed Pharmacognosy of the bark of Nyctanthes arbortristis Linn (Oleaceae), an important plant in Indian system of medicine. Methods: the macroscopy, microscopy, physicochemical analysis, preliminary phytochemical testing of powder of the plant bark and other WHO recommended methods for the standardization was done. Results: Trunk bark consists of two distinct regions i.e. outer bark and inner bark. Outer bark consists of broad periderm of a wide phellem and inner phelloderm regions. Inner bark is broader than the outer part and it includes all the secondary phloem tissues. It can be distinguished into 2 zones viz. collapsed secondary phloem and non-collapsed secondary phloem regions. Collapsed secondary phloem region consist of thick blocks of phloem sclereids and radially oblique dark streaks of crushed sieve tubes and dilated axial parenchyma cells. Non-collapsed secondary phloem region is the conducting part of the phloem where the sieve elements are intact. It consists of intact sieve tube members, companion cells, axial parenchyma cells and narrow undilated ray. Calcium oxalate crystals are abundant in collapsed phloem region. Conclusions: it can be concluded that the pharmacognostic profile of N. arbortristis bark is helpful in developing standards for quality, purity and sample identification.

  4. Metals Bioaccumulation Mechanism in Neem Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnani, Kishore K; Boddu, Veera M; Moon, Deok Hyun; Ghadge, S V; Sarkar, Biplab; Brahmane, M P; Choudhary, K; Kathiravan, V; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to define the bioaccumulation mechanism of metals onto the non-living biomaterial prepared from an extensively available plant bark biomass of neem (Azadirachta indica). Based on maximum ultimate fixation capacities (mmol/g) of the product, metals ions could be arranged as Hg(2+) Neem bark can be used as bioindicators, bioaccumulators and biomonitors while determining environmental pressures. Metal bioaccumulative properties and structural investigation of plant bark has potential in providing quantitative information on the metal contamination in the surrounding environment.

  5. US Forest Service Western Bark Beetle Strategy

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting Western Bark Beetle Strategy (WBBS) activities reported through the U.S. Forest Service FACTS database. Activities include...

  6. Investigation of thermal decomposition of bark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczak, B.; Babicki, R.

    1978-01-01

    Destructive distillation of Scots pine bark in the laboratory yielded poor quality charcoal. Processing of liquid distillates was not economically justified. The charcoal could be upgraded by demineralization followed by briquetting but this would considerably increase costs. (Refs. 5).

  7. Quantum non-barking dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imari Walker, Sara; Davies, Paul C. W.; Samantray, Prasant; Aharonov, Yakir

    2014-06-01

    Quantum weak measurements with states both pre- and post-selected offer a window into a hitherto neglected sector of quantum mechanics. A class of such systems involves time dependent evolution with transitions possible. In this paper we explore two very simple systems in this class. The first is a toy model representing the decay of an excited atom. The second is the tunneling of a particle through a barrier. The post-selection criteria are chosen as follows: at the final time, the atom remains in its initial excited state for the first example and the particle remains behind the barrier for the second. We then ask what weak values are predicted in the physical environment of the atom (to which no net energy has been transferred) and in the region beyond the barrier (to which the particle has not tunneled). Thus, just as the dog that didn't bark in Arthur Conan Doyle's story Silver Blaze gave Sherlock Holmes meaningful information about the dog's non-canine environment, here we probe whether the particle that has not decayed or has not tunneled can provide measurable information about physical changes in the environment. Previous work suggests that very large weak values might arise in these regions for long durations between pre- and post-selection times. Our calculations reveal some distinct differences between the two model systems.

  8. Quantum non-barking dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum weak measurements with states both pre- and post-selected offer a window into a hitherto neglected sector of quantum mechanics. A class of such systems involves time dependent evolution with transitions possible. In this paper we explore two very simple systems in this class. The first is a toy model representing the decay of an excited atom. The second is the tunneling of a particle through a barrier. The post-selection criteria are chosen as follows: at the final time, the atom remains in its initial excited state for the first example and the particle remains behind the barrier for the second. We then ask what weak values are predicted in the physical environment of the atom (to which no net energy has been transferred) and in the region beyond the barrier (to which the particle has not tunneled). Thus, just as the dog that didn't bark in Arthur Conan Doyle's story Silver Blaze gave Sherlock Holmes meaningful information about the dog's non-canine environment, here we probe whether the particle that has not decayed or has not tunneled can provide measurable information about physical changes in the environment. Previous work suggests that very large weak values might arise in these regions for long durations between pre- and post-selection times. Our calculations reveal some distinct differences between the two model systems. (paper)

  9. The bark, the howl and the bark-howl: Identity cues in dingoes' multicomponent calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déaux, Éloïse C; Charrier, Isabelle; Clarke, Jennifer A

    2016-08-01

    Dingoes (genus Canis) produce a stereotyped bark-howl vocalisation, which is a unimodal complex signal formed by the concatenation of two call types (a bark and a howl). Bark-howls may function as alarm signals, although there has been no empirical investigation of this vocalisation's structure or function. We quantified the content and efficacy of the bark and howl segments separately and when combined, using 140 calls from 10 individuals. We found that both segments are individually distinctive, although howl segments are more accurately classified, suggesting a higher level of individuality. Furthermore, howls convey signature characteristics that are conserved across different contexts of production, and thus may act as 'identity signals'. The individual distinctiveness of full bark-howls increases above that of isolated segments, which may be a result of selection on improved signal discriminability. Propagation tests revealed that bark-howls are best described as medium-range signals, with both segments potentially allowing for individual discrimination up to 200m regardless of environmental conditions. We discuss our findings regarding the fitness benefits of encoding identity cues in a potential alarm call and propose additional hypotheses for the function(s) of bark and howl segments.

  10. Metals bioaccumulation mechanism in neem bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this work was to define the bioaccumulation mechanism of metals onto the non-living biomaterial prepared from an extensively available plant bark biomass of neem (Azadirachta indica). Based on maximum ultimate fixation capacities (mmol/g) of the product, metals ions could be arranged as H...

  11. Phenolic glycosides of Paulownia tomentosa bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticher, O; Lahloub, M F

    1982-11-01

    The isolation of acteoside and coniferin from Paulownia tomentosa bark along with the previously reported phenolic glucoside syringin is described. The structure of both, acteoside and coniferin, have been assigned by (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:17396961

  12. Antioxidant activity of Rhizophora mangle bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Janet; Melchor, Gleiby; Martínez, Gregorio; Escobar, Arturo; Faure, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    The antioxidant activity of Rhizophora mangle bark aqueous extract and its majoritary component and high molecular weight polyphenols' fraction were studied using deoxyribose assay. The total extract and its fraction showed scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals and hability to chelate iron ions. PMID:16436316

  13. Bark and charcoal filters for greywater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dalahmeh, Sahar

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity, inappropriate sanitation and wastewater pollution are critically important global issues. Greywater is a sustainable water source for recycling, so this thesis examined simple, robust, low-cost alternatives for on-site treatment of greywater to irrigation water quality. Laboratory-scale pine bark, activated charcoal and sand filters were evaluated as regards their pollutant removal and interactions between medium properties, greywater, microbial activity and bacterial communit...

  14. A dynamical model for bark beetle outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křivan, Vlastimil; Lewis, Mark; Bentz, Barbara J; Bewick, Sharon; Lenhart, Suzanne M; Liebhold, Andrew

    2016-10-21

    Tree-killing bark beetles are major disturbance agents affecting coniferous forest ecosystems. The role of environmental conditions on driving beetle outbreaks is becoming increasingly important as global climatic change alters environmental factors, such as drought stress, that, in turn, govern tree resistance. Furthermore, dynamics between beetles and trees are highly nonlinear, due to complex aggregation behaviors exhibited by beetles attacking trees. Models have a role to play in helping unravel the effects of variable tree resistance and beetle aggregation on bark beetle outbreaks. In this article we develop a new mathematical model for bark beetle outbreaks using an analogy with epidemiological models. Because the model operates on several distinct time scales, singular perturbation methods are used to simplify the model. The result is a dynamical system that tracks populations of uninfested and infested trees. A limiting case of the model is a discontinuous function of state variables, leading to solutions in the Filippov sense. The model assumes an extensive seed-bank so that tree recruitment is possible even if trees go extinct. Two scenarios are considered for immigration of new beetles. The first is a single tree stand with beetles immigrating from outside while the second considers two forest stands with beetle dispersal between them. For the seed-bank driven recruitment rate, when beetle immigration is low, the forest stand recovers to a beetle-free state. At high beetle immigration rates beetle populations approach an endemic equilibrium state. At intermediate immigration rates, the model predicts bistability as the forest can be in either of the two equilibrium states: a healthy forest, or a forest with an endemic beetle population. The model bistability leads to hysteresis. Interactions between two stands show how a less resistant stand of trees may provide an initial toe-hold for the invasion, which later leads to a regional beetle outbreak in the

  15. Xanthones from the bark of Garcinia Xanthochymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two novel xanthones, 1,6-dihydroxy-4,5-dimethoxyxanthone (1) and 1,5,6-trihydroxy-7,8-di(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-6',6'-dimethylpyrano(2',3':3,4)xanthone (2) were isolated from the bark of Garcinia xanthochymus by normal phase and reverse phase silica gel column chromatography. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, especially 2D-NMR techniques.(C) 2007 Guang Zhong Yang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. INORGANIC STATUS OF STEM BARK OF PTEROCARPUS MARSUPIUM

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    Gaikwad Dattatraya Krishna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pterocarpus marsupium is well known for its sugar lowering potential. In the present examination different bark samples (Apical bark, middle bark and mature inner bark of Pterocarpus marsupium were screened for inorganic status. The levels of macro-minerals Nitrogen (1.50-3.13%, Phosphorus (0.023-0.163%, Calcium (0.60-1.848%, and Magnesium (0.21-0.339%, levels of trace minerals Copper (0.68-3.2mg/100g, Zinc (1.98-3.62mg/100g, Manganese (2.0-4.94mg/100g and Iron (11.38-44.34mg/100g and heavy metals Chromium (2.08-3.94mg/100g and Nickel (0.32-1.26mg/100g were evaluated in the present study. Cadmium and Lead were found to be absent in all the bark samples analyzed.

  17. Molluscicidal activity of Punica granatum bark and Canna indica root

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, S.M.; Singh, D.K.

    2000-01-01

    The molluscicidal activity of Punica granatum Linn. (Punicaceae) and Canna indica Linn. (Cannaceae) against the snail Lymnaea acuminata was studied. The molluscicidal activity of P. granatum bark and C. indica root was found to be both time and dose dependent. The toxicity of P. granatum bark was more pronounced than that of C. indica. The 24 h LC50 of the column-purified root of C. indica was 6.54 mg/l whereas that of the column-purified bark of P. granatum was 4.39 mg/l. The ethanol extract...

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF FICUS GLOMERATA LINN. BARK

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    Jagtap Supriya G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ficus glomerata Linn. (Moraceae, commonly known as Ficus racemosa. A large deciduous tree distributed all over India and Ceylon, found throughout the year, grows in evergreen forest, moist localities, along the sides of ravines and banks of streams. Gular (Ficus glomerata Linn. is well known, commonly used plant in various disorders. It has been traditionally claimed to be useful in asthmatic condition, as an antitussive and anti-inflammatory. Successive soxhlet extractions of dried powdered bark were carried out using petroleum ether and methanol as a solvent. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts were tested in vitro against two different bacterial species Bacillus substilis and Escherichia coli by cup plate diffusion method were used in this investigation. The results of antimicrobial activity revealed that methanolic extract showed good activity as compared to petroleum ether extract. Methanolic extract is more potent towards gram - positive bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts were compared with standard antibiotics.

  19. Vasorelaxant effect of Prunus yedoensis bark

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    Lee Kyungjin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prunus yedoensis Matsum. is used as traditional medicine—‘Yaeng-Pi’ or ‘Hua-Pi’—in Japan and Korea. However, no studies have examined the pharmacological activities of the P. yedoensis bark. Only the antioxidant and antiviral activities of P. yedoensis fruit and the anti-hyperglycaemic effect of P. yedoensis leaf have been investigated. While studying the antihypertensive effects of several medicinal plants, we found that a methanol extract of P. yedoensis bark (MEPY had distinct vasorelaxant effects on rat aortic rings. Methods The aortic rings were removed from Sprague–Dawley rats and suspended in organ chambers containing 10 ml Krebs-Henseleit solution. The aortic rings were placed between 2 tungsten stirrups and connected to an isometric force transducer. Changes in tension were recorded via isometric transducers connected to a data acquisition system. Results MEPY relaxed the contraction induced by phenylephrine (PE both in endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings concentration dependently. However, the vasorelaxant effects of MEPY on endothelium-denuded aortic rings were lower than endothelium-intact aortic rings. The vasorelaxant effects of MEPY on endothelium-intact aortic rings were reduced by pre-treatment with l-NAME, methylene blue, or ODQ. However, pre-treatment with indomethacin, atropine, glibenclamide, tetraethylammonium, or 4-aminopyridine had no affection. In addition, MEPY inhibited the contraction induced by extracellular Ca2+ in endothelium-denuded rat thoracic aorta rings pre-contracted by PE (1 μM or KCl (60 mM in Ca2+-free solution. Conclusions Our results suggest that MEPY exerts its vasorelaxant effects via the activation of NO formation by means of l-Arg and NO-cGMP pathways and via the blockage of extracellular Ca2+ channels.

  20. MALDI-TOF MS Analysis of Condensed Tannins with Potent Antioxidant Activity from the Leaf, Stem Bark and Root Bark of Acacia confusa

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    Shu-Dong Wei

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the condensed tannins from leaf, stem bark and root bark of Acacia confusa were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and their antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP assays. The results showed that the condensed tannins from stem bark and root bark include propelargonidin and procyanidin, and the leaf condensed tannins include propelargonidin, procyanidin and prodelphinidin, all with the procyanidin dominating. The condensed tannins had different polymer chain lengths, varying from trimers to undecamers for leaf and root bark and to dodecamers for stem bark. The condensed tannins extracted from the leaf, stem bark and root bark all showed a very good DPPH radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing power.

  1. MALDI-TOF MS Analysis of Condensed Tannins with Potent Antioxidant Activity from the Leaf, Stem Bark and Root Bark of Acacia confusa

    OpenAIRE

    Shu-Dong Wei; Hai-Chao Zhou; Yi-Ming Lin; Meng-Meng Liao; Wei-Ming Chai

    2010-01-01

    The structures of the condensed tannins from leaf, stem bark and root bark of Acacia confusa were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis, and their antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. The results showed that the condensed tannins from stem bark and root bark include propelargonidin and procyanidi...

  2. Antibacterial and cytotoxic compounds from the bark of Cananga odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Lopa, Simin S; Sadik, Golam; Harun-Or-Rashid; Islam, Robiul; Khondkar, Proma; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Rashid, Mohammad A

    2005-12-01

    O-Methylmoschatoline, liriodenine and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid isolated from the barks of Cananga odorata showed antibacterial activities against a number of Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria. The compounds also showed antifungal and cytotoxic activities. PMID:16242266

  3. A Styrylpyrone Dimer from the Bark of Goniothalamus leiocarpus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing MU; Yi Neng HE; Wei Dong TANG; Chao Ming LI; Li Guang LOU; Han Dong SUN; Bin XU; Guo Xun YANG; Chang Qi HU

    2004-01-01

    A dimer of styrylpyrone derivative, leiocarpin E (1), was isolated from the bark of Goniothalamus leiocarpus. Its structures was elucidated by means of spectral and chemical methods. The cytotoxicity of leiocarpin E against HL-60 cells was tested.

  4. A New Abietane Diterpenoid from the Barks of Taxus yunnanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The structure of a new abietane diterpenoid,taxayunnin (1),from the barks of Taxus yunnanensis,was determined by spectroscopic analysis.A known abietane diterpenoid,taxamairin C (2),was also isolated.

  5. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Legault; Karl Girard-Lalancette; Dominic Dufour; André Pichette

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native American...

  6. Estimation and relevance of bark proportion in a willow stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Anneli [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Dept. of Short Rotation Forestry, Uppsala (Sweden); Estonian Agricultural Univ. (EAU), Inst. of Zoology and Botany, Tartu (Estonia); Verwijst, Theo; Aronsson, Paer [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Dept. of Short Rotation Forestry, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    We studied bark proportion of a willow (Salix viminalis) plantation established to produce biomass for energy, the vertical distribution of elements (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Si, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg and Ni) in bark and in wood of the shoots and the content of elements in the standing biomass. The study is based on 5-year-old shoots (clone 77-683) from a 12-year-old plantation. The bark proportion of the whole willow stand was 19% (9 tDM ha{sup -1}). The bark proportion of single shoots was constant after they had reached the size of 20 mm at stem diameter at 55 cm height. Compared to wood, bark had significantly higher concentrations of N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Cd, Pb, Co and Zn. The nutrient element (N, P, K, Mg) concentrations in the bark and in the wood of the current year shoot fractions (twigs) were significantly higher compared to the bark and the wood of other fractions. The accumulation of heavy metals occurred due to the accumulation of tree biomass and not due to the increase of heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Pb and Hg) concentrations in plant tissues over time. In summary, different management regimes give a possibility to influence shoot size frequency distribution of the crop and the chemical composition of biomass. For minimizing element removals from the soil and corrosion processes in power plants, energy willow stands should be managed in a way that promotes low bark proportion and thereby as little nutrient removal from the site by biomass harvest as possible. (Author)

  7. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF NATURAL PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM ACACIA CONCURRENS BARK

    OpenAIRE

    Nimbekar, Tulsidas; Wanjari, Bhumesh; Patil, A. T.

    2010-01-01

    The present study showed that the ethanolic extracts from the bark of Acacia concurrens exhibited a strong antioxidant activity. Among all the fractions from ethanolic extracts of bark, the EtOAc soluble fraction exhibited the best antioxidant performance. Furthermore, the amounts of total phenolic compound were determined from the ethanolic extracts. Therefore, Acacia concurrens could be considered as a potential source of natural antioxidant.

  8. Antibacterial Effect of Juglans Regia Bark against Oral Pathologic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Faramarz Zakavi; Leila Golpasand Hagh; Arash Daraeighadikolaei; Ahmad Farajzadeh Sheikh; Arsham Daraeighadikolaei; Zahra Leilavi Shooshtari

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study antimicrobial effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Juglans regia bark in Iran was evaluated on four different oral bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of Juglans regia bark were prepared by using disk diffusion technique and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods. Tetracycline 30 μg and Erythromycin 15 μg were used as positive control and w...

  9. Antibacterial Effect of Juglans Regia Bark against Oral Pathologic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zakavi, Faramarz; Golpasand Hagh, Leila; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash; Farajzadeh Sheikh, Ahmad; Daraeighadikolaei, Arsham; Leilavi Shooshtari, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study antimicrobial effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Juglans regia bark in Iran was evaluated on four different oral bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of Juglans regia bark were prepared by using disk diffusion technique and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods. Tetracycline 30  μ g and Erythromycin 15  μ g were used as positive control and w...

  10. INCORPORATION OF BARK AND TOPS IN EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS WOOD PULPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Miranda,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bark and the tops of E. globulus trees were considered for kraft pulping under industrial conditions. Pulping experiments included wood, bark, tops, and composite samples. Top wood had an average chemical composition most similar to that of wood but with somewhat lower cellulose content (52.8% vs. 56.9% and higher lignin content (18.8% vs. 17.8%. There was also a small difference between tops and wood for non-polar extractives, which were higher for tops (2.0% vs. 1.4%. Bark had a less favorable chemical composition with more extractives, especially polar extractives (5.3% vs. 1.6% and 1% NaOH solubility (19.9% vs. 12.2%, pentosans (23.7% vs. 21.3%, and ash (2.9% vs. 1.0%, although the fiber length was higher (1.12 mm vs. 0.98 mm. The kraft pulps obtained using bark showed significantly lower yield, delignification degree, and strength properties but had a quicker response to refining. The incorporation of tops and bark in the wood pulping in levels below or similar to a corresponding whole-stem, however, had a limited effect on pulp yield, kappa number, refining, and pulp strength properties. These additional raw-materials, which were estimated to be 26% of the commercial stem wood (14% bark and 12% tops, may therefore be considered in enlarging the eucalypt fiber feedstock in kraft pulping.

  11. Bark thickness across the angiosperms: more than just fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A

    2016-07-01

    Global variation in total bark thickness (TBT) is traditionally attributed to fire. However, bark is multifunctional, as reflected by its inner living and outer dead regions, meaning that, in addition to fire protection, other factors probably contribute to TBT variation. To address how fire, climate, and plant size contribute to variation in TBT, inner bark thickness (IBT) and outer bark thickness (OBT), I sampled 640 species spanning all major angiosperm clades and 18 sites with contrasting precipitation, temperature, and fire regime. Stem size was by far the main driver of variation in thickness, with environment being less important. IBT was closely correlated with stem diameter, probably for metabolic reasons, and, controlling for size, was thicker in drier and hotter environments, even fire-free ones, probably reflecting its water and photosynthate storage role. OBT was less closely correlated with size, and was thicker in drier, seasonal sites experiencing frequent fires. IBT and OBT covaried loosely and both contributed to overall TBT variation. Thickness variation was higher within than across sites and was evolutionarily labile. Given high within-site diversity and the multiple selective factors acting on TBT, continued study of the different drivers of variation in bark thickness is crucial to understand bark ecology. PMID:26890029

  12. DNA Extraction and Amplification from Contemporary Polynesian Bark-Cloth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Ximena; Payacán, Claudia; Arriaza, Francisco; Lobos, Sergio; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Paper mulberry has been used for thousands of years in Asia and Oceania for making paper and bark-cloth, respectively. Museums around the world hold valuable collections of Polynesian bark-cloth. Genetic analysis of the plant fibers from which the textiles were made may answer a number of questions of interest related to provenance, authenticity or species used in the manufacture of these textiles. Recovery of nucleic acids from paper mulberry bark-cloth has not been reported before. Methodology We describe a simple method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from small samples of contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth (tapa) using two types of nuclear markers. We report the amplification of about 300 bp sequences of the ITS1 region and of a microsatellite marker. Conclusions Sufficient DNA was retrieved from all bark-cloth samples to permit successful PCR amplification. This method shows a means of obtaining useful genetic information from modern bark-cloth samples and opens perspectives for the analyses of small fragments derived from ethnographic materials. PMID:23437166

  13. Efficient dewatering of bark in heated presses. Survey and pilot-scale trials; Effektivare avvattning av bark i vaermda pressar. Problemkartering samt foersoek i pilotskala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haakansson, Martin; Stenstroem, Stig (Lund Inst. of Technology, Lund (SE))

    2007-12-15

    Dewatering and drying of biofuels such as bark and GROT have received increased importance due to an increased interest to use these products as energy sources. In Sweden there are about 30 bark presses installed, however the amount of available information is very limited about dewatering of bark. The goal with this work is to increase the knowledge about dewatering of bark. Two separate goals have been defined in the project: A. Survey about problems related to dewatering of bark and compilation of operating experiences at Swedish mills. B. Study how different parameters affect bark dewatering at pilot scale experiments. Study different techniques for heating bark and the bark pressing process. The results will mainly be of interest for mills which are handling bark, for municipal power plants who buy wet forest residues (bark, GROT etc.) and for manufacturers of industrial bark pressing equipment. The results show that the dry matter content for birch- and pine bark normally are so high that pressing does not result in dewatering of the barks. Both dry and wet debarking is used and these bark fractions should be pressed separately. On line measurement of the dry matter content for the bark should be used as a standard tool on the bark press. This will facilitate improved control of the bark press during the year. Other conclusions are that smaller bark particles result in an increased dry matter content, large bark- and wood pieces decrease the dewatering in the bark press and that the total residence time in the press nip should be at least 30 seconds. The most common method to take care of bark water is to send it to the evaporators or to the water purification plant. Maintenance of the bark press appears not to be a big problem. Hot pressing can be accomplished in different ways, either the bark press can be heated or the bark can be heated in different ways. The alternatives that have been studied in this project are steaming the bark, heating the bark using

  14. Management, morphological, and environmental factors influencing Douglas-fir bark furrows in the Oregon Coast Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Christopher D.; Puettmann, Klaus J.; Huso, Manuela M.P.; Hagar, Joan C.; Falk, Kristen R.

    2013-01-01

    Many land managers in the Pacific Northwest have the goal of increasing late-successional forest structures. Despite the documented importance of Douglas-fir tree bark structure in forested ecosystems, little is known about factors influencing bark development and how foresters can manage development. This study investigated the relative importance of tree size, growth, environmental factors, and thinning on Douglas-fir bark furrow characteristics in the Oregon Coast Range. Bark furrow depth, area, and bark roughness were measured for Douglas-fir trees in young heavily thinned and unthinned sites and compared to older reference sites. We tested models for relationships between bark furrow response and thinning, tree diameter, diameter growth, and environmental factors. Separately, we compared bark responses measured on trees used by bark-foraging birds with trees with no observed usage. Tree diameter and diameter growth were the most important variables in predicting bark characteristics in young trees. Measured environmental variables were not strongly related to bark characteristics. Bark furrow characteristics in old trees were influenced by tree diameter and surrounding tree densities. Young trees used by bark foragers did not have different bark characteristics than unused trees. Efforts to enhance Douglas-fir bark characteristics should emphasize retention of larger diameter trees' growth enhancement.

  15. Bark- and wood-borer colonization of logs and lumber after heat treatment to ISPM 15 specifications: the role of residual bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Robert A; Petrice, Toby R

    2009-06-01

    Wood packaging material (WPM) is a major pathway for international movement of bark- and wood-infesting insects. ISPM 15, the first international standard for treating WPM, was adopted in 2002 and first implemented in the United States in 2006. ISPM 15 allows bark to remain on WPM after treatment, raising concerns that insects could infest after treatment, especially if bark were present. We conducted field studies to evaluate insect infestation of green logs and lumber with varying amounts of bark after heat treatment. In a log study, Cerambycidae and Scolytinae (ambrosia beetles and bark beetles) readily infested and developed in logs with bark after heat treatment. In a lumber study, Cerambycidae and bark beetles laid eggs in all sizes of bark patches tested (approximately 25, 100, 250, and 1,000 cm2) after heat treatment but did not infest control or heat-treated lumber without bark. Cerambycidae completed development only in boards with bark patches of 1,000 cm2, whereas bark beetles completed development on patches of 100, 250, and 1,000 cm2. Survival of bark beetles was greater in square patches (10 by 10 cm) versus rectangular patches (2.5 by 40 cm) of the same surface area (100 cm2). In surveys at six U.S. ports in 2006, 9.4% of 5,945 ISPM 15-marked WPM items contained bark, and 1.2% of 564 ISPM 15-marked WPM items with bark contained live insects of quarantine significance under the bark. It was not possible to determine whether the presence of live insects represented treatment failure or infestation after treatment.

  16. Utilization of flavonoid compounds from bark and wood: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Flavonoid compounds, which are extracted from bark and wood and used commercially, are flavan 3-ols as monomers and their polymers, which are called "condensed tannins". Reactions of the condensed tannins with formaldehyde are the basis for wood adhesives. In the late 1940s, tannin research for wood adhesives was begun and the world-first commercial use of wattle tannin from black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark as wood adhesives occurred in Australia in the 1960s. In addition, wattle tannin-based adhesives were further developed in South Africa and the uses of these adhesives have been continuing to date. The success of wattle tannin in wood adhesives is demonstrated by the collaboration of the ACIAR with the CAF in the early 1990s. Although radiata pine bark (Pinus radiata) could be a useful resource for the production of wood adhesives, three problems prevented its use in this application: low extractive yields from the bark, variable quality of the tannin extracts and excessive viscosity of the formulated tannin adhesives. In order to overcome these problems, various extraction methods have been proposed. Studies on tannin adhesives from bark of other pine species are also described. Furthermore, the use of the tannin in the bark without extraction is described as "bark adhesives" from radiata pine and black wattle. The use of radiata tannin without formaldehyde for moulded wood products is also described. Owing to the strong antioxidant activity of flavonoid compounds, bark extracts from French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster, synonym P. maritima) and radiata pine have been commercialized as nutritional supplements: Pycnogenol and Enzogenol, respectively. The background and the development of Pycnogenol and the basic difference in the preparation processes between Pycnogenol and Enzogenol are described. On the basis of the discovery that the SOSA value for wattle tannin is approximately 10 times that of extracts from pine bark supplements (Pycnogenol and Enzogenol

  17. Pharmacognostic evaluation of stem bark of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dinesh Kumar; Ajay Kumar; Om Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To perform the pharmacognostic study of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre (P. pinnata) stem bark. Method: The pharmacognostic studies were carried out in terms of organoleptic, macroscopic, microscopic, fluorescence analysis and physicochemical parameters. Results: The bark consisting of channelled, recurved, slightly quilled, usually 0.2-1 cm thick, lenticellate pieces with outer surface ash-grey to greyish-brown and internal surface yellowish-white to cream coloured having unpleasant odour and bitter taste. The main microscopic characterstics of the bark include phellem (5-20 or more layers of cork), phellogen (2-3 layered) followed by 10-15 layered phelloderm. Among other microscopic components were phloem parenchyma, phloem fibre and stone cells, traversed by wavy medullary rays. Further, physicochemical analysis of the bark power showed total ash, water soluble ash, acid insoluble ash and sulphated ash as 10.94, 1.96, 1.47 and 15.8 % w/w respectively. The alcohol and water soluble extractives values of the stem bark were 9.6 and 18.4 %w/w respectively. Conclusions: Various pharmacognostic characters observed in this study helps in botanical identification and standardization of P. pinnata L. in crude form.

  18. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Jean; Girard-Lalancette, Karl; Dufour, Dominic; Pichette, André

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50), were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol), which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity. PMID:26784337

  19. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Legault

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50, were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol, which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity.

  20. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study indicates that root bark of G. asiatica exhibits peripheral and central analgesic effect and anti-inflammatory activity, which may be attributed to the various phytochemicals present in root bark of G. asiatica.

  1. Antigenotoxic properties of Terminalia arjuna bark extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scassellati-Sforzolini, G; Villarini, L M; Moretti, L M; Marcarelli, L M; Pasquini, R; Fatigoni, C; Kaur, L S; Kumar, S; Grover, I S

    1999-01-01

    Compounds possessing antimutagenic properties (polyphenols, tannins, vitamins, etc.) have been identified in fruits, vegetables, spices, and medicinal plants. Terminalia arjuna (Combretaceae), a tropical woody tree occurring throughout India and known locally as Kumbuk, is a medicinal plant rich in tannins and triterpenes that is used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine as a cardiac tonic. The aim of the present collaborative work was to test six solvent extracts from the bark of Terminalia arjuna for antigenotoxic activity using in vitro short-term tests. Terminalia arjuna extracts were obtained by sequential extraction using acetone, methanol, methanol + HCl, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and ethyl ether. The antigenotoxic properties of these extracts were investigated by assessing the inhibition of genotoxicity of the directacting mutagen 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4NQO) using the "comet" assay and the micronucleus (MN) test. Human peripheral blood leukocytes were incubated with different concentrations of the six extracts (from 5 to 100 microg/ mL) and with 4NQO (1 and 2 microg/mL, for the "comet" assay and MN test, respectively). Each extract/4NQO combination was tested twice; in each experiment, positive control (4NQO alone) and negative control (1% DMSO) were set. "Comet" assay results showed that acetone and methanol extracts were highly effective in reducing the DNA damage caused by 4NQO, whereas the acidic methanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and ethyl ether extracts showed less marked or no antigenotoxic activity. In the MN test, a decrease in 4NQO genotoxicity was observed by testing this mutagen in the presence of acetone, methanol, chloroform, and ethyl acetate extracts, even though the extent of inhibition was not always statistically significant. PMID:15281223

  2. A small animal model study of perlite and fir bark dust on guinea pig lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, R F; DiPalma, J R; Blumenstein, R; Amenta, P S; Freedman, A P; Barbieri, E J

    1983-05-01

    Fir bark (Abies) and perlite (noncrystalline silicate) dusts have been reported to cause pulmonary disease in humans. Guinea pigs were exposed to either fir bark or perlite dust in a special chamber. Severe pathologic changes occurred in the lungs, consisting of lymphoid aggregated and a perivascular inflammatory response. Both dusts caused similar changes although one was vegetable (fir bark) and the other mineral (perlite). Fir bark and perlite dust appeared to be more than just nuisance dusts.

  3. Effect of bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) attack on bark VOC emissions of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Rajendra P.; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Blomqvist, Minna; Holopainen, Toini; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2016-02-01

    Climate warming driven storms are evident causes for an outbreak of the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) resulting in the serious destruction of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) forests in northern Europe. Conifer species are major sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the boreal zone. Climate relevant BVOC emissions are expected to increase when conifer trees defend against bark beetle attack by monoterpene (MT)-rich resin flow. In this study, BVOC emission rates from the bark surface of beetle-attacked and non-attacked spruce trees were measured from two outbreak areas, Iitti and Lahti in southern Finland, and from one control site at Kuopio in central Finland. Beetle attack increased emissions of total MTs 20-fold at Iitti compared to Kuopio, but decreased the emissions of several sesquiterpenes (SQTs) at Iitti. At the Lahti site, the emission rate of α-pinene was positively correlated with mean trap catch of bark beetles. The responsive individual MTs were tricyclene, α-pinene, camphene, myrcene, limonene, 1,8-cineole and bornyl acetate in both of the outbreak areas. Our results suggest that bark beetle outbreaks affect local BVOC emissions from conifer forests dominated by Norway spruce. Therefore, the impacts of insect outbreaks are worth of consideration to global BVOC emission models.

  4. Tannins quantification in barks of Mimosa tenuiflora and Acacia mearnsii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Calegari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical complexity, there are several methodologies for vegetable tannins quantification. Thus, this work aims at quantifying both tannin and non-tannin substances present in the barks of Mimosa tenuiflora and Acacia mearnsii by two different methods. From bark particles of both species, analytical solutions were produced by using a steam-jacketed extractor. The solution was analyzed by Stiasny and hide-powder (no chromed methods. For both species, tannin levels were superior when analyzed by hide-powder method, reaching 47.8% and 24.1% for A. mearnsii and M. tenuiflora, respectively. By Stiasny method, the tannins levels considered were 39.0% for A. mearnsii, and 15.5% for M. tenuiflora. Despite the best results presented by A. mearnsii, the bark of M. tenuiflora also showed great potential due to its considerable amount of tannin and the availability of the species at Caatinga biome.

  5. Factors controlling bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition in five tropical tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Gbadamassi G. O.; Paudel, Ekananda; Cao, Kunfang; Schaefer, Douglas; Harrison, Rhett D.

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter decomposition represents a vital ecosystem process by which nutrients are made available for plant uptake and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have investigated decomposition of different plant parts, but few considered bark decomposition or its role in decomposition of wood. However, bark can comprise a large fraction of tree biomass. We used a common litter-bed approach to investigate factors affecting bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition for five tree species in a secondary seasonal tropical rain forest in SW China. For bark, we implemented a litter bag experiment over 12 mo, using different mesh sizes to investigate effects of litter meso- and macro-fauna. For wood, we compared the decomposition of branches with and without bark over 24 mo. Bark in coarse mesh bags decomposed 1.11–1.76 times faster than bark in fine mesh bags. For wood decomposition, responses to bark removal were species dependent. Three species with slow wood decomposition rates showed significant negative effects of bark-removal, but there was no significant effect in the other two species. Future research should also separately examine bark and wood decomposition, and consider bark-removal experiments to better understand roles of bark in wood decomposition. PMID:27698461

  6. PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND MICROBICIDAL ACTIVITY OF STEM BARK OF PTEROCARPUS MARSUPIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaysing Hari Patil,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bactericidal potential of methanolic extract of stem bark (Apical bark, middle bark and Mature bark of Pterocarpus marsupium was evaluated with respect to pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoneae, Salmonella typhi, Proteus mirabilis and Micrococcus sp. The methanolic extract of apical stem bark was effective than the middle bark and mature bark in inhibiting the growth of all bacteria. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was most sensitive among all the bacterial species studied. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, glycosides,flavonoids, flavonols, phenols and terpenoids. Saponins were absent in all the bark samples.The concentrations of these phytoconstituents was higher in the apical stem bark than the middle and mature stem bark. The percent extract yield was maximum in apical stem bark. Thus, in the pharmacological point of view, it is important to study the biochemistry of apical bark in order to isolate and screen the new pharmacological active principals which can be useful in designing of new drugs active against various infectious micro- rganisms like bacteria, fungi and viruses etc.

  7. PHARMACOGNOSTIC EVALUATION AND PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF ALBIZIA ODORATISSIMA BARK POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Amrish

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacognostic evaluation of the crude drugs powder is done by using the different botanical parameters in order to evaluate the quality and purity of drugs, based on the concentration of their active principles, physical and chemical standards. This article reports on pharmacognostic evaluation or standardization of the crude drug powder of Albizia odoratissima bark powder. Albizia odoratissima bark powder has been standardized on the basis of organoleptic properties, physical characteristics, and physico‐chemical properties and phytochemical investigation. In the phytochemical investigation flavonoids, tannin, carbohydrate, saponin, triterpenoids are found to be present.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY STANDARDS OF BERBERIS ARISTATA STEM BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Ahamad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aristata is an important medicinal plant of family Berberidaceae. It is commonly known as Zarishk and Daruhaldi. It is mainly used for the treatment piles, liver diseases and diabetes. As the herb is used widely in the Indian traditional systems of medicine, it was thought worthwhile to develop the quality standards for its stem bark. The results of Pharmacognostic standardization of stem bark of B. aristata are very helpful in determination of quality and purity of the crude drug and its marketed formulation.

  9. Improvement of nutritive value of acacia mangium bark by alkali treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Wina

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Bark, especially from Acacia mangium is a by-product from wood processing industries that commonly found in Indonesiaand in big amount will cause environmental problems. One of the alternatives to utilize bark is for animal feed. The aims of this experiment are to improve the nutritive value of bark by alkali treatments (urea and sodium hydroxide and to determine the level of substitution of elephant grass by bark. The experiment consisted of 3 in vitro studies and 1 in sacco study. In vitro studies consisted of 1 the use of urea or NaOH by wetting and incubation-method, 2 the use of different concentration of Na OH (0-4% by soaking method, 3 determination of substitution level of elephant grass by treated bark. In sacco study was conducted at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation to compare the degradation of treated bark to elephant grass. The results show that urea treatment did not improve DM or OM digestibilities of bark. Soaking bark in 4% NaOH solution was more effective than wetting and incubation-method in improving in vitro digestibility. (49.26% vs19.56% for soaking and dry-method, respectively. In sacco studyl shows that treated bark had a very high solubility at 0 hour incubation but the degradation at 72 hours incubation was not significantly different from that of 0 hour incubation. The gas produced at in vitro study of treated bark was very low indicated that there was no degradation of bark at all. The level of substitution of elephant grass by treated bark up to 30% gave a non-significant digestibility value to that of 100% elephant grass. In conclusion, bark after tannin-extraction was a better feedstuff for animal feed. The soaking method in 4% NaOH solution improved the digestibility of bark significantly and the level of substitution of elephant grass by treated bark was 30%.

  10. Hepatocurative potential of Vitex doniana root bark, stem bark and leaves extracts against CCl4-induced liver damage in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James Dorcas Bolanle; Kadejo Olubukola Adetoro; Sallau Abdullahi Balarabe; Owolabi Olumuyiwa Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hepatocurative effects of aqueous root bark, stem bark and leaves ofVitex doniana in carbon tetrachloride (CCl albino rats.Methods:4) induced liver damage and non induced liver damage were assigned into liver damage and non liver damage groups of 6 rats in a group. The animals in the CCl4 induced liver damage groups, were induced by intraperitoneal injection with a single dose of CCl4 (1 mL/kg body weight) as a 1:1(v/v) solution in olive oil and were fasted for 36 h before the subsequent treatment with aqueous root bark, stem bark and leaves extracts of Vitex doniana and vitamin E as standard drug (100 mg/kg body weight per day) for 21 d, while the animals in the non induced groups were only treated with the daily oral administration of these extracts at the same dose. The administration of CCl4 was done once a week for a period of 3 weeks.Results:There was significant (P<0.05) increase in concentration of all liver marker enzymes, A total of 60 albino rats (36 induced liver damage and 24 non induced liver damage) alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline aminotransferase (ALT, AST and ALP) and significant (P<0.05) decrease in albumin in the CCl4 induced liver damage control when compared to the normal control. The extracts caused a significant (P<0.05) reduction in the serum activities of liver marker enzymes (ALT, AST and ALP) and a significant (P<0.05) increase in albumin of all the induced treated groups. Only stem bark extract and vitamin E significantly (P<0.05) increased total protein. All the extracts significantly (P<0.05) lowered serum creatinine whereas only root bark extract significantly (P<0.05) lowered serum level of urea in the rats with CCl4 induced liver damage.Conclusion:Hepatocurative study shows that all the plant parts (root bark, stem bark and leaves) possess significant hepatocurative properties among other therapeutic values justifying their use in folklore medicine.

  11. The usability of tree barks as long term biomonitors of atmospheric radionuclide deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belivermis, Murat, E-mail: belmurat@istanbul.edu.t [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Kilic, Onder, E-mail: okilic@istanbul.edu.t [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Cotuk, Yavuz, E-mail: cotukyav@istanbul.edu.t [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Sayhan, E-mail: sayhantopcuoglu@yahoo.co [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Kalayci, Guelsah, E-mail: gulsahkalayci@yahoo.co [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Pestreli, Didem, E-mail: didempestreli@hotmail.co [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    In view of the lower radionuclide activities of moss and lichen, tree barks can be used as biomonitors of radioactive contamination, regardless of the contribution of soil uptake. The present study was conducted to determine the activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U in the barks of pine (Pinus nigra) and oak (Quercus petraea) trees collected from the Thrace region in Turkey. By considering the previous studies carried out in the same region, it is noticed that among lichen, moss, oak bark and pine bark, oak bark is the best accumulator of {sup 137}Cs and natural radionuclides.

  12. Morphology of Betula pendula var. carelica bark at the pre-reproductive stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda N. Nikolaeva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in bark morphology at the pre-reproductive stage of Karelian birch are for the first time considered in connection with the type of trunk surface. The bark surface in Karelian birch changes with age from smooth to fissured. At the pre-reproductive stage Karelian birch has smooth bark with different types of exfoliation of the phellem surface layers, and tubercular specimens feature locally fissured bark on muffs at the very onset of their formation, as well as early rhytidome formation. Morphology of the bark tissues complex is a reflection of direction and intensity of the internal processes of the plant.

  13. Clerodane diterpenes from bark of Croton urucurana baillon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzolatti, Moacir G.; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J.; Brighente, Ines M.C.; Zuchinalli, Analice; Carvalho, Francieli K., E-mail: moacir.pizzolatti@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Departamento de Qumica; Candido, Ana C. S.; Peres, Marize T.L.P. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Departamento de Hidraulica e Transportes

    2013-04-15

    The new clerodane diterpene methyl 3-oxo-12-epibarbascoate was isolated from the stem barks of Croton urucurana together with the known diterpene methyl 12-epibarbascoate. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic techniques and comparison with the literature data. The obtainment of crystals allowed the crystallographic analysis of X-ray diffraction of diterpenes, thus confirming the proposed structures. (author)

  14. A new chromanone acid from the bark of Calophyllum dryobalanoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieu, Ly Ha; Hansen, Poul Erik; Duus, Fritz;

    2012-01-01

    A new chromanone acid, calodryobalanoic acid, along with six known compounds, apetalic acid, isoblancoic acid, lupeol, 1-hydroxy-2-methoxyxanthone, 1,7-dihydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone, and 5,7,4′-trihydroxyflavanone, was isolated from the bark of Calophyllum dryobalanoides collected in Vietnam. The s...

  15. Ellagitannins and complex tannins from Quercus petraea bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, M; Scholz, E; Hartmann, R; Lehmann, W; Rimpler, H

    1994-10-01

    The ellagitannins 2,3-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-glucose, pedunculagin, vescalagin, and castalagin; the flavanoellagitannins acutissimin A, acutissimin B, eugenigrandin A, guajavin B, and stenophyllanin C; and the procyanidinoellagitannin mongolicanin have been isolated from the bark of Quercus petraea. The ellagitannin fraction had a weak antisecretory effect. PMID:7807126

  16. New Diarylheptanoid from the Barks of Alnus japonica Steudel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new diarylheptanoid glycoside, 1,7-bis-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-hydroxyheptane-3-O-β-D-xylopyranoside (1), together with nine known diarylheptanoids (2-10) were isolated from the fresh bark of Alnus japonica which is a species of the genus Alnus species, growing throughout Korea.

  17. Cytotoxic Coumarins from the Bark of Mammea siamensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Ngoc Trang Nhu; Nguyen, Vy Thuy; Vo, Hoa Van;

    2010-01-01

    A new geranylated coumarin, (E)-4-(1-hydroxypropyl)-5,7-dihydroxy-6-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-8-(3-methyl-1-oxobutyl)coumarin (named surangin D), was isolated from the bark of Mammea siamensis collected in Vietnam, along with four known coumarins, surangins B and C, and theraphins B and C, an...

  18. Nitrogen Availability in Fresh and Aged Douglas Fir Bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine if there are growth differences in geranium (Pelargonium ×hortorum Bailey 'Maverick Red') produced in either fresh or aged Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco] bark (DFB). A second objective was to document nitrogen immobilization and deco...

  19. [Removing the bark from the cinnamon cane] 790

    OpenAIRE

    W L H Skeen and Co

    2003-01-01

    279 x 211 mm. Showing four men seated in a row on the ground in front of a bungalow, with piles of cinnamon beside them from which they are stripping the bark. Annotated '790' on bottom left hand corner of the photograph. Date approximate.

  20. A new diterpenoid from the stem bark of Populus davidiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Feng Zhang; Xiang Li; Byung Sun Min; Ki Hwan Bae

    2008-01-01

    A new diterpenoid, named populusol A (1), was isolated from the methanolic extraction of the stem bark of Populus davidiana. The structure was elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR as well as HRFAB-MS spectroscopic analysis.

  1. Ellagitannins and complex tannins from Quercus petraea bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, M; Scholz, E; Hartmann, R; Lehmann, W; Rimpler, H

    1994-10-01

    The ellagitannins 2,3-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-glucose, pedunculagin, vescalagin, and castalagin; the flavanoellagitannins acutissimin A, acutissimin B, eugenigrandin A, guajavin B, and stenophyllanin C; and the procyanidinoellagitannin mongolicanin have been isolated from the bark of Quercus petraea. The ellagitannin fraction had a weak antisecretory effect.

  2. The use of tree bark as long term biomonitor of (137)Cs deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, Constantin; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Incze, Reka; Kovacs, Tibor; Žunić, Zora S

    2016-03-01

    Airborne (137)Cs originated from the nuclear tests in the atmosphere and from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster was retained by the trees biomass and nowadays it can still be found in various concentrations in tree barks from Romania and other European countries. This study brings the first results of (137)Cs presence in tree bark from Romania on different considerations: (i) data dispersion in spruce and oak bark from NW, SW and central Romania, and the spatial variability of (137)Cs within oak and spruce bark from a natural protected forest area from Balvanyos area (Covasna County), known to be highly affected by the Chernobyl nuclear release; (ii) comparison of (137)Cs content in different tree bark species (oak, spruce, poplar and cherry); (iii) differences in (137)Cs concentrations with the bark depth layers and around the tree trunk; and (iv) comparison of mean (137)Cs values in spruce/oak bark from Romania with data from other European countries. PMID:26771244

  3. Bark ecology of twigs vs. main stems: functional traits across eighty-five species of angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A; Castorena, Matiss; Laws, Claire A; Westoby, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Although produced by meristems that are continuous along the stem length, marked differences in bark morphology and in microenvironment would suggest that main stem and twig bark might differ ecologically. Here, we examined: (1) how closely associated main stem and twig bark traits were, (2) how these associations varied across sites, and (3) used these associations to infer functional and ecological differences between twig and main stem bark. We measured density, water content, photosynthesis presence/absence, total, outer, inner, and relative thicknesses of main stem and twig bark from 85 species of angiosperms from six sites of contrasting precipitation, temperature, and fire regimes. Density and water content did not differ between main stems and twigs across species and sites. Species with thicker twig bark had disproportionately thicker main stem bark in most sites, but the slope and degree of association varied. Disproportionately thicker main stem bark for a given twig bark thickness in most fire-prone sites suggested stem protection near the ground. The savanna had the opposite trend, suggesting that selection also favors twig protection in these fire-prone habitats. A weak main stem-twig bark thickness association was observed in non fire-prone sites. The near-ubiquity of photosynthesis in twigs highlighted its likely ecological importance; variation in this activity was predicted by outer bark thickness in main stems. It seems that the ecology of twig bark can be generalized to main stem bark, but not for functions depending on the amount of bark, such as protection, storage, or photosynthesis.

  4. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of Syzygium cumini bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandan, S; Srinivasan, K; Chandra, S; Tandan, S K; Lal, J; Raviprakash, V

    2001-05-01

    The ethanolic extract of the bark of Syzygium cumini was investigated for its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models. The extract did not show any sign of toxicity up to a dose of 10.125 g/kg, p.o. in mice. Significant anti-inflammatory activity was observed in carrageenin (acute), kaolin-carrageenin (subacute), formaldehyde (subacute)-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma (chronic) tests in rats. The extract did not induce any gastric lesion in both acute and chronic ulcerogenic tests in rats. Thus, the present study demonstrated that S. cumini bark extract has a potent anti-inflammatory action against different phases of inflammation without any side effect on gastric mucosa. PMID:11395258

  6. Phenolic glycosides from sugar maple (Acer saccharum) bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tao; Wan, Chunpeng; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Kandhi, Vamsikrishna; Cech, Nadja B; Seeram, Navindra P

    2011-11-28

    Four new phenolic glycosides, saccharumosides A-D (1-4), along with eight known phenolic glycosides, were isolated from the bark of sugar maple (Acer saccharum). The structures of 1-4 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis. All compounds isolated were evaluated for cytotoxicity effects against human colon tumorigenic (HCT-116 and Caco-2) and nontumorigenic (CCD-18Co) cell lines. PMID:22032697

  7. Singular Fibers in Barking Families of Degenerations of Elliptic Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Okuda, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Takamura established a theory on splitting families of degenerations of complex curves. He introduced a powerful method for constructing a splitting family, called a barking family, in which there appear not only a singular fiber over the origin but also singular fibers over other points, called subordinate fibers. In this paper, for the case of degenerations of elliptic curves, we determine the types of these subordinate fibers.

  8. PHYTOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE STEM BARK OF MORINGA OLEIFERA LAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Maria

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the stem bark of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae furnished two new phytoconstituents identified as n-heptacosanyl n-octadec-9,12,15 trieneoate (moringyl linoleneate and n- docas- 4-en-11-one-1-yl n-decanoate (oleiferyl capriate along with the known compounds β-sitosterol, epilupeol, glyceropalmityl phosphate and glycerol-oleiostearyl phosphate. The structures of all the phytoconstituents have been elucidated on the basis of spectral data analyses and chemical reactions.

  9. Pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects of Pinus pinaster bark extract

    OpenAIRE

    Iravani, S.; Zolfaghari, B.

    2011-01-01

    In everyday life, our body generates free radicals and other reactive oxygen species which are derived either from the endogenous metabolic processes (within the body) or from external sources. Many clinical and pharmacological studies suggest that natural antioxidants can prevent oxidative damage. Among the natural antioxidant products, Pycnogenol® (French Pinus pinaster bark extract) has been received considerable attention because of its strong free radical-scavenging activity against reac...

  10. New sucrose derivatives from the bark of Securidaca longipedunculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tommasi, N; Piacente, S; De Simone, F; Pizza, C

    1993-01-01

    Two new bitter principles were isolated from the bark of Securidaca longipedunculata (Polygalaceae) and identified as beta-D-(3,4-disinapoyl)fructofuranosyl-alpha-D-(6-sinapoyl)g lucopyranoside and beta-D-(3-sinapoyl)fructofuranosyl-alpha-D-(6-sinapoyl)gluco pyranoside. The structures were elucidated by a combination of 1H nmr (1D, 2D COSY, 2D HOHAHA), 13C-nmr, and fabms spectra. PMID:8450315

  11. Three new compounds from the stem bark of Juglans mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hua; Zhang, Yu-Wei; Hua, Ying; Bao, Yong-Li; Wu, Yin; Sun, Lu-Guo; Yu, Chun-Lei; Huang, Yan-Xin; Wang, En-Bo; Jiang, Hong-Yu; Li, Yu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Three new compounds, 3,6-dihydroxy-4,5-dimethoxy-1,8-naphalic anhydride (1), 3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxy-1,8-naphalic anhydride (2), and methyl (7E,9E)-6,11-dioxononadeca-7,9-dienoate (3), were isolated from the stem bark of Juglans mandshurica. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence, including 1D and 2D NMR, HR-TOF-MS, and by comparison with the literature data.

  12. Acoustic cues to identity and predator context in meerkat barks

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Simon; Charlton, Benjamin; Manser, Marta B.

    2014-01-01

    Formants, the resonance frequencies of the vocal tract, are the key acoustic parameters underlying vowel identity in human speech. However, recent work on nonhuman animal communication systems has shown that formant variation provides potentially important information to receivers about static and dynamic attributes of callers. Meerkats, Suricata suricatta, produce broadband noisy bark vocalisations, lacking a clear fundamental frequency and harmonic structure, when they detect aerial or terr...

  13. A New Phenolic Glycoside from the Barks of Cinnamomum cassia

    OpenAIRE

    Junfen Zeng; Yongbo Xue; Yongji Lai; Guangmin Yao; Zengwei Luo; Yonghui Zhang; Jinwen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A new phenolic glycoside (1), named methyl 2-phenylpropanoate-2-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)-O-β-D–glucopyranoside, was isolated from the barks of Cinnamomum cassia, along with three known phenolic glycosides and four known lignan glycosides. The structure of 1 was elucidated by extensive interpretation of spectroscopic data and chemical method. Selected compounds were evaluated for their immunosuppressive activities against murine lymphocytes. Compounds 1, 2, 6 and 8 exhibited differential inhi...

  14. Bioactive constituents of the bark of Parkia biglobosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, C; Spatafora, C; Longo, O D

    2000-04-01

    In the frame of a systematic analysis of African plants used for the 'cure salée', from the bark of Parkia biglobosa, a long-chain ester of trans-ferulic acid (1) has been isolated together with an unseparable mixture of long-chain cis-ferulates (2a-e). In addition, lupeol, 4-O-methyl-epi-gallocatechin, epi-gallocatechin, epi-catechin 3-O-gallate, and epi-gallocatechin 3-O-gallate were isolated.

  15. HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECT OF ACETONE EXTRACT OF TERMINALIA ARJUNA ROXB. BARK ON TYPE-2 DIABETIC ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAMSHUN NEHAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, hypoglycemic effects of Terminalia arjuna bark extract were seen in high fructose (21%followed by streptozotocin (40mg/kg BW induced type-2 diabetic male albino rats. In vivo study showedprotective effect of T. arjuna bark acetone extract of towards blood glucose, serum urea, serum createnine, SGOT,SGPT, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT, urine sugar and urine ketone bodies in diabetic rats. Feeding 500 mg/kgBW arjuna bark extract to rats showed better effect for blood and urine parameters as compared to rats fed with250 mg/kg BW arjuna bark extract. The effect of feeding 500 mg/kg BW arjuna bark extract was found to bealmost equal to that of with glimepiride fed diabetic rats. The result indicated that Terminalia arjuna bark acetoneextract of have antidiabetogenic and possess hypoglycemic effects in type-2 diabetic rats.

  16. Antibacterial Effect of Juglans Regia Bark against Oral Pathologic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Zakavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study antimicrobial effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Juglans regia bark in Iran was evaluated on four different oral bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of Juglans regia bark were prepared by using disk diffusion technique and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC methods. Tetracycline 30 μg and Erythromycin 15 μg were used as positive control and water as negative control in disk diffusion and MIC methods. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test. Results. The results showed that S. sanguis and S. mutans were the most sensitive and the most resistant bacteria against ethanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Ethanolic extract had significant antibacterial effect against all tested bacteria. Aqueous extract did not show antibacterial effect on S. mutans, in contrast to ethanolic extract. Aqueous extract had significantly antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus, S. salivarius, and S. sanguis compared to control (P<0.0001, but it did not show effect on S. mutans when compared with Erythromycin. According to the obtained MIC values, ethanol extract of Juglans regia bark had the lowest rate. Conclusion. The results may provide the basis for using natural antimicrobial substance for oral hygiene prophylaxis purposes.

  17. Molluscicidal activity of Punica granatum bark and Canna indica root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Tripathi

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The molluscicidal activity of Punica granatum Linn. (Punicaceae and Canna indica Linn. (Cannaceae against the snail Lymnaea acuminata was studied. The molluscicidal activity of P. granatum bark and C. indica root was found to be both time and dose dependent. The toxicity of P. granatum bark was more pronounced than that of C. indica. The 24 h LC50 of the column-purified root of C. indica was 6.54 mg/l whereas that of the column-purified bark of P. granatum was 4.39 mg/l. The ethanol extract of P. granatum (24 h LC50: 22.42 mg/l was more effective than the ethanol extract of C. indica (24 h LC50: 55.65 mg/l in killing the test animals. P. granatum and C. indica may be used as potent molluscicides since the concentrations used to kill the snails were not toxic for the fish Colisa fasciatus, which shares the same habitat with the snail L. acuminata.

  18. Phenolic Extracts from Acacia mangium Bark and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are present at very high concentrations in the bark of Acacia mangium. These compounds are known to have strong antioxidant activity and thus different beneficial effects on human health. Phenolic compounds in bark of A. mangium were extracted and their antioxidant activities were investigated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical-scavenging and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. A central composite design has been employed to optimize the experimental conditions for a high total phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The desirability function approach has been employed to simultaneously optimize the three responses: total phenols, antiradical activity and FRAP. An extraction time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 5, and temperature of 50 °C was predicted for the optimum experimental conditions using the desirability function. A significant linear relationship between antioxidant potency, antiradical activity and the content of phenolic compounds of bark extracts was observed. The structures of condensed tannins isolated from A. mangium were characterized by MALDI-TOF MS analyses. Condensed tannin oligomers from A. mangium were shown to be heterogeneous mixtures consisting of procyanidin and prodelphinidin structural units with polymerization degrees up to 9.

