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Sample records for bariatric surgical procedures

  1. [Choice of bariatric and metabolic surgical procedures].

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    Liang, Hui; Lin, Shibo; Guan, Wei

    2017-04-25

    Bariatric and metabolic surgery has become the clinical hot topic of the treatment of metabolic syndromes including obesity and diabetes mellitus, but how to choose the appropriate surgical procedure remains the difficult problem in clinical practice. Clinical guidelines of American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery(ASMBS)(version 2013) introduced the procedures of bariatric and metabolic surgery mainly including biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch(BPD-DS), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy(LSG). To choose the appropriate bariatric and metabolic procedure, the surgeons should firstly understand the indications and the contraindications of each procedure. Procedure choice should also consider personal condition (body mass index, comorbidities and severity of diabetes), family and socioeconomic status (postoperative follow-up attendance, understanding of potential surgical risk of gastrectomy and patient's will), family and disease history (patients with high risk of gastric cancer should avoid LRYGB; patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should avoid LSG) and associated personal factors of surgeons. With the practice of bariatric and metabolic surgery, the defects, especially long-term complications, of different procedures were found. For example, LRYGB resulted in higher incidence of postoperative anemia and marginal ulcer, high risk of gastric cancer as well as the requirement of vitamin supplementation and regular follow-up. Though LSG has lower surgical risk, its efficacy of diabetes mellitus remission and long-term weight loss are inferior to the LRYGB. These results pose challenges to the surgeons to balance the benefits and risks of the bariatric procedures. A lot of factors can affect the choice of bariatric and metabolic procedure. Surgeons should choose the procedure according to patient's condition with the consideration of the

  2. Comparison of the efficacy of standard bariatric surgical procedures on Saudi population using the bariatric analysis and reporting outcome system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzam Al Kadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the efficacy of various standard bariatric surgical procedures using the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS. Methods: This is a prospective, descriptive analytical study conducted in 2 medical institutions in Saudi Arabia. A total of 270 patients who had different bariatric surgery during the period between March 2010 and December 2012 were included. The data was analyzed and scored against 3 outcomes, excess weight loss, cure or improvement of comorbidities, and quality of life changes. Results: All patients who had different bariatric procedures were included in our study. Seventy-nine (29.3% underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP, 159 (58.9% had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, and 32 (11.9% had laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB. Complete remission of at least one comorbidity was reported in 36% of LRYGBP, 51% in LSG, and 42% in LAGB. While all other patients have improved comorbidities. The BAROS score was good or higher in 78.5% of LRYGBP, 83.6% for the LSG, and 84.4% of LAGB patients. The average excess weight loss was 67.9% in LRYGBP, 75.8% in LSG, and 81.7% LAGB patients. Conclusion: Bariatric surgery provides a substantial reduction in excess weight, improvement and cure of comorbidities, and improvement in quality of life. Standard bariatric procedures have different degrees of outcomes that can be beneficial in selecting appropriate procedure for appropriate indications and patients.

  3. Utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic general and bariatric surgical procedures at Academic Medical Centers.

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    Villamere, James; Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Stephen; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-07-01

    Robotic-assisted general and bariatric surgery is gaining popularity among surgeons. The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques for common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures performed at Academic Medical Centers. We analyzed data from University HealthSystem Consortium clinical database from October 2010 to February 2014 for all patients who underwent laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for eight common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures: gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric band, antireflux surgery, Heller myotomy (HM), cholecystectomy (LC), colectomy, rectal resection (RR). Utilization and outcome measures including demographics, in-hospital mortality, major complications, 30-day readmission, length of stay (LOS), and costs were compared between techniques. 96,694 laparoscopic and robotic procedures were analyzed. Utilization of the robotic approach was the highest for RR (21.4%), followed by HM (9.1%). There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality or major complications between laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for all procedures. Only two procedures had improved outcome associated with the robotic approach: robotic HM and robotic LC had a shorter LOS compared to the laparoscopic approach (2.8 ± 3.6 vs. 2.3 ± 2.1; respectively, p bariatric surgical procedures with the highest utilization for rectal resection. Compared to conventional laparoscopy, there were no observed clinical benefits associated with the robotic approach, but there was a consistently higher cost.

  4. Current Techniques of Teaching and Learning in Bariatric Surgical Procedures: A Systematic Review.

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    Kaijser, Mirjam; van Ramshorst, Gabrielle; van Wagensveld, Bart; Pierie, Jean-Pierre

    2017-10-12

    The gastric sleeve resection and gastric bypass are the 2 most commonly performed bariatric procedures. This article provides an overview of current teaching and learning methods of those techniques in resident and fellow training. A database search was performed on Pubmed, Embase, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) to identify the methods used to provide training in bariatric surgery worldwide. After exclusion based on titles and abstracts, full texts of the selected articles were assessed. Included articles were reviewed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In total, 2442 titles were identified and 14 full text articles met inclusion criteria. Four publications described an ex vivo training course, and 6 focused on at least 1 step of the gastric bypass procedure. Two randomized controlled trials (RCT) provided high-quality evidence on training aspects. Surgical coaching caused significant improvement of Bariatric Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (BOSATS) scores (3.60 vs. 3.90, p = 0.017) and reduction of technical errors (18 vs. 10, p = 0.003). A preoperative warm-up increased global rating scales (GRS) scores on depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03). Stepwise education, surgical coaching, warming up, Internet-based knowledge modules, and ex vivo training courses are effective in relation to bariatric surgical training of residents and fellows, possibly shortening their learning curves. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

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    ... Procedures Who is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery Life ... Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity 100 SW 75th Street, Suite 201, Gainesville, FL, ...

  6. Surgical Skill in Bariatric Surgery: Does Skill in One Procedure Predict Outcomes for Another?

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    Varban, Oliver A.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Schram, Jon; Ghaferi, Amir A.; Thumma, Joythi R.; Carlin, Arthur M.; Dimick, Justin B.

    2016-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Background Recent data establishes a strong link between peer video ratings of surgical skill and clinical outcomes with laparoscopic gastric bypass. Whether skill for one bariatric procedure can predict outcomes for another, related procedure is unknown. Methods Twenty surgeons voluntarily submitted videos of a standard laparoscopic gastric bypass procedure, which was blindly rated by 10 or more peers using a modified version of the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Surgeons were divided into quartiles for skill in performing gastric bypass and their outcomes within 30 days after sleeve gastrectomy were compared. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to adjust for patient risk factors. Results Surgeons with skill ratings in the top (n=5), middle (n=10, middle two combined), and bottom (n=5) quartiles for laparoscopic gastric bypass had similar rates of surgical and medical complications following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (top 5.7%, middle 6.4%, bottom 5.5%, p=0.13). Furthermore, surgeon skill ratings did not correlate with rates of reoperation, readmission and emergency department visits. Top rated surgeons had significantly faster operating room times for sleeve gastrectomy (top 76 min, middle 90 min, bottom 88 min; plaparoscopic gastric bypass do not predict outcomes with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Evaluation of surgical skill with one procedure may not apply to other related procedures and may require independent assessment of surgical technical proficiency. PMID:27324569

  7. Clinical factors that predict remission of diabetes after different bariatric surgical procedures: interdisciplinary group of bariatric surgery of Verona (G.I.C.O.V.).

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    Zenti, Maria Grazia; Rubbo, Ilaria; Ceradini, Giulia; Rinaldi, Elisabetta; Nadalini, Luisa; Battistoni, Marco; Genna, Michele; Bonora, Enzo; Zoppini, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate weight loss and glycemic control parameters after different bariatric surgical procedures in type 2 diabetes (T2D) obese patients and identify patients' factors that predict diabetes remission. The study included 105 obese T2D patients (66 women and 39 men) who underwent laparoscopic gastric banding (LAGB, 11 subjects, age 47 ± 10 years, BMI 42.3 ± 8.3 kg/m(2)), or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYBP, 77 subjects, age 50 ± 8 years, BMI 45.7 ± 6.8 kg/m(2)), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG, 17 subjects, age 49 ± 11 years, BMI 50.2 ± 8.8 kg/m(2)) during 2005-2012 period. The average percentage of weight loss at 12 months after surgery was 26.4 ± 9.8 %, and it was maintained at 24 and 36 months of follow-up. Diabetes remission occurred in 68.6 % of study participants (4/11 of LAGB, 54/77 of RYBP and 14/17 of SG). In multivariate Cox analysis, age, duration of diabetes, surgical procedure and glycated hemoglobin Bariatric surgical procedures that modify the upper gastrointestinal tract anatomy (RYBP and SG) are more successful in producing weight loss and remission of T2D than those that simply restrict stomach capacity (LAGB). Younger age, short duration of diabetes and better glucose control confer higher probability of achieving remission of diabetes.

  8. Different effects of bariatric surgical procedures on dyslipidemia: a registry-based analysis.

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    Spivak, Hadar; Sakran, Nasser; Dicker, Dror; Rubin, Moshe; Raz, Itamar; Shohat, Tamy; Blumenfeld, Orit

    2017-07-01

    The scale and variables linked to bariatric surgery's effect on dyslipidemia have not been conclusive. To compare the effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), and adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) on dyslipidemia SETTING: National bariatric surgery registry. Plasma lipids and associated variables were compared at baseline and 1 year (12±4 mo) after surgery for registry patients with dyslipidemia enrolled from June 2013 to August 2014. The greatest mean total-cholesterol (TC) reduction was observed post-RYGB, 226.7±26.4 to 181.3±30.9 mg/dL (19.9%, n = 208), followed by post-SG, 227.9±24.4 to 206.7±34.2 mg/dL (8.9%, n = 1515; PRYGB patients compared with 43.5% post-SG patients (odds ratio [OR] = 6.24, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.69-10.53) and 25.6% post-LABG patients (OR = 9.66, 95% CI: 4.11-22.67; PRYGB male patients (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.04-2.35), (P = .02). The lowering of triglyceride levels by approximately 75% was comparable after SG and RYGB procedures. The type of surgery was the strongest independent predictor for all lipid level improvements or remissions. Male sex was an independent predictor for LDL normalization only (OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.24-2.85). Excess weight loss offered no meaningful prediction for lipid improvement (OR = 1.01-1.03). Particular types of bariatric surgeries had different effects on dyslipidemia, independent of weight loss. Overall, the RYGB achieved the biggest reduction in plasma lipids (TC and LDL), although SG did affect HDL. Our results could aid in the decision-making process regarding the most appropriate procedure for patients with dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Contemporary Bariatric Surgical Procedures on Type 2 Diabetes Remission. A Population-Based Matched Cohort Study.

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    Gulliford, Martin C; Booth, Helen Pascale; Reddy, Marcus; Charlton, Judith; Fildes, Alison; Prevost, A Toby; Khan, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effect of gastric banding, gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy on medium to long-term diabetes control in obese participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Matched cohort study using primary care electronic health records from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Obese participants with type 2 diabetes who received bariatric surgery from 2002 to 2014 were compared with matched control participants who did not receive BS. Remission was defined for each year of follow-up as HbA1c <6.5 % and no antidiabetic drugs prescribed. There were 826 obese participants with T2DM who received bariatric surgery including adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) 220; gastric bypass (GBP) 449; or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) 153; with four procedures undefined. Mean HbA1c declined from 8.0 % before BS to 6.5 % in the second postoperative year; proportion with HbA1c <6.5 % (<48 mmol/mol) increased from 17 to 47 %. The proportion of patients in remission was 30 % in the second year, being 20 % for LAGB, 34 % for GBP and 38 % for SG. The adjusted relative rate of remission over the first six postoperative years was 5.97 (4.86 to 7.33, P < 0.001) overall; for LAGB 3.32 (2.27 to 4.86); GBP 7.16 (5.64 to 9.08); and SG 6.82 (5.05 to 9.19). Rates of remission were maintained into the sixth year of follow-up. Remission of diabetes may continue for up to 6 years after bariatric surgical procedures. Diabetes outcomes are generally more favourable after gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy than LAGB.

  10. Operative strategies for patients with failed primary bariatric procedures.

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    Buhmann, Helena; Vines, Larissa; Schiesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat obesity and its sequelae. With the increasing incidence of obesity, the number of bariatric procedures has dramatically increased in recent years. The perioperative morbidity reached a very low level, and nearly all revisional bariatric procedures are primarily minimally invasive today. About 10-25% of the patients undergoing bariatric surgery require a revision at some point after their initial operation. Consequently, revisional bariatric surgery has emerged as a distinct practice, performed mainly at tertiary centers, to resolve complications caused by the primary operation and to provide satisfactory weight loss. In this review, our personal experience with revisional bariatric surgery is discussed against the background of the available literature. We further attempt to define major indications for revisional bariatric surgery and balance them with perioperative and long-term morbidity as well as the surgical outcome.

  11. Bariatric Surgery and Endoluminal Procedures: IFSO Worldwide Survey 2014.

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    Angrisani, L; Santonicola, A; Iovino, P; Vitiello, A; Zundel, N; Buchwald, H; Scopinaro, N

    2017-09-01

    Several bariatric surgery worldwide surveys have been previously published to illustrate the evolution of bariatric surgery in the last decades. The aim of this survey is to report an updated overview of all bariatric procedures performed in 2014.For the first time, a special section on endoluminal techniques was added. The 2014 International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) survey form evaluating the number and the type of surgical and endoluminal bariatric procedures was emailed to all IFSO societies. Trend analyses from 2011 to 2014 were also performed. There were 56/60 (93.3%) responders. The total number of bariatric/metabolic procedures performed in 2014 consisted of 579,517 (97.6%) surgical operations and 14,725 (2.4%) endoluminal procedures. The most commonly performed procedure in the world was sleeve gastrectomy (SG) that reached 45.9%, followed by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) (39.6%), and adjustable gastric banding (AGB) (7.4%). The annual percentage changes from 2013 revealed the increase of SG and decrease of RYGB in all the IFSO regions (USA/Canada, Europe, and Asia/Pacific) with the exception of Latin/South America, where SG decreased and RYGB represented the most frequent procedure. There was a further increase in the total number of bariatric/metabolic procedures in 2014 and SG is currently the most frequent surgical procedure in the world. This is the first survey that describes the endoluminal procedures, but the accuracy of provided data should be hopefully improved in the next future. We encourage the creation of further national registries and their continuous updates taking into account all new bariatric procedures including the endoscopic procedures that will obtain increasing importance in the near future.

  12. Non-surgical complications following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Snežana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment for obesity and comorbidities. This treatment modality is the most potent for weight reduction with long-term weight maintenance and positive metabolic effects. The effect on weight loss and possible side effect depends of type of surgery. Micro and macronutrient deficiencies can occur after malapsorptive procedures. Iron deficiency occurs in almost half of patients following RYGB (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The main causes of iron deficiency are insufficient meat ingestion and lack of hydrochloric acid after removal of pylorus. B12 deficiency occured 6 months after RYGB in patients with oral supplementation of B12. Bone turnover increased three months after RYGB, and the levels of bone turnover markers increased 200% in next 12-18 months. Impaired vitamin D absorption leads to decreased calcium absorption and secondary hyperparathyroidism with lower bone mineral density. After the bariatric surgery, testosterone level becomes higher and all sexual quality indicators improving. Malapsorptive procedures with nutritive deficiency can cause oligo-astenozooteratospermia and male infertility. Due to the same reason pregnancy is not recommended in the first year bariatric surgery. Possible side effect of pregnancy within 12 months after surgery is fetal growth retardation. There is twice higher incidence for developing alcohol or other addition after bariatric surgery then in non-operated obese patients. The frequency of depressive episodes and suicide attempt is higher after bariatric surgery.

  13. Diarrhea after bariatric procedures: Diagnosis and therapy.

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    Borbély, Yves Michael; Osterwalder, Alice; Kröll, Dino; Nett, Philipp C.; Inglin, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea after bariatric procedures, mainly those with malabsorptive elements including Roux-Y Gastric Bypass and Biliopancreatic Diversion, is common and an essential determinant of quality of life and micro- and macronutrient deficiencies. Bariatric surgery is the only sustainably successful method to address morbid obesity and its comorbidities, particularly gaining more and more importance in the specific treatment of diabetic patients. Approximately half a million procedures are annually...

  14. Diarrhea after bariatric procedures: Diagnosis and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Borb?ly, Yves M; Osterwalder, Alice; Kr?ll, Dino; Nett, Philipp C; Inglin, Roman A

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea after bariatric procedures, mainly those with malabsorptive elements including Roux-Y Gastric Bypass and Biliopancreatic Diversion, is common and an essential determinant of quality of life and micro- and macronutrient deficiencies. Bariatric surgery is the only sustainably successful method to address morbid obesity and its comorbidities, particularly gaining more and more importance in the specific treatment of diabetic patients. Approximately half a million procedures are annually...

  15. Non-surgical complications following bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Polovina Snežana; Micić Dragan; Micić Dušan; Šumarac-Dumanović Mirjana 0000-0002-6216-6650; Kendereški Aleksandra; Micić J.; Stamenković-Pejković Danica; Cvijović Goran; Zorić S.; Jeremić D.; Bjelović Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment for obesity and comorbidities. This treatment modality is the most potent for weight reduction with long-term weight maintenance and positive metabolic effects. The effect on weight loss and possible side effect depends of type of surgery. Micro and macronutrient deficiencies can occur after malapsorptive procedures. Iron deficiency occurs in almost half of patients following RYGB (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). The main causes of iron deficiency ...

  16. Management and Prevention of Surgical and Nutritional Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

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    Marcotte, Eric; Chand, Bipan

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is well-recognized for its effects on health, beyond weight-loss. It underwent a revolution recently with the growing performance of laparoscopic procedures, leading to enhanced recovery and a reduction in procedural risk. However, surgical complications, although rare, do develop. It is important to recognize the complications, and ideally prevent them from happening. This article reviews the risks of the four most commonly performed bariatric procedures, with an emphasis on technique and management in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The nutritional aspect of bariatric surgery is of the utmost importance, because catastrophic consequences have been linked to malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute complications after laparoscopic bariatric procedures: update for the general surgeon.

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    Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Boru, Cristian E; Rizzello, Mario; Puzziello, Alessandro; Copaescu, Catalin; Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Silecchia, Gianfranco

    2013-06-01

    Development and widespread use of laparoscopic bariatric surgery exposes emergency room physicians and general surgeons to face acute or chronic surgical complications of bariatric surgery. The most common surgical emergencies after bariatric surgery are examined based on an extensive review of bariatric surgery literature and on the personal experience of the authors' practice in four high-volume bariatric surgery centers. An orderly stepwise approach to the bariatric patient with an emergency condition is advisable. Resuscitation should follow the same protocol adopted for the non-bariatric patients. Consultation with the bariatric surgeon should be obtained early, and referral to the bariatric center should be considered whenever possible. The identification of the surgical procedure to which the patient was submitted will orient in the diagnosis of the acute condition. Procedure-specific complication should always be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis. Acute slippage is the most frequent complication that needs emergency treatment in a laparoscopic gastric banding. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypasses may present with life-threatening suture leaks or suture line bleeding. Gastric greater curvature plication (investigational restrictive procedure) can present early complications related to prolonged postoperative vomiting. Both gastric bypass and bilio-pancreatic diversion may cause anastomotic marginal ulcer, bleeding, or rarely perforation and severe stenosis, while small bowel obstruction due to internal hernia represents a surgical emergency, also caused by trocar site hernia, intussusceptions, adhesions, strictures, kinking, or blood clots. Rapid weight loss after bariatric surgery can cause cholecystitis or choledocholithiasis, which are difficult to treat after bypass procedures. The general surgeon should be informed about modern bariatric procedures, their potential acute complications, and emergency management.

  18. Diarrhea after bariatric procedures: Diagnosis and therapy.

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    Borbély, Yves M; Osterwalder, Alice; Kröll, Dino; Nett, Philipp C; Inglin, Roman A

    2017-07-14

    Diarrhea after bariatric procedures, mainly those with malabsorptive elements including Roux-Y Gastric Bypass and Biliopancreatic Diversion, is common and an essential determinant of quality of life and micro- and macronutrient deficiencies. Bariatric surgery is the only sustainably successful method to address morbid obesity and its comorbidities, particularly gaining more and more importance in the specific treatment of diabetic patients. Approximately half a million procedures are annually performed around the world, with numbers expected to rise drastically in the near future. A multitude of factors exert their influence on bowel habits; preoperative comorbidities and procedure-related aspects are intertwined with postoperative nutritional habits. Diagnosis may be challenging owing to the characteristics of post-bariatric surgery anatomy with hindered accessibility of excluded segments of the small bowel and restriction at the gastric level. Conventional testing measures, if available, generally yield low accuracy and are usually not validated in this specific population. Limited trials of empiric treatment are a practical alternative and oftentimes an indispensable part of the diagnostic process. This review provides an overview of causes for chronic post-bariatric surgery diarrhea and details the particularities of its diagnosis and treatment in this specific patient population. Topics of current interest such as the impact of gut microbiota and the influence of bile acids on morbid obesity and especially their role in diarrhea are highlighted in order to provide a better understanding of the specific problems and chances of future treatment in post-bariatric surgery patients.