  19. PHARMACOGNOSTICAL STANDARDIZATION AND HPTLC FINGERPRINT OF ALSTONIA SCHOLARIS LINN. BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Patil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing global interest in herbal and other forms of traditional medicines. Herbs have long been an important source of numerous effective drugs. As per World Health Organization recommendations, there is a need for investigation of traditional medicinal plants for their potential therapeutic efficacy. The bark of Alstonia scholaris (L. R. Br. (Family: Apocynaceae locally known as ‘Sapthaparni’ or ‘Satwid’, is reported to have anticancer, antihelminthic, antidiarrhoeal, antiasthamatic, antimalarial etc. The present work embodies the study carried out for quality control of herbal drugs which comprises of macroscopy, microscopy, physicochemical properties, phytochemical analysis, fluorescence analysis and HPTLC fingerprint. The anatomical markers present were found to be stone cells, sclereids, cork cells, fibers and prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate. Methanol soluble extractive value was found to be higher than Water, Ethanol and Petroleum ether soluble extractive values. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, steroids, amino acids, fats, fixed oil, glycosides, proteins, starch and flavonoids. A unique HPTLC fingerprint for A. scholaris (L. R. Br. bark was developed. Results of the present study on pharmacognostical and phytochemical investigation of A. scholaris (L. R. Br. bark will be helpful in developing standards for quality, purity and sample identification of this plant.

  20. Antibacterial Effect of Juglans Regia Bark against Oral Pathologic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakavi, Faramarz; Golpasand Hagh, Leila; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash; Farajzadeh Sheikh, Ahmad; Daraeighadikolaei, Arsham; Leilavi Shooshtari, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study antimicrobial effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Juglans regia bark in Iran was evaluated on four different oral bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of Juglans regia bark were prepared by using disk diffusion technique and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods. Tetracycline 30  μ g and Erythromycin 15  μ g were used as positive control and water as negative control in disk diffusion and MIC methods. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test. Results. The results showed that S. sanguis and S. mutans were the most sensitive and the most resistant bacteria against ethanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Ethanolic extract had significant antibacterial effect against all tested bacteria. Aqueous extract did not show antibacterial effect on S. mutans, in contrast to ethanolic extract. Aqueous extract had significantly antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus, S. salivarius, and S. sanguis compared to control (P effect on S. mutans when compared with Erythromycin. According to the obtained MIC values, ethanol extract of Juglans regia bark had the lowest rate. Conclusion. The results may provide the basis for using natural antimicrobial substance for oral hygiene prophylaxis purposes. PMID:23878540

  1. Antioxidant Tannins from Stem Bark and Fine Root of Casuarina equisetifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Guang-Hui Lin; Shu-Dong Wei; Hai-Chao Zhou; Yi-Ming Lin; Shang-Ju Zhang; Gong-Fu Ye

    2010-01-01

    Structures of condensed tannins from the stem bark and fine root of Casuarina equisetifolia were identified using MALDI-TOF MS and HPLC analyses. The condensed tannins from stem bark and fine root consist predominantly of procyanidin combined with prodelphinidin and propelargonidin, and epicatechin is the main extension unit. The condensed tannins had different polymer chain lengths, varying from trimers to tridecamer for stem bark and to pentadecamer for fine root. The antioxidant activities...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    OpenAIRE

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Jae Ho; Park, Gwang Hun; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was...

  3. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not y...

  4. Isolation and amplification of genomic DNA from barks of Cinnamomum spp.

    OpenAIRE

    SWETHA, Valya Parambil; PARVATHY, Viswanath Alambath; SHEEJA, Thotten Elampillay; Bhaskaran SASIKUMAR

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum Presl (syn. C. zeylanicum Blume), the cinnamon of commerce, is an important aromatic tree spice having wide applications in perfumery, flavoring, beverages, and medicine. Adulteration of cinnamon with the cheaper and inferior barks of C. aromaticum and C. malabatrum is a problem. Morphological distinction of the barks is difficult; in the case of powdered barks, the situation is even worse. DNA-based molecular tools are preferred under these circumstances. Isolation of high q...

  5. Spatially distinct responses within willow to bark stripping by deer: effects on insect herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motonobu; Nakamura, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Within individual plants, cervid herbivory may cause positive or negative plant-mediated effects on insect herbivores, depending on where it occurs. Using a combination of field observations and artificial bark-stripping experiments in Hokkaido, Japan, we examined the plant-mediated effects of bark stripping by sika deer ( Cervus nippon yesoensis) on insect herbivory in two spatially distinct parts of willow ( Salix udensis) trees: resprouting leaves below bark-stripping wounds and canopy leaves above. Natural and artificial bark stripping stimulated resprouting from trunks below wounds. Resprouting leaves on bark-stripped trees had lower total phenolics, condensed tannin, and C/N ratios than did canopy leaves on control trees. Herbivory rates were higher in resprouting leaves on bark-stripped trees than in canopy leaves on controls. Conversely, above-wound canopy leaves on bark-stripped trees had higher total phenolics than did those on controls, while herbivory rates were lower in the canopy leaves of bark-stripped trees than in those on controls. These results demonstrate that plant-mediated effects of bark stripping diverge between plant tissues below and above wounds in individual willow trees. We submit that focusing on multiple plant parts can elucidate plant-mediated effects at the whole-plant scale.

  6. Content of certain mineral components in the thallus of lichens and the bark of roadside trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisława Kuziel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The total N, P, Mg, Ca, K and Na contents were investigated in the thalli of several lichen species occurring on various trees, and in the bark and bark extracts from these trees. pH of the bark extracts was also determined. Wide differences were found in the content of the elements in point in the thalli of various lichen species on Acer platanoides and on the thalli of the same species on other trees. No relation was detected between the chemical composition of the bark and that of the lichen thalli occurring on it.

  7. BIOSORPTION OF LEAD (II ON MODIFIED BARKS EXPLAINED BY THE HARD AND SOFT ACIDS AND BASES (HSAB THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Astier,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical modification of Douglas fir bark and its subsequent utilization in adsorption of Pb(II from aqueous solutions was investigated. The polysaccharidic moiety of barks was functionalized by periodate oxidation and derivatized after reductive amination in the presence of aminated oligo-carrageenans. Pb(II adsorption isotherms of derivatized barks were then determined and compared to the capabilities of crude barks using the Langmuir adsorption model in terms of affinity (b and maximum binding capacity (qmax. Compared to crude barks, the derivatization of barks by oligo-carrageenans resulted in significant enhancements of qmax and b by up to x8 and x4, respectively. The results obtained from crude barks on chemically grafted carboxylic and sulfated barks are discussed and interpreted through the Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (HSAB theory.

  8. Phytochemical Analysis and Biological Activities of Cola nitida Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand Dah-Nouvlessounon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kola nut is chewed in many West African cultures and is used ceremonially. The aim of this study is to investigate some biological effects of Cola nitida’s bark after phytochemical screening. The bark was collected, dried, and then powdered for the phytochemical screening and extractions. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of C. nitida were used in this study. The antibacterial activity was tested on ten reference strains and 28 meat isolated Staphylococcus strains by disc diffusion method. The antifungal activity of three fungal strains was determined on the Potato-Dextrose Agar medium mixed with the appropriate extract. The antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS methods. Our data revealed the presence of various potent phytochemicals. For the reference and meat isolated strains, the inhibitory diameter zone was from 17.5±0.7 mm (C. albicans to 9.5±0.7 mm (P. vulgaris. The MIC ranged from 0.312 mg/mL to 5.000 mg/mL and the MBC from 0.625 mg/mL to >20 mg/mL. The highest antifungal activity was observed with F. verticillioides and the lowest one with P. citrinum. The two extracts have an excellent reducing free radical activity. The killing effect of A. salina larvae was perceptible at 1.04 mg/mL. The purified extracts of Cola nitida’s bark can be used to hold meat products and also like phytomedicine.

  9. Bark water uptake promotes localized hydraulic recovery in coastal redwood crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason Earles, J; Sperling, Or; Silva, Lucas C R; McElrone, Andrew J; Brodersen, Craig R; North, Malcolm P; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2016-02-01

    Coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), the world's tallest tree species, rehydrates leaves via foliar water uptake during fog/rain events. Here we examine if bark also permits water uptake in redwood branches, exploring potential flow mechanisms and biological significance. Using isotopic labelling and microCT imaging, we observed that water entered the xylem via bark and reduced tracheid embolization. Moreover, prolonged bark wetting (16 h) partially restored xylem hydraulic conductivity in isolated branch segments and whole branches. Partial hydraulic recovery coincided with an increase in branch water potential from about -5.5 ± 0.4 to -4.2 ± 0.3 MPa, suggesting localized recovery and possibly hydraulic isolation. As bark water uptake rate correlated with xylem osmotic potential (R(2)  = 0.88), we suspect a symplastic role in transferring water from bark to xylem. Using historical weather data from typical redwood habitat, we estimated that bark and leaves are wet more than 1000 h per year on average, with over 30 events being sufficiently long (>24 h) to allow for bark-assisted hydraulic recovery. The capacity to uptake biologically meaningful volumes of water via bark and leaves for localized hydraulic recovery throughout the crown during rain/fog events might be physiologically advantageous, allowing for relatively constant transpiration.

  10. Linking Increasing Drought Stress to Scots Pine Mortality and Bark Beetle Infestations

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    Matthias Dobbertin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the dry Swiss Rhone Valley, Scots pine forests have experienced increased mortality in recent years. It has commonly been assumed that drought events and bark beetles fostered the decline, however, whether bark beetle outbreaks increased in recent years and whether they can be linked to drought stress or increasing temperature has never been studied.

  11. Elemental analyses of pine bark and wood in an environmental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarela, K.-E.; Harju, L.; Rajander, J. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Process Chemistry Group, AAbo Akademi University, Biskopsg. 8, FIN-20500 AAbo (Finland); Lill, J.-O.; Heselius, S.-J. [Turku PET Centre, Accelerator Laboratory, AAbo Akademi University, Porthansg. 3, FIN-20500 AAbo (Finland); Lindroos, A. [Department of Geology and Mineralogy, AAbo Akademi University, Domkyrkotorget 1, FIN-20500 AAbo (Finland); Mattsson, K. [Department of Biology, AAbo Akademi University, BioCity, Artillerig. 6, FIN-20500 AAbo (Finland)

    2005-05-01

    Bark and wood samples were taken from the same individuals of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from a polluted area close to a Cu-Ni smelter in Harjavalta and from some relatively unpolluted areas in western Finland. The samples were analysed by thick-target particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) after preconcentration by dry ashing at 550 {sup o}C. The elemental contents of pine bark and wood were compared to study the impact of heavy metal pollution on pine trees. By comparison of the elemental contents in ashes of bark and wood, a normalisation was obtained. For the relatively clean areas, the ratios of the concentration in bark ash to the concentration in wood ash for different elements were close to 1. This means that the ashes of Scots Pine wood and bark have quite similar elemental composition. For the samples from the polluted area the mean concentration ratios for some heavy metals were elevated (13-28), reflecting the effect of direct atmospheric contamination. The metal contents in the ashes of pine bark and wood were also compared to recommendations for ashes to be recycled back to the forest environment. Bark from areas close to emission sources of heavy metal pollution should be considered with caution if aiming at recycling the ash. Burning of bark fuel of pine grown within 6 km of the Cu-Ni smelter is shown to generate ashes with high levels of Cu, Ni as well as Cd, As and Pb. (author)

  12. Selective bark-stripping of beech, Fagus sylvatica, by free-ranging horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiters, A.T.; Sluijs, van der L.A.M.; Wytema, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Incidence and intensity of bark-stripping by horses was surveyed in stands and tree lanes of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Veluwezoom National Park, by using transects. Damage was apparent on 38% of beech trees, and 11% were seriously damaged (score 3 or more). Susceptibility to bark-stripp

  13. 78 FR 23592 - Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars, Termination of the Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars, Termination of the Investigation AGENCY: U.S... certain electronic bark control collars by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent No. 5....usitc.gov . The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic...

  14. Divergence among barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, C.S.; Sullivan, B.K.; Malone, J.H.; Schwalbe, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) are distributed from southern Mexico along the Sierra Madre Occidental into Arizona and the Sierra Madre Oriental into Texas and New Mexico. Barking frogs in Arizona and most of Texas live in rocky areas in oak woodland, while those in New Mexico and far western Texas live in rodent burrows in desertscrub. Barking frogs in each of the three states have distinct coloration and differ in sexually dimorphic characters, female vocalization, and skin toxicity. We analyzed advertisement call variation and conducted a phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial DNA sequences (ND2 and tRNA regions) for barking frogs from these three states. Advertisement calls of frogs from Arizona were significantly longer in duration, higher in frequency, and had longer duration pulses than those of frogs from either New Mexico or Texas; frogs from these latter two sites were indistinguishable in these call variables. Phylogenetic analysis showed deep divisions among barking frogs from the three states. Differences in call structure, coloration, and mitochondrial DNA sequences strongly suggest that barking frogs in Arizona are reproductively isolated from those in New Mexico and Texas. Our results indicate that either northern populations are connected via gene flow through southern Mexico (i.e., they are subspecies as currently recognized), or represent independent lineages as originally described (i.e., western barking frogs, E. cactorum in AZ, and the eastern barking frogs, E. latrans in NM, TX).

  15. Microscopic and UPLC-UV-MS analyses of authentic and commercial yohimbe (Pausinystalia johimbe) bark samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohimbine is the major alkaloid found in the stem-bark of yohimbe, Pausinystalia johimbe (Rubiaceae), an evergreen tree native to Africa. A number of yohimbe products are sold in USA as dietary supplements. Hand-sections of the stem-bark were prepared and the anatomical features were studied by ligh...

  16. Bark water uptake promotes localized hydraulic recovery in coastal redwood crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason Earles, J; Sperling, Or; Silva, Lucas C R; McElrone, Andrew J; Brodersen, Craig R; North, Malcolm P; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2016-02-01

    Coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), the world's tallest tree species, rehydrates leaves via foliar water uptake during fog/rain events. Here we examine if bark also permits water uptake in redwood branches, exploring potential flow mechanisms and biological significance. Using isotopic labelling and microCT imaging, we observed that water entered the xylem via bark and reduced tracheid embolization. Moreover, prolonged bark wetting (16 h) partially restored xylem hydraulic conductivity in isolated branch segments and whole branches. Partial hydraulic recovery coincided with an increase in branch water potential from about -5.5 ± 0.4 to -4.2 ± 0.3 MPa, suggesting localized recovery and possibly hydraulic isolation. As bark water uptake rate correlated with xylem osmotic potential (R(2)  = 0.88), we suspect a symplastic role in transferring water from bark to xylem. Using historical weather data from typical redwood habitat, we estimated that bark and leaves are wet more than 1000 h per year on average, with over 30 events being sufficiently long (>24 h) to allow for bark-assisted hydraulic recovery. The capacity to uptake biologically meaningful volumes of water via bark and leaves for localized hydraulic recovery throughout the crown during rain/fog events might be physiologically advantageous, allowing for relatively constant transpiration. PMID:26178179

  17. Two new phenylbutanoids from inner bark of Betula pendula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Jaana; Sinkkonen, Jari; Karonen, Maarit; Pihlaja, Kalevi

    2008-02-01

    Two phenylbutanoids, 7-{3R-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)butyl] beta-glucopyranosid-O-6-yl} 4-O-beta-glucopyranosylvanillin and 3-beta-glucopyranosyloxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-butanone were isolated from an aqueous methanol extract of the inner bark of Betula pendula. Their structures were determined by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The complete assignment of proton and carbon signals was achieved by 1D and 2D NMR experiments: selective 1D TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC and DQF-COSY. PMID:18098157

  18. Procyanidin xylosides from the bark of Betula pendula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Jaana; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari

    2012-04-01

    A procyanidin dimer xyloside, catechin-(4α→8)-7-O-β-xylopyranosyl-catechin, was isolated from the inner bark of Betula pendula and its structure was determined using 1D and 2D NMR, CD and high-resolution ESIMS. Interestingly, the 7-O-β-xylopyranose unit was found to be present in the lower terminal unit of the dimer. In addition to this procyanidin dimer xyloside, an entire series of oligomeric and polymeric procyanidin xylosides was detected. Their structures were investigated by hydrophilic interaction HPLC-HRESIMS. Procyanidin glycosides are still rarely found in nature. PMID:22273040

  19. Cytotoxic Constituents from bark and leaves of Amyris pinnata Kunth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Enrique Cuca-Suarez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available From leaves and bark of Amyris pinnata Kunth twelve compounds were isolated, corresponding to six lignans 1-6, three coumarins 7-9, a sesquiterpene 10, an oxazole alkaloid 11, and a prenylated flavonoid 12,. Metabolites were identified by spectroscopic techniques ( 1H and 13C NMR, EIMS and by comparison with published data in the literature. C ytotoxicity against leukemia, solid tumors, and normal cells was evaluated for all isolated compounds. Lignans were found to be the most cytotoxic compounds occurring in A. pinnata.

  20. Lancifoliaine, a New Bisbenzylisoquinoline from the Bark of Litsea lancifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Zaima

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A new bisbenzylisoquinoline, lancifoliaine (1, together with seven known alkaloids – N-allyllaurolitsine (2, reticuline (3, actinodaphnine, norboldine, pallidine, cassythicine and boldine – were isolated from the stem bark of Litsea lancifolia (Lauraceae. In addition to that of lancifoliaine, complete 13C-NMR data of N-allyl-laurolitsine (2 was also reported. The alkaloidal structures were elucidated by means of high field 1D- and 2D-NMR IR, UV, and LCMS-IT-TOF spectral data. N-Allyllaurolitsine (2 showed a moderate vasorelaxant activity on isolated rat aorta.

  1. Triterpenoid saponins from the stem bark of Caryocar villosum

    OpenAIRE

    Magid, A. A.; Voutquenne Nazabadioko, L.; Renimel, I.; Harakat, D.; Moretti, Christian; Lavaud, C.

    2006-01-01

    Five triterpenoid saponins, caryocarosides II-22 (3), III-22 (4), II-23 (5), III-23 (6), and II-24 (7), have been isolated from the methanol extract of the stem bark of Caryocar villosum, along with two known saponins (1-2). The seven saponins are glucuronides of hederagenin (II) or bayogenin (III). Caryocaroside II-24 (7) is an unusual galloyl ester saponin acylated on the sugar chain attached to C-28, the 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-glueurono...

  2. Chemical Constituents from Stem Bark and Roots of Clausena anisata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Dongo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigations on the stem bark and roots of the tropical shrub Clausena anisata led to the isolation and characterization three carbazole alkaloids: girinimbine, murrayamine-A and ekeberginine; two peptide derivatives: aurantiamide acetate and N-benzoyl-l-phenylalaninyl-N-benzoyl-l-phenylalaninate; and a mixture of two phytosterols: sitosterol and stigmasterol. The structures of these compounds were established by nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, COSY, HSQC, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS.

  3. Prenylated xanthones from the root bark of Cudrania tricuspidata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji Hye; Hong, Seong Su; Han, Xiang Hua; Hwang, Ji Sang; Lee, Dongho; Lee, Heesoon; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Kim, Youngsoo; Ro, Jai Seup; Hwang, Bang Yeon

    2007-07-01

    Four new prenylated xanthones, cudratricusxanthones J-M (1-4), were isolated from the CH2Cl2-soluble extract of the root bark of Cudrania tricuspidata, along with four known prenylated xanthones, isocudraxanthone K (5), cudraxanthone C (6), cudratricusxanthone A (7), and cudraxanthone L (8), and three known prenylated flavonoids, cudraflavone A (9), cudraflavanone A (10), and cudraflavone B (11). The structures of compounds 1-4 were elucidated using spectroscopic methods. Cudratricusxanthone A (7), cudraflavanone A (10), and cudraflavone B (11) showed moderate inhibitory effects on mouse brain monoamine oxidase (MAO) with IC50 values of 88.3, 89.7, and 80.0 microM, respectively.

  4. Pharmacognostical evaluation of medicinally important Ficus retusa (Leaves and bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Semwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ficus retusa (F. retusa belongs to family Moraceae is a large and extensively growing tree across Indian continent. It's commonly known as Chilkan and Marabuten. This tree is claimed to have medicinal properties. The aim of present study is to investigate the pharmacognostical characters of important medicinal plant, F. retusa L. The pharmacognostic studies were carried out in terms of macroscopical, microscopical characters, standardization, phytoconstituents and chromatographic analysis of F. retusa leaf and bark. Various standard methods were adopted to carry out the investigation.

  5. Antiplasmodial and larvicidal compounds of Toddalia asiatica root bark

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Nyahanga; J Isaac Jondiko; L Onyango Arot Manguro; J Atieno Orwa

    2013-09-01

    From the -hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Toddalia asiatica root bark were isolated eight compounds (1-8) which were identified on the basis of both spectroscopic and physical data as well as comparison with already published results. The crude extracts and isolated compounds showed moderate in vitro antiplasmodial activity against D6 (chloroquine-sensitive) and W2 (chloroquine-resistant) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The extracts and isolates also exhibited larvicidal activities against Aedes aegypti and coumarins were identified as the active compounds.

  6. Calotroposide S, New Oxypregnane Oligoglycoside from Calotropis procera Root Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrin R. M. Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Calotroposide S (1, a new oxypregnane oligoglycoside has been isolated from the n-butanol fraction of Calotropis procera (Ait R. Br. root bark. The structure of 1 was assigned based on various spectroscopic analyses. Calotroposide S (1 possesses the 12-O-benzoylisolineolon aglycone moiety with eight sugar residues attached to C-3 of the aglycone. It showed potent anti-proliferative activity towards PC-3 prostate cancer, A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and U373 glioblastoma (GBM cell lines with IC 50 0.18, 0.2, and 0.06 µM, respectively compared with cisplatin and carboplatin.

  7. In vitro Development of Callus from Node of Mimusops elengi - As Substitute of Natural Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Gami

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, results of in vitro callus development from Mimusops elengi as substitute of bark were formulated. By different auxine/cytokinine ratio from young nodal explant compact, globular and fragile types of callus were developed. Methanolic extract of all types of callus and bark were studied for extractable matter, antibacterial activity, phytochemical profiling, biouautography and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC banding patterns. Results of all calluses were compared with results of natural bark of M. elengi. TLC pattern of three types of callus and bark revealed similar banding pattern, and same bioactivity was also observed in bioautography. Our results indicate that natural bark & in vitro developed callus of M. elengi posses similar chemical profiling and bioactivity regardless the type & colour of callus.

  8. STUDIES ON SOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA BARK GUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  9. Bacterial and fungal symbionts of parasitic Dendroctonus bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohet, Loïc; Grégoire, Jean-Claude; Berasategui, Aileen; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Biedermann, Peter H W

    2016-09-01

    Bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are one of the most species-rich herbivorous insect groups with many shifts in ecology and host-plant use, which may be mediated by their bacterial and fungal symbionts. While symbionts are well studied in economically important, tree-killing species, little is known about parasitic species whose broods develop in living trees. Here, using culture-dependent and independent methods, we provide a comprehensive overview of the associated bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi of the parasitic Dendroctonus micans, D. punctatus and D. valens, and compare them to those of other tree-inhabiting insects. Despite inhabiting different geographical regions and/or host trees, the three species showed similar microbial communities. Enterobacteria were the most prevalent bacteria, in particular Rahnella, Pantoea and Ewingella, in addition to Streptomyces Likewise, the yeasts Candida/Cyberlindnera were the most prominent fungi. All these microorganisms are widespread among tree-inhabiting insects with various ecologies, but their high prevalence overall might indicate a beneficial role such as detoxification of tree defenses, diet supplementation or protection against pathogens. As such, our results enable comparisons of symbiont communities of parasitic bark beetles with those of other beetles, and will contribute to our understanding of how microbial symbioses facilitate dietary shifts in insects. PMID:27387908

  10. Pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects of Pinus pinaster bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iravani, S; Zolfaghari, B

    2011-01-01

    In everyday life, our body generates free radicals and other reactive oxygen species which are derived either from the endogenous metabolic processes (within the body) or from external sources. Many clinical and pharmacological studies suggest that natural antioxidants can prevent oxidative damage. Among the natural antioxidant products, Pycnogenol(®) (French Pinus pinaster bark extract) has been received considerable attention because of its strong free radical-scavenging activity against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. P. pinaster bark extract (PBE) contains polyphenolic compounds (these compounds consist of catechin, taxifolin, procyanidins of various chain lengths formed by catechin and epicatechin units, and phenolic acids) capable of producing diverse potentially protective effects against chronic and degenerative diseases. This herbal medication has been reported to have cardiovascular benefits, such as vasorelaxant activity, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibiting activity, and the ability to enhance the microcirculation by increasing capillary permeability. Moreover, effects on the immune system and modulation of nitrogen monoxide metabolism have been reported. This article provides a brief overview of clinical studies describing the beneficial and health-promoting effects of PBE. PMID:22049273

  11. Anticonvulsant properties of saponins from Ficus platyphylla stem bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindo, Ben A; Anuka, Joseph A; McNeil, Lilly; Yaro, Abdullahi H; Adamu, Simon S; Amos, Samson; Connelly, William K; Lees, George; Gamaniel, Karniyus S

    2009-03-30

    Preparations of Ficus platyphylla have been used in Nigerian traditional medicine for the management of epilepsy for many years and their efficacy is widely acclaimed among the Hausa communities of northern Nigeria. The anticonvulsant properties of the saponin rich fraction (SFG) obtained from the methanol extract of F. platyphylla stem bark were studied on pentylenetetrazole-, strychnine- and maximal electroshock seizures in mice. Effects of SFG were also examined in murine models for neurological disease and on relevant in vitro targets for anticonvulsant drugs. SFG protected mice against pentylenetetrazole- and strychnine-induced seizures; and significantly delayed the onset of myoclonic jerks and tonic seizures. SFG failed to protect mice against maximal electroshock seizures at doses tested. SFG neither abolished the spontaneous discharges induced by 4-aminopyridine in a neonatal rat brain slice model of tonic-clonic epilepsy nor could it modulate chloride currents through GABA(A) receptor channel complex in cultured cortical cells. However, it was able to non-selectively suppress excitatory and inhibitory synaptic traffic, blocked sustained repetitive firing (SRF) and spontaneous action potential firing in these cultured cells. Our results provide scientific evidence that F. platyphylla stem bark may contain psychoactive principles with potential anticonvulsant properties. SFG impaired membrane excitability; a property shared by most anticonvulsants particularly the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) blocking drugs, thus supporting the isolation and development of the saponin components of this plant as anticonvulsant agents.

  12. Studies on some physicochemical properties of Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/ v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  13. Polysaccharides with immunomodulating properties from the bark of Parkia biglobosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Bing-Zhao; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Barsett, Hilde; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; El-Zoubair, Elnour; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-01-30

    The bark of Parkia biglobosa is used in traditional medicine to cure a wide range of illnesses. Polysaccharides were extracted from the bark with 50% ethanol-water, 50°C and 100°C water, and seven active fractions obtained by anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The complement fixation and macrophage stimulating activities of the different fractions were determined. The acidic fractions PBEII-I and PBEII-IV were the most active in the complement fixation assay, but the other fractions were also potent compared to the positive control BPII from Biophytum petersianum. Fractions PBEII-I and PBEII-IV were also the most potent fractions in stimulating macrophages to release nitric oxide. Structural studies showed that PBEII-I and PBEII-IV were pectic type polysaccharides, containing arabinogalactan type II structures. The observed differences in biological activities among the seven purified polysaccharide sub-fractions are probably due to differences in monosaccharide compositions, linkage types and molecular sizes.

  14. IN VITRO ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF FICUS BENGHALENSIS BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matpal Mahesh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the anti-inflammatory property of the different extract of bark of Ficus benghalensis, family Moraceae is a very large, fast growing, evergreen tree up to 30 meters, with spreading branches and many aerial roots. Leaves stalked, ovate-cordate, 3-nerved, entire, when young downy on both sides; petiole with a broad smooth greasy gland at the apex, compressed, downy; Fruit in axillary pairs, the size of a cherry, round and downy. According to Ayurveda, it is astringent to bowels; useful in treatment of biliousness, ulcers, erysipelas, vomiting, vaginal complains, fever, inflammations, leprosy. According to Unani system of medicine, its latex is aphrodisiac, tonic, vulernary, maturant, lessens inflammations; useful in piles etc. The present study aimed at the evaluation of anti-inflammatory property of the aqueous, chloroform and alcoholic extracts of the bark by in vitro methods. In vitro method was estimated by human red blood cell membrane stabilization (HRBC method. Results showed significant anti-inflammatory property of the different extracts tested. The methanolic extract at a concentration of 200 mg/ml. showed potent activity on comparing with the standard drug diclofenac sodium.

  15. Black pine (Pinus nigra) barks as biomonitors of airborne mercury pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarantini, Laura; Rimondi, Valentina; Benvenuti, Marco; Beutel, Marc W; Costagliola, Pilario; Gonnelli, Cristina; Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Paolieri, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Tree barks are relevant interfaces between plants and the external environment, and can effectively retain airborne particles and elements at their surface. In this paper we have studied the distribution of mercury (Hg) in soils and in black pine (Pinus nigra) barks from the Mt. Amiata Hg district in southern Tuscany (Italy), where past Hg mining and present-day geothermal power plants affect local atmospheric Hg concentration, posing serious environmental concerns. Barks collected in heavily Hg-polluted areas of the district display the highest Hg concentration ever reported in literature (8.6mg/kg). In comparison, barks of the same species collected in local reference areas and near geothermal power plants show much lower (range 19-803μg/kg) concentrations; even lower concentrations are observed at a "blank" site near the city of Florence (5-98μg/kg). Results show a general decrease of Hg concentration from bark surface inwards, in accordance with a deposition of airborne Hg, with minor contribution from systemic uptake from soils. Preliminary results indicate that bark Hg concentrations are comparable with values reported for lichens in the same areas, suggesting that tree barks may represent an additional useful tool for biomonitoring of airborne Hg. PMID:27341111

  16. Enhancing the hydrophobicity of mangrove bark by esterification for oil adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpour, Robabeh; Sapari, Nasiman Bin; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Orji, Kalu Uka

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills generally cause worldwide concern due to their detrimental effects on the environment and the economy. An assortment of commercial systems has been developed to control these spills, including the use of agricultural wastes as sorbents. This work deals with raw and modified mangrove barks (Rhizophora apiculata), an industrial lignocellulosic waste, as a low cost adsorbent for oil-product-spill cleanup in the aquatic environment. Mangrove bark was modified using fatty acids (oleic acid and palmitic acid) to improve its adsorption capacity. The oil sorption capacity of the modified bark was studied and compared with that of the raw bark. Kinetic tests were conducted with a series of contact times. The influence of particle size, oil dosage, pH and temperature on oil sorption capacity was investigated. The results showed that oleic acid treated bark has a higher sorption capacity (2,860.00 ± 2.00 mg/g) than untreated bark for Tapis crude oil. A correlation between surface functional groups, morphology and surface area of the adsorbent was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectrum, field emission scanning electron microscopy images and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. Isotherm study was conducted using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The result showed that adsorption of crude oil on treated mangrove bark could be best described by the Langmuir model. PMID:25325547

  17. Physiological resistance of grasshopper mice (Onychomys spp.) to Arizona bark scorpion (Centruroides exilicauda) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Ashlee H; Rowe, Matthew P

    2008-10-01

    Predators feeding on toxic prey may evolve physiological resistance to the preys' toxins. Grasshopper mice (Onychomys spp.) are voracious predators of scorpions in North American deserts. Two species of grasshopper mice (Onychomys torridus and Onychomys arenicola) are broadly sympatric with two species of potentially lethal bark scorpion (Centruroides exilicauda and Centruroides vittatus) in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts, respectively. Bark scorpions produce toxins that selectively bind sodium (Na(+)) and potassium (K(+)) ion channels in vertebrate nerve and muscle tissue. We previously reported that grasshopper mice showed no effects of bark scorpion envenomation following natural stings. Here we conducted a series of toxicity tests to determine whether grasshopper mice have evolved resistance to bark scorpion neurotoxins. Five populations of grasshopper mice, either sympatric with or allopatric to bark scorpions, were injected with bark scorpion venom; LD50s were estimated for each population. All five populations of grasshopper mice demonstrated levels of venom resistance greater than that reported for non-resistant Mus musculus. Moreover, venom resistance in the mice showed intra- and interspecific variability that covaried with bark scorpion sympatry and allopatry, patterns consistent with the hypothesis that venom resistance in grasshopper mice is an adaptive response to feeding on their neurotoxic prey. PMID:18687353

  18. Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Bark and Ambrosia Beetles in a Brazilian Tropical Dry Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo-Reis, Luiz Eduardo; Novais, Samuel Matos Antunes de; Monteiro, Graziela França; Flechtmann, Carlos Alberto Hector; Faria, Maurício Lopes de; Neves, Frederico de Siqueira

    2016-01-01

    Bark and the ambrosia beetles dig into host plants and live most of their lives in concealed tunnels. We assessed beetle community dynamics in tropical dry forest sites in early, intermediate, and late successional stages, evaluating the influence of resource availability and seasonal variations in guild structure. We collected a total of 763 beetles from 23 species, including 14 bark beetle species, and 9 ambrosia beetle species. Local richness of bark and ambrosia beetles was estimated at 31 species. Bark and ambrosia composition was similar over the successional stages gradient, and beta diversity among sites was primarily determined by species turnover, mainly in the bark beetle community. Bark beetle richness and abundance were higher at intermediate stages; availability of wood was the main spatial mechanism. Climate factors were effectively non-seasonal. Ambrosia beetles were not influenced by successional stages, however the increase in wood resulted in increased abundance. We found higher richness at the end of the dry and wet seasons, and abundance increased with air moisture and decreased with higher temperatures and greater rainfall. In summary, bark beetle species accumulation was higher at sites with better wood production, while the needs of fungi (host and air moisture), resulted in a favorable conditions for species accumulation of ambrosia. The overall biological pattern among guilds differed from tropical rain forests, showing patterns similar to dry forest areas. PMID:27271969

  19. Development and characterization of ice cream enriched with different formulations flour jabuticaba bark (Myrciaria cauliflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Leopoldina Lamounier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to perform the physicochemical characterization of the flour from the bark of jabuticaba, as well as developing three ice cream formulations (enriched with 0, 5 and 10% of this flour and evaluate the physicochemical and sensory characteristics. Fruits were pulped, the peels were dehydrated, dried, crushed and sieved to obtain the flour that was analyzed for physicochemical levels. Then, three ice cream formulations were developed (with 0%, 5% and 10% flour from the bark of jabuticaba, considering the physicochemical and sensorial characteristics. The results showed that the flour from the bark of jabuticaba showed high ash and fiber. The ice creams showed differences (p < 0.05 for pH, titratable acidity, moisture and ash due to the incorporation of flour from the bark of jabuticaba. The only attribute that did not differ (p > 0.05 was soluble solid. The overrun was ecreasing with increasing addition of flour. In the sensory evaluation, only attributes that differ (p < 0.05 were flavor, texture and overall appearance of the formulation with 10% flour from the bark of jabuticaba, which represents that incorporation of 5% flour from the bark of jabuticaba did not affect the cceptability of ice creams. It can be concluded that the enrichment of blemish bark flour provides edible ice increase in nutritional value without affecting the sensory characteristics at the level of 5% added.

  20. Cork oak vulnerability to fire: the role of bark harvesting, tree characteristics and abiotic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe X Catry

    Full Text Available Forest ecosystems where periodical tree bark harvesting is a major economic activity may be particularly vulnerable to disturbances such as fire, since debarking usually reduces tree vigour and protection against external agents. In this paper we asked how cork oak Quercus suber trees respond after wildfires and, in particular, how bark harvesting affects post-fire tree survival and resprouting. We gathered data from 22 wildfires (4585 trees that occurred in three southern European countries (Portugal, Spain and France, covering a wide range of conditions characteristic of Q. suber ecosystems. Post-fire tree responses (tree mortality, stem mortality and crown resprouting were examined in relation to management and ecological factors using generalized linear mixed-effects models. Results showed that bark thickness and bark harvesting are major factors affecting resistance of Q. suber to fire. Fire vulnerability was higher for trees with thin bark (young or recently debarked individuals and decreased with increasing bark thickness until cork was 3-4 cm thick. This bark thickness corresponds to the moment when exploited trees are debarked again, meaning that exploited trees are vulnerable to fire during a longer period. Exploited trees were also more likely to be top-killed than unexploited trees, even for the same bark thickness. Additionally, vulnerability to fire increased with burn severity and with tree diameter, and was higher in trees burned in early summer or located in drier south-facing aspects. We provided tree response models useful to help estimating the impact of fire and to support management decisions. The results suggested that an appropriate management of surface fuels and changes in the bark harvesting regime (e.g. debarking coexisting trees in different years or increasing the harvesting cycle would decrease vulnerability to fire and contribute to the conservation of cork oak ecosystems.

  1. Cork oak vulnerability to fire: the role of bark harvesting, tree characteristics and abiotic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catry, Filipe X; Moreira, Francisco; Pausas, Juli G; Fernandes, Paulo M; Rego, Francisco; Cardillo, Enrique; Curt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Forest ecosystems where periodical tree bark harvesting is a major economic activity may be particularly vulnerable to disturbances such as fire, since debarking usually reduces tree vigour and protection against external agents. In this paper we asked how cork oak Quercus suber trees respond after wildfires and, in particular, how bark harvesting affects post-fire tree survival and resprouting. We gathered data from 22 wildfires (4585 trees) that occurred in three southern European countries (Portugal, Spain and France), covering a wide range of conditions characteristic of Q. suber ecosystems. Post-fire tree responses (tree mortality, stem mortality and crown resprouting) were examined in relation to management and ecological factors using generalized linear mixed-effects models. Results showed that bark thickness and bark harvesting are major factors affecting resistance of Q. suber to fire. Fire vulnerability was higher for trees with thin bark (young or recently debarked individuals) and decreased with increasing bark thickness until cork was 3-4 cm thick. This bark thickness corresponds to the moment when exploited trees are debarked again, meaning that exploited trees are vulnerable to fire during a longer period. Exploited trees were also more likely to be top-killed than unexploited trees, even for the same bark thickness. Additionally, vulnerability to fire increased with burn severity and with tree diameter, and was higher in trees burned in early summer or located in drier south-facing aspects. We provided tree response models useful to help estimating the impact of fire and to support management decisions. The results suggested that an appropriate management of surface fuels and changes in the bark harvesting regime (e.g. debarking coexisting trees in different years or increasing the harvesting cycle) would decrease vulnerability to fire and contribute to the conservation of cork oak ecosystems.

  2. Lost Books: Abbess Hildelith and the Literary Culture of Barking Abbey.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, D

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the literary culture of Barking Abbey, a vital centre of Anglo-Saxon learning, when it was under the rule of its second abbess, Hildelith, in the late seventh and early eighth century. Particular attention is given to the intersection of lived practice at Barking and the literary record, focusing on three pieces of evidence: Bede’s account of the early history of Barking in his Ecclesiastical History, written in 731; Aldhelm’s De Virginitate (c.675-680), which was writte...

  3. Energy capacity of black wattle wood and bark in different spacing plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Eloy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at the energetic description of wood and bark biomass of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. in two spacing plantations: 2.0 m × 3.0 m × 1.0 m and 1.5 m, during 36 months after the planting. The experiment was conducted in the municipality of Frederico Westphalen, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Biomass (BIO, calorific value, basic density, ash content, volatile matter and fixed carbon content and energy density (ED of wood and bark were determined. The smallest spacing plantation presented the highest production per unit area of BIO and ED of wood and bark.

  4. Assessment of Alder Tree Bark Potential as a Renewable Source of Proanthocyanidins in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janceva Sarmīte

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to assess potential of alder tree bark as a renewable source of bioactive polyphenolic compounds, antioxidant properties of hydrophilic extracts and proanthocyanidins (PAC isolated from bark of two alder species (grey alder and black alder growing in Latvia have been examined employing two test systems, ABTS●+, DPPH● assays. In the tests the high free radical scavenging capacities of the PAC were demonstrated. The polyphenolic nature of the bark PAC opens the possibility of its application as food additive. The PAC has good potential as an antioxidant for mayonnaise.

  5. Antiplasmodial compounds from Cassia siamea stem bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaiyeoba, E O; Ashidi, J S; Okpako, L C; Houghton, P J; Wright, C W

    2008-02-01

    Cassia siamea L. (Fabaceae) was identified from the southwest Nigerian ethnobotany as a remedy for febrile illness. This led to the bioassay-guided fractionation of stem bark of the plant extract, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase assay and multi-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1) for assessing the in vitro antimalarial activity. Emodin and lupeol were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction by a combination of chromatographic techniques. The structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopy, co-spotting with authentic samples and comparison with literature data. Both compounds were found to be the active principles responsible for the antiplasmodial property with IC(50) values of 5 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:17705142

  6. Condensed tannins from the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae), nine compounds were isolated and identified: ent-catechin, epicatechin, ent-gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, epiafzelechin-(4β?8)-epicatechin, epicatechin-(4β?8)-catechin (procyanidin B1), epicatechin-(4β?8)-epicatechin (procyanidin B2), epicatechin-(4β?8)-epigallocatechin, and the new compound 4'-O-methyl-epiafzelechin. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral and literature data. HPLC fingerprint analysis of the semipurified extract was performed on a C18 column, with a mixture of acetonitrile (0.05% trifluoroacetic acid):water (0.05% trifluoroacetic acid) (v/v) with a flow rate of 0.8 mL min-1. The sample injection volume was 100 μL and the wavelength was 210 nm. (author)

  7. Condensed tannins from the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Gisely C.; Rocha, Juliana C.B.; Mello, Joao C.P. de [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas], e-mail: mello@uem.br; Almeida, Glalber C. de [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    From the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae), nine compounds were isolated and identified: ent-catechin, epicatechin, ent-gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, epiafzelechin-(4{beta}?8)-epicatechin, epicatechin-(4{beta}?8)-catechin (procyanidin B1), epicatechin-(4{beta}?8)-epicatechin (procyanidin B2), epicatechin-(4{beta}?8)-epigallocatechin, and the new compound 4'-O-methyl-epiafzelechin. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral and literature data. HPLC fingerprint analysis of the semipurified extract was performed on a C18 column, with a mixture of acetonitrile (0.05% trifluoroacetic acid):water (0.05% trifluoroacetic acid) (v/v) with a flow rate of 0.8 mL min-1. The sample injection volume was 100 {mu}L and the wavelength was 210 nm. (author)

  8. ANTIOXIDANT, CYTOTOXIC AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SONNERATIA ALBA BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ali Milon*1, Md. Abdul Muhit , Durajan Goshwami , Mohammad Mehedi Masud and Bilkis Begum

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate antioxidant, cytotoxic and antimicrobial activity of Sonneratia alba bark. The carbon tetrachloride, chloroform soluble partitionate of methanolic extract and crude methanolic extract showed significant antioxidant property using 1,1-diphenyl-2-pecrylhydrazyl(DPPH scavenging assay ,of which chloroform partitionate and crude extract demonstrated highest activity with IC50 value of 12µg/ml and 14µg/ml respectively. In the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, LC50 values obtained from the best fit line slope were 0.812, 14.94, 0.831 and 3.288 µg/ml for standard (Vincristine sulphate, n-Hexane, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform soluble partitionate of methanolic extract respectively. The carbon tetrachloride soluble fraction revealed moderate activities against Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina lutea, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella dysenteriae test organisms.

  9. Influence of Metals on Lindane Adsorption onto Pine Bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some persistent pesticides, as organochlorines, are not efficiently removed from usual wastewater treatment plants, unless a tertiary treatment, commonly activated carbon adsorption, is applied. The downside of this practice rests on its high regeneration costs. This fact motivated the research for alternative processes involving the use of natural materials. Pine bark was used in this work, to remove lindane from contaminated waters. The adsorptive capabilities of this material were studied (equilibrium time, adsorption model and saturation of the adsorbent) and the interference of some metals (iron, cadmium, copper, nickel and lead) was also investigated. Results showed an excellent efficiency of adsorption (average 80,65%) and that the presence of the studied metals did not affect both efficiency and the model of the adsorption, within the range of the concentration of the pesticide studied

  10. Nitric oxide inhibitory constituents from the barks of Cinnamomum cassia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Zeng, Ke-Wu; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2016-07-01

    Six new compounds including one γ-butyrolactone, cinncassin A (1), two tetrahydrofuran derivatives, cinncassins B and C (2, 3), two lignans, cinncassins D and E (4, 5), and one phenylpropanol glucoside, cinnacassoside D (6), together with 14 known lignans (7-20) were isolated from the barks of Cinnamomum cassia. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data analysis as well as chemical methods, and the absolute configurations were established by experimental and calculated ECD data. The anti-inflammatory activities of the isolates were evaluated on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BV-2 microglial cells. Compounds 5, 7, 8, and 15 showed potent inhibition activities with IC50 values of 17.6, 17.7, 18.7, and 17.5μM, respectively. PMID:27223848

  11. TANNIN CONTENT DETERMINATION IN THE BARK OF Eucalyptus spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernando Trugilho

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the tannin contents in the bark oftwenty-five species of Eucalyptus through two extraction methods, one using hot water andthe other a sequence of toluene and ethanol. The results showed that the extraction methodspresented significant differences in the tannin contents. The method using the sequencetoluene and ethanol, for most of the species, promoted a larger extraction of tannin. The hotwater method presented higher contents of tannin for Eucalyptus cloeziana (40,31%,Eucalyptus melanophoia (20,49% and Eucalyptus paniculata (16,03%. In the toluene andethanol method the species with higher tannin content was Eucalyptus cloeziana (31,00%,Eucalyptus tereticornis (22,83% and Eucalyptus paniculata (17,64%. The Eucalyptuscloeziana presented great potential as commercial source of tannin, independent of theextraction method considered.

  12. Installations of SNCR on bark-fired boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience has been collected from the twelve bark-fired boilers in Sweden with selective non catalytic reduction (SNCR) installations to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides. Most of the boilers have slope grates, but there are also two boilers with cyclone ovens and two fluidized bed boilers. In addition to oil there are also possibilities to burn other fuel types in most boilers, such as sludge from different parts of the pulp and paper mills, saw dust and wood chips. The SNCR installations seems in general to be of simple design. In most installations the injection nozzles are located in existing holes in the boiler walls. The availability is reported to be good from several of the SNCR installations. There has been tube leakage in several boilers. The urea system has resulted in corrosion and in clogging of one oil burner. This incident has resulted in a decision not to use SNCR system with the present design of the system. The fuel has also caused operational problems with the SNCR system in several of the installations due to variations in the moisture content and often high moisture content in bark and sludge, causing temperature variations. The availability is presented to be high for the SNCR system at several of the plants, in two of them about 90 %. The results in NOx reduction vary between the installations depending on boiler, fuel and operation. The emissions are between 45 and 100 mg NO2/MJ fuel input and the NOx reduction rates are in most installations between 30 and 40 %, the lowest 20 and the highest 70 %. 13 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Effect of Different Pretreatment Methods on Birch Outer Bark: New Biorefinery Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaouri, Anthi; Rova, Ulrika; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study among different pretreatment methods used for the fractionation of the birch outer bark components, including steam explosion, hydrothermal and organosolv treatments based on the use of ethanol/water media, is reported. The residual solid fractions have been characterized by ATR-FTIR, (13)C-solid-state NMR and morphological alterations after pretreatment were detected by scanning electron microscopy. The general chemical composition of the untreated and treated bark including determination of extractives, suberin, lignin and monosaccharides was also studied. Composition of the residual solid fraction and relative proportions of different components, as a function of the processing conditions, could be established. Organosolv treatment produces a suberin-rich solid fraction, while during hydrothermal and steam explosion treatment cleavage of polysaccharide bonds occurs. This work will provide a deeper fundamental knowledge of the bark chemical composition, thus increasing the utilization efficiency of birch outer bark and may create possibilities to up-scale the fractionation processes.

  14. Extraction of betulin from bark of Betula platyphylla by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-hong; YU Tao; WANG Yang

    2003-01-01

    Betulin, which is a medicinal pentacyclic triterpene, is abundant in the bark of white birch (Betula platyphlly). The bark of birch was collected at Tayuan Forest Farm of Jiagedaqi, Heilongjiang Province in September 2000. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) that is a new separation technology has been used for the processing pharmaceutical and natural products. In this paper, the extraction of betulin from the bark of birch by supercritical CO2 extraction was studied. The authors investigated and analyzed a few parameters such as modifier dosage, extraction pressure and extraction temperature. The optimal extraction conditions showed that the modifier dosage used for per gram bark powder was 1.5 mL, the extraction pressure was at 20 Mpa, and the extraction temperature was at 55 ℃. The velocity of flow of liquid CO2 was at 10 kg/h. The pressure and temperature in separation vessel were at 5.5 Mpa and 50 ℃, respectively.

  15. Mechanisms of Odor Coding in Coniferous Bark Beetles: From Neuron to Behavior and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin N. Andersson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coniferous bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae locate their hosts by means of olfactory signals, such as pheromone, host, and nonhost compounds. Behavioral responses to these volatiles are well documented. However, apart from the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs detecting pheromones, information on the peripheral olfactory physiology has for a long time been limited. Recently, however, comprehensive studies on the ORNs of the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus, were conducted. Several new classes of ORNs were described and odor encoding mechanisms were investigated. In particular, links between behavioral responses and ORN responses were established, allowing for a more profound understanding of bark beetle olfaction. This paper reviews the physiology of bark beetle ORNs. Special focus is on I. typographus, for which the available physiological data can be put into a behavioral context. In addition, some recent field studies and possible applications, related to the physiological studies, are summarized and discussed.

  16. STRUCTURES OF TWO NEW BENZOFURAN DERIVATIVES FROM THE BARK OF MULBERRY TREE (MORUS MACROURA MIQ.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG-GUO SUN; RUO-YUN CHEN; DE-QUAN YU

    2001-01-01

    Two new benzofuran derivatives, macrourins A (1) and B (2), together with two known stilbene derivatives, were isolated from the barks of Morus macroura Miq. Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic evidence.

  17. Sweet Chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. Bark Extract: Cardiovascular Activity and Myocyte Protection against Oxidative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Chiarini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at evaluating the cardioprotective effects of Castanea sativa Mill. (CSM bark extract characterized in its phenolic composition by HPLC-DAD-MS analysis. The study was performed using primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to investigate the antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of CSM bark extract and isolated guinea pig left and right atria, left papillary muscle, and aorta to evaluate its direct effect on cholinergic and adrenergic response. In cultured cardiomyocytes the CSM bark extract reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species formation and improved cell viability following oxidative stress in dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the extract decreased the contraction induced by noradrenaline (1 μM in guinea pig aortic strips and induced transient negative chronotropic and positive inotropic effects without involvement of cholinergic or adrenergic receptors in the guinea pig atria. Our results indicate that CSM bark extract exhibits antioxidant activity and might induce cardioprotective effect.

  18. Effect of Different Pretreatment Methods on Birch Outer Bark: New Biorefinery Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi Karnaouri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study among different pretreatment methods used for the fractionation of the birch outer bark components, including steam explosion, hydrothermal and organosolv treatments based on the use of ethanol/water media, is reported. The residual solid fractions have been characterized by ATR-FTIR, 13C-solid-state NMR and morphological alterations after pretreatment were detected by scanning electron microscopy. The general chemical composition of the untreated and treated bark including determination of extractives, suberin, lignin and monosaccharides was also studied. Composition of the residual solid fraction and relative proportions of different components, as a function of the processing conditions, could be established. Organosolv treatment produces a suberin-rich solid fraction, while during hydrothermal and steam explosion treatment cleavage of polysaccharide bonds occurs. This work will provide a deeper fundamental knowledge of the bark chemical composition, thus increasing the utilization efficiency of birch outer bark and may create possibilities to up-scale the fractionation processes.

  19. 78 FR 4167 - Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars; Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars; Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments Relating to the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice....

  20. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya; Parveen Kumar; Wanjari, Manish M.; Thenmozhi, S.; B R Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Grewia asiatica Linn. (Family: Tiliaceae), called Phalsa in Hindi is an Indian medicinal plant used for a variety of therapeutic and nutritional uses. The root bark of the plant is traditionally used in rheumatism (painful chronic inflammatory condition). Aims: The present study demonstrates the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of G. asiatica in rodents. Settings and Design: The methanolic extract of Grewia asiatica (MEGA) and aqueous extract of Grewia...

  1. QUANTIFICATION OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM LEAVES AND STEM BARK OF COCHLOSPERMUM RELIGIOSUM (L) ALSTON

    OpenAIRE

    Sasikala A; Linga Rao M; Savithramma N

    2013-01-01

    Phytochemical constituents are responsible for medicinal activity of plant species. Hence the present study quantification of primary and secondary metabolites from leaves and stem bark of Cochlospermum religiosum was carried out. The results showed that the leaf was rich in chlorophylls followed by lipids, proteins and carbohydrates whereas in stem bark highest amount found in chlorophylls followed by carbohydrates, proteins and lipids of primary metabolites. Cochlospermum religiosum leaf wa...

  2. Bactericidal Effect of Aqueous Extracts of the Bark of the Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) on Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rabah Chadli; Aman Bouzid; Khadidja Bouzid; Hamida Nader

    2015-01-01

    This research concerns the study of antibacterial properties of different aqueous extracts of the bark of the pomegranate (Punica granatum L.). Three bacterial strains were used in this test: Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella. Very interesting bactericidal properties of aqueous extracts of the bark of the pomegranate were found on bacteria. The inhibition zones have a very large diameter up to 20 mm and the MIC and MBC are low, of the order of 0.78 mg/ml. This work ...

  3. Potential Activity And Toxicity Of Methanol Extract Stem Bark Banyuru (Pterospermum Celebicum Miq.)

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki, Agus

    2015-01-01

    Banyuru (Pterospermum celebicum, Miq.) is one of the specific plant, a stem bark that has the potential to be developed as a source of antibacterial drugs. Research of antibacterial activity and toxicity of methanol extract Banyuru aims to determine the antibacterial activity and the level of toxicity to Artemia Salina. The method used to test the antibacterial activity is the agar diffusion method and the method used to test the toxicity Brine Shrimp Lethaly Test (BSLT). Banyuru stem bark (...

  4. Antibacterial and radical scavenging activity of leaf and bark of Persea macrantha (Nees) Kosterm. (Lauraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Prashith Kekuda T.R; Vivek M. N; Yashoda Kambar; Manasa M; Raghavendra H. L

    2014-01-01

    Persea macrantha (Nees) Kosterm. belonging to the family Lauraceae is found in various states of Karnataka. The plant has got various traditional uses and is reported to exhibit several bioactivities. In the present study, we report antibacterial and radical scavenging potential of leaf and bark of P. macrantha. The powdered leaf and bark were extracted using methanol and the extracts were subjected to phytochemical analysis. Antibacterial activity was determined by Agar well diffusion assay....

  5. Heartwood, sapwood and bark content of teak trees grown in Karna-taka, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vindhya Prasad Tewari; K.M. Mariswamy

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated heartwood, sapwood and bark content in teak trees. A total of 27 sample plots were laid out in teak plantations raised by State Forest Department in Karnataka covering different age groups (11−36 years), density (516−2061 trees/ha) and sites. From these planta-tions, a total of 130 trees were felled for estimating the yield and bark content in relation to diameter at breast height (DBH), age and density. Bark content ranged from 22.2%−54.3%. Heartwood and sapwood con-tent were analyzed by sampling five trees each from two different planta-tions, one 30 years old at 553 trees⋅ha-1 and the other 32 years old at 911 trees⋅ha-1. The highest heartwood proportion of stem wood volume (over-bark) was 56.3%and the lowest was 37.1%. The sapwood propor-tion ranged from 12.9%−23.0%, while the bark content ranged from 27.8%−43.5%. The heartwood proportion increased with DBH, while the proportion of bark decreased. The sapwood proportion did not vary with DBH. The bark content decreased with increasing age, but increased with stand density. There was no significant difference in heartwood content with respect to age or stand density because the ages of the two stands were similar. A larger dataset from young to mature stands is needed to describe the relationships between age and stand density and heartwood, sapwood and bark content of trees.

  6. Penguin amplitudes in B^+ to pi^+ K^*0, K^+ \\bar{K}^*0 decays

    OpenAIRE

    Zenczykowski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The question of the relative size of two independent penguin amplitudes is studied using the data on the B^+ to pi^+ K^*0, and B^+ to K^+ \\bar{K}^*0 decays. Our discussion involves a Regge-phenomenology-based estimate of SU(3) breaking in the final quark-pair-creating hadronization process. The results are in agreement with earlier estimates of the relative size of the two penguins obtained from B^+ to pi^+ K^0, K^+ \\bar{K}^0.

  7. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT DRYING METHODS ON THE QUALITY OF STEM BARK OF TERMINALIA ARJUNA ROXB.

    OpenAIRE

    Kulshrestha Mayank Krishna; Karbhal Kamleshwar Singh

    2012-01-01

    The effects of Ayurvedic medicine by different drying conditions were studied. Stem bark of Terminalia arjuna was chosen and dried by shade, sun and oven. The dried samples were characterized by means of microscopic study, preliminary physiochemical & phytochemical studies and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) study. The aim of this study was therefore to develop an understanding of suitable conditions for the processing of stem bark of T. arjuna. The objectives of this study were to investigat...

  8. Evaluation of antidiarrheal activity of ethanolic stem bark extract of Albizzia lebbeck Linn. in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Balekar; Dinesh Kumar Jain; Pankaj Dixit; Veena Nair

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to substantiate the traditional claim of the antidiarrheal activity of stem bark extractof Albizzia lebbeck Linn. in rats. The effects of ethanolic extract of the stem bark of A. lebbeck on castor oil-induced diarrhea,castor oil magnesium sulphate-induced enteropooling, and gastrointestinal motility test using charcoal meal method wereexamined. The extract was initially assayed for its effects in castor oil-induced diarrhea at different doses (250, 500, and 100...

  9. Activity-guided screening of the antioxidants from Paulownia tomentosa var. tomentosa Bark

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan-Ling Si; Shi-Chao Liu; Hai-Yan Hu; Ju-Zheng Jiang; Guo-Jing Yu; Xiao-Dan Ren; Guang-Hui Xu

    2013-01-01

    Tree barks, as a type of forestry residues, are a rich and renewable bioresource that can produce high value-added products. Paulownia tomentosa var. tomentosa (PTT) has been extensively used in traditional Chinese medicine to cure various diseases. However, the antioxidative activity of the chemical constituents of the tree has not yet been investigated. In this study, the bark of PTT were extracted and fractioned. Then the resulting ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction, which exhibited th...

  10. In Vitro Antioxidant and Anticancer potential of Bark of Costus pictus D.DON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malairaj Sathuvan; Anadhan Vignesh; Ramar Thangam; Perumal Palani; Ramasamy Rengasamy; Kandasamy Murugesan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant and anticancer potential of different fractions of bark of Costus pictus using various in vitro antioxidant assay systems. Methods: In this study, assay like DPPH radical, superoxide anion radical scavenging activity, nitric oxide scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity, metal chelating activity and reducing power were used. The concentrations of total phenolic and flavonoids were also calculated for the extracts.Result:pictus. This study suggested that, among the three fractions, the chloroform fraction possesses high antioxidant activity which might be helpful in preventing or slowing the progress of various oxidative stress related disorders. Moreover, all fractions possess potent anticancer properties against colon cancer cells of HT29 and lung carcinoma cells of A549. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the extract of the bark of C. pictus has potential natural antioxidant and this can be used in food industries. There are few reports on the antioxidant capacity of bark of C. pictus and the mechanism of different fractions of bark of C. pictus as antioxidative agents is still not fully understood. Hence further research is underway to analyse and isolate the active compounds responsible for the antioxidant and anticancer activity of different fractions of the bark of C.pictus. The present study elucidated for the first time the antioxidant property of bark of C.

  11. Chronic treatment with bark infusion from Croton cajucara lowers plasma triglyceride levels in genetic hyperlipidemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighetti, Eliete J B; Souza-Brito, Alba R M; de Faria, Eliana C; Oliveira, Helena C F

    2004-06-01

    Aqueous infusion and preparations containing dehydrocrotonin (DHC) and essential oil from Croton cajucara bark were tested for plasma lipid-lowering effects in genetically modified hyperlipidemic mice. Two mouse models were tested: 1) primary hypercholesterolemia resulting from the LDL-receptor gene knockout, and 2) combined hyperlipidemia resulting from crosses of LDL-receptor knockout mice with transgenic mice overexpressing apolipo protein (apo) CIII and cholesteryl ester-transfer protein. Mice treated with bark infusion, DHC, essential oil, or placebos for 25 days showed no signals of toxicity as judged by biochemical tests for liver and kidney functions. The bark infusion reduced triglyceride plasma levels by 40%, while essential oil and DHC had no significant effects on plasma lipid levels. The bark infusion treatment promoted a redistribution of cholesterol among the lipoprotein fractions in combined hyperlipidemic mice. There was a marked reduction in the VLDL fraction and an increase in the HDL fraction, in such a way that the (VLDL + LDL)/HDL ratio was reduced by half. The bark infusion treatment did not modify cholesterol distribution in hypercholesterolemic mice. In conclusion, C. cajucara bark infusion reduced plasma triglycerides levels and promoted a redistribution of cholesterol among lipoproteins in genetically combined hyperlipidemic mice. These changes modify risk factors for the development of atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:15381962

  12. Anti-pseudomonas activity of essential oil, total extract, and proanthocyanidins of Pinus eldarica Medw. bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Sadeghi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pinus eldarica Medw. (Iranian pine is native to Transcaucasian region and has been vastly planted in Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Various parts of this plant have been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases including infectious conditions (e.g. infectious wounds. In this study we aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity of P. eldarica bark extract, essential oil and proanthocyanidins on three important bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibacterial analysis was performed using standard disk diffusion method with different concentrations of essential oil, bark total hydroalcoholic extract, and bark proanthocyanidins (0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/ml. After incubation at 37 °C for 24 h, the antibacterial activity was assessed by measuring the zone of growth inhibition surrounding the disks. The results indicated that the essential oil, total hydroalcoholic extract, and proanthocyanidins of the bark of the P. eldarica were effective against the gram negative bacteria, P. aeruginosa, and significantly inhibited its growth in disk diffusion method (P<0.001 of which the essential oil had the most potent inhibitory effect. However, none of the bark preparations could significantly inhibit the growth of S. aureus or E. coli. Our findings showed that P. eldarica bark components have significant anti-pseudomonas activity having potentials for new sources of antibacterial agents or antibacterial herbal preparations.

  13. Production and characterization of nanospheres of bacterial cellulose from Acetobacter xylinum from processed rice bark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goelzer, F.D.E. [Group of Industrial Microbiology, UNIVALI-Universidade do Vale do Itajai, R. Uruguai, 458, 88302-202, Itajai, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Faria-Tischer, P.C.S. [Group of Industrial Microbiology, UNIVALI-Universidade do Vale do Itajai, R. Uruguai, 458, 88302-202, Itajai, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Laboratory of Biopolymers, UFPR-Universidade Federal do Parana, CxP 19081, 81531-990, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Vitorino, J.C. [Group of Industrial Microbiology, UNIVALI-Universidade do Vale do Itajai, R. Uruguai, 458, 88302-202, Itajai, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Sierakowski, Maria-R. [Laboratory of Biopolymers, UFPR-Universidade Federal do Parana, CxP 19081, 81531-990, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Tischer, C.A. [Group of Industrial Microbiology, UNIVALI-Universidade do Vale do Itajai, R. Uruguai, 458, 88302-202, Itajai, Santa Catarina (Brazil)], E-mail: cesarat@uol.com.br

    2009-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), biosynthesized by Acetobacter xylinum, was produced in a medium consisting of rice bark pre-treated with an enzymatic pool. Rice bark was evaluated as a carbon source by complete enzymatic hydrolysis and monosaccharide composition (GC-MS of derived alditol acetates). It was treated enzymatically and then enriched with glucose up to 4% (w/v). The BC produced by static and aerated processes was purified by immersion in 0.1 M NaOH, was characterized by FT-IR, X-ray diffraction and the biosynthetic nanostructures were evaluated by Scanning Electronic (SEM), Transmission Electronic (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The BC films arising from static fermentation with rice bark/glucose and glucose are tightly intertwined, partially crystalline, being type II cellulose produced with rice bark/glucose, and type I to the produced in a glucose medium. The nanostructurated biopolymer obtained from the rice bark/glucose medium, produced in a reactor with air flux had micro- and nanospheres linked to nanofibers of cellulose. These results indicate that the bark components, namely lignins, hemicelluloses or mineral contents, interact with the cellulose forming micro- and nanostructures with potential use to incorporate drugs.

  14. Ophiostoma species (Ascomycetes: Ophiostomatales) associated with bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) colonizing Pinus radiata in northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romón, Pedro; Zhou, XuDong; Iturrondobeitia, Juan Carlos; Wingfield, Michael J; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2007-06-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) are known to be associated with fungi, especially species of Ophiostoma sensu lato and Ceratocystis. However, very little is known about these fungi in Spain. In this study, we examined the fungi associated with 13 bark beetle species and one weevil (Coleoptera: Entiminae) infesting Pinus radiata in the Basque Country of northern Spain. This study included an examination of 1323 bark beetles or their galleries in P. radiata. Isolations yielded a total of 920 cultures, which included 16 species of Ophiostoma sensu lato or their asexual states. These 16 species included 69 associations between fungi and bark beetles and weevils that have not previously been recorded. The most commonly encountered fungal associates of the bark beetles were Ophiostoma ips, Leptographium guttulatum, Ophiostoma stenoceras, and Ophiostoma piceae. In most cases, the niche of colonization had a significant effect on the abundance and composition of colonizing fungi. This confirms that resource overlap between species is reduced by partial spatial segregation. Interaction between niche and time seldom had a significant effect, which suggests that spatial colonization patterns are rarely flexible throughout timber degradation. The differences in common associates among the bark beetle species could be linked to the different niches that these beetles occupy. PMID:17668036

  15. Comparative study of leaf and stem bark extracts of Parkia biglobosa against enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millogo-Kone, H; Guissou, I P; Nacoulma, O; Traore, A S

    2008-04-10

    Hydroethanolic and aqueous extracts of leaf and stem bark of Parkia biglobosa (Jacq) Benth. (Mimosaceae) were tested against clinical isolates Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae and Enterococcus faecalis, and corresponding collection strains E. coli CIP 105 182, Salmonella enterica CIP 105 150, Shigella dysenteriae CIP 54-51 and Enterococcus faecalis CIP 103 907. Discs of Gentamicin, a broad spectrum antibiotic were used as positive controls. The results showed that all the extracts possess antimicrobial activities. A comparative study of the antibacterial activity of the leaves and that of the bark showed that for all the tested microorganisms, the hydroalcoholic extract of the bark is more active than the aqueous extract of the leaf. The hydroethanolic extract of the leaves is as effective as the aqueous extract of the stem bark prescribed by the traditional healer, suggesting it is possible to use leaves other than the roots and bark. The phytochemical screening showed that sterols and triterpenes, saponosides, tannins, reducing compounds, coumarins, anthocyanosides, flavonosides are present in both bark and leaf but in different concentrations.

  16. Optical solar energy adaptations and radiative temperature control of green leaves and tree barks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrion, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut [Department of Si-Photovoltaik and Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Trees have adapted to keep leaves and barks cool in sunshine and can serve as interesting bionic model systems for radiative cooling. Silicon solar cells, on the other hand, loose up to one third of their energy efficiency due to heating in intensive sunshine. It is shown that green leaves minimize absorption of useful radiation and allow efficient infrared thermal emission. Since elevated temperatures are detrimental for tensile water flow in the Xylem tissue below barks, the optical properties of barks should also have evolved so as to avoid excessive heating. This was tested by performing optical studies with tree bark samples from representative trees. It was found that tree barks have optimized their reflection of incoming sunlight between 0.7 and 2 {mu}m. This is approximately the optical window in which solar light is transmitted and reflected by green vegetation. Simultaneously, the tree bark is highly absorbing and thus radiation emitting between 6 and 10 {mu}m. These two properties, mainly provided by tannins, create optimal conditions for radiative temperature control. In addition, tannins seem to have adopted a function as mediators for excitation energy towards photo-antioxidative activity for control of radiation damage. The results obtained are used to discuss challenges for future solar cell optimization. (author)

  17. Biomagnetic monitoring of traffic air pollution in Toulouse (France) using magnetic properties of tree bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macouin, M.; Rousse, S.; Brulfert, F.; Durand, M.; Feida, N.; Durand, X.; Becaud, L.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic properties of various atmospheric samples represent rapid and economic proxies in the pollution studies based on their strong linkage to heavy metals and/or volatile organic carbons. We report a biomonitoring study of air pollution in Toulouse (France) based on the magnetic properties of tree (Platanus acerifolia) bark. More than 250 bark samples were taken at different areas of the city. Both mass specific magnetic susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) at 1 Tesla display relationships with the traffic intensity and the distance to the road. Urban roadside tree bark exhibit significant enhancement in their values of susceptibility and IRM reflecting surface accumulation of particulate pollutants, compared with tree growing at lower traffic sites. To estimate the deposition time and accumulation on bark, we have deposited 20 "clean" bark samples from low traffic area with susceptibility inferior to 10 SI, near the city ring road. Samples were then collected during three months. Samples were imparted a 1 Tesla IRM both prior the deposition and after the resampling. Results are useful to apprehend the process of magnetic particulates accumulation and to evaluate the potential of tree bark for the air quality monitoring.

  18. Variations in bark thickness and sapwood density of Calophyilum inophyllum provenances in Australia and in Sri Lanka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhash Hathurusingha; Nanjappa Ashwath

    2011-01-01

    Sapwood density and bark thickness of Calophyllum inophyl- lum L. (a multipurpose durable timber species) were studied in various locations in Northern Australia and in Sri Lanka. Measurements were taken non-destructively by using core sampling and bark gauge. From each provenance, 4-15 mature trees having girth at breast height over bark (GBHOB) at 100-150 cm were selected on the basis of the popula- tion size. Significant (p<0.05) hemispheric and provenance variations in bark thickness were found. Variations in the bark thickness are influ- enced by environmental variables. Variations in sapwood density were less pronounced compared to that of bark thickness. Variations in sap- wood density are likely to be governed by genotypic variations.

  19. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Properties and Phenolics of Different Solvent Extracts from Bark, Leaves and Seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid M Alkharfy; Anwarul-Hassan Gilani; Ghulam Rasul; Ghulam Shabir; Farooq Anwar; Zahid Iqbal Sajid

    2012-01-01

    This study appraises the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of various solvent extracts (absolute methanol, aqueous methanol, absolute ethanol, aqueous ethanol, absolute acetone, aqueous acetone, and deionized water) from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre. Maximum extraction yield of antioxidant components from bark (16.31%), leaves (11.42%) and seeds (21.51%) of P. pinnata was obtained using aqueous methanol (20:80). Of the extracts tested, the bark extract, obtain...

  20. First Report of Stemonitis splendens Rostaf Causing Bark Decay of Oak Logs Used for Shiitake Cultivation in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Han; Kim, Da-Ran; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2014-09-01

    Severe bark decay disease was observed on oak logs at a shiitake cultivation farm in Geochang-gun, Gyeongnam province. The symptoms observed were fruiting bodies that had developed on the top and side surface of oak logs. As a result, the bark came off easily exposing the sapwood. Slime mold specimens collected from oak logs showed developing fruiting bodies comprising of stalks, hypothallus, capillitium, and columella, and the causal agent of bark decay disease was identified as Stemonitis splendens on the basis of morphological characteristics. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Stemonitis splendens causing bark decay of oak logs used for shiitake mushroom cultivation in Korea. PMID:25346606

  1. In vivo antioxidant effect of aqueous root bark, stem bark and leaves extracts of Vitex doniana in CCl4 induced liver damage rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadejo Olubukola Adetoro

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: The result of the present study suggests that application of V. doniana plant would play an important role in increasing the antioxidant effect and reducing the oxidative damage that formed both in liver and in kidney tissues. However stem bark has potential to improve renal function in normal rats.

  2. Extraction and Hydrophobic Modification of Cotton Stalk Bark Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Yu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton stalk bark fiber (CSBF was extracted at high temperature and under high pressure, under the condition of the alkali content of 11 wt%. Experimental results proved that the extraction yield of CSBF was 27.3 wt%, and the residual alkali concentration was 2.1 wt%. Then five kinds of modifiers including methyl methacrylate (MMA, MMA plus initiator, epoxy propane, copper ethanolamine, and silane coupling agent were chosen to modify the surface of CSBF. It was found by measuring water retention value (WRV that these five kinds of modifiers were all effective and the silane coupling agent was best modifier among all. The optimal modifying conditions of silane coupling agent were obtained: modifier concentration was 5%, the mixing temperature was 20°C, the mixing time was 1 h, and vacuum drying time was 1 h. Under the optimal condition, the WRV of the modified CSBF was 89%. It is expected that these modified CSBF may be a filler with strengthening effect in wood plastic composites (WPC fields.

  3. Antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of bark extract of Terminalia arjuna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh Kumar Vaidya; Ramesh C; Nandakumar Krishnadas; Srinath Rangappa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The alcoholic extract of stem bark of Terminalia arjuna (ALTA) was screened for antioxidant and antimutagenic (anticlastogenic) activity. Methods: Antioxidant property was determined by 1,1,Diphynyl,2-Picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) assay, super oxide radical scavenging activity, lipid peroxidation assay and total polyphenolic content was determined by Folin-Ciocalteau's reagent. Antimutagenic activity was evaluated using micronucleus test in mice. Results: The ALTA has shown potent antioxidant activity with EC50 of 2.491±0.160, 50.110±0.150 &71.000±0.250 in DPPH assay, superoxide radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation assay, which is comparable with ascorbic acid with EC50 of 2.471±0.140, 40.500±0.390 and 63.000±0.360 respectively. In micronucleus test, ALTA (100 & 200 mg/kg, p.o.) showed significant reduction in percentage of micronucleus in both polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) and also shown significant reduction in P/N ratio. Conclusions: These results suggested that ALTA possess significant antioxidant and antimutagenic activity.

  4. Acetylcholine and memory-enhancing activity of Ficus racemosa bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiyaz Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer′s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in dementia and enhancement of acetylcholine (Ach levels in brain using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is one of the most important approaches for the treatment of AD. Methods: In this study, aqueous extract of Ficus racemosa Linn. (Moraceae bark having anti-infl ammatory, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activity was evaluated for its ability to enhance Ach levels, and to ascertain its antidementia activity in rats. This work was carried out under the assumption that the F. racemosa extract may show combination of actions which could be beneficial in the treatment of AD, such as neuroprotection, attributed to antioxidant and anti-infl ammatory property and may elevate levels of Ach like Ficus hispida extract reported earlier. Results: Administration of the extract at two levels viz., 250 and 500 mg/kg signifi cantly raised (P ≤ 0.05 Ach levels in hippocampi of rats compared to control. The percentage enhancement in Ach levels was found to be 22% and 38%, respectively. Further, the extract at both dosage levels elicited signifi cant reduction (P ≤ 0.05 in transfer latency on elevated plus-maze, which was used as an exteroceptive behavioral model to evaluate memory in rats. Conclusion: It is inferred that it would be worthwhile to explore the potential of F. racemosa in the management of Alzheimer disease.

  5. Cough and Arabinogalactan Polysaccharide from the Bark of Terminalia Arjuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivová, V; Bera, K; Ray, B; Nosáľ, S; Nosáľová, G

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigated the antitussive activity of the medicinal tree Terminalia arjuna. We used the stem bark for extraction and preparation of water extracted isolate and its two fractions: acetone-soluble (TA-S) and acetone precipitated (TA-P) fraction. The presence of a pectic arabinogalactan was confirmed in TA-P fraction by chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. The antitussive activity of samples was assessed after oral administration in a dose of 50 mg.kg(-1) in healthy guinea pigs, in which cough was elicited by inhalation of citric acid (0.3 mol/L) in body plethysmograph. The water extracted isolate showed a significant ability to decrease the number of cough efforts by 64.2 %; the antitussive activity on par with that of codeine phosphate. The TA-P fraction showed the antitussive activity of 54.8 %. In contrast, TA-S fraction had only a mild antitussive activity. No changes in in vivo airway resistance were noted. We conclude that arabinogalactan is an essential component of Terminalia arjuna that underlies its antitussive action. PMID:27334729

  6. Novel tirucallane triterpenoids from the stem bark of Toona sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Wen-Yuan; Xie, Ning; Chen, Lei; Feng, Feng; Qu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation on the stem bark of Toona sinensis was carried out by various chromatographic techniques resulting in the isolation and elucidation of two novel tirucallane triterpenoids, named (20S)-3-oxo-tirucalla-25-nor-7-en-24-oic acid (1) and (20S)-5α,8α-epidioxy-3-oxo-24-nor-6.9(11)-dien-23-oic acid (2), along with fifteen known triterpenoids (3-17), their structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D-, 2D-NMR and HR-ESI-MS experiments. Compound 2 is uncommon in nature, which possesses a peroxide bridge cross C-5 and C-8 in the triterpenoid skeleton. All isolated compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against five human tumor cell lines (A-549, Hela, HepG2, SGC-7901 and SW-480), among them, compound 17 displayed strongest cytotoxic activity against A-549 cells and the results indicated that its cytotoxicity against A-549 cells was mediated by the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, ROS production-inhibitory activities were also evaluated, but none of them was active. PMID:27215130

  7. Antioxidant compounds from the stem bark of Garcinia atroviridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen-Nee; Khairuddean, Melati; Wong, Keng-Chong; Tong, Woei-Yenn; Ibrahim, Darah

    2016-08-01

    A new xanthone, namely garcinexanthone G (1), along with eight known compounds, stigmasta-5,22-dien-3β-ol (2), stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-O-β-glucopyranoside (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α,12α-epoxyoleanan-28,13β-olide (4), 2,6-dimethoxy-p-benzoquinone (5), 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2-methoxyxanthone (6), 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (7), kaempferol (8) and quercetin (9), were isolated from the stem bark of Garcinia atroviridis. Their structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic methods including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-1D and 2D), UV, IR, and mass spectrometry. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant properties based on the DPPH radical scavenging activities. Results showed that 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone and quercetin showed significant antioxidant activities with EC50 values of 16.20 and 12.68 μg/ml, respectively, as compared to the control, ascorbic acid (7.4 μg/ml). PMID:26999039

  8. Induced terpene accumulation in Norway spruce inhibits bark beetle colonization in a dose-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytinae are among the most economically and ecologically important forest pests in the northern hemisphere. Induction of terpenoid-based oleoresin has long been considered important in conifer defense against bark beetles, but it has been difficult to demonstrate a direct correlation between terpene levels and resistance to bark beetle colonization. METHODS: To test for inhibitory effects of induced terpenes on colonization by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L. we inoculated 20 mature Norway spruce Picea abies (L. Karsten trees with a virulent fungus associated with the beetle, Ceratocystis polonica (Siem. C. Moreau, and investigated induced terpene levels and beetle colonization in the bark. RESULTS: Fungal inoculation induced very strong and highly variable terpene accumulation 35 days after inoculation. Trees with high induced terpene levels (n = 7 had only 4.9% as many beetle attacks (5.1 vs. 103.5 attacks m(-2 and 2.6% as much gallery length (0.029 m m(-2 vs. 1.11 m m(-2 as trees with low terpene levels (n = 6. There was a highly significant rank correlation between terpene levels at day 35 and beetle colonization in individual trees. The relationship between induced terpene levels and beetle colonization was not linear but thresholded: above a low threshold concentration of ∼100 mg terpene g(-1 dry phloem trees suffered only moderate beetle colonization, and above a high threshold of ∼200 mg terpene g(-1 dry phloem trees were virtually unattacked. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study demonstrating a dose-dependent relationship between induced terpenes and tree resistance to bark beetle colonization under field conditions, indicating that terpene induction may be instrumental in tree resistance. This knowledge could be useful for developing management strategies that decrease the impact of tree-killing bark beetles.

  9. High ice nucleation activity located in blueberry stem bark is linked to primary freeze initiation and adaptive freezing behaviour of the bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Hideyuki; Saruwatari, Atsushi; Murakawa, Hiroki; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Price, William S; Ishikawa, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    Controlled ice nucleation is an important mechanism in cold-hardy plant tissues for avoiding excessive supercooling of the protoplasm, for inducing extracellular freezing and/or for accommodating ice crystals in specific tissues. To understand its nature, it is necessary to characterize the ice nucleation activity (INA), defined as the ability of a tissue to induce heterogeneous ice nucleation. Few studies have addressed the precise localization of INA in wintering plant tissues in respect of its function. For this purpose, we recently revised a test tube INA assay and examined INA in various tissues of over 600 species. Extremely high levels of INA (-1 to -4 °C) in two wintering blueberry cultivars of contrasting freezing tolerance were found. Their INA was much greater than in other cold-hardy species and was found to be evenly distributed along the stems of the current year's growth. Concentrations of active ice nuclei in the stem were estimated from quantitative analyses. Stem INA was localized mainly in the bark while the xylem and pith had much lower INA. Bark INA was located mostly in the cell wall fraction (cell walls and intercellular structural components). Intracellular fractions had much less INA. Some cultivar differences were identified. The results corresponded closely with the intrinsic freezing behaviour (extracellular freezing) of the bark, icicle accumulation in the bark and initial ice nucleation in the stem under dry surface conditions. Stem INA was resistant to various antimicrobial treatments. These properties and specific localization imply that high INA in blueberry stems is of intrinsic origin and contributes to the spontaneous initiation of freezing in extracellular spaces of the bark by acting as a subfreezing temperature sensor. PMID:25082142

  10. Genotype variation in bark texture drives lichen community assembly across multiple environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamit, L J; Lau, M K; Naesborg, R Reese; Wojtowicz, T; Whitham, T G; Gehring, C A

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of community genetics is to understand the influence of genetic variation within a species on ecological communities. Although well-documented for some organisms, additional research is necessary to understand the relative and interactive effects of genotype and environment on biodiversity, identify mechanisms through which tree genotype influences communities, and connect this emerging field with existing themes in ecology. We employ an underutilized but ecologically significant group of organisms, epiphytic bark lichens, to understand the relative importance of Populus angustifolia (narrowleaf cottonwood) genotype and environment on associated organisms within the context of community assembly and host ontogeny. Several key findings emerged. (1) In a single common garden, tree genotype explained 18-33% and 51% of the variation in lichen community variables and rough bark cover, respectively. (2) Across replicated common gardens, tree genotype affected lichen species richness, total lichen cover, lichen species composition, and rough bark cover, whereas environment only influenced composition and there were no genotype by environment interactions. (3) Rough bark cover was positively correlated with total lichen cover and richness, and was associated with a shift in species composition; these patterns occurred with variation in rough bark cover among tree genotypes of the same age in common gardens and with increasing rough bark cover along a -40 year tree age gradient in a natural riparian stand. (4) In a common garden, 20-year-old parent trees with smooth bark had poorly developed lichen communities, similar to their 10-year-old ramets (root suckers) growing in close proximity, while parent trees with high rough bark cover had more developed communities than their ramets. These findings indicate that epiphytic lichens are influenced by host genotype, an effect that is robust across divergent environments. Furthermore, the response to tree genotype is

  11. A study on temporal variation of elemental composition in tree barks used as air pollution indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Eliane C.; Saiki, Mitiko, E-mail: eliane_csantos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: mitiko@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The study of air pollution using biological matrices has shown that tree barks may be used as biomonitor due to accumulation of aerosol particles on its porous surface. The bark elemental composition can provide information on pollution sources as well as characterize the aerial pollutants from a wide geographical region. The aim of this study was to investigate the variation in elemental composition in barks with time of exposure. Tree barks from Tipuana (Tipuana tipu) and Sibipiruna (Caesalpinia peltophoroides) species were collected in February 2013 and July 2014 in the city of São Paulo. For analysis, the barks were cleaned, grated, ground and analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Aliquots of samples and synthetic standards of elements were irradiated with thermal neutron flux at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor and after a suitable decay time, the induced gamma activities were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The elements As, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn were determined and the results indicated variability in the concentrations depending on the element, sampling period and also on tree species, indicating that there are not very well defined temporal trends. The quality control of the analytical results evaluated by analyzing INCT Virginia Tobacco Leaves certified reference material (CRM) presented values of |z-score| < 2, indicating that the procedure of NAA applied is suitable for the analyses. (author)

  12. Removal of Murexide from Aqueous Solution Using Pomegranate bark as adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of Murexide from aqueous solution onto the Pomegranate bark was investigated at room temperature. The morphological study presented that the HNO/sub 3/ treatment increased the surface roughness of the adsorbent. EDX studies show that the untreated Pomegranate bark had carbon content (52 wt %) and oxygen content (44 wt %) while in the case of HNO/sub 3/ treated pomegranate bark, the carbon quantity decreased (42 wt %) and oxygen quantity (52 wt %) increased. The results showed that the adsorption of Murexide dye from aqueous solution was increased as increased the adsorption time and then equilibrium was reached after 30 min of adsorption time. The HNO/sub 3/ treated Pomegranate bark adsorbed high quantity of Murexide (1.7 mg/g) as compared to untreated Pomegranate bark (0.73 mg/g), which might be due to increased surface roughness. The adsorption of Murexide was also studied at different pH, which presented that low pH was favorable for the removal of color material from aqueous solution. (author)

  13. The interaction of Saccharomyces paradoxus with its natural competitors on oak bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallik, Vienna; Miller, Eric; Greig, Duncan

    2015-04-01

    The natural history of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is poorly understood and confounded by domestication. In nature, S. cerevisiae and its undomesticated relative S. paradoxus are usually found on the bark of oak trees, a habitat very different from wine or other human fermentations. It is unclear whether the oak trees are really the primary habitat for wild yeast, or whether this apparent association is due to biased sampling. We use culturing and high-throughput environmental sequencing to show that S. paradoxus is a very rare member of the oak bark microbial community. We find that S. paradoxus can grow well on sterile medium made from oak bark, but that its growth is strongly suppressed when the other members of the community are present. We purified a set of twelve common fungal and bacterial species from the oak bark community and tested how each affected the growth of S. paradoxus in direct competition on oak bark medium at summer and winter temperatures, identifying both positive and negative interactions. One Pseudomonas species produces a diffusible toxin that suppresses S. paradoxus as effectively as either the whole set of twelve species together or the complete community present in nonsterilized oak medium. Conversely, one of the twelve species, Mucilaginibacter sp., had the opposite effect and promoted S. paradoxus growth at low temperatures. We conclude that, in its natural oak tree habitat, S. paradoxus is a rare species whose success depends on the much more abundant microbial species surrounding it.

  14. Equations of bark thickness and volume profiles at different heights with easy-measurement variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellini, J. M.; Galarza, M.; Burns, S. L.; Martinez-Pastur, G. J.; Lencinas, M. V.

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to develop equations of thickness profile and bark volume at different heights with easy-measurement variables, taking as a study case Nothofagus pumilio forests, growing in different site qualities and growth phases in Southern Patagonia. Data was collected from 717 harvested trees. Three models were fitted using multiple, non-lineal regression and generalized linear model, by stepwise methodology, iteratively reweighted least squares method for maximum likelihood estimation and Marquardt algorithm. The dependent variables were diameter at 1.30 m height (DBH), relative height (RH) and growth phase (GP). The statistic evaluation was made through the adjusted determinant coefficient (r2-adj), standard error of the estimation (SEE), mean absolute error and residual analysis. All models presented good fitness with a significant correlation with the growth phase. A decrease in the thickness was observed when the relative height increase. Moreover, a bark coefficient was made to calculate volume with and without bark of individual trees, where significant differences according to site quality of the stands and DBH class of the trees were observed. It can be concluded that the prediction of bark thickness and bark coefficient is possible using DBH, height, site quality and growth phase, common and easy measurement variables used in forest inventories. (Author) 23 refs.

  15. Antivenom potential of ethanolic extract of Cordia macleodii bark against Naja venom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pranay Soni; Surendra H. Bodakhe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antivenom potential of ethanolic extract of bark of Cordia macleodii against Naja venom induced pharmacological effects such as lethality, hemorrhagic lesion, necrotizing lesion, edema, cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity.Methods:Wistar strain rats were challenged with Naja venom and treated with the ethanolic extract of Cordia macleodii bark. The effectiveness of the extract to neutralize the lethalities ofNaja venom was investigated as recommended by WHO. Results: At the dose of 400 and 800 mg/kg ethanolic extract of Cordia macleodii bark significantly inhibited the Naja venom induced lethality, hemorrhagic lesion, necrotizing lesion and edema in rats. Ethanolic extract of Cordia macleodii bark was effective in neutralizing the coagulant and defibrinogenating activity of Naja venom. The cardiotoxic effects in isolated frog heart and neurotoxic activity studies on frog rectus abdominus muscle were also antagonized by ethanolic extract of Cordia macleodii bark.Conclusions:It is concluded that the protective effect of extract of Cordia macleodii against Naja venom poisoning may be mediated by the cardiotonic, proteolysin neutralization, anti-inflammatory, antiserotonic and antihistaminic activity. It is possible that the protective effect may also be due to precipitation of active venom constituents.

  16. Tests of CP Violation with $\\bar{K^0}$ and $ K^{0} $ at LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS195 Tests of CP Violation with &bar.K$^0$ and K$^0$ at LEAR \\\\ \\\\The aim of the experiment is to carry out precision tests of CP, T and CPT on the neutral kaon system through $ K ^0 - $\\bar{K}^0 $ interferometry using LEAR as an intense source. A beam of $ ~10^{6}~\\bar{p}$~events/second is brought to rest in a hydrogen target producing $ K ^0 $ and $ $\\bar{K}^0 $ events through the reaction channels : \\\\ \\\\ \\begin{center} $\\bar{p}p~~~~~\\rightarrow~~~~K^0~+~(K^-\\pi^+$) \\\\ \\\\~~~~~~~~$\\rightarrow~~~~\\bar{K}^0~+~(K^+\\pi^-$) \\end{center}\\\\ \\\\The neutral strange particles and their antiparticles are tagged by detecting in the magnetic field the sign of the accompanying charged kaons identified via Cerenkovs and scintillators. The experiment has the unique feature that the decays from particles and antiparticles are recorded under the same operating conditions using tracking chambers and a gas sampling electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured time-dependent $ K ^0 $-$ $\\bar{K}^0 $ asymmetries for non-lepton...

  17. Associations of Conifer-Infesting Bark Beetles and Fungi in Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Wingfield

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytinae have a widespread association with fungi, especially with ophiostomatoid fungi (Ascomycota that cause blue staining of wood, and in some cases, serious tree diseases. In Fennoscandia, most studies of these fungi have focused on economically important bark beetle species and this is likely to have led to a biased view of the fungal biodiversity in the region. Recently, the associations between fungi and bark beetles in Fennoscandia have been shown to be more diverse than previously thought. Furthermore, they form complex and dynamic associations that are only now beginning to emerge. This review examines the current knowledge of the rather poorly known interactions between bark beetles, fungi and their conifer host trees in Fennoscandia. The diversity of ophiostomatoid species is discussed and the possible factors that influence the assemblages of fungal associates are considered for all species that are known to occur in the region. For many ophiostomatoid species found in Fennoscandia, little or nothing is known regarding their pathogenicity, particularly if they were to be transferred to new environments. We, therefore, draw attention to the possible threats of timber trade and climate change-induced invasions of new habitats by bark beetles and the fungi that can be moved along with them.

  18. Growth and Wood/Bark Properties of Abies faxoniana Seedlings as Affected by Elevated CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Zhou Qiao; Yuan-Bin Zhang; Kai-Yun Wang; Qian Wang; Qi-Zhuo Tian

    2008-01-01

    Growth and wood and bark properties of Abies faxoniana seedlings after one year's exposure to elevated CO2 concentration (ambient + 350 (=1= 25) μmol/mol) under two planting densities (28 or 84 plants/mz) were investigated in closed-top chambers. Tree height, stem diameter and cross-sectional area, and total biomass were enhanced under elevated CO2 concentration, and reduced under high planting density. Most traits of stem bark were improved under elevated CO2 concentration and reduced under high planting density. Stem wood production was significantly increased in volume under elevated CO2 concentration under both densities, and the stem wood density decreased under elevated CO2 concentration and increased under high planting density. These results suggest that the response of stem wood and bark to elevated CO2 concentration is density dependent. This may be of great importance in a future CO2 enriched world in natural forests where plant density varies considerably. The results also show that the bark/wood ratio in diameter, stem cross-sectional area and dry weight are not proportionally affected by elevated CO2 concentration under the two contrasting planting densities. This indicates that the response magnitude of stem bark and stem wood to elevated CO2 concentration are different but their response directions are the same.

  19. New triterpenoids from the stem bark of Hypodaphnis zenkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, Itbert Joseph; Dufat, Thi-Hanh; Wandji, Jean; Michel, Sylvie; Chiozem, David Dako

    2013-01-01

    A new pentacyclic triterpenoid and three new derivatives based on the taraxer-14-ene skeleton with a C-28 attached a carboxylic acid group have been isolated from the stem bark of Hypodaphnis zenkeri, together with six known compounds. The new product was identified as 2α,3α-dihydroxytaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid (1). Its derivatives, 2α,3α-diacetyltaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid (2), 2α,3α-di-O-carbonyl-2α,3α-dihydroxytaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid (3) and 2α,3α-dipropionyltaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid (4) were obtained by semisynthesis. The known compounds were identified as 3β-hydroxytaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid or aleuritolic acid (5) (McPhail, A.T., McPhail, D.R., Wani, M.C., Wall, M.E. & A.W., Nicholas, A.W. (1989). Identity of maprounic acid with aleuritolic acid. Revision of the structure of maprounic acid: X-ray crystal structure of p-bromobenzyl acetylmaprounate. Journal Natural Products, 52, 212), 3α-hydroxytaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid or isoaleuritolic acid (6), 3α-acetyltaraxer-14-en-28-oic acid acetate or aleuritolic acid acetate (7) (Chaudhuri, S.K., Fullas, F., Brown, D.M., Wani, M.C., Wall, M.E., Cai, L., … Kinghorn, A.D. (1995). Isolation and structural elucidation of pentacyclic triterpenoids from Maprounea africana. Journal of Natural Products, 58, 1-9), 3-oxo-taraxer-14-ene or taraxerone (8) β-sitosterol (9) and stigmasterol (10) (Kamboj & Saluja, 2011), together with fatty acids. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic studies and chemical transformations.

  20. Clinical course of bark scorpion envenomation managed without antivenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ayrn; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2012-09-01

    Bark scorpion envenomation is potentially life threatening in children and traditionally treated with antivenom (AV). We sought to describe the clinical course, management, complications and outcome of children with severe scorpion envenomation treated with supportive care during a period when AV was unavailable. A retrospective chart review was performed, all children presenting to a referral hospital between September 1, 2004 and July 31, 2006 with severe scorpion envenomation not receiving AV, were included. A standardized data abstraction form was used to record time of symptom onset, time to healthcare facility (HCF), clinical findings, treatment, complications, and length of stay. Eighty-eight patients were included with mean age of 3.7 years (0.33-12). Mean time to symptom onset was 20 min (0-130) and mean time to HCF was 79 min (10-240). Incidence of clinical manifestations include: neuromuscular agitation, 100 %; opsoclonus, 97 %; hypersalivation, 81 %; tachycardia, 82 %; hypertension, 49 %; vomiting, 38 %; fever, 28 %; respiratory distress, 33 %; and hypoxia, 18 %. Complications included rhabdomyolysis in 18 (20 %) and aspiration in 12 (13 %) patients. Intubation was required in 24 % of patients. The most frequently used agents to control symptoms were benzodiazepines (98 %) followed by opioids (69 %). Intravenous fluids were given to 84 %. Mean length of stay was 29 h (range, 6-73 h). There were no deaths. In addition to the classic findings of neuromuscular hyperactivity, opsoclonus, and hypersalivation, a high incidence of hyperadrenergic findings and respiratory compromise are noted in this series. A significant number of patients required mechanical ventilation. Benzodiazpines and opioids were the most common medications used to control symptoms. PMID:22562239

  1. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of Rhododendron arboreum bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Ali, Sajid; Muhammad, Naveed; Gillani, Syed N; Shah, Muhmmad R; Khan, Haroon; Maione, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Rhododendron arboreum Smith. (Ericaceae), an evergreen small tree, is one of the 1000 species that belongs to genus Rhododendron distributed worldwide. In folk medicine, as various parts of this plant exhibit medicinal properties, it is used in the treatment of different ailments.The present study was designed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of methanolic extract of R. arboreum bark, followed by activity-guided fractionation of n-hexane, n-butanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions.The ethyl acetate fraction (200 mg/kg i.p.) showed the maximum analgesic effect (82%) in acetic acid-induced writhing, followed, to a less extent, by crude extract and chloroform fraction both at a dose of 200 mg/kg i.p. (65.09% and 67.89%, respectively). In carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema, the crude extract and its related fractions displayed in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) an anti-inflammatory activity for all time-courses (1-5 hrs). For the active extract/fractions (200 mg/kg i.p.), the maximum effect was observed 5 h after carrageenan injection. These evidences were also supported by in vitro lipoxygenase inhibitory properties. In conclusion, R. arboreum crude methanolic extract and its fractions exhibited anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects. For these reasons, this plant could be a promising source of new compounds for the management of pain and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25501256

  2. Spatial-temporal modeling of forest gaps generated by colonization from below- and above-ground bark beetle species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jun; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Møller, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    the Great Lakes region. Here we examine the impact of two bark beetle groups, red turpentine beetles and pine engraver bark beetles, on tree mortality and the subsequent gap formation over time in a plantation in Wisconsin. We construct spatial-temporal statistical models that quantify the relations among...

  3. A PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDY ON THE PREGNANCY TERMINATION EFFECT OF COMPLEX PRESCRIPTION OF ELM WHITE BARK IN ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIUXi-Min; LIPci-Quan; ZHANGJian-Guo; YEXue-Min

    1989-01-01

    Complex prescription of elm white bark is made up of elm white bark and Olibanum, which has been used as a female contraceptive in China. Our animal experimental results showed that it had terminating effect of early, mid and fate pregnancies in

  4. Mimusops elengi bark extract mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rakhi; Bag, Braja Gopal; Ghosh, Pooja

    2016-04-01

    The bark extract of Mimusops elengi is rich in different types of plant secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids and saponins. The present study shows the usefulness of the bark extract of Mimusops elengi for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles in water at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the gold nanoparticles was complete within a few minutes without any extra stabilizing or capping agents and the polyphenols present in the bark extract acted as both reducing as well as stabilizing agents. The synthesized colloidal gold nanoparticles were characterized by HRTEM, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The synthesized gold nanoparticles have been used as an efficient catalyst for the reduction of 3-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol to their corresponding aminophenols in water at room temperature.

  5. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity of Cordia dichotoma (Forst f.) bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariya, Pankaj B; Bhalodia, Nayan R; Shukla, Vinay J; Acharya, Rabinarayan; Nariya, Mukesh B

    2013-01-01

    Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. bark, identified as botanical source of Shleshmataka in Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia. Present investigation was undertaken to evaluate possible antioxidant potential of methanolic and butanol extract of C. dichotoma bark. In vitro antioxidant activity of methanolic and butanol extract was determined by 1,1, diphenyl-2, picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. The extracts were also evaluated for their phenolic contents and antioxidant activity. Phenolic content was measured using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and was calculated as Gallic acid equivalents. Antiradical activity of methanolic extract was measured by DPPH assay and was compared to ascorbic acid and ferric reducing power of the extract was evaluated by Oyaizu method. In the present study three in vitro models were used to evaluate antioxidant activity. The first two methods were for direct measurement of radical scavenging activity and remaining one method evaluated the reducing power. The present study revealed that the C. dichotoma bark has significant radical scavenging activity.

  6. Antioxidant Tannins from Stem Bark and Fine Root of Casuarina equisetifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hui Lin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Structures of condensed tannins from the stem bark and fine root of Casuarina equisetifolia were identified using MALDI-TOF MS and HPLC analyses. The condensed tannins from stem bark and fine root consist predominantly of procyanidin combined with prodelphinidin and propelargonidin, and epicatechin is the main extension unit. The condensed tannins had different polymer chain lengths, varying from trimers to tridecamer for stem bark and to pentadecamer for fine root. The antioxidant activities were measured by two models: 1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing/ antioxidant power  (FRAP. The condensed tannins extracted from C. equisetifolia showed very good DPPH radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing/ antioxidant power, suggesting that these extracts may be considered as new sources of natural antioxidants for food and nutraceutical products.

  7. To Study Antidiabetic Activity of Stem Bark of Bauhinia purpurea Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. A.T. Patil

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bauhinia purpurea Linn commonly known as Purple Orchid-Tree and is cultivated throughout India. Literature survey revealed that the bark of Bauhinia purpurea Linn is traditionally used as an astringent in diarrhoea. Flowers are laxative. The bark, root and flower mixed with rice water are used as a maturant for boils and abscesses[2]. the present study was undertaken to evaluate the antidiabetic activity of Petroleum ether, Chloroform ,Ethyl Acetate, Acetone ,Methanol and Hydro alcoholic extract of stem bark of Bauhinia purpurea extracts was evaluated using mice i.e. alloxan induced diabetes in mice by glucometer method, with 50 mg/kg ,100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg and higher doses showed significant value represent at table no and Figure 1,2,3 respectivelly with different succissive extract and show the Significant P Value.

  8. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-ARTHRITIC ACTIVITIES OF DELONIX ELATA BARK EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murugananthan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Delonix elata (D. elata, has long been used in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of arthritis pain. In the present study an attempt was made to study the effect of D. elata barks for its anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effect in animal models. Barks were subjected for extraction with pet. ether, chloroform and 40% hydroalcohol successively and evaporated under rotary evaporator to get the concentrated extract. All the extracts were subjected for acute oral toxicity studies in rats and found to be safe up to the dose of 5g/kg body weight. Anti-inflammatory screening by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet induced granuloma method, the hydro alcohol extract of D. elata barks showed significant protection against the inflammation. In Complete Freund’s Adjuvant induced arthritis model also the hydro alcohol exhibited significant protection on day 7 onwards.

  9. Variations in Tannin and Oxalic acid Content in Terminalia arjuna (Arjuna Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Pandey

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna (Arjuna, belonging to family combretaceae, grows along the streams or rivers and often in the shallow streambeds and riverbeds in central India. It has been considered by the Ayurvedic physicians as well as by the modern practitioners as a cardiac tonic. Clinical evaluation indicated that it has been found beneficial in the treatment of coronary artery disease, heart failure, and possibly hypercholesterolemia. It has also been found to possess antibacterial, antimutagenic and antioxidant activities. Demand for T. arjuna bark, both in India and abroad has been increasing rapidly for over a decade. About 95 percent of the requirement is met from the wild and collected in a pattern that is not concomitant with sustainable harvesting practices. The quality of the bark is directly dependent on harvesting technique and time. There is also a clear relationship between the part of the plant harvested, harvesting method used, and the impact of these on the plant. Keeping above into consideration it has been planned to carry out systematic study on phytochemical investigation of Arjuna bark collected from various parts of the tree at different harvesting time. The bark samples were analyzed for tannin and oxalic acid. The tannin and oxalic acid content varied from 6.75 to 14.82 % and 7.66 to 20.05 % respectively in various samples of T. arjuna bark collected from various places of Madhya Pradesh. The middle-aged trees having GBH around 130 cm were found to contain more amount of tannin. The study gives important information to obtain better quality of T. arjuna bark on sustainable basis.

  10. Bark and Ambrosia Beetles Show Different Invasion Patterns in the USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Rassati

    Full Text Available Non-native bark and ambrosia beetles represent a threat to forests worldwide. Their invasion patterns are, however, still unclear. Here we investigated first, if the spread of non-native bark and ambrosia beetles is a gradual or a discontinuous process; second, which are the main correlates of their community structure; third, whether those correlates correspond to those of native species. We used data on species distribution of non-native and native scolytines in the continental 48 USA states. These data were analyzed through a beta-diversity index, partitioned into species richness differences and species replacement, using Mantel correlograms and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS ordination for identifying spatial patterns, and regression on distance matrices to test the association of climate (temperature, rainfall, forest (cover area, composition, geographical (distance, and human-related (import variables with β-diversity components. For both non-native bark and ambrosia beetles, β-diversity was mainly composed of species richness difference than species replacement. For non-native bark beetles, a discontinuous invasion process composed of long distance jumps or multiple introduction events was apparent. Species richness differences were primarily correlated with differences in import values while temperature was the main correlate of species replacement. For non-native ambrosia beetles, a more continuous invasion process was apparent, with the pool of non-native species arriving in the coastal areas that tended to be filtered as they spread to interior portions of the continental USA. Species richness differences were mainly correlated with differences in rainfall among states, while rainfall and temperature were the main correlates of species replacement. Our study suggests that the different ecology of bark and ambrosia beetles influences their invasion process in new environments. The lower dependency that bark beetles have

  11. Bark and Ambrosia Beetles Show Different Invasion Patterns in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassati, Davide; Faccoli, Massimo; Haack, Robert A; Rabaglia, Robert J; Petrucco Toffolo, Edoardo; Battisti, Andrea; Marini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Non-native bark and ambrosia beetles represent a threat to forests worldwide. Their invasion patterns are, however, still unclear. Here we investigated first, if the spread of non-native bark and ambrosia beetles is a gradual or a discontinuous process; second, which are the main correlates of their community structure; third, whether those correlates correspond to those of native species. We used data on species distribution of non-native and native scolytines in the continental 48 USA states. These data were analyzed through a beta-diversity index, partitioned into species richness differences and species replacement, using Mantel correlograms and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination for identifying spatial patterns, and regression on distance matrices to test the association of climate (temperature, rainfall), forest (cover area, composition), geographical (distance), and human-related (import) variables with β-diversity components. For both non-native bark and ambrosia beetles, β-diversity was mainly composed of species richness difference than species replacement. For non-native bark beetles, a discontinuous invasion process composed of long distance jumps or multiple introduction events was apparent. Species richness differences were primarily correlated with differences in import values while temperature was the main correlate of species replacement. For non-native ambrosia beetles, a more continuous invasion process was apparent, with the pool of non-native species arriving in the coastal areas that tended to be filtered as they spread to interior portions of the continental USA. Species richness differences were mainly correlated with differences in rainfall among states, while rainfall and temperature were the main correlates of species replacement. Our study suggests that the different ecology of bark and ambrosia beetles influences their invasion process in new environments. The lower dependency that bark beetles have on climate

  12. Bark and Ambrosia Beetles Show Different Invasion Patterns in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassati, Davide; Faccoli, Massimo; Haack, Robert A.; Rabaglia, Robert J.; Petrucco Toffolo, Edoardo; Battisti, Andrea; Marini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Non-native bark and ambrosia beetles represent a threat to forests worldwide. Their invasion patterns are, however, still unclear. Here we investigated first, if the spread of non-native bark and ambrosia beetles is a gradual or a discontinuous process; second, which are the main correlates of their community structure; third, whether those correlates correspond to those of native species. We used data on species distribution of non-native and native scolytines in the continental 48 USA states. These data were analyzed through a beta-diversity index, partitioned into species richness differences and species replacement, using Mantel correlograms and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination for identifying spatial patterns, and regression on distance matrices to test the association of climate (temperature, rainfall), forest (cover area, composition), geographical (distance), and human-related (import) variables with β-diversity components. For both non-native bark and ambrosia beetles, β-diversity was mainly composed of species richness difference than species replacement. For non-native bark beetles, a discontinuous invasion process composed of long distance jumps or multiple introduction events was apparent. Species richness differences were primarily correlated with differences in import values while temperature was the main correlate of species replacement. For non-native ambrosia beetles, a more continuous invasion process was apparent, with the pool of non-native species arriving in the coastal areas that tended to be filtered as they spread to interior portions of the continental USA. Species richness differences were mainly correlated with differences in rainfall among states, while rainfall and temperature were the main correlates of species replacement. Our study suggests that the different ecology of bark and ambrosia beetles influences their invasion process in new environments. The lower dependency that bark beetles have on climate

  13. Irradiation Effect on the antioxidant properties, anti-microbial and cytoprotective of the bark of Punica granatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bark of pomegranate has been used for some years to treat various health problems . Several studies have focused on specifying these problems, including antibacterial , antioxidant and cytoprotective . The use of pomegranate rind powder is an effective treatment against gastric ulcer and intestines and to strengthen the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, we studied the effects of gamma irradiation on the type antibacterial, anti-ulcer and bark grenade. This study was conducted on powdered pomegranate bark irradiated by applying decreasing radiation doses from 25kGy to 1.25KGy. All of our results shows that irradiation with a low degree improves the effectiveness of pomegranate bark for the treatment of gastric ulcer , however high degree irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of bark pomegranate against Staphylococcus aureus.

  14. Comparative Antioxidant Activity of Water Extract of ,em>Azadiractha indica Stem Bark and Telfairia occidentalis Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Anokwuru

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activity of Azadirachta indica stem bark and Telfairia occidentalis leaf aqueous extract was studied. The Total Phenolic Content (TPC was determined using folin Ciocalteu method while the Total Flavonoid Content (TFC was determined using aluminum chloride method. Antioxidant activity was determined using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazine (DPPH inhibition. Telfairia occidentalis extracted more phenols (11.32g GAE/ 100g than Azadirachta indica stem bark (10.74g GAE/100g but not significantly different (p<0.05. Azadirachta indica stem bark extracted more flavonoid content (5.21g QE/100g than Telfairia occidentalis leaf (0.96g QE/100g. Azadirachta indica stem bark inhibited more free radicals (83% than Telfairia occidentalis leaf (65%. This study showed that Azadirachta indica stem bark had higher antioxidant activity compared to Telfairia occidentalis leaf.

  15. Black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as an alternative indicator of urban air pollution by chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capabilities of black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as a biomonitor of atmospheric air pollution by chemical elements were tested against epiphytic lichens Xanthoria parietina (L.) and Physcia adscendens (Fr.). Concentrations of 40 macro and trace elements were determined using epicadmium and instrumental NAA. The data obtained were processed using non-parametric tests. A good correlation was found between concentrations of majority of elements in bark and lichens. On the accumulation capability bark turned out to be competitive with both lichens examined. The main inorganic components of black poplar-tree bark were revealed. A substrate influence on the concentrations of some elements in epiphytic lichens was established. An optimized procedure of bark pre-irradiation treatment was suggested. (author)

  16. Determination of anthelmintic activity of the leaf and bark extract of Tamarindus Indica linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of ethanolic and aqueous extract of leaves and bark of Tamarindus indica Linn using Pheretima posthuma and Tubifex tubifex as test worms. The time of paralysis and time of death were studied and the activity was compared with piperazine citrate as reference standard. The alcohol and aqueous extract of bark of Tamarindus indica exhibited significant anthelmintic activity as evidenced by decreased paralyzing time and death time. The results thus support the use of Tamarindus indica as an anthelmintic agent.

  17. Determination of anthelmintic activity of the leaf and bark extract of tamarindus indica linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S S; Dey, Monalisha; Ghosh, A K

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of ethanolic and aqueous extract of leaves and bark of Tamarindus indica Linn using Pheretima posthuma and Tubifex tubifex as test worms. The time of paralysis and time of death were studied and the activity was compared with piperazine citrate as reference standard. The alcohol and aqueous extract of bark of Tamarindus indica exhibited significant anthelmintic activity as evidenced by decreased paralyzing time and death time. The results thus support the use of Tamarindus indica as an anthelmintic agent.

  18. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not yet known. To assess the risk for hepatotoxicity by Kampo medicines, we evaluated the daily coumarin intake of patients who were prescribed Kampo medicines and investigated the relation between hepatotoxicity and the coumarin intake. The clinical data of 129 outpatients (18 male and 111 female, median age 58 years) who had been prescribed keishibukuryogankayokuinin (TJ-125) between April 2008 and March 2013 was retrospectively investigated. Concurrent Kampo medicines and liver function were also surveyed. In addition to TJ-125, the patients took some of the other 32 Kampo preparations and 22 decoctions that include cinnamon bark. The coumarin content of these Kampo medicines was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TJ-125 had the highest daily content of coumarin (5.63 mg/day), calculated from the daily cinnamon bark dosage reported in the information leaflet inserted in each package of Kampo medicine. The coumarin content in 1g cinnamon bark decoction was 3.0 mg. The daily coumarin intake of the patients was 0.113 (0.049-0.541) mg/kg/day, with 98 patients (76.0%) exceeding the TDI. Twenty-three patients had an abnormal change in liver function test value, but no significant difference was found in the incidence of abnormal change between the group consuming less than the TDI value (6/31, 19.4%) and the group consuming equal to or greater than the TDI value (17/98, 17.3%). In addition, no abnormal change related to cinnamon bark was found for individual

  19. Condensed tannins from acacia mangium bark: Characterization by spot tests and FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharudin, Muhammad Azizi; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the adaptation and evaluation of one chemical tests for tannins characterization in acacia mangium bark. Acid butanol test developed to identify respectively condensed tannins is described. The two traditional tests used for tannin characterization namely ferric test and vanillin test were also performed and their functional also discussed. Condensed tannins were extracted from acacia mangium bark using water medium in presence of three different concentration basic reagent of NaOH(5%,10% and 15%) and were characterized by FT-IR spectrometry.

  20. A mechanistic approach to methylene blue sorption on two vegetable wastes: Cork bark and grape stalks

    OpenAIRE

    M. Àngels Olivella,; Núria Fiol,; Florencio de la Torre,; Jordi Poch,; Isabel Villaescusa

    2012-01-01

    Two vegetable wastes, cork bark and grape stalks, were investigated for the removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution. The effects of contact time, dye concentration, pH, and temperature on sorption were studied relative to adsorption on a commercially-activated carbon. The highest adsorption yield was obtained within the pH range 5 to 10 for grape stalks and 7 to 10 for cork bark. The sorption kinetics of dye onto activated carbon and grape stalks was very fast. Kinetics data were fitt...

  1. Chemical composition of essential oil from the bark of Croton cajucara Bentham

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fabiano Rosa; Wisniewski Junior, Alberto; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Nunes, Domingos Sávio

    2012-01-01

    The essential oil from the bark of Croton cajucara Bentham, popularly known as sacaca or cajuçara, was obtained by hydrodistillation, yielding 1.28% of the former bark mass, and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 50 compounds were identified, with oxygenated sesquiterpenes composing the majority of components. The main compounds identified were: cyperene (12.36%), α-guaiene, (11.50%) and epi-β-Santalene (8.70%).__________...

  2. The effects of urbanization, bark fissure depth and sun exposure on lichens in south eastern Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Tälle, Malin

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that air pollution, as well as bark fissure depth and sun exposure of a tree can have an effect on lichen growth as well as abundance of lichen species. The aim of this study was to find out the relative importance of these factors. 211 oaks in south eastern Sweden were surveyed for presence of 17 lichen species, as well as the total number of lichen species. Half of the trees were situated in urban areas and half in the countryside. For each tree the bark fissure depth was...

  3. Selective Solvents for Extraction of Triterpenes from Betula Pendula Outer Bark

    OpenAIRE

    Pāže, A; Zandersons, J; Rižikovs, J; Dobele, G.; Jurkjāne, V; Spince, B

    2013-01-01

    The volume of birch plywood production in Latvia is illustrated by the 208 000 m3 of plywood sold in 2011 and about 562 000 m3 of processed birch veneer blocks. Wood residues such as bark, veneer shorts, cut off ends and others are used as a fuel. It would be more expedient to increase the birch wood utilisation degree by involving also birch outer bark in the processing cycle. It makes up 2% of the veneer blocks’ mass. At the J.S.C. “Latvijas Finieris”, about 6000 t per year of graded and mi...