  19. Diarrhea after bariatric procedures: Diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Yves M; Osterwalder, Alice; Kröll, Dino; Nett, Philipp C; Inglin, Roman A

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea after bariatric procedures, mainly those with malabsorptive elements including Roux-Y Gastric Bypass and Biliopancreatic Diversion, is common and an essential determinant of quality of life and micro- and macronutrient deficiencies. Bariatric surgery is the only sustainably successful method to address morbid obesity and its comorbidities, particularly gaining more and more importance in the specific treatment of diabetic patients. Approximately half a million procedures are annually performed around the world, with numbers expected to rise drastically in the near future. A multitude of factors exert their influence on bowel habits; preoperative comorbidities and procedure-related aspects are intertwined with postoperative nutritional habits. Diagnosis may be challenging owing to the characteristics of post-bariatric surgery anatomy with hindered accessibility of excluded segments of the small bowel and restriction at the gastric level. Conventional testing measures, if available, generally yield low accuracy and are usually not validated in this specific population. Limited trials of empiric treatment are a practical alternative and oftentimes an indispensable part of the diagnostic process. This review provides an overview of causes for chronic post-bariatric surgery diarrhea and details the particularities of its diagnosis and treatment in this specific patient population. Topics of current interest such as the impact of gut microbiota and the influence of bile acids on morbid obesity and especially their role in diarrhea are highlighted in order to provide a better understanding of the specific problems and chances of future treatment in post-bariatric surgery patients. PMID:28765690

  20. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimation of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Wayne J; DeMaria, Eric J; Brethauer, Stacy A; Mattar, Samer G; Rosenthal, Raul J; Morton, John M

    2018-03-01

    Bariatric surgery, despite being the most successful long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity, remains underused as only approximately 1% of all patients who qualify for surgery actually undergo surgery. To determine if patients in need are receiving appropriate therapy, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery created a Numbers Taskforce to specify annual rate of use for obesity treatment interventions. The objective of this study was to determine metabolic and bariatric procedure trends since 2011 and to provide the best estimate of the number of procedures performed in the United States in 2016. United States. We reviewed data from the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. In addition, data from industry and outpatient centers were used to estimate outpatient center activity. Data from 2016 were compared with the previous 5 years of data. Compared with 2015, the total number of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in 2016 increased from approximately 196,000 to 216,000. The sleeve gastrectomy trend is increasing, and it continues to be the most common procedure. The gastric bypass and gastric band trends continued to decrease as seen in previous years. The percentage of revision procedures and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch procedures increased slightly. Finally, intragastric balloons placement emerged as a significant contributor to the cumulative total number of procedures performed. There is increasing use of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States from 2011 to 2016, with a nearly 10% increase noted from 2015 to 2016. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Conversional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery].

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    Zorron, R; Bothe, C; Junghans, T; Pratschke, J; Benzing, C; Krenzien, F

    2016-10-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the therapy of choice in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are showing higher rates of treatment failure, reducing obesity-associated morbidity and body weight insufficiently. Moreover, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can occur refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to RYGB can be reasonable as long as specific conditions are fulfilled.Endoscopic procedures are currently being applied to revise bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20 % of cases. Transoral outlet reduction is the minimally invasive method of choice to reduce gastrojejunal anastomosis of the alimentary limb. The diameter of a gastric sleeve can be unwantedly enlarged as well; that can be reduced by placement of a longitudinal full-thickness suture.Severe hypoglycemic episodes can be present in patients following RYGB. Hypoglycemic episodes have to be diagnosed first and can be treated conventionally. Alternatively, a laparoscopic approach according to Branco-Zorron can be used for non-responders. Hypoglycemic episodes can thus be prevented and body weight reduction can be assured.Conversional and endoscopic procedures can be used in patients with treatment failure following bariatric surgery. Note that non-invasive approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional procedure is performed.

  2. A nomogram for predicting surgical complications in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Patricia L; Saager, Leif; Dalton, Jarrod; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; Roberman, Dmitry; Melara, Pamela; Kurz, Andrea; Turan, Alparslan

    2011-05-01

    To minimize morbidity and mortality associated with surgery risks in the obese patient, algorithms offer planning operative strategy. Because these algorithms often classify patients based on inadequate category granularity, outcomes may not be predicted accurately. We reviewed patient factors and patient outcomes for those who had undergone bariatric surgical procedures to determine relationships and developed a nomogram to calculate individualized patient risk. From the American College of Surgeons National Security Quality Improvement Program database, we identified 32,426 bariatric surgery patients meeting NIH criteria and treated between 2005 and 2008. We defined a composite binary outcome of 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality. A predictive model based on preoperative variables was developed using multivariable logistic regression; a multiple imputation procedure allowed inclusions of observations with missing data. Model performance was assessed using the C-statistic. A calibration plot graphically assessed the agreement between predicted and observed probabilities in regard to 30-day morbidity/mortality. The nomogram model was constructed for maximal predictive accuracy. The estimated C-statistic [95% confidence interval] for the predictive nomogram was 0.629 [0.614, 0.645], indicative of slight to moderate discriminative ability beyond that of chance alone, and the greatest impacts on the estimated probability of morbidity/mortality were determined to be age, body mass index, serum albumin, and functional status. By accurately predicting 30-day morbidity and mortality, this nomogram may prove useful in patient preoperative counseling on postoperative complication risk. Our results additionally indicate that neither age nor presence of obesity-related comorbidities should exclude patients from bariatric surgery consideration.

  3. Animal models in bariatric surgery--a review of the surgical techniques and postsurgical physiology.

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    Rao, Raghavendra S; Rao, Venkatesh; Kini, Subhash

    2010-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective current treatment for morbid obesity. Since the first publication of an article by Kremen, Linner, and Nelson, many experiments have been performed using animal models. The initial experiments used only malabsorptive procedures like intestinal bypass which have largely been abandoned now. These experimental models have been used to assess feasibility and safety as well as to refine techniques particular to each procedure. We will discuss the surgical techniques and the postsurgical physiology of the four major current bariatric procedures (namely, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, and biliopancreatic diversion). We have also reviewed the anatomy and physiology of animal models. We have reviewed the literature and presented it such that it would be a reference to an investigator interested in animal experiments in bariatric surgery. Experimental animal models are further divided into two categories: large mammals that include dogs, cats, rabbits, and pig and small mammals that include rats and mice.

  4. Quality of life evaluation after selected bariatric procedures using the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hady Razak Hady

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Morbid obesity leads to significant decrease in quality of life. The Bariatric Analysis and ReportingOutcome System (BAROS was created for objective evaluation of surgical treatment for morbid obesity outcomes. Aim: Evaluation of late results of surgical treatment for morbid obesity with laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding(LAGB and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB procedures, together with evaluation of quality of life in the postoperativeperiod. Material and methods: Sixty patients treated surgically for morbid obesity were included in the study. Group 1 constitutedpatients who underwent LAGB – n = 30 patients with mean age 34 ±9.67, mean BMI 44.3 ±3.7. Group 2 constitutedpatients who underwent RYGB – n = 30 patients with mean age 50.9 ±7.8 years, mean BMI 54.5 ±6.72.Patients were operated on in the period 2007-2008. At least 6 months after the operation, they received questionnairesbased on the BAROS scale in the authors’ own modification. Results: In both groups of patients treated with LAGB and RYGB, an excellent result of surgical treatment wasachieved in 17% of patients, very good in 57%, good in 23%, fair in 1.5% and failure in 1.5%. In the final evaluation ofquality of life (QoL in both groups treated with LAGB and RYGB, QoL was significantly better in 55% of patients, betterin 42%, while in 3% QoL was unchanged. Conclusions: The quality of life of patients with morbid obesity, evaluated at least six months after the surgery,improves significantly following the bariatric operations performed most often so far, in both laparoscopic and classictechnique.

  5. Surgical skill and complication rates after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmeyer, John D; Finks, Jonathan F; O'Reilly, Amanda; Oerline, Mary; Carlin, Arthur M; Nunn, Andre R; Dimick, Justin; Banerjee, Mousumi; Birkmeyer, Nancy J O

    2013-10-10

    Clinical outcomes after many complex surgical procedures vary widely across hospitals and surgeons. Although it has been assumed that the proficiency of the operating surgeon is an important factor underlying such variation, empirical data are lacking on the relationships between technical skill and postoperative outcomes. We conducted a study involving 20 bariatric surgeons in Michigan who participated in a statewide collaborative improvement program. Each surgeon submitted a single representative videotape of himself or herself performing a laparoscopic gastric bypass. Each videotape was rated in various domains of technical skill on a scale of 1 to 5 (with higher scores indicating more advanced skill) by at least 10 peer surgeons who were unaware of the identity of the operating surgeon. We then assessed relationships between these skill ratings and risk-adjusted complication rates, using data from a prospective, externally audited, clinical-outcomes registry involving 10,343 patients. Mean summary ratings of technical skill ranged from 2.6 to 4.8 across the 20 surgeons. The bottom quartile of surgical skill, as compared with the top quartile, was associated with higher complication rates (14.5% vs. 5.2%, Pbariatric surgeons varied widely, and greater skill was associated with fewer postoperative complications and lower rates of reoperation, readmission, and visits to the emergency department. Although these findings are preliminary, they suggest that peer rating of operative skill may be an effective strategy for assessing a surgeon's proficiency.

  6. Do acute care surgeons need bariatric surgical training to ensure optimal outcomes in obese patients with nonbariatric emergencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Andrea; Skinner, Ruby

    2018-03-01

    Acute care surgeons care for the entire breadth of the American adult population, including obese patients. As the population gets heavier, more patients will present to acute case surgeons with nonbariatric surgical emergencies. Do these surgeons need bariatric training to properly care for obese population? To evaluate our experience in obese population requiring acute surgery and compare outcomes based on surgeon expertise in bariatric surgery. Community teaching hospital, United States. Retrospective review of obese patients requiring acute surgical intervention. Surgeons were classified as bariatric surgeons (B, n = 2) versus nonbariatric surgeons (NB, n = 4). Demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, and outcomes based on surgeon training were compared. Two hundred three patients comprised the cohort. The mean body mass index was 37 ±6 kg/m 2 . The majority of procedures were laparoscopic (cholecystectomies n = 75, appendectomies n = 45). The remaining nonroutine laparoscopic cases were intestinal obstructions (n = 9), incarcerated hernias (n = 17), traumatic injuries (n = 48), and intestinal ischemia or perforation (n = 9). Bariatric surgeons performed 35% of cases, and risk profiles were similar between groups. Operative times were similar for cholecystectomies and appendectomies. Bariatric surgeons performed more nonroutine cases laparoscopically (7% B versus 2% NB, P = .001). Surgical site infections were low (2% B versus 4% NB, P = .4). Hospital length of stay was higher in the NB group at 9 ± 9 days versus 5 ± 4 days for B (P = .05). Mortality was 5%. Acute surgical procedures were performed in obese patients. Bariatric expertise favorably affected length of stay and the application of laparoscopy. Bariatric expertise may improve outcomes in nonbariatric emergencies, but further study is warranted. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FROM COMPLEX EVOLVING TO SIMPLE: CURRENT REVISIONAL AND ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES FOLLOWING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZORRON, Ricardo; GALVÃO-NETO, Manoel Passos; CAMPOS, Josemberg; BRANCO, Alcides José; SAMPAIO, José; JUNGHANS, Tido; BOTHE, Claudia; BENZING, Christian; KRENZIEN, Felix

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a standard therapy in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding, although with good results in the literature, are showing higher rates of treatment failure to reduce obesity-associated morbidity and body weight. Other problems after bariatric may occur, as band erosion, gastroesophageal reflux disease and might be refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to a RYGB can be an effective alternative, as long as specific indications for revision are fulfilled. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse own and literature data on revisional bariatric procedures to evaluate best alternatives to current practice. Methods: Institutional experience and systematic review from the literature on revisional bariatric surgery. Results: Endoscopic procedures are recently applied to ameliorate failure and complications of bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20%. Transoral outlet reduction is currently an alternative method to reduce the gastrojejunal anastomosis. The diameter and volume of sleeve gastrectomy can enlarge as well, which can be reduced by endoscopic full-thickness sutures longitudinally. Dumping syndrome and severe hypoglycemic episodes (neuroglycopenia) can be present in patients following RYGB. The hypoglycemic episodes have to be evaluated and usually can be treated conventionally. To avoid partial pancreatectomy or conversion to normal anatomy, a new laparoscopic approach with remnant gastric resection and jejunal interposition can be applied in non-responders alternatively. Hypoglycemic episodes are ameliorated while weight loss is sustained. Conclusion: Revisional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery in patients with collateral symptomatic or treatment failure can be applied. Conventional non-surgical approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional surgery will be indicated. Former complex

  8. A biomechanical approach to the analysis of methods and procedures of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Frigo, Alessandro; Fontanella, Chiara Giulia; De Benedictis, Giulia Maria; Rubini, Alessandro; Barp, Luca; Pluchino, Gioela; Sabbadini, Beatrice; Polese, Lino

    2017-05-03

    Bariatric surgery includes a variety of procedures that are performed on obese people and aim at decreasing the intake of food and calories. This goal is usually pursued by reducing stomach capacity and/or absorbing capability. Adjustable gastric banding is the most common and successful operation. In general, bariatric surgical procedures are effective, but are often associated with major complications. Surgical procedure and post-surgical conformation of the stomach are usually defined on clinical and surgical basis only. Instead, the optimal configuration should be identified by analyzing the mechanical functionality of the stomach and the surrounding structures, and the relationship between food intake, nutrient adsorption, mechanical stimulation of stomach wall and feeling of satiety. A novel approach to bariatric surgery is required, integrating competences in the areas of biomechanics, physiology and surgery, based on a strong interaction between engineers and clinicians. Preliminary results from coupled experimental and computational investigations are here reported. The analyses aim to develop computational tools for the investigation of stomach mechanical functionality in pre- and post-surgical conformations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Can a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass be safely performed by surgical residents in a bariatric center-of-excellence? The learning curve of surgical residents in bariatric surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijswijk, Anne-Sophie; Moes, Daan E.; Geubbels, Noëlle; Hutten, Barbara A.; Acherman, Yair I. Z.; van de Laar, Arnold W.; de Brauw, Maurits; Bruin, Sjoerd C.

    2018-01-01

    Background A learning curve (LC) is a graphic display of the number of consecutive procedures performed necessary to reach competence and is defined by complications and duration of surgery (DOS). There is little evidence on the LC of surgical residents in bariatric surgery. Aim of the study is to

  10. Benefits of Bariatric Surgery and Perioperative Surgical Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chung Tham

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide problem with numerous associated health problems. The number of patients eligible for surgery outnumber surgical capacity and so patients need to be prioritised based on their obesity- related health burden and comorbidities. Weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery is significant and maintained in the long term. In addition to weight loss, patient health improves in terms of metabolic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease. As a result, quality of life is better, along with psychosocial wellbeing. Bariatric surgery is associated with a relatively low number of complications and appears to result in a reduction in mortality risk due to the resolution of comorbidities. Hence, surgery can now be routinely considered as an adjunct to medical therapy in the management of obesity.

  11. [Digestive surgical complications during pregnancy following bariatric surgery: Experience of a center for perinatology and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrot, A; Lesage, N; Msika, S; Mandelbrot, L

    2016-04-01

    To describe severe complications during pregnancy requiring surgery in patients with a history of obesity surgery. A retrospective study in a hospital with tertiary care perinatology and an obesity reference center, on all pregnancies following bariatric surgery over a 10-year period, analyzing all cases of surgical complications. There were 8 major complications related to the procedure in 141 pregnancies with bariatric surgery. The 2 complications in women with gastric banding were band slippage resulting in severe dysphagia, one of which leading to intractable vomiting and serious hydrolectric disorders. Among the 6 complications after bypass surgery, 4 were occlusions: 3 on internal hernias of which 2 with volvulus and 1 associated with intestinal invagination, as well as one with intestinal invagination only. One patient had a laparotomy for a suspected invagination which was not confirmed. The other surgical complications after gastric bypass were a hernia and an exploratory laparotomy for suspected intussusception which was overturned. There was no case of maternal or perinatal death. Pregnancies in patients with a history of bariatric surgery are at high risk, in particular for complications related to the surgery and thus require careful interdisciplinary surveillance, and determination of predictive factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Endoscopic management of erosion after banded bariatric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Matthew D; Aher, Chetan V; English, Wayne J; Williams, D Brandon

    2017-11-01

    Prosthetic materials wrapped around a portion of the stomach have been used to provide gastric restriction in bariatric surgery for many years. Intraluminal erosion of adjustable and nonadjustable gastric bands typically occurs many years after placement and results in various symptoms. Endoscopic management of gastric band erosion has been described and allows for optimal patient outcomes. We will describe our methods and experience with endoscopic management of intraluminal gastric band erosions after bariatric procedures. University hospital in the United States. A retrospective review of our bariatric surgery database identified patients undergoing removal of gastric bands. A chart review was then undertaken to confirm erosion of prosthetic material into the gastrointestinal tract. Baseline characteristics, operative reports, and follow-up data were analyzed. Sixteen patients were identified with an eroded gastric band: 11 after banded gastric bypass, 3 after laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB), and 2 after vertical banded gastroplasty. All patients were successfully treated with endoscopic removal of the prosthetic materials using either endoscopic scissors or ligation of the banding material with off-label use of a mechanical lithotripter device. Complications included a postoperative gastrointestinal bleed requiring repeat endoscopy, 1 patient with asymptomatic pneumoperitoneum requiring observation, and 1 with seroma at the site of LAGB port removal. Endoscopic management of intraluminal prosthetic erosion after gastric banded bariatric procedures can be safe and effective and should be considered when treating this complication. Erosion of the prosthetic materials inside the gastric lumen allows for potential endoscopic removal without free intraabdominal perforation. Endoscopic devices designed for dividing eroded LAGBs may help standardize and increase utilization of this approach. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery

  13. An enhanced recovery program for bariatric surgical patients significantly reduces perioperative opioid consumption and postoperative nausea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Adam B; Spann, Matthew D; Jablonski, Patrick; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Sandberg, Warren S; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2018-02-13

    Patients frequently remain in the hospital after bariatric surgery due to pain, nausea, and inability to tolerate oral intake. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concepts address these perioperative complications and therefore improve length of stay for bariatric surgery patients. To determine if ERAS concepts increase the proportion of patients discharged on postoperative day 1. Secondary objectives included mean length of stay, perioperative opioid use, emergency department visits, and readmissions. A large metropolitan university tertiary hospital. A quantitative before and after study was conducted for patients undergoing bariatric surgical patients. Data were collected surrounding length of stay, perioperative opioid consumption, antiemetic therapy requirements postoperatively, multimodal analgesia compliance, emergency department visits, and hospital readmission rates. Wilcoxon rank-sum and χ 2 test were used to compare continuous and categorical variables, respectively. A secondary analysis was performed using Aligned Rank Transformation and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel χ 2 tests to account for an increase in sleeve gastrectomies in the intervention group. The 2 groups had clinically similar baseline characteristics. Comparison group (N = 366) and ERAS group (N = 715) patients underwent a primary bariatric surgery procedure. There was an increase in the number of patients undergoing a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in the intervention group. After accounting for this increase, the percentage of patients discharged on postoperative day 1 was unchanged (79.8% non-ERAS versus 83.1% ERAS, P = .52). ERAS length of stay was statistically significantly lower for gastric bypass (P<.001) and robotic gastric bypass (P = .01). Perioperative opioid consumption was reduced (41.0 versus 16.2 morphine equivalents, P<0.001), and fewer ERAS patients required postoperative antiemetics (68.8% versus 46.2%, P<.001). Emergency department visits at 7 days were reduced (6

  14. Dietary habits of obese patients qualified for bariatric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Patients with obesity, including morbid obesity, commit numerous dietary mistakes. They prefer high-energy diets, but of poor nutritional value. Patients qualified for bariatric procedures show deficiencies in vitamins and minerals due to insufficient intake of vegetables, fruit and whole grain products. Analysis of dietary habits in morbidly obese patients prepared for bariatric surgery, including assessment of eating style and frequency of consumption of certain products. The study group contained 39 people aged 18 - 65 years, who were surveyed with a questionnaire elaborated in the Department of Clinical Dietetics and Nutrition, Medical University of Bialystok. The following factors were assessed: number of meals, snacking between meals and eating at night, types of snacks eaten, and frequency of consumption of certain foods. Results were analyzed using Statistica 9.0. The majority of surveyed men (41.7%) ate three meals a day, whereas most women (40.7%) had at least 4 meals a day. Nearly 85% of the respondents admitted snacking between meals, mainly eating fruit, sweets and sandwiches. Whole grain cereal, milk and dairy products, fish, fruit, vegetables and pulses appeared in diet of patients qualified for treatment of obesity very rarely. Dietary habits of obese patients qualified for bariatric procedures are not consistent with recommendations. Therefore, these patients should receive nutritional education in order to foster proper eating habits that will help in the postoperative nutrition.