  4. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not yet known. To assess the risk for hepatotoxicity by Kampo medicines, we evaluated the daily coumarin intake of patients who were prescribed Kampo medicines and investigated the relation between hepatotoxicity and the coumarin intake. The clinical data of 129 outpatients (18 male and 111 female, median age 58 years) who had been prescribed keishibukuryogankayokuinin (TJ-125) between April 2008 and March 2013 was retrospectively investigated. Concurrent Kampo medicines and liver function were also surveyed. In addition to TJ-125, the patients took some of the other 32 Kampo preparations and 22 decoctions that include cinnamon bark. The coumarin content of these Kampo medicines was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TJ-125 had the highest daily content of coumarin (5.63 mg/day), calculated from the daily cinnamon bark dosage reported in the information leaflet inserted in each package of Kampo medicine. The coumarin content in 1g cinnamon bark decoction was 3.0 mg. The daily coumarin intake of the patients was 0.113 (0.049–0.541) mg/kg/day, with 98 patients (76.0%) exceeding the TDI. Twenty-three patients had an abnormal change in liver function test value, but no significant difference was found in the incidence of abnormal change between the group consuming less than the TDI value (6/31, 19.4%) and the group consuming equal to or greater than the TDI value (17/98, 17.3%). In addition, no abnormal change related to cinnamon bark was found for individual

  5. PRODUCTION OF WOOD-CEMENT BONDED PARTICLEBOARDS WITH DIFFERENT CONTENTS OF BARK AND MICROSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Correia Silva

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This work’s objective was to evaluate the effect of three percentages of addition of microsilica (0, 20 and 30% on the physical and mechanical properties of wood-cement bonded particleboards of Eucalyptus urophylla composed by three wood:bark ratios (100:0, 95:5 and 90:10. Results showed that the most significant effect of the additive on the produced panels was in those containing bark, and that of 20% of additive was more efficient on the physical and mechanical properties.

  6. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not yet known. To assess the risk for hepatotoxicity by Kampo medicines, we evaluated the daily coumarin intake of patients who were prescribed Kampo medicines and investigated the relation between hepatotoxicity and the coumarin intake. The clinical data of 129 outpatients (18 male and 111 female, median age 58 years) who had been prescribed keishibukuryogankayokuinin (TJ-125) between April 2008 and March 2013 was retrospectively investigated. Concurrent Kampo medicines and liver function were also surveyed. In addition to TJ-125, the patients took some of the other 32 Kampo preparations and 22 decoctions that include cinnamon bark. The coumarin content of these Kampo medicines was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TJ-125 had the highest daily content of coumarin (5.63 mg/day), calculated from the daily cinnamon bark dosage reported in the information leaflet inserted in each package of Kampo medicine. The coumarin content in 1g cinnamon bark decoction was 3.0 mg. The daily coumarin intake of the patients was 0.113 (0.049-0.541) mg/kg/day, with 98 patients (76.0%) exceeding the TDI. Twenty-three patients had an abnormal change in liver function test value, but no significant difference was found in the incidence of abnormal change between the group consuming less than the TDI value (6/31, 19.4%) and the group consuming equal to or greater than the TDI value (17/98, 17.3%). In addition, no abnormal change related to cinnamon bark was found for individual

  7. GREEN SYNTHESIS OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES USING TOONA CILIATA METHANOL BARK EXTRACT AND THEIR CHARACTERISATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik Rajan; Mann Avninder Singh; Sandhu Bharpur Singh; Parihar Vidya Bhushan Singh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and justified the use of MeOH extract from Toona ciliata bark as a reducing and capping agent for the ecofriendly synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the basis of modern analytical techniques. The reduction of 1.0 mM aqueous solution of aurochloric acid with 1 ml, 1% w/v aqueous solution of MeOH bark extract from Toona ciliata has resulted in the formation of stabilised Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs). The synthesised gold particles showed a surface plasmon band ...

  8. Pine bark as bio-adsorbent for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Ansias-Manso, L.; Fernandez Calviño, David;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the retention of five metals on pine bark using stirred flow and batch-type experiments. Resulting from batch-type kinetic experiments, adsorption was rapid, with no significant differences for the various contact times. Adsorption was between 98 and 99...... to the added concentrations, with Pb always showing the lowest levels. Stirred flow chamber experiments showed strong hysteresis for Pb and Cu, sorption being mostly irreversible. The differences affecting the studied heavy metals are mainly due to different affinity for the adsorption sites. Pine bark can...

  9. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 3: the chemical composition of wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Pieter B; Senekal, Nadine D; Kemp, Gabré; Amra-Jordaan, Maryam; Khan, Pir; Bonnet, Susan L; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2012-11-01

    Wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark extract is an important renewable industrial source of natural polymers for leather tanning and adhesive manufacturing. The wattle bark proanthocyanidin oligomers have 5-deoxy extender units that render the interflavanyl bonds resistant to acid catalysed hydrolysis and their composition cannot be determined via conventional thiolysis. We combined established phyto- and synthetic chemistry perspectives with an electrospray mass spectrometry investigation to establish that the flavan-3-ol based oligomers consist of a starter unit which is either catechin or gallocatechin, angularly bonded to fisetinidol or predominantly robinetinidol extender units. PMID:22917955

  10. Composition and antioxidant activity of the essential oils of Xylopia aethiopica (Dun) A. Rich. (Annonaceae) leaves, stem bark, root bark, and fresh and dried fruits, growing in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Anastasia; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Mensah, Merlin L K; Fleischer, Theophilus C; Skaltsa, Helen

    2004-12-29

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the leaves, the barks of the stem and the root, as well as from the fresh and dried fruits of Xylopia aethiopica, growing in Ghana, was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. Kovats indices, mass spectra, and standard compounds were used to identify a total of 93 individual compounds. The monoterpene hydrocarbons formed the main portion in all studied samples. beta-Pinene was predominant in all cases, while trans-m-mentha-1(7),8-diene was the main compound in the essential oils of the leaves and the barks of roots and stems. Their potential antioxidant activity was also investigated and found to be significant in scavenging superoxide anion radical.

  11. Optimization of Ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols, tannins and epigallocatechin gallate from barks of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville bark extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Jordana N.; Nathalia B. Pedroso; Leonardo L. Borges; Gerlon A.; Jose R. Paula; Edemilson C. Conceicao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mar.) Coville is a native plant from Brazil, rich in phenolic compounds and used on popular medicine as a wound healing agent, in the treatment of gastric lesions and as antimicrobial. Materials and Methods: Ultrassound-assisted extraction (UAE) was applied to extraction of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), total polyphenols (TP) and total tannins (TT) content from barks of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mar.) Coville. Several operating parameters, namely...

  12. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2008-05-15

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in southern Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold-side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT' (=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the flue gases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/year) for relative humidity <22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue

  13. Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process

  14. Study of the betulin enriched birch bark extracts effects on human carcinoma cells and ear inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehelean Cristina A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentacyclic triterpenes, mainly betulin and betulinic acid, are valuable anticancer agents found in the bark of birch tree. This study evaluates birch bark extracts for the active principles composition. Results New improved extraction methods were applied on the bark of Betula pendula in order to reach the maximum content in active principles. Extracts were analyzed by HPLC-MS, Raman, SERS and 13C NMR spectroscopy which revealed a very high yield of betulin (over 90%. Growth inhibiting effects were measured in vitro on four malignant human cell lines: A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma, A2780 (ovarian carcinoma, HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma and MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma, by means of MTT assay. All of the prepared bark extracts exerted a pronounced antiproliferative effect against human cancer cell lines. In vivo studies involved the anti-inflammatory effect of birch extracts on TPA-induced model of inflammation in mice. Conclusions The research revealed the efficacy of the extraction procedures as well as the antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of birch extracts.

  15. In vitro antimicrobial activity of leaves and bark extracts of Ficus religiosa (Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Ramakrishnaiah *1, T.Hariprasad2

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated antimicrobial activity of diethyl ether and methanol extractions of bark and leaves of Ficus religiosa plant against three bacteria (E.coli, Staphylococcus aureus & Pseudomonas aurignosa and one fungi (Aspergillus niger. The results showed that the methanol extracts of both leaves and bark showed antimicrobial activity on three tested bacteria and no effect on A.niger. In methanol extracts S.aureus showed maximum sensitivity (inhibition zone 28mm followed by E.coli (inhibition zone 16mm and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (inhibition zone 12mm. Diethyl ether extracts of leaves were also showed maximum inhibition on S.aureus followed by E.coli and P.aeruginosa. Both methanol and diethyl ether extracts of bark showed antimicrobial activity on three types of tested bacteria and very less inhibition activity on A.niger. But comparatively bark extracts of both the solvents were showed less antimicrobial activity than leaves extracts on the tested microbes.

  16. IN VITRO ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF LEAVES AND BARK EXTRACTS OF FICUS RELIGIOSA (Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gampa Ramakrishnaiah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated antimicrobial activity of diethyl ether and methanol extractions of bark and leaves of Ficus religiosa plant against three bacteria (E.coli, Staphylococcus aureus & Pseudomonas aurignosa and one fungi (Aspergillus niger. The results showed that the methanol extracts of both leaves and bark showed antimicrobial activity on three tested bacteria and no effect on A.niger. In methanol extracts S.aureus showed maximum sensitivity (inhibition zone 28mm followed by E.coli (inhibition zone 16mm and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (inhibition zone 12mm. Diethyl ether extracts of leaves were also showed maximum inhibition on S.aureus followed by E.coli and P.aeruginosa. Both methanol and diethyl ether extracts of bark showed antimicrobial activity on three types of tested bacteria and very less inhibition activity on A.niger. But comparatively bark extracts of both the solvents were showed less antimicrobial activity than leaves extracts on the tested microbes.

  17. Antibacterial and radical scavenging activity of leaf and bark of Persea macrantha (Nees Kosterm. (Lauraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashith Kekuda T. R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Persea macrantha (Nees Kosterm. belonging to the family Lauraceae is found in various states of Karnataka. The plant has got various traditional uses and is reported to exhibit several bioactivities. In the present study, we report antibacterial and radical scavenging potential of leaf and bark of P. macrantha. The powdered leaf and bark were extracted using methanol and the extracts were subjected to phytochemical analysis. Antibacterial activity was determined by Agar well diffusion assay. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Total phenolic content of extracts was estimated by FCR method.Preliminary phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and glycosides in both the extracts. Among bacteria tested, S. aureus and S. typhi were inhibited to higher extent by extracts. The extracts scavenged DPPH free radical dose dependently. Bark extract (IC50 2.44μg/ml displayed high radical scavenging potential than leaf extract (IC50 8.31μg/ml. Total phenolic content was higher in bark extract than leaf extract. A direct correlation was observed between total phenolic content of extracts and radical scavenging activity. In conclusion, the observed bioactivities of extracts could be ascribed to the presence of phytochemicals in particular phenolics. The plant is shown to be promising for the development of therapeutic agents active against oxidative stress and pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Toxicity of invert drilling muds composted with wood/bark chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessie, K. [EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Since the early to mid 1990s, many companies have composted invert (diesel) drilling muds with wood chips/bark chips in the green (forestry) zone as a method of drilling mud treatment. This presentation addressed the toxicity of invert drilling muds composted with wood/bark chips and provided some background on composted invert drilling mud (CIDM). EBA Engineering monitored 22 third-party sites in 2002, some of which were biopiles, and others land treatment areas (LTAs). Active treatment started between 1995 and 1999 and some LTAs were seeded with varying degrees of success. Composted materials had hydrocarbon odour and staining and were very moist. Materials exceeded Alberta Environment guidelines for petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) and sometimes barium. Most sites were within areas that had forestry production/wildlife as end land use. Receptors included plants, soil invertebrates by soil contact, and wildlife by ingestion. Stakeholder meetings were held for their input and an ecotoxicity study was developed. Material tested, tests and species used as well as results of the ecotoxicity study were presented. A comparison of results to other EBA composting studies was also given. It was concluded that CIDM affects the reproduction of earthworms and springtails, and plant growth; wood/barks chips themselves can be ecotoxic; and, other compost studies with finely ground sawdust and no bark chips had less ecotoxicity. tabs., figs.

  19. Lichen and bryophyte distribution on oak in London in relation to air pollution and bark acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R.S. [Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Bell, J.N.B. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); James, P.W. [Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Chimonides, P.J. [Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Rumsey, F.J. [Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Tremper, A. [Kings College, London (United Kingdom); Purvis, O.W. [Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: w.purvis@nhm.ac.uk

    2007-03-15

    Epiphytic lichen and bryophyte distribution and frequency were investigated on the trunks of 145 young oak trees throughout London and surrounding counties, and compared with pollution levels and bark pH. Sixty-four lichen and four bryophyte species were recorded. Three major zones were identified: (i) two central regions with a few lichens, bryophytes absent; (ii) a surrounding region with a more diverse flora including a high cover of nitrophyte lichens; and (iii) an outer region, characterised by species absent from central London, including acidophytes. Nineteen species were correlated with nitrogen oxides and 16 with bark pH, suggesting that transport-related pollution and bark acidity influence lichen and bryophyte distribution in London today. Lichens and bryophytes are responding to factors that influence human and environmental health in London. Biomonitoring therefore has a practical role to assess the effects of measures to improve London's air quality. - Transport-related pollutants and bark acidity influence lichen and bryophyte distribution and abundance in London today.

  20. Toxicity profile of ethanolic extract of Azadirachta indica stem bark in male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anofi Omotayo Tom Ashafa

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: Overall, the alterations in the biochemical parameters of toxicity have consequential effects on the normal functioning of the organs of the animals. Therefore, the ethanolic extract of A. indica stem bark at the doses of 50, 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight may not be completely safe as an oral remedy and should be taken with caution if absolutely necessary.

  1. Acutangulosides A-F, monodesmosidic saponins from the bark of Barringtonia acutangula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Clive; Carroll, Anthony R; Quinn, Ronald J

    2005-03-01

    Nine triterpene saponins, acutangulosides A-F (2-7), and acutanguloside D-F methyl esters (5a-7a) and a single triterpene aglycone (1) were isolated from a water extract of the bark of Barringtonia acutangula. Their structures were assigned on the basis of spectroscopic data. PMID:15787427

  2. Alternative solutions for the bio-denitrification of landfill leachates using pine bark and compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrified leachate may still require an additional bio-denitrification step, which occurs with the addition of often-expensive chemicals as carbon source. This study explores the applicability of low-cost carbon sources such as garden refuse compost and pine bark for the denitrification of high strength landfill leachates. The overall objective is to assess efficiency, kinetics and performance of the substrates in the removal of high nitrate concentrations. Garden refuse and pine bark are currently disposed of in general waste landfills in South Africa, separated from the main waste stream. A secondary objective is to assess the feasibility of re-using green waste as by-product of an integrated waste management system. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests and leaching columns packed with immature compost and pine bark. Biologically treated leachate from a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) with nitrate concentrations of 350, 700 and 1100 mgN/l were used for the trials. Preliminary results suggest that, passed the acclimatization step (40 days for both substrates), full denitrification is achieved in 10-20 days for the pine bark and 30-40 days for the compost.

  3. Alternative solutions for the bio-denitrification of landfill leachates using pine bark and compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering. School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban, 4041 (South Africa); Pisano, Giulia [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering. School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban, 4041 (South Africa); Oxarango, Laurent [LTHE (UMR 5564 CNRS/INPG/IRD/UJF), Universite de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Nitrified leachate may still require an additional bio-denitrification step, which occurs with the addition of often-expensive chemicals as carbon source. This study explores the applicability of low-cost carbon sources such as garden refuse compost and pine bark for the denitrification of high strength landfill leachates. The overall objective is to assess efficiency, kinetics and performance of the substrates in the removal of high nitrate concentrations. Garden refuse and pine bark are currently disposed of in general waste landfills in South Africa, separated from the main waste stream. A secondary objective is to assess the feasibility of re-using green waste as by-product of an integrated waste management system. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests and leaching columns packed with immature compost and pine bark. Biologically treated leachate from a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) with nitrate concentrations of 350, 700 and 1100 mgN/l were used for the trials. Preliminary results suggest that, passed the acclimatization step (40 days for both substrates), full denitrification is achieved in 10-20 days for the pine bark and 30-40 days for the compost.

  4. An efficient, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for herbal samples like Cinchona bark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Honoré; Holmfred, Else Skovgaard; Cornett, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    An effective, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for the grinding of herb samples like bark and roots was developed by rebuilding a commercially available coffee grinder. The grinder was constructed to be able to provide various particle sizes, to be easy to clean, and to have a minimum of d...

  5. Atmospheric pollution in an urban environment by tree bark biomonitoring--part I: trace element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Lahd Geagea, Majdi; Boutin, René

    2012-03-01

    Tree bark has been shown to be a useful biomonitor of past air quality because it accumulates atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in its outermost structure. Trace element concentrations of tree bark of more than 73 trees allow to elucidate the impact of past atmospheric pollution on the urban environment of the cities of Strasbourg and Kehl in the Rhine Valley. Compared to the upper continental crust (UCC) tree barks are strongly enriched in Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. To assess the degree of pollution of the different sites in the cities, a geoaccumulation index I(geo) was applied. Global pollution by V, Ni, Cr, Sb, Sn and Pb was observed in barks sampled close to traffic axes. Cr, Mo, Cd pollution principally occurred in the industrial area. A total geoaccumulation index I(GEO-tot) was defined; it is based on the total of the investigated elements and allows to evaluate the global pollution of the studied environment by assembling the I(geo) indices on a pollution map.

  6. Are bark beetles chewing up our forests? What about our coffee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    A write-up for the Elsevier SciTech Connect blog on the recently published book entitled "Bark Beetles: Biology and Ecology of Native and Invasive Species," edited by Fernando E. Vega and Richard W. Hofstetter. The book was published by Academic Press in January 2015....

  7. GREWIA TILIAEFOLIA BARK EXTRACT AS GREEN INHIBITOR OF MILD STEEL C ORROSION IN SULPHURIC ACID MEDIUM

    OpenAIRE

    V.N. Sheeja; S. Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the inhibitory properties of Grewia tiliaefolia bark extract on the corrosion of mild steel in sulphuric acid medium. The corrosion rates and inhibition efficiencies were evaluated by weight loss measurements. The adsorption of inhibitor obeyed Langmuir isotherm and the negative values of Gibbs energy indicate the nature of interactions between inhibitor molecules and metal surface. Further...

  8. Three new naphthalenyl glycosides from the root bark of Juglans cathayensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Xiang; Zhao, Xiao-Ya; Fu, Xiao-Fang; Yu, Heng-Yi; Li, Xue; Li, Shu-Ming; Ruan, Han-Li

    2012-01-01

    Phytochemical investigations of the root bark of Juglans cathayensis DODE. led to the isolation of three new naphthalenyl glycosides, Jugnaphthalenoside A-C (1-3). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive analysis of spectroscopic data. The cytotoxicities of the three new compounds were also evaluated.

  9. Characterization of condensed tannins and carbohydrates in hot water bark extracts of European softwood species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Sauro; Kroslakova, Ivana; Janzon, Ron; Mayer, Ingo; Saake, Bodo; Pichelin, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    Condensed tannins extracted from European softwood bark are recognized as alternatives to synthetic phenolics. The extraction is generally performed in hot water, leading to simultaneous extraction of other bark constituents such as carbohydrates, phenolic monomers and salts. Characterization of the extract's composition and identification of the extracted tannins' molecular structure are needed to better identify potential applications. Bark from Silver fir (Abies alba [Mill.]), European larch (Larix decidua [Mill.]), Norway spruce (Picea abies [Karst.]), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.]) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) were extracted in water at 60°C. The amounts of phenolic monomers, condensed tannins, carbohydrates, and inorganic compounds in the extract were determined. The molecular structures of condensed tannins and carbohydrates were also investigated (HPLC-UV combined with thiolysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, anion exchange chromatography). Distinct extract compositions and tannin structures were found in each of the analysed species. Procyanidins were the most ubiquitous tannins. The presence of phenolic glucosides in the tannin oligomers was suggested. Polysaccharides such as arabinans, arabinogalactans and glucans represented an important fraction of all extracts. Compared to traditionally used species (Mimosa and Quebracho) higher viscosities as well as faster chemical reactivities are expected in the analysed species. The most promising species for a bark tannin extraction was found to be larch, while the least encouraging results were detected in pine. A better knowledge of the interaction between the various extracted compounds is deemed an important matter for investigation in the context of industrial applications of such extracts. PMID:26547588

  10. Resin duct characteristics associated with tree resistance to bark beetles across lodgepole and limber pines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Kane, Jeffrey M; Mitton, Jeffry B

    2014-04-01

    Bark beetles have recently killed billions of trees, yet conifer defenses are formidable and some trees resist attack. A primary anti-insect defense of pines is oleoresin from a system of resin ducts throughout the tree. Resin defense traits are heritable, and evidence suggests that resin duct characteristics are associated with resistance to insects. However, comparisons of resin ducts in trees killed by bark beetles to trees that resisted attack are unavailable. We compared vertical resin duct characteristics (number, density, and size) and growth rates from trees that were "resistant" (survived mass attack) versus "susceptible" (killed by attack) to bark beetles in lodgepole (Pinus contorta) and limber (Pinus flexilis) pines. Resistant trees of both species had significantly more resin ducts in recent growth than susceptible trees. Discriminant analysis (DA) correctly categorized 84% of lodgepole and 92% of limber pines as susceptible/resistant based on combinations of resin duct and growth characteristics from recent 5- through 20-year growth intervals. DA models using measures from only the most recent 5 years of growth correctly categorized 72 and 81% of lodgepole and limber pines, respectively. Comparing resistant to susceptible trees independent of species identity led to the correct categorization of 82% of trees based on factors from 5- to 20-year intervals, and 73% of trees using only resin duct counts from the most recent 5 years. We conclude that resin duct characteristics can be used to assess tree resistance to bark beetles across pine species, and offer a metric for management to enhance pest resistance.

  11. First observation of the decay $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi \\bar{K}^{*0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A first observation of the decay $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi \\bar{K}^{*0}$ is reported from an analysis based on a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7 TeV$, collected with the LHCb detector. A yield of $30 \\pm 6$ $B_s^0 \\to (KK)(K\\pi)$ candidates is found in the mass windows $1012.5 < M(KK) < 1026.5 MeV/c^2$ and $746 < M(K\\pi)< 1046 MeV/c^2$, corresponding to a signal significance of 6.1 standard deviations. The candidates are found to be dominated by $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi \\bar{K}^{*0}$ decays, and the branching fraction is measured to be $BF( B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi \\bar{K}^{*0} ) = (1.10 \\pm 0.24 (stat) \\pm 0.14 (syst) \\pm 0.08 (f_d/f_s ) ) \\times 10^{-6}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the ratio of fragmentation fractions $f_d/f_s$ which accounts for the different production rate of $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons. The fraction of longitudinal polarization in $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi \\bar{K}^{*0}$ decay...

  12. Habitat use and spatial structure of a barking frog (Eleutherodactylus augusti) population in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, C.S.; Schwalbe, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Barking Frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) are the northernmost ranging member of the large tropical family Leptodactylidae. We investigated the ecology of this saxicolous species at the northern edge of its range in a canyon in southern Arizona. We captured 54 frogs on discontinuous rock outcrops; eight of nine females and 39 of 45 males were on limestone outcrops. The remaining frogs were closer to limestone outcrops by more than 200 m than would be expected if they were distributed randomly with respect to limestone formations. Seven of 10 frogs radio-tracked had core home ranges (50% fixed kernel) from 94 to 100% on limestone; the other three frogs did not have any part of their home range on limestone outcrops. During five years of mark-recapture efforts, no frogs were found on a different outcrop from the one where they were originally captured; no radio-tracked frogs moved between outcrops during the breeding season. We estimated that four to 20 Barking Frogs occupied each outcrop; these groups probably are connected primarily by juvenile dispersal. As an organism living at the edge of its range, Barking Frogs in Arizona may rely heavily on extensive underground areas such as those found in limestone to protect them from a physiologically challenging environment. To manage for the persistence of Barking Frogs in southern Arizona, we must identify and protect habitat patches and movement pathways among them.

  13. 78 FR 12788 - Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars; Notice of Institution of Investigation; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars; Notice of Institution of Investigation; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1337 AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice....

  14. Triterpenoids from n-hexane extract of Garcinia picrorrhiza Miq. stem bark

    OpenAIRE

    Atiek Soemiati

    2005-01-01

    Chromatographic separation of n-hexane extract of dried Garcinia picrorrhiza Miq. stem bark (Cluciaceae) furnished two triterpenoids, identified as 3oxo-7,24-euphadien-26oic acid (1), 3β-hydroxy-7,24-euphadien-26 oic acid (2). The structure of compounds were determined by using UV-vis, FT-IR, 1D and 2D NMR techniques.

  15. Study on osteopotential activity of Terminalia arjuna bark extract incorporated bone substitute

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Krithiga; T Hemalatha; R Deepachitra; Kausik Ghosh; T P Sastry

    2014-10-01

    Bark extract of Terminalia arjuna (TA) possesses potent medical properties and therefore, holds a reputed position in both Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine. Bone substitutes play an inevitable role in traumatic bone damages. Growth factors induce osteoinductivity, but suffer from limitations such as high cost and side effects. This study aims to evaluate the osteoinductive potential of bark extract of TA in bone substitutes. Bone substitutes prepared with TA bark extract were characterized for their physicochemical properties. In vitro biomineralization study was carried out using simulated body fluid. Cytotoxicity, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization potential were assessed using MG-63 cell lines. Scanning electron microscope revealed apatite formation on the surface after biomineralization. Thermogravimetric analysis showed 15% increase in residual weight by deposition of calcium and phosphate and their presence was identified by energy dispersive analysis. Increased alkaline phosphatase and calcium release was observed in bone substitutes prepared with TA extract compared with control. The functional groups of TA bark extract help in in vitro biomineralization. In MG-63 cells, it showed potential influence in cell differentiation. TA extract may be used as low-cost alternative for growth factors for treatment of fractured bones.

  16. Nitrogen immobilization in plant growth substrates: clean chip residual, pine bark and peat moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent of nitrogen (N) immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate (clean chip residual (CCR)). Control treatments of pine bark (PB) and peat moss (PM) were compared to two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm) of CCR for micro...

  17. Recent bark beetle outbreaks have little impact on streamflow in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinski, Kimberly M.; Hogue, Terri S.; Porter, Aaron T.; McCray, John E.

    2016-07-01

    In the Western United States (US), the current mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected more than five million hectares since its start in 1996, including headwater catchments that supply water to much of the Western US. There is widespread concern that the hydrologic consequences of the extensive pine tree die-off will impact water supply across the Western US. While forest disturbance studies have shown that streamflow increases in response to tree harvest, the actual effect of bark beetle infestations on water supply remains widely debated. The current study evaluates watershed-level response following bark beetle outbreak for 33 watersheds in seven western states. Streamflow records were investigated to assess whether the timing and amount of stream discharge during bark beetle outbreak and early recovery periods were significantly different to pre-outbreak conditions. Results show no significant modification in peak flows or average daily streamflow following bark beetle infestation, and that climate variability may be a stronger driver of streamflow patterns and snowmelt timing than chronic forest disturbance.

  18. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory evaluation of essential oils from leaves and stem barks from Drimys brasiliensis Miers (Winteraceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lago, Joao Henrique G., E-mail: joao.lago@unifesp.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Diadema, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra; Carvalho, Larissa A.C.; Silva, Flavia S. da; Romoff, Paulete [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades; Toyama, Daniela de O.; Favero, Oriana A. [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas e da Saude

    2010-07-01

    The essential oils from leaves and stem barks from Drimys brasiliensis Miers (Winteraceae) were individually obtained by hydrodistillation and their compounds characterized by use of GC/FID and GC/MS. The main identified derivatives were monoterpenes (leaves 4.31% and stem barks 90.02%) and sesquiterpenes (leaves 52.31% and stem barks 6.35%). Additionally, the sesquiterpene polygodial was isolated from hexane extract from stem barks of D. brasiliensis after chromatographic steps and characterized by spectroscopic means, mainly NMR. Aiming the evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential, the crude essential oils and the sesquiterpene polygodial were subjected to bioassays to evaluate the acute toxicity of these compounds as well as the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities induced by carrageenan and formalin in mice. Ours results showed that essential oil obtained from the stem barks significantly reduced the oedema induced by carrageenan. The anti-inflammatory effect induced by stem barks oil (at 200 mg kg{sup -1}) was similar to observed for indomethacin (at 10 mg kg{sup -1}) and superior for polygodial (at 200 mg kg{sup -1}) in 30 and 60 min after the administration of essential oils. The inflammatory response induced by formalin was effective to the stem barks oil (62.5%) in comparison to polygodial (50.0%). (author)

  19. Development of chain limbing and small-drum barking equipment; Ketjukarsinta- ja pienrumpukuorintaan perustuvan laitteiston kehittaeminen tuotantovalmiiksi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieppo, K. [Metsaeteho Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Hakkila, P.; Kalaja, H. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    Three test series were carried out in 1996 at the chain limbing- drum barking station developed by Pertti Szepaniak Oy. The test equipment was developed during the test series. During the first experiment in February the wood used was frozen. In this test series the whipping efficiency was insignificant and consequently, the bark contents remained too large. In the second test in September the whipping efficiency was too high and was not easy to adjust, and as a consequence the wood loss was unreasonable. In the third test in November, when the wood was not yet frozen, the whipping efficiency was correct and promising results were obtained both with regard to the bark content and wood loss. Limbed pine pulpwood was used as raw material. The bark contents of the chips ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 % and the wood loss in barking from 2.8 to 3.6 %. The productivity also improved clearly during the tests. The experiments indicated that a separate station based on a combination of chain limbing- barking and drum-barking is able to produce high-grade pulp chips both from limbed and non-limbed first-thinning pine wood. (orig.)

  20. Decomposition of conifer tree bark under field conditions: effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Kurganova, Irina; Kapitsa, Ekaterina; Shorokhova, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    In forest ecosystems, the processes of decomposition of coarse woody debris (CWD) can contribute significantly to the emission component of carbon (C) cycle and thus accelerate the greenhouse effect and global climate change. A better understanding of decomposition of CWD is required to refine estimates of the C balance in forest ecosystems and improve biogeochemical models. These estimates will in turn contribute to assessing the role of forests in maintaining their long-term productivity and other ecosystems services. We examined the decomposition rate of coniferous bark with added nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers in experiment under field conditions. The experiment was carried out in 2015 during 17 weeks in Moscow region (54o50'N, 37o36'E) under continental-temperate climatic conditions. The conifer tree bark mixture (ca. 70% of Norway spruce and 30% of Scots pine) was combined with soil and placed in piles of soil-bark substrate (SBS) with height of ca. 60 cm and surface area of ca. 3 m2. The dry mass ratio of bark to soil was 10:1. The experimental design included following treatments: (1) soil (Luvisols Haplic) without bark, (S), (2) pure SBS, (3) SBS with N addition in the amount of 1% of total dry bark mass (SBS-N), and (4) SBS with N and P addition in the amount of 1% of total dry bark mass for each element (SBS-NP). The decomposition rate expressed as CO2 emission flux, g C/m2/h was measured using closed chamber method 1-3 times per week from July to early November using LiCor 6400 (Nebraska, USA). During the experiment, we also controlled soil temperature at depths of 5, 20, 40, and 60 cm below surface of SBS using thermochrons iButton (DS1921G, USA). The pattern of CO2 emission rate from SBS depended strongly on fertilizing. The highest decomposition rates (DecR) of 2.8-5.6 g C/m2/h were observed in SBS-NP treatment during the first 6 weeks of experiment. The decay process of bark was less active in the treatment with only N addition. In this

  1. Testing applicability of black poplar (Populus nigra L.) bark to heavy metal air pollution monitoring in urban and industrial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study of the capabilities of black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as a biomonitor of atmospheric heavy-metal pollution is reported. Performance indicators (concentrations and enrichment factors) of heavy metal bioaccumulation of bark were compared to the corresponding indicators of epiphytic lichens Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr. and Physcia adscendens (Fr.) H. Oliver, collected simultaneously with bark samples within the Kiev urban-industrial conurbation. The concentrations of 40 minor and trace elements in the samples were measured by a combination of epithermal and instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) using a 10 MW nuclear research reactor WWR-M as the neutron source. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using non-parametric tests. It was shown that for the majority of the elements determined a good correlation exists between their concentrations in bark and in the lichen species. The accumulation capability of the bark was found to be as effective as, and in some cases better, for both types of lichens. Based on the background levels and variations of the elemental concentration in black poplar-tree bark, threshold values for the enrichment factors were established. For a number of elements (As, Au, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, La, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, Sm, Ti, Th, U, V, W) an interspecies calibration was performed. An optimized pre-irradiation treatment of the bark sample was employed which efficiently separated the most informative external layer from the deeper layers of the bark and thus minimized variations of the element concentrations. Results of this study support black poplar-tree bark as an alternative to epiphytic lichens for heavy metal air pollution monitoring in urban and industrial regions, where severe environmental conditions may result in scarcity or even lack of the indicator species

  2. A MECHANISTIC APPROACH TO METHYLENE BLUE SORPTION ON TWO VEGETABLE WASTES: CORK BARK AND GRAPE STALKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Àngels Olivella,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Two vegetable wastes, cork bark and grape stalks, were investigated for the removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution. The effects of contact time, dye concentration, pH, and temperature on sorption were studied relative to adsorption on a commercially-activated carbon. The highest adsorption yield was obtained within the pH range 5 to 10 for grape stalks and 7 to 10 for cork bark. The sorption kinetics of dye onto activated carbon and grape stalks was very fast. Kinetics data were fitted to the pseudo-first and second order kinetic equations, and the values of the pseudo-second-order initial rate constants were found to be 1.69 mg g-1 min-1 for activated carbon, 2.24 mg g-1 min-1 for grape stalks, and 0.90 mg g-1 min-1 for cork bark. Langmuir maximum sorption capacities for activated carbon, grape stalks, and cork bark for methylene blue estimated by the Orthogonal Distance Regression method (ODR were 157.5 mg g-1, 105.6 mg g-1, and 30.52 mg g-1, respectively. FTIR spectra indicated that carboxylic groups and lignin play a significant role in the sorption of methylene blue. Electrostatic forces, n-π interactions, cation-π, and π-π stacking interactions contribute to methylene blue sorption onto grape stalks and cork bark. Grape stalks can be considered an efficient biosorbent and as a viable alternative to activated carbon and ion-exchange resins for the removal of methylene blue.

  3. Effect of Chloroxylon swietenia Dc bark extracts against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Jayaprasad; Subramanian, Sharavanan; Kaliyan, Veerakumar

    2015-11-01

    Mosquitoes are the vector of more diseases and cause major health problems like malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and lymphatic filariasis. This article deals with the mosquito larvicidal activity of Chloroxylon swietenia Dc bark extracts against late third instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi. Methanolic crude extract of Ch. swietenia bark was obtained by soxhlet apparatus and aqueous crude extract by cold percolation method. The range of concentrations of the crude extracts used was 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 ppm. The mortality and lethal concentration (LC50 and LC90) was calculated after a 24-h exposure period. Both the extracts showed trustworthy larvicidal activity. The larvicidal activity of the methanol extract of Ch. swietenia bark was higher than the aqueous extract, and the LC50 and the LC90 values of the methanol extract were found to be 124.70 and 226.26 μg/ml (Ae. aegypti), 130.57 and 234.67 ppm (Cu. quinquefasciatus), and 137.55 and 246.09 ppm (An. stephensi). The LC50 and the LC90 values of the aqueous extract were found to be 133.10 and 238.93 ppm (Ae. aegypti), 136.45 and 242.47 ppm (Cu. quinquefasciatus), and 139.43 and 248.64 ppm (An. stephensi). No mortality was observed in the control. Methanolic crude extract Ch. swietenia bark shows higher activity against An. stephensi than the other two tested larvae and aqueous extract. The results of the present study propose a possible way for further investigations to find out the active molecule responsible for the larvicidal activity of Ch. swietenia bark extracts. PMID:26246308

  4. Biological Activity of Tannins from Acacia mangium Bark Extracted by Different Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium bark is abundant byproduct of wood industry in Indonesia. It is underutilized and mainly used as fire wood for the wood industry. The bark contains high level of tannin but the tannin has not been extracted or produced commercially. Tannin isolate can be used for several purposes such as tanning agent for leather, adhesive for plywood or particle board, etc. In ruminant, tannin can be detrimental but can also be beneficial. This experiment was aimed of getting the highest yield of tannin extract with the highest biological activity in rumen fermentation. Nine different solvents at different temperatures were used to extract tannin from A. mangium bark. The extracts were analyzed for their tannin contents and biological activities. Tannin content was analyzed using folin ciocalteau and butanol-HCl methods. Biological activity was described as a percentage of an increase in gas production in the in vitro rumen-buffer fermentation, with and without addition of PEG. The results show that Na2SO3 solution extracted more tannin than other solutions and the higher the concentration of Na2SO3 solution, the higher the yield of tannin extract. The solution of 6% sodium sulphite gave the highest yield of tannin extract (31.2% of original bark sample and the highest concentration of tannin (18.26% but produced a negative effect on in vitro fermentation (% increase of gas production = 2.70%. Extraction with 50% acetone gave a high yield of extract (22.28% of original bark which contained 12.98% of tannin and showed the highest biological response (% increase of gas production = 216%. In conclusion, sodium sulphite solution is not recommended for tannin extraction if the tannin will be used as feed additive in ruminant feed; on the other hand, the aqueous acetone (50% acetone solution is a better choice to be used.

  5. The biomedical significance of the phytochemical, proximate and mineral compositions of the leaf, stem bark and root of Jatropha curcas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atamgba; Agbor; Asuk; Margaret; Akpana; Agiang; Kayode; Dasofunjo; Amonor; James; Willie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the phytochemical contents of leaf, stem bark and root of Jatropha curcas(J. curcas) in four solvent extracts and their proximate and mineral compositions. Methods: Standard analytical procedures were used for the determination of phytochemicals, proximate and mineral compositions of the leaf, stem bark and root extracts of J. curcas. Results: Results of the analysis showed the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, cardiac glycosides, coumarins, saponins, terpenoids, steroids, triterpenoid saponins, carotenoids, phlobatannins and tannins in the leaf, stem bark and root of all the solvent extracts. Flavonoids were present in the highest amount in the ethyl acetate extracts of the leaf(7.35% ± 0.02%), stem bark(4.12% ± 0.01%) and root(3.35% ± 0.02%) followed by polyphenols in the methanol extracts of leaf(4.62% ± 0.02%), stem bark(2.77% ± 0.05%) and root(2.49% ± 0.02%). Poly-acetylated compounds were absent in all the solvent extracts of the leaf, stem bark and root. However, some anti-nutritional agents such as oxalates, phytates and cyanates were present in all the solvent extracts of the leaf, stem bark and root except the ethyl acetate. Phytates were high in the aqueous solvent of the leaf(6.12% ± 0.00%) but low in the stem bark(1.00% ± 0.05%) and root(0.89% ± 0.03%). Proximate composition showed appreciable amounts of total carbohydrate(36.33% ± 0.72%), crude protein(26.00% ± 0.47%) and reducing sugars(5.87% ± 0.14%) in the leaf, while crude fat was more in the stem bark(16.70% ± 0.30%). There was corresponding substantial energy in the leaf [(1 514.77 ± 20.87) kJ /100 g] and stem bark [(907.00 ± 8.52) kJ /100 g]. Moisture and ash contents of the leaf, stem bark and root were within acceptable limits for the use in drugs formulation. The mineral composition showed substantial amounts of important elements such as Fe, Ca, Na, Mg and Zn. Others were P, K and Se. Conclusions: The outcome of this study suggests that the

  6. Bark derived submicron-sized and nano-sized cellulose fibers: From industrial waste to high performance materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sandeep S; Yan, Ning

    2015-12-10

    In this study, the use of bark as a natural source for the production of cellulose nanofibers has been explored for the first time. The fibrillation using bleached and unbleached cellulose fibers from the bark yielded sub-micron scale (20%) have never been possible from any other sources. The maximum elastic modulus value of 15.6 GPa and tensile strength value of 76 MPa were obtained for the films made from fibrillated bark cellulose fibers. The water vapour barrier efficiency for these films is comparable to nanocellulose films from other studies. PMID:26428123

  7. A NOVEL SAMPLING METHOD FOR PRESENT AND HISTORICAL MONITORING OF AIR POLLUTION BY USING TREE BARK%利用‘树皮'进行大气污染历史监测的新采样方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋泉; 朱晨; 王宇; 黄志勇; 李振基; 黄本立; 角田欣一; 佐竹研一

    2003-01-01

    The concentrations of lead and cadmium in the tree bark from Sanming and Xiamen, Fujian province, China were determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results obtained in the outer tree bark and tree bark pocket could reflect the degree of present and historical air pollution at different sampling locations. Tree bark and tree bark pocket should be expected to be as a useful biomonitor of present and historical condition of air pollution.

  8. Is bark pH more important than tree species in determining the composition of nitrophytic or acidophytic lichen floras?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spier, L. [Alterra, Landscape Center, POB 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Dobben, H. van, E-mail: han.vandobben@wur.n [Alterra, Landscape Center, POB 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Dort, K. van [Alterra, Landscape Center, POB 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    To study the pH preference of epiphytic lichens, the bark pH of Fraxinus, Tilia, Quercus and Ulmus trees in an urban environment was measured using a flat surface electrode. The total number of trees was 253. A survey was made of the lichens in a 40 x 40 cm quadrat surrounding the pH measurement point. Our data analysis using multivariate and univariate statistical techniques indicates that the tree species is the most important factor influencing lichen colonisation, and that bark pH alone is of less importance. We hypothesize that the changed pollution climate, with strong decreases in both sulphur dioxide and ammonia concentrations over the past two decades and a concomitant general increase in bark pH, has made epiphytes less sensitive to pH. - Tree species, rather than bark pH determines the occurrence of acidophytes and nitrophytes on trees.

  9. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar bark by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Jae Taek; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Gon Wi, Seung; Cho, Jae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Pretreatment of poplar bark with a combination of sulfuric acid (3%, w/w, H2SO4) and gamma irradiation (0-1000 kGy) was performed in an attempt to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The yields of reducing sugar were slightly increased with an increasing irradiation dose, ranging from 35.4% to 51.5%, with a 56.1% reducing sugar yield observed after dilute acid pretreatment. These results clearly showed that soluble sugars were released faster and to a greater extent in dilute acid-pretreated poplar bark than in gamma irradiation-pretreated bark. When combined pretreatment was carried out, a drastic increase in reducing sugar yield (83.1%) was found compared with individual pretreatment, indicating the possibility of increasing the convertibility of poplar bark following combined pretreatment. These findings are likely associated with cellulose crystallinity, lignin modification, and removal of hemicelluloses.

  10. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD

  11. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of marine halophyte Luminetzera racemosa bark extract in CCL4 induced hepatotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MurugesanGnanadesigan; SundaramRavikumar; SamuelJacobInbaneson

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To identify the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of Luminetzera racemosa (L. racemosa )bark extract. Methods:Wistar albino rats were divided into 6 groups:Group 1 served as control;Group 2 served as hepatotoxin (CCL4 treated) group;Group 3 served as positive control (Silymarin) treated groups;Group 4, 5 and 6 served as (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg bw p.o.) L. racemosa bark extract treated groups. Moreover, in vitro antioxidant indexes, including DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (HRSA), NO, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), lipid hydroperoxide (LPO) and super oxide dismutase (SOD) were also analyzed in the bark extract. Results:The results suggested that, the level of serum glutamate oxyloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatise (ALP), bilurubin, cholesterol, sugar and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly (P<0.05) increased in hepatotoxin treated rats when compared with the control group. But, the maximum reduction of SGOT [(225.36±13.65) IU/L], SGPT [(96.85±17.36) IU/L], ALP [(315.37±17.16) IU/L], bilirubin [(2.97±0.46) mg/dL], cholesterol [(163.73±17.54) mg/dL], sugar [(127.35±27.35) mg/dL] and LDH [(1 784.00±268.36) IU/L] were observed with 300 mg/kg bw of bark extract treated rats. Histopathological scores showed that, no visible changes were observed with high dose (300 mg/kg bw) of bark extract treated rats except mild fatty changes. The in vitro antioxidant assays showed that, the IC50 values were observed as (44.17±6.87)μg/mL, (42.45±2.81)μg/mL, (62.37±3.98)μg/mL, (54.24±3.09)μg/mL, (87.25±5.90)μg/mL and (71.54±5.42)μg/mL for DPPH, HRSA, NO, FRAP, LPO and SOD radical scavenging activities, respectively. Conclusions:The hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of the bark extract might be to the presence of unique chemical classes such as flavonoids, alkaloids and polyphenols.

  12. Predisposition to bark beetle attack by root herbivores and associated pathogens: Roles in forest decline, gap formation, and persistence of endemic bark beetle populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aukema, Brian H.; Zhu, Jun; Møller, Jesper;

    2010-01-01

    , in that the proportion of killed trees that were not first colonized by root organisms increases. This positive feedback is very weak, however, and we propose the slope between beetle population density and reliance on host stress as a quantitative distinction along a gradient from noneruptive through eruptive species...... within the primary stem, root weevils that breed in root collars, and bark beetles that breed in basal stems. We quantify the sequence of events that drive this decline syndrome, with the primary emergent pattern being an interaction between below- and above-ground herbivores and their fungal symbionts...

  13. Phytochemical screening and studies of analgesic potential of Moringa oleifera Lam. stem bark extract on experimental animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Shumaia Parvin; Md. Abu Shuaib Rafshanjani; Md. Abdul Kader; Most. Afia Akhtar; Tahmida Sharmin

    2014-01-01

    The work has been done for the phytochemical investigation and study of analgesic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam. ethanolic stem bark extract using Acetic Acid Induced Writhing method. The effect of extract was tested for qualitative chemical analysis which reveals the presence of alkaloid, glycosides, flavonoids, tannins, saponin, carbohydrate etc. For peripheral analgesic effect acetic acid induced writhing test was used and for this stem bark extract was administered intraperitoneally at...

  14. Complete Genomic Characterization of Plum bark necrosis stem pitting-associated virus Infecting Sweet Cherry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiawei; Zhai, Ying; Liu, Weizhen; Zhu, Dongzi; Pappu, Hanu R; Liu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Plum bark necrosis stem pitting-associated virus (PBNSPaV) causes the plum bark necrosis stem pitting-associated disease. We obtained the complete genome of a PBNSPaV isolate (PBNSPaV-TA) using small RNA deep sequencing followed by overlapping RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a completed genome of PBNSPaV identified from cherry trees. PMID:27198034

  15. Antioxidant activities of ethanol extracts and fractions of Crescentia cujete leaves and stem bark and the involvement of phenolic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Nandita; Islam, Md. Ekramul; Jahan, Nusrat; Islam, Mohammad Saiful; Khan, Alam; Islam, Md Rafikul; Parvin, Mst Shahnaj

    2014-01-01

    Background Antioxidant compounds like phenols and flavonoids scavenge free radicals and thus inhibit the oxidative mechanisms that lead to control degenerative and other diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant activity in vitro, total phenolic and flavonoid contents in ethanol extracts and fractions of Crescentia cujete leaves and stem bark. Methods Crescentia cujete leaves and bark crude ethanol extract (CEE) and their partitionates petroleum ether (PEF), chlorofor...

  16. A PIXE and ICP-MS analysis of metallic atmospheric contaminants in tree bark tissues, a basis for biomonitoring uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrault, Sophie; El Alaoui-Faris, Fatima Ezzahra; Asta, Juliette; Tissut, Michel; Daudin, Laurent; Mariet, Clarisse; Ravanel, Patrick; Gaudry, André; Cherkaoui, Rajaa

    2007-05-01

    The qualitative and quantitative metallic content of tree barks of Argania spinosa (L.) Skeels were studied. Argania spinosa is an endemic species in Morocco. This tree is adapted to semi-arid climates and exposed to specific conditions of relative humidity, temperature, wind, and particle transport. Three sites were sampled in Morocco: the large town of Rabat, the harbor of Agadir, and Aït Baha, a countryside location exposed to continuous desert wind. The methodologies included (1) in situ microanalysis with proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and (2) trace element determinations by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS) associated with extraction procedures. Both methods allowed detection of elements coming from different bark compartments. The profile of airborne contaminants in the barks was typical of the sampling sites. The level of lead in barks sampled in Rabat reached 100 ng cm(-2), or higher, while it varied between 3 and 35 ng cm(-2) in Aït Baha. The in situ study of the microscopic structure of the bark provided the location of major and minor elements at various depths inside the bark. A differential between free deposit on the bark surface and penetrated content was found for the major and trace elements. The free deposit on the bark surface was suspected to be mostly the result of recent contamination. Part of the contaminants spread out on the surface penetrated the superficial suber. This long-term accumulation affected mostly Pb. In deeper levels, airborne elements at low concentrations and elements resulting from root uptake were concurrently present and resulted in a complex situation, as noted for zinc. PMID:17613745

  17. Single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics of maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) after oral administration to healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Tanja; Skrabala, Roswitha; Chovanová, Zuzana; Muchová, Jana; Sumegová, Katarína; Liptáková, Anna; Ďuračková, Zdeňka; Högger, Petra

    2006-01-01

    Background Since plant extracts are increasingly used as phytotherapeutics or dietary supplements information on bioavailability, bioefficacy and safety are warranted. We elucidated the plasma kinetics of genuine extract components and metabolites after single and multiple ingestion of the standardized maritime pine bark extract Pycnogenol (USP quality) by human volunteers. Methods Eleven volunteers received a single dose of 300 mg pine bark extract, five volunteers ingested 200 mg daily for ...

  18. Identification of Chemical Compounds from the Ethanolic Extract of the Bark of Bauhinia tomentosa L. By GC-MS Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan S; Vadivel E

    2016-01-01

    The bark of Bauhinia tomentosa L. is used wildly used for the treatment of varies ailments such as inflammation, wound, dysentery, skin diseases and for microbial infections. In the present study the ethanolic extract of the bark of Bauhinia tomentosa L. has been subjected to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, while the mass spectra of the compounds found in the extract was matched with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) library. GC-MS analysis revea...

  19. Impact Of Pine (Pinus sylvestris L. And Spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. Bark Extracts On Important Strawberry Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minova Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytopathogenic fungi induced considerable economic losses in strawberry production industry; therefore, more attention should be paid to development and implementation of preventative treatment that is environmentally friendly. Coniferous trees produce a wide variety of compounds, such as terpenoids and phenolics. Several studies are known on fungicidal activity of different components of coniferous tree bark. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. bark ethanol extracts impact on pathogenous fungi causing diseases of strawberries. Products of processed pine (Pinus sylvestris and spruce (Picea abies bark were tested. During 2011 to 2013, several in vitro experiments were carried out to test the effectiveness of pine and spruce bark extracts against various phytopathogenic fungi isolated from strawberries: Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum acutatum, Phytophthora cactorum and Mycosphaerella fragariae. Radial growth tests showed that coniferous bark extracts inhibit mycelial growth of B. cinerea, C. acutatum, P. cactorum and M. fragariae. Extracts had the highest antifungal effect on B. cinerea two and five days after inoculation (p < 0.05. Bark extracts can reduce the sporulation of B. cinerea, C. acutatum and P. cactorum.

  20. Structure, histochemistry and phytochemical profile of the bark of the sobol and aerial stem of Tontelea micrantha (Celastraceae - Hippocrateoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA OLÍVIA MERCADANTE-SIMÕES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The bark of the underground stem of Tontelea micrantha (Mart. ex. Schult. A. C. Sm., a native Brazilian Cerrado species, is used in folk medicine for treating kidney ailments. The structures of the underground and the aerial stems were examined and their barks were analyzed for the presence of secondary metabolites. Bark fragments were processed according to conventional techniques in plant anatomy and their chemical compositions examined using histochemical and phytochemical tests, thin layer chromatography, and high-efficiency liquid chromatography. The underground stem is a sobol with unusual cambial activity. Laticifers that secrete terpenoids were present in the cortex and phloem of both organs and can contribute to the identification of the species in field. Druses were present in both barks, but mono-crystals were only observed in the sobol. Tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids, and terpenoids occurred in both types of bark, but carotenoids were only detected in the sobol. The similarities between these two organs indicate that the aerial stem bark has potential medicinal use and represents a plausible alternative to harvesting the sobol, which could contribute to the preservation of natural populations of this species.

  1. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy

  2. IN VITRO ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF PTEROCARPUS MARSUPIUM ROXB. STEM BARK ON ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rageeb Mohammed Usman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are believed to be an important source of new chemical substance with potential therapeutic applicability. Several plant species traditionally used as anti-inflammatory.This research work is carryout for the anti-inflammatory activity of Pterocarpus marsupium roxb. Stem bark extracts using Carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Ibuprofen 60mg/kg p.o. was kept as standard. The research was carried out in Wister strain weighing 150-200gm. The Methanol (100mg/Kg and Aqueous extract (100mg/Kg has exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Flavonoids present in stem bark may be responsible for anti-inflammatory activity. However, it needs isolation, structural elucidation and screening of above active principles to pin point activity of drug.

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTHELMINTIC ACTIVITY OF AQUEOUS AND ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF BARK OF HOLOPTELEA INTEGRIFOLIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjot Kaur

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anthelmintic potential of ethanolic and aqueous extract of bark of Holoptelea integrifolia using Eisenia foetida. Various concentrations (10, 25, 50 and 100 mg/ml of ethanolic and aqueous extract were tested in the bioassay, which involved determination of time of paralysis (P and time of death (D of the worms. Piperazine Citrate (10 mg/ml was included as standard. The results indicated that the ethanolic and aqueous extract significantly demonstrated paralysis and also caused death of worms especially at higher concentration as compared to standard references. In conclusion, the use of bark of Holoptelea integrifolia as an anthelmintic have been confirmed and further studies are suggested to isolate the active principles responsible for the activity.

  4. Bioactive properties of Tynanthus panurensis (Bureau) Sanwith bark extract, the Amazonian "clavo huasca".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lidia; Acero, Nuria; Galán, Antonio; Perez-García, Carmen; Alguacil, Luis Fernando; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2011-09-01

    Tynanthus panurensis (Bureau) Sanwith (Bignoniaceae) is a liana vine used in traditional Amazonian medicine as a tonic and energizer as well as a treatment for rheumatism. These traditional indications prompted this study of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of T. panurensis bark extract (ETP). Phytochemical analysis of ETP showed the presence of saponins and a high concentration of phenols and flavonoids. A battery of in vitro tests revealed that the extract has free radical-scavenging antioxidant properties and reduces microsomal lipid peroxidation, uric acid synthesis, and tumor necrosis factor-α production. The anti-inflammatory properties of ETP were further confirmed in vivo in a rat carrageenan edema model, in which the extract exhibited a potent activity. These results support the idea that T. panurensis bark extract could be beneficial for treating inflammation and are in agreement with one of the main traditional uses of this plant. PMID:21488753

  5. Characterizing noise in nonhuman vocalizations: Acoustic analysis and human perception of barks by coyotes and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Tobias; Mitchell, Brian R.; Tokuda, Isao; Owren, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    Measuring noise as a component of mammalian vocalizations is of interest because of its potential relevance to the communicative function. However, methods for characterizing and quantifying noise are less well established than methods applicable to harmonically structured aspects of signals. Using barks of coyotes and domestic dogs, we compared six acoustic measures and studied how they are related to human perception of noisiness. Measures of harmonic-to-noise-ratio (HNR), percent voicing, and shimmer were found to be the best predictors of perceptual rating by human listeners. Both acoustics and perception indicated that noisiness was similar across coyote and dog barks, but within each species there was significant variation among the individual vocalizers. The advantages and disadvantages of the various measures are discussed.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of the root, stem bark and seed extracts of moringa oleifera lam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic extracts (Hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol) and the aqueous extracts of Moringa oleifera Lam or horseradish (root, stem bark and seed) were tested against five bacterial strains using the disc diffusion method and against three fungal strains. The water extracts of the seed was active against a wide range of organisms tested. Hexane and ethyl acetate extracts of the stem bark exhibited moderate activity. Of the fifteen extracts screened, five (33.3 percent) showed activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and against Trichophyton mentagrophytes while two were active against Microsporum gypseum. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for the water extracts ranged from 6.25 to 50 mg/ml. The good activity observed on the water extract explains the success in traditional use of Moringa oleifera for the treatment of infectious diseases.(author)

  7. Alkaloids of root barks of Zanthoxylum spp; Alcaloides das cascas das raizes de Zanthoxylum spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohlemwerger, Sandra Virginia Alves; Sales, Edijane Matos; Costa, Rafael dos Santos; Velozo, Eudes da Silva [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia. Dept. do Medicamento; Guedes, Maria Lenise da Silva, E-mail: euvelozo@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Herbario Alexandre Leal Costa

    2012-07-01

    In 1959, Gottlieb and Antonaccio published a study reporting the occurrence of lignan sesamin and triterpene lupeol in Zanthoxylum tingoassuiba. In this work we describe the phytochemical study of the root bark of the Z. tingoassuiba which allowed the identification of the lupeol, sesamin, and alkaloids dihydrochelerythrine, chelerythrine, anorttianamide, cis-N-methyl-canadin, predicentine, 2, 3-methylenedioxy-10,11-dimethoxy-tetrahydro protoberberine. The investigation of hexane and methanol extracts of the root bark of Z. rhoifolium and Z. stelligerum also investigated showed the presence of alkaloids dihydrochelerythrine, anorttianamide, cis-N-methyl-canadine, 7,9-dimethoxy-2,3- methylenedioxybenzophen anthridine and angoline. The occurrence of 2,3-methylenedioxy-10,11-dimethoxy-tetrahydro protoberberine is first described in Z. tingoassuiba and Z. stelligerum. This is also the first report of the presence of hesperidin and neohesperidin in roots of Z. stelligerum (author)

  8. Using lake sediment records to reconstruct bark beetle disturbances in western North America

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    Jesse Lee Morris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent outbreak of native bark beetles in western North America is unprecedented in severity and scale, at least during the historical period. The aim of this work is to develop a proxy-based methodology to understand how bark beetle disturbances are recorded in lake sediments. Three hypotheses are tested to determine how the ecological impacts of severe spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis disturbances are recorded following mortality of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii. Outbreaks are hypothesized to: (1 decrease the ratio of spruce to fir pollen; (2 increase soil erosion and mobilize terrestrial C; and (3 leach foliar N, enhancing algal productivity. To test these hypotheses, sediment cores from spruce beetle-affected basins were analyzed for pollen, insect remains, organic and minerogenic content, and isotopic and elemental concentrations. The dataset was tested statistically using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs to determine if the response variables differed significantly between outbreak and non-outbreak periods. 