  15. Revisional Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Noah J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Gill, Richdeep S; Sherman, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    Revisional bariatric procedures are increasingly common. With more primary procedures being performed to manage severe obesity and its complications, 5% to 8% of these procedures will fail, requiring revisional operation. Reasons for revisional bariatric surgery are either primary inadequate weight loss, defined as less than 25% excess body weight loss, or weight recidivism, defined as a gain of more than 10 kg based on the nadir weight; however, each procedure also has inherit specific complications that can also be indications for revision. This article reviews the history of each primary bariatric procedure, indications for revision, surgical options, and subsequent outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The implications for the surgical community of bariatric surgery as a "cure" for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Josef E

    2013-07-01

    The United States is in the throes of an epidemic of morbid obesity and, parenthetically, type 2 diabetes. Recent data indicate that bariatric surgery, notably Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is valid not only for weight loss but also for a high success rate in the amelioration and perhaps "cure" of type 2 diabetes. It clearly is not weight loss alone, because the amelioration of type 2 diabetes occurs before weight loss. The mechanism needs to be elucidated and researched. For the first time since tuberculosis--before antitubercular drugs, when surgical procedures were the principal mechanism for dealing with tuberculosis--surgery has the opportunity to participate in the amelioration and perhaps cure of this epidemic and to regain its professional stature. Included in this article are the author's thoughts and suggestions on how we can keep control of weight loss and bariatric procedures that are valid treatments for morbid obesity and related type 2 diabetes. We should use this opportunity to stop the current conversion of surgeons from professionals to employees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical procedures for voice restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawka, Tadeus; Hosemann, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Surgical procedures for voice restoration serve to improve oral communication by better vocal function. They comprise of phonomicrosurgery, with direct and indirect access to the larynx; laryngoplasty; laryngeal injections; and surgical laryngeal reinnervation. The basis for modern surgical techniques for voice disorders is the knowledge about the ultrastructure of the vocal folds and the increasing experience of surgeons in voice surgery, while facing high social and professional demands on the voice. Vocal activity limitation and participation restriction has become more important in the artistic and social areas. A number of surgical methods that have been developed worldwide for this reason, are presented in this article. Functional oriented surgery has to meet high standards. The diagnostics of vocal function has to be multi-dimensional in order to determine the indication and the appropriate surgical intervention. PMID:22073062

  18. Increasing access to specialty surgical care: application of a new resource allocation model to bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Eric J; Morton, John M; Rivas, Homero

    2014-08-01

    To calculate the public health impact and economic benefit of using ancillary health care professionals for routine postoperative care. The need for specialty surgical care far exceeds its supply, particularly in weight loss surgery. Bariatric surgery is cost-effective and the only effective long-term weight loss strategy for morbidly obese patients. Without clinically appropriate task shifting, surgeons, hospitals, and untreated patients incur a high opportunity cost. Visit schedules, time per visit, and revenues were obtained from bariatric centers of excellence. Case-specific surgeon fees were derived from published Current Procedural Terminology data. The novel Microsoft Excel model was allowed to run until a steady state was evident (status quo). This model was compared with one in which the surgeon participates in follow-up visits beyond 3 months only if there is a complication (task shifting). Changes in operative capacity and national quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated. In the status quo model, per capita surgical volume capacity equilibrates at 7 surgical procedures per week, with 27% of the surgeon's time dedicated to routine long-term follow-up visits. Task shifting increases operative capacity by 38%, resulting in 143,000 to 882,000 QALYs gained annually. Per surgeon, task shifting achieves an annual increase of 95 to 588 QALYs, $5 million in facility revenue, 48 cases of cure of obstructive sleep apnea, 44 cases of remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 35 cases of cure of hypertension. Optimal resource allocation through task shifting is economically appealing and can achieve dramatic public health benefit by increasing access to specialty surgery.

  19. Treatment of adolescents with morbid obesity with bariatric procedures and anti-obesity pharmacological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Um SS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scott S Um1, Wendelin Slusser2, Daniel A DeUgarte11Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Adolescent obesity is a growing health concern that can have immense physical and psychological impact. Treatment of morbidly obese adolescents should include a multidisciplinary team to address medical comorbidities, diet, physical activity, mental health, and behavior modification. Anti-obesity pharmacologic agents have a limited role in the treatment of adolescents because of concerns with side effects, safety, and efficacy. Orlistat (GlaxoSmithKline, Moon Township, PA is the only approved medication for weight-loss in adolescents. However, it is associated with gastrointestinal side effects and its long-term efficacy is unknown. Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat morbid obesity. However, adolescents must meet rigorous criteria and have appropriate cognitive, psychological, and social clearance before being considered for surgical intervention. Gastric bypass remains the gold standard bariatric operation. The adjustable gastric band is not FDA-approved for use in patients under 18 years of age. Sleeve gastrectomy is a promising procedure for adolescents because it avoids an intestinal bypass and the implantation of a foreign body. Prospective longitudinal assessment of bariatric surgery procedures is required to determine long-term outcomes. In this manuscript, we review the treatment options, efficacy, and impact on quality of life for morbidly obese adolescents.Keywords: bariatric surgery, morbid obesity, weight loss, adolescent

  20. ANAESTHESIA FOR OPHTHALMIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for ophthalmic surgical procedures (1-7). Regional anaesthetic techniques eliminate the need for some routine investigations like chest X-ray, ECG,as well as risk associated with general anaesthesia (8) they are more tolerable for elderly patients, ill patients, they are cheaper and generally more useful for ambulatory ...

  1. Histopathological examination of tissue resected during bariatric procedures – to be done or not to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Walędziak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is one of the major lifestyle diseases and provokes various comorbidities, such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, and even neoplasms. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment of obesity. Since cost-effectiveness has become a major concern, there is a tendency to avoid general histological evaluation of surgical specimens during routine procedures. Aim: To evaluate the necessity of histopathological investigation of tissue excised during bariatric surgery and to verify whether the operation should be continued in the case of suspicious macroscopic findings. Material and methods: From January 2013 to December 2016, 1252 patients with obesity were qualified for bariatric procedures. The qualification was performed according to the current European recommendations. Every operation started with an inspection of the peritoneal cavity performed once the abdomen was insufflated. If a macroscopic pathology was found, the specimen was secured for histopathological investigation. Results : Out of 81 (6.47% patients from whom histopathological samples were collected, 39% (n = 32 showed negative results, and 61% (n = 49 cases showed abnormalities. Conclusions : As it is impossible to exclude the existence of gastric tumors only in preoperative gastroscopy and ultrasonography, especially as there is a higher risk in obese patients, routine histological examination of tissue excised during bariatric procedures should be considered. Since most of the neoplasms were found to be benign, there is no need to abandon the bariatric procedure if a pathology is found and resected. Bariatric surgeons should always focus on thorough examination of the abdominal and the pelvic cavity, especially in female patients.

  2. Enabling recruitment success in bariatric surgical trials: pilot phase of the By-Band-Sleeve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivan, S; Rogers, C A; Welbourn, R; Byrne, J P; Salter, N; Mahon, D; Noble, H; Kelly, J; Mazza, G; Whybrow, P; Andrews, R C; Wilson, C; Blazeby, J M; Donovan, J L

    2017-11-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving surgical procedures are challenging for recruitment and infrequent in the specialty of bariatrics. The pilot phase of the By-Band-Sleeve study (gastric bypass versus gastric band versus sleeve gastrectomy) provided the opportunity for an investigation of recruitment using a qualitative research integrated in trials (QuinteT) recruitment intervention (QRI). The QRI investigated recruitment in two centers in the pilot phase comparing bypass and banding, through the analysis of 12 in-depth staff interviews, 84 audio recordings of patient consultations, 19 non-participant observations of consultations and patient screening data. QRI findings were developed into a plan of action and fed back to centers to improve information provision and recruitment organization. Recruitment proved to be extremely difficult with only two patients recruited during the first 2 months. The pivotal issue in Center A was that an effective and established clinical service could not easily adapt to the needs of the RCT. There was little scope to present RCT details or ensure efficient eligibility assessment, and recruiters struggled to convey equipoise. Following presentation of QRI findings, recruitment in Center A increased from 9% in the first 2 months (2/22) to 40% (26/65) in the 4 months thereafter. Center B, commencing recruitment 3 months after Center A, learnt from the emerging issues in Center A and set up a special clinic for trial recruitment. The trial successfully completed pilot recruitment and progressed to the main phase across 11 centers. The QRI identified key issues that enabled the integration of the trial into the clinical setting. This contributed to successful recruitment in the By-Band-Sleeve trial-currently the largest in bariatric practice-and offers opportunities to optimize recruitment in other trials in bariatrics.

  3. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery - comparison between procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Soto, María L; Martín-Leyva, Ana; González-Jiménez, Amalia; García-Rubio, Jesús; Cózar-Ibáñez, Antonio; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Leyva-Martínez, María S; Jiménez-Ríos, Jose A; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernándo

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the mid-term type 2 diabetes mellitus recovery patterns in morbidly obese patients by comparing some relevant physiological parameters of patients of bariatric surgery between two types of surgical procedures: mixed (roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion) and restrictive (sleeve gastrectomy). This is a prospective and observational study of co-morbid, type 2 diabetes mellitus evolution in 49 morbidly obese patients: 37 underwent mixed surgery procedures and 12 a restrictive surgery procedure. We recorded weight, height, body mass index, and glycaemic, lipid, and nutritional blood parameters, prior to procedure, as well as six and twelve months post-operatively. In addition, we tested for differences in patient recovery and investigated predictive factors in diabetes remission. Both glycaemic and lipid profiles diminished significantly to healthy levels by 6 and 12 months post intervention. Type 2 diabetes mellitus showed remission in more than 80% of patients of both types of surgical procedures, with no difference between them. Baseline body mass index, glycated haemoglobin, and insulin intake, among others, were shown to be valuable predictors of diabetes remission one year after the intervention. The choice of the type of surgical procedure did not significantly affect the remission rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus in morbidly obese patients. (Endokrynol Pol 2017; 68 (1): 18-25).

  4. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  5. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hezelgrave, N. L.; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to ...

  7. Pre-surgical Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Asthma Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Yasemin; van Huisstede, Astrid; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Taube, Christian; Braunstahl, Gert-Jan

    2017-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to investigate the feasibility of pre-surgical pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in morbidly obese patients with uncontrolled asthma, undergoing bariatric surgery. Four morbidly obese female patients with asthma participated in a 12-week PR program (exercise, diet, and psychological intervention) before undergoing bariatric surgery, and the outcomes were compared to a matched group of seven female controls (bariatric surgery only). In patients who participated in PR, asthma control and asthma quality of life improved dramatically after 3 months of PR. Besides, asthma control was better at the moment of surgery. The results of this pilot study show that PR is feasible in morbidly obese asthmatics and should be considered for a selected group of patients with uncontrolled asthma before undergoing bariatric surgery.

  8. Long-term outcomes of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a primary bariatric procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boza, Camilo; Daroch, David; Barros, Diego; León, Felipe; Funke, Ricardo; Crovari, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has been established as a reliable bariatric procedure, but questions have emerged regarding its long-term results. Our aim is to report the long-term outcomes of LSG as a primary bariatric procedure. Retrospective analysis of patients submitted to LSG between 2005 and 2007 in our institution. Long-term outcomes at 5 years were analyzed in terms of body mass index (BMI), excess weight loss (EWL) and co-morbidities resolution. Surgical success was defined as %EWL>50%. Also, we compared long-term results according to preoperative BMI, using Mann-Whitney test. A total of 161 LSG were analyzed, and 114 patients (70.8%) were women. The median age was 36 years old (range 16-65), median preoperative BMI was 34.9 kg/m(2) (interquartile range [IQR], 33.3-37.5). A total of 112 patients (70%) completed 5 years of follow-up. At the fifth year, median BMI and %EWL was 28.5 kg/m(2) (IQR: 25.8-31.9) and 62.9% (IQR: 45.3-89.6), respectively, with a surgical success of 73.2% of followed patients. According to preoperative BMI, surgical success was achieved in 80% of patients with BMI40 kg/m(2), with significant lower %EWL in patients with BMI>40 kg/m(2) (P = .001 and .004). Dyslipidemia and insulin resistance resolution was 80.7% and 84.7%, respectively. A total of 26.7% of patients reported new-onset gastroesophageal reflux symptoms at 5 years. LSG as a primary procedure is a reliable surgery. We observed positive long-term outcomes of %EWL and co-morbidities resolution. In our series, best results are seen in patients with preoperative BMI<40 kg/m(2). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity: pre-operative assessment, surgical techniques and post-operative monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breznikar, Brane; Dinevski, D

    2009-01-01

    This observational clinical analysis included 246 patients who underwent surgery for adjustable gastric banding (AGB), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), or gastric bypass (GBP) between May 2005 and December 2008. The most frequent surgical procedure was for AGB (73.2% of patients). A thorough psychological evaluation of the patients was carried out, and pre- and post-operative psychological and dietary support was offered. A total of 111/120 (92.5%) AGB patients, 21/30 (70.0%) LSG patients and 8/36 (22.2%) GBP patients have been monitored for at least 1 year, and their mean weight losses (percentage excess weight loss) were 24.7 kg (52.4%), 46.0 kg (57.9%) and 40.5 kg (77.9%), respectively. The AGB procedure was associated with the fewest complications but is not appropriate for all patients. Good pre-operative psychological evaluation has been shown to be necessary for successful outcomes and, in the super-obese, we prefer to use LSG. Surgeons should learn the skills needed to perform laparoscopic Roux-en-Y GBP as it is likely to become the standard-of-care for the surgical treatment of obesity. The best outcomes following bariatric surgery are achieved with a multidisciplinary approach, including participation in a support group guided by a psychologist.

  10. Bariatric Outcomes: Self-Management for Sustained Surgical Success: A Multicomponent Treatment for Dysregulated Overeating in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura M; Chacko, Thomas P

    Binge eating disorder, food addiction, and dysregulated overeating are common among people with severe obesity and prevalent among bariatric surgery populations. These problematic eating habits share commonalities with other addictions. Effective, holistic self-management is needed to promote long-term weight loss and psychosocial adjustment among patients who are severely obese who undergo surgery, especially those with clinically remarkable levels of binge eating, food addiction, or dysregulated overeating.This article aims to briefly review binge eating disorder, food addiction, and obesity-as well as issues surrounding surgery for individuals who are severely obese-and introduce the Bariatric Outcomes: Self-management for Sustained Surgical Success (BOSSSS) program. The BOSSSS program is holistic, skill based, and designed to promote weight loss, prevent weight regain, and improve well-being in patients with severe obesity with a history of bariatric surgery.Preliminary survey data suggest that bariatric surgery patients report a lack of skill-based emotional and behavioral support designed to help them over the long term. The BOSSSS program is rooted in self-determination theory, integrating mobile health technology across program components. Self-determination theory-based interventions are personalized and encourage autonomy, competence, and social support among participating patients and providers. The behavioral self-regulation training within BOSSSS is energy balance self-monitoring and titration. Emotional self-regulation is addressed via a specialized version of dialectical behavior skills therapy, emphasizing promotion of coping skills and use of adaptive, healthy substances in immediate environments. The BOSSSS program has been well received by patients and could be implemented by nurses and other health professionals with minimal support.

  11. Problematic eating behaviors among bariatric surgical candidates: a psychometric investigation and factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, Bethany L; Delparte, Chelsea A; Wright, Kristi D; Hart, Regan

    2015-01-01

    Psychological factors (e.g., anxiety, depression) are routinely assessed in bariatric pre-surgical programs, as high levels of psychopathology are consistently related to poor program outcomes (e.g., failure to lose significant weight pre-surgery, weight regain post-surgery). Behavioral factors related to poor program outcomes and ways in which behavioral and psychological factors interact, have received little attention in bariatric research and practice. Potentially problematic behavioral factors are queried by Section H of the Weight and Lifestyle Inventory (WALI-H), in which respondents indicate the relevance of certain eating behaviors to obesity. A factor analytic investigation of the WALI-H serves to improve the way in which this assessment tool is interpreted and used among bariatric surgical candidates, and subsequent moderation analyses serve to demonstrate potential compounding influences of psychopathology on eating behavior factors. Bariatric surgical candidates (n =362) completed several measures of psychopathology and the WALI-H. Item responses from the WALI-H were subjected to principal axis factoring with oblique rotation. Results revealed a three-factor model including: (1) eating in response to negative affect, (2) overeating/desirability of food, and (3) eating in response to positive affect/social cues. All three behavioral factors of the WALI-H were significantly associated with measures of depression and anxiety. Moderation analyses revealed that depression did not moderate the relationship between anxiety and any eating behavior factor. Although single forms of psychopathology are related to eating behaviors, the combination of psychopathology does not appear to influence these problematic behaviors. Recommendations for pre-surgical assessment and treatment of bariatric surgical candidates are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High failure rate of the laparoscopic-adjustable gastric band as a primary bariatric procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindel, Tammy; Martin, Emily; Hungness, Eric; Nagle, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Determinants of success of a bariatric procedure are many but paramount is the ability to durably produce significant and reliable weight loss. We sought to determine the primary success of the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) by defining failure as clinical weight loss failure with an intact band (excess weight loss [EWL]bariatric procedure). A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent an LAGB as a primary bariatric procedure between January 2003 and December 2007. Data collected included body mass index (BMI), weight, postoperative follow-up length, EWL, and adjustment number, as well as complications of the LAGB. Sixteen of 120 patients had the band removed. Nine were terminally removed for unmanageable symptoms, and 7 were converted to an alternative bariatric procedure. The average follow-up for the 104 patients with an intact band was 4.8 years. The average EWL for successful intact bands was 44.9±19.4%; however, an additional 35.6% of patients had an EWLbariatric procedure for 44% of patients because of either inadequate weight loss or adequate weight loss with unmanageable symptoms. This suggests that the LAGB should be abandoned as a primary bariatric procedure for the majority of morbidly obese patients because of its high failure rate. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tattoo preservation during surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenna S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stefania Tenna, Pietro Francesco Delle Femmine, Alfonso Luca Pendolino, Beniamino Brunetti, Paolo Persichetti Plastic Surgery Unit, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: In recent years, the number of people getting tattoos has continued to increase. Tattoos are much more than cultural fads and cosmetic complements, and nowadays often represent events that express the patient's personality without words. The presence of a tattoo in the surgical field may be a problem for both the patient and the surgeon. However, the relevant literature is mostly based on complications related to application of tattoos or methods used to remove them. To date, few reports have focused on the importance of preserving a tattoo during a surgical procedure, and no organized studies could be found. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the range of solutions that surgeons can use to preserve tattoos during surgery. A PubMed database search was done to assess other surgeons' experience. The terms "tattoo" in combination with "incision", "surgery", "surgical", or "operative" were used as key words. Following a review of the literature, photographs of patients presenting with a tattoo in the last 5 years at University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome were identified in order to determine the frequency of patients presenting with tattoos in our department. The patients were classified according to sex, age, type of surgery, number of tattoos, and tattoo location. Specific requests to preserve tattoos were recorded. Finally, an algorithm of treatment according to tattoo dimension and location is proposed. Knowledge of all the strategies available for saving tattoos is important for plastic and cosmetic surgeons. If a tattooed area needs to be operated on, surgeons should attempt, when possible, to avoid altering the tattoo in order to maximize the final cosmetic result. Keywords: tattoo incision, body contouring, surgery

  14. Video Ratings of Surgical Skill and Late Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Christopher P.; Varban, Oliver A.; Carlin, Arthur M.; Birkmeyer, John D.; Dimick, Justin B.

    2018-01-01

    Importance Measures of surgeons’ skill have been associated with variations in short-term outcomes after laparoscopic gastric bypass. However, the impact of surgical skill on long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery is unknown. Objective To study the association between surgical skill and long-term outcomes of bariatric surgery Design Surgeons were ranked on their skill level through blinded peer video review, and sorted into quartiles of skill. Outcomes of bariatric surgery were then examined at the patient level across skill levels. Setting The Michigan Bariatric Surgical Collaborative, a prospective clinical registry of 40 hospitals performing bariatric surgery in the state of Michigan Participants 20 surgeons performing bariatric surgery who submitted videos for anonymous peer ratings; patients undergoing surgery with these surgeons for whom one year follow-up data postoperatively was available. Exposure Surgeon skill level. Main Outcome Measures Excess body weight loss at one year; resolution of medical comorbidities (hypertension, sleep apnea, diabetes, hyperlipidemia), functional status, patient satisfaction. Results Peer ratings of surgical skill varied from 2.6 to 4.8 on a 5-point scale. There was no difference between the best (top 25%) and worst (bottom 25%) performance quartiles when comparing excess body weight loss (67.2% excess body weight loss vs 68.5%, p=.89) at one year. There were no differences in resolution of sleep apnea (62.6% vs 62.0%, p=.77), hypertension (47.1% vs 45.4%, p=.73), or hyperlipidemia (52.3% vs 63.4%, p=.45). Surgeons with the lowest skill rating had patients with higher rates of diabetes resolution (78.8%) when compared to the high-skill group (72.8%, p=0.01). Conclusions and Relevance In contrast to its impact on early complications, surgical skill did not impact postoperative weight loss or resolution of medical comorbidities at one year after laparoscopic gastric bypass. These findings suggest that long-term outcomes

  15. [Bariatric surgery in duodenal switch procedure: weight changes and associated nutritional deficiencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella Romero, Francisco; Milla Tobarra, Marta; Alfaro Martínez, José Joaquín; García Arce, Llanos; García Gómez, Angélica; Salas Sáiz, M Ángeles; Soler Marín, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Bariatric surgery using the technique of duodenal switch is considered as one of the most effective treatments to lose weight and decrease comorbidity in morbidly obese patients. However, we have to be familiar with and adequately manage the various nutritional deficiencies that may occur as a consequence of its practice. To assess weight loss and development of nutritional deficiencies in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery through the duodenal switch procedure. One hundred and twenty-eight morbidly obese patients underwent a duodenal switch procedure at Hospital General Universitario in Albacete. Weight changes and the most important nutritional deficiencies occurring after surgery were recorded. Median follow-up time was 30 months (interquartile range, 18 months). Body weight markedly decreased, with mean body mass index (BMI) decreasing from a preoperative value of 52.9±7.7kg/m(2) to 30.8±5.2kg/m(2) 18 months after surgery. The percentage of excess weight lost (% EWL) was 81.4±16.4% in this period. Weight loss slowed down subsequently, reaching its lowest value 30 months after surgery (% EWL 82.1%±16.8, BMI 30.2±4.3kg/m(2)) and tended to stabilize in patients with longer follow-up times. Significant nutritional deficiencies requiring replacement therapy were detected in some micronutrients with iron (42.9%), zinc (38.3%), vitamin A (55.5%), and vitamin D (57.8%) deficiencies being most relevant. Duodenal switch is a very effective surgical procedure for treating morbidly obese patients because it allows for achieving a significant and sustained weight loss.Close lifetime monitoring is required in these patients because of the high prevalence of nutritional deficiencies during follow-up. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Anaesthesia for Ophthalmic Surgical Procedures | Onakpoya | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    General anaesthesia was indicated in seven (41.2%) of emergency ophthalmic surgical procedures as compared to 16 (5.9%) of elective ophthalmic procedures P<0.0001. Conclusion: General anaesthesia was more commonly employed in children, eye wall repairs and emergency ophthalmic surgical procedures.

  17. What’s Age Got to Do With It? A Comparison of Bariatric Surgical Outcomes Among Young, Midlife, Older and Oldest Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy L. Marihart PhD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has become an accepted method to treat obesity and its related diseases in adults; nevertheless, few bariatric surgery follow-up studies compare changes in body mass index (BMI, disease outcomes, and side effects among age groups. This study compares bariatric surgery outcomes across four adult age groups by comparing changes in milestone BMIs such as highest and lowest BMI, perceived existing disease outcomes, and symptoms related to those diseases. Data were obtained using a 40-item questionnaire that was mailed to 2,520 patients of a Midwestern weight management center who were at least 18 months post-bariatric surgical procedure. The 534 respondents were divided into four age groups in years: 18 to 49 ( n = 171, 50-59 ( n = 148, 60-69 ( n = 138, and ≥ 70 ( n = 77. There were no differences among the age groups for lowest ( p = .93 and current BMI ( p = .51. Significant improvement in eight chronic diseases occurred across all age groups. There were no differences between age groups in reported occurrence of incontinence ( p = .65, diarrhea ( p = .22, flatulence ( p = .46, heartburn ( p = .73, and indigestion ( p = .22. Constipation rarely occurred among the oldest adults ( p < .001. Bariatric surgery should be considered an option for weight loss and disease management for older adults as much as it is for younger adults.

  18. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Irene T.; Madura, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical proc...

  19. Understanding the post-surgical bariatric experiences of patients two or more years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rebecca H; Irwin, Jennifer D

    2017-11-01

    In Canada, one year after bariatric surgery follow-up appointments become less frequent and surgical recipients must cope with weight management more independently. Up to 50% of patients experience weight regain by two years post-surgery. Understanding the lived experiences of those who have gone through the bariatric process may shed light on what is needed to support others moving forward. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the physical, psychological, social, and clinic-related experiences of individuals who have undergone bariatric surgery at least two years prior. The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the physical, psychological, social, and clinic-related experiences of individuals who have undergone bariatric surgery at least two years prior. In-depth, individual semi-structured interviews lasting approximately 60 min were conducted. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and inductive content analysis was used to identify emerging themes. Methods were employed throughout to support data trustworthiness. Participants (n = 28; 21 female) were primarily middle-aged (mean: 49.7 ± 12.7 years old), Caucasian (71%), and completed bariatric surgery more than three years. The data fell naturally into four primary themes, namely physical changes and challenges, psychological experiences, social functioning and support, and clinic-related experiences and reflections. Generally, participants described positive improvements in their physical, psychological, and social state since surgery. However, concerns pertaining to several unanticipated outcomes of the surgery were underscored and informed the recommendations for other patients to be prepared to relearn about ones' body, utilize the support services available, and be aware that social relationships may change and/or require tending. Participants' insights can be used to help others meet with long-term success post-bariatric surgery.

  20. Bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost six decades different surgical techniques have been developed to treat patients with morbid obesity. Various surgical techniques are generally divided with respect to their effect into restrictive, malabsorbtive and humoral and a combination of these. Surgically modified human metabolism ameliorates metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes, even in nonobese patients. The understanding of metabolic effects changed the traditional paradigm of bariatric surgery from simple weight-loss procedure to metabolic surgery affecting whole-body metabolism. Proper surgical technique for individual patient is the most important factor influencing long- term results, comorbidities and quality of life. Recommendations for patient selection, surgical methods and pre- and postoperative patient management are to be respected. Metabolic surgery principles and current concepts are presented.

  1. The effects of bariatric surgical procedures on the improvement of metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese patients: Comparison of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy versus laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafalı, Mehmet Ertuğrul; Şahin, Mustafa; Ece, İlhan; Acar, Fahrettin; Yılmaz, Hüseyin; Alptekin, Hüsnü; Ateş, Leyla

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in terms of weight loss, metabolic parameters, and postoperative complications. Data on patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with a diagnosis of morbid obesity between January 2012 and June 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were compared in terms of age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, and long term follow-up results. During the study period, 91 patients (45 laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 46 laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) underwent bariatric surgery. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of preoperative patient characteristics. Both groups showed statistically significant weight loss and improvement in co-morbidities when compared with the preoperative period. Weight loss and improvement in metabolic parameters were similar in both groups. The duration of operation and hospital stay was longer in the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group. Furthermore, the rate of total complications was significantly lower in the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy group. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective method with a significantly lower complication rate and length of hospital stay than laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, with similar improvement rates in metabolic syndrome.

  2. FROM COMPLEX EVOLVING TO SIMPLE: CURRENT REVISIONAL AND ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES FOLLOWING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, Ricardo; Galvão-Neto, Manoel Passos; Campos, Josemberg; Branco, Alcides José; Sampaio, José; Junghans, Tido; Bothe, Claudia; Benzing, Christian; Krenzien, Felix

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a standard therapy in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding, although with good results in the literature, are showing higher rates of treatment failure to reduce obesity-associated morbidity and body weight. Other problems after bariatric may occur, as band erosion, gastroesophageal reflux disease and might be refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to a RYGB can be an effective alternative, as long as specific indications for revision are fulfilled. The objective of this study was to analyse own and literature data on revisional bariatric procedures to evaluate best alternatives to current practice. Institutional experience and systematic review from the literature on revisional bariatric surgery. Endoscopic procedures are recently applied to ameliorate failure and complications of bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20%. Transoral outlet reduction is currently an alternative method to reduce the gastrojejunal anastomosis. The diameter and volume of sleeve gastrectomy can enlarge as well, which can be reduced by endoscopic full-thickness sutures longitudinally. Dumping syndrome and severe hypoglycemic episodes (neuroglycopenia) can be present in patients following RYGB. The hypoglycemic episodes have to be evaluated and usually can be treated conventionally. To avoid partial pancreatectomy or conversion to normal anatomy, a new laparoscopic approach with remnant gastric resection and jejunal interposition can be applied in non-responders alternatively. Hypoglycemic episodes are ameliorated while weight loss is sustained. Revisional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery in patients with collateral symptomatic or treatment failure can be applied. Conventional non-surgical approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional surgery will be indicated. Former complex surgical revisional procedures are evolving to less

  3. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about the different surgical procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of each... Find a Provider The ... field of bariatric surgery. Take the IH Compensation Survey Please complete this survey to help ASMBS become ...

  4. Effects of bariatric surgery on glycemic and lipid metabolism, surgical complication and quality of life in adolescents with obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lin; Guo, Yan; Liu, Chao-Qian; Huang, Zhi-Ping; Sheng, Yuan; Zou, Da-Jin

    2017-12-01

    Obesity in adolescents is associated with numerous health risks and co-morbidities, including type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Bariatric surgery on adolescents induces weight loss, but little is known about metabolic effects of these operations. To explore weight loss and metabolic effects of bariatric surgery on young people. A systematic review and meta-analysis. University Hospital, China. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for relevant studies up to July 2017. The related studies in adolescents after operation were included. A total of 49 studies with 3007 patients were included. The average preoperative age ranged from 13.9 to 19.9 years. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 1216), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (n = 1028), and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (n = 665) were the most common bariatric surgeries performed. At the longest follow-up (range, 12-120 mo), bariatric surgery led to an overall 16.43 kg/m 2 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.84-18.01) and 31% (95% CI: 28%-34%) reduction in body mass index. There were significant improvements in glycemic and lipid profiles including glycosylated hemoglobin A1C, fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, postoperatively at 12 months. The remission rate of dyslipidemia was 55% (95% CI: 34%-76%), 70% (95% CI: 55%-82%), and 95% (95% CI: 80%-100%) at 1, 3, and>5 years after surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass produced better improvements than other surgical procedures. Bariatric surgery in adolescents may achieve significant weight loss, and glycemic and lipid control. Further well-designed studies with longer follow-up are warranted to provide more reliable evidence. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. What Are the Real Procedural Costs of Bariatric Surgery? A Systematic Literature Review of Published Cost Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, Brett; Wordsworth, Sarah; Rogers, Chris A; Welbourn, Richard; Byrne, James; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to evaluate the current literature on the procedural costs of bariatric surgery for the treatment of severe obesity. Using a published framework for the conduct of micro-costing studies for surgical interventions, existing cost estimates from the literature are assessed for their accuracy, reliability and comprehensiveness based on their consideration of seven 'important' cost components. MEDLINE, PubMed, key journals and reference lists of included studies were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies had to report per-case, total procedural costs for any type of bariatric surgery broken down into two or more individual cost components. A total of 998 citations were screened, of which 13 studies were included for analysis. Included studies were mainly conducted from a US hospital perspective, assessed either gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding procedures and considered a range of different cost components. The mean total procedural costs for all included studies was US$14,389 (range, US$7423 to US$33,541). No study considered all of the recommended 'important' cost components and estimation methods were poorly reported. The accuracy, reliability and comprehensiveness of the existing cost estimates are, therefore, questionable. There is a need for a comparative cost analysis of the different approaches to bariatric surgery, with the most appropriate costing approach identified to be micro-costing methods. Such an analysis will not only be useful in estimating the relative cost-effectiveness of different surgeries but will also ensure appropriate reimbursement and budgeting by healthcare payers to ensure barriers to access this effective treatment by severely obese patients are minimised.

  6. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: More than a restrictive bariatric surgery procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaiges, David; Más-Lorenzo, Antonio; Goday, Albert; Ramon, José M; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Roux, Juana A Flores-Le

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a restrictive bariatric surgery technique that was first used as part of restrictive horizontal gastrectomy in the original Scopinaro type biliopancreatic diversion. Its good results as a single technique have led to a rise in its use, and it is currently the second most performed technique worldwide. SG achieves clearly better results than other restrictive techniques and is comparable in some aspects to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current gold standard in bariatric surgery. These benefits have been associated with different pathophysiologic mechanisms unrelated to weight loss such as increased gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and activation of hormonal mechanisms such as increased GLP-1 hormone and decreased ghrelin. The aim of this review was to highlight the salient aspects of SG regarding its historical evolution, pathophysiologic mechanisms, main results, clinical applications and perioperative complications. PMID:26557004

  7. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: more than a restrictive bariatric surgery procedure?

    OpenAIRE

    Benaiges Foix, David; Más-Lorenzo, Antonio; Goday Arno, Alberto; Ramón Moros, José Manuel; Chillarón Jordan, Juan José; Pedro-Botet, Juan Carlos; Flores-Le-Roux, Juana Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a restrictive bariatric surgery technique that was first used as part of restrictive horizontal gastrectomy in the original Scopinaro type biliopancreatic diversion. Its good results as a single technique have led to a rise in its use, and it is currently the second most performed technique worldwide. SG achieves clearly better results than other restrictive techniques and is comparable in some aspects to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current gold standard in ba...

  8. Does rating the operation videos with a checklist score improve the effect of E-learning for bariatric surgical training? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Garza, Javier Rodrigo; Kowalewski, Karl-Friedrich; Friedrich, Mirco; Schmidt, Mona Wanda; Bruckner, Thomas; Kenngott, Hannes Götz; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat-Peter; Nickel, Felix

    2017-03-21

    Laparoscopic training has become an important part of surgical education. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure performed. Surgeons must be well trained prior to operating on a patient. Multimodality training is vital for bariatric surgery. E-learning with videos is a standard approach for training. The present study investigates whether scoring the operation videos with performance checklists improves learning effects and transfer to a simulated operation. This is a monocentric, two-arm, randomized controlled trial. The trainees are medical students from the University of Heidelberg in their clinical years with no prior laparoscopic experience. After a laparoscopic basic virtual reality (VR) training, 80 students are randomized into one of two arms in a 1:1 ratio to the checklist group (group A) and control group without a checklist (group B). After all students are given an introduction of the training center, VR trainer and laparoscopic instruments, they start with E-learning while watching explanations and videos of RYGB. Only group A will perform ratings with a modified Bariatric Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (BOSATS) scale checklist for all videos watched. Group B watches the same videos without rating. Both groups will then perform an RYGB in the VR trainer as a primary endpoint and small bowel suturing as an additional test in the box trainer for evaluation. This study aims to assess if E-learning and rating bariatric surgical videos with a modified BOSATS checklist will improve the learning curve for medical students in an RYGB VR performance. This study may help in future laparoscopic and bariatric training courses. German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS00010493 . Registered on 20 May 2016.

  9. Tattoo preservation during surgical procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Tenna S; Delle Femmine PF; Pendolino AL; Brunetti B; Persichetti P

    2014-01-01

    Stefania Tenna, Pietro Francesco Delle Femmine, Alfonso Luca Pendolino, Beniamino Brunetti, Paolo Persichetti Plastic Surgery Unit, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: In recent years, the number of people getting tattoos has continued to increase. Tattoos are much more than cultural fads and cosmetic complements, and nowadays often represent events that express the patient's personality without words. The presence of a tattoo in the surgic...

  10. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, Tamar; Sheiner, Eyal

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has put the spotlight on two different aspects of pregnancy after bariatric surgery: safety of the mother and fetus, and the procedure's effectiveness in preventing the complications surrounding reproduction and pregnancy often seen in the obese woman. To evaluate the pregnancy outcome foLlowing bariatric surgery. Although there are severaL reports documenting poor perinatal outcomes and late surgical complications during pregnancies subsequent to bariatric surgery, systematic studies have generaLLy not proven such an association. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safe, and in general perinatal outcome is better when compared to pregnancies of obese women. Providers should be familiar with potential complications related to postoperative pregnancies and be prepared to provide appropriate interventions such as nutritional supplementation and band adjustment when necessary.

  11. The Effects of Bariatric Procedures versus Medical Therapy for Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effects of bariatric surgery versus medical therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods. The Cochrane library, PubMed, Embase, Chinese biomedical literature database, and Wanfang database up to February 2012 were searched. The literature searches strategies contained terms (“diabetes*”, “surg*”, and “medic*” were used, combined with the medical subject headings. Randomized controlled trails (RCTs of frequently used bariatric surgery for obese patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Study selection, data extraction, quality assessment, and data analyses were performed according to the Cochrane standards. Results. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs involving 170 patients in the bariatric surgery groups and 100 patients in the medical therapy group were selected. Compared with medical therapy, bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes can significantly decrease the levels of HbA1c, FBG, weight, triglycerides, and the dose of hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering medicine, while increasing the rate of diabetes remission (RR = 9.74, 95%CI, (1.36, 69.66 and the levels of high-density lipoprotein. However, there are no statistical differences in serious adverse events between the surgical and medical groups (RR = 1.23, 95%CI, (0.80, 1.87. Conclusions. Surgical procedures were more likely to help patients achieve benefits than medical therapy alone. Further intensive RCTs of high-quality, multiple centers and long-term followup should be carried out to provide more reliable evidence.

  12. Mental Health Evaluations for Adolescents Prior to Bariatric Surgery: A Review of Existing Practices and a Specific Example of Assessment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Devlin, Michael J.; Annunziato, Rachel A.; Zitsman, Jeffrey L.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Objective Best practice guidelines for adolescents considering bariatric surgery recommend a pre-operative mental health evaluation. However, only general information about these assessments appears in the literature, which makes consistency of administration challenging. This review proposes a specific empirically-derived format for pre-surgical mental health evaluations and summarizes currently available data on the psychiatric functioning of adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Design Studies of mental health evaluations for adults preparing for bariatric surgery are reviewed, as is the limited literature relevant to adolescent evaluations. A specific and detailed example of an evaluation (clinical interview, self-report questionnaires, cognitive assessment) used for younger patients at a major metropolitan hospital center is presented, followed by data from an initial group of adolescents completing this evaluation. Subjects 200 adolescents (n=139 female; age: 14–18 y, BMI: 35.4–83.3 kg/m2) presenting for bariatric surgery. Results A notable subset of adolescents reported current Axis I conditions (31.5%) and current mental health treatment (29.5%), but reports of current illicit drug use (1.5%) and regular alcohol use (0.5%) were relatively rare. Procedures for using the completed evaluation and post-surgery monitoring of psychosocial issues are discussed. Conclusions Adolescents considering weight loss surgery should receive comprehensive pre-surgical mental health evaluations, but additional data are needed to develop specific recommendations the use of these evaluations in post-operative care. PMID:24073019

  13. Mental Health Evaluations for Adolescents Prior to Bariatric Surgery: A Review of Existing Practices and a Specific Example of Assessment Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Zandberg, Laurie J; Devlin, Michael J; Annunziato, Rachel A; Zitsman, Jeffrey L; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-06-01

    Best practice guidelines for adolescents considering bariatric surgery recommend a pre-operative mental health evaluation. However, only general information about these assessments appears in the literature, which makes consistency of administration challenging. This review proposes a specific empirically-derived format for pre-surgical mental health evaluations and summarizes currently available data on the psychiatric functioning of adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Studies of mental health evaluations for adults preparing for bariatric surgery are reviewed, as is the limited literature relevant to adolescent evaluations. A specific and detailed example of an evaluation (clinical interview, self-report questionnaires, cognitive assessment) used for younger patients at a major metropolitan hospital center is presented, followed by data from an initial group of adolescents completing this evaluation. 200 adolescents (n=139 female; age: 14-18 y, BMI: 35.4-83.3 kg/m 2 ) presenting for bariatric surgery. A notable subset of adolescents reported current Axis I conditions (31.5%) and current mental health treatment (29.5%), but reports of current illicit drug use (1.5%) and regular alcohol use (0.5%) were relatively rare. Procedures for using the completed evaluation and post-surgery monitoring of psychosocial issues are discussed. Adolescents considering weight loss surgery should receive comprehensive pre-surgical mental health evaluations, but additional data are needed to develop specific recommendations the use of these evaluations in post-operative care.

  14. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezelgrave, N L; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to have positive effects on fertility and reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Moreover, there appears to be a reduced incidence of fetal macrosomia post-bariatric procedure, although there remains uncertainty about the increased rates of small-for-gestational age and intrauterine growth restricted infants, as well as premature rupture of membranes in this group. A number of case reports highlight that pregnancy following bariatric surgery is not without complications and it must be managed as high risk by the multidisciplinary team.

  15. Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Hezelgrave

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to have positive effects on fertility and reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Moreover, there appears to be a reduced incidence of fetal macrosomia post-bariatric procedure, although there remains uncertainty about the increased rates of small-for-gestational age and intrauterine growth restricted infants, as well as premature rupture of membranes in this group. A number of case reports highlight that pregnancy following bariatric surgery is not without complications and it must be managed as high risk by the multidisciplinary team.

  16. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Four Bariatric Surgery Procedures in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of four bariatric surgical procedures to induce diabetes remission and lower cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic obese patients. Moreover, the influence of surgery on weight evolution in the diabetic population was compared with that observed in a nondiabetic matched population. Methods. Among 970 patients who were operated on in our center since 2001, 81 patients were identified as type 2 diabetes. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (GB, intervention type Mason (MA, gastric bypass (RYGB, and sleeve gastrectomy (SG were performed, respectively, in 25%, 17%, 28%, and 30% of this diabetic population. Results. The resolution rate of diabetes one year after surgery was significantly higher after SG than GB (62.5% versus 20%, P<0.01, but not significantly different between SG and RYGB. In terms of LDL-cholesterol reduction, RYGB was equivalent to SG and superior to CGMA or GB. Considering the other cardiovascular risk factors, there was no significant difference according to surgical procedures. The weight loss was not statistically different between diabetic and nondiabetic matched patients regardless of the surgical procedures used. Conclusion. Our data confirm that the efficacy of surgery to treat diabetes is variable among the diverse procedures and SG might be an interesting option in this context.