  9. Redox properties of Abarema cochliacarpos (Gomes) Barneby & Grime (Fabaceae) stem bark ethanol extract and fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, A S; Lima, A C B; Santos, A L M L; Rabelo, T K; Serafini, M R; Andrade, C R; Fernandes, X A; Moreira, J C F; Gelain, D P; Estevam, C S; Araujo, B S

    2013-01-01

    The redox properties of the hydroethanol extract (EE) and its ethyl acetate (EAF) and hydromethanol (HMF) fractions obtained from Abarema cochliacarpos (Gomes) Barneby & Grimes stem bark were evaluated. EAF had the highest total phenol content (848.62 ± 78.18 mg g⁻¹), while EE showed the highest content of catechin (71.2 µg g⁻¹). EE, EAF and HMF exhibited the highest levels of antioxidant activity at 100 and 1000 µg mL⁻¹ when the non-enzymatic antioxidant potential was evaluated by the total reactive antioxidant potential, total antioxidant reactivity and nitric oxide scavenging assays. In addition, EAF and HMF showed SOD-like activity. The results for EE, EAF and HMF in this study showed that A. cochliacarpos (Gomes) Barneby & Grimes stem bark have redox properties and may be able to help the endogenous enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems to keep the redox balance.

  10. A new benzophenanthridine alkaloid and other bioactive constituents from the stem bark of Zanthoxylum heitzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, Helle; Ho, Giang Thanh Thi; Tadesse, Margey; Miles, Christopher O; Moussavi, Nastaran; Mikolo, Bertin; Malterud, Karl Egil

    2016-03-01

    Heitziquinone (7), a new benzophenanthridine alkaloid, together with five known compounds; isoarnottianamide (5), rhoifoline B (6), isobauerenol (8), 6-hydroxypellitorine (9) and sylvamide (10), were isolated as minor compounds from the hexane extract of stem bark from Zanthoxylum heitzii. Four previously reported compounds (1-4) were found, as well. Compounds 5 and 7 were both found to exist as 4:1 mixtures of two atropisomers. The structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. Compounds 5-10 were identified for the first time in this species, and they are all rare natural compounds. Pellitorine (4), one of the main compounds from the hexane bark extract, was found to be responsible for the brine shrimp larvae toxicity (LC50 37 μM, 8 μg/ml) of the crude extract (LC50 24 μg/ml). Low cytotoxicity against a macrophage cell line was observed. PMID:26802607

  11. Activity-guided screening of the antioxidants from Paulownia tomentosa var. tomentosa Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Ling Si

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tree barks, as a type of forestry residues, are a rich and renewable bioresource that can produce high value-added products. Paulownia tomentosa var. tomentosa (PTT has been extensively used in traditional Chinese medicine to cure various diseases. However, the antioxidative activity of the chemical constituents of the tree has not yet been investigated. In this study, the bark of PTT were extracted and fractioned. Then the resulting ethyl acetate (EtOAc soluble fraction, which exhibited the strongest antioxidative effect, was subjected to repeated open column chromatography for purification. The screening process was carried out under the guidance antioxidative activity via diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging assay. Eight phenolic compounds, glucodistylin (I, luteolin (II, ellagic acid (III, cistanoside F (IV, campneoside II (V, isocampneoside II (VI, verbascoside (VII, and isoverbascoside (VIII, were isolated and their structures were elucidated by various spectroscopic analyses. Among the phenolics, II~VIII showed significant antioxidative activity.

  12. Evaluation of the antipsychotic potential of aqueous fraction of Securinega virosa root bark extract in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, M G; Mohammed, M; Magaji, R A; Musa, A M; Abdu-Aguye, I; Hussaini, I M

    2014-03-01

    Securinega virosa (Roxb ex. Willd) Baill. is a plant which is commonly used in African traditional medicine in management of mental illness. Previous study showed that the crude methanolic root bark extract of the plant possesses antipsychotic activity. In this study, the antipsychotic potential of the residual aqueous fraction of the plant was evaluated using two experimental models, apomorphine induced stereotypic climbing behaviour and swim induced grooming, all in mice. The effect of the fraction on haloperidol-induced catalepsy was also evaluated. The fraction significantly reduced the mean climbing score at the highest dose tested (500 mg/kg). In the swim-induced grooming test, the fraction significantly and dose-dependently (125-500 mg/kg) decreased the mean number and mean duration of swim-induced grooming activity in mice. Similarly, the standard haloperidol (1 mg/kg) significantly (p bark extract of Securinega virosa contains biological active principle with antipsychotic potential.

  13. Microbial communities associated with tree bark foliose lichens: a perspective on their microecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O Roger

    2014-01-01

    Tree-bark, foliose lichens occur widely on a global scale. In some locales, such as forests, they contribute a substantial amount of biomass. However, there are few research reports on microbial communities including eukaryotic microbes associated with foliose lichens. Lichens collected from tree bark at 11 locations (Florida, New York State, Germany, Australia, and the Arctic) were examined to determine the density and C-biomass of bacteria and some eukaryotic microbes, i.e. heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and amoeboid protists. A rich microbial diversity was found, including large plasmodial slime molds, in some cases exceeding 100 μm in size. The densities of HNF and amoeboid protists were each positively correlated with densities of bacteria, r = 0.84 and 0.80, respectively (p slime mold plasmodia. PMID:24734903

  14. EVALUATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT FRACTIONS OF DELONIX ELATA BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabbithi Sathya Chethan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with an objective to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal potential of bark of Delonix elata. Antibacterial activity of various fractions obtained from methanolic extract (PE, DM , EA, MR of bark were carried out against three Gram positive bacteria – Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus albus, Enterococus faceialis and three Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Klebesiela. The antifungal activity of the fractions was evaluated on two common pathogenic fungi Candida albicans and Cryptcocus neoframens. The testing was done by the disc diffusion method. Zones of inhibition of fractions were compared with that of standard Amikacin for antibacterial activity and Ketoconazole for antifungal activity. The EA and MR fractions showed significant antibacterial activity but did not exhibit anti-fungal activities comparable with that of standard against the organisms tested.

  15. STUDIES ON ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECTS OF BARK, SEED AND CALLUS EXTRACTS OF HOLARRHENA ANTIDYSENTERICA WALL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOMA ROY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure has been outlined for callus formation and antibacterial effects of bark, seed and callus extracts of animportant medicinal shrub Holarrhena antidysenterica WALL. Explants used for callus formation were mainlyseeds and both in vivo and in vitro grown plant parts like stem, nodal parts, roots and apical shoots. A friable typeof callus was obtained when these explants were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS culture mediumcontaining different concentrations of 2,4-D separately and in combinations of KN. During present studiesmethanolic extracts of bark, seed and callus were made and tested for their antimicrobial activities againstStaphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Eschercia coli. Results showed that all three different typesof extracts of Holarrhena antidysenterica possess nearly similar potential for antibacterial activity against thesepathogenic bacteria.

  16. Antibacterial activity of bark extracts of Moringa oleifera Lam. against some selected bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffer, Mudasser; Ahmad, Showkat; Sharma, Rajendra; Mahajan, Surabhi; Gupta, Ankur; Agnihotri, Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-11-01

    The methanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous bark extracts of Moringa oleifera were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against four bacteria viz. Staphylococcus aureus, Citrobacter freundii, Bacillus megaterium and Pseudomonas fluorescens using erythromycin as positive control. The activity was analyzed using paper disc diffusion method at different concentration of the extract. The study revealed that all the bark extracts irrespective of their types, in different concentrations inhibited growth of the test pathogens to varying degrees. Ethyl acetate extract showed maximum activity against all the bacterial strains followed in descending order by chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts. The activity decreased with decrease in concentration of the extract. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most sensitive test organism to different extracts of Moringa oleifera. Looking to these results it may be concluded that M. oleifera may be a potential source for the treatment of different infections caused by the resistant microbes.

  17. Brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity of extracts from the bark of Schleichera oleosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laxman Pokhrel; Bigyan Sharma; Gan B Bajracharya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the antibacterial efficacy and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water) obtained from the bark of Schleichera oleosa. Methods: The powdered bark sample was Soxhlet extracted sequentially in hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antibacterial evaluation was carried out by following the agar diffusion method and amoxicillin disc was used as a reference. Slightly modified Meyer’s method was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts in brine shrimps. Results: Among the nine bacterial strains tested, the methanolic and aqueous extracts showed promising antibacterial efficacy against Serratia marcescens, Escherarichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. None of the extracts were found significantly toxic to brine shrimps. Conclusions: Strong antibacterial activity and low brine shrimp toxicity of methanolic and aqueous extracts can provide new antibacterial compounds.

  18. Brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity of extracts from the bark of Schleichera oleosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antibacterial efficacy and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water obtained from the bark of Schleichera oleosa. Methods: The powdered bark sample was Soxhlet extracted sequentially in hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antibacterial evaluation was carried out by following the agar diffusion method and amoxicillin disc was used as a reference. Slightly modified Meyer’s method was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts in brine shrimps. Results: Among the nine bacterial strains tested, the methanolic and aqueous extracts showed promising antibacterial efficacy against Serratia marcescens, Escherarichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. None of the extracts were found significantly toxic to brine shrimps. Conclusions: Strong antibacterial activity and low brine shrimp toxicity of methanolic and aqueous extracts can provide new antibacterial compounds.

  19. HEAVY METAL LEVELS IN PINE (Pinus eldarica Medw. TREE BARKS AS INDICATORS OF ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Kord

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Bio-monitoring of air quality in TehranCity was investigated by analyzing 36 pine tree (Pinus eldarica Medw. barks. The samples were taken from different locations with different degrees of metal pollution (urban, industrial, highway, and control sites. Then, the concentrations of lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, copper (Cu, nickel (Ni, and chromium (Cr were measured using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results of this study showed that the highest and lowest metal concentrations were found in the heavy traffic sites and the control site, respectively. Lead content was found to be the highest in high traffic density areas. The industrial part of the city was characterized by high Zn, Cr, and Ni contents. Variation in heavy metal concentrations between sites was observed and attributed to differences in traffic density and anthropogenic activities. The research also confirms the suitability of Pinus eldarica Medw barks as a suitable bio-indicator of aerial fallout of heavy metals.

  20. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of isolated constituents from the bark of Polyalthia longifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Sankhadip

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The bark of Polyalthia longifolia is traditionally reputed to lower blood pressure, stimulate respiration and help in fever and skin diseases, diabetes, hypertension and vitiated conditions of vata and pitta. Preliminary phytochemical investigation of various extracts of the bark of Polyalthia longifolia showed the presence of flavonoids, alkaloids, steroids and carbohydrates. An attempt has been made to isolate flavonoids and perform antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the same. We carried out DPPH radical scavenging assay, nitric oxide scavenging assay, metal chelating activity and reducing power activity in antioxidant activity. In antimicrobial activity, we used six microorganisms, which included two Gram positive, two Gram negative bacteria and two fungi. Both the isolated flavonoids exhibited a concentration-dependant free radical scavenging capacity. Isolated compounds showed promising results against various micro-organisms in comparison with standard drugs (Penicillin, Gentamicin and Ketoconazol.

  1. Bioactive properties of Tynanthus panurensis (Bureau) Sanwith bark extract, the Amazonian "clavo huasca".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lidia; Acero, Nuria; Galán, Antonio; Perez-García, Carmen; Alguacil, Luis Fernando; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2011-09-01

    Tynanthus panurensis (Bureau) Sanwith (Bignoniaceae) is a liana vine used in traditional Amazonian medicine as a tonic and energizer as well as a treatment for rheumatism. These traditional indications prompted this study of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of T. panurensis bark extract (ETP). Phytochemical analysis of ETP showed the presence of saponins and a high concentration of phenols and flavonoids. A battery of in vitro tests revealed that the extract has free radical-scavenging antioxidant properties and reduces microsomal lipid peroxidation, uric acid synthesis, and tumor necrosis factor-α production. The anti-inflammatory properties of ETP were further confirmed in vivo in a rat carrageenan edema model, in which the extract exhibited a potent activity. These results support the idea that T. panurensis bark extract could be beneficial for treating inflammation and are in agreement with one of the main traditional uses of this plant.

  2. Tannin signatures of barks, needles, leaves, cones, and wood at the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Hedges, John I.

    2004-03-01

    We analyzed 117 tissues from 77 different plant species for molecular tannin. Tannin was measured in 89 tissues (as high as 10.5 wt.% total tannin), including procyanidin (PC) tannin in 88 tissues, prodelphinidin (PD) tannin in 50, and propelargonidin (PP) tannin in 24. In addition to tannin, several flavones, flavanones, and triterpenoids were measured, the latter which yielded as much as 4.5 wt.%. Compositions varied considerably between species, including several that yielded comparatively rare tannin or triterpenoids. Conifer needles were distinguished by high yields of PD tannin overall and relative to PC tannin. Dicotyledon leaves were characterized by the presence of flavones and triterpenoids. Barks were marked by flavanones and tetracosanoic acid. Based on these trends, relationships that could be useful as geochemical parameters were developed for distinguishing needles, leaves, and barks as possible components of litter, soil, or sedimentary mixtures.

  3. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil [School of Applied Physic, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-01

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Use of Rice Husk-Bark Ash in Producing Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumrerng Rukzon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of blend of Portland cement with rice husk-bark ash in producing self-compacting concrete (SCC. CT was partially replaced with ground rice husk-bark ash (GRHBA at the dosage levels of 0%–40% by weight of binder. Compressive strength, porosity, chloride penetration, and corrosion of SCC were determined. Test results reveal that the resistance to chloride penetration of concrete improves substantially with partial replacement of CT with a blend of GRHBA and the improvement increases with an increase in the replacement level. The corrosion resistances of SCC were better than the CT concrete. In addition, test results indicated that the reduction in porosity was associated with the increase in compressive strength. The porosity is a significant factor as it affects directly the durability of the SCC. This work is suggested that the GHRBA is effective for producing SCC with 30% of GHRBA replacement level.

  6. Adsorption of phenol on formaldehyde-pretreated Pinus pinaster bark: equilibrium and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, G; González-Alvarez, J; García, A I; Freire, M S; Antorrena, G

    2007-05-01

    This work studies phenol adsorption on Pinus pinaster bark that has been previously treated with formaldehyde in acid medium. The influence of several variables such as solid/liquid ratio, pH and initial concentration of phenol in the solution on the adsorption capacity of the bark has been analysed. A kinetic model based on phenol diffusion within the pores of the adsorbent was in agreement with the results obtained for high initial concentrations of phenol, allowing the determination of diffusion coefficients. Adsorption equilibrium data were fitted by the Freundlich and BET isotherms. From their parameters phenol adsorption capacity and intensity, as well as the specific surface (BET) of the adsorbent, were determined.

  7. Defoliation and bark harvesting affect life-history traits of a tropical tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaoue, Orou; Horvitz, Carol; Ticktin, Tamara;

    2013-01-01

    Selectively harvesting whole individuals in managed populations (e.g. fisheries, hunting) has substantial effects on life expectancy and age at maturity. Although demographic rates of trees are impacted by recurrent harvest of plant organs (e.g. fruit, leaf, bark) known as non-timber forest...... products, the effect of such harvesting on life-history traits is less explored. Here, we investigate how different strategies of foliage and bark harvest by local people affect life expectancy and age at maturity of Khaya senegalensis across two climatic regions in West Africa. We compare elasticities...... of drought to life-history traits. Harvesting at constant rates only affects (increased) life expectancy in the moist region and (reduced) age at first reproduction in the dry region. Models in which harvest intensity varies stochastically over time show results similar to those with constant harvesting rate...

  8. Antiplasmodial benzophenone derivatives from the root barks of Symphonia globulifera (Clusiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Marti, G; Eparvier, V.; Moretti, Christian; Prado, S.; Grellier, P; Hue, N.; Thoison, O.; Delpech, B; Gueritte, F.; Litaudon, M.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to find antimalarial drugs, a systematic in vitro evaluation on a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (FcB1) was undertaken on sixty plant extracts collected in French Guiana. The ethyl acetate extract obtained from the root barks of Symphonia globulifera exhibited a strong antiplasmodial activity (97% at 10 mu g/ml). The phytochemical investigation of this extract led to the isolation of nine polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinol (PPAPs) compounds and tw...

  9. Antifungal activities of Terminalia ivorensis A. Chev. bark extracts against Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ouattara Sitapha; KPOROU KOUASSI ELISEE; Djaman Allico Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The present study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro antifungal activity of aqueous and hydroacoholic extracts from bark of Terminalia ivorensis A. Chev. (Combretaceae). In vitro antifungal activity of all the extracts was done by agar slant double dilution method. Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus clinically important strains were used for the study. ketoconazole was used as standards for antifungal assay. Antifungal activity was determinated by evaluating of antifung...

  10. Sustainable communities : qualitative householder research findings from South Cambridgeshire and Barking and Dagenham

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2007-01-01

    This report is part of the evidence base for 'In-depth review of sustainable communities policy'. This qualitative householder research was carried out to complement the Area-Based Assessments undertaken on behalf of the Sustainable Development Commission. It was undertaken in Barking and Dagenham, and South Cambridgeshire. This report is based on the transcripts of interviews undertaken in these areas. The aim of the research was to seek householders’ opinions of their communities. Pub...

  11. ANTIHYPERGLYCEMIC AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF CASSIA FISTULA (L.) STEM BARK

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ashraf Ali et al.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate antihyperglycemic and analgesic effects of ethanolic extract of Cassia fistula (CF) stem barks in rats and mice, respectively. The analgesic effect of extract was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing test method while antihyperglycemic effect was investigated by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i. p.) and metformin (150 mg/kg, p. o.) were used as reference drugs for comparison....

  12. Hypoglycemic Effect of Treculia Africana Decne Root Bark in Normal and Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelola, O O; Moody, J O; Odeniyi, M A; Fakeye, T O

    2007-01-01

    The solvent partitioned purified fractions of the hydro-acetone root bark extract of the African breadfruit (Treculia africana Decne) were evaluated for hypoglycemic activities in normal and diabetic albino rats. Fasting blood glucose levels were estimated by the use of a glucometer at pre-determined intervals after oral administration of the test extracts/fractions. Results revealed that the test fractions have only a slight effect on blood sugar level of normal rats. On short term and chron...

  13. Two New Chemical Constituents from the Stem Bark of Garcinia mangostana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene See

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed chemical study on the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the stem bark of Garcinia mangostana resulted in the successful isolation of one new prenylated xanthone, mangaxanthone B (1, one new benzophenone, mangaphenone (2, and two known xanthones, mangostanin (3 and mangostenol (4. The structures of these compounds were elucidated through analysis of their spectroscopic data obtained using 1D and 2D NMR and MS techniques.

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Croton macrostachyus Stem Bark Extracts against Several Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie K. Obey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Kenya, leaves and roots from Croton macrostachyus are used as a traditional medicine for infectious diseases such as typhoid and measles, but reports on possible antimicrobial activity of stem bark do not exist. In this study, the antibacterial and antifungal effects of methanol, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts, and purified lupeol of C. macrostachyus stem bark were determined against important human gram-negative pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes, gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes, and a fungus Candida albicans. The most promising broad scale antimicrobial activity against all the studied pathogens was shown by the ethyl acetate extract. The ethyl acetate extract induced the zone of inhibition between 10.1±0.6 mm and 16.0±1.2 mm against S. typhi, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. aerogenes, and L. monocytogenes with weaker antimicrobial activity against C. albicans (zone of inhibition: 5.6±1.0 mm. The antibiotic controls (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, clotrimazole, and cefotaxime showed antimicrobial activity with zones of inhibition within 13.4±0.7–22.1±0.9 mm. The ethyl acetate extract had MIC in the range of 125–250 mg/mL against all the studied bacteria and against C. albicans MIC was 500 mg/mL. The present results give scientific evidence and support the traditional use of C. macrostachyus stem bark as a source for antimicrobials. We show that C. macrostachyus stem bark lupeol is a promising antimicrobial agent against several important human pathogens.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Croton macrostachyus Stem Bark Extracts against Several Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obey, Jackie K.; von Wright, Atte; Orjala, Jimmy; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya, leaves and roots from Croton macrostachyus are used as a traditional medicine for infectious diseases such as typhoid and measles, but reports on possible antimicrobial activity of stem bark do not exist. In this study, the antibacterial and antifungal effects of methanol, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts, and purified lupeol of C. macrostachyus stem bark were determined against important human gram-negative pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes, gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes, and a fungus Candida albicans. The most promising broad scale antimicrobial activity against all the studied pathogens was shown by the ethyl acetate extract. The ethyl acetate extract induced the zone of inhibition between 10.1 ± 0.6 mm and 16.0 ± 1.2 mm against S. typhi, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. aerogenes, and L. monocytogenes with weaker antimicrobial activity against C. albicans (zone of inhibition: 5.6 ± 1.0 mm). The antibiotic controls (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, clotrimazole, and cefotaxime) showed antimicrobial activity with zones of inhibition within 13.4 ± 0.7–22.1 ± 0.9 mm. The ethyl acetate extract had MIC in the range of 125–250 mg/mL against all the studied bacteria and against C. albicans MIC was 500 mg/mL. The present results give scientific evidence and support the traditional use of C. macrostachyus stem bark as a source for antimicrobials. We show that C. macrostachyus stem bark lupeol is a promising antimicrobial agent against several important human pathogens. PMID:27293897

  16. Isolation and preparation of cytotoxic chromanone acids from the bark of Calophyllum dongnaiense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tri Hieu; Hansen, Poul Erik; Duus, Fritz;

    2009-01-01

    Three chromanone acids, blancoic acid (1), isoblancoic acid (2) and chapelieric acid (3), were isolated from the bark of Calophyllum dongnaiense Pierre collected in Dong Nai Province. Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic techniques (1-D and 2-D NMR, UV, IR and MS) as well as chemi...... as chemical methods. Cytotoxicity of compounds 1-3 and their 5-O-acetylated and methylated derivatives against Hela cell line was examined....

  17. The Study of Interactions between Active Compounds of Coffee and Willow (Salix sp.) Bark Water Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Durak; Urszula Gawlik-Dziki

    2014-01-01

    Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia). Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed...

  18. Antifungal and cytotoxic substances from the stem barks of Desmos chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monchanok Tuntipaleepun; Suda Chakthong; Chanita Ponglimanont; Patimaporn Plodpai; Supayang P. Voravuthikunchai

    2012-01-01

    Isounonal-7-methyl ether (1) and chinendihydrochalcone (2) together with 8 known compounds were isolated from the stem barks of Desmos chinensis.Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data.Compound 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against MOLT-3 cancer cell line (ICso 7.16 μg/mL) and antifungal activity against Pyricularia oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani with MIC values of 15.6 and 31.2 μg/mL,respectively.

  19. Anticholinesterase activities of cold and hot aqueous extracts of F. racemosa stem bark

    OpenAIRE

    Faiyaz Ahmed; Asna Urooj

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the anticholinesterase activity of cold and hot aqueous extracts of Ficus racemosa stem bark against rat brain acetylcholinesterase in vitro. Both the cold aqueous extract (FRC) and the hot aqueous extract (FRH) exhibited a dose dependent inhibition of rat brain acetylcholinesterase. FRH showed significantly higher ( p ≤ 0.001) cholinesterase inhibitory activity compared to FRC; however, both the extracts did not show 50% inhibition of AChE at the doses tested (200...

  20. Composition and Elevation of Spruce Forests Affect Susceptibility to Bark Beetle Attacks: Implications for Forest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Massimo Faccoli; Iris Bernardinelli

    2014-01-01

    The spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is one of the most destructive insects infesting spruce forests in Europe. Data concerning infestations of I. typographus occurring over the last 19 years (1994–2012) on the Southern Alps were analyzed in seven spruce forest types: (1) pure spruce plantations; (2) pure spruce reforestations; (3) pure spruce mountain forests; (4) pure spruce alpine forests; (5) spruce-conifer mixed forests; (6) spruce-broad...

  1. Isolation of a novel antifungal peptide from the bark of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shihui; Zhao Degang; Han Yuzhen

    2008-01-01

    A novel Eucommia antifungal peptide, named EAFP3, was isolated from the bark of Eucommia ulmoides by NaCl extract, gel filtration and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The molecular mass of EAFP3 is 4157.3 Da, and its partial amino acid sequence is -.LYQQLIAGITLNK.-. EAFP3 exerts an inhibitory activity against Candida albicans in vitro and the drug concentration required for 50% growth inhibition (IC50) is 31.25μg/mL.

  2. Investigation of cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of Cinnamomum cassia bark water extract

    OpenAIRE

    Sozer Karadagli, Sumru; Agrap, Borte; Lermioglu Erciyas, Ferzan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Recently many investigations on cinnamon have focused on its powerful antioxidant activity due to its rich polyphenol content. Polyphenols have also been reported to act as pro-oxidants, causing oxidative strand breaks in DNA. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of Cinnamomum cassia water extract in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods: Cinnamomum cassia water extract was prepared from grounded bark of cinnamon by maceration with ultra...

  3. Antioxidant potential and total phenolic content of methanolic bark extract of Madhuca indica (koenig) Gmelin

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Anu; Bhandari, Anil; Pandurangan, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of methanolic extract of Madhuca indica bark in varios systems. DPPH radical, superoxide anion radical, nitric oxide radical, hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, and total phenolic content assays were carried out to evaluate the antioxidant potential of the extract. The percentage inhibition of 40 μg/ml concentration of MMI in DPPH radical scavenging model was found as 74.1%. The scavenging of nit...

  4. Bark essential oil composition of Cedrela tonduzii C. DC. (Meliaceae from Monteverde, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M. Eason

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The bark essential oils from two different individuals of Cedrela tonduzii were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The chemical compositions of the two oils were qualitatively similar, but showed quantitative differences. One sample had abundant quantities of a -selinene (32% and germacrene-D (17%, while the second sample was rich in a-humulene (34%, β-caryophyllene (13% and germacrene-D (13%.

  5. Constituintes das cascas de Tapirira guianensis (Anacardiaceae Constituents of the bark of Tapirira guianensis (Anacardiaceae

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    Suzimone de J. Correia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available From the hexane extract of barks of Tapirira guianensis were isolated and identified beta-sitosterol, 3beta-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-sitosterol, sitostenone and stigmast-4-en-6beta-ol-3-one. Besides these compounds six alkyl ferulates were obtained including a new one with an unusual odd alkyl chain, nonadecyl coumarate. All structures were determined by spectral data.

  6. Equations of bark thickness and volume profiles at different heights with easy-measurement variables

    OpenAIRE

    Cellini, Juan Manuel; Galarza, Martín; Burns, Sarah Lilian; Martínez Pastur, Guillermo; Lencinas, María Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop equations of thickness profile and bark volume at different heights with easy-measurement variables, taking as a study case Nothofagus pumilio forests, growing in different site qualities and growth phases in Southern Patagonia. Data was collected from 717 harvested trees. Three models were fitted using multiple, non-lineal regression and generalized linear model, by stepwise methodology, iteratively reweighted least squares method for maximum likelih...

  7. TERPENOIDS FROM THE STEM BARK OF JATROPHA PLANTS AND THEIR BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Manggau Marianti; Taher Muhammad; Sahidin; Ardiansyah

    2011-01-01

    Three terpenoids, including two diterpenes (curcusone B and jatrophone) and a triterpene (stigmasterol) have beenisolated from the stem bark of Jatropha plants. Curcusone B and stigmasterol were isolated from J. curcas, meanwhilejatrophone and stigmasterol were from J. gossypifolia. The biological activities of these compounds have beenevaluated toward bacteria, fungi and tumour cells. Isolation was carried out in vacuum liqiud cromatography (VLC)technique with silica gel as an adsorben and s...

  8. Simulating water and pollutant transport in bark, charcoal and sand filters for greywater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ciuk Karlsson, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    A septic tank combined with a sand filter is the most common onsite wastewater treatment system worldwide, since it is a simple, lowcost and reliable treatment method. Alternatives to sand in filters could be advantageous in terms of availability of material and enhanced treatment properties. In this study, flow dynamics and pollutant transport in three filter materials; sand, pine bark and activated charcoal, intermittently dosed with artificial greywater, were simulated using the HYDRU...

  9. Antioxidant and antiplatlet aggregation properties of bark extracts of Garcinia pedunculata and Garcinia cowa

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Anushi; Joseph, G. S.; Singh, R. P.

    2014-01-01

    The bark extracts of Garcinia pedunculata and Garcinia cowa, which are abundant in the Northeastern regions of India, were screened for their antioxidant and in vitro antiplatelet aggregating activities. By β-carotene linoleate model for antioxidant assay, acetone extract of G. pedunculata and hexane extracts of G. cowa exhibited higher antioxidant activity (86.47 and 66.94 % respectively, at 25 ppm) than other extracts. Similar pattern was observed for superoxide radical scavenging method fo...

  10. Triterpenoids from n-hexane extract of Garcinia picrorrhiza Miq. stem bark

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    Atiek Soemiati

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatographic separation of n-hexane extract of dried Garcinia picrorrhiza Miq. stem bark (Cluciaceae furnished two triterpenoids, identified as 3oxo-7,24-euphadien-26oic acid (1, 3β-hydroxy-7,24-euphadien-26 oic acid (2. The structure of compounds were determined by using UV-vis, FT-IR, 1D and 2D NMR techniques.

  11. Bioactive Friedolanostanes and 11(10-8)-Abeolanostanes from the Bark of Garcinia speciosa

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Luís M. M.; Anake Kijjoa; Rujida Wilairat; Maria São José Nascimento; Luis Gales; Ana Margarida Damas; Silva, Artur M.S.; Ing-On Mondranondra; Werner Herz

    2004-01-01

    A new friedolanostane, 7, and three triterpenes, 8, 9a, and 10, possessing the new 11(10#8594;8)-abeolanostane carbon skeleton were isolated from the bark of Garcinia speciosa. Structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and spectrometric studies and the structure of 8 by X-ray crystallographic analysis, thus forcing structure revision of a triterpene from the same source previously assumed to be a friedolanostane. These and several friedo- and lanostanes earlier isolated from the same source...

  12. Two New Chemical Constituents from the Stem Bark of Garcinia mangostana

    OpenAIRE

    Irene See; Gwendoline Cheng Lian Ee; Soek Sin Teh; Arifah Abdul Kadir; Shaari Daud

    2014-01-01

    A detailed chemical study on the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the stem bark of Garcinia mangostana resulted in the successful isolation of one new prenylated xanthone, mangaxanthone B (1), one new benzophenone, mangaphenone (2), and two known xanthones, mangostanin (3) and mangostenol (4). The structures of these compounds were elucidated through analysis of their spectroscopic data obtained using 1D and 2D NMR and MS techniques.

  13. Triterpenoids compounds from N-hexane extract of the stem bark of Garcinia benthami

    OpenAIRE

    Berna Elya; Soleh Kosela; Muhammad Hanafi

    2009-01-01

    Two triperpenoidscompounds, i.e. friedelin (1) and 3β-hydroxy-lanosta-9(11),24-dien-26-oic acid (2) were isolated from the n-hexaneextract of the stem bark of Garcinia benthami. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by IR, MS,1H-NMRand 13C-NMR spectroscopy and by comparison of their spectroscopic data with those reported data from the literature.

  14. Study on Antibacterial Activity of the Bark of Garcinia lanceifolia Roxb.

    OpenAIRE

    Bora, Nilutpal Sharma; Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhusan; Gogoi, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    Garcinia lanceifolia Roxb. is an important and endemic medicinal plant of Assam which has been used by various ethnic communities of Northeast India to treat various disorders like dysentery, dyspepsia, and biliousness. The plant is considered to be containing much medicinal value and is also eaten raw or made into pickles by the local people. Our present study has been focused on the evaluation of the antibacterial activity of the methanolic extract of the bark of Garcinia lanceifolia which ...

  15. Erwinia typographi sp. nov., isolated from bark beetle (Ips typographus) gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodenyte-Arbaciauskiene, V; Radziute, S; Stunzenas, V; Būda, V

    2012-04-01

    Gram-negative-staining bacteria that were resistant to monoterpene myrcene (7-methyl-3-methylene-1.6-octadiene, C10H16, at concentrations of up to 10 µl ml(-1) in TSB) were isolated from the gut contents of adult bark beetles Ips typographus (Coleoptera, Scolytidae). The beetles were collected from the bark of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Lithuania. Bark beetles feed on conifers, which produce myrcene among many other defensive compounds. It has been suggested that the micro-organisms present within the beetles' guts could be involved in their resistance towards this plant defensive compound. The most resistant bacterial strains were isolated and characterized by phenotypic assays as well as fatty acid analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) based on the rpoB, atpD and infB genes and DNA-DNA hybridization. Biochemical characterization indicated that the bacteria belonged to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and MLSA of the novel strains revealed that they belonged to the genus Erwinia, but represented a novel species. The dominant cellular fatty acids were C16:0 and C17:0 cyclo. The DNA G+C content was 49.1 mol%. The results obtained in this study indicated that these bacteria from the bark beetle gut represented a novel species, for which the name Erwinia typographi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain DSM 22678T (=Y1T=LMG 25347T).

  16. Antifertility activity of methanolic bark extract of Aegle marmelos (l. in male wistar rats

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    Agrawal Shyam S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aegle marmelos leaf, seed and fruit from earlier studies is known to affect male fertility in reversible manner. However they had delayed onset and recovery was found to be prolonged. The present study was undertaken with an aim to evaluate the effect of Aegle marmelos bark extract on rats as the extract is found to be a rich source of marmin and fagarine known for reducing male fertility. Three different concentration of methanolic bark extracts of Aegle marmelos (L. were evaluated for male antifertility activity on albino wistar rats. Methanolic bark extract of Aegle marmelos at the dose of 200, 400, and 600 mg/Kg b.w was administered orally for 60 days. Treatments were stopped thereafter and animals were sacrificed after a recovery period of 30 days. Control animal were administered vehicle (0.5% CMC for 60 days. Lonidamine was used as standard drug to compare the effect of extract. Results Methanolic extract causes a dose & duration dependent infertility via reducing reproductive organ weight and serum testosterone levels. Sperm analysis results showed reduction in sperm density, motility, viability and sperm acrosomal integrity without interfering libido and vital organ body weight. Histopathological studies of testes revealed exfoliation of elongated spermatids, nuclear chromatin condensation, degeneration and prominent spaces detected within the germinal epithelium signifying testicular cytotoxicity and necrosis. Time dependent complete infertility was observed in all dose levels. Animals after the withdrawal from treatment, for 30 days showed restoration of the morphological as well as physiological parameters in extract treated rats. Methanolic extract showed lipid lowering activity compared to control, suggestive good candidature of this plant for further studies. Conclusions Our studies suggested Aegle marmelos barks methanolic extract as strong candidate for male contraceptive via its ability to produce complete

  17. Antifertility Activity of Methanolic Bark Extract of Aegle Marmelos (l. in Male Wistar Rats

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    Shyam S Agrawal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aegle marmelos leaf, seed and fruit from earlier studies is known to affect male fertility in reversible manner. However they had delayed onset and recovery was found to be prolonged. The present study was undertaken with an aim to evaluate the effect of Aegle marmelos bark extract on rats as the extract is found to be arich source of marmin and fagarine known for reducing male fertility. Three different concentration of methanolic bark extracts of Aegle marmelos (L. were evaluated for male antifertility activity on albino wistar rats. Methanolic bark extract of Aegle marmelos at the dose of 200, 400, and 600 mg/Kg b.w was administered orally for 60 days.Treatments were stopped thereafter and animals were sacrificed after a recovery period of 30 days. Control animalwere administered vehicle (0.5% CMC for 60 days. Lonidamine was used as standard drug to compare the effect of extract.Results: Methanolic extract causes a dose & duration dependent infertility via reducing reproductive organ weight and serum testosterone levels. Sperm analysis results showed reduction in sperm density, motility, viability and sperm acrosomal integrity without interfering libido and vital organ body weight. Histopathological studies of testes revealed exfoliation of elongated spermatids, nuclear chromatin condensation, degeneration and prominentspaces detected within the germinal epithelium signifying testicular cytotoxicity and necrosis. Time dependent complete infertility was observed in all dose levels. Animals after the withdrawal from treatment, for 30 days showed restoration of the morphological as well as physiological parameters in extract treated rats. Methanolicextract showed lipid lowering activity compared to control,uggestive good candidature of this plant for further studies.Conclusions: Our studies suggested Aegle marmelos barks methanolic extract as strong candidate for male contraceptive via its ability to produce complete inhibition of

  18. Evaluation of analgesic activity of Terminalia arjuna (Roxb.) Wight and Arn bark: A tribal claim

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Anurag; Nishteswar, K.; Shukla, Vinay J.; Ashok, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plants occupy an important place in folk medicine all over the world for centuries and indigenous communities have developed their own specific knowledge on plant resources, uses, management, and conservation. Research interest and activities in the area of ethno medicine have increased tremendously in the last decade. Currently, scientists are evincing keen interest in the scientific evaluation of ethno medical claims. Bark powder of Arjuna (Terminalia arjuna [Roxb.] Wight and Ar...

  19. Phytochemical Investigation, Isolation and Characterization of Betulin from Bark of Betula Utilis

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Joshi; Gyanendra Kumar Saxena; Vikas Singh; Ekta Arya; Rahul Pratap Singh

    2013-01-01

    Betula utilis is a hardy perennial plant of moderate size up to 20 M in height, forming the upper limit of forest vegetation. It inhabitates along the Himalayan range from Bhutan westwards, ascending to an altitude of 4200 M. The bark of Betula utilis contains sitosterol, betulin, betulic acid, oleanolic acid, acetyloleanolic acid, lupeol, lupenone, methyl betulonate, methyl betulate and a new triterpenoid karachic acid. The ethanolic extract of powdered drug of Betula utilis was prepared. Mo...

  20. Effect of Bark Extract and Gum Exudate of Commiphora Caudata on Aspirin Induced Ulcer in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    R Nanthakumar; Ambrose S Stephen; E Sriram; Babu, G.; K Chitra; C Uma maheswara Reddy

    2009-01-01

    Commiphora caudata is used in Indian folk medicine as an antiulcerogenic agent. Despite of its promising use, there has been no scientific report present regarding its antiulcer activity. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antiulcer activity of bark extract and gum exudate of commiphora caudata on aspirin induced ulcer in rats. Acute toxicity study was performed and 200 mg/kg was selected as an effective dose. Four groups of Albino Swiss rats were included in this study. Aspir...

  1. Optimization of Ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols, tannins and epigallocatechin gallate from barks of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart. Coville bark extracts

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    Jordana N. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mar. Coville is a native plant from Brazil, rich in phenolic compounds and used on popular medicine as a wound healing agent, in the treatment of gastric lesions and as antimicrobial. Materials and Methods: Ultrassound-assisted extraction (UAE was applied to extraction of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, total polyphenols (TP and total tannins (TT content from barks of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mar. Coville. Several operating parameters, namely extraction time (min, liquid to solid ratio (mg/mL, ethanolic strength (%, v/v, were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM with a Box-Behnken design. Results: By using the desirability function approach, the optimum UAE conditions to obtain desirable extraction yields for all these metabolites simultaneously were found at the extraction time of 30 min, solid to liquid ratio of 4 mg/mL and ethanolic strength of 65. Under these conditions, the epigallocatechin gallate, total polyphenols and total tannins content were 0.31; 22.95 and 11.95 % (w/w, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicated that knowledge gained from this study should be helpful to further exploit and apply this resource and also showed the feasibility of ultrasound-assisted extraction for obtaining GEGC, TP and TT from barks of S. adstrigens.

  2. Antioxidant, Cytotoxic, and Antiproliferative Activities and Total Polyphenol Contents of the Extracts of Geissospermum reticulatum Bark

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    Joanna J. Sajkowska-Kozielewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geissospermum species are medically important plants due to their health-promoting effects. The objective of this study was to determine the antioxidant ability and antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of infusions, tinctures, and ethanolic extracts of Geissospermum reticulatum barks in relation to the contents of total phenolics and flavonoids. Seven samples of barks were collected in various regions of Peruvian Amazonia. We found that the amount of total phenolics in the studied products varied from 212.40 ± 0.69 to 1253.92 ± 11.20 mg GAE/kg. In our study there is a correlation (R2=0.7947 between the results of antioxidants assays: FRAP and ORAC for tinctures, infusions, and ethanolic extracts of G. reticulatum barks. We have also observed antiproliferative activities of the ethanolic extracts on normal T-cells. These extracts have caused death on malignant cell lines (THP-1 and HL-60 and this data correlates well with their antioxidant capacity measured by ORAC method. Interestingly, the highest concentration of the ethanolic extract was not toxic in the zebrafish embryo developmental assay. Our results indicate that G. reticulatum is rich in antioxidants and have cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties. The data suggests potential immunosuppressive role of the extracts. This is the first study presenting the results of chemical and biological analysis of multiple preparations from G. reticulatum.

  3. Tableting technology from the individual and new galenic alkaloid consisting preparations of the Phellodendron lavallei bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskheli, M; Vachnadze, V; Kurdiani; Tsagareishvili, N; Bakuridze, A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the research was to work out the technology and tablet composition from new galenic preparations consisting of alkaloids of the bark of Phellodendron lavallei and hydrochloride of berberin on the base of complex research. The bark of the Phellodendron lavallei introduced in Georgia contains alkaloids, from which 2% is berberine used for curing chronicle hepatitis, hepatic cholecystitis and bilestone disease. The structural-mechanical and technological character of tablets and their masses were defined by the known methodic. Friability was studied by defining the fluctuation and bending corner. Volume density was established by using vibration cylinder. Volume density of powders was studied by pyknometers. Porosity was calculated by the bearing of volume density of the masses. The size of pressing was established by defining the firmness of tablets. The granule composition was defined by analysis. On the basis of studying technological and physical-chemical character features of the substances of new galenic preparations and individual substances consisting of alkaloids got from the bark of Phellodendron lavallei, it is scientifically proved and practically offered optimal technological parameters of tablets forming process and recipes. PMID:21778548

  4. Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of Cordia dichotoma (Forster F.) bark extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariya, Pankaj B; Bhalodia, Nayan R; Shukla, V J; Acharya, R N

    2011-10-01

    Cordia dichotoma Forst.f. bark, identified as botanical source of Shlesmataka in Ayurvedic pharmacopoeias. Present study was carried out with an objective to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal potentials of Cordia dichotoma bark. Antibacterial activity of methanol and butanol extracts of the bark was carried out against two gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two Gram positive bacteria (St. pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus). The antifungal activity of the extracts was carried out against three common pathogenic fungi (Aspergillus niger, A.clavatus, and Candida albicans). Zone of inhibition of extracts was compared with that of different standards like Amplicilline, Ciprofloxacin, Norfloxacin and Chloramphenicol for antibacterial activity and Nystain and Greseofulvin for antifungal activity. The extracts showed remarkable inhibition of zone of bacterial growth and fungal growth and the results obtained were comparable with that of standards drugs against the organisms tested. The activity of extracts increased linearly with increase in concentration of extract (mg/ml). The results showed the antibacterial and antifungal activity against the organisms tested.

  5. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening and HPTLC Fingerprinting of Bark Extracts of Symplocos racemosa

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    Rashmi Tambe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish physical constants and fingerprint profile of Symplocos racemosa using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC technique. Methods: Preliminary phytochemical screening was done, physical constants were evaluated and HPTLC studies were carried out. CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with Linomat V applicator, TLC scanner 3, Reprostar 3 and WIN CATS-4 software were used. Results: Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extract showed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenes, tannins, saponins, glycosides, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. The proximate analysis showed satisfactory result with respect to foreign matter, moisture content, ash value and extractive values. HPTLC finger printing of methanol extract of bark powder revealed presence of eight components 0.23 0.44, 0.57, 0.68 0.97,1.17,1.35,1.43 Component number 6 at Rf 1.17 showed maximum concentration.Aqueous extract of bark powder showed seven peaks with Rf values in the range with their Rf value Rf - 0.23 0.27 0.32, 0.38 0.54, 0.75 Component number 5 at 0.0.54 Rf showed maximum concentration. Conclusions: It can be concluded that HPTLC fingerprint analysis of bark powder extract of Symplocos racemosa can be used as a diagnostic tool for the correct identification of the plant and it is useful as a phytochemical marker and also a good estimator of genetic variability in plant populations.

  6. Antifertility Effects of Ethanolic Root Bark Extract of Chrysophyllum albidum in Male Albino Rats

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    A C Onyeka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The present study was conducted to investigate the antifertility activity of the ethanol root bark extract of Chrysophyllum albidum on sperm parameter and hormonal levels in rats. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups of six animals each. The first group (A received distilled water and served as control. The second and third group (B & C of animals were administered the ethanol root bark extract daily at 100mg/kg body weight and 200mg/kg decrease in the caudal epididymal sperm count, motility and sperm morphology was observed compared with the control. Serum gonadotrophins and testosterone were measured and C. albidum extract also caused a dose related significant reduction (p<0.05 of serum testosterone, Luteinizing hormones and FSH concentrations in all treatment groups as compared to the control. The result showed that ethanol extract of the root bark of C. albidum suppresses the hormonal levels and sperm production in rats and deserves to be further investigated as a potential male contraceptive agent. Industrial relevance: The unique advantages of this antifertility option is that they are safer, reliable, affordable, long-lasting, acceptable and can be taken without consulting a health worker in comparison to pharmaceutical drugs that are expensive and have negative side effect. Keywords: Chrysophyllum albidum; Infertility; testosterone; gonadotrophin; testis

  7. In vivo antioxidant activity of bark extract of Bixa orellana L. against acetaminophen- induced oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Smilin Bell Aseervatham G; Shamna R; Sangeetha B; Sasikumar JM

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vivo activity of bark extract of Bixa orellana L. (B. orellana) against acetaminophen induced oxidative stress. Methods: In the present study, antioxidant activity ofB. orellana was evaluated by using normal and acetaminophen induced oxidative stressed rats at the dose of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg p.o. oraly daily for 20 days. The animal's body weight was checked before and after treatment. Different biochemical parameters such as serum glutamate pyruvate transaminases, serum glutamate oxalo transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, cholesterol, protein, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxide was performed. Histopathological analysis of the control and the hepatotoxicity induced rats were performed. Results: It was observed that the B. orellana bark extract showed significant protective activity against acetaminophen induced damage at 200 mg/kg dose level, while the 100 mg/kg dose showed moderate activity. Conclusions: From the result obtained in the present study suggest that B. orellana bark extract elicit protective activity through antioxidant activity on acetaminophen induced hepatic damage in rats.

  8. Protective effects of Ficus racemosa stem bark against doxorubucin-induced renal and testicular toxicity

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    Faiyaz Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ficus racemosa Linn. (Moraceae bark is a rich source of phenolic compounds known to possess potential antioxidant activity offering numerous health benefits. Materials and Methods: The present study evaluated the protective effects of sequential acetone extract of Ficus racemosa bark at two doses (FR 250 ; 250 mg kg -1 and FR 500 ; 500 mg kg -1 p.o. against doxorubicin-induced renal and testicular toxicity in rats. Results: Doxorubicin administration resulted in significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05 in total protein and glutathione concentrations, while increased (P ≤ 0.05 serum urea, creatinine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS. Extract pretreatment restored biochemical parameters toward normalization. FR 250 and FR 500 decreased serum creatinine levels by 22.5% and 44%, while serum urea levels were decreased by 30.4% and 58.8%, respectively. Extract pretreatment (500 mg kg -1 decreased TBARS and increased glutathione levels in the kidney and testis to control levels. These observations were substantiated by histopathological studies, wherein normal renal and testicular architecture was restored in FR500 group. Conclusion: Doxorubicin exposure results in pronounced oxidative stress, and administration of F. racemosa stem bark extract offers significant renal and testicular protection by inhibiting lipidperoxidation-mediated through scavenging free radicals.

  9. The Study of Interactions between Active Compounds of Coffee and Willow (Salix sp. Bark Water Extract

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    Agata Durak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia. Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study.

  10. The study of interactions between active compounds of coffee and willow (Salix sp.) bark water extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Agata; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia). Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study. PMID:25013777

  11. Repellent Constituents of essential oil from Citrus wilsonii stem barks against Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wua, Yan; Chenb, Hai-Ping; Wei, Jian-Yu; Yang, Kai; Tian, Zhao-Fu; Li, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Ping-Juan; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Du, Shu-Shan; Cai, Qian

    2014-10-01

    The essential oil obtained from Citrus wilsonii Tanaka stem barks with hydrodistillation was investigated by GC-FID and GC-MS. The main components of the essential oil were identified to be nerol acetate (44.5%), nerol (13.6%), citronellyl propionate (13.5%) and α-terpineol (3.6%). Among them, the four active constituents, predicted with a bioactivity-test, were isolated and identified as nerolacetate, nerol, citronellyl propionate and α-terpineol. It was found that the essential oil of C. wilsonii stem barks possessed strong repellency (86% and 92%, respectively, at 78.6 nL/cm2, after 2 and 4 h treatment) against Tribolium castaneum adults. Repellency of the four active compounds was also determined. Nerolacetate, nerol, citronellyl propionate and α-terpineol were strongly repellent (100%, 100%, 90% and 96%, respectively, at 15.7 nL/cm2, after 2h treatment) against T. castaneum. Nerol exhibited the same level of repellency as the positive control, DEET. The results indicate that the essential oil of C. wilsonii stem barks and its active compounds have the potential to be developed as natural repellents for control of T. castaneum.

  12. Surveillance of Invitro Antioxidant and Anthelmintic Activity of Methanolic Extract of Syzygium Cumini Bark (Myrtaceae

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    Nellickal Subramanyan Jayamohan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herbal medicines have been used for treating various diseases from ancient times. Even in the era of advanced modern medicine, natural sources of antioxidants and pharmaceutical compounds are of great importance, many of such rich sources are still unearthed.Materials and methods: Methanolic extract of Jamun (Syzygium cumini tree bark was screened for in vitro- antioxidant activity. Preliminary phytochemical screening results showed S. cumini was positive for flavonoids, saponins, tannins and terpenoids. Antioxidant studies includes DPPH scavenging activity, reducing capacity assessment, reducing effect, scavenging of hydrogen peroxide and nitrous oxide scavenging activity against ascorbic acid (ASA standard.Results: The phenolic content was 480 mg % of gallic acid equivalents, tannin 1.9 mg % of gallic acid equivalents, tannin was 250 mg % of catechine equivalents on ferric chloride estimation and flavon content 66.17 µg/ ml was considerable. Anthelmintic property of methanolic and aqueous extract of S. cumini bark showed promising activity against control.Discussion: S. cumini could be a promising agent in antioxidant and anthelmintic research and could lead in development of new drug molecule. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the antioxidant and anthelmintic activity of S. cumini bark

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF WOOD AND BARK EXTRACTIVES AND THEIR TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON THE TMP EFFLUENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaokunZhang; MohiniSain

    2004-01-01

    Wood extractives in model TMP effluents and bio-treated TMP mill effluent were extracted, isolated with liquid-liquid extraction, and analyzed with GC/MS following sylilation. Acute and chronic toxicity of the effluent samples were tested with Ceriodaphnia dubia. Wood and bark extractives are responsible for the toxicity of the TMP effluent to aquatic life. Resin and fatty acids have a dominating contribution to acute toxicity. Removal of them from the effluent cannot deplete all toxicants, some neutral extractives such as phytosterols, are still chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Wood bark has a dramatic impact on acute toxicity of the TMP effluent. Only 5% of spruce bark addition can increase acute toxicity by 38.4%. However, it has a reverse trend for chronic toxicity, which indicates that some neutral wood extractives may play important role in chronic toxicity of the TMP effluent as well. Successful control of the debarking process and debark effluents is essential for achieving high-quality effluent treatment.

  14. Antioxidant, Cytotoxic, and Antiproliferative Activities and Total Polyphenol Contents of the Extracts of Geissospermum reticulatum Bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Nicholas M.; Wawer, Iwona; Paradowska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Geissospermum species are medically important plants due to their health-promoting effects. The objective of this study was to determine the antioxidant ability and antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of infusions, tinctures, and ethanolic extracts of Geissospermum reticulatum barks in relation to the contents of total phenolics and flavonoids. Seven samples of barks were collected in various regions of Peruvian Amazonia. We found that the amount of total phenolics in the studied products varied from 212.40 ± 0.69 to 1253.92 ± 11.20 mg GAE/kg. In our study there is a correlation (R2 = 0.7947) between the results of antioxidants assays: FRAP and ORAC for tinctures, infusions, and ethanolic extracts of G. reticulatum barks. We have also observed antiproliferative activities of the ethanolic extracts on normal T-cells. These extracts have caused death on malignant cell lines (THP-1 and HL-60) and this data correlates well with their antioxidant capacity measured by ORAC method. Interestingly, the highest concentration of the ethanolic extract was not toxic in the zebrafish embryo developmental assay. Our results indicate that G. reticulatum is rich in antioxidants and have cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties. The data suggests potential immunosuppressive role of the extracts. This is the first study presenting the results of chemical and biological analysis of multiple preparations from G. reticulatum.

  15. Nor-hopanes from Zanha africana root bark with toxicity to bruchid beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Philip C; Green, Paul W C; Veitch, Nigel C; Farrell, Iain W; Kusolwa, Paul; Belmain, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Zanha africana (Radlk.) Exell (Sapindaceae) root bark is used by farmers throughout sub-Saharan Africa to protect stored grain from bruchid beetles, such as Callosobruchus maculatus. Chloroform, methanol and water extracts of Z. africana root bark inhibited oviposition and caused significantly higher mortality of C. maculatus at a rate of application equivalent to that applied by farmers compared to control insects. The chloroform extract contained nor-hopanes rarely found in plants of which seven were isolated, one of which was previously known. Two of the most abundant nor-hopanes 3β,6β-dihydroxy-7β-[(4-hydroxybenzoyl)oxy]-21αH-24-norhopa-4(23),22(29)-diene and 3β,6β-dihydroxy-7β-[(4-hydroxybenzoyl)oxy]-24-norhopa-4(23),17(21)-diene were toxic to and reduced oviposition of C. maculatus in a dose dependent manner. Z. africana root bark is rich in insecticidal compounds that account for its effective use by smallholder farmers as an alternative to conventional insecticides. PMID:26803395

  16. The use of tree crown variables in over-bark diameter and volume prediction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özçelik R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Linear and nonlinear crown variable functions for 173 Brutian pine (Pinus brutia Ten. trees were incorporated into a well-known compatible volume and taper equation to evaluate their effect in model prediction accuracy. In addition, the same crown variables were also incorporated into three neural network (NN types (Back-Propagation, Levenberg-Marquardt and Generalized Regression Neural Networks to investigate their applicability in over-bark diameter and stem volume predictions. The inclusion of crown ratio and crown ratio with crown length variables resulted in a significant reduction of model sum of squared error, for all models. The incorporation of the crown variables to these models significantly improved model performance. According to results, non-linear regression models were less accurate than the three types of neural network models tested for both over-bark diameter and stem volume predictions in terms of standard error of the estimate and fit index. Specifically, the generated Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network models outperformed the other models in terms of prediction accuracy. Therefore, this type of neural network model is worth consideration in over-bark diameter and volume prediction modeling, which are some of the most challenging tasks in forest resources management.

  17. Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of the Condensed Tannins from Alaska Cedar Inner Bark

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    Martha Rosales-Castro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure and antioxidant activity of condensed tannins isolated from Alaska Cedar inner bark have been investigated. Oligomers of flavan-3-ol were purified by column chromatography (Sephadex LH-20 and analyzed by 13CNMR and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometries. Their antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1’-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS free radicals scavenging, ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP, and β-carotene-linoleic acid model system (β-CLAMS assays. Results showed that the condensed tannins consents of both homogeneous and heterogeneous oligomers of procyanidins (catechin/epicatechin and prodelphinidins (gallocatechin/ epigallocatechin flavan-3-ol units; and oligomers from trimmers to heptamers with dominant interflavan linkages B-type as it is most common in proanthocyanidins. Condensed tannins showed significant ntioxidant activity as the median inhibition capacity IC 50 is comparable to the catechin control response. Alaska Cedar inner bark oligomers show high antioxidant capacity, evaluated by both methods based on electron transfer mechanisms and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. This bark may be considered as a new source of natural antioxidants for nutraceutical ingredients.

  18. Conifer stored resources and resistance to a fungus associated with the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus.

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    Eleanor C Lahr

    Full Text Available Bark beetles and associated fungi are among the greatest natural threats to conifers worldwide. Conifers have potent defenses, but resistance to beetles and fungal pathogens may be reduced if tree stored resources are consumed by fungi rather than used for tree defense. Here, we assessed the relationship between tree stored resources and resistance to Ceratocystis polonica, a phytopathogenic fungus vectored by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. We measured phloem and sapwood nitrogen, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC, and lipids before and after trees were attacked by I. typographus (vectoring C. polonica or artificially inoculated with C. polonica alone. Tree resistance was assessed by measuring phloem lesions and the proportion of necrotic phloem around the tree's circumference following attack or inoculation. While initial resource concentrations were unrelated to tree resistance to C. polonica, over time, phloem NSC and sapwood lipids declined in the trees inoculated with C. polonica. Greater resource declines correlated with less resistant trees (trees with larger lesions or more necrotic phloem, suggesting that resource depletion may be caused by fungal consumption rather than tree resistance. Ips typographus may then benefit indirectly from reduced tree defenses caused by fungal resource uptake. Our research on tree stored resources represents a novel way of understanding bark beetle-fungal-conifer interactions.