  17. National survey for bariatric procedures in adolescents: Long time follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Roberto Luca; Toppino, Mauro; Favretti, Franco; Camoglio, Francesco Saverio; Zampieri, Nicola

    2017-10-01

    The role of bariatric surgery and its role in adolescent is still under discussion worldwide. The aim of this study is to report an Italian survey for bariatric procedures in adolescents and the outcome with a medium and long-term follow-up. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive data added into the Italian register of the society for bariatric surgery(period 2000-2010). We evaluated all patients treated in a 10-year period with a mean follow-up of 3 years. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were created. All patients were aged between 13 and 18 years. We evaluated and compared clinical data. After reviewing medical charts, 173 patients were considered for the study; 85 patients were treated with adjustable gastric band (AGB), 47 with intragastric balloon (IB), 26 with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and other 15 patients with malabsorptive techniques (MT). Among clinical data, there was a statistical difference in terms of %excess weight loss (%EWL) between techniques only after 1 year post-procedure; at 5 years, considering the percentage of patients studied, sleeve gastrectomy had the best %EWL respect to other non malabsorptive techniques (padolescent; more than 80% of patients are followed until 5 years post-op but only few patients (less than 5%) until 10 years. Our results demonstrated that sleeve gastrectomy in adolescent is safe and had a better %EWL respect to other non-malabsorptive bariatric procedures. level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surgical procedures in pinniped and cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jennifer L; Hendrickson, Dean A

    2013-12-01

    Significant advances in veterinary diagnostic and surgical techniques have been made over the past several decades. Many of these advances, however, have not reached the field of marine mammal medicine. A number of limitations exist: risks of anesthesia, anatomical challenges, difficulties with wound closure, environmental constraints, equipment limitations, and perceived risks. Despite these limitations, surgical treatments have been successfully utilized in marine mammals. While surgery is performed in pinnipeds more frequently than in cetaceans, studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s on dolphin sleep and hearing demonstrated that general anesthesia can be successfully induced in cetaceans. Since this pioneering work, a small number of successful surgeries have been performed in dolphins under both general anesthesia and heavy sedation. While these surgical procedures in pinnipeds and cetaceans have typically been limited to wound management, dentistry, ophthalmic procedures, fracture repair, and superficial biopsy, a number of abdominal surgeries have also been performed. Recently there have been pioneering successes in the application of minimally invasive surgery in marine mammals. Many of the anatomical challenges that almost prohibit traditional laparotomies in cetacean species and present challenges in pinnipeds can be overcome through the use of laparoscopic techniques. Due to the limited number of pinnipeds and cetaceans in captivity and, thus, the limited case load for veterinarians serving marine mammal species, it is vital for knowledge of surgical procedures to be shared among those in the field. This paper reviews case reports of surgical procedures, both traditional and laparoscopic, in pinnipeds and cetaceans. Limitations to performing surgical procedures in marine mammals are discussed and surgical case reports analyzed in an effort to determine challenges that must be overcome in order to make surgery a more feasible diagnostic and treatment

  19. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  20. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene T; Madura, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch.

  1. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  2. Immersive Learning Experiences for Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Young-Woon; Dou, Mingsong; Chabra, Rohan; Menozzi, Federico; State, Andrei; Wallen, Eric; Fuchs, Henry

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a computer-based system that is designed to record a surgical procedure with multiple depth cameras and reconstruct in three dimensions the dynamic geometry of the actions and events that occur during the procedure. The resulting 3D-plus-time data takes the form of dynamic, textured geometry and can be immersively examined at a later time; equipped with a Virtual Reality headset such as Oculus Rift DK2, a user can walk around the reconstruction of the procedure room while controlling playback of the recorded surgical procedure with simple VCR-like controls (play, pause, rewind, fast forward). The reconstruction can be annotated in space and time to provide more information of the scene to users. We expect such a system to be useful in applications such as training of medical students and nurses.

  3. Bariatric Surgery Prior to Total Joint Arthroplasty May Not Provide Dramatic Improvements In Post Arthroplasty Surgical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Elizabeth W.; Fisher, David; Li, Robert A.; Barber, Thomas C.; Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the total joint arthroplasty (TJA) surgical outcomes of patients who had bariatric surgery prior to TJA to TJA patients who were candidates but did not have bariatric surgery. Patients were retrospectively grouped into: Group 1 (n=69), those with bariatric surgery >2 years prior to TJA, Group 2 (n=102), those with surgery within 2 years of TJA, and Group 3 (n=11,032), those without bariatric surgery. In Group 1, 2.9% (95%CI 0.0–6.9%) had complications within 1 year compared to 5.9% (95%CI 1.3–10.4%) in Group 2, and 4.1% (95%CI 3.8–4.5%) in Group 3. 90-day readmission (7.2%, 95%CI 1.1–13.4%) and revision density (3.4/100 years of observation) was highest in Group 1. Bariatric surgery prior to TJA may not provide dramatic improvements in post-operative TJA surgical outcomes. PMID:24674730

  4. Cosmetic Surgical Procedures for the Aging Face

    OpenAIRE

    Owsley, John Q.

    1982-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a remarkable increase in the number of patients having cosmetic operations to achieve a more youthful appearance. Demographic, social and economic factors in our society have contributed to this phenomenon, along with an increase in the number of trained plastic surgeons. Moreover, there recently have been major technical advances in aesthetic surgical procedures, including innovations in anesthetic techniques. The newer procedures for forehead-plasty, blepha...

  5. Pre-surgical cortical activation to food pictures is associated with weight loss following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Abigail; Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Aupperle, Robin; Lepping, Rebecca; Martin, Laura; Hancock, Laura; Patrician, Trisha; Malley, Steve; Selim, Niazy; Savage, Cary R

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that preintervention functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data may predict weight loss outcomes among patients who participate in a behavioral weight loss plan. No study has examined whether presurgical brain activation can predict outcomes following bariatric surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain activations during a presurgical fMRI food-motivation paradigm are associated with weight loss 3 and 6 months following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Nineteen participants viewed food and nonfood pictures from a well-established food motivation paradigm during an fMRI scanning session before LAGB surgery. Weight was assessed presurgery and 3 and 6 months postsurgery; data for all participants was available at each time point. fMRI data were analyzed using the BrainVoyager QX statistical package. Whole brain voxelwise correlations of presurgery (food-nonfood) brain activation and weight, corrected for multiple comparisons, were performed to analyze the relationship between presurgical brain activation and subsequent weight loss. The settings were a medical university brain imaging center and 2 surgical weight loss centers in a major metropolitan area. Increased activity in frontal regions associated with cognitive control (medial, middle, superior frontal gyrus) and posterior cingulate cortex was associated with weight loss following LAGB. We found that neural activity in previously established regions associated with cognitive and behavioral self-regulation predicts weight loss following bariatric surgery. These preliminary findings highlight the role of neural circuitry in the success and maintenance of weight loss and suggest a possible future use of fMRI in screening LAGB surgery candidates. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bariatric surgery waiting times in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Nicolas V; Efthimiou, Evangelos

    2009-06-01

    Severe obesity is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the world, including Canada. The only permanent treatment of severe or morbid obesity is bariatric surgery. Access to bariatric surgery is very limited in Canada. We sought to collect accurate data on waiting times for the procedure. We carried out a survey of members of the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons and performed a more detailed analysis within Quebec and at one Canadian bariatric surgery centre where a prospectively collected bariatric surgery registry has been maintained since 1983. The survey response rate was 85%. All centres determined whether patients were eligible for bariatric surgery based on the National Institutes of Health criteria. Patients entered the queue as "office contacts" and moved through the queue, with the exit point being completion of the procedure. In 2007, a total of 6783 patients were waiting for bariatric surgery and 1313 procedures were performed in Canada. Assuming these trends are maintained, the calculated average waiting time for bariatric surgery in Canada is just over 5 years (6783/1313). The Fraser Institute and the Wait Times Alliance benchmarks for reasonable surgical waiting times vary from 8 weeks for cancer surgery to 18 months for cosmetic surgery. At one Canadian centre, 12 patients died while waiting for bariatric surgery. The waiting times for bariatric surgery are the longest of any surgically treated condition. Given the significant reduction in the relative risk of death with bariatric surgery (40%-89% depending on the study), the current waiting times for the procedure in Canada are unacceptable.

  7. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina F. Nicoletti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient’s genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  8. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina F; Cortes-Oliveira, Cristiana; Pinhel, Marcela A S; Nonino, Carla B

    2017-09-06

    This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient's genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  9. The Anatomy of a Weight Recidivism and Revision Bariatric Surgical Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    de Gara, C. J.; Karmali, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Weight recidivism in bariatric surgery failure is multifactorial. It ranges from inappropriate patient selection for primary surgery to technical/anatomic issues related to the original surgery. Most bariatric surgeons and centers focus on primary bariatric surgery while weight recidivism and its complications are very much secondary concerns. Methods. We report on our initial experience having established a dedicated weight recidivism and revisional bariatric surgery clinic. A sing...

  10. Long-Term Food Tolerance After Bariatric Surgery: Comparison of Three Different Surgical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel A; Domínguez-Serrano, Inmaculada; Torres-García, Antonio J

    2017-11-01

    Food tolerance has been related to quality of life after bariatric surgery. However, long-term results about this issue are quite limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term food tolerance in obese patients submitted to surgery, comparing the results between gastric bypass (GBP), long alimentary modified biliopancreatic diversion (MBPD), and long alimentary modified duodenal switch (MDS). A cross-sectional analytic study was performed. Food tolerance was studied with a questionnaire based on subjective alimentary satisfaction, tolerance to different foods, and frequency of vomiting and regurgitation. A food tolerance score was obtained (1 point being the worst possible tolerance and 27 points being a perfect one). Information was obtained with a telephone interview. One hundred ninety-six patients submitted to bariatric surgery were included. Ninety-nine patients were submitted to GBP, 54 to MBPD, and 43 to MDS. One hundred and sixty-one patients (82.1%) were not lost during a mean follow-up time of 87.9 months. Mean food tolerance score was 24.2. Tolerance satisfaction was good or excellent in 73.3% of the patients. Red meat was the worst tolerated food, but nearly 80% of the patients could tolerate it without any problem. Mean food tolerance score was 24.6, 24.0, and 23.7 for GBP, MBPD, and MDS, respectively. There were no significant differences between these procedures in food tolerance score, alimentary satisfaction, or frequency of vomiting. Long-term food tolerance after bariatric surgery is good. No differences between GBP, MBPD, and MDS were found.

  11. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloy, Viktoria L; Briel, Matthias; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bucher, Heiner C; Nordmann, Alain J

    2013-10-22

    To quantify the overall effects of bariatric surgery compared with non-surgical treatment for obesity. Systematic review and meta-analysis based on a random effects model. Searches of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to December 2012 regardless of language or publication status. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials with ≥ 6 months of follow-up that included individuals with a body mass index ≥ 30, compared current bariatric surgery techniques with non-surgical treatment, and reported on body weight, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life, or adverse events. The meta-analysis included 11 studies with 796 individuals (range of mean body mass index at baseline 30-52). Individuals allocated to bariatric surgery lost more body weight (mean difference -26 kg (95% confidence interval -31 to -21)) compared with non-surgical treatment, had a higher remission rate of type 2 diabetes (relative risk 22.1 (3.2 to 154.3) in a complete case analysis; 5.3 (1.8 to 15.8) in a conservative analysis assuming diabetes remission in all non-surgically treated individuals with missing data) and metabolic syndrome (relative risk 2.4 (1.6 to 3.6) in complete case analysis; 1.5 (0.9 to 2.3) in conservative analysis), greater improvements in quality of life and reductions in medicine use (no pooled data). Plasma triglyceride concentrations decreased more (mean difference -0.7 mmol/L (-1.0 to -0.4) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations increased more (mean difference 0.21 mmol/L (0.1 to 0.3)). Changes in blood pressure and total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were not significantly different. There were no cardiovascular events or deaths reported after bariatric surgery. The most common adverse events after bariatric surgery were iron deficiency anaemia (15% of individuals undergoing malabsorptive bariatric surgery) and reoperations (8%). Compared with non-surgical treatment of obesity, bariatric

  12. Earliest signs and management of leakage after bariatric surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcomes of treatment in patients who develop gastrointestinal leaks after different bariatric surgeries. Methods: Retrospective review of 632 consecutive bariatric surgical procedures performed from 1999–2009 in Alexandria University Hospital, ...

  13. Veterinary students' recollection methods for surgical procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Tanggaard, Lene; Berendt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    When veterinary students face their first live animal surgeries, their level of anxiety is generally high and this can affect their ability to recall the procedure they are about to undertake. Multimodal teaching methods have previously been shown to enhance learning and facilitate recall; however...... commonly used. This is relevant information in the current educational situation, which uses an array of educational tools, and it stresses the importance of supporting the traditional surgical teaching methods with high-quality instructional videos....

  14. Bariatric surgery: nutritional considerations for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickers, Lisa; McSherry, Ciara

    Nutritional deficiencies are common in patients who are obese and therefore individuals considering bariatric surgery may require dietary supplementation with multivitamins and minerals before surgery. Nutritional deficiencies following bariatric surgery are often proportional to the degree of malabsorption created by the surgical procedure or the extent of weight loss. Eating habits often contribute to nutritional deficiencies, so appropriate dietary and lifestyle counselling are essential following bariatric procedures to ensure appropriate macronutrient and micronutrient status. Nutritional supplementation following bariatric surgery commonly includes calcium with vitamin D, iron and vitamin B12 in addition to a daily multivitamin and mineral tablet. Although general guidelines exist, individual monitoring and tailoring are frequently required. This article provides an update of guidelines regarding the most common nutritional concerns and myths surrounding bariatric surgery.

  15. Changing trends in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Menzo, E; Szomstein, S; Rosenthal, R J

    2015-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered the only long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity. Techniques and procedures have changed dramatically. We report on some of the major changes in the field. We reviewed some of the major changes in trends in bariatric surgery based on some landmark paper published in the literature. We identified three major phases in the evolution of bariatric surgery. The pioneer phase was mostly characterized by discovery of weight loss procedures serendipitously from procedures done for other purposes. The second phase can be identified with the advent of laparoscopic techniques. This is considered the phase of greatest expansion of bariatric surgery. The metabolic phase derives from the improved understanding of the mechanisms of actions of the bariatric operations at the hormonal and molecular level. Bariatric surgery has changed significantly over the years. The safety of the laparoscopic approach, along with the better understanding of the metabolic changes obtained postoperatively, has led to a more individualized approach and also an attempt to expand the indications for these procedures. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  16. Bariatric surgery and vitamin D: key messages for surgeons and clinicians before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Leigh A

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional problem globally. Bariatric surgery is the preeminent long-term obesity treatment. Bariatric procedures manipulate the intestines to produces malabsorption and/or restrict the size of the stomach. The most enduring bariatric procedure is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, which utilizes both restriction (small stomach pouch) and malabsorption (duodenum bypass). The in-vogue procedure is the vertical sleeve gastrectomy - resection of the greater curvature of the stomach (predominantly restrictive). Malabsorptive procedures function by decreasing nutrient absorption, primarily fat and fat-soluble nutrients (vitamins A, D, E, and K). Most studies of vitamin D status in bariatric surgery candidates reported a prevalence of over 50% vitamin D deficiency (deficient at 10 years post-bariatric surgery. Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation, which may contribute to adverse surgical outcomes, e.g. poor healing and infection. Since vitamin D deficiency is also associated with chronic inflammation, obese individuals with vitamin D deficiency have extraordinary risk of adverse surgical outcomes, particularly delayed wound healing and infection due to the role of vitamin D in re-epithelialization and innate immunity. When the risk of adverse surgical outcomes in obesity is combined with that of vitamin D deficiency, there is likely an additive or potentially a synergistic effect. Furthermore, deficiency in fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin D, is considered a metabolic complication of bariatric surgery. Thus, determining the vitamin D status of bariatric surgery candidates and amending it preoperatively may prove greatly beneficial acutely and lifelong.

  17. Present status of bariatric surgery in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał R. Janik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The first survey of bariatric surgery in Poland was published in 2007. New trends are observed worldwide, and there is a current need to investigate the status of bariatric surgery in Polish institutions. This survey was initiated to gain an overview of Polish bariatric surgery during 2007–2014. Aim : To analyze the number and types of bariatric procedures performed in Polish institutions in 2014 and to perform a trend analysis from 2007 to 2014. Material and methods : A questionnaire regarding the numbers and types of bariatric procedures performed between 2007 and 2014 was e-mailed to all members of the Bariatric Society (a branch of the Association of Polish Surgeons and to 28 surgical departments. Trend analyses from 2007 to 2014 were performed. Results: Among the surgical departments, 16 (57% responded. The results showed that 1499 bariatric procedures were performed in Poland in 2014, with 96.4% done laparoscopically. The highest number was from Masovian Voivodeship. The most commonly reported procedures were laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG (60.7%, followed by laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (19.2%, mini gastric bypass (11.1%, and adjustable gastric banding (7.6%. Most significant was the rise in prevalence of LSG from 8.0% to 60.4% of the total bariatric procedures from 2007 to 2014. Conclusions : Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is currently the most frequently performed bariatric procedure in Poland. The accuracy of the national survey of procedures would be enhanced if we could create a national registry.

  18. The longitudinal trajectory of post-surgical % total weight loss among middle-aged women who had undergone bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Chul Seo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Middle-aged women are at a higher risk of being obese. We examined the trajectory of post-surgical % total weight loss (%TWL among middle-aged female bariatric patients. We fitted sequential generalized estimating equations models to analyze a sample of women who received bariatric surgery in 1995–2012, aged 40–65 years at the time of surgery (N = 158,292 whose pre-operative body mass index (BMI was ≥30 kg/m2 in the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database. The %TWL computed by 100% × (pre-surgery BMI − post-surgery BMI / pre-surgery BMI showed different trajectories depending on type of surgery. For gastric banding, %TWL increased rapidly right after bariatric surgery and started to decrease around 1 year after surgery. For Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy, %TWL overall did not show remarkable changes from around 1 year after surgery. The highest increase in %TWL was observed in patients whose pre-operative BMI was 40 or higher and those who had undergone RYGB (ps < 0.001. Whereas the trajectories of %TWL among patients with sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding did not differ much between different pre-operative BMI groups, the trajectories for RYGB were notably different between different pre-operative BMI groups (ps < 0.001. Middle-aged female bariatric patients are likely to achieve the highest %TWL if they receive RYGB and if their pre-operative BMI is 40 or higher. Further research is warranted to corroborate the present study's finding on the long-term effect of different types of bariatric surgery on %TWL among middle-aged women.

  19. [Follow-up after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsø, Dag; Aasheim, Erlend T; Søvik, Torgeir T; Jakobsen, Gunn Signe; Johnson, Line Kristin; Sandbu, Rune; Aas, Alf Tore; Kristinsson, Jon; Hjelmesæth, Jøran

    2011-10-04

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures in Norway is increasing. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery may experience surgical, medical and nutritional complications. Follow-up of these patients is therefore important. The article is based on non-systematic literature searches in PubMed and on the clinical experience of the authors. Bariatric surgery induces significant and sustained weight loss and improves obesity-related disorders. Gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in Norway. This procedure is associated with a 30-day mortality of below 0.5 %, while severe complications occur in approximately 5 % of patients. Late complications include internal herniation, intestinal ulcers and gallbladder disease. After surgery all patients are given iron, vitamin D/calcium and vitamin B12 supplements to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Gastrointestinal symptoms and postprandial hypoglycaemia after surgery can be improved by dietary modifications, and the need for anti-diabetic and blood pressure lowering medications is reduced. Dose adjustment of other medications may also be necessary. Pregnancy is not recommended during the first year after bariatric surgery. Many patients need plastic surgery after the operation. Complications after bariatric surgery may manifest in the long term. Regular follow-up is required. General practitioners should be responsible for follow-up in the long term, and should be familiar with common and serious complications as well as normal symptomatology after bariatric surgery.

  20. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Gloy, Viktoria L; Briel, Matthias; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bucher, Heiner C; Nordmann, Alain J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the overall effects of bariatric surgery compared with non-surgical treatment for obesity. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis based on a random effects model. Data sources Searches of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to December 2012 regardless of language or publication status. Eligibility criteria Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials with ≥6 months of follow-up that included individuals with a body mass index ≥30, c...

  1. Surgical weight loss as a life-changing transition: The impact of interpersonal relationships on post bariatric women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficaro, Irene

    2018-04-01

    Surgical Weight Loss as A Life-changing Transition: The Impact of Interpersonal Relationships on Post-Bariatric Women BACKGROUND: Although women account for 80% of patients having bariatric surgery (BS), the complex psychosocial mechanisms that accompany this transformation process have not been well established. The purpose of this study is to explore the lived experience of women transitioning in their interpersonal relationships post BS. A semi-structured interview with four questions was used. Six women, from six to 12 months post BS, were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. By seeking support systems prior to undergoing BS, adequate social support was received during their recovery period. Attending bariatric support group meetings and using social media were significant to these women's satisfactory recovery. Relationship adjustments were sometimes needed, but overall these women established fulfilling social lives. Within the first year post bariatric surgery, women began to gain emotional strength and inspire others to lose weight as well. By inquiring about the psychosocial concerns of women who have undergone BS, healthcare providers can provide a more practical wellness plan. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of 3 bariatric surgery procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, and sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny H; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Le, Quang A

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is associated with improved co-morbidities, quality of life, and survival in severely obese patients. Common bariatric surgery procedures include Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Currently, literature studying comparative effectiveness on different bariatric surgery procedures in veterans is limited. To compare effectiveness of 3 bariatric surgery procedures performed in veterans. Veterans Affairs Loma Linda Healthcare Systems (VALLHS), Loma Linda, California, United States. This study was a single-institution, retrospective cohort study. Primary outcome was weight reduction, expressed as kilograms lost, body mass index (BMI) reduction, percentage weight loss (%WL), and percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) after 12 months of bariatric surgery. Secondary outcomes were reduction in number of medications and laboratory markers for obesity-related chronic conditions. Inverse-probability weighting propensity score method was used to balance baseline characteristics among the procedures. A total of 162 patients were included in the study. At 12 months, the kilograms lost, BMI reduction, %WL, and %EWL were 40.7±14.5 kg, 13.4±4.1 kg/m(2), 31.5±8.5%, and 41.4±11.6% for RYGB; 24.4±22.1 kg, 7.9±7.3 kg/m(2), 20.2±21.5%, and 26.7±27.6% for SG; and 15.3±15.7 kg, 5.0±5.0 kg/m(2), 12.0±11.7%, and 16.1±15.9% for LAGB, respectively (RYGB versus SG, RYGB versus LAGB, and SG versus LAGB, all Psurgery procedure in patients who are not candidates for RYGB. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Elective plastic surgical procedures in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Mary H; Schooler, Wesley G

    2004-10-01

    Adolescent patients are seeking plastic surgery to correct deformities or perceived deformities in increasing numbers. It is essential for the physician to understand the influence of perceived body image irregularity that motivates patients of all ages to request plastic surgery. The increased demand for plastic surgical procedures among young patients is caused partially to increased media exposure to the available procedures offered by plastic surgeons. A successful aesthetic procedure can have a positive influence on a mature, well-motivated teenager, while surgery on a psychologically unstable adolescent can be damaging to the patient. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery has developed guidelines for the appropriate selection of teenagers for aesthetic plastic surgery [26]. First, the physician must "assess physical maturity, because operating on a feature that has not yet fully developed could interfere with growth or negate the benefits of surgery in later years." Second, the physician should explore emotional maturity and expectations of the teenager. The teenager should understand the goals and limitations of the proposed surgery and have realistic expectations. Third, only board certified plastic surgeons who operate in accredited facilities should perform these procedures, to ensure the safety of the teenager and the quality of the procedure. Finally, teenagers and their parents should understand the risks of surgery, postoperative restrictions on activity, and typical recovery times. The referring physician and surgeon must be aware of the positive or negative effects that plastic surgery can have on the life of a teenager and be able to select patients who have the motivation, maturity, psychosocial, and emotional attributes that will lead to patient satisfaction.

  4. Exposure to key surgical procedures during specialist general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The logged experience of specialist general surgical trainees has made it possible to analyse their surgical procedural exposure. Objective. To evaluate the exposure to key surgical procedures of South African (SA) trainees in general surgery from logbooks submitted to the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa ...

  5. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quali...

  6. The bariatric surgery patient: a growing role for registered dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulick, Doina; Hark, Lisa; Deen, Darwin

    2010-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2004, the total number of bariatric procedures increased almost 10-fold, from 13,386 procedures in 1998 to 121,055 in 2004. Current estimates suggest the number of bariatric operations will exceed 220,000 in 2010. Bariatric surgery encompasses several surgical techniques classified as restrictive or malabsorptive, based on the main mechanism of weight loss. Clinical studies and meta-analyses show that bariatric surgery decreases morbidity and mortality when compared with nonsurgical treatments. A successful long-term outcome of bariatric surgery is dependent on the patient's commitment to a lifetime of dietary and lifestyle changes. The registered dietitian (RD) is an important member of the bariatric team and provides critical instructions to help patients adhere to the dietary changes consistent with surgery. Referencing current literature, this article outlines the indications, contraindications, and types of bariatric surgery. The role of the RD for preoperative and postoperative nutrition assessment and medical nutrition therapy is highlighted. Management of long-term nutrition issues is also reviewed. The current recommendations include a multivitamin/mineral supplement plus vitamin B-12, calcium, vitamin D-3, iron, and folic acid. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity and bariatric surgery procedures, caring for patients who have undergone surgery will be an expanding role for the RD. Close postoperative follow-up and careful monitoring will improve the odds for successful surgical outcomes, and RDs play a very important part in this process. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Revision of failed bariatric procedures to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoursheed, Mousa A; Al-Bader, Ibtisam A; Al-asfar, Fahad S; Mohammad, Ali I; Shukkur, Mumtaz; Dashti, Hussain M

    2011-08-01

    Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity has been established as an effective treatment method and has been shown to be associated with resolution of co-morbidities. Despite its success, some patients may require revision because of weight regain or mechanical complications. From September 2005 to December 2009, 42 patients underwent revisional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). All procedures were performed by one surgeon. Demographics, indications for revision, complications, and weight loss were reviewed. Thirty-seven patients were treated with laparoscopic (n = 36) or open (n = 1) RYGB after failed laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Four patient were treated with laparoscopic (n = 3) or open (n-1) RYGB after failed vertical banded gastroplasty, and one patient underwent open redo RYGB due to large gastric pouch. Conversion rate from laparoscopy to open surgery was 2.5% (one patient). Mean operative time was 145.83 ± 35.19 min, and hospital stay was 3.36 ± 1.20 days. There was no mortality. Early and late complications occurred in six patients (14.2%). The mean follow-up was 15.83 ± 13.43 months. Mean preoperative body mass index was 45.15 ± 7.95 that decreased to 35.23 ± 6.7, and mean percentage excess weight loss was 41.19 ± 20.22 after RYGB within our follow-up period. RYGB as a revisional bariatric procedure is effective to treat complications of restrictive procedures and to further reduce weight in morbidly obese patients.

  8. Improving access to bariatric surgery: early surgical and patient-focused outcomes of a rural obesity clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angela W; Hopkins, Julie; Gagnon, Isabelle; Birch, Daniel W

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery is typically offered in larger health care centers, forcing patients to travel long distances to access care. An adult obesity program was established in Whitehorse, Yukon based on the multidisciplinary adult bariatric clinic in Edmonton, to alleviate long-distance care difficulties. This study analyzes patient/health care staff satisfaction and surgical outcomes for this program. A survey was administered to patients and health care staff at Edmonton and Whitehorse. Patient charts were reviewed. A multivariate linear regression predicted the main effect of travel distance and other clinical covariates on follow-up compliance. Postoperative body mass index, complications, and satisfaction scores were similar. Whitehorse patients had higher rates of follow-up (85.6% vs 71.1%, P = .002). The Whitehorse Bariatric Program provides perioperative obesity care comparable to a larger center. Patient follow-up and satisfaction suggest a highly successful program. This may serve as a model for improving access to obesity services across Canada. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychiatric and Psychosocial Aspects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzin Mukaddes Sevincer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is a treatment modality which is becoming increasingly popular in the last decade in our country and around the world. Patients who treated with a conventional methods are unable to loose sufficient weight and even they regained most of their lost weight easily. The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery are increasing day by day considering the success of bariatric surgery with regard to lose weight fast and the improvement in co-morbid conditions. Obesity and bariatric surgery are in a reciprocal relationship both with psychiatric disorders and psychosocial variables. Relations are begin with the evaluation of a patients eligibility for surgery in terms of psychiatric and psychosocial issues at a very early stage of the process. Presence of psychopathology, level of knowledge related to the surgical procedure and patients expectations about physical, psychological and social changes that may occur after surgery are the significant parts of the evaluation of bariatric surgery patients. These components should be considered in assessing capacity of patients to comply with medical advice in post-operative stage. In this article the needs for assesment of psychiatric and psychosocial aspects of obese patients who will undergo bariatric surgery is reviewed in the light of current literature . Possible medical, psychiatric and psychosocial complications of bariatric surgery and related issues are reviewed and psycosocial factors that may be predictors of the successful outcome of bariatric surgery are discussed.Discussions around the nature of specific eating disorders seen frequently in bariatric surgery patients, wheter it is a separate entities from well known eating disorders and controversial issues such as presence or absence of psychopathology like suicide as directly consequence of the surgical procedures are summarized. Discussions about performing of psychiatric and psychosocial assesment (i.e by whom, how and

  10. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  11. Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jonathan G; Yazdi, Farshid; Reisin, Efrain

    2017-12-08

    Obesity continues to increase in prevalence worldwide. Hypertension has long been associated with obesity, and weight loss continues to be a first-line therapy in the treatment of hypertension. Lifestyle modification and pharmacologic therapy, however, often meet with treatment failure. Bariatric surgery continues to be the most successful approach to sustained weight loss. This review focuses on the underlying physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the impact of bariatric surgery on the treatment of hypertension. Current available literature on the physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the major trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the impact of bariatric surgery procedures on hypertension are reviewed. Evidence suggests significant improvement in obesity-hypertension in patients who undergo surgical weight-reduction procedures. Malabsorptive techniques such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or surgical resection techniques such as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appear to offer superior results in regards to hypertension control over restrictive techniques such as Gastric Banding. Though long-term control of hypertension following surgery remains a concern, available follow-up post-operative data of up to 10 years suggests a sustained, if lessened, effect on hypertension control over time. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  13. The bariatric surgery patient--nutrition considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Caroline; Gervasoni, Ashlee; Williams, Trudy

    2013-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective method of weight loss for the treatment of morbid obesity. It is more effective when combined with nutritional care, which is sometimes complex, always ongoing and differs between surgical procedures. In Australia, the three most common bariatric surgical procedures are the adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. This article introduces the nutritional and dietary considerations for each procedure, and provides practical advice to support the general practitioner's role in managing patients who are considering, or who have had, bariatric surgery. While bariatric procedures influence the volume of food consumed, none of the procedures necessarily improve the quality of food consumed or compliance with recommended supplement usage, leaving nutrition care and food choice important lifelong considerations. Ongoing coordinated care by the GP, that links with the bariatric dietitian and others in the health management team, maximises the benefits and health outcomes for the patient through ongoing monitoring of nutritional status, prevention of nutrient deficiencies and maximising long term weight loss.

  14. The Anatomy of a Weight Recidivism and Revision Bariatric Surgical Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. de Gara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Weight recidivism in bariatric surgery failure is multifactorial. It ranges from inappropriate patient selection for primary surgery to technical/anatomic issues related to the original surgery. Most bariatric surgeons and centers focus on primary bariatric surgery while weight recidivism and its complications are very much secondary concerns. Methods. We report on our initial experience having established a dedicated weight recidivism and revisional bariatric surgery clinic. A single surgeon, dedicated nursing, dieticians, and psychologist developed care maps, goals of care, nonsurgical candidate rules, and discharge planning strategies. Results. A single year audit (2012 of clinical activity revealed 137 patients, with a mean age 49 ± 10.1 years (6 years older on average than in our primary clinic, 75% of whom were women with BMI 47 ± 11.5. Over three quarters had undergone a vertical band gastroplasty while 15% had had a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band. Only 27% of those attending clinic required further surgery. As for primary surgery, the role of the obesity expert clinical psychologist was a key component to achieving successful revision outcomes. Conclusion. With an exponential rise in obesity and a concomitant major increase in bariatric surgery, an inevitable increase in revisional surgery is becoming a reality. Anticipating this increase in activity, Alberta Health Services, Alberta, Canada, has established a unique and dedicated clinic whose early results are promising.

  15. Limitations of the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD) with bariatric surgical candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfish, Steven; Wise, Edward A; Streiner, David L

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we critique the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic's (MBMD) psychometric characteristics for use with bariatric surgery patients. The reliability data presented by the test authors in their manual were examined. The results found 16 of 32 scales of have internal consistency reliability coefficients that do not meet minimal standards for use with bariatric populations. Of the remaining 16 scales, 13 do not have any compelling evidence that they are reliable. We suggest that if a test is not psychometrically reliable then its validity is called into question. Based on these data, 16 of the MBMD's 32 scales have inadequate reliability and 13 are lacking evidence of reliability. We urge clinicians to carefully consider these findings and the implications for their work with bariatric surgery patients.

  16. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  17. Development of Bariatric and Metabolic Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Han Li

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Bariatric and metabolic endoscopy would help obese people lose weight or prepare for bariatric surgery and hopefully alleviate some of the complications of bariatric procedures. Adequate studies and data are still needed for the new endoscopic devices.

  18. Peripheral circadian misalignment: contributor to systemic insulin resistance and potential intervention to improve bariatric surgical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kyle N.; Hanlon, Erin C.; Prachand, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Thirteen percent of the world's population suffers from obesity and 39% from being overweight, which correlates with an increase in numerous secondary metabolic complications, such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and results in significant weight loss and the amelioration of obesity-related comorbidities through changes in enteroendocrine activity, caloric intake, and alterations in gut microbiota composition. The circadian system has recently been found to be a critical regulatory component in the control of metabolism and, thus, may potentially play an important role in inappropriate weight gain. Indeed, some behaviors and lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of obesity are also risk factors for misalignment in the circadian clock system and for the metabolic syndrome. It is thus possible that alterations in peripheral circadian clocks in metabolically relevant tissues are a contributor to the current obesity epidemic. As such, it is plausible that postsurgical alterations in central circadian alignment, as well as peripheral gene expression in metabolic tissues may represent another mechanism for the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery may represent an opportunity to identify changes in the circadian expression of clock genes that have been altered by environmental factors, allowing for a better understanding of the mechanism of action of surgery. These studies could also reveal an overlooked target for behavioral intervention to improve metabolic outcomes following bariatric surgery. PMID:27465735

  19. How do patients’ clinical phenotype and the physiological mechanisms of the operations impact the choice of bariatric procedure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bächler T

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Bächler,1 Carel W le Roux,2,3 Marco Bueter4 1Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Fribourg Cantonal Hospital (HFR, Fribourg, Switzerland; 2Diabetes Complications Research Centre, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 3Gastrosurgical Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 4Division of Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Zurich (USZ, Zürich, Switzerland Abstract: Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective option for the treatment of morbid obesity and its associated comorbidities. Recent clinical and experimental findings have challenged the role of mechanical restriction and caloric malabsorption as the main mechanisms for weight loss and health benefits. Instead, other mechanisms including increased levels of satiety gut hormones, altered gut microbiota, changes in bile acid metabolism, and/or energy expenditure have been proposed as explanations for benefits of bariatric surgery. Beside the standard proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the biliopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal switch, where parts of the small intestine are excluded from contact with nutrients, resectional techniques like the sleeve gastrectomy (SG have recently been added to the armory of bariatric surgeons. The variation of weight loss and glycemic control is vast between but also within different bariatric operations. We surveyed members of the Swiss Society for the Study of Morbid Obesity and Metabolic Disorders to assess the extent to which the phenotype of patients influences the choice of bariatric procedure. Swiss bariatric surgeons preferred Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and SG for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and patients with a body mass index >50 kg/m2, which is consistent with the literature. An SG was preferred in patients with a high anesthetic risk or previous laparotomy. The surgeons’ own experience was a major determinant as there is little evidence in

  20. Health Disparities in Adolescent Bariatric Surgery: Nationwide Outcomes and Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Lopez, Omar; Jupiter, Daniel C; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S; Bowen-Jallow, Kanika A

    2017-11-01

    Bariatric surgery represents an appropriate treatment for adolescent severe obesity, but its utilization remains low in this patient population. We studied the impact of race and sex on preoperative characteristics, outcomes, and utilization of adolescent bariatric surgery. Retrospective analysis (2007-2014) of adolescent bariatric surgery using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, a national database that collects bariatric surgical care data. We assessed the relationships between baseline characteristics and outcomes (weight loss and remission of obesity-related conditions [ORCs]). Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and U.S. census data, we calculated the ratio of severe obesity and bariatric procedures among races and determined the ratio of ratios to assess for disparities. About 1,539 adolescents underwent bariatric surgery. Males had higher preoperative body mass index (BMI; 51.8 ± 10.5 vs. 47.1 ± 8.7, p adolescents underwent bariatric surgery at a higher proportion than blacks and Hispanics (2.5 and 2.3 times higher, respectively). Preoperative characteristics vary according to race and sex. Race and sex do not impact 12-month weight loss or ORC's remission rates. Minority adolescents undergo bariatric surgery at lower-than-expected rates. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The medicalization of obesity, bariatric surgery, and population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Selena E; Kawachi, Ichiro; Boyce, Angie M

    2017-09-01

    This article examines how the medicalization of obesity validates the use of bariatric surgery to treat obesity in the United States and how expansions in access to bariatric surgery normalize surgical procedures as disease treatment and prevention tools. Building on this discussion, the article poses two questions for population health regarding health technology: (1) to what extent does bariatric surgery treat obesity in the United States while diverting attention away from the ultimate drivers of the epidemic and (2) to what extent does bariatric surgery improve outcomes for some groups in the US population while simultaneously generating disparities? We conduct a brief, historical analysis of the American Medical Association's decision to reclassify obesity as a disease through internal documents, peer-reviewed expert reports, and major media coverage. We use medicalization theory to show how this decision by the American Medical Association channels increased focus on obesity into the realm of medical intervention, particularly bariatric surgery, and use this evidence to review research trends on bariatric surgery. We propose research questions that investigate the population health dimensions of bariatric surgery in the United States and note key areas of future research. Our objective is to generate a discourse that considers bariatric surgery beyond the medical realm to better understand how technological interventions might work collectively with population-level obesity prevention efforts and how, in turn, population health approaches may improve bariatric surgery outcomes.

  2. Complications of staple line and anastomoses following laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    With over 600 million people being obese, and given the scientific demonstration of the advantages of surgical treatment, bariatric surgery is on the rise. The promising long-term results in terms of weight loss, and particularly in relation to comorbidities and the control/cure rate, mean that the number of procedures performed in all countries remains high. However, the risk of potentially complex or fatal complications, though small, is present and is related to the procedures per se . This review is a guide for bariatric and/or general surgeons, offering a complete overview of the pathogenesis of anastomosis and staple line following the most common laparoscopic bariatric procedures: sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, and mini-gastric bypass. The review is divided according to the procedure and the complications (leak, bleeding and stenosis), and evaluates all the factors that can potentially improve or worsen the complication rate, representing a "unicum" in the present literature on bariatric surgery.

  3. Complications of staple line and anastomoses following laparoscopic bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    With over 600 million people being obese, and given the scientific demonstration of the advantages of surgical treatment, bariatric surgery is on the rise. The promising long-term results in terms of weight loss, and particularly in relation to comorbidities and the control/cure rate, mean that the number of procedures performed in all countries remains high. However, the risk of potentially complex or fatal complications, though small, is present and is related to the procedures per se. This review is a guide for bariatric and/or general surgeons, offering a complete overview of the pathogenesis of anastomosis and staple line following the most common laparoscopic bariatric procedures: sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, and mini-gastric bypass. The review is divided according to the procedure and the complications (leak, bleeding and stenosis), and evaluates all the factors that can potentially improve or worsen the complication rate, representing a “unicum” in the present literature on bariatric surgery. PMID:29333067

  4. Bariatric Surgery or Non-Surgical Weight Loss for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea? A Systematic Review and Comparison of Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafian, Hutan; Toma, Tania; Rowland, Simon P; Harling, Leanne; Tan, Alan; Efthimiou, Evangelos; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a well-recognised complication of obesity. Non-surgical weight loss (medical, behavioural and lifestyle interventions) may improve OSA outcomes, although long-term weight control remains challenging. Bariatric surgery offers a successful strategy for long-term weight loss and symptom resolution. To comparatively appraise bariatric surgery vs. non-surgical weight loss interventions in OSA treatment utilising body mass index (BMI) and apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) as objective measures of weight loss and apnoea severity. A systematic literature review revealed 19 surgical (n = 525) and 20 non-surgical (n = 825) studies reporting the primary endpoints of BMI and AHI before and after intervention. Data were meta-analysed using random effects modelling. Subgroup analysis, quality scoring and risk of bias were assessed. Surgical patients had a mean pre-intervention BMI of 51.3 and achieved a significant 14 kg/m(2) weighted decrease in BMI (95%CI [11.91, 16.44]), with a 29/h weighted decrease in AHI (95%CI [22.41, 36.74]). Non-surgical patients had a mean pre-intervention BMI of 38.3 and achieved a significant weighted decrease in BMI of 3.1 kg/m(2) (95%CI [2.42, 3.79]), with a weighted decrease in AHI of 11/h (95%CI [7.81, 14.98]). Heterogeneity was high across all outcomes. Both bariatric surgery and non-surgical weight loss may have significant beneficial effects on OSA through BMI and AHI reduction. However, bariatric surgery may offer markedly greater improvement in BMI and AHI than non-surgical alternatives. Future studies must address the lack of randomised controlled and comparative trials in order to confirm the exact relationship between metabolic surgery and non-surgical weight loss interventions in OSA resolution.