  19. Naturally-Occurring Entomopathogenic Fungi on Three Bark Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Bulgaria

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    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae belong to one of the most damaging groups of forest insects and the activity of their natural enemies –pathogens, parasitoids,parasites or predators suppressing their population density,is of great importance. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic fungi on bark beetles in Bulgaria has been investigated sporadically. The aim of this preliminary study was to find, identify and study morphological characteristics of fungal entomopathogens naturally-occurring in populations of three curculionid species – Ips sexdentatus Boern, Ips typographus (L. and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratz.. Dead pest adults were found under the bark of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies trees collectedfrom forests in the Maleshevska and Vitosha Mountains. Fungal pathogens were isolated into pure cultures on SDAY (Sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract and were identified based on morphological characteristics both on the host and in a culture.Morphological characteristics of the isolates were studied by phenotypic methods. The fungal isolates obtained from dead adults of Ips sexdentatus, Ips typographus and D. autographus were found to belong to the species Beauveria bassiana (Bals. – Criv. Vuillemin,Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo Petch and Isaria farinosa (Holmsk. Fries (anamorph Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Morphological traits of the isolates are described.

  20. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studied by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing /sup 13/C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  2. Pelletized ponderosa pine bark for adsorption of toxic heavy metals from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshabalala, M. A.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Bark flour from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa was consolidated into pellets using citric acid as cross-linking agent. The pellets were evaluated for removal of toxic heavy metals from synthetic aqueous solutions. When soaked in water, pellets did not leach tannins, and they showed high adsorption capacity for Cu(II, Zn(II, Cd(II, and Ni(II under both equilibrium and dynamic adsorption conditions. The experimental data for Cd(II and Zn(II showed a better fit to the Langmuir than to the Freundlich isotherm. The Cu(II data best fit the Freundlich isotherm, and the Ni(II data fitted both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms equally. According to the Freundlich constant KF, adsorption capacity of pelletized bark for the metal ions in aqueous solution, pH 5.1 ± 0.2, followed the order Cd(II > Cu(II > Zn(II >> Ni(II; according to the Langmuir constant b, adsorption affinity followed the order Cd(II >> Cu(II ≈ Zn(II >> Ni(II. Although data from dynamic column adsorption experiments did not show a good fit to the Thomas kinetic adsorption model, estimates of sorption affinity series of the metal ions on pelletized bark derived from this model were not consistent with the series derived from the Langmuir or Freundlich isotherms and followed the order Cu(II > Zn(II ≈ Cd(II > Ni(II. According to the Thomas kinetic model, the theoretical maximum amounts of metal that can be sorbed on the pelletized bark in a column at influent concentration of ≈10 mg/L and flow rate = 5 mL/min were estimated to be 57, 53, 50, and 27 mg/g for copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel, respectively. This study demonstrated the potential for converting low-cost bark residues to value-added sorbents using starting materials and chemicals derived from renewable resources. These sorbents can be applied in the removal of toxic heavy metals from waste streams with heavy metal ion concentrations of up to 100 mg/L in the case of Cu(II.

  3. Hyperglycaemic effect of Artocarpus communis Forst (Moraceae) root bark aqueous extract in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, S O; Ojewole, J O

    2007-01-01

    Decoctions and infusions of Artocarpus communis (Forst) (family: Moraceae) root bark are traditionally used among the Yoruba-speaking people of western Nigeria as folk remedies for the management, control and treatment of an array of human diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although numerous bioactive prenylflavonoids have been isolated from the roots, stem bark and leaves of A communis, to the best of our knowledge, the effects of the plant's root bark extract on animal models of diabetes mellitus have hitherto not been reported in the biomedical literature. In our pilot study, we observed that A communis root bark aqueous extract (ACE) raised blood glucose concentrations in rats. In view of this finding, the present study was undertaken to investigate the glycaemic effect of ACE in comparison with that of streptozotocin (STZ) in Wistar rats. Four groups (A, B, C and D) of Wistar rats, each group consisting of 10 rats, were used in this study. Group A rats received distilled water in quantities equivalent to the volume of ACE administered. Diabetes mellitus was induced in the animals in groups B and C by intraperitoneal (ip) injections of STZ (75 mg/kg body weight). The rats in group C were additionally treated with ACE (50 mg/kg body weight ip) from the third to the tenth day following STZ treatment. Group D rats received ACE (12.5-100 mg/kg body weight ip) only. The effects of ACE were compared with those of STZ on blood glucose concentrations, serum and pancreatic insulin levels, hepatic hexokinase (HXK) and glucokinase (GCK) activities, and hepatic glycogen contents in the experimental animal paradigm used. The rats in treated groups B, C and D exhibited pronounced polyuria, hypo-insulinaemia and hyperglycaemia. Group D rats developed significant hyperglycaemia (p < 0.05) immediately after ACE administration, whereas groups B and C rats became hyperglycaemic 24 to 72 hours post STZ and STZ + ACE treatments, when compared with the control group A

  4. Antioxidant, antimicrobial properties and phenolics of different solvent extracts from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Zahid Iqbal; Anwar, Farooq; Shabir, Ghulam; Rasul, Ghulam; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    This study appraises the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of various solvent extracts (absolute methanol, aqueous methanol, absolute ethanol, aqueous ethanol, absolute acetone, aqueous acetone, and deionized water) from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre. Maximum extraction yield of antioxidant components from bark (16.31%), leaves (11.42%) and seeds (21.51%) of P. pinnata was obtained using aqueous methanol (20:80). Of the extracts tested, the bark extract, obtained with aqueous methanol, exhibited greater levels of total phenolics [6.94 g GAE/100 g dry weight (DW)], total flavonoids (3.44 g CE/100 g DW), inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (69.23%) and DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC(50) value, 3.21 μg/mL), followed by leaves and seeds extracts. Bark extract tested against a set of bacterial and fungal strains also revealed the strongest antimicrobial activity with the largest inhibition zone and lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). HPLC analysis of aqueous methanol extracts from bark, leaves and seeds indicated the presence of protocatechuic, ellagic, ferulic, gallic, gentisic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 4-hydroxycinnamic acids in bark (1.50-6.70 mg/100 g DW); sorbic, ferulic, gallic, salicylic and p-coumaric acids in leaves (1.18-4.71 mg/100 g DW); vanillic, gallic and tannic acids in seeds (0.52-0.65 mg/100 g DW) as the main phenolic acids. The present investigation concludes that the tested parts of P. pinnata, in particular the bark, have strong potential for the isolation of antioxidant and antimicrobial agents for functional food and pharmaceutical uses. PMID:22466852

  5. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Properties and Phenolics of Different Solvent Extracts from Bark, Leaves and Seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L. Pierre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Alkharfy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study appraises the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of various solvent extracts (absolute methanol, aqueous methanol, absolute ethanol, aqueous ethanol, absolute acetone, aqueous acetone, and deionized water from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L. Pierre. Maximum extraction yield of antioxidant components from bark (16.31%, leaves (11.42% and seeds (21.51% of P. pinnata was obtained using aqueous methanol (20:80. Of the extracts tested, the bark extract, obtained with aqueous methanol, exhibited greater levels of total phenolics [6.94 g GAE/100 g dry weight (DW], total flavonoids (3.44 g CE/100 g DW, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (69.23% and DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 value, 3.21 μg/mL, followed by leaves and seeds extracts. Bark extract tested against a set of bacterial and fungal strains also revealed the strongest antimicrobial activity with the largest inhibition zone and lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. HPLC analysis of aqueous methanol extracts from bark, leaves and seeds indicated the presence of protocatechuic, ellagic, ferulic, gallic, gentisic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 4-hydroxycinnamic acids in bark (1.50–6.70 mg/100 g DW; sorbic, ferulic, gallic, salicylic and p-coumaric acids in leaves (1.18–4.71 mg/100 g DW; vanillic, gallic and tannic acids in seeds (0.52–0.65 mg/100 g DW as the main phenolic acids. The present investigation concludes that the tested parts of P. pinnata, in particular the bark, have strong potential for the isolation of antioxidant and antimicrobial agents for functional food and pharmaceutical uses.

  6. Water content and bark thickness of Norway spruce (Picea abies) stems: phloem water capacitance and xylem sap flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Rolf; Landolt, W; Schleppi, P; Michellod, V; Bucher, J B

    2002-06-01

    To determine the relationship between phloem transport and changes in phloem water content, we measured temporal and spatial variations in water content and sucrose, glucose and fructose concentrations in phloem samples and phloem exudates of 70- and 30-year-old Norway spruce trees (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Large temporal and spatial variations in phloem water content (1.4-2.6 mg mg(dw)(-1)) and phloem total sugar concentration (31-70 mg g(dw)(-1)) paralleled each other (r(2) = 0.83, P dendrometer readings were only 8-11% of the maximum measured changes in phloem water content, indicating that reversible changes in bark thickness did not reflect changes in internal water relations. We also studied the relationship between xylem sap velocity and changes in bark thickness in 70-year-old trees during summer 1999 and winter 1999-2000. Sap flow occurred sporadically throughout the winter, but there was no relationship between bark shrinkage or swelling and sap velocity. In winter, mean daily xylem sap velocity was significantly correlated with mean daily vapor pressure deficit and air temperature (P 0 degrees C, changes in relative humidity alone caused changes in thickness of boiled bark samples. Because living bark of Norway spruce trees contains large areas with crushed and dead sieve cell zones-up to 24% of the bark is air-filled space-we suggest that this space can compensate for volume changes in living phloem cells independently of total tissue water content. We conclude that changes in bark thickness are not indicative of changes in either phloem water capacitance or xylem sap flow. PMID:12069917

  7. Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Potentiality of Randia dumetorum Lam. Leaf and Bark via Inhibition of Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Saikia, Bikas; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Singh, Yogendra P; Kalita, Kasturi; Dash, Suvakanta; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Randia dumetorum Lam. (RD) (Rubiaceae) is traditionally used by some tribes of Assam and Manipur of North East India for the treatment of liver ailments. In this context, to scientifically validate this indigenous traditional knowledge, we have evaluated the antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of RD leaf and bark. The methanol extracts of RD leaf and bark were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant activity which exhibited good antioxidant activity in terms of reducing power assay, total antioxidant assay and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging assay. Total phenolic and flavonoid content were found to be 112 ± 3.24 mg and 138 ± 2.46 mg gallic acid equivalents/g extract and 2.6 ± 0.26 mg and 3.34 ± 0.31 mg rutin equivalents/g extract respectively for RD leaf and bark methanol extracts. The in vivo hepato protective activity of the RD leaf and bark extract was evaluated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic damage in male wistar rats. CCl4 administration induced hepatic damage in rats resulted in increased levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, thiobarbituric acid reacting substances, albumin, bilirubin, TNF-α, IL-1β and decreased levels of total protein and antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase. RD leaf and bark methanol extracts pre-treatment exhibited protection against CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity by reversing all the abnormal parameters to significant levels. Histopathological results revealed that RD leaf and bark extracts at 400 mg/kg protects the liver from damage induced by CCl4. The results of this study scientifically validate the traditional use of RD leaf and bark for the treatment of liver ailments. PMID:27471465

  8. Susceptibility of pine stands to bark stripping by chacma Papio ursinus baboons in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe

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    C.A.T. KATSVANGA, L. JIMU, J.F. MUPANGWA, D. ZINNER

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility, intensity and distribution of pine trees to bark stripping by chacma baboons Papio ursinus in three plantations in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe. The number of plots/ha, stripped trees/plot and stripped trees/ha was recorded during the pre-rainy, rainy and post-rainy seasons from August 2006 to May 2007. During data collection, altitude, aspect, season and other site predictor variables (e.g., roads and fire traces, water points, indigenous vegetation conservation areas, crop fields, human settlements, wattle scrubs, rocky areas, open grasslands, earlier stripped sites and roost sites were recorded for each plot in association with selected predictor variables within plantation estates. Data on the number of stripped plots/ha, stripped trees/plot and stripped trees/ha were analysed as dependent variables using the Generalised Linear Model (GLM through SPSS version 15 (2006 to determine which predictor variables were significantly related to bark stripping. Differences between means were tested using Bonferroni tests with a 5% level of significance. Our findings show that bark stripping of pine trees by baboons occurred at all altitudes and aspects. Overall, the number of bark stripped trees/ha did not significantly vary by season. The number of bark stripped plots/ha was lower during the pre-rainy season than the rainy season, whereas the number of bark stripped trees/plot was higher during the pre-rainy than the rainy season. Bark stripping of pines occurred more often in the vicinities of areas with abundant food and water [Current Zoology 55 (6: 389 –395, 2009].

  9. Quick Decline Disease Disturbs the Levels of Important Phytochemicals and Minerals in the Stem Bark of Mango (Mangifera indica

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    Abdul Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quick decline is one of the deadly diseases of mango (Mangifera indica which causes a serious damage to the tree and its production. In the current study, we examined the levels of important phytochemicals and minerals in the stem bark of healthy and infected mango tree. Infected stem bark showed 12.5% lower levels of total sugars and 51.1% higher levels of proteins as compared to healthy parts, whereas no variation was observed in reducing sugar, free amino acid, and ascorbic acid. Among micronutrients, the levels of Zn, Na, Cr, and Cl were lowered by 25%, 54.3%, 25%, and 75.4%, respectively, whereas the level of Ni was 62.5% higher in the infected stem bark when compared with the healthy stem bark. However, other micronutrients did not show significant differences between healthy and infected parts. Among macronutrients, the quantity of N, P, and Mg showed an increase of 51.2%, 34.7%, and 27.6%, respectively, whereas the quantity of Ca and K was decreased by 25.2% and 7.66% in the infected stem barks as compared to healthy ones. The results of this study provide some basic but important information that may ultimately be helpful in managing the quick decline disease in the mango trees.

  10. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Terminalia arjuna Wight & Arn. bark against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sukalyani Debnath; Diganta Dey; Sudipta Hazra; Subhalakshmi Ghosh; Ratnamala Ray; Banasri Hazra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate antimicrobial activity of Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna) bark against clinical strains of multi-drug resistant bacteria, and Candida spp. isolated from patients, as well as the corresponding reference strains.Methods:were evaluated by agar-well diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by broth micro-dilution method. The clinical isolates were studied for antibacterial susceptibility by Kirby and Bauer disk diffusion technique. The antimicrobial activity of water, methanol and chloroform extracts of T. arjuna bark Results: The water and methanolic extracts of T. arjuna bark produced significant zones of inhibition against twenty-two tested bacteria including eight uropathogens. MIC values against the bacteria were found in the range of 0.16 to 2.56 mg/mL. The chloroform extract did not exhibit antibacterial activity. The polar extracts of T. arjuna also demonstrated strong antifungal effect against eight species of Candida, with MIC between 0.16 and 0.64 mg/mL. The antimicrobial efficacy of the polar extracts was found to be commensurate with high polyphenol content in contrast to the non-polar (chloroform fraction). Conclusions: This study has revealed the therapeutic prospect of T. arjuna bark for the treatment of microbial diseases. The polar fraction of the bark could be used for development of novel antimicrobial agents, particularly against urinary tract infections, and candidiasis/candidaemia.

  11. Effect of Tamarindus indica Linn. and Cassia fistula Linn. stem bark extracts on oxidative stress and diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Anoop; Singh, Vijender

    2013-01-01

    Tamarindus indica and Cassia fistula are traditionally important medicinal plants. Stem barks of these plants have not been much explored for their potential hypoglycemic and oxidative stress conditions. The main aim of present study was to evaluate antidiabetic activity along with renal complications and antioxidant potential of alcoholic extracts of stem barks of these plants. Alcoholic extracts of stem barks of Tamarindus indica and Cassia fistula were evaluated for anti-hyperglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Biochemical parameters including blood glucose, serum cholesterol, triglycerides, serum albumin, total protein and creatinine were studied. Antioxidant potential in DPPH, nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical induced in vitro assay methods were evaluated. Acute toxicity studies were carried out to establish the safety of the drugs according to OECD guidelines. There was a significant decrease in blood glucose level in diabetic rats treated with the alcoholic extracts of both plants. Serum cholesterol, serum triglyceride, serum creatinine, serum albumin, total proteins and body weight were recovered to normal levels at the end of the studies. Alcoholic extract of stem bark of both plants showed significant antioxidant activity in DPPH, nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical induced in vitro assay methods. Acute toxicity studies with the extracts of both plants showed no signs of toxicity up to a dose level of 2000 mg/p.o. It can be concluded from the study that Tamarindus indica and Cassia fistula stem barks possess blood glucose lowering effect along with antioxidant effect and protective effect on renal complications associated with hyperglycemia.

  12. Characterization of epiphytic bacterial communities from grapes, leaves, bark and soil of grapevine plants grown, and their relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Guilherme; Lauga, Béatrice; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Mercier, Anne; Lonvaud, Aline; Soulas, Marie-Louise; Soulas, Guy; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Despite its importance in plant health and crop quality, the diversity of epiphytic bacteria on grape berries and other plant parts, like leaves and bark, remains poorly described, as does the role of telluric bacteria in plant colonization. In this study, we compare the bacterial community size and structure in vineyard soils, as well as on grapevine bark, leaves and berries. Analyses of culturable bacteria revealed differences in the size and structure of the populations in each ecosystem. The highest bacteria population counts and the greatest diversity of genera were found in soil samples, followed by bark, grapes and leaves. The identification of isolates revealed that some genera - Pseudomonas, Curtobacterium, and Bacillus - were present in all ecosystems, but in different amounts, while others were ecosystem-specific. About 50% of the genera were common to soil and bark, but absent from leaves and grapes. The opposite was also observed: grape and leaf samples presented 50% of genera in common that were absent from trunk and soil. The bacterial community structure analyzed by T-RFLP indicated similarities between the profiles of leaves and grapes, on the one hand, and bark and soil, on the other, reflecting the number of shared T-RFs. The results suggest an interaction between telluric bacterial communities and the epiphytic bacteria present on the different grapevine parts.

  13. Effect of Butea monosperma Lam. leaves and bark extracts on blood glucose in streptozotocin-induced severely diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that has significant impact on the health, quality of life and life expectancy, as well as on the health care system. Butea monosperma Lam. Kuntze (Fabaceae, commonly known as palash, is widely used in the treatment of various diseases and disorders including diabetes. Materials and Methods: The present study was planned to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of aqueous extracts of B. monosperma leaves and bark in streptozotocin-induced severely diabetic rats. The animals were divided into four groups, with each consisting of six rats, viz. control, diabetic control, leaf extract-treated and bark extract-treated groups. Treatment was continued for 6 weeks. The biochemical estimations included blood glucose and serum insulin levels. Histopathology of pancreas was also performed. Results: The results indicated that both leaf and bark extracts of B. monosperma produced insignificant antihyperglycemic activity. The leaf and bark extracts reduced blood glucose to an extent of 28% and 11%, respectively. It was also evidenced that both leaf and bark extracts did not increase insulin synthesis or secretion and did not improve pancreatic architecture as reflected by the histopathologic studies. Conclusions: The findings of the study emphasize that B. monosperma does not possess significant antidiabetic activity in severe experimental diabetes at the dosage tested.

  14. Cognition-enhancing and neuroprotective activities of the standardized extract of Betula platyphylla bark and its major diarylheptanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Yong; Jeong, Eun Ju; Huh, Jungmoo; Cho, Namki; Kim, Tae Bum; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hong Pyo; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-15

    Diarylheptanoids have been the center of the intensive research efforts for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and its major diarylheptanoids in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice through cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation. Oral administration of the standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark (100mg/kg body weight), aceroside VIII (1mg/kg body weight) and platyphylloside (1 or 2mg/kg body weight) significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced amnesia in passive avoidance test. CREB phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the cortex and hippocampus of the scopolamine-treated mice were markedly increased by the treatment of the standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and platyphylloside. The standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and its major diarylheptanoids also significantly protected HT22 cells against neurotoxicity induced by glutamate insult. The standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and platyphylloside may ameliorate memory deficits by activating the CREB-BDNF pathway and prevent a neurodegeneration by inhibiting neuronal cell death.

  15. Bark beetles and pinhole borers (Curculionidae, Scolytinae, Platypodinae alien to Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Kirkendall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive bark beetles are posing a major threat to forest resources around the world. DAISIE’s web-based and printed databases of invasive species in Europe provide an incomplete and misleading picture of the alien scolytines and platypodines. We present a review of the alien bark beetle fauna of Europe based on primary literature through 2009. We find that there are 18 Scolytinae and one Platypodinae species apparently established in Europe, from 14 different genera. Seventeen species are naturalized. We argue that Trypodendron laeve, commonly considered alien in Europe, is a native species; conversely, we hypothesize that Xyleborus pfeilii, which has always been treated as indigenous, is an alien species from Asia. We also point out the possibility that the Asian larch bark beetle Ips subelongatus is established in European Russia. We show that there has been a marked acceleration in the rate of new introductions to Europe, as is also happening in North America: seven alien species were first recorded in the last decade. We present information on the biology, origins, and distributions of the alien species. All but four are polyphagous, and 11 are inbreeders: two traits which increase invasiveness. Eleven species are native to Asia, six to the Americas, and one is from the Canary Islands. The Mediterranean is especially favorable for invasives, hosting a large proportion of the aliens (8/18. Italy, Spain and France have the largest numbers of alien species (15, 10 and 7 respectively. We point out that the low numbers for at least some countries is likely due to under-reporting. Finally, we discuss the difficulties associated with identifying newly invasive species. Lack of good illustrations and keys hinder identification, particularly for species coming from Asia and Oceania.

  16. Antidiarrheal activity of extracts and compound from Trilepisium madagascariense stem bark

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    Teke Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The present study was performed to evaluate the preventive and curative antidiarrheal effects of the methanol extract, fractions and compound from the stem bark of Trilepisium madagascariense in rats. Materials and Methods : The methanol extract from the stem bark of T. madagascariense, its fractions (n-hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous residue and compound (obtained from further column chromatography of the ethyl acetate fraction were evaluated for the antidiarrheal activity in rats. These test samples (at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg for the extract and fractions and 2.5 mg/kg for compound were assayed on the latent periods, purging indices and fecal frequencies in castor oil-induced diarrhea. Gastrointestinal transit and castor oil-induced enteropooling assays were conducted. Shigella-induced diarrhea was assayed. Blood chemistry and fecal Shigella load were examined. Results : The fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction from the methanol extract of T. madagascariense afforded a known compound [isoliquiritigenin (1]. Compound 1 increased the latent period of diarrhea induction (179.40 min compared to the saline control (60.80 min. The purging indices, fecal frequencies and intestinal enteropooling decreased with an increase in the dose of test samples. The blood cell counts, sera creatinine and fecal Shigella load decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05 in the plant extract-treated rats compared to the saline control. Conclusion : The results of our study, being reported for the first time, provide clear evidence that the methanol extract, fractions and isoliquiritigenin from T. madagascariense stem bark possess antidiarrheal activities.

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL, ANTIOXIDANT AND CYTOTOXIC EFFECTS OF THE BARK OF TERMINALIA ARJUNA

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    Md. Shafikur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of the bark of Terminalia arjuna. The plant part was extracted with methanol to yield the crude extract. The antimicrobial activity test of the methanol extract of the bark of Terminalia arjuna was done using disc diffusion method. Standard antibiotic discs of Kanamycin (30 μg/disc were used as standard. The crude extract was used at a concentration of 500μg/disc. All the microorganisms were susceptible in various degrees to the extract. The methanol extract was found to be moderately active against Staphylococus aereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The zone of inhibition was found from 12 mm to 19 mm. The crude methanol extract was again studied for investigating free radical scavenging potentiality and was subjected to this study with 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH. The methanol extract of the bark of the plant exhibited the potential free radical scavenging activity (antioxidant effect having IC50 value of 7.05 µg/ml. The cytotoxic activity of the crude methanol extract was determined by Brine Shrimp Lethality Bioassay. In this bioassay methanol extract showed positive results and the LC50 was 6.163 µg/ml indicating that the some of the compounds of the extract are biologically active. From this experiment, it was reveled that the test sample showed different response at different concentrations. The mortality rate of brine shrimp was found to be increased with the increased concentrations of sample, and a plot of log of concentration versus percent mortality on the graph produced an approximate linear correlation.

  18. Phenolic Assesment of Uncaria tomentosa L. (Cat’s Claw: Leaves, Stem, Bark and Wood Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirtha Navarro Hoyos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic composition of extracts from Uncaria tomentosa L. from different regions of Costa Rica was studied using advanced analytical techniques such as UPLC/TQ-ESI-MS and 13C-NMR. Samples from leaves, stems, bark and wood (n = 22 were subjected to extraction to obtain phenolic and alkaloid extracts, separately. Comparatively, higher values of total phenolic content were observed for leaves, stems and bark (225–494 gallic acid equivalents/g than for wood extracts (40–167 gallic acid equivalents/g. A total of 32 non-flavonoid and flavonoid compounds were identified in the phenolic extracts: hydroxybenzoic acids (benzoic, salicylic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, prochatechuic, gallic, syringic and vanillic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and isoferulic acids, flavan-3-ols monomers [(+-catechin and (−-epicatechin], procyanidin dimers (B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B7 and two other of unknown structure and trimers (C1, T2 and one of unknown structure, flavalignans (four unknown structures pertaining to the cinchonain family and propelargonidin dimers (four unknown structures, reported for the first time in U. tomentosa. Additionally, alkaloid extracts obtained from the plant residue after phenolic extraction exhibited a content of tetracyclic and pentacyclic alkaloids ranging between 95 and 275 mg/100 g of dry material for bark extracts, and between 30 and 704 mg/100 g for leaves extracts. In addition, a minor alkaloid was isolated and characterized, namely 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinoic acid. Our results confirmed the feasibility of U. tomentosa as a suitable raw material for obtaining phenolic- and alkaloid-rich extracts of potential interest.

  19. Anticonvulsant effect of Rhus chirindensis (Baker F.) (Anacardiaceae) stem-bark aqueous extract in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojewole, John A O

    2008-04-17

    Extracts of Rhus chirindensis stem-bark are used extensively in South African traditional medicines for the treatment, management and/or control of an array of human ailments, including childhood convulsions and epilepsy. In this study, we investigated the anticonvulsant activity of the plant's stem-bark aqueous extract (RCE, 50-800 mg/kg i.p.) against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, picrotoxin (PCT)- and bicuculline (BCL)-induced seizures in mice. Phenobarbitone and diazepam were used as reference anticonvulsant drugs for comparison. Single intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (90 mg/kg), PCT(10 mg/kg) or BCL (30 mg/kg) produced tonic-clonic seizures. Like the standard antiseizure drugs used, Rhus chirindensis stem-bark aqueous extract (RCE, 100-800 mg/kg i.p.) significantly delayed (pbark aqueous extract (RCE, 100-800 mg/kg i.p.) also profoundly antagonized picrotoxin-induced seizures, but only weakly antagonized bicuculline-induced seizures. Although the data obtained in the present study do not provide conclusive evidence, it would appear that RCE produces its antiseizure effect by enhancing GABAergic neurotransmission and/or action in the brain. The results of this laboratory animal study indicate that RCE possesses anticonvulsant activity in the mammalian experimental model used, and thus suggest that the plant may be used as a natural supplementary remedy in the management, control and/or treatment of childhood convulsions and epilepsy. In conclusion, the findings of this study lend pharmacological credence to the suggested folkloric, ethnomedical uses of Rhus chirindensis in the management of childhood convulsions and epilepsy in some rural communities of South Africa.

  20. Effect of Alstonia Scholaris bark extract on testicular function of Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R·S·Gupta; RakhiSharma

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the antifertility effect of Alstonia scholaris bark extract in male rats.Methods:In male Wistar rats Alstonia scholaris bark extract was given by oral route at a dose of 200mg/day for60days,The fertility and testicular function were assessed by mating tests,sperm motility,sperm concentration,biochemical indices and testicular cell population dynamics.Results:Oral feeding with the extract at a dose of 200mg/day for the period of 60days did not cause body weight loss,while the weights of testes,epididymides,seminal vesicle and ventral prostate were significantly reduced.The production of step-19 spermatids was reduced by 79.6%in treated rats.The popu-lation of preleptotene and pachytene spermatocytes were decrased by61.9%and60.1%,respectively.Spematogo-nia and Sertoli cell population were also affected.The seminiferous tubule and Leydig cell nuclear area were reduced significantly(P<0.01)when compared to the controls..Reduced sperm count and motility yesulted in a total supprs-sion of fertility.A significant fall in the protein and sialic acid content of the testes,epididymides,seminal vesicle and ventral prostate as well as glycogen content of testes were also noticed.The fructose content in the seminal vesicle was lowered whereas the testicular cholesterol was elevated as compared with the controls.The following com-pounds were obtained from the extract with chromatographic separation over Si-gel column;α-amyrin,β-amyrin,lupiol acetate,venenative,rhazine and yohimbine,Conclusion:At the dose level employed,Alstonia scholaris bark extract has a significant antifertility effect in male rast;the primary site of action may be post meiotic germ cells(Step19spermatids).

  1. Phenolic Assesment of Uncaria tomentosa L. (Cat's Claw): Leaves, Stem, Bark and Wood Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Hoyos, Mirtha; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Murillo Masis, Renato; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Zamora Ramirez, William; Monagas, Maria J; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The phenolic composition of extracts from Uncaria tomentosa L. from different regions of Costa Rica was studied using advanced analytical techniques such as UPLC/TQ-ESI-MS and (13)C-NMR. Samples from leaves, stems, bark and wood (n = 22) were subjected to extraction to obtain phenolic and alkaloid extracts, separately. Comparatively, higher values of total phenolic content were observed for leaves, stems and bark (225-494 gallic acid equivalents/g) than for wood extracts (40-167 gallic acid equivalents/g). A total of 32 non-flavonoid and flavonoid compounds were identified in the phenolic extracts: hydroxybenzoic acids (benzoic, salicylic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, prochatechuic, gallic, syringic and vanillic acids), hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and isoferulic acids), flavan-3-ols monomers [(+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin)], procyanidin dimers (B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B7 and two other of unknown structure) and trimers (C1, T2 and one of unknown structure), flavalignans (four unknown structures pertaining to the cinchonain family) and propelargonidin dimers (four unknown structures, reported for the first time in U. tomentosa). Additionally, alkaloid extracts obtained from the plant residue after phenolic extraction exhibited a content of tetracyclic and pentacyclic alkaloids ranging between 95 and 275 mg/100 g of dry material for bark extracts, and between 30 and 704 mg/100 g for leaves extracts. In addition, a minor alkaloid was isolated and characterized, namely 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinoic acid. Our results confirmed the feasibility of U. tomentosa as a suitable raw material for obtaining phenolic- and alkaloid-rich extracts of potential interest.

  2. Phenolic Assesment of Uncaria tomentosa L. (Cat's Claw): Leaves, Stem, Bark and Wood Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Hoyos, Mirtha; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Murillo Masis, Renato; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Zamora Ramirez, William; Monagas, Maria J; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The phenolic composition of extracts from Uncaria tomentosa L. from different regions of Costa Rica was studied using advanced analytical techniques such as UPLC/TQ-ESI-MS and (13)C-NMR. Samples from leaves, stems, bark and wood (n = 22) were subjected to extraction to obtain phenolic and alkaloid extracts, separately. Comparatively, higher values of total phenolic content were observed for leaves, stems and bark (225-494 gallic acid equivalents/g) than for wood extracts (40-167 gallic acid equivalents/g). A total of 32 non-flavonoid and flavonoid compounds were identified in the phenolic extracts: hydroxybenzoic acids (benzoic, salicylic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, prochatechuic, gallic, syringic and vanillic acids), hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and isoferulic acids), flavan-3-ols monomers [(+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin)], procyanidin dimers (B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B7 and two other of unknown structure) and trimers (C1, T2 and one of unknown structure), flavalignans (four unknown structures pertaining to the cinchonain family) and propelargonidin dimers (four unknown structures, reported for the first time in U. tomentosa). Additionally, alkaloid extracts obtained from the plant residue after phenolic extraction exhibited a content of tetracyclic and pentacyclic alkaloids ranging between 95 and 275 mg/100 g of dry material for bark extracts, and between 30 and 704 mg/100 g for leaves extracts. In addition, a minor alkaloid was isolated and characterized, namely 18,19-dehydrocorynoxinoic acid. Our results confirmed the feasibility of U. tomentosa as a suitable raw material for obtaining phenolic- and alkaloid-rich extracts of potential interest. PMID:26694348

  3. Efficacy of methanolic extract of Terminalia brownii bark and leaves in treating experimentally infected rabbits

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    O. O. Thoria,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the methanolic extract of Terminalia brownii bark and leaves was tested in rabbits, experimentally infected with Pasteurella multocida strain B2. Two experiments were performed, in one using the bark and in the other using the leaves of the plant. In each experiment 30 rabbits were used and divided into 5 groups 1a, 2a, 3a, 4a, and 5a and 1b, 2b, 3b, 4b and 5b. Each group was injected subcutaneously with 0.2ml of an over night broth culture of Pasturalla Multocida strain B -2 -3 -6 2 (1x10 , 1x10 and 1x10 dilution. Groups 1a and 1b were kept as control. The methanolic extract of Terminalia brownii bark and leaves was prepared as a suspension in normal saline at a concentration of 50mg/ml and given orally by stomach tube at a dose rate of 100 mg/kg body weight to each infected rabbit two days before infection and then every day after infection for 12 days. Blood samples were taken before dosing and then every 3 days after doing for counting leuckocytes and finding the percentages of neutrophils and lymphocytes. The plant extracts were found to be effective when the rabbits were infected with low doses of Pasteurella multocida strain B2. In group 5a and 5b only half of the rabbits (50% died after survival for a number of days, while the other half recovered at the end of therapy. Rabbits of the other infected groups died within 24 hours after infection.

  4. The Hidden History of a Famous Drug : Tracing the Medical and Public Acculturation of Peruvian Bark in Early Modern Western Europe (c. 1650-1720)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Wouter; Pieters, Toine

    2016-01-01

    The history of the introduction of exotic therapeutic drugs in early modern Europe is usually rife with legend and obscurity and Peruvian bark is a case in point. The famous antimalarial drug entered the European medical market around 1640, yet it took decades before the bark was firmly established

  5. Phenolic compounds of the inner bark of Betula pendula: seasonal and genetic variation and induction by wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Jaana; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari; Helander, Marjo; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2012-11-01

    The contents of individual phenolic compounds in the inner bark of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) were analyzed by HPLC-DAD. Samples from 21 mature trees originating from three micropropagated parent trees were collected six times over a 1-year period. Significant seasonal variation in the quantities of ten compounds and four chromatographically unresolved compound pairs was found. A majority of the compounds also exhibited significant quantitative variation among birch clones. There were no qualitative differences associated with the season or among the clones. However, wounding of the bark induced the production of new types of bark phenolics: several ellagitannins were detected in the callus tissues of birch for the first time. PMID:23065107

  6. A study by non-isothermal thermal methods of spruce wood bark materialss after their application for dye removal

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    VIORICA DULMAN

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a study of some materials obtained from spruce bark (Picea abies, Romania, after retention of some dyes frequently used in dyeing processes in the textile industry and waste water treatment. These materials obtained by dye retention exhibit a particular thermal behavior which is different from that of the blank sample (spruce bark. The characteristic temperatures, weight losses, the residue remaining after thermo-oxidative degradation, as well as the activation energies of the significant thermo-destruction stages, estimated from non-isothermal thermogravimetric data, together with the thermal quantities calculated from DTAdata support the conclusion presented in a previous study on dye retention from aqueous solution. The obtained results made evident that, under optimal retention conditions, spruce bark shows the highest retention capacity for the Basic Blue dye, followed by Direct Brown 95 and Direct Brown 2.

  7. Influence of Prunus spp., peach cultivars, and bark damage on oviposition choices by the lesser peachtree borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, T E; Fuest, J; Horton, D L

    2008-12-01

    An examination of oviposition choices by the lesser peachtree borer, Synanthedon pictipes (Grote and Robinson) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), showed that wounded peach, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, bark was attractive to females for oviposition. Females responded to bark that was injured mechanically (e.g., hammer blows, knife cuts, pruning wounds), infested by lesser peachtree borer larvae or injured by disease. In fact, there was no difference in female oviposition response to knife cut wounds and knife cut wounds infested with lesser peachtree borer larvae. Oviposition on wounded bark from three different high chill peach cultivars was similar and strongly suggests that the narrow genetic base of high chill peach cultivars grown in the southeastern United States has little inherent resistance to the lesser peachtree borer. In stark contrast, when provided different Prunus spp., i.e., exotic peach and the native species P. angustifolia and P. serotina, the exotic peach was highly preferred for oviposition by the native lesser peachtree borer.

  8. Attenuation of Helicteres isora L. bark extracts on streptozotocin-induced alterations in glycogen and carbohydrate metabolism in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G; Sharmila Banu, G; Murugesan, A G

    2009-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of Helicteres isora L. on four important enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism (glucokinase [GK], hexokinase [HK] phosphofructokinase [PFK] and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase [FBP]) along with glycogen content of insulin-dependent (skeletal muscle and liver) and insulin-independent tissues (kidneys and brain) in streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg)-induced model of diabetes for 30 days. Administration of bark extracts (100, 200 mg/kg) for 30 days led to decrease in plasma glucose levels by approximately 9.60% and 22.04% and 19.18% and 33.93% on 15th and 30th day, respectively, of the experiment. Liver and two-kidney weight expressed as percentage of body weight significantly increased in diabetics (P bark extract of H. isora partially corrected this alteration. The efficacy of the bark extract was comparable with Tolbutamide, a well-known hypoglycemic drug.

  9. In vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of methanol extracts of Erythrina indica Lam. leaves and stem bark

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan; Jince Mary Joseph; Dharmar Rajendrakumaran

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the total phenolic content and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of methanol extracts of leaves and stem bark of Erythrina indica. Methods: Folin-ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295nm associated with uric acid formation. Results:The methanol extract of stem bark of E. indica contains higher level of total phenolic content (412.8 mg GAE/g extract) and also exhibited higher xanthine oxidase inhibition activity (IC50 52.75μg/mL) than the leaves. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the stem bark of E. indica was highly effective in xanthine oxidase inhibition and might be used for the gout related disorders.

  10. A lead isotopic assessment of tree bark as a biomonitor of contemporary atmospheric lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Gavin J. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Farmer, John G. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: J.G.Farmer@ed.ac.uk

    2007-12-15

    The outermost bark layer of trees, predominantly Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), was sampled at 82 non-urban locations from six arbitrarily designated areas (Northwest, Northeast, Central Highlands, Central and East, Central and Southwest, Southeast), throughout Scotland during 2002-2003 and analysed for lead concentration and stable lead isotopes by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. The mean lead concentration and mean {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio ({+-} 1 standard deviation, SD) for bark samples from the areas were as follows: Northwest (8.0 mg kg{sup -1}, 1.121 {+-} 0.014, n = 17), Northeast (8.9 mg kg{sup -1}, 1.117 {+-} 0.012, n = 12), Central Highlands (11.3 mg kg{sup -1}, 1.130 {+-} 0.010, n = 11), Central and East (35.3 mg kg{sup -1}, 1.120 {+-} 0.007, n = 10), Central and Southwest (20.6 mg kg{sup -1}, 1.125 {+-} 0.018, n = 22) and Southeast (34.4 mg kg{sup -1}, 1.120 {+-} 0.005, n = 10), with an overall mean lead concentration of 18.5 mg kg{sup -1} (range 0.6-146 mg kg{sup -1}, median 8.4 mg kg{sup -1}) and an overall mean {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio of 1.122 {+-} 0.014 (range 1.089-1.168, median 1.122). The overall mean {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio for bark was therefore significantly lower (p < 0.01, t test) than the mean atmospheric {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio of 1.154 {+-} 0.006 (range 1.144-1.167, n = 50) and 1.154 {+-} 0.010 (range 1.134-1.171, n = 26) as determined in rainwater collected routinely at Glensaugh, Central Highlands, during 2002 and 2003, respectively. The bark {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb values, 90% of which lay between 1.10 and 1.14, were more akin to those recorded for the atmosphere (via rainwater, atmospheric particulates, moss, etc.) at various locations throughout Scotland during the 1990s, a decade over which the use of leaded petrol (mean {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio = 1.076 {+-} 0.011) declined markedly before its complete withdrawal in 2000

  11. HPLC Analysis of Esculin and Fraxin in Horse-Chestnut Bark (Aesculus hippocastanum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Stanić, Gordana; Juričić, Blaženka; Brkić, Dragomir

    1999-01-01

    Selective and sensitive HPLC method was used for simultaneous determination of esculin and fraxin in a methanolic extract of horse-chestnut bark (A. hippocastanum L.). The samples were separated on a LiChrospher RP 18 column (150 4 mm i.d.) with the mobile phase consisting of acetic acid, 1%, and methanol (84:16 v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and quantified by measuring the UV absorbance at 340 nm. The assay of esculin and fraxin is linear over the range 0.02–2 mg/mL. It was shown that t...

  12. Phenolic compounds from the stem bark Erythrina Orientalis and detection of antimalaria activity by ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjadarie, Tjitjik Srie; Saputri, Ratih Dewi; Tanjung, Mulyadi

    2016-03-01

    Erythrina orientalis has local name "Dadap". This plant has known producing alkaloids, flavonoids, pterocarpans, stilbenes, and arylbenzofurans which are active compounds.Three prenylated flavonoids, 8-prenyl-daidzein (1), alpinumisoflavone (2) and 4'-O-methyl licoflavanone (3) had been isolated from the stem bark of Erythrina Orientalis. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data,which are IR, UV, MS, and NMR 1D (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D (COSY, HMQC, and HMBC).

  13. Use of bacteriophage for the selective isolation of thermophilic actinomycetes from composted eucalyptus bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtböke, D I; Murphy, N E; Sivasithamparam, K

    1993-01-01

    A method was developed to reduce the numbers of thermophilic bacteria on isolation plates, which in turn facilitated the detection and isolation of thermophilic actinomycetes. The method involves exposing the test material to bacteriophage suspensions prior to inoculation on isolation plates. This method was applied to composted eucalyptus bark samples, which were then inoculated on R8 and 1/2 TSA + 0.2% casein hydrolysate agar plates. The phage susceptibility of thermophilic bacteria provided a selective means of reducing their numbers on isolation plates and hence increased the numbers of Thermomonospora, Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula, and thermophilic Streptomyces spp. on these media in comparison with the numbers recorded from control plates.

  14. Fistulains A and B, New Bischromones from the Bark of Cassia fistula, and Their Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Zhou, Kun; Gao, Xue-Mei; Jiang, Zhi-Yong; Lv, Jun-Jiang; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Guang-Yu; Miao, Ming-Ming; Che, Chun-Tao; Hu, Qiu-Fen

    2015-06-01

    Fistulains A and B (1 and 2), two novel bischromones with unique coupling patterns, alone with their biosynthetic related compound 3, were isolated from the bark of Cassia fistula. Fistulain A represents a new type of dimeric chromone alkaloid biogenetically derived from a chromone and a tricyclic alkaloid through an unusual C-14-N linkage. Fistulain B has a new carbon skeleton with a C-14-C-5' linkage formed between two different chromone units. Fistulain A displayed anti-TMV activity, and both 1 and 2 showed weak cytotoxicities.

  15. Study of Polyphenol Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Myrianthus Arboreus (Cecropiaceae) Root Bark Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Betu Kasangana; Pierre Selim Haddad; Tatjana Stevanovic

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of polyphenolic extracts from root bark of M. arboreus, we have determined the content of various polyphenols in aqueous and ethanol (EtOH) extract as well as two sub-fractions of the latter: ethyl acetate (EAc) and hexane (Hex). The total phenols, flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids and proanthocyanidins have been determined for all studied extracts/fractions by spectrophotometric methods. Both TP content (331.5 ± 2.5 mg GAE/g) and HCA content (20...

  16. Antifungal and larvicidal compounds from the root bark of Cordia alliodora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioset, J R; Marston, A; Gupta, M P; Hostettmann, K

    2000-03-01

    Two new natural products, a phenylpropanoid derivative characterized as 1-(3'-methoxypropanoyl)-2,4,5-trimethoxybenzene (1) and a prenylated hydroquinone, 2-(2Z)-(3-hydroxy-3,7-dimethylocta-2, 6-dienyl)-1,4-benzenediol (2), have been isolated from the root bark of Cordia alliodora. Both compounds exhibited antifungal properties against the phytopathogenic mold Cladosporium cucumerinum. The phenylpropanoid derivative (1), whose structure is closely related to beta-asarone, also demonstrated a marked activity against larvae of the yellow-fever-transmitting mosquito Aedes aegypti. PMID:10757739

  17. Five new prenylated stilbenes from the root bark of Lonchocarpus chiricanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioset, J R; Marston, A; Gupta, M P; Hostettmann, K

    2001-06-01

    Besides the known compounds longistylines C (1), D (2), and 3,5-dimethoxystilbene (5), five new prenylated stilbenes, named chiricanines A--E (3, 4, 6--8), have been isolated from the root bark of Lonchocarpus chiricanus. Their structures were resolved on the basis of spectrometric methods including (1)H, (13)C, and 2D NMR experiments and mass spectrometry. Compound 3 was the only prenylated stilbene to demonstrate antifungal effects against Cladosporium cucumerinum. Four of the isolated compounds showed toxic properties against larvae of the yellow fever-transmitting mosquito Aedes aegypti. Compound 5 was found to be as potent as rotenone in larvicidal dilution tests. PMID:11421729

  18. The occurrence of 2-hydroxy-6-methoxybenzoic acid methyl ester in Securidaca longepedunculata Fresen root bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lognay G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing search for natural fumigants from Senegalese plants, we have investigated Securicicidaca longepedunculata root barks and demonstrated that 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid methyl ester (methyl salicylate, I is responsible of their biocide effect against stored grain insects. A second unknown apparented product, II has been systematically observed in all analyzed samples. The present paper describes the identification of this molecule. The analytical investigations including GCMS, GLC and 1H-NMR. spectrometry led to the conclusion that II corresponds to the 2-hydroxy-6-methoxybenzoic acid methyl ester.

  19. Tree and penguin amplitudes from B to pi pi, K pi, K bar{K}

    OpenAIRE

    Zenczykowski, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The question of the relative size of tree and penguin amplitudes is analyzed using the data on B to pi pi, B^+ to pi^+ K^0, and B^+ to K^+ \\bar{K}^0 decays. Our discussion involves an estimate of SU(3) breaking in the final quark-pair-creating hadronization process. The estimate is based on Regge phenomenology, which many years ago proved very successful in the description of soft hadronic physics. Accepting the Regge prediction as solid, it is then shown that the relative size and phase of t...

  20. Improving Anticancer Activities of Oplopanax horridus Root Bark Extract by Removing Water-soluble Components

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, SHI; Li, Xiao-Li; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Williams, Stainley; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2010-01-01

    Oplopanax horridus is used as a folk medicine by natives in the Northern Pacific coast of North America. This experiment studied the anti-proliferative effects of the extract of O. horridus root bark and its fractions chromatographed from Dianion HP20 resin column with water, 30, 50, 70 and 100% ethanol on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The role of O. horridus in the cell cycle and apoptosis of MCF-7 cells was also investigated. The results showe...

  1. Protective effects of pine bark extract against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Je-Won; Lee, In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyuk; Moon, Changjong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of pine bark extract (pycnogenol®, PYC) against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following four groups: (1) vehicle control, (2) cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg), (3) cisplatin & PYC 10 (10 mg/kg/day), and (4) cisplatin & PYC 20 (20 mg/kg/day). A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin induced hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferase and histopathological al...

  2. Anticholinesterase activities of cold and hot aqueous extracts of F. racemosa stem bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Urooj, Asna

    2010-04-01

    The present study evaluated the anticholinesterase activity of cold and hot aqueous extracts of Ficus racemosa stem bark against rat brain acetylcholinesterase in vitro. Both the cold aqueous extract (FRC) and the hot aqueous extract (FRH) exhibited a dose dependent inhibition of rat brain acetylcholinesterase. FRH showed significantly higher (P

  3. Dimethoxyflavone Isolated From the Stem Bark of Stereospermum Kunthianum Possesses Antidiarrhoeal Activity in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Ching, F. P.; Otokiti, I O; Egert-omoneukanrin, B

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the antidiarrhoeal activity of 3, 7, 4′-trihydroxy-3′-(8″-acetoxy-7″-methyloctyl)-5, 6-dimethoxyflavone, a flavonoid isolated from the stem bark of Stereospermum kunthianum. The antidiarrhoeal activity was evaluated using rodent models with diarrhoea. The normal intestinal transit, castor oil-induced intestinal transit and castor oil-induced diarrhoea tests in mice as well as castor oil-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in rats were employed in the st...

  4. Preliminary pharmacological activity of the methanolic extract of Premna integrifolia barks in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajera Khatun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Premna integrifolia Linn (Family: Verbenaceae synonym of Premna serratifolia has tremendous medicinal value. Preliminary pharmacological studies were performed on the methanolic extract of Premna integrifolia (MEPI bark to investigate neuropharmacological, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Materials and methods: Neuropharmacology study was done by open field and hole cross test whereas acetic acid writhing test and formalin induced pain was done for analgesic activity of MEPI. Carrageenan induced inflammatory model was considered for anti-inflammatory activity evaluation.   Results: A statistically significant (p

  5. Glucose lowering efficacy of Ficus racemosa bark extract in normal and alloxan diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskara Rao, R; Murugesan, T; Sinha, Sanghamitra; Saha, B P; Pal, M; Mandal, Subhash C

    2002-09-01

    The glucose-lowering efficacy of a methanol extract of the stem bark of Ficus racemosa Linn. (MEBFR) (Family Moraceae) was evaluated both in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The MEBFR at the doses examined (200 and 400 mg/kg p.o.) exhibited significant hypoglycaemic activity in both experimental animal models when compared with the control group. The activity was also comparable to that of the effect produced by a standard antidiabetic agent, glibenclamide 10 mg/kg. The present investigation established pharmacological evidence to support the folklore claim that it is an antidiabetic agent.

  6. Anti-inflammatory diterpene dimers from the root barks of Aphanamixis grandifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zhang, Yang-Mei; Luo, Jian-Guang; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-07-21

    A total of 14 new diterpene dimers, aphanamenes C-P ()1-14, with four known homologous compounds were isolated from the root barks of Aphanamixis grandifolia Bl. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, and their absolute configurations were determined using the CD exciton chirality method. In addition, all the compounds exhibited significant inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 macrophages, with IC50 values between 7.75 and 38.23 μM.

  7. Study on Antibacterial Activity of the Bark of Garcinia lanceifolia Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Nilutpal Sharma; Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhusan; Gogoi, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    Garcinia lanceifolia Roxb. is an important and endemic medicinal plant of Assam which has been used by various ethnic communities of Northeast India to treat various disorders like dysentery, dyspepsia, and biliousness. The plant is considered to be containing much medicinal value and is also eaten raw or made into pickles by the local people. Our present study has been focused on the evaluation of the antibacterial activity of the methanolic extract of the bark of Garcinia lanceifolia which may lead us to a scientific evidence of the use of this plant in cases of dysentery and diarrhoea.

  8. NEW FLAVONOL DIESTERS FROM THE STEM BARK OF FICUS CARICA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat M Zaffer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the methanolic extract of the stem bark of Ficus carica L. (Moraceae resulted in the isolation of two new flavonol diesters, characterized as 3,5-dihydroxy-7,4'-dimethoxy-flavonol-3-octadec-9''-en-oxy-5-hexadecanoate and 3,5,3'-trihydroxy-7,4'-dimethoxy flavonol -3-n–octadec-9''-en-oxy-5-hexadecanoate, along with known compound n-pentyl-n-docosanoate, β-amyrin acetate and n-hexadec-9-enoyl-2-n-hexadecanoyl-glyceryl phosphate. The structures of the isolated compounds were established by spectral data analysis.

  9. Early Detection of Bark Beetle Green Attack Using TerraSAR-X and RapidEye Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Kändler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles cause widespread damages in the coniferous-dominated forests of central Europe and North America. In the future, areas affected by bark beetles may further increase due to climate change. However, the early detection of the bark beetle green attack can guide management decisions to prevent larger damages. For this reason, a field-based bark beetle monitoring program is currently implemented in Germany. The combination of remote sensing and field data may help minimizing the reaction time and reducing costs of monitoring programs covering large forested areas. In this case study, RapidEye and TerraSAR-X data were analyzed separately and in combination to detect bark beetle green attack. The remote sensing data were acquired in May 2009 for a study site in south-west Germany. In order to distinguish healthy areas and areas affected by bark beetle green attack, three statistical approaches were compared: generalized linear models (GLM, maximum entropy (ME and random forest (RF. The spatial scale (minimum mapping unit was 78.5 m2. TerraSAR-X data resulted in fair classification accuracy with a cross-validated Cohen’s Kappa Coefficient (kappa of 0.23. RapidEye data resulted in moderate classification accuracy with a kappa of 0.51. The highest classification accuracy was obtained by combining the TerraSAR-X and RapidEye data, resulting in a kappa of 0.74. The accuracy of ME models was considerably higher than the accuracy of GLM and RF models.

  10. Phytochemical screening, total phenolics and antioxidant activities of bark and leaf extracts of Goniothalamus velutinus (Airy Shaw from Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erum Iqbal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Goniothalamus velutinus Airy Shaw belongs to the family Annonaceae which is known to have anticancer, antitumor and many other bioactivities. Natives of Sabah and Sarawak use root decoction of G. velutinus for the treatment of headache and food poisoning while the bark was used as a mosquito repellent. Bark and leaf extracts of this plant, obtained from Brunei Darussalam, were tested for phytochemical and antioxidant activities. Phytochemical screening of plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, steroids, terpenoids and cardiac glycosides. Quantitative determination of total phenolics, total flavonoids, and various in vitro antioxidant activities (DPPH, ABTS and FRAP of methanolic extract was carried out using colorimetric methods. The total phenolic content, expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE per gram of extract, was found to be 68 mg GAE/g and 78 mg GAE/g for bark and leaves respectively. The radical scavenging activity measurement, expressed in terms of EC50 (effective concentration of extract in μg/mL that reduces DPPH absorbance to 50% as compared to negative control, for leaf and bark extracts was found to be 155 μg/mL and 204 μg/mL respectively. Standards trolox and ascorbic acid show EC50 value of 5 μg/mL and 4 μg/mL respectively. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC was measured using the ABTS and FRAP method. Result for bark and leaf extracts was 79 mg and 106 mg trolox equivalent (TE/g respectively for the ABTS method. For FRAP assay, results for bark and leaf extracts were 80 and 89 mg TE/g respectively.

  11. Comparative analysis of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of bark and leaves of Acacia ferruginea DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samriti Faujdar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of hydroalcoholic extracts of bark and leaves of Acacia ferruginea DC. Hydroalcoholic extracts of bark and leaves were evaluated for analgesic activity using hot plate method and acetic acid-induced writhing test, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema method. Hydroalcoholic extract of the bark at the dose of 50 mg/kg (6.10 ± 0.30 and leaves at a dose of 100 mg/kg (5.72 ± 0.39 after 45 min exhibited significant (P < 0.001 analgesic activity in hot plate test, which was comparable to Tramadol (6.11 ± 0.31 at a dose of 10 mg/kg. However, in acetic acid-induced writhing test, hydroalcoholic extract of both bark (90% and leaves (90.91% showed maximum protection from acetic acid at the dose of 100 mg/kg as compared to standard drug (50.91% at a dose of 5 mg/kg. In the evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity, hydroalcoholic extract of leaves at a dose of 400 mg/kg had significantly (74.68% inhibited the inflammation as comparable to indomethacin (82.8% after 3 h of induction of carrageenan. It is concluded that hydroalcoholic extracts of bark and leaves have central analgesic and peripheral analgesic effects, respectively. Both hydroalcoholic extracts of the bark and leaves significantly reduced the paw oedema at a dose of 400 mg/kg and exhibited anti-inflammatory activity.

  12. Elevated bark temperature in unremoved stumps after disturbances facilitates multi-voltinism in Ips typographus population in a mountainous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischer Peter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of Ips typographus generations developed in a year might be indicative of its population size and of risk to Norway spruce forests. Warm weather and unremoved fallen trees after natural disturbances are thought of as key factors initiating large population increase. We studied I. typographus development in a spruce forest of the Tatra National Park, which was heavily affected by large-scale disturbances in the last decade. Repeated windthrows and consequent bark beetle outbreaks have damaged almost 20,000 hectares of mature Norway spruce forests, what is a half of the National Park forest area. Current I. typographus population size and its response to the environment and to forestry defense measures attract attention of all stakeholders involved in natural resource management, including public. In this paper we analyse the potential I. typographus population size in two consecutive years 2014 and 2015, which represented a climatologically normal year and an extremely hot year, respectively. We used bark temperature and phenology models to estimate the number of generations developed in each year. In 2014, the average bark temperature of standing living trees at study sites was 14.5 °C, in 2015 it increased to 15.7 °C. The bark temperature of fallen logs was 17.7 °C in 2014, and 19.5 °C in 2015. The bark temperature of standing living trees allowed to develop one and two generations in 2014 and 2015, respectively. The elevated bark temperature of fallen logs allowed to develop two generations in 2014 and three generations in 2015. The good match between the predicted and observed timing of each generation emergence as well as the large increase in the number of catches in pheromone traps in 2015 indicated a dramatic increase of the I. typographus population in the extremely warm year, especially at the unmanaged windthrown site.