  5. Cardiovascular effects of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Olbers, Torsten; Kelly, Aaron S; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem, and its multisystem effects are inextricably linked with elevated cardiovascular risk and adverse outcomes. The cardiovascular benefits of reversing obesity in adults are well-established. Compared with other weight-loss strategies, programmes that incorporate bariatric surgery for weight loss are beneficial for sustained BMI reduction. A marked improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidaemia, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been observed after bariatric surgery. This broad improvement in cardiovascular risk profile has led to substantial reductions in the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. As with all procedures, the benefits of bariatric surgery must be weighed against its potential risks. Modern bariatric surgery has an excellent safety profile, but important limitations remain, including the potential for surgical complications and nutritional deficiencies, and the lifelong requirement for nutritional supplementation. Surgery should be considered in patients with severe obesity, especially those with cardiovascular comorbidities. In this Review, we summarize the current management options for patients with obesity, and discuss the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes.

  6. Bariatric Surgery: A Brief Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Frichtel, Christina M

    2004-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is on the rise as treatment for the increasing number of obese patients in the US population. As this procedure becomes more common, primary care physicians are assuming increased responsibility not only for preoperative selection and education of bariatric surgery candidates but also for their postoperative care and monitoring—two factors necessary for a successful surgical outcome. This article highlights some issues relevant for primary care physicians and reports an illu...

  7. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  8. Surgical management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Landa, Samuel; Kannan, Umashankkar; Guajardo, Isabella; Pickett-Blakely, Octavia E; Dempsey, Daniel T; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    2018-02-01

    Obesity is a spreading epidemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality with a prevalence of over 36% worldwide. In the face of a growing epidemic, increasing medical costs, and the disappointing limitations of medical and lifestyle modification bariatric surgery was found to consistently lead to significant weight loss and improvement in obesity-associated comorbidities when compared to non-surgical interventions. Bariatric procedures fall within three basic categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and procedures that combine both restrictive and malabsorptive mechanisms. Four major procedures are currently performed (most often laparoscopically): Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, adjustable gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy. Although the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was the most frequently performed bariatric procedure, the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has since become the most popular. Bariatric surgery currently has similar mortality rates to standard general surgical operations. Morevoer, bariatric surgery reduces mortality by the improvement and remission of obesity-related comorbidities. Newer minimally-invasive weight loss procedures and endoscopic methods continue to evolve as we expand our understanding of the intricacies of obesity and the effects of currently available surgical treatments.

  9. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, S.; Colledge, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Patel, K.

    2011-01-01

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  10. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, S., E-mail: shaun.quigley@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Colledge, J. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, S. [Bariatric Surgery Unit, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Patel, K. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  11. Micronutrient Deficiencies After Bariatric Surgery: An Emphasis on Vitamins and Trace Minerals [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayshil J; Mundi, Manpreet S; Hurt, Ryan T; Wolfe, Bruce; Martindale, Robert G

    2017-08-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic with a disproportionate increase in grade III obesity. Bariatric surgery offers an attractive option for sustained weight loss compared with traditional methods such as exercise and diet. Micronutrient deficiencies are common and clinically significant after bariatric surgery. These deficiencies are related to a combination of patient and surgical variables. A thorough understanding of specific micronutrient deficiencies is necessary for early recognition and optimal management. The purpose of this review is to describe indications, outcomes, and types of bariatric procedures, risk factors, and mechanisms for micronutrient deficiencies, as well as outline specific vitamin and trace element deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

  12. Iron deficiency and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-05-15

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients' outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  13. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron, before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  14. Postoperative outcomes in bariatric surgical patients participating in an insurance-mandated preoperative weight management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrew; Hutcheon, Deborah A; Hale, Allyson; Ewing, Joseph A; Miller, Megan; Scott, John D

    2018-02-02

    Many insurance companies require patient participation in a medically supervised weight management program (WMP) before offering approval for bariatric surgery. Clinical data surrounding benefits of participation are limited. To evaluate the relationship between preoperative insurance-mandated WMP participation and postoperative outcomes in bariatric surgery patients. Regional referral center and teaching hospital. A retrospective review of patients who underwent vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between January 2014 and January 2016 was performed. Patients (N = 354) were divided into 2 cohorts and analyzed according to presence (n = 266) or absence (n = 88) of an insurance-mandated WMP requirement. Primary endpoints included rate of follow-up and percent of excess weight loss (%EWL) at postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12. All patients, regardless of the insurance-mandated WMP requirement, followed a program-directed preoperative diet. The majority of patients with an insurance-mandated WMP requirement had private insurance (63.9%). Both patient groups experienced a similar proportion of readmissions and reoperations, rate of follow-up, and %EWL at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months (P = NS). Median operative duration and hospital length of stay were also similar between groups. Linear regression analysis revealed no significant improvement in %EWL at 12 months in the yes-WMP group. These data show that patients who participate in an insurance-mandated WMP in addition to completing a program-directed preoperative diet experience no significant benefit to rate of readmission, reoperation, follow-up, or %EWL up to 12 months postoperation. Our findings suggest that undergoing bariatric surgery without completing an insurance-mandated WMP is safe and effective. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical conditions and requested procedures for ruminants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical conditions and requested procedures for ruminants and small animals handled at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture clinic, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia: A retrospective study 1999-2007.

  16. Utilization of banked blood in pediatric surgical procedures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... quantities of blood but utilizing only little is tantamount to inadequate use and delays surgical intervention. Indirectly, it increases cost of surgery. There is need to rationalize our blood ordering habits without causing harm to patients. Key words: Banked Blood, Calabar – Nigeria, pediatrics, surgical procedures, utilization ...

  17. Video content analysis of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    In addition to its therapeutic benefits, minimally invasive surgery offers the potential for video recording of the operation. The videos may be archived and used later for reasons such as cognitive training, skills assessment, and workflow analysis. Methods from the major field of video content analysis and representation are increasingly applied in the surgical domain. In this paper, we review recent developments and analyze future directions in the field of content-based video analysis of surgical operations. The review was obtained from PubMed and Google Scholar search on combinations of the following keywords: 'surgery', 'video', 'phase', 'task', 'skills', 'event', 'shot', 'analysis', 'retrieval', 'detection', 'classification', and 'recognition'. The collected articles were categorized and reviewed based on the technical goal sought, type of surgery performed, and structure of the operation. A total of 81 articles were included. The publication activity is constantly increasing; more than 50% of these articles were published in the last 3 years. Significant research has been performed for video task detection and retrieval in eye surgery. In endoscopic surgery, the research activity is more diverse: gesture/task classification, skills assessment, tool type recognition, shot/event detection and retrieval. Recent works employ deep neural networks for phase and tool recognition as well as shot detection. Content-based video analysis of surgical operations is a rapidly expanding field. Several future prospects for research exist including, inter alia, shot boundary detection, keyframe extraction, video summarization, pattern discovery, and video annotation. The development of publicly available benchmark datasets to evaluate and compare task-specific algorithms is essential.

  18. A rare case of small bowel volvulus after jenjunoileal bariatric bypass requiring emergency surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pranav H; Slesser, Alistair Ap; Khalil, Aoff; Bassett, Oliver; Natarajan, Kt; Livingstone, Jeremy I

    2012-03-07

    Bariatric surgery is on the increase throughout the world. Jejunoileal bypass bariatric procedures have fallen out of favor in western surgical centers due to the high rate of associated complications. They are, however, performed routinely in other centers and as a consequence of health tourism, management of complications related to these procedures may still be encountered. We describe a rare case of small bowel obstruction in a 45-year-old British Caucasian woman, secondary to a volvulus of the jejunoileal anastomosis following bariatric bypass surgery. The pre-operative diagnosis was confirmed by radiology. We describe a successful surgical technique for this rare complication. Bariatric surgery may be complicated by bowel obstruction. Early imaging is vital for diagnosis and effective management. The use of our surgical technique provides a simple and effective approach for the successful management of this bariatric complication.

  19. A rare case of small bowel volvulus after jenjunoileal bariatric bypass requiring emergency surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Pranav H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bariatric surgery is on the increase throughout the world. Jejunoileal bypass bariatric procedures have fallen out of favor in western surgical centers due to the high rate of associated complications. They are, however, performed routinely in other centers and as a consequence of health tourism, management of complications related to these procedures may still be encountered. Case presentation We describe a rare case of small bowel obstruction in a 45-year-old British Caucasian woman, secondary to a volvulus of the jejunoileal anastomosis following bariatric bypass surgery. The pre-operative diagnosis was confirmed by radiology. We describe a successful surgical technique for this rare complication. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be complicated by bowel obstruction. Early imaging is vital for diagnosis and effective management. The use of our surgical technique provides a simple and effective approach for the successful management of this bariatric complication.

  20. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  1. IGF1 modifications after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients: potential implications of nutritional status according to specific surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellitero, Silvia; Granada, María Luisa; Martínez, Eva; Balibrea, Jose María; Guanyabens, Elena; Serra, Assumpta; Moreno, Pau; Navarro, Maruja; Romero, Ramon; Alastrué, Antonio; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2013-11-01

    IGF1 is decreased in morbidly obese (MO) patients and its changes after bariatric surgery weight loss (WL) are not well known. The aim of this study was to analyse IGF1 modifications in MO patients after WL and its relationship to ghrelin and to different types of surgeries. Retrospective follow-up study at the University Medical Center. One hundred and nine MO patients (age 44.19.3, BMI 51.748.75KG/M(2)) were evaluated at baseline and 1 year after surgery: 28 sleeve gastrectomy (SG), 31 distal modified (m), and 50 ringed (r) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) surgery. Changes in IGF1, IGFBP3, ratio IGF1:IGFBP3, and ghrelin were evaluated 1 year after surgery. Baseline prevalence of low IGF1 (defined by s.d. IGF1surgery was 34.9±8.9%. There was a significant decrease in IGFBP3 in all the procedures, an increase in IGF1:IGFBP3 ratio in rRYGBP and SG, but total IGF1 only increased significantly in SG. Albumin concentrations decreased in mRYGBP, did not change in rRYGBP, but increased in SG after surgery. Total ghrelin concentrations increased after both RYGBPs and decreased after SG (Ptechniques. The %albumin change was the only dependent variable associated with the % total IGF1 change. Recovery of low IGF1 after bariatric surgery was specifically related to the albumin modifications induced by surgery and was not related to ghrelin modifications.

  2. [Efficacy and limits of the bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Albano; Taus, Marina; Busni, Debora; Petrelli, Massimiliano

    2005-01-01

    Morbid obesity is associated with and increased risk of serious comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes, sleep apnoea, cardiovascular diseases, and orthopedic disabilities. Not operative treatments for superobese patients have not been shown to produce reliable long-term benefits, therefore surgical therapy has became the treatment of choice. The number of surgical procedures increased in the last year confirm these data. However, before recommended a specific surgical procedures to a superobese patients it is necessary to consider some variables, such as: patient, health structure, and multidisciplinary equipe. Since there are not recommended or condemned surgical procedures, in this paper the Authors tried to evaluate the effectiveness and limits of the most performed surgical procedures for the treatment of pathologic obesity: gastric by-pass, biliopancreatic diversion (duodenal switch), vertical gastroplasty, banding gastric. The Authors used some pointer of outcome to measure effectiveness and limits: five year post-operative percentage excess weight loss >////losing ground, while malabsorbitive bariatric procedures are collecting successful.

  3. Distribution of isodose curves in urological surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanfredi, M.P.; Dias, J.H.; Ravazio, R.C.; Anés, M.; Bacelar, A.; Lykawka, R.

    2017-01-01

    During urological surgical procedures with fluoroscopy, the doses of the care team may be significant. However, the knowledge of the occupational exposure of these professionals is still very incipient in the national surgical centers. The objective of the study is to determine the isodose curves of the urological surgical procedures, in order to estimate the exposure of the personnel involved. The equipment used was a Arco-C BV Philips Bracelet. Patients with thicknesses of 20 and 28 cm were simulated using acrylic plates. The dose rates were measured with RaySafe i2 Unfors dosimeters positioned in a 50 x 50 cm mesh at three different heights of the floor: 95, 125 and 165 centimeters respectively corresponding to the gonadal, thoracic and crystalline regions of a typical adult . The isodose curves applied to the distribution of the surgical team suggest that the exposures are in the following descending order of intensity: primary physician, auxiliary physician, scrub nurse, anesthetist and nurse

  4. Psychological Aspects of Bariatric Surgery as a Treatment for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbe, Sandra; Hamlet, Claire; Meyrick, Jane

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the psychological effects on life after bariatric surgery despite the high prevalence of psychological disorders in candidates seeking this procedure. Our review discusses the literature around the psychological impact of bariatric surgery, exploring whether the procedure addresses underlying psychological conditions that can lead to morbid obesity and the effect on eating behaviour postoperatively. Findings show that despite undisputed significant weight loss and improvements in comorbidities, current literature suggests some persisting disorder in psychological outcomes like depression and body image for patients at longer term follow-up, compared to control groups. Lack of postoperative psychological monitoring and theoretical mapping limits our understanding of reasons behind these findings. Reframing bariatric approaches to morbid obesity to incorporate psychological experience postoperatively would facilitate understanding of psychological aspects of bariatric surgery and how this surgical treatment maps onto the disease trajectory of obesity.

  5. Bariatric Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Carel W; Heneghan, Helen M

    2018-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the indications for and the published outcomes of commonly performed bariatric procedures, including weight loss, perioperative morbidity and mortality, late complications, as well as the impact of bariatric surgery on comorbidities, cardiovascular risk, and mortality. They also briefly discuss the mechanisms by which bariatric/metabolic surgery causes such significant weight loss and health gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Perception and Awareness of Bariatric Surgery in Canada: a National Survey of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirpara, Dhruvin H; Cleghorn, Michelle C; Kwong, Josephine; Saleh, Fady; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Quereshy, Fayez A; Okrainec, Allan; Jackson, Timothy D

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess Canadian general surgeons' knowledge of bariatric surgery and perceived availability of resources to manage bariatric surgery patients. A self-administered questionnaire was developed using a focus group of general surgeons. The questionnaire was distributed at two large general surgery conferences in September and November 2012. The survey was also disseminated via membership association electronic newsletters in November and December 2012. One hundred sixty-seven questionnaires were completed (104 practicing surgeons, 63 general surgery trainees). Twenty respondents were bariatric surgeons. Among 84 non-bariatric surgeons, 68.3 % referred a patient in the last year for bariatric surgery, 79 % agreed that bariatric surgery resulted in sustained weight loss, and 81.7 % would consider referring a family member. Knowledge gaps were identified in estimates of mortality and morbidity associated with bariatric procedures. The majority of surgeons surveyed have encountered patients with complications from bariatric surgery in the last year. Over 50 % of surgeons who do not perform bariatric procedures reported not feeling confident to manage complications, 35.4 % reported having adequate resources and equipment to manage morbidly obese patients, and few are able to transfer patients to a bariatric center. Of the respondents, 73.3 % reported residency training provided inadequate exposure to bariatric surgery, and 85.3 % felt that additional continuing medical education resources would be useful. There appears to be support for bariatric surgery among Canadian general surgeons participating in this survey. Knowledge gaps identified indicate the need for more education and resources to support general surgeons managing bariatric surgical patients.

  7. Wound classification in pediatric surgical procedures: Measured and found wanting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Gonzalez, Dani O; Gonzalez, Katherine W; Nwomeh, Benedict C; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-06-01

    Surgical wound classification has emerged as a measure of surgical quality of care, but scant data exist in the era of minimally invasive procedures, especially in children. The aim of this study is to examine the surgical site infection (SSI) rate by wound classification during common pediatric surgical procedures. A retrospective analysis of the 2013 Pediatric-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (Peds-NSQIP) dataset was conducted. Patients undergoing pyloromyotomy, cholecystectomy, ostomy reversal, and appendectomy were included. Wound classification, SSI rate, reoperation, and readmission were analyzed. A total of 10,424 records were included. Pyloromyotomy, a clean case, had a 0.7% SSI rate, while ostomy reversal, a clean contaminated case, had an SSI in 6.9% of cases. Appendectomy for nonperforated acute appendicitis and laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholecystitis, both contaminated cases, had SSI rates of 2.1% and 40% for dirty cases. Reoperations and readmission rates ranged from wound classifications systems do not reflect surgical risk in children and remain questionable tools for benchmarking surgical care in children. Role of readmissions and reoperations as quality of care indices needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourman, Matthew M; Saber, Alan A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a nationwide epidemic, and the only evidence-based, durable treatment of this disease is bariatric surgery. This field has evolved drastically during the past decade. One of the latest advances has been the increased use of robotics within this field. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the recent data to determine the safety and efficacy of robotic bariatric surgery. The setting was the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (Cleveland, OH). A PubMed search was performed for robotic bariatric surgery from 2005 to 2011. The inclusion criteria were English language, original research, human, and bariatric surgical procedures. Perioperative data were then collected from each study and recorded. A total of 18 studies were included in our review. The results of our systematic review showed that bariatric surgery, when performed with the use of robotics, had similar or lower complication rates compared with traditional laparoscopy. Two studies showed shorter operative times using the robot for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but 4 studies showed longer operative times in the robotic arm. In addition, the learning curve appears to be shorter when robotic gastric bypass is compared with the traditional laparoscopic approach. Most investigators agreed that robotic laparoscopic surgery provides superior imaging and freedom of movement compared with traditional laparoscopy. The application of robotics appears to be a safe option within the realm of bariatric surgery. Prospective randomized trials comparing robotic and laparoscopic outcomes are needed to further define the role of robotics within the field of bariatric surgery. Longer follow-up times would also help elucidate any long-term outcomes differences with the use of robotics versus traditional laparoscopy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Weight gain after bariatric surgery as a result of a large gastric stoma: endotherapy with sodium morrhuate may prevent the need for surgical revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Marc F; Rudic, Goran; Anderson, Alfred J; Chua, Thomas Y

    2007-08-01

    Obesity affects more than 30% of the U.S. population and is associated with the development of life-threatening complications. Numerous therapeutic approaches to the problem have been advocated, including low-calorie diets, anoretic drugs, behavior modifications, and exercise therapy. The only treatment proven to be effective in the long-term management of morbid obesity is surgical intervention. Complications of bariatric surgery include stomal stenosis and/or ulcer and stomal dilation (secondary to overeating). The latter complication can result in a gain of previously lost weight. To determine the effect of endoscopic injection by using a sclerosant (sodium morrhuate) to induce stomal stenosis in patients who present with stomal dilatation complicated by weight gain. Bariatric patients with a large gastric stoma were treated with sodium morrhuate stomal injection. Diameters of the stoma were followed at repeat endoscopy. Weight loss at scheduled clinic visits were compared with pretherapy weights. Twenty-eight patients (10 men, 18 women; age range, 27-58 years), after bariatric surgery with GI bypass, were referred with weight gain after initial weight loss. Weight gain was believed to be the result of a large gastric stoma. Treatment included injection of sodium morrhuate (1-2 mL circumferentially) surrounding the stoma. A total of 1 to 3 injection sessions were performed in an attempt to achieve a stoma diameter of 1.2 cm or smaller. Treatment success was defined as a decrease of stoma size to weight loss >or=75% of the weight the patient gained after establishing a steady state post bariatric surgery weight. A total of 2.3 injection sessions were performed. Successful endotherapy was achieved in 18 of 28 patients (64%). One patient developed symptoms of stomal stenosis, which required 2 separate balloon dilating sessions. No other complications were encountered. Retrospective case series. Endoscopic injection of sodium morrhuate surrounding the dilated

  10. Nutritional consequences of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthakos, Stavra A; Inge, Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is being increasingly used to help treat morbidly obese adults and adolescents. As a greater percentage of this population faces a lifetime of living with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology, increased awareness of the nutritional consequences is critical for all health care practitioners, as many of these patients may be lost to follow-up and can present with significant nutritional complications years after surgery. Nutritional deficiencies can occur after bariatric surgery, although to a lesser degree after restrictive procedures. Risk may increase over time, perhaps due to poor compliance with supplementation, continued inadequate intake and/or ongoing malabsorption. Adolescent patients may be at greater risk due to poor compliance and longer life span. Nutritional monitoring and supplementation among bariatric programs has been widely variable and few prospective studies of outcomes exist. Bariatric surgery can carry significant risk of nutritional complications. Compliance with dietary recommendations should be monitored and encouraged, with annual screening for selected deficiencies. Prospective longitudinal research is needed to identify the true prevalence and significance of nutritional deficiency in these patients and to determine optimum dietary recommendations.

  11. Anthropometric and clinical profiles of post-bariatric patients submitted to procedures in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Simone Corrêa; Macedo, Jefferson Lessa Soares DE; Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Canedo, Lucas Ribeiro; Marques, João Vitor Almeida

    2018-01-01

    to evaluate the profile of patients submitted to post-bariatric plastic surgery at the North Wing Regional Hospital, Brasília, DF. we conducted a prospective, descriptive and analytical study of patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastroplasty, and subsequently to plastic surgery, from January 2011 to December 2016. We assessed body mass index before gastroplasty and after surgery plastic surgery, postoperative complications and comorbidities. we studied 139 patients (130 women and nine men), with a mean age of 41 years, who underwent 233 operations. The mean BMI at the time of plastic surgery was 27.44kg/m2. The mean weight loss was 47.02kg and the mean maximum BMI was 45.17kg/m2. The mean time between bariatric surgery and plastic surgery was 42 months. The most important co-morbidities before plastic surgery were arterial hypertension (11.5%), arthropathy (5.4%), diabetes mellitus (5%) and metabolic syndrome (4.3%) (pprofile of post-bariatric patients who underwent plastic surgery was similar to that reported in the literature, except for the low rate of associated surgeries and postoperative complications. Plastic surgery in post-bariatric patients has led to an improvement in the quality of life in most of these patients.

  12. Bariatric surgery and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Divya K; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2010-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most reliable way to sustain weight loss in the morbidly obese. Reproductive age women comprise the majority of bariatric patients, and many may be interested in conceiving after surgery. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the recent literature on bariatric surgery and fertility to assist providers in patient counseling. Obesity adversely impacts fecundability and IVF outcomes through a variety of mechanisms. The body of literature on reproductive outcome after bariatric surgery is sparse and of mixed quality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to improve menstrual cyclicity in anovulatory women, but little is published on the impact of surgical weight loss on spontaneous or IVF-treatment-related pregnancy rates. The increased risk of miscarriage in obese women may decline after bariatric surgery. There are currently insufficient data to support recommendations regarding the ideal timing for pregnancy after bariatric surgery. Obesity has been shown to adversely impact fertility, and weight loss is associated with significant improvement in many parameters of reproductive function. Further research is required as to the specific impact of surgical weight loss on pregnancy and miscarriage rates, as well as the optimal timing of pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

  13. Micronutrient deficiencies in the pre-bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Karla Vanessa Gomes; Costa, Maria José de Carvalho; Gonçalves, Maria da Conceição Rodrigues; Sousa, Bruno Soares

    2013-01-01

    Data already demonstrated the increased prevalence of obesity in various segments of the population. In this context, bariatric surgery is accepted nowadays as the most effective tool in the treatment and control of morbid obesity. Several studies have evaluated the nutritional status after bariatric surgery, especially mixed by detecting a reduction in food intake of protein, vitamins and minerals. However, other studies have investigated the presence of nutritional deficiencies prior to surgery, which may be aggravated by the surgical procedure, resulting in serious postoperative complications. To analyze the literature in relationship to micronutrient deficiencies in obese patients before bariatric surgery. Was carried out a systematic review in several electronic databases, such as PubMed/ Medline, Scielo, Lilacs and Bireme. The following keywords were used alone or in combination: bariatric surgery, obesity, preoperative, gastric bypass, vitamin deficiencies, deficiencies and mineral nutrient absorption. Were included 40 review and original articles published between 2005 to 2012. There were consensus on the combination of preoperative nutritional deficiencies, restrictions and malabsorption, possibly induced by bariatric surgery that can lead patients to experience significant nutritional deficits during the late postoperative period, especially of micronutrients, resulting in serious complications. The high occurrence of micronutrient deficiencies preoperatively detected in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery, plus a malabsorptive procedure, may involve worse prognosis during the late postoperative period. Preoperative evaluation of nutritional parameters and food intake is recommended in conjunction with surgical interventions.

  14. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Matthew C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgical procedures is a refinement used to alleviate pain. In this study, a structured literature review was carried out to examine current trends in analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Results 128 papers from 51 peer-reviewed journals were selected for inclusion in this review. Reporting administration of systemic analgesia to rabbits in peer-reviewed scientific papers increased significantly from 16% to 50% between 1995-1997 and 2005-2007 (P P Conclusions Although this review provides evidence that systemic analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing surgical procedures is increasing, rabbits do not always receive analgesia when they undergo experimental surgery. Other practices in rabbit perioperative care that could be improved, highlighted by this survey include: 1 changing the timing of analgesic administration by giving systemic analgesics pre- or perioperatively rather than only postoperatively, 2 using multimodal analgesia when pain is likely to be moderate to severe and 3 increasing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and use of other techniques such as epidural analgesia particularly for orthopaedic procedures.

  15. Blood utilization in elective surgical procedures in Ilorin | Olawumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood utilization was evaluated in elective surgical procedures over a period of 6 months using different indices such as crossmatch to transfusion ratio(C/T ratio), transfusion probability (%T), and transfusion index (TI). Out of 436 units of blood crossmatched for 207 patients, only 132 were transfused with no utilization of ...

  16. Ophthalmic surgical procedures in children at the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The second commonest indication for surgery was cataract (23.0%), while eyeball removal (9% of cases) due to tumours or infection was the third commonest surgical procedure. Strabismus and pterygium surgery were infrequently performed (0.9%). Late presentation for eye surgery was the pattern in most of the cases.

  17. [Surgical procedures involved in claims for alleged defects in praxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimany-Manso, Josep; Benet-Travé, J; Bruguera-Cortada, M; Torné-Escasany, R; Klamburg-Pujol, J; Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L

    2014-03-01

    Medical professional liability and adverse events in health care are major concerns worldwide and the analysis of claims for alleged defects in praxis is a potential source of knowledge. High rates of adverse events and complaints have been reported in surgical procedures. This article analyzes the claims registered by the Council of Medical Colleges in Catalonia between 1986 and 2012, and explores surgical procedures claimed (ICD- 9-CM coding), as well as the final outcome of the claim. Among the 5,419 records identified on surgical procedures, the interventions of the musculoskeletal system and skin and integument showed the highest frequencies. Interventions related to "non-curative" medicine should be emphasized because of their higher rates of economical agreement or condemnation outcomes, which were significantly higher for mastopexia. The results underscore the importance of the surgical area in medical professional liability and the high risk of payouts among those procedures belonging to the so-called "non-curative" medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Referencing orbital measures for surgical and cosmetic procedures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orbital morphometry is an important consideration during surgical procedures such as reconstruction of the face and cranium. These are done to restore lost functional capacity or to improve cosmetic appearance. Periorbital and intraorbital neurovascular structures risk relative damage during these maneuvers. A thorough ...

  19. Cancellation of elective surgical procedures in the university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancellation of elective surgical procedures in the university teaching hospital centre Yalgado Ouedraogo in Burkina Faso: incidence, reasons and proposals for improvement pital ls for. In total, 63.1% (n = 65) had their scheduled surgery as planned. The scheduled surgery and cancellations are shown according to.

  20. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quality and genome-wide expression signature. RNA integrity number (RIN) values were compared between total RNA samples extracted from consecutive LRP (n=11) and ORP (n=24) prostate specimens. Expression profiling was performed using the Agilent human whole-genome expression microarrays. Expression differences by surgical type were analyzed by Volcano plot analysis and gene ontology analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used for expression validation in an independent set of LRP (n=8) and ORP (n=8) samples. The LRP procedure did not compromise RNA integrity. Differential gene expression by surgery types was limited to a small subset of genes, the number of which was smaller than that expected by chance. Unexpectedly, this small subset of differentially expressed genes was enriched for those encoding transcription factors, oxygen transporters and other previously reported surgery-induced stress-response genes, and demonstrated unidirectional reduction in LRP specimens in comparison to ORP specimens. The effect of the LRP procedure on RNA quality and genome-wide transcript levels is negligible, supporting the suitability of LRP surgical specimens for routine molecular analysis. Blunted in vivo stress response in LRP specimens, likely mediated by CO(2) insufflation but not by longer ischemia time, is manifested in the reduced expression of stress-response genes in these specimens.

  1. Predictors of Changes in Health-Related Quality of Life 6 and 12 months After a Bariatric Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterhänsel, Carolin; Nagl, Michaela; Wagner, Birgit; Dietrich, Arne; Kersting, Anette

    2017-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective method for treating morbid obesity and improving patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). As research on predictors that contribute to the amelioration of HRQoL is sparse, our prospective study was conducted to examine the predictive value of demographic, psychological and physiological variables on physical and mental HRQoL 6 and 12 months after surgery. We surveyed 154 participants who had undergone either a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Prior to surgery and both 6 and 12 months after the procedure, patients completed questionnaires concerning their demographic data, height and weight, co-morbid conditions, HRQoL (Short Form Health Survey-12), depression severity (Beck Depression Inventory-II), and eating psychopathology (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire). Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to detect predictors of physical and mental HRQoL 6 and 12 months post-operation. The predictors included within the models explained 50 to 58% of the variance of post-operative physical and mental HRQoL, respectively. Higher baseline depression severity was associated with reduced HRQoL after surgery, whereas changes from pre- to post-surgery in BDI-II scores positively predicted HRQoL values, especially mental HRQoL. The persistence of somatic co-morbid disorders had a negative effect on physical HRQoL. Depression severity before surgery and changes in depression scores were found to be major predictors of HRQoL after bariatric surgery. Therefore, we recommend screening patients regularly for depression both before and after bariatric surgery and offering them adequate psychotherapeutic and/or psychopharmacologic support.

  2. Surgical Procedures Needed to Eradicate Infection in Knee Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Omkar H; Patel, Karan A; Andersen, Clark R; Carmichael, Kelly D

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee is encountered on a regular basis by orthopedists and nonorthopedists. No established therapeutic algorithm exists for septic arthritis of the knee, and there is much variability in management. This study assessed the number of surgical procedures, arthroscopic or open, required to eradicate infection. The study was a retrospective analysis of 79 patients who were treated for septic knee arthritis from 1995 to 2011. Patients who were included in the study had native septic knee arthritis that had resolved with treatment consisting of irrigation and debridement, either open or arthroscopic. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the relation between the interval between onset of symptoms and index surgery and the use of arthroscopy and the need for multiple procedures. Fifty-two patients met the inclusion criteria, and 53% were male, with average follow-up of 7.2 years (range, 1-16.2 years). Arthroscopic irrigation and debridement was performed in 70% of cases. On average, successful treatment required 1.3 procedures (SD, 0.6; range, 1-4 procedures). A significant relation (P=.012) was found between time from presentation to surgery and the need for multiple procedures. With arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, most patients with septic knee arthritis require only 1 surgical procedure to eradicate infection. The need for multiple procedures increases with time from onset of symptoms to surgery. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers, 2011-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers, 2011-2016 Published July 2016 2011 2012 ... Search Treat your Obesity | Patient Learning Center Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity ...

  4. Nutrient deficiencies secondary to bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I

    2004-09-01

    The number of adolescent and adult patients submitting to bariatric surgery is increasing rapidly around the world. This review describes the literature published in the last few years concerning nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery as well as their etiology, incidence, treatment and prevention. Although bariatric surgery was first introduced in the 1950s, safe and successful surgical management has progressed over the last two decades and longer post-surgical follow-up data are now available. Most of the patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures will develop some nutritional deficiency, justifying mineral and multivitamin supplementation to all postoperatively. Nutrient deficiency is proportional to the length of absorptive area and to the percentage of weight loss. Low levels of iron, vitamin B12, vitamin D and calcium are predominant after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Protein and fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies are mainly detected after biliopancreatic diversion. Thiamine deficiency is common in patients with frequent vomiting. As the incidence of these deficiencies progresses with time, the patients should be monitored frequently and regularly to prevent malnutrition. Nutritional deficiencies can be prevented if a multidisciplinary team regularly assists the patient. Malnutrition is generally reverted with nutrient supplementation, once it is promptly diagnosed. Especial attention should be given to adolescents, mainly girls at reproductive age who have a substantial risk of developing iron deficiency. Future studies are necessary to detect nutrient abnormalities after new procedures and to evaluate the safety of bariatric surgery in younger obese patients.

  5. Treatment of Adult Obesity with Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Robin; Harrison, T Daniel; McGraw, Shaniqua L

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, approximately 179,000 bariatric surgery procedures were performed in the United States, including the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (42.1%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (34.2%), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (14.0%). Choice of procedure depends on the medical conditions of the patient, patient preference, and expertise of the surgeon. On average, weight loss of 60% to 70% of excess body weight is achieved in the short term, and up to 50% at 10 years. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs in 60% to 80% of patients two years after surgery and persists in about 30% of patients 15 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. The Roux-en-Y procedure carries an increased risk of malabsorption sequelae, which can be minimized with nutritional supplementation and surveillance. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5%. Cohort studies show that bariatric surgery reduces all-cause mortality by 30% to 50% at seven to 15 years postsurgery compared with patients with obesity who did not have surgery. Dietary changes, such as consuming protein first at every meal, and regular physical activity are critical for patient success after bariatric surgery. The family physician is well positioned to counsel patients about bariatric surgical options, the risks and benefits of surgery, and to provide long-term support and medical management postsurgery.

  6. A new surgical procedure for the very severe inverted nipple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S; Sakai, Y; Izawa, H

    1999-01-01

    Severe cases of inverted nipple usually cannot be corrected by a simple procedure, especially if the nipple cannot be pulled out above the areolar level by manipulation. We describe a new method for these cases and we classify the inverted nipple into 3 grades following the choice of their required operative procedure. Our classification for inverted nipple is as follows. Grade I: The inversion is corrected simply by manipulation; the nipple protrusion is long-lasting. Grade II: The inversion can be corrected by manipulation, but recurrence of the inversion is frequent. Grade III: The inversion cannot be corrected without a surgical procedure. Cases of Grades I and II can be corrected by conventional simple surgical procedures. But some cases of Grade II and almost all of Grade III cannot be corrected by conventional methods, in spite of the high frequency of relapse. Cutting of the lactiferous duct, such as the Pitanguy and Broadbent methods, can correct the very severely inverted nipple. But if we want to maintain the lactiferous function after correction, we had better not cut the lactiferous ducts. Our new procedure for correcting very severe cases can keep the lactiferous function after correction without any relapse. In order to avoid the recurrence of nipple retraction and to maintain the lactiferous function, the new surgical procedure that we performed makes an incision deeply and vertically on the nipple to free the lactiferous ducts from the contracted tissues surrounding them. After extension or resection of the restricting tissues, the nipple is raised easily. This procedure will preserve the feeding function and prevent the recurrence of nipple inversion. For very severe cases, using a dermal flap inserted into the base of the nipple may be necessary due to its role of interposing tissue to prevent reverting to inversion.

  7. Rehabilitation needs after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faintuch, J; Souza, S A F; Fabris, S M; Cecconello, I; Capodaglio, P

    2013-06-01

    Bariatric surgery has grown from an obscure experimental procedure to one of the most popular operations in the world. Such accelerated progress left many gaps, notably concerning subsequent rehabilitation needs of this population. In the present study, a brief description of both the patients and the interventions is provided, along with potentially disabling features especially concerning the locomotor system, which has received comparatively little attention . Based on reported protocols and actual experience, major issues are addressed. Bariatric patients are initially managed in the hospital, however long-term and even lifetime needs may be recognized, requiring major lifestyle and physical activity changes. These have to be focused in all settings, inside and outside the healthcare institutions. Initially only adults were considered bariatric candidates, however currently also adolescents and the elderly are admitted in many centers. Bariatric weight loss is certainly successful for remission or prevention of metabolic, cardiovascular and cancer comorbidities. Yet benefits for bones, joints and muscles, along with general physical performance are still incompletely established. This should be no reason for denying continued care to such individuals, within the context of well-designed protocols, as available evidence points toward favorable rehabilitation in the realms of physical, social and workplace activities. The importance of a physiatric curriculum in medical schools has been emphasized. Even more crucial is the presence of such a specialists in obesity and bariatric teams, a requirement recognized in a few countries but not in others. The relevance of obesity as a disabling condition is reviewed, along with the positive changes induced by surgical weight loss. Although obesity alleviation is a legitimate end-point it is not a sufficient one. The shortcomings of such result from the point of view of physical normalization are outlined, and

  8. A medical platform for simulation of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurfjell, L; Lundin, A; McLaughlin, J

    2001-01-01

    Surgery simulation is a promising technique for training of surgical procedures. The overall goal for any surgical simulator is to allow for efficient training of the skills required and to improve learning by giving the user proper feedback. This goal is easier achieved if the training is performed in a realistic environment. Therefore functionality such as soft tissue deformation, tearing and cutting, penetration of soft tissue etc. is necessary. Furthermore, a realistic simulator must provide haptic feedback so that all senses match, that is, there should be a correspondence between what you see and what you feel with your hands. In this paper we describe a medical platform that provides all this functionality. It is based on the Reachln Magma API, which has been extended for surgery simulation. We describe the development of the platform and illustrate the use of it for the development of two different types of surgical simulators, both of which represents work in progress.

  9. Surgical Treatment of Gastro-Pulmonary Fistula Following Bariatric Surgery: Possible and Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Nun, Alon; Simansky, David; Rokah, Merav; Zeitlin, Nona; Golan, Nir; Abu Khalil, Ramez; Soudack, Michalle

    2017-11-15

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a common surgical management of morbid obesity. Major complication rate is 3-8%. Staple line leak is one of the most serious complications. In a small group of patients, a gastro-pulmonary fistula is formed. Endoscopic and minimally invasive measures are the first line of treatment with considerable success rate. There are very poor data in the literature what should be done in cases of failure. In this paper, we report our positive experience with definitive surgical repair. Retrospective evaluation of 13 consecutive patients referred to the general thoracic surgery department for gastro-pulmonary fistula following sleeve gastrectomy. Prior to their referral, all patients underwent surgical or percutaneous drainage and multiple treatment attempts including stent insertion, pyloric dilatation, endo-clip/ring closure, endoscopic argon ablation and glue injection. Two patients underwent emergency thoracotomy for sepsis and bile empyema. One died in the early postoperative period. Eleven patients underwent semi-elective definitive surgery. Surgery included left lower lobectomy, partial diaphragmectomy and digestive system reconstruction. There was no mortality or major complications in this group. Complication rate was 45% mostly local wound infection and pneumonia. Gastro-pulmonary fistula is a rare devastating complication of sleeve gastrectomy. When minimally invasive measures fail, there is no place for nihilism. Surgical repair is possible and safe. The data presented herein support this treatment policy.

  10. Use of bariatric outcomes longitudinal database (BOLD) to study variability in patient success after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stephen C; Hunter, Tina D; Francis, Diane M; De La Cruz-Munoz, Nestor

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the contributions of various predictors to the large variations in absolute weight loss and percent body mass index (BMI) loss after bariatric surgery. The data source was the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database(SM) by the Surgical Review Corporation. Eligibility criteria included a first bariatric surgery for adjustable gastric band (AGB), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYBG), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) between January 2007 and February 2010; age 21 years or older; presurgery BMI > 30 kg/m2; and at least one preoperative visit within 6 months and at least one postoperative visit 30 days or more after surgery. Potential predictor variables included procedural details, patient demographics, comorbidities, and prior surgical history. Linear regression models of absolute weight loss and %BMI loss were fitted at 12, 18, and 24 months. The 12-month absolute weight loss endpoint was then chosen for a more in-depth analysis of variability through variable transformations and separate models by procedure. A total of 31,443 AGB, 40,352 RYGB, and 2,194 SG patients met all inclusion criteria. Regression models explained 37 to 55% of the variability in %BMI loss and 52 to 65% of variability in absolute weight loss. The key predictors for absolute weight loss at 12 months were procedure (44.8%) and baseline weight (18.5%), with 34.2% of the variability unexplained. Other significant predictors, each of which accounted for bariatric surgery.

  11. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgical procedures is a refinement used to alleviate pain. In this study, a structured literature review was carried out to examine current trends in analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Results 128 papers from 51 peer-reviewed journals were selected for inclusion in this review. Reporting administration of systemic analgesia to rabbits in peer-reviewed scientific papers increased significantly from 16% to 50% between 1995-1997 and 2005-2007 (P buprenorphine was the most frequently used agent and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were used less frequently than opioids in both time periods. Conclusions Although this review provides evidence that systemic analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing surgical procedures is increasing, rabbits do not always receive analgesia when they undergo experimental surgery. Other practices in rabbit perioperative care that could be improved, highlighted by this survey include: 1) changing the timing of analgesic administration by giving systemic analgesics pre- or perioperatively rather than only postoperatively, 2) using multimodal analgesia when pain is likely to be moderate to severe and 3) increasing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and use of other techniques such as epidural analgesia particularly for orthopaedic procedures. PMID:21338514

  12. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Legal sanctity of consent for surgical procedures in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons, we are morally committed to respecting the right of self-determination of patients, thus an informed consent is necessary before any operative intervention. Many neurosurgical patients are incapable of giving consent because of impaired consciousness. Moreover, neurosurgical procedures involve high risks and often are time sensitive; therefore obtaining consent is a challenging job. Patients and their family members need immense courage, understanding, and trust before giving consent for a surgical procedure to a doctor. Lawsuits against doctors are on the rise and it is important to understand "what is consent?" in legal parlance.

  14. A rare case of small bowel volvulus after jenjunoileal bariatric bypass requiring emergency surgery: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Pranav H; Slesser Alistair AP; Khalil Aoff; Bassett Oliver; Natarajan KT; Livingstone Jeremy I

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Bariatric surgery is on the increase throughout the world. Jejunoileal bypass bariatric procedures have fallen out of favor in western surgical centers due to the high rate of associated complications. They are, however, performed routinely in other centers and as a consequence of health tourism, management of complications related to these procedures may still be encountered. Case presentation We describe a rare case of small bowel obstruction in a 45-year-old British C...

  15. Non-surgical cosmetic procedures: older women's perceptions and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd Clarke, Laura; Repta, Robin; Griffin, Meridith