  13. Effect of oral administration of bark extracts of Pterocarpus santalinus L. on blood glucose level in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, B; Giri, R; Kesavulu, M M; Apparao, C

    2001-01-01

    The effect of administration of different doses of Pterocarpus santalinus L. bark extracts in normal and diabetic rats, on blood glucose levels was evaluated in this study. Among the three fractions (aqueous, ethanol and hexane), ethanolic fraction at the dose of 0.25 g/kg body weight showed maximum antihyperglycemic activity. The same dose did not cause any hypoglycemic activity in normal rats. The results were compared with the diabetic rats treated with glibenclamide and the antihyperglycemic activity of ethanolic extract of PS bark at the dose of 0.25 g/kg b.w. was found to be more effective than that of glibenclamide. PMID:11137350

  14. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening and Proximate Analysis of the trunk bark of Alstonia scholaris (L. R.Br.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anowar Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alstonia scholaris (L. R.Br. (Apocynaceae, called satiyana in Assamese, is an evergreen tropical tree native to the Indian sub-continent and South East Asia. A. scholaris has a rough grayish bark and a milky sap rich in poisonous alkaloids. The tree is traditionally used by many ethnic groups of North-East India and elsewhere as a remedy for various ailments. Scientific standardization and pharmaco-botanical parameters for the trunk bark is limited; hence this study, which attempts to both analyze the phytochemical composition and establish a physicochemical standard. This information will be helpful in controlling quality parameters for the development of drugs

  15. The biophysical controls on tree defense against attacking bark beetles in managed pine forests of the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, K. A.; Miniat, C. F.; Denham, S. O.; Ritger, H. M.; Williams, C.; Guldin, J. M.; Bragg, D.; Coyle, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bark beetles are highly damaging pests capable of destroying large areas of southern pine forests, with significant consequences for regional timber supply and forest ecosystem carbon dynamics. A number of recent studies have shown that following bark beetle outbreak, significant effects on ecosystem carbon and water cycling can occur. Relatively few studies have explored how ecosystem carbon and water cycling interact with other factors to control the hazard or risk of bark beetle outbreaks; these interactions, and their representation in conceptual model frameworks, are the focus of this study. Pine trees defend against bark beetle attacks through the exudation of of resin - a viscous compound that deters attacking beetles through a combination of chemical and physical mechanisms. Constitutive resin flow (CRF, representing resin produced before attack) is assumed to be directly proportional to the balance between gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP) according to the Growth-Differentiation Balance theory (GDB). Thus, predictions for tree mortality and bark beetle dynamics under different management and climate regimes may be more accurate if a model framework describing the biophysical controls on resin production (e.g., GDB) were employed. Here, we synthesize measurements of resin flow, bark beetle dynamics, and ecosystem C flux from three managed loblolly pine forests in the Southeastern U.S.: the Duke Forest in Durham, NC; the Savannah River DOE site near Aiken, SC; and the Crossett Experimental Forest in southern Arkansas. We also explore the relationship between CRF and induced resin flow (IRF, representing the de novo synthesis of resin following stem wounding) in the latter two sites, where IRF was promoted by a novel tree baiting approach and prescribed fire, respectively. We assimilate observations within a hierarchical Bayesian framework to 1) test whether observations conform to the GDB hypothesis, and 2) explore effects

  16. The Curative Activity of Isolated Fraction from Spathodea campanulata Beauv Stem Bark on Rat’s Exposed to Benzopyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masruri Masruri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a screening results of the secondary metabolites composed in Spathodea campanulata Beauv stem bark, evaluate inhibiting activity of malondialdehyde (MDA on rat’s cancer model exposed with benzopyrene, and the histology of its lung. The secondary metabolite of the stem bark fraction consisted of alkaloids, flavonoids-phenolic, terpenoid and steroid compounds. The isolated fraction contained of these metabolites significantly indicate bioactivity by reducting of malondialdehyde (MDA level, and also histology appearance of the lung tissue prepared from the benzopyrene-exposed rat indicated a curative activity.

  17. Climate change induced effects on the predisposition of forests of the water protection zone Wildalpen to disturbances by bark beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, P.; Pennerstorfer, J.; Schopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    The provision of drinking water of high quality is a precious service of forests. Large-scale disturbances like forest fires, wind throws, pest outbreaks and subsequent clear cutting may lead to changes in hydrology (runoff as well as percolation). Furthermore, water quality can be negatively influenced by increased erosion, increased decomposition of litter and humus and leaching of nitrate. Large-scale epidemics of forest pests may induce forest decline at landscape scale with subsequent long-lasting negative effects on water quality. The European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.), is one of the most significant sources of mortality in mature spruce forest ecosystems in Eurasia. The objective of this study was to apply a complex predisposition assessment system for hazard rating and for the evaluation of climate change impacts for the water protection forests of the City of Vienna in Wildalpen. The following steps have been done to adapt/apply the bark beetle phenology model and the hazard rating system: -application, adaptation and validation of the bark beetle phenology model PHENIPS concerning start of dispersion, brood initiation, duration of development, beginning of sister broods, voltinism and hibernation - spatial/temporal modelling of the phenology and voltinism of I. typographus using past, present as well as projected climate data - application and validation of the stand- and site related long-term predisposition assessment system using forest stand/site data, annual damage reports and outputs of phenology modelling as data input - mapping of endangered areas and assessment of future susceptibility to infestations by I. typographus and other disturbing agents based on climate scenarios using GIS. The assessment of site- and stand-related predisposition revealed that the forest stands in Wildalpen are highly susceptible to bark beetle infestation. More than 65% of the stands were assigned to the predisposition classes high/very high. Only 10% of

  18. Antidiabetic effect of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jayaprasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been increasing at an alarming rate around the world, and experts have relied on remedies from the utilization of ancient drugs that are essentially derived from plants. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male albino Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (50 mg/kg b.w.. The diabetic rats were administered orally with C. swietenia bark (CSB methanolic (CSBMEt and aqueous (CSBAEt (250 mg/kg b.w. extracts and glibenclamide (600 µg/kg b.w. by intragastric intubation for 45 days. The result showed a heavy loss in weight, increase in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level, and decline in plasma insulin and total hemoglobin content. Furthermore, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase were found to be increased whereas hexokinase and glycogen contents were decreased in STZ induced diabetic rats. CSBAEt, CSBMEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats showed moderate reduction in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels; in addition, plasma insulin and hemoglobin levels were elevated. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and liver glycogen were improved remarkably. CSBMEt results were comparable to the standard drug glibenclamide. The present findings support the usage of the plant extracts for the traditional treatment of diabetes.

  19. Organochlorine pesticides removal from wastewater by pine bark adsorption after activated sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sérgio; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Ruiz, Antonio; Ratola, Nuno; Alves, Arminda

    2011-04-01

    Pesticides have been responsible for strong environmental impacts, mainly due to their persistence in the environment. Removal technologies are usually combined, because degradation of organic matter is needed prior to a tertiary treatment to guarantee pesticides elimination to levels below legal limits (normally 0.1 microg L(-1)). Pine bark was studied as an alternative to activated carbon, for organochlorine pesticides removal. A combination of technologies based on biodegradation with activated sludge followed by pine bark adsorption treatment was used for lindane (LIN) and heptachlor (HEP) removal from contaminated waters. Pesticides were quantified throughout the process by GC-ECD preceded by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). An experimental set-up was maintained for 4 months, by feeding a standard solution with pesticides concentration of 1 microg L(-1) each and known organic matter (Chemical Oxygen Demand, COD, -563 mg O2 L(-1)) on a daily basis. COD suffered a reduction of about 81% in the biological step and no increase was detected in the subsequent adsorption treatment. Overall removal efficiency was 76.6% and above 77.7% for LIN and HEP, respectively.

  20. Antimicrobial kinetics of Alstonia scholaris bark extract-mediated AgNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supraja, N.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; David, E.; Giridhara Krishna, T.

    2016-06-01

    Nanobiotechnology is considered as one of the important branches of nanotechnology, and research on synthesis of nanoscale materials, silver in particular, using plant and plant parts has been progressing rapidly. Herein, we used bark extract of Alstonia scholaris one of the most important medicinal plants to synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which exhibited excellent antimicrobial properties against biofilm formed in drinking water PVC pipes. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles was done by treating 90 mL of 1 mM AgNO3 aqueous solution with 10 mL of 5 % bark extract. As-prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized using the biophysical techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering for the measurement of hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential. The kinetics of the antimicrobial activity against PVC biofilm of prepared silver nanoparticles were done using comparative solution suspension time-killing assessments and which are evidenced in Epi-fluorescent microscopic observations.

  1. Pentacyclic triterpenes in birch bark extract inhibit early step of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary Navid, M; Laszczyk-Lauer, M N; Reichling, J; Schnitzler, P

    2014-09-25

    Antiviral agents frequently applied for treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and its derivatives. The antiviral effect of a triterpene extract of birch bark and its major pentacyclic triterpenes, i.e. betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid against acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSV type 1 strains was examined. The cytotoxic effect of a phytochemically defined birch bark triterpene extract (TE) as well as different pentacyclic triterpenes was analyzed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. TE, betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests with IC50 values ranging between 0.2 and 0.5 μg/ml. Infectivity of acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strains was significantly reduced by all tested compounds and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action, TE and the compounds were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had low effect on virus multiplication. Minor virucidal activity of triterpenes was observed, however both TE and tested compounds exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Pentacyclic triterpenes inhibit acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of HSV-1 in the early phase of infection.

  2. Picea mariana bark: a new source of trans-resveratrol and other bioactive polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Martha-Estrella; Royer, Mariana; Herbette, Gaëtan; Desjardins, Yves; Pouliot, Roxane; Stevanovic, Tatjana

    2012-12-01

    The ethyl acetate soluble fraction obtained from the hot water extract of Picea mariana bark (BS-EAc(f)) has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Thus, in the current study, we isolated and characterised major compounds of this fraction by HPLC, NMR and MS analyses. On the whole, 28 compounds were identified, among which were five neolignans, seven lignans, trans-resveratrol, three phenolic acids and four flavonoids. To the best of our knowledge, 2,3-dihydro-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-(2S,3S)-1,4-benzodioxin-6-propanol, threo and erythro 3-methoxy-8,4'-oxyneolignan-3',4,7,9,9'-pentol, pallasiin, (±) epi-taxifolin, homovanillyl alcohol, orcinol and 2-[4-(3-hydroxypropyl)-2-methoxyphenoxy]-1,3-propanediol are reported for the first time in the Picea genus. P. mariana dry bark contains at least 104μgg(-1)dw of trans-resveratrol and it could be therefore considered as a new accessible source of this molecule. This study provides novel information about the identity of major compounds present in BS-EAc(f), which is essential for the understanding of the anti-inflammatory and nutraceutical potential of this extract. PMID:22953840

  3. Quillajasides A and B: New Phenylpropanoid Sucrose Esters from the Inner Bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Christiane; Conrad, Jürgen; Steingass, Christof B; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2015-10-14

    The phenolic composition of freshly prepared aqueous extracts of the inner bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina was compared to that of commercially available Quillaja extracts, which are currently used as emulsifiers in foods and cosmetics. Major phenolics in both extracts were (+)-piscidic acid and several p-coumaroyl sucrose esters. Among the latter, two new compounds were isolated and characterized: α-l-rhap-(1→4)-α-l-rhap-(1→3)-(4-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-α-d-glup-(1→2)-(3-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-β-d-fruf (quillajaside A) and β-d-apif-(1→4)-α-l-rhap-(1→4)-α-l-rhap-(1→3)-(4-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-α-d-glup-(1→2)-(3-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-β-d-fruf (quillajaside B). In addition, a putative biosynthetic pathway of at least 20 structurally related p-coumaroyl sucrose esters was tentatively identified. Besides their antioxidant activity and their potential function as substrate for enzymatic browning reactions, the new compounds are highly characteristic for both the inner bark of Q. saponaria and commercial extracts derived therefrom. Consequently, they might serve as authenticity markers for the detection of Quillaja extracts in food and cosmetic formulations. PMID:26375986

  4. Identification of new phytoconstituents and antimicrobial activity in stem bark of Mangifera indica (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ruchi; Singh, S K; Maharia, R S; Garg, A N

    2015-02-01

    Mangifera indica, commonly called mango or amra belonging to a family of Anacardiaceae, is an important medicinal plant widely used in a variety of Ayurvedic preparations. Extract of its bark, leaves, flowers and kernels are being extensively used for curing various chronic diseases. Mango wood is used in yagya as base fire through which medicated smoke is generated. Three new compounds have been isolated from methanolic and hexane extracts of stem bark: 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, mono(2-ethylhexyl)ester and 9,12-tetradecadiene-1-ol-acetate from the hexane extract and 3-chloro-N-(2-phenylethyl) propanamide from the methanolic extract. These were first separated by thin layer chromatography and later in a silica gel column and identified by characteristic infrared bands corresponding to respective functional groups. The compounds were further confirmed on the basis of GC-MS fragmentation pattern after comparing the data with NIST mass spectral database. All three compounds exhibited antimicrobial activity due to triterpenoids and flavonoids. Elemental analyses by INAA show it to be enriched in essential nutrient elements such as Ca, Fe, K, Mn and Zn which all play an important role in enzymatic processes.

  5. Antioxidant Capacity and Proanthocyanidin Composition of the Bark of Metasequoia glyptostroboides

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    Fengyang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng is the only living species in the genus Metasequoia Miki ex Hu et Cheng (Taxodiaceae, which is well known as a “living fossil” species. In the Chinese folk medicine, the leaves and bark of M. glyptostroboides are used as antimicrobic, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory drug for dermatic diseases. This study is the first to report the free radical scavenging capacity, antioxidant activity, and proanthocyanidin composition of the bark of M. glyptostroboides. We observed total of six extracts and fractions, which were easily obtained by water-ethanol extraction and followed by a further separation with D101 resin column chromatography, had significant DPPH radical, superoxide anion radical, and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity, total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC, lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity, and metal ions chelating capacity. The fraction MGEB, which was obtained by 60% ethanol extraction and followed by a further separation with D101 resin column chromatograph, possessed the highest proanthocyanidin content and the highest free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. Furthermore, MGEB could significantly protect against CCl4 induced acute liver injury through inhibition of oxidative stress in mice. In addition, ten proanthocyanidins were isolated from MGEB, and six of them were firstly reported from this plant.

  6. Antiinflammatory activity of aqueous extract of Stereospermum kunthianum (cham, sandrine petit stem bark in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereospermum kunthianum, Cham, Sandrine Petit (family: Bignoniaceae is used in traditional medicine to treat bronchitis, pneumonia and coughs, gastritis, wounds, rheumatic arthritis, ulcers, dysentery, leprosy and venereal diseases in humans. The antiinflammatory activity of the aqueous extract of the stem bark was investigated with experimental animal models using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema, leucocytes migration and granuloma air pouch tests in rats. The extract (100, 200 or 400 mg/kg at 3 h post-treatment caused a significant (p< 0.05 reduction in the paw oedema in rats. The effect of the extract was most pronounced at the dose of 400 mg/kg and was higher than that of indomethacin (10 mg/kg. The extract (400 mg/kg caused a significant (p< 0.05 reduction in the number of recruited leucocytes and it′s inhibition of peritoneal exudate formation was comparable to that of indomethacin at a dose of 10 mg/kg. The exudate formation inhibited by 400 mg/kg of the extract in the granuloma air pouch test was comparatively less to that of indomethacin at a dose of 10 mg/kg. The findings of the study indicate that the aqueous extract of Stereospermum kunthianum stem bark possesses antiinflammatory activity which is probably related to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. This is a possible rationale for its folkloric use as an antiinflammatory agent.

  7. Antinociceptive effect of aqueous extracts from the bark of Croton guatemalensis Lotsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen, Rejón-Orantes José; Willam, Hernández Macías John; Del Carmen, Grajales Morales Azucena; Nataly, Jiménez-García; Stefany, Coutiño Ochoa Samantha; Anahi, Cañas Avalos; Domingo, Parcero Torres Jorge; Leonardo, Gordillo Páez; Miguel, Pérez de la Mora

    2016-01-01

    Croton guatemalensis Lotsy (CGL), known as "copalchi" in Chiapas, Mexico, is used for the treatment of fever, abdominal pain and malaria and also as a remedy for chills and for treating rheumatism. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether aqueous extracts from the bark of this plant possesses indeed antinociceptive properties by using two different animal models of nociception, the acetic acid-induced writhing test and the hot plate model. The results showed that i.p. administration of this extract (0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) 30 min prior testing had significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and that the reduction of writhings (85.5 % as compared to the control) at the highest dose tested is similar to that exhibited by dipyrone (250 mg/kg). This effect was not reversed by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, suggesting that the endogenous opioid system does not underlie the antinociceptive effects of CGL in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. No effects were however observed in the hot-plate model. Our results indicate that aqueous extracts from Croton guatemalensis bark contain pharmacologically active constituents endowed with antinociceptive activity. It is suggested that cyclooxygenase inhibition might be at least partially involved in the antinociceptive effects of this extract. PMID:27051428

  8. Characterization of a novel natural cellulosic fiber from Prosopis juliflora bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, S S; Kumaravel, A; Nagarajan, T; Sudhakar, P; Baskaran, R

    2013-02-15

    Natural fibers from plants are ideal choice for producing polymer composites. Bark fibers of Prosopis juliflora (PJ), an evergreen plant have not been utilized for making polymer composites yet. Hence, a study was undertaken to evaluate their suitability as a novel reinforcement for composite structures. PJ fiber (PJF) was analyzed extensively to understand its chemical and physical properties. The PJF belonged to gelatinous or mucilaginous type. Its lignin content (17.11%) and density (580 kg/m(3)) were relatively higher and lower, respectively in comparison to bark fibers of other plants. The free chemical groups on it were studied by FTIR and XRD. It had a tensile strength of 558±13.4 MPa with an average strain rate of 1.77±0.04% and microfibril angle of 10.64°±0.45°. Thermal analyses (TG and DTG) showed that it started degrading at a temperature of 217 °C with kinetic activation energy of 76.72 kJ/mol.

  9. Antinociceptive effect of aqueous extracts from the bark of Croton guatemalensis Lotsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen, Rejón-Orantes José; Willam, Hernández Macías John; Del Carmen, Grajales Morales Azucena; Nataly, Jiménez-García; Stefany, Coutiño Ochoa Samantha; Anahi, Cañas Avalos; Domingo, Parcero Torres Jorge; Leonardo, Gordillo Páez; Miguel, Pérez de la Mora

    2016-01-01

    Croton guatemalensis Lotsy (CGL), known as "copalchi" in Chiapas, Mexico, is used for the treatment of fever, abdominal pain and malaria and also as a remedy for chills and for treating rheumatism. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether aqueous extracts from the bark of this plant possesses indeed antinociceptive properties by using two different animal models of nociception, the acetic acid-induced writhing test and the hot plate model. The results showed that i.p. administration of this extract (0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) 30 min prior testing had significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and that the reduction of writhings (85.5 % as compared to the control) at the highest dose tested is similar to that exhibited by dipyrone (250 mg/kg). This effect was not reversed by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, suggesting that the endogenous opioid system does not underlie the antinociceptive effects of CGL in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. No effects were however observed in the hot-plate model. Our results indicate that aqueous extracts from Croton guatemalensis bark contain pharmacologically active constituents endowed with antinociceptive activity. It is suggested that cyclooxygenase inhibition might be at least partially involved in the antinociceptive effects of this extract.

  10. Antinociceptive effect of aqueous extracts from the bark of Croton guatemalensis Lotsy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejón-Orantes José del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Croton guatemalensis Lotsy (CGL, known as "copalchi" in Chiapas, Mexico, is used for the treatment of fever, abdominal pain and malaria and also as a remedy for chills and for treating rheumatism. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether aqueous extracts from the bark of this plant possesses indeed antinociceptive properties by using two different animal models of nociception, the acetic acid-induced writhing test and the hot plate model. The results showed that i.p. administration of this extract (0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg 30 min prior testing had significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and that the reduction of writhings (85.5 % as compared to the control at the highest dose tested is similar to that exhibited by dipyrone (250 mg/kg. This effect was not reversed by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, suggesting that the endogenous opioid system does not underlie the antinociceptive effects of CGL in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. No effects were however observed in the hot-plate model. Our results indicate that aqueous extracts from Croton guatemalensis bark contain pharmacologically active constituents endowed with antinociceptive activity. It is suggested that cyclooxygenase inhibition might be at least partially involved in the antinociceptive effects of this extract.

  11. Antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of methanol extract of Syzygium operculatum (Roxb.) Niedz. bark

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Mizanur Rahman; Ahmmed Rusti Foysol; Anaytulla; Md. Masudur Rahman; Mohammed Aktar Sayeed; Md. Abdullah-Al-Mamun; Mohammad Mustakim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antidiabetic and antioxidant effects of the methanol extract of Syzygium operculatum bark (MSOB) using in vivo and in vitro models. Methods: Antidiabetic activity was assessed by using alloxan induced (120 mg/kg body weight) diabetic mice. The plant extract (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg body weight) was administrated i.p. to diabetic mice in comparison with standard metformin hydrochloride (150 mg/kg body weight). The antioxidant activity of the extract was evaluated by using a range of in vitro assays and results were compared to standards. Results: The extract MSOB 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg reduced the blood glucose level 44.05%and 55.53% respectively where the standard drug metformin reduced 69.42% in dose of 150 mg/kg body weight. The extract MSOB showed significant 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity, total phenol content, total flavonoid content and reducing power capacity compared to standards. The IC50 values were found 300.34 μg/mL in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay where 40.31 μg/mL for ascorbic acid. The total phenol and flavonoid contents were 197.5 and 267.5 mg of gallic acid equivalent per gram, respectively. Conclusions: The present study indicates that the extract of Syzygium operculatum bark is the potential sources of natural antioxidant and possesses significant antidiabetic activities.

  12. Effect of Bark Extract and Gum Exudate of Commiphora Caudata on Aspirin Induced Ulcer in Rats

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    R Nanthakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Commiphora caudata is used in Indian folk medicine as an antiulcerogenic agent. Despite of its promising use, there has been no scientific report present regarding its antiulcer activity. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antiulcer activity of bark extract and gum exudate of commiphora caudata on aspirin induced ulcer in rats. Acute toxicity study was performed and 200 mg/kg was selected as an effective dose. Four groups of Albino Swiss rats were included in this study. Aspirin suspended in 0.5 % carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC was given orally to group 1 rats as a negative control group. Group 2 and group 3 animals received methanolic extract and gum exudate of commiphora caudata respectively. Sucralfate was given orally to group 4 animals as a positive control. The methanolic extract of commiphora caudata has been found to reduce total acidity as much as by sucralfate. However, it has not changed the fluid secretion. The gum preparation not only reduced the total acidity but also considerably reduce the gastric fluid secretion. In case of ulcer score sucralfate, methanolic extract and the gum have produced the low ulcer score compared to aspirin. Increased gastric mucosal protective mechanism by bark extract and gum exudate is probably due to the presence of some active principles present in the plant. However, further investigations are required to elucidate their exact mechanism of anti-ulcer activity.

  13. Tannins gravimetric yield condensed in Anadenanthera peregrina bark in different diameter classes

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    Caroline Junqueira Sartori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to determine the gravimetric yield of condensed tannins in the Anadenanthera peregrina bark in different diameter classes. Fifty-nine trees samples were collected of Anadenanthera peregrina, at 1.30m of the ground (diameter at breast height - DBH, distributed in seven diameter classes. The barks were dried and crushed in mill of hammer. Composite sample was made to prepare the extract. The extraction was done using water in the ratio 15:1 (v/w, added 3% sodium sulfite (w/w in water-bath at 70°C for 4 hours. The material was filtered using fine cloth strainer and concentrated on a heating plate at approximately 150 g. It was determined the extract mass and removed 10 g for obtaining solids content and 20g for the Stiasny's index. The average values of total solids content, Stiasny's index, condensed tannin content and the compound content non-tannin were 11.34%; 75.79%; 12.76% and 4.07%, respectively. The content of solids, Stiasny's index, compound content non-tannin show significant differences between diameter classes. For the condensed tannins production, the diameter class parameter there was no influence.

  14. Response of exposed bark and exposed lichen to an urban area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, A.M.J. [Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Oliveira do Hospital (Portugal). Oliveira do Hospital College of Technology and Management; Freitas, M.C.; Canha, N. [URSN, Sacavem (Portugal). Inst. Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN); Verburg, T.G.; Wolterbeek, H.T. [Technical Univ. of Delft (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to understand emission sources of chemical elements using biomonitoring as a tool. The selected lichen and bark were respectively Parmotrema bangii and Criptomeria japonica, sampled in the pollution-free atmosphere of Azores (Sao Miguel island), Portugal, and were exposed in the courtyards of 22 basic schools of Lisbon. The exposure was from January to May 2008 and from June to October 2008 (designated through the text as winter and summer respectively). The chemical element concentrations were determined by INAA. Conductivity of the lichen samples was measured. Factor analysis (MCTTFA) was applied to winter/summer bark/lichen exposed datasets. Arsenic emission sources, soil with anthropogenic contamination, a Se source, traffic, industry, and a sea contribution, were identified. In lichens, a physiological source based on the conductivity values was found. The spatial study showed contribution of sources to specific school positioning. Conductivity values were high in summer in locations as international Lisbon airport and downtown. Lisbon is spatially influenced by marine air mass transportation. It is concluded that one air sampler in Lisbon might be enough to define the emission sources under which they are influenced. (orig.)

  15. Host-Tree Monoterpenes and Biosynthesis of Aggregation Pheromones in the Bark Beetle Ips paraconfusus

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    John A. Byers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A paradigm developed in the 1970s that Ips bark beetles biosynthesize their aggregation pheromone components ipsenol and ipsdienol by hydroxylating myrcene, a host tree monoterpene. Similarly, host α-pinene was hydroxylated to a third pheromone component cis-verbenol. In 1990, however, we reported that amounts of ipsenol and ipsdienol produced by male Ips paraconfusus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae feeding in five host pine species were nearly the same, even though no detectable myrcene precursor was detected in one of these pines (Pinus sabiniana. Subsequent research showed ipsenol and ipsdienol are also biosynthesized from smaller precursors such as acetate and mevalonate, and this de novo pathway is the major one, while host tree myrcene conversion by the beetle is the minor one. We report concentrations of myrcene, α-pinene and other major monoterpenes in five pine hosts (Pinus ponderosa, P. lambertiana, P. jeffreyi, P. sabiniana, and P. contorta of I. paraconfusus. A scheme for biosynthesis of ipsdienol and ipsenol from myrcene and possible metabolites such as ipsenone is presented. Mass spectra and quantities of ipsenone are reported and its possible role in biosynthesis of aggregation pheromone. Coevolution of bark beetles and host trees is discussed in relation to pheromone biosynthesis, host plant selection/suitability, and plant resistance.

  16. Kinetic modeling of the ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols from Picea abies bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Liliana; Talmaciu, Adina Iulia; Volf, Irina; Popa, Valentin I

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the kinetics of polyphenols extraction from spruce bark (Picea abies) under ultrasounds action was investigated. Studies were performed in order to express the effect of some specific parameters (as: ultrasounds, surface contact between solvent and solid, extraction time and temperature) on the total phenolic content (TPC). Experiments were performed in the presence and absence of ultrasounds, using different contact surfaces between solvent and solid, for times from 5 to 75min and temperatures of 318, 323 and 333K. All these factors have a positive influence on the process, enhancing the extraction rate by recovering higher amounts of polyphenols. The process takes place in two stages: a fast one in the first 20-30min (first stage), followed by a slow one approaching to an equilibrium concentration after 40min (second stage). In these conditions, the second-order kinetic model was successfully developed for describing the mechanism of ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols from P. abies bark. Based on this model, values of second-order extraction rate constant (k), initial extraction rate (h), saturation concentration (Cs) and activation energy (Ea) could be predicted. Model validation was done by plotting experimental and predicted values of TPC's, revealing a very good correlation between the obtained data (R(2)>0.98). PMID:27150760

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of methanol extract of Kalopanax pictus bark and its fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E B; Li, D W; Hyun, J E; Kim, I H; Whang, W K

    2001-10-01

    The methanol extract of Kalopanax pictus bark was evaluated on anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities in animal models. The extract produced a significant inhibition of vascular permeability at doses of 1 and 3 g/kg, p.o. in mice and of leucocyte emigration at doses of 0.15 and 0.3 g/rat, s.c., in CMC-pouch of rats. However, the extract (0.25 and 3 g/kg, p.o.) did not show anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced edema of rats. The extract at a dose of 2.5 g/kg, p.o. inhibited writhing syndromes, whereas it did not exhibit anti-nociceptive in Randall-Selitto assay. The methanol extract was then partitioned with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol to give each soluble fraction and finally water soluble fraction. Among those fractions, the inhibitory effect on vascular permeability in mice was produced by ethyl acetate soluble fraction in this activity-guided fractionation. The methanol extract showed low acute toxicity in mice. These results suggest that the methanol extract of Kalopanax pictus bark has an anti-inflammatory activity which is distributed in the ethyl acetate fraction. PMID:11535364

  18. Acute toxicity of the methanolic extracts of Terminalia brownii bark in rats

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    Thoria, O. O,

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to reveal the toxicopathological effects of the methanolic extract of the bark of Terminalia brownie in Swiss albino rats. The methanolic extracts of the bark were given at doses rate of 100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg (group 1, 2 and 3 respectively body weight to Swiss albino rats. Oral administration of the extracts caused symptoms such as dullness, inappetence and decreased activity in group 2 and 3 rats. The mean values of haemoglobin (Hb concentration, red blood cell counts (RBC and packed cell volume (PCV decreased in the three treated groups. Serum analysis indicated no changes in the activity of the enzyme alanine amino transferase (ALT or the concentration of urea, creatinine, bilirubin, total protein, and total albumin in the sera of all treated rats during the course of the experiment. However, there was an increase in the activity of the enzyme aspartate amino transferase (AST in the sera of group 3 and 4 rats. The main lesions found were congestion and hemorrhage in the liver, kidney, lung, stomach and small intestine.

  19. Morphoanatomical studies of Uncaria tomentosa and Uncaria guianensis bark and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, M; Di Sapio, O; Gattuso, S; Pereyra, E Li

    2004-02-01

    The genus Uncaria Schreber (Rubiaceae) includes species that are widely distributed in tropical areas. The inner bark of the stems and leaves of two native species of South America, Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Roemer & Schultes) DC., and Uncaria guianensis (Aublet) J. F. Gmelin, "cat's claw" are used in either folk medicine or in procuring phytotherapeutic drugs. These species contain about sixty active substances which are being tested widely for possible medicinal value. The following applications are considered: peptic ulcer, rheumatism, tumours, antiinflammatory effect, inflammation, diabetes and as general tonic. Currently, Uncaria tomentosa is in demand as tea, tablets or capsules in more than 30 countries outside Perú, as well as inside the country. Pharmacognosy studies are required to determine the comparative morphoanatomical and micrographic features for identification and quality control purposes. Several microscopic parameters, including phloem fibers, calcium oxalate crystals, starch granules, trichomes, and foliar architecture should be considered. The aim of our work is to analyse comparative morphoanatomical and micrographic features which might provide assistance in the identification, analysis and standardization of Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Roemer & Schultes) DC. and Uncaria guianensis (Aublet) J. F. Gmelin stem bark and leaves in order to obtain phytotherapeutic drugs, and of the crude drug as well.

  20. Urban and industrial contribution to trace elements in the atmosphere as measured in holm oak bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drava, Giuliana; Brignole, Daniele; Giordani, Paolo; Minganti, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn were measured by ICP-OES in samples of bark of the holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) collected from trees in different urban environments (residential and mixed residential/industrial). The use of tree bark as a bioindicator makes it easy to create maps that can provide detailed data on the levels and on the spatial distribution of each trace element. For most of the elements considered (As, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V and Zn), the concentrations in the industrial sites are about twice (from 1.9 to 2.8 times higher) of those in the residential area. Arsenic, Fe and Zn show the highest concentrations near a steel plant (operational until 2005), but for the other elements it is not possible to identify any localized source, as evident from the maps. In areas where urban pollution is summed up by the impact of industrial activities, the population is exposed to significantly higher amounts of some metals than people living in residential areas.

  1. Chemical constituents of the underground stem bark of Duguetia furfuracea (Annonaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Denise B. da; Tulli, Elaine C.O.; Siqueira, Joao M. de [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia]. E-mail: jmaximo@nin.ufms.br; Garcez, Walmir S. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Nascimento, Evandro A. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2007-07-01

    In the present investigation the underground parts of Duguetia furfuracea (Annonaceae) were used to conduct a phytochemical study that included the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality bioassay. The substances (-)-duguetine {beta}-N-oxide, (-)-duguetine, dicentrinone, (-)-Nmethyltetrahydropalmatine, and (+)-N-methylglaucine were isolated from the alkaloid extract of the bark of the underground stem, and the ureide allantoin was also isolated by precipitation from the ethanol extract of the wood of the underground stem. A fresh volatile oil and a nonpolar extract were also obtained from the underground stem bark. The substances 2,4,5- trimethoxystyrene, {alpha}-gurjunene, aromadendrene, bicyclogermacrene, (E)-methylisoeugenol, and {alpha}-asarone were isolated from the fresh volatile oil and polycarpol, {beta}-caryophyllene oxide, 2,4,5- trimethoxystyrene, {alpha}-asarone, and asaraldehyde were obtained from the petroleum ether extract. The present study describes for the first time the alkaloid (-)-duguetine {beta}-N-oxide and the occurrence of (-)-N-methyltetrahydropalmatine and (+)-N-methylglaucine in the family Annonaceae. All extracts were active in the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. (author)

  2. Low antiplasmodial activity of alkaloids and amides from the stem bark of Zanthoxylum rubescens (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penali L.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The stem bark of Zanthoxylum rubescens (syn. Fagara rubescens is used for treating fevers associated with malaria in the Ivory Coast. Three alkaloids: N-nornitidine, 7,9-dimethoxy-2,3- methylenedioxybenzophenanthridine, and bis[6-(5,6- dihydrochelerythrinyl] ether; and two amides: zanthomamide and lemairamide, were isolated from the stem bark of this plant. These compounds were screened in vitro against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain and the chloroquine-resistant FCM29 strain of P. falciparum. N-nornitidine was found to be inactive. 7,9- dimethoxy-2,3-methylenedioxybenzophenanthridine, lemairamide and zanthomamide showed weak activity with average IC50 values ranging from 45.6 μM to 149.9 μM. Bis[6-(5,6- dihydrochelerythrinyl] ether was the most active of the tested compounds with mean IC50s of 14.9 ± 1.4 μM in FCM29 strain and 15.3 ± 3.4 μM in 3D7 strain (~ 58 to ~ 1130 times less active than chloroquine respectively. The anti-Plasmodium activities of the tested alkaloids of Z. rubescens were low; and do not encourage the use of this plant as antimalarial.

  3. Surveying the endomicrobiome and ectomicrobiome of bark beetles: The case of Dendroctonus simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Audrey-Anne; Bergeron, Amélie; Constant, Philippe; Buffet, Jean-Philippe; Déziel, Eric; Guertin, Claude

    2015-11-26

    Many bark beetles belonging to the Dendroctonus genus carry bacterial and fungal microbiota, forming a symbiotic complex that helps the insect to colonize the subcortical environment of the host tree. However, the biodiversity of those bacteria at the surface of the cuticle or inside the body parts of bark beetles is not well established. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacterial microbiome associated with the eastern larch beetle, Dendroctonus simplex, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The ecto- and endomicrobiome and the subcortical galleries were investigated. Several bacterial genera were identified, among which Pseudomonas, Serratia and Yersinia are associated with the surface of the beetle cuticle, and genera belonging to Enterobacteriaceae and Gammaproteobacteria with the interior of the insect body. The index of dissimilarity indicates that the bacterial microbiome associated with each environment constitutes exclusive groups. These results suggest the presence of distinct bacterial microbiota on the surface of the cuticle and the interior of D. simplex body. Additionally, the bacterial diversity identified in the galleries is substantially different from the ectomicrobiome, which could indicate a selection by the insect. This study reports for the first time the identification of the eastern larch beetle microbiome.

  4. Characteristics of palm bark pyrolysis experiment oriented by central composite rotatable design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotatable design was applied for directing pyrolysis experiment of palm bark with the variation of retention time and reaction temperature. Based on the regression equations, the optimal operating conditions were extrapolated at 13.2 min, 459 °C and 15.7 min, 475 °C. The gas product comprised mainly C1–C4 hydrocarbons with the content up to 58.2 wt% while the liquid product was a complex mixture composed of mostly oxygenated compounds. Owing to using the high pressure condition as in tubing reactor, the reaction characteristics were different from those at normal pressure, thus possibly resulting in the high selectivity for liquid product. The analysis result of solid residue after reaction showed that the oxygen content was decreased noticeably to 25.4 wt% as compared to that of raw biomass due to pyrolysis. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of palm kernel cake in a tubing reactor. • Apply the central composite rotatable design. • Effect of namely retention time, reaction temperature and mass of sample on product yields. • Analysis of bio-oils from the pyrolysis of palm bark

  5. ANTIPYRETIC POTENTIAL OF DIFFERENT EXTRACTS OF CASSIA FISTULA LINN (FABACEAE BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Goutam Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnobotany is a multidisciplinary science defined as the interaction between plants and people. On the basis of ethnomedicinal use, antipyretic activity of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, chloroform, methanol extract of Cassia fistula Linn (Fabaceae bark has been investigated in albino rats. Normal body temperature is regulated by a centre in the hypothalamus that ensures a balance between heat loss and production. Fever occurs when there is a disturbance of this hypothalamic ‘thermostat’, which leads to the set-point of body temperature being raised. Once there has been a return to the normal set-point, temperature regulating mechanism (dilatation of superficial blood vessels, sweating etc. operates to reduce temperature. The study was carried out by using dose of 300 mg/kg orally. Experimental results exhibited that petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, chloroform, methanol extract of Cassia fistula bark, possess a significant antipyretic effect. After inducing 15% w/v suspension of yeast (1ml /100gm Body weight, temperature of experimental animal was increased. Then different extracts of the drug was induced into albino rats, which shows significant results. It was observed that methanol extract at a dose of 300 mg / kg body weight showed maximum antipyretic activity amongst other extracts which is statistically significant as the value of p<0.05.

  6. Phytochemical screening and cytotoxicity studies of Chrysophyllum pruniforme Pierre ex Engl. barks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Aboughe Angone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chrysophyllum pruniforme of family sapotaceae is a plant used in traditional medicine in Gabon. Materials and Methods: In this study, C. pruniforme barks were subjected to phytochemical screening and cytotoxicity investigations. Different concentrations of aqueous and total phenolic extract were tested on mice and on human erythrocytes. Results: Phytochemical screening of C. pruniforme barks revealed the presence of flavonoids, saponins, and tannins, reducing sugars, polyphenols and traces of anthraquinones. When tested in vitro, aqueous and the phenolic extracts showed hemolytic activities on human erythrocytes with phenolic compounds being more cytotoxic than aqueous extracts. In vivo study of toxicity, allowed to determine the LD 50 at 90 mg/kg for the doses of 50, 150 and 250 mg/kg of body weight. Conclusion: These data indicate in one hand that C. pruniforme is rich in phenolic compounds and that the aqueous and total phenolic extracts could be considered as toxic for mice and maybe potentially toxic to humans in the other hand.

  7. Antidiuretic activity of aqueous bark extract of Sri Lankan Ficus racemosa in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasooriya, W D; Jayakody, J R A C; Nadarajah, T

    2003-01-01

    The decoction (D) of the bark of Ficus racemosa Linn (Family: Moraceae) is claimed as an antidiuretic by some Sri Lankan traditional practitioners. However, the validity of this claim has not been scientifically proven or refuted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiuretic potential of D of the bark of F. racemosa (made as specified in traditional use) in rats using three doses (250, 500 or 1000 mg/kg) following oral administration. The reference drug used was ADH. The results demonstrated both the low- and high-doses of D and ADH significantly impaired the total urine output. The D-induced antidiuresis had a rapid onset (within 1 h), peaked at 3 h and lasted throughout the study period (5 h). However, antidiuretic potential of D was about 50% lower than that of ADH. The D was well tolerated even with subchronic administration. The D caused a reduction in urinary Na+ level and Na+/K+ ratio, and an increase in urinary osmolarity indicating multiple mechanisms of action. The results provide scientific support for its claimed antidiuretic action and deserve intensive scrutiny.

  8. GASTROPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF PONGAMIA PINNATA STEM BARK IN WISTAR ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khumanthem Deepak Singh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the stem bark of Pongamia pinnata Linn, belonging to the family Fabaceae. It is one of the fast growing, glabrous, deciduous tree and has recently gained importance as a commercial source of alkaloids like kaempferol, karanjin. Methanolic extract of Pongamia pinnata was subjected to phytochemical screening. Acute gastric ulceration was produced by oral administration of various noxious chemicals including Ethanol, Indomethacin, Pylorus ligation and Cold restraint stress. In pharmacological screening, the effect of methanolic extract of stem bark of Pongamia pinnata Linn was evaluated in Wistar Albino Rats of either sex(150-200g for Antiulcer activity at a dose of 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg(p.o and the effect was compared with Omeprazole(10mg/kg p.o as standard drug. The extract decreased the ulcer index thereby increasing the percentage ulcer protection. Thus from the study and literature, it can be concluded that Pongamia pinnata Linn have potent antiulcer activity.

  9. Study of $\\chi_{cJ}$ decaying into $\\phi$ $K^*(892)$ $\\bar{K}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    Using a data sample of 106 million $\\psi(3686)$ events collected with the BESIII detector operated at the BEPCII storage ring, we study for the first time the decay $\\chi_{cJ}\\to\\phi K^{0}_S K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$ and $\\chi_{cJ}\\to\\phi K^{+} K^{-}\\pi^{0}$ in the E1 radiative transition $\\psi(3686)\\to\\gamma\\chi_{cJ}$. The decays are dominated by the three-body decay $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\phi K^*(892)\\bar{K}$. We measure branching fractions for this reaction via the neutral and charged $K^*(892)$ and find them consistent with each other within the expectation of isospin symmetry. In the $K\\bar{K}\\pi$ invariant mass distribution a structure near the $K^*(892)\\bar{K}$ mass threshold is observed, and the corresponding mass and width are measured to be $1412\\pm4(\\mathrm{stat.})\\pm8(\\mathrm{sys.}) \\mathrm{MeV}/c^2$ and $\\Gamma$ = $84\\pm12(\\mathrm{stat.})\\pm40(\\mathrm{sys.}) \\mathrm{MeV}$, respectively. The observed state favors an assignment to the $h_1(1380)$, considering its possible $J^{PC}$ and comparing its mass, width and...

  10. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of softwood bark and softwood char particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murlidhar Gupta; Jin Yang; Christian Roy [Universite Laval, Sainte-Foy, PQ (Canada). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2003-05-01

    Very few data exist regarding the thermal properties of softwood bark and therein derived softwood chars. This work describes the measurement of specific heat and particle thermal conductivity of softwood (SW), softwood bark (SB) and therein derived softwood char (SC). Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) was used to measure the specific heat. At 313 K, the measured specific heat was found to be 1172, 1364 and 768 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1} for SW, SB and SC, respectively. The specific heat of SW and SB increased linearly from 1172 to 1726 and 1364 to 1777 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, with an increase in temperature from 313 to 413 K. With an increase in temperature from 313 to 713 K, the specific heat of SC doubled from 768 to 1506 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1} and followed a polynomial relationship with temperature. A modified Fitch apparatus was constructed, calibrated and used for measurement of particle conductivity of SW, SB and SC. The particle thermal conductivity of SB was found to be twice that of SC, i.e. 0.2050 and 0.0946 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, at 310 K. The particle thermal conductivity of SW, SB and SC followed a linear increase with temperature. 32 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects of dioclenol flavonoid isolated from stem bark of dioclea grandiflora on mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E R De Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the anxiolitic and anticonvulsant effect of fraction (alcoholic obtained from the stem bark of Dioclea grandiflora (Dg and Dioclenol on mice using several behavioural assays. Groups of mice treated by the intraperitoneal (i.p. route with doses of 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg (i.p. of the fraction and Dioclenol with a dose of 10 mg / kg showed significant action in the Elevated Plus-maze (EPM (time spent in open arms and time in spent in the closed arms. The Hole-board Test also showed a significant increase in the time spent in the Head-dip and Marble-Burying Tests. The same treatment increased the duration of the sleeping time induced by Sodium Pentobarbital, and showed a significant increase in protection against Pentylenotetrazole induced convulsion. These results indicate an anxiolitic-like and anticonvulsant-like effect of the fraction of stem bark of Dg and Dioclenol in mice. The phytochemical analysis suggests that the alcoholic fraction has higher concentration of flavonoid active (Dioclenol and deserves further analysis. The studies conducted with the Dioclea grandiflora, can contribute, in the long term, in the field of its action in the CNS this flavonoid. Industrial relevance: The studies conducted with the Dioclea grandiflora, can contribute, in the long term, in the field of its action in the CNS.

  12. Phytochemical Investigation, Isolation and Characterization of Betulin from Bark of Betula Utilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Joshi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Betula utilis is a hardy perennial plant of moderate size up to 20 M in height, forming the upper limit of forest vegetation. It inhabitates along the Himalayan range from Bhutan westwards, ascending to an altitude of 4200 M. The bark of Betula utilis contains sitosterol, betulin, betulic acid, oleanolic acid, acetyloleanolic acid, lupeol, lupenone, methyl betulonate, methyl betulate and a new triterpenoid karachic acid. The ethanolic extract of powdered drug of Betula utilis was prepared. Most of the constituents were found to be present in the ethanolic extract. Thus it was concluded that constituents of Betula utilis bark are more soluble in polar solvents. The ethanolic extract showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, saponins and triterpenes. After identification of crude extract, the main work was to isolate the desired compound (betulin. So, fractionation of ethanolic extract was done by suspending it in water and then extracted it with n-hexane and dichloromethane. Betulin was isolated from dichloromethane fraction using column chromatography. Ethyl acetate and n-hexane in various ratios (1:10; 1:5; 1:3; 1:2 was used as eluent for separation of desired compound from the dichloromethane fraction. After isolation of desired compound, it was subjected to characterization. For characterization studies; melting range, TLC and spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, Mass and NMR were utilized.

  13. C-Glucoside xanthone from the stem bark extract of Bersama engleriana

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    Pierre C Djemgou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The genus Bersama belongs to the Melianthaceae family and comprises of four species (B. swinnyi, B. yangambiensis, B. abyssinica, and B. engleriana all of which are very high trees; the latter two detected species are found in Cameroon. Previous phytochemical investigation on B. yangambiensis, B. swinnyi, and B. abyssinica led to the isolation of triterpenes, saponins, flavonoids, and xanthones. Method: The stem bark of B. engleriana were collected in the village, Baham near Bafoussam city, Cameroon in August 2003 and identifi ed by Dr. Onana National Herbaruim, Yaoundι, Cameroon. The air dried and powdered stem bark of B. engleriana (1 kg was extracted at room temperature with CH2Cl2-MeOH (1:1 5 L for 48 hours. The mixture of the solvent was removed by evaporation to yield 200 g of crude extract. The latter was then dissolved in CH2Cl2 to give the CH2Cl2 soluble fraction of 5 g and a remaining gum of 195 g. Part of the remaining gum (22 g was dissolved in water and extracted four times with butanol to give 12 g of red oil; which was then separated by paper chromatography, with butanol-acetic acid-water (4:1:5, to give 3 g of orange gum; purification was carried out on HPLC with MeOH (100% to yield 2 g of mangiferin (1 as red oil. The CH2Cl2 soluble extract was eluted on silica gel n-hexane-CH2Cl2 gradient ratio and Sephadex LH-20 (n-hexane -CH2Cl2 -MeOH, (7:4:0.5 to afford compounds swinniol (2, Δ4-stigmaster-3b-ol (3, 4-methylstigmaster-5,23-dien-3b-ol(4. Results: Herein, we carried out a phytochemical study of the stem bark of B. engleriana, and we report herein the isolation and structural elucidation of mangiferin, in addition to three triterpenes, previously reported from other species of the genus. [3],[5] The assignment of the signals of mangiferin was determined using 1H, 13C-NMR, and 2D-NMR spectral data (HMQC, COSY, HMBC. The terpenoids were identifi ed by comparison of their 1H and 13C-NMR spectra with the literature

  14. Globulixanthones A and B, two new cytotoxic xanthones with isoprenoid groups from the root bark of Symphonia globulifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkengfack, Augustin E; Mkounga, Pierre; Fomum, Zacharias T; Meyer, Michele; Bodo, Bernard

    2002-05-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root bark extract of Symphonia globulifera has yielded, in addition to stigmasterol, two new xanthones with isoprenoid units, named globulixanthones A (1) and B (2). The structures of these compounds have been elucidated by spectroscopic means. They possess significant cytotoxicity in vitro against the KB cell line. PMID:12027753

  15. Globulixanthones C, D and E: three prenylated xanthones with antimicrobial properties from the root bark of Symphonia globulifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkengfack, Augustin E; Mkounga, Pierre; Meyer, Michele; Fomum, Zacharias T; Bodo, Bernard

    2002-09-01

    Two prenylated xanthone derivatives, named globulixanthones C and D and one bis-xanthone, designated globulixanthone E, have been isolated from the root bark of Symphonia globulifera. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by a detailed spectroscopic analysis. They have been shown to exhibit in vitro significant antimicrobial activity against a range of micro-organisms. PMID:12169313

  16. Effect of Peat Moss and Pumice on Douglas Fir Bark based Soilless Substrate Physical and Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb.(Franco)] bark (DFB), sphagnum peat moss, and pumice are the most common substrate components used in the Oregon nursery industry. The objective of this study was to document the effect of peat and pumice addition on the physical and hydrological properties o...

  17. 78 FR 27124 - Pacific Ocean Off the Kekaha Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION... amend its regulations to establish a new danger zone in waters of the Pacific Ocean off the Kekaha Range... INFORMATION: Executive Summary The purpose of this regulatory action is to establish a new danger zone...

  18. Antidiabetic activity of methanolic bark extract ofAlbizia odoratissima Benth. in alloxan induced diabetic albino mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dinesh Kumar; Sunil Kumar; Sonia Kohli; Renu Arya; Jyoti Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antidiabetic potential of methanolic extract ofAlbizia odoratissima Benth. bark in alloxan induced diabetic mice.Methods: Group-Ⅰ (normal control) mice received only basal diet without any treatment. In Group-Ⅱ (Diabetic control) mice, diabetes was induced by alloxan (150 mg/kgi.p.) and received only Tween80, 5% v/v in normal saline. Group-Ⅲ and Group-Ⅳ mice received metformin (10 mg/kg) and gliclazide (10 mg/kg) as standard drugs. Group-Ⅴ and Ⅵ mice received methanolic bark extract ofAlbizia odoratissima at doses of250 and500 mg/kg body weightp.o., respectively.Results: The results of the study indicates thatAlbizia odoratissima bark extract significantly (P<0.01) reduced the blood sugar level. The bark extract also significantly reduced the levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and decreases level of total proteins in alloxan induced diabetic mice.Conclusions:Methanolic extract ofAlbizia odoratissima has protective effects on the protection of vital tissues (pancreas, kidney, liver, heart and spleen), thereby reducing the causation of diabetes in experimental animals.

  19. The Effect of Bark Borer Herbivory on BVOC Emissions in Boreal Forests and Implications for SOA Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Celia; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Holopainen, Jarmo; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Kokkola, Harri; Blande, James; Guenther, Alex; Virtanen, Annele

    2015-04-01

    Herbivore outbreaks are expected to increase as a result of climate change. These outbreaks can have significant effects on the emissions of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) from vegetation, which contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We have synthesized the published results investigating changes to BVOC emissions from herbivory by the pine weevil, Hylobius abietis--a bark borer herbivore. Previous lab experiments have shown that bark borer herbivory on Scots pine trees increases monoterpene emissions 4-fold and sesquiterpene emissions 7-fold. Norway spruce exhibits a similar response. The BVOCs most impacted were linalool, beta-phellandrene, limonene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, myrcene, and sesquiterpenes like beta-farnesene, beta-bourbonene, and longifolene. The quantitative results from these studies were used to estimate potential impacts of bark borer herbivory on BVOC emissions at a regional scale using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). MEGAN was run under baseline and herbivore outbreak conditions for a typical boreal forest environment in spring. Emissions output from MEGAN was used to run a microphysical box model to estimate the SOA formation potential under baseline and outbreak conditions. This estimate could provide us with an upper limit to the potential impact of bark borer outbreaks on SOA formation in a boreal forest.

  20. Antibacterial activity of the essential oils extracted from cassia bark, bay fruits and cloves against Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spices are added into foods mainly for enhancing the organoleptic quality of the food. The application of spices and their derivatives in foods as preservatives has been investigated for years. In this study, we determined the antibacterial activity of the essential oils of three spices, cassia bark...

  1. Purification of antifungal protein against blister bark pathogen of Casuarina equisetifolia J. R. Forster et G. Forster

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, M.; Thangamani, D.; Thapliyal, M.; Yasodha, R.; Gurumurthi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Aprotein extract from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata (Acanthaceae) was found to inhibit the spore germination and hyphal extension of Trichosporium vesiculosum, the blister bark pathogen of Casuarina equisetifolia. The antifungal protein component was further purified from the crude extract and the molecular mass of the toxic protein was estimated to be 39.5 kDa.

  2. The biomedical significance of the phytochemical, proximate and mineral compositions of the leaf, stem bark and root of Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atamgba Agbor Asuk

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The outcome of this study suggests that the leaf, stem bark and root of J. curcas have very good medicinal potentials, meet the standard requirements for drug formulation and serve as good sources of energy and nutrients except for the presence of some anti-nutritional elements predominant in the leaf.

  3. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  4. Is bark pH more important than tree species in determining the composition of nitrophytic or acidophytic lichen floras?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spier, L.; Dobben, van H.F.; Dort, van K.W.

    2010-01-01

    To study the pH preference of epiphytic lichens, the bark pH of Fraxinus, Tilia, Quercus and Ulmus trees in an urban environment was measured using a flat surface electrode. The total number of trees was 253. A survey was made of the lichens in a 40 x 40 cm quadrat surrounding the pH measurement poi

  5. Plant Stem Bark Extractivism in the Northeast Semiarid Region of Brazil: A New Aport to Utilitarian Redundancy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Soares Ferreira Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the model of utilitarian redundancy as a basis for research. This model provides predictions that have not been tested by other research. In this sense, we sought to investigate the stem bark extraction between preferred and less-preferred species by a rural community in Caatinga environment. In addition, we sought to explain local preferences to observe if preferred plants have a higher content of tannins than less-preferred species. For this, we selected seven preferred species and seven less-preferred species from information obtained from semistructured interviews applied to 49 informants. Three areas of vegetation around the community were also selected, in which individuals were tagged, and were measured the diameter at ground level (DGL diameter at breast height (DBH, and measurements of available and extracted bark areas. Samples of bark of the species were also collected for the evaluation of tannin content, obtained by the method of radial diffusion. From the results, the preferred species showed a greater area of bark removed. However, the tannin content showed no significant differences between preferred and less-preferred plants. These results show there is a relationship between preference and use, but this preference is not related to the total tannins content.

  6. Erythroivorensin: A novel anti-inflammatory diterpene from the root-bark of Erythrophleum ivorense (A Chev.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, Francis A; Annan, Kofi; Mensah, Abraham Y; Amponsah, Isaac K; Tocher, Derek A; Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-09-01

    The stem- and root-bark of Erythrophleum ivorense (A Chev., family, Fabaceae) are routinely employed in the West African traditional medicine to treat inflammation and a variety of other disease conditions. Although the chemistry and pharmacology of cassaine-type diterpene alkaloids isolated from the stem-bark of the plant are fairly established, the root-bark has not yet been investigated. In the present study, the crude aqueous-alcohol extract of the root-bark was demonstrated to display a time- and dose (30-300 mg/kg p.o.)-dependent anti-inflammatory effect in chicks. Comprehensive chromatographic analysis coupled with spectroscopic and X-ray study further allowed the assignment of one of the major anti-inflammatory constituents as a novel cassaine-type diterpene, erythroivorensin. The other major constituents were known anti-inflammatory compounds: a triterpene, betulinic acid and a flavonoid, eriodictyol. The dose (10-100mg/kg p.o.)-dependent anti-inflammatory effects of the three compounds were either comparable or more significant than the positive control, diclofenac. PMID:26057191

  7. Erythroivorensin: A novel anti-inflammatory diterpene from the root-bark of Erythrophleum ivorense (A Chev.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, Francis A; Annan, Kofi; Mensah, Abraham Y; Amponsah, Isaac K; Tocher, Derek A; Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-09-01

    The stem- and root-bark of Erythrophleum ivorense (A Chev., family, Fabaceae) are routinely employed in the West African traditional medicine to treat inflammation and a variety of other disease conditions. Although the chemistry and pharmacology of cassaine-type diterpene alkaloids isolated from the stem-bark of the plant are fairly established, the root-bark has not yet been investigated. In the present study, the crude aqueous-alcohol extract of the root-bark was demonstrated to display a time- and dose (30-300 mg/kg p.o.)-dependent anti-inflammatory effect in chicks. Comprehensive chromatographic analysis coupled with spectroscopic and X-ray study further allowed the assignment of one of the major anti-inflammatory constituents as a novel cassaine-type diterpene, erythroivorensin. The other major constituents were known anti-inflammatory compounds: a triterpene, betulinic acid and a flavonoid, eriodictyol. The dose (10-100mg/kg p.o.)-dependent anti-inflammatory effects of the three compounds were either comparable or more significant than the positive control, diclofenac.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of Boswellia ovalifoliolata stem bark-extract-mediated zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supraja, N.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Krishna, T. Giridhara; David, E.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of metal nanoparticles using biological systems is an expanding research area in nanotechnology. Moreover, search for new nanoscale antimicrobials is been always attractive as they find numerous avenues for application in medicine. Biosynthesis of metallic nanoparticles is cost effective and eco-friendly compared to those of conventional methods of nanoparticles synthesis. Herein, we present the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using the stem bark extract of Boswellia ovalifoliolata, and evaluation of their antimicrobial efficacy. Stable ZnO nanoparticles were formed by treating 90 ml of 1 mM zinc nitrate aqueous solution with 10 ml of 10 % bark extract. The formation of B. ovalifoliolata bark-extract-mediated zinc oxide nanoparticles (BZnNPs) was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopic analysis and recorded the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at 230 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR) analysis revealed that primary and secondary amine groups in combination with the proteins present in the bark extract are responsible for the reduction and stabilization of the BZnNPs. The morphology and crystalline phase of the nanocrystals were determined by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrodynamic diameter (20.3 nm) and a positive zeta potential (4.8 mV) were measured using the dynamic light scattering technique. The antimicrobial activity of BZnNPs was evaluated (in vitro) against fungi, Gram-negative, and Gram-positive bacteria using disk diffusion method which were isolated from the scales formed in drinking water PVC pipelines.

  9. STUDY OF THE VARIABILITY IN CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BARK LAYERS OF QUERCUS SUBER L. FROM DIFFERENT PRODUCTION AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jové

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cork is the bark of the cork oak tree (Quercus suber L, a renewable and biodegradable raw bioresource concentrated mainly in the Mediterranean region. Development of its potential uses as a biosorbent will require the investigation of its chemical composition; such information can be of help to understand its interactions with organic pollutants. The present study investigates the summative chemical composition of three bark layers (back, cork, and belly of five Spanish cork samples and one cork sample from Portugal. Suberin was the main component in all the samples (21.1 to 53.1%, followed by lignin (14.8 to 31%, holocellulose (2.3 to 33.6%, extractives (7.3 to 20.4%, and ash (0.4 to 3.3%. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether the variations in chemical composition with respect to the production area and bark layers were significant. The results indicate that, with respect to the bark layer, significant differences were found only for suberin and holocellulose contents: they were higher in the belly and cork than in the back. Based on the results presented, cork is a material with a lot of potential because of its heterogeneity in chemical composition.

  10. Comparative study of in-vitro antimicrobial activity and phytochemical composition of Sida cuneifolia fruits, leaves, and stem bark extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Nalubega

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: The study provides scientific evidence for ethno-veterinary use of S. cuneifolia leaves, fruits and stem bark, and this can be exploited in the transformative development of ethno-medicine. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 781-788

  11. Effects of wood bark and fertilizer amendment on trace element mobility in mine soils, Broken Hill, Australia: implications for mined land reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, N C; Lottermoser, B G

    2010-01-01

    Soil amendments can immobilize metals in soils, reducing the risks of metal exposure and associated impacts to flora, fauna and human health. In this study, soil amendments were compared, based on "closed system" water extracts, for reducing metal mobility in metal-contaminated soil from the Broken Hill mining center, Australia. Phosphatefertilizer (bovine bone meal, superphosphate, triple superphosphate, potassium orthophosphate) and pine bark (Pinus radiata) were applied to two soils (BH1, BH2) contaminated with mining waste. Both soils had near neutral to alkaline pH values, were sulfide- or sulfate-rich, and contained metal and metalloid at concentrations that pose high environmental risks (e.g., Pb = 1.25 wt% and 0.55 wt%, Zn = 0.71 wt% and 0.47 wt% for BH1 and BH2, respectively). The addition of fertilizers and/or pine bark to both soil types increased water extractable metals and metalloids concentrations (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Sb, Zn) compared with nonamended soils. One or more of the elements As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn increased significantly in extracts of a range of different soil+pine bark and soil+fertilizer+piner+pine bark tests in response to increased pine bark doses. By contrast, Fe and Sb concentrations in extracts did not change significantly with pine bark addition. Solution pH was decreased by phosphate fertilizers (except for bovine bone meal) and pine bark, and pine bark enhanced dissolved organic carbon. At least in the short-term, the application of phosphate fertilizers and pine bark proved to be an ineffective method for controlling metal and metalloid mobility in soils that contain admixtures of polymetallic, polymineralic mine wastes. PMID:21284303

  12. From a traditional medicinal plant to a rational drug: understanding the clinically proven wound healing efficacy of birch bark extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ebeling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Birch bark has a long lasting history as a traditional medicinal remedy to accelerate wound healing. Recently, the efficacy of birch bark preparations has also been proven clinically. As active principle pentacyclic triterpenes are generally accepted. Here, we report a comprehensive study on the underlying molecular mechanisms of the wound healing properties of a well-defined birch bark preparation named as TE (triterpene extract as well as the isolated single triterpenes in human primary keratinocytes and porcine ex-vivo wound healing models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show positive wound healing effects of TE and betulin in scratch assay experiments with primary human keratinocytes and in a porcine ex-vivo wound healing model (WHM. Mechanistical studies elucidate that TE and betulin transiently upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cyclooxygenase-2 on gene and protein level. For COX-2 and IL-6 this increase of mRNA is due to an mRNA stabilizing effect of TE and betulin, a process in which p38 MAPK and HuR are involved. TE promotes keratinocyte migration, putatively by increasing the formation of actin filopodia, lamellipodia and stress fibers. Detailed analyses show that the TE components betulin, lupeol and erythrodiol exert this effect even in nanomolar concentrations. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton is dependent on the activation of Rho GTPases. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide insights to understand the molecular mechanism of the clinically proven wound healing effect of birch bark. TE and betulin address the inflammatory phase of wound healing by transient up-regulation of several pro-inflammatory mediators. Further, they enhance migration of keratinocytes, which is essential in the second phase of wound healing. Our results, together with the clinically proven efficacy, identify birch bark as the first medical plant with a high potential to improve wound healing, a field which urgently

  13. The Chemical Composition Analysis of Eucalyptus Bark%桉树树皮化学成分分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝玉姣; 陈奎; 何其飞; 符韵林; 陈松武

    2012-01-01

    [ Objective ] The chemical composition of eucalyptus plantation bark was determined and analyzed by using the Chinese wood chemical composition analysis national standards. [Method] Content of holocellulose, cellulose, lignin, ash, extractive of eucalyptus bark was determined ,and compared with other four kinds of plants. [ Result] The chemical compositions content of the eucalyptus plantation bark respectively were, bolocellulose 79. 35% , cellulose 46. 81 % , lignin 19. 69% , 1 % NaOH extraction content 19. 83% , cold water extraction content 5. 30% ,hot water extraction content 8.11% .benzene alcohol extraction content 2.63% ,ash content 2. 82%. [ Conclusion] Content of holocel-lulose, cellulose, ash, extractive were comparatively rich in eucalyptus bark, lignin was lower in eucalyptus bark.%[目的]采用我国木材化学成分分析国家标准,对人工林桉树树皮的化学成分进行了测定和分析.[方法]测定桉树树皮的综纤维素、纤维素、木质素、灰分、抽提物含量,并与其他4种植物进行比较.[结果]人工林桉树树皮化学成分含量分别为,综纤维素79.35%,纤维素46.81%,木质素19.69%,1% NaOH抽提物19.83%,冷水抽提物5.30%,热水抽提物8.11%,苯醇抽提物2.63%,灰分2.82%.[结论]桉树树皮综纤维素、纤维素、灰分、抽提物含量较高,木质素含量较低.

  14. Screening of Antioxidant Potential of Selected Barks of Indian Medicinal Plants by Multiple in vitro Assays LI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ARCHANA KUMARI; POONAM KAKKAR

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antioxidant potential in herbal extract barks of five therapeutically important medicinal plants native to India,i.e.Crataeva nurvala Buch.-Ham.,Buchanania lanzan Spreng.,Aegle marmelos Corr.,Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.ex DC.,and Cedrela toona Roxb.Methods Standardized aqueous alcoholic extracts from the selected barks having different target radicals,such as superoxide radical,nitric oxide,ABTS radical,and peroxidative decomposition of phosphohpids.were prepared and screened bv multiple in vitro assays.These extracts were also tested for total phenolic and tannin content and correlated with antioxidant capacity. Results Tbtal phenolic and tannin contents were found to be the highest in C. nurvala (195 GAE mg/g and 218.3 mg/g CE).SOD mimetic activity was found to be the highest in Crataeva nurvula,although all barks showed activity more than 100 units/mg extract.Lipid peroxidation inhibitory potential was found to be the highest in Crataeva nurvala(83.4% inhibition of MDA formation/10 μg extract),and also showed a comparatively high NO quenching capacity (45.5% per 10 μg extract).The highest NO quenching potential was found in Aegle marmelos(47.3% per 10 μg extract).Cedrela toona showed the lowest LPO inhibitory potential and NO quenching capacity(50.5% and 30.5%,respectively).Buchanania lanzan,a medicinal plant extensively used for inflammatory disorders and Dalbergia sissoo also showed 72.5% and 69.1% LPO inhibitory potential/10 μg extract.Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity ranged from 0.24 to 0.39 mmol/L TEAC/mg extract,indicating that all the barks tested had ABTS+ radical quenching capacity.Conclusion Bark of Crataeva nurvulahas the highest antioxidant capacity and a positive correlation between antioxidant activity and their plendic content was found.

  15. Efficacy evaluation of Bauhinia variegata L. stem bark powder as adjunct therapy in chronic Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Ranjan Dash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to study the effect of Bauhinia variegata L. stem bark powder as adjunct therapy in chronic Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in goat. Materials and Methods: Mastitis was induced by intracisternal inoculation of coagulase positive S. aureus (J638 at the concentration of 2000 colony forming units. Group I animals were treated with repeated dose of ceftriaxone at 20 mg/kg intravenously, and Group II animals were treated with once daily oral administration of B. variegata L. stem bark powder at 6 g/kg for 7 days followed by maintenance dose at 3 g/kg for next 7 days along with repeated dose of the antibiotic at 20 mg/kg intravenously at 4 days interval. Results: No significant improvement in the clinical condition of the udder was noticed in the group treated with repeated dose of ceftriaxone alone. However, in the group treated with B. variegata L. stem bark powder along with repeated dose of ceftriaxone, no S. aureus colony was seen at 96 h and onwards in milk samples with a marked decrease in somatic cell count and milk alkaline phosphatase activity and increased lactoperoxidase activity. Further, plasma and milk concentration of ceftriaxone/ceftizoxime was increased, which indicated antibacterial, bioenhancing and antiinflammatory properties of the bark powder. The Group II animals also exhibited marked reduction in polymorphonuclear cells and fibrous tissue indicating antifibrotic property of B. variegata L. Conclusion: B. variegata L. stem bark powder can be considered as an effective adjunct therapy to intravenous ceftriaxone in S. aureus chronic mastitis in goat.

  16. Antiplasmodial benzophenone derivatives from the root barks of Symphonia globulifera (Clusiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Guillaume; Eparvier, Véronique; Moretti, Christian; Prado, Soizic; Grellier, Philippe; Hue, Nathalie; Thoison, Odile; Delpech, Bernard; Guéritte, Françoise; Litaudon, Marc

    2010-06-01

    In an effort to find antimalarial drugs, a systematic in vitro evaluation on a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (FcB1) was undertaken on sixty plant extracts collected in French Guiana. The ethyl acetate extract obtained from the root barks of Symphonia globulifera exhibited a strong antiplasmodial activity (97% at 10 microg/ml). The phytochemical investigation of this extract led to the isolation of nine polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinol (PPAPs) compounds and two oxidized derivatives. All compounds showed antiplasmodial activity with IC(50)s ranged from 2.1 to 10.1 microM. A LC/ESI-MS(n) study performed on polyprenylated benzophenones previously isolated from Moronobea coccinea provided a reliable method for their detection in the extract and structural elucidation. PMID:20356612

  17. Birch inner bark procyanidins can be resolved with enhanced sensitivity by hydrophilic interaction HPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karonen, Maarit; Liimatainen, Jaana; Sinkkonen, Jari

    2011-11-01

    A complex mixture of procyanidin aglycones was isolated by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography from the silver birch inner bark, which is a polyphenol-rich source of natural antioxidants. Procyanidins were studied by using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography combined with high-resolution ESI-TOF-MS. A good chromatographic separation was achieved and procyanidins eluted according to their increasing degree of polymerization. Individual procyanidins were detected from dimers up to the degree of polymerization of 22 by their negative-ion mass spectra. The results showed that hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography can be successfully applied for the analysis of high-molecular-weight procyanidins with enhanced sensitivity in electrospray mass spectrometry. PMID:21998029

  18. Potential pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of phenolic constituents from the root bark of Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Manh Tuan; Tran, Manh Hung; Ah, Kim Jeong; Jo, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jaewang; Kim, Wook Dong; Cheon, Woo Jae; Woo, Mi Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Min, Byung Sun

    2016-06-15

    Detailed phytochemical investigation from the root bark of Morus alba resulted in the isolation of eleven new compounds, including seven 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives (morusalfurans A-G), three flavonoids (morusalnols A-C), and one geranylated stilbene (morusibene A), as well as 22 known compounds. The structures of the identified compounds were elucidated based on a comprehensive analysis of spectroscopic data and Mosher's method. Compounds 2, 3, 6-8, 11, 23, 24, and 29 showed potent inhibition of PL in comparison with the positive control treatment (orlistat, IC50=0.012μM), with IC50 values ranging from 0.09 to 0.92μM. PMID:27156775

  19. Chemical constituents isolated from the bark of Guatteria blepharophylla (Annonaceae) and their antiproliferative and antimicrobial activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytochemical study of the bark of Guatteria blepharophylla (Mart.) Mart. afforded twelve compounds, namely two sesquiterpenes, caryophyllene oxide (1) and spathulenol (3), one xanthone, lichexanthone (2), a mixture of steroids, b-sitosterol (4), and stigmasterol (5), and seven isoquinoline alkaloids, O-methylmoschatoline (6), lysicamine (7), nornuciferine (8), liriodenine (9), isocoreximine (10), subsessiline (11), and isomoschatoline (12). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1-6, 11 and 12 were reported for the first time in this species. The 13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) data for the compounds 11 and 12 are described for the first time in the literature. The antiproliferative activity against human tumour cell lines and antimicrobial activities were investigated for the major compounds. Compound 9 showed significant activity against cell lines of breast (MCF-7, Michigan Cancer Foundation-7), superior to the positive control doxorubicin. Compound 12 presented antifungal activity similar to the positive control nystatin against Candida albicans. (author)

  20. Structure elucidation of β-sitosterol with antibacterial activity from the root bark of Malva parviflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ododo, Mesfin Medihin; Choudhury, Manash Kumar; Dekebo, Ahmed Hussen

    2016-01-01

    The powder of root bark of Malva parviflora (Malvaceae) was successively extracted with petroleum ether (b.p. 60-80 °C), chloroform and ethanol. The chloroform extract showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, whereas the ethanolic extract showed antibacterial activity against only S. aureus. The chloroform extract, after column chromatographic separation on silica gel using petroleum ether:chloroform (3:1) as eluent, furnished 98 mg of white crystalline compound. The yield of the compound is 0.316 % (w/w). The compound has a melting point of 134-136 °C and the Rf value 0.56 in benzene:chloroform:acetone (1:15:1) on silica gel TLC. The compound was characterized as β-sitosterol by physical properties, chemical test, spectral analysis (FTIR, NMR and MS) and comparing the data obtained from the literature.

  1. Phytochemisty and Spermatogenic Potentials of Aqueous Extract of Cissus populnea (Guill. and Per Stem Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony B. Ojekale

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo clinical trials involving the administration of crude extracts of Cissus populnea to male subjects (normospermic, oligospermic, and azoopermic in a 72-day study revealed that continuous exposure of the subjects to the extracts over this period did not significantly (p ≤ 0.05 alter sperm count, morphology, motility, or volume. Antimicrobial screening of the extract against some selected microbial isolates secondarily implicated in male infertility revealed total inactivity against the microbial isolates screened, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella paratyphi, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and Klebsiella sp. Phytochemistry revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, saponins, and steroids. The presence of these secondary metabolites was confirmed by thin layer chromatography. We conclude that oral administration of aqueous extracts of the stem bark of Cisssus populnea over a 72-day period to human subjects apparently had no fertility enhancement effects on sperm parameters monitored in this study.

  2. Naucline, a New Indole Alkaloid from the Bark of Nauclea officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Litaudon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new indole alkaloid, naucline (1 together with four known alkaloids, angustine (2, angustidine (3, nauclefine (4 and naucletine (5, were isolated from the bark of Nauclea officinalis. The structures of all isolated compounds were elucidated with various spectroscopic methods such as 1D- and 2D- NMR, IR, UV and LCMS-IT-TOF. In addition to that of alkaloid 1, the complete 13C-NMR data of naucletine (5 were also reported. Naucline (1 showed a moderate vasorelaxant activity (90% relaxation at 1 × 10−5 M whereas, angustine (2, nauclefine (4, and naucletine (5 showed potent vasorelaxant activity (more than 90% relaxation at 1 × 10−5 M on an isolated rat aorta.

  3. Preferential host switching and codivergence shaped radiation of bark beetle symbionts, nematodes of Micoletzkya (Nematoda: Diplogastridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susoy, V; Herrmann, M

    2014-05-01

    Host-symbiont systems are of particular interest to evolutionary biology because they allow testable inferences of diversification processes while also providing both a historical basis and an ecological context for studies of adaptation. Our investigations of bark beetle symbionts, predatory nematodes of the genus Micoletzkya, have revealed remarkable diversity of the group along with a high level of host specificity. Cophylogenetic analyses suggest that evolution of the nematodes was largely influenced by the evolutionary history of beetles. The diversification of the symbionts, however, could not be attributed to parallel divergence alone; our results indicate that adaptive radiation of the nematodes was shaped by preferential host shifts among closely related beetles along with codivergence. Whereas ecological and geographic isolation have played a major role in the diversification of Micoletzkya at shallow phylogenetic depths, adaptations towards related hosts have played a role in shaping cophylogenetic structure at a larger evolutionary scale.

  4. Ent-kauren-19-oic acid derivatives from the stem bark of Croton pseudopulchellus Pax

    OpenAIRE

    Langat, MK; Mulholland, DA; Crouch, NR; Tammela, P; Pohjala, L; Smith, PJ

    2012-01-01

    Two new ent-kauren-19-oic acid derivatives, ent-14S*-hydroxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid and ent-14S*,17-dihydroxykaur-15-en-19-oic acid together with eleven known compounds ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, ent-kaur-16-en-19-al, ent-12β-hydroxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid, ent-12β-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid, 8R,13R-epoxylabd-14-ene, eudesm-4(15)-ene-1β,6α-diol, (-)-7-epivaleran-4-one, germacra-4(15), 5E,10(14)-trien-9β-ol, acetyl aleuritolic acid, β-amyrin, and stigmasterol were isolated from the stem bark...

  5. PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION AND ANTHELMINTIC ACTIVITY OF ACACIA SUMA (ROXB BARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharyya Suman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was conducted to investigate the preliminary phytochemical studies and anthelmintic activities on the bark of Acacia suma (Roxb. Family- Fabaceae against adult Indian earthworms, Pheretima posthuma. Various concentrations (5-25 mg/ml of each extract along with the reference samples (Piperazine citrate, Albendazole were subjected for anthelmintic activity study. The qualitative test revealed that the petroleum ether extracts contained only terpenoids but chloroform and hydroalcoholic (Methanol 70% v/v extracts exhibited the presence of carbohydrates, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, tannins and saponins but amino acids and steroids were absent. All the extracts showed anthelmintic activity when compared with petroleum ether and chloroform extracts. The anthelmintic activity of hydroalcoholic extract was comparable with reference drugs.

  6. The $\\Xi^* \\bar{K}$ and $\\Omega \\eta$ interaction within a chiral unitary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siqi; Chen, Xurong; Jia, Duojie

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the interaction of the coupled channels $\\Omega \\eta$ and $\\Xi^* \\bar{K}$ within the chiral unitary approach. The systems under consideration have total isospins $0$, strangeness $S = -3$, and spin $3/2$. We studied the $s$ wave interaction which implies that the possible resonances generated in the system can have spin-parity $J^P = 3/2^-$. The unitary amplitudes in coupled channels develop poles that can be associated with some known baryonic resonances. We find there is a dynamically generated $3/2^-$ $\\Omega$ state with mass around $1800$ MeV, which is in agreement with the predictions of the five-quark model.

  7. Anti-inflammatory diterpenoids from the root bark of Acanthopanax gracilistylus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Yi-Bei; Zhu, Kong-Kai; Luo, Cheng; Zhang, Jing-Xian; Cheng, Chun-Ru; Feng, Rui-Hong; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Zeng, Feng; Wang, Yang; Xu, Ping-Ping; Guo, Ji-Ling; Liu, Xuan; Guan, Shu-Hong; Guo, De-An

    2014-11-26

    Five new ent-pimarane (1-3, 7, and 8) and three new ent-kaurane diterpenoids (4-6) and a new oleanane triterpene acid (9), together with 22 known compounds, were isolated from the root bark of the medicinal herb Acanthopanax gracilistylus. The structures of 1-9 were established based on the interpretation of high-resolution MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR data. The absolute configurations of 7 and 11 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and electronic circular dichroism analysis. Compounds 7 and 8 represent rare naturally occurring structures based on the devinyl ent-pimarane skeleton. Compounds 3, 10, 14, 16, and 17 exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25338180

  8. Chemical constituents isolated from the bark of Guatteria blepharophylla (Annonaceae) and their antiproliferative and antimicrobial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Emmanoel V.; Marques, Francisco de Assis; Maia, Beatriz H.L.N.S., E-mail: noronha@ufpr.b [Universidade Federal do Parana (DQ/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Pinheiro, Maria Lucia B. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (DQ/UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braga, Raquel M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Delarmelina, Camila; Duarte, Marta Cristina T.; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T.G.; Carvalho, Joao Ernesto de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Microbiologia e Div. Farmacologia e Toxicologia

    2011-07-01

    Phytochemical study of the bark of Guatteria blepharophylla (Mart.) Mart. afforded twelve compounds, namely two sesquiterpenes, caryophyllene oxide (1) and spathulenol (3), one xanthone, lichexanthone (2), a mixture of steroids, b-sitosterol (4), and stigmasterol (5), and seven isoquinoline alkaloids, O-methylmoschatoline (6), lysicamine (7), nornuciferine (8), liriodenine (9), isocoreximine (10), subsessiline (11), and isomoschatoline (12). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1-6, 11 and 12 were reported for the first time in this species. The {sup 13}C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) data for the compounds 11 and 12 are described for the first time in the literature. The antiproliferative activity against human tumour cell lines and antimicrobial activities were investigated for the major compounds. Compound 9 showed significant activity against cell lines of breast (MCF-7, Michigan Cancer Foundation-7), superior to the positive control doxorubicin. Compound 12 presented antifungal activity similar to the positive control nystatin against Candida albicans. (author)

  9. Antimalaria Effect of the Ethanolic Stem Bark Extracts of Ficus platyphylla Del

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isma'il Shittu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimalarial effect of the ethanolic stem bark extract of Ficus platyphylla Del was evaluated against Plasmodium berghei infection in mice. Nontreated, experimental control mice died of fulminant parasitemia from day 7 to 9 post-infection but mice treated with the extract at 300 mg/kg showed markedly reduced parasitaemia bouts of 43.50% and a mean survival time of 28 days postinfection. The plant extract prevented a drastic reduction in PCV showing its efficacy in ameliorating anaemic conditions in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Histological examination of liver tissues of treated and untreated mice further supports the antimalaria potential of this plant. This observation validates the traditional use of this plant for the treatment of malaria.

  10. Studies on the antimicrobial potential of Mahonia leschenaultii Takeda root and root bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraiswamy B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The methanol extracts of Mahonia leschenaultii takeda (Berberidaceae root and root bark were tested for antibacterial potential against Escherichia coli (NCIM 2068, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCIM 2053, Staphylococcus aureus (NCIM 2492, and Staphylococcus epidermitis (NCIM 2493 on nutrient agar medium and nutrient broth using ampicillin trihydrate as standard drug. For antifungal study, stains used were Trichophytons lignorum (NCIM 1195 and Candida crusei (NCIM 3129 on Sabourauds dextrose agar (SDA and Sabourauds dextrose broth (SDB by cup plate method using amphotericin B as standard drug. The results showed that all extracts exhibited significant activity against all the selected strains of bacteria and relatively more against Staphylococcus epidermitis . The antifugal activity was less significant when compared with antibacterial activity.

  11. Ceramide, cerebroside and triterpenoid saponin from the bark of aerial roots of Ficus elastica (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbosso, Emmanuel Jean Teinkela; Nguedia, Jules Clément Assob; Meyer, Franck; Lenta, Bruno Ndjakou; Ngouela, Silvère; Lallemand, Benjamin; Mathieu, Véronique; Antwerpen, Pierre Van; Njunda, Anna Longdoh; Adiogo, Dieudonné; Tsamo, Etienne; Looze, Yvan; Kiss, Robert; Wintjens, René

    2012-11-01

    Three compounds, ficusamide (1), ficusoside (2) and elasticoside (3), were isolated from the bark of aerial roots of Ficus elastica (Moraceae), together with nine known compounds, including four triterpenes, three steroids and two aliphatic linear alcohols. The chemical structures of the three compounds were established by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and by comparison with published data. The growth inhibitory effect of the crude extract and isolated compounds was evaluated against several microorganisms and fungi. The cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines was also assessed. Ficusamide (1) displayed a moderate in vitro growth inhibitory activity against the human A549 lung cancer cell line and a strong activity against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, while elasticoside (3) showed a potent activity on Enterococcus faecalis.

  12. STUDIES ON DIURETIC AND LAXATIVE ACTIVITY OF ACACIA SUMA (ROXB BARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Sumanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The diuretic and laxative activity of aqueous extract of Acacia suma (Roxb. barks (Family: Fabaceae were studied in Wistar albino rats. Furosemide (10 mg/kg, p.o. and agar-agar (300 mg/kg, p.o. were used as reference standards respectively for activity comparison. The aqueous extract (400 mg/kg has shown significant increase in the volume of urine, urinary concentration of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions. However 200mg/kg dose failed to do so. On the other hand the extract was found to produce significant laxative activity in dose dependant manner. Presence of different phytoconstituents in aqueous extract of Acacia suma may be responsible for the specific activities.

  13. A review on biological, nutraceutical and clinical aspects of French maritime pine bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimoona, Alya; Naeem, Ismat; Saddiqe, Zeb; Jameel, Khalid

    2011-01-27

    Bark extract of Pinus pinaster has a long history of ethnomedicinal use and is available commercially as herbal dietary supplement with proprietary name pycnogenol. It is used as a food supplement to overcome many degenerative disorders. Rohdewald (2002) wrote the first comprehensive review of extract highlighting its antioxidative nature and its role in different diseases. Later, Watson (2003) and Gulati (2005) in their reviews about cardiovascular health, described the extract as a best neutraceutical agent in this regard. The objective of this paper is to review the current research on this extract in terms of extraction methods, its pharmacological, toxicological and nutraceutical effects and clinical studies. Web sites of Google Scholar, Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles written in English and published in peer-reviewed journals from 2006 to 2009 and sixty-nine research articles were extracted. Of these, two are about extraction advancement and analysis while the rest relate to its clinical, biological and nutraceutical aspects. PMID:21044675

  14. Host suitability analysis of the bark beetle Scolytus amygdali (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiri, A; Ahmed, M Z; Braham, M; Qiu, B-L

    2015-08-01

    Scolytus amygdali is a polyphagous insect pest that feeds on fruit trees and forest trees. Our study assessed the host preference and reproductive potential of S. amygdali on four tree species: almond (Prunus dulcis), apricot (Prunus armeniaca), peach (Prunus persica), and plum (Prunus domestica). Females of S. amygdali produced maternal galleries that were longer on peach than the other three trees, and female fecundity was highest on peach. Females with longer maternal galleries produced more eggs, indicating a positive correlation between maternal gallery length and female fertility. The under-bark development time of S. amygdali is significantly shorter on plum (45 days) and almond (56 days) than on apricot (65 days) and peach (64 days). Despite this longer development time on peach, our results still suggest that, of the four types of tree tested, peach is the most preferred host for S. amygdali.

  15. Inhibition effect of cashew stem bark extract (Anacardium Occidentale L. on biofilm formation of Streptococcus sanguinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizni Amaliah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilm is communities of microorganisms attached to solid surface and enclosed in extracellular matrix that protected microorganisms from antibacterial agents and host defense. One of bacteria might have a role in initial colonization of biofilm formation is Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis. Previous studies showed that cashew stem bark extract (Anacardium occidentale L. can inhibit the growth of Streptococcus strains. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the inhibition effect of cashew (Anacardium occidentale L. stem bark ethanol extract on biofilm formation of S. sanguinis. Methods: Streptococcus sanguinis grown in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI + 2% sucrose medium by using microplate polystyrene 96 wells. The samples were divided into 3 groups, 5% polyethyleneglycol (PEG as negative control, cashew stem bark extract (concentration 3.125 mg/ml, 6.25 mg/ml, 9.375 mg/ml, and 12.5 mg/ml, and 0.12% chlorhexidine (as positive control. Biofilm was stained by 1% crystal violet. Afterwards, optical density (OD of samples were measured by microplate reader λ 595 nm. The data of biofilm formation inhibition percentage were analyzed by one way ANOVA and then continued by Least Significant Difference (LSD test. Results: The result of one way ANOVA showed that there were significant differences in inhibition of S. sanguinis biofilm formation (p<0.05. LSD test showed that concentration extract 3.125 mg/ml had significant difference with concentration 9.375 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml. Reciprocally, concentration 6.25 mg/ml had significant difference with concentration 9.375 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml. Conclusion: Cashew stem bark extract was able to inhibit biofilm formation of S. sanguinis.Latar belakang: Biofilm merupakan sekumpulan mikroorganisme yang melekat pada permukaan solid dan diselubungi oleh matriks ekstraseluler yang melindungi mikroorganisme dari bahan-bahan antibakteri dan sel-sel pertahanan tubuh. Salah satu bakteri yang

  16. Anticholinesterase activities of cold and hot aqueous extracts of F. racemosa stem bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiyaz Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the anticholinesterase activity of cold and hot aqueous extracts of Ficus racemosa stem bark against rat brain acetylcholinesterase in vitro. Both the cold aqueous extract (FRC and the hot aqueous extract (FRH exhibited a dose dependent inhibition of rat brain acetylcholinesterase. FRH showed significantly higher ( p ≤ 0.001 cholinesterase inhibitory activity compared to FRC; however, both the extracts did not show 50% inhibition of AChE at the doses tested (200-1000 μg ml -1 . The IC 50 values of 1813 and 1331 μg ml -1 were deduced for FRC and FRH, respectively (calculated by extrapolation using Boltzmann′s dose response analysis.

  17. Two new conjugated ketonic fatty acids from the stem bark of Juglans mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Da-Lei; Zhang, Chang-Hao; Li, Ren; Luo, Jie; Jin, Mei; Piao, Jin-Hua; Zheng, Ming-Shan; Cui, Jiong-Mo; Son, Jong Keun; Li, Gao

    2015-04-01

    The present study was designed to isolate and characterize novel chemical constituents of the stem bark of Juglans mandshurica Maxim. (Juglandaceae). The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by various chromatographic techniques. The structures of the compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectral data (1D and 2D NMR, HR-ESI-MS, CD, UV, and IR) and by the comparisons of spectroscopic data with the reported values in the literatures. Two long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (1 and 2) were obtained and identified as (S)-(8E,10E)-12-hydroxy-7-oxo-8,10-octadecadienoic acid (1) and (S)-(8E, 10E)-12-hydroxy-7-oxo-8,10-octadecadienoic acid methyl ester (2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation and structural elucidation of the two new conjugated ketonic fatty acids from this genus.

  18. Identification of Minor Benzoylated 4-Phenylcoumarins from a Mammea neurophylla Bark Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach Tai Dang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Through dereplication analysis, seven known Mammea coumarins were identified in a fraction obtained from Mammea neurophylla dichloromethane bark extract selected for its ability to prevent advanced glycation end-product (AGE formation. Among them, a careful examination of the NMR dataset of pedilanthocoumarin B led to a structural revision. Inspection of LC-DAD-MSn chromatograms allowed us to predict the presence of four new compounds, which were further isolated. Using spectroscopic methods (1H-, 13C- and 2D-NMR, HRMS, UV, these compounds were identified as new benzoyl substituted 4-phenylcoumarins (iso-pedilanthocoumarin B and neurophyllol C and 4-(1-acetoxypropylcoumarins cyclo F (ochrocarpins H and I.

  19. Biosynthesis, characterization and antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles from root bark extract of Berberislycium Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Ansar; Murtaza, Ghulam; Bhatti, Tariq Mahmood; Kausar, Rehana; Ahmed, Muhammad Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Various biological methods are being recognized for the fabrication of silver nanoparticles, which are used in several fields. The phytosynthesis of nanoparticles came out as a cost effective and enviro-friendly approach. When root bark extract of Berberis lycium was treated with silver ions, they reduced to silver nanoparticles, which were spherical, crystalline, size ranged from 10-100nm and capped by biomolecules. Synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The plant mediated synthesized silver nanoparticles showed pronounced antimicrobial activities against both Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebseilla pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). The plant mediated process proved to be non-toxic and low cost contender as reducing agent for synthesizing stable silver nanoparticles. PMID:26826826

  20. French Maritime Pine Bark Extract (Pycnogenol®) Effects on Human Skin: Clinical and Molecular Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional strategies to benefit skin health are of growing importance. Current approaches mainly involve nutritional supplements containing antioxidants which were initially designed to protect human skin against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage. Within recent years, however, a growing number of studies suggests that the beneficial effects of these products clearly extend beyond photoprotection. In this review we take the nutritional supplement Pycnogenol®, which is based on an extract prepared from French marine pine bark extract, as an example to illustrate this development. Accordingly, the existing data provide compelling evidence that Pycnogenol® intake does not only provide photoprotection, but may be used to (i) reduce hyperpigmentation of human skin and (ii) improve skin barrier function and extracellular matrix homeostasis. PMID:26492562

  1. An equation characterizing multi-heavy-metal sorption onto bentonite, forest soil and spruce bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Li, L Y

    2003-12-01

    An empirical equation was developed to quantitatively describe heavy metal sorption in ternary systems of lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd). The three sorbants investigated were bentonite, forest soil and spruce bark. This multi-sorption equation is based on three assumptions: the relationship between sorption and initial heavy metal concentration fits a power curve; the presence of one heavy metal proportionately reduces the sorption curve of another heavy metal; and the competition between two heavy metals is independent of the presence of other heavy metals. The multi-sorption equation modeled sorption in ternary systems to a regression fit greater than 0.96. The data required for the equation were generated from a technically straightforward and quick laboratory program involving batch adsorption tests. PMID:14977144

  2. Elm bark beetle in Holocene peat deposits and the northwest European elm decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah H. E.; Edwards, Kevin J.

    2004-09-01

    The elm decline of 5000 14C yr ago has been the most widely discussed phenomenon in post-glacial vegetation history. This pan-European reduction of elm populations, echoed in the decimation of elmwoods in Europe during the twentieth century, has attracted a series of interrelated hypotheses involving climate change, human activity, disease and soil deterioration. The elm bark beetle (Scolytus scolytus L.) is an essential component of disease explanations. We present evidence for the presence of the beetle over a prolonged period (ca. 7950-4910 yr BP [8800-5660 cal. yr BP]) from a lowland raised mire deposit in northeast Scotland, with its final appearance at this site, and the first and only appearance in another mire of a single scolytid find, around the time of the elm decline. The subfossil S. scolytus finds are not only the first from Scotland, but they also represent the most comprehensive sequence of finds anywhere. Copyright

  3. A New Atisane-Type Diterpene from the Bark of the Mangrove Plant Excoecaria Agallocha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Chang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new atisane-type diterpene, ent-16α-hydroxy-atisane-3,4-lactone (4 and three known diterpenes, ent-16α-hydroxy-atisane-3-one (1, ent-atisane-3β,16α-diol (2, ent-3,4-seco-16α-hydroxyatis- 4(19-en -3-oic acid (3 were isolated from the bark of the mangrove plant Excoecaria agallocha. Their structures and relative stereochemistry were elucidated by means of extensive NMR and MS analysis. Compound 3 exhibited significant anti-microfouling activity against the adherence of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, with an EC50 value of 0.54 ± 0.01 ppm.

  4. Antimicrobial effects of the stem bark extracts of Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) Benth. on Shigellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millogo-Kone, H; Guissou, Ip; Nacoulma, O; Traore, A S

    2007-06-10

    Total and hydroalcoholic extracts of the stem barks of Parkia biglobosa (Jacq) Benth. (Mimosaceae) were tested on strains belonging to three species of Shigellae: S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri and S. boydii collected from hospitals in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. The results showed that both extracts were active against Shigellae. The hydroalcoholic extract was more active than the decoction (aqueous one) prescribed by the traditional healer. Both extracts were particularly effective against S. dysenteriae, the most virulent of the three pathogenic species. The effects of the extracts have been compared to that of gentamicin. The phytochemical screening on the extracts revealed the presence of sterols, triterpenes, polyphenolic compounds including tannins, flavonoids, coumarins, anthocyanidins. Other components are saponosides and reducing sugars.

  5. The antisnake venom activities of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) stem bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuzu, I U; Harvey, A L

    2003-12-01

    Snake bites in rural Nigeria are commonly treated with plant extracts. We have studied the ability of one such traditionally used plant (Parkia biglobosa; [Jacq.] Benth., Mimosaceae) to reduce the effects of two snake venoms (Naja nigricollis, and Echis ocellatus) in several experimental models. A water-methanol extract of P. biglobosa stem bark significantly (pbiglobosa extract (75, 150 and 300 microg/ml) significantly (pbiglobosa extract (400 mg/kg) did not protect mice injected i.p. with 5 and 2.5 mg/kg of E. ocellatus and N. nigricollis venoms, respectively. It, however, protected 40% of the mice from death caused by E. ocellatus venom after the extract and venom were pre-incubated for 30 min before injecting the mixture.

  6. Phytochemical Screening And Analgesic Studies Of The Root Bark Of Hymenocardia Acida, Tul (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu N. Paul

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The research work covers the phytochemical screening and Analgesic studies of the root bark of Hymenocardia acida, Tul, (Euphorbiaceae which is claimed by the Hausa in the Northern Nigeria to be used traditionally for the treatment of headache, chest-pain, rheumatic pain, toothache, ear pain, migraine and sickle cell crisis. The various phytochemical tests revealed the presence of carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and cardiac glycosides. The result of analgesic activity of the extracts showed a significant and dose dependent analgesic activity when compared to the untreated control group at P<0.05. This justifies the use of the plant in ethnomedicine for the treatment of headache, chest pain, rheumatic pain, toothache, ear pain, migraine and sickle cell crisis.

  7. Polyphenol and phytosterol composition in an antibacterial extract from Rhizophora mangle L. bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Perera, Luz María; Varcalcel, Lino; Escobar, Arturo; Noa, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rhizophora mangle L. bark aqueous extract has antimicrobial, wound healing and antiulcerogenic properties. These properties could be associated with its chemical composition. To test this hypothesis, gravimetric, colorimetric, gas chromatography techniques were used to determine the preliminary chemical composition of this extract. Sephadex LH-20 Exclusion Chromatography was used by the fractionation of total extract and fractionation of low molecular weight polyphenols by liquid/liquid extraction. High Performance Liquid Chromatography was used to perform the composition in this low molecular weigh polyphenols fraction. The extract presented polyphenolic structures (54.78%) and other structural components (45.22%). Polymeric tannins were the major polyphenolic component (80%) and 20% were hydrolysable tannins. Epicatechin, catechin, chlorogenic acid, gallic acid and ellagic acid were monomeric structures determined in this extract. Phytosterols (0.0285%): stigmasterol, beta-sitosterol and campesterol were also present. PMID:18928137

  8. In vitro and In vivo Antioxidant Activity of Aphanamixis polystachya Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alluri V. Krishnaraju

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Free radical stress leads to tissue injury and progression of disease conditions such as arthritis, hemorrhagic shock, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hepatic injury, aging and ischemia, reperfusion injury of many tissues, gastritis, tumor promotion, neurodegenerative diseases and carcinogenesis. Safer antioxidants suitable for long term use are needed to prevent or stop the progression of free radical mediated disorders. Approach: Many plants possess antioxidant ingredients that provided efficacy by additive or synergistic activities. A. polystachya bark was a strong astringent, used for the treatment of liver and spleen diseases, rheumatism and tumors. Antioxidant activity of the crude extracts of bark of A. polystachya were assessed using NBT, DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays. The potent fraction (AP-110/82C was tested for in vivo efficacy Results: The methanol, aqueous methanol and water extracts exhibited potent antioxidant activity compared to known antioxidants. In vivo studies on potent fraction AP-110/82C demonstrated dose dependent reduction in hepatic malondialdehyde (320.6, 269.3 and 373.69 µM mg-1 protein with simultaneous improvement in hepatic glutathione (6.9, 17.1 and 5.8 µg mg-1 protein and catalase levels (668.9, 777.0 and 511.94 µg mg-1 protein respectively for 50, 100 mg kg-1 doses and control compared to control group. Conclusion: Due to its natural origin and potent free-radical scavenging ability A. polystachya could be used as a potential preventive intervention for free radical-mediated diseases.

  9. Biomonitoring air pollution in the Czech Republic by means of tree bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the point of view of atmospheric pollution some parts of the Czech Republic rank among the most devastated areas in Europe. Heavy industry is the source of exhausts which, especially in North-West Bohemia, have made large pieces of the country nearly dead. Therefore, monitoring air pollution is one of the key questions in environmental studies in the country. Our survey intended to use similar methods like those used in the Netherlands at the end of the 80's, i.e., activation analysis of lichen Parmelia sulcata. However, preliminary investigations have shown that the proper lichens have disappeared in the most polluted areas. Therefore, tree bark has been chosen as a biomonitor. Both activation analysis in the IRI TUDelft and radionuclide X-ray fluorescence in the FNSPE CTU Prague have been used as the methods of trace element analysis. Some methodological remarks are summarised in the first part of the paper. The effort was directed towards optimising the method in the relatively complicated height profile of the Czech landscape. Finally, oak bark was chosen as the biomonitor; investigations of disturbing effects led to the conclusion that they were within the error of measurement. The second part of the paper is devoted to the results of application of the method to a specified area of the Czech Republic. This survey covered the area of nearly 40,000 square kilometres. It included the most important parts of the country from the point of view of atmospheric pollution. The evaluation of both the INAA and RXRFA results is still in progress. Nevertheless, some maps of relative distribution of air pollution over the monitored area can now be presented. They show that for some elements (sulphur, titanium) the range of the concentrations measured is extraordinarily high and that the situation in North-West Bohemia is really alarming. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the acute and sub acute toxicity ofAnnona senegalensis root bark extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theophine C Okoye; Peter A Akah; Adaobi C Ezike; Maureen O Okoye; Collins A Onyeto; Frankline Ndukwu; Ejike Ohaegbulam; Lovelyn Ikele

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To investigate the safety profile ofAnnona senegalensis (A. senegalensis).Methods:Dried powdered root-bark of A. senegalensis was prepared by Sohxlet extraction using methanol-methylene chloride (1:1) solution and concentrated to obtain the methanol-methylene chloride extract (MME).MME was fractionated to obtain then-hexane (HF), ethylacetate (EF) and methanol (MF) fractions. Acute toxicity (LD50) test was performed withMME, HF, EF andMF in mice by oral route. The sub acute toxicity studies were performed in rats after14 days ofMME administration while haematological and biochemical parameters were monitored.Results:Medium lethal (LD50) values of1 296, 3 808, 1 265 and 2 154mg/kg were obtained for theMME, MF, HF andEF, respectively. The sub-acute toxicity studies indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in the body weight of both the treated rats and the control. The haematological tests indicated no change in the packed cell volume values but a significant (P<0.05) increase in the totalWBC count at100and 400 mg/kg doses. The differential analysis showed a decrease in the nutrophils and a non-significant increase in the lymphocyte counts. The liver transaminase enzymes, alanin transaminase and aspartate transaminase showed no significant increase compared to the control. Histopathological examination of the liver sections also indicted no obvious signs of hepatotoxicity except with the400 mg/kg dose that showed degeneration and necrosis of the hepatocytes.Conclusions:These results indicated that the root bark extracts ofA. Senegalensis are safe at the lower doses tested, and calls for caution in use at higher doses in treatment.

  11. High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pureswaran, Deepa S.; Sullivan, Brian T.; Ayres, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation via pheromone signalling is essential for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait that is linked to fitness, so high individual variation is paradoxical. One explanation is that the technique of measuring static pheromone pools overestimates true variation among individuals. An alternative hypothesis is that aggregation behaviour dilutes the contribution of individuals to the trait under selection and reduces the efficacy of natural selection on pheromone production by individuals. We compared pheromone measurements from traditional hindgut extractions of female southern pine beetles with those obtained by aerating individuals till they died. Aerations showed greater total pheromone production than hindgut extractions, but coefficients of variation (CV) remained high (60-182%) regardless of collection technique. This leaves the puzzle of high variation unresolved. A novel but simple explanation emerges from considering bark beetle aggregation behaviour. The phenotype visible to natural selection is the collective pheromone plume from hundreds of colonisers. The influence of a single beetle on this plume is enhanced by high variation among individuals but constrained by large group sizes. We estimated the average contribution of an individual to the pheromone plume across a range of aggregation sizes and showed that large aggregation sizes typical in mass attacks limit the potential of natural selection because each individual has so little effect on the overall plume. Genetic variation in pheromone production could accumulate via mutation and recombination, despite strong effects of the pheromone plume on the fitness of individuals within the aggregation. Thus, aggregation behaviour, by limiting the efficacy of natural selection, can allow the persistence of extreme phenotypes in nature.

  12. In vivo antiplasmodial and in vitro antioxidant property of stem bark extracts of Haematostaphis barteri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johnson; Nyarko; Boampong; Akua; Afryie; Karikari; Elvis; Ofori; Ameyaw

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimalarial and antioxidant properties of stem bark extracts of Haematostaphis barteri(H. barteri).Methods: The prophylactic activity of the plant was performed by dosing mice with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine(1.2 mg/kg), aqueous extract(30, 100, 300 mg/kg) and dichloromethane/methanol(D/M)(30, 100, 300 mg/kg) extracts of H. barteri for 3 days. On the 4th day, the mice were inoculated with Plasmodium berghei. The parasite density was estimated for each mouse 72 h post-parasite inoculation. The curative activity of the plant was also performed by inoculating mice with Plasmodium berghei. Three days later, they were treated with artemether-lumefantrine(4 mg/kg), aqueous and D/M extracts of H. barteri stem bark for 5 days. The in vitro antioxidant property of the aqueous extract was determined by using the reducing power, nitric oxide and total antioxidant capacity assays. Results: The aqueous extract exerted significant(P < 0.05) curative and prophylactic antimalarial activities. The D/M extract exhibited significant curative(P < 0.05) but not prophylactic antiplasmodial ef ect. The aqueous extract exhibited in vitro antioxidant property with IC50’s of(0.930 ± 0.021) mg/mL,(0.800 ± 0.001) mg/mL and(0.22 ± 0.05) mg/mL in the total antioxidant capacity, reducing power and nitric oxide assays. Histological assessment of the liver of aqueous and D/M treated animals did not reveal any sign of toxicity.Conclusions: H. barteri is not toxic which exerted significant curative antiplasmodial ef ects but the prophylactic property was however fraction dependent. The mechanism of the antiplasmodial activity of H. barteri may partly be mediated by its antioxidant property.

  13. ANTIHYPERGLYCEMIC AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF CASSIA FISTULA (L. STEM BARK

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    M. Ashraf Ali et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate antihyperglycemic and analgesic effects of ethanolic extract of Cassia fistula (CF stem barks in rats and mice, respectively. The analgesic effect of extract was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing test method while antihyperglycemic effect was investigated by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i. p. and metformin (150 mg/kg, p. o. were used as reference drugs for comparison. The extract significantly (P<0.05 reduced blood sugar level in alloxan induced diabetic (hyperglycaemic and glucose induced hyperglycemic (normo-hyperglycaemic rats orally at 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively. The glucose tolerance results showed significant (p<0.05 improved at the dose 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight (b. wt. of ethanolic extract respectively. On the Other hand, the analgesic activity of extract at 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg dose level were produced 45% and 62% writhing inhibitory response but diclofenac was observed 82% of that when compared to control group. The plant's extract produced dose-dependent, significant (P<0.05 analgesic effects against chemically induced nociceptive pain in mice. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the plant extract showed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenoids, flavonoids, saponins and tannins etc. were present in the plant which has antihyperglycemic and analgesic properties. However a glucose tolerance hypoglycemic test is comparable to diabetic control group and effect is a dose dependent. The findings of this experimental animal study indicate that Cassia fistula stem-bark ethanolic extract possesses analgesic and antihyperglycemic properties; and thus lend pharmacological credence to the folkloric, ethnomedical uses of the plant in the treatment and/or management of painful, inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Raiders of the lost bark: orangutan foraging strategies in a degraded landscape.

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    Gail Campbell-Smith

    Full Text Available Deforestation is rapidly transforming primary forests across the tropics into human-dominated landscapes. Consequently, conservationists need to understand how different taxa respond and adapt to these changes in order to develop appropriate management strategies. Our two year study seeks to determine how wild Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii adapt to living in an isolated agroforest landscape by investigating the sex of crop-raiders related to population demographics, and their temporal variations in feeding behaviour and dietary composition. From focal animal sampling we found that nine identified females raided cultivated fruits more than the four males. Seasonal adaptations were shown through orangutan feeding habits that shifted from being predominantly fruit-based (56% of the total feeding time, then 22% on bark to the fallback food of bark (44%, then 35% on fruits, when key cultivated resources such as jackfruit (Artocarpus integer, were unavailable. Cultivated fruits were mostly consumed in the afternoon and evening, when farmers had returned home. The finding that females take greater crop-raiding risks than males differs from previous human-primate conflict studies, probably because of the low risks associated (as farmers rarely retaliated and low intraspecific competition between males. Thus, the behavioral ecology of orangutans living in this human-dominated landscape differs markedly from that in primary forest, where orangutans have a strictly wild food diet, even where primary rainforests directly borders farmland. The importance of wild food availability was clearly illustrated in this study with 21% of the total orangutan feeding time being allocated to feeding on cultivated fruits. As forests are increasingly converted to cultivation, humans and orangutans are predicted to come into conflict more frequently. This study reveals orangutan adaptations for coexisting with humans, e.g. changes in temporal foraging patterns, which

  15. Biosorption of Divalent ion onto Treated Prosopis juliflora Bark from Aqueous Solutions - Isothermal and Statistical Analysis

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    N. Muthulakshmi Andal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work emphasizes the utilization of Prosopis juliflora bark, an agro waste material for the adsorption of Cu(II. The raw Prosopis juliflora bark (PJB is treated using 0.1N hydrochloric acid to enhance the sorption efficiency. The characterization studies of TPJB using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller(BET and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH analyses carried out. The batch mode experimental set up is verified to assess the sorption capacity of the chosen material for the operating factors viz., particle sizes/ doses of the sorbent material upon a range of initial concentrations of Cu(II at different temperatures, agitation time and pH of the Cu(II- TPJB system. The amount of Cu(II ion adsorbed on to TPJB surface is found to be 43.11 mg/g (97.4% under optimized conditions, its efficiency 3 fold times more than the Ce values reported by other researchers. The sorption characteristic of TPJB is quantitatively estimated through column experiments based on the Ce value by batch mode. The removal is observed as 98%. Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin isothermal curves at various initial concentrations are plotted for Cu(II-TPJB system wherein the straight line fit is best suited for the Freundlich isotherm model. The results show that the response of TPJB in trapping Cu(II ions are influenced by various parameters being statistically verified using SPSS software, indicative of good correlation.

  16. Anti-hyperglycemic and Antioxidant Potential of Water-Ethanol Extract of Musanga cecropioides Stem Bark

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    Nyemb Nyunaï

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of Musanga cecropioides (MC water-ethanol stem bark extract on blood glucose level in both hyperglycemic loaded glucose rats and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats, and evaluated its antioxidant capacity. The Wistar rats were induced diabetes after fasting. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT was conducted on normoglycemic rats, and anti-hyperglycemic test on diabetic rats; five groups with five rats each were constituted. Group 1: negative control was treated with vehicle; Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 were treated with increasing water-ethanol extract (200, 300 and 400 mg/kg b.w; Group 5 was the positive control, treated with glibenclamide. The antioxidant capacity of the extract was also evaluated by measuring the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power, Total Phenolic Content, Total Flavonoid Content, and radical scavenging activity of water-ethanol stem bark extract. In OGTT the water-ethanol extract of MC, at the dose of 300 mg/kg, significantly lowered the Area under Curve (AUC induced by glucose. In STZ diabetic rats, the extract significantly lowered the AUC of blood glucose, at all doses. Glibenclamide was more efficient in both OGTT and anti-hyperglycemic test. The MC extract presented relevant antioxidant activity with IC50 = 6.23 mg/mL. Both the Total Phenolic Content and the Total Flavonoid Content increased in a dose-dependent manner. The correlation of DPPH % free radical scavenged and Total Flavonoid Content was positive and statistically significant. MC water-ethanol extract possesses a good antioxidant potential, and could be helpful to lower hyperglycemic state associated with diabetes.

  17. Sub-chronic Hepatotoxicity of Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae) Inner Stem Bark Extract in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, T J N; Okorie, O; Okonta, J M; Okonkwo, C J

    2010-05-01

    The extracts of Anacardium occidentale have been used in the management of different cardiovascular disorders in Nigeria. These have necessitated the assessment of the toxicity of this plant extract in sub-chronic administration. The inner stem bark of Anacardium occidentale was extracted with 80 % methanol and quantitatively analysed for antinutrients and some heavy metals. The phytochemical compositions and acute toxicity of the extract were determined also. Toxicity profiles of the extract on some liver function parameters were evaluated following a sub-chronic oral administration at doses of 1.44 and 2.87 g/kg. The phytochemical screening of extract revealed the presence of high amount of tannins, moderate saponins and trace of free reducing sugars. The antinutrient levels were 5.75 % (tannins), 2.50 % (oxalates), 2.00 % (saponins), 0.25 % (phytate) and 0.03 % (cyanide). The quantity of iron detected from dried crude was 8.92 mg/100 g, while lead and cadmium were non-detectable. The extract had LD(50)of 2.154g/kg p.o. in mice. Sub-chronic administration of the extract significantly increased the serum levels of alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransaminase, which are indicative of liver damage. The serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and total protein of the treated animals were not significantly increased. The effects of sub-chronically administered extract on hepatocytes were minimal as the serum alkaline phosphatase; total bilirubin and total protein levels in treated animals were not significant (p< 0.05). Thus, sub-chronic administrations of Anacardium occidentale inner stem bark extract did not significantly (p< 0.05) depress the function of hepatocytes in Wistar rats.

  18. Sub-chronic hepatotoxicity of Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae inner stem bark extract in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okonkwo T. J. N.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of Anacardium occidentale have been used in the management of different cardiovascular disorders in Nigeria. These have necessitated the assessment of the toxicity of this plant extract in sub-chronic administration. The inner stem bark of Anacardium occidentale was extracted with 80 % methanol and quantitatively analysed for antinutrients and some heavy metals. The phytochemical compositions and acute toxicity of the extract were determined also. Toxicity profiles of the extract on some liver function parameters were evaluated following a sub-chronic oral administration at doses of 1.44 and 2.87 g/kg. The phytochemical screening of extract revealed the presence of high amount of tannins, moderate saponins and trace of free reducing sugars. The antinutrient levels were 5.75 % (tannins, 2.50 % (oxalates, 2.00 % (saponins, 0.25 % (phytate and 0.03 % (cyanide. The quantity of iron detected from dried crude was 8.92 mg/100 g, while lead and cadmium were non-detectable. The extract had LD 50 of 2.154 g/kg p.o. in mice. Sub-chronic administration of the extract significantly increased the serum levels of alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransaminase, which are indicative of liver damage. The serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and total protein of the treated animals were not significantly increased. The effects of sub-chronically administered extract on hepatocytes were minimal as the serum alkaline phosphatase; total bilirubin and total protein levels in treated animals were not significant (p< 0.05. Thus, sub-chronic administrations of Anacardium occidentale inner stem bark extract did not significantly (p< 0.05 depress the function of hepatocytes in Wistar rats.

  19. Pharmacological properties and related constituents of stem bark of Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir. (Fabaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oudraogo Noufou; Sawadogo Richard Wamtinga; Tibiri Andr; Bayet Christine; Lompo Marius; Hay A Emmanuelle; Koudou Jean; Dijoux Marie-Genevive; Guissou Innocent Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To screen methanol and dichloromethane extracts of stem bark of Pterocarpus erinaceus for anti-inflammatory, analgesic, in vitro antioxidant activities and phytochemical analysis. Methods:Anti-inflammatory activity was determined by using carrageenan induced-edema of mice paw and croton oil-induced edema of mice ear;analgesic effect was evaluated using acetic acid-induced writhing. Phytochemical screening of extracts was performed by thin layer chromatography. The chromatographic fractionation led to the isolation of main active components as friedelin, lupeol and epicathechin. The structures were established by TLC and nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Results:Both methanol and dichloromethane extracts, friedelin, lupeol and epicatechin showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect using croton oil induced-ear edema. Furthermore, the action of dichloromethane extract was more important. At the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg, the methanol extract was able to reduce the carrageenan induced-hind paw edema, while at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, it showed an important analgesic effect against writhing induced by acetic acid injection of 38.8%, 68.0%and 74.3%, respectively. Antioxidative properties of methanol extract and its dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions were assessed by using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method. The methanol extract showed the stronger radical scavenging activity than dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions, with an antiradical power of 5, 3.5 and 2 respectively. The main components isolated from these extracts as friedelin, lupeol and epicathechin were responsible of these activities. Conclusions:The results suggest that the stem bark extracts of Pterocarpus erinaceus possessed important anti-inflammatory, analgesic activities and strong antioxidant properties, therefore, they could be used as natural potential ingredients for pharma ceutical industry.

  20. Spatial characterization of bark beetle infestations by a multidate synergy of SPOT and Landsat imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Hooman; Schumann, Bastian; Kautz, Markus; Dech, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Biological infestations in forests, e.g. the insect outbreaks, have been shown as favoured by future climate change trends. In Europe, the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) is one of the main agents causing substantial economic disturbances in forests. Therefore, studies on spatio-temporal characterization of the area affected by bark beetle are of major importance for rapid post-attack management. We aimed at spatially detecting damage classes by combining multidate remote sensing data and a non-parametric classification. As study site served a part of the Bavarian Forest National Park (Germany). For the analysis, we used 10 geometrically rectified scenes of Landsat and SPOT sensors in the period between 2001 and 2011. The main objective was to explore the potential of medium-resolution data for classifying the attacked areas. A further aim was to explore if the temporally adjacent infested areas are able to be separated. The random forest (RF) model was applied using the reference data drawn from high-resolution aerial imagery. The results indicate that the sufficiently large patches of visually identifiable damage classes can be accurately separated from non-attacked areas. In contrast to those, the other mortality classes (current year, current year 1 and current year 2 infested classes) were mostly classified with higher commission or omission errors as well as higher classification biases. The available medium-resolution satellite images, combined with properly acquired reference data, are concluded to be adequate tools to map area-based infestations at advanced stages. However, the quality of reference data, the size of infested patches and the spectral resolution of remotely sensed data are the decisive factors in case of smaller areas. Further attempts using auxiliary height information and spatially enhanced data may refine such an approach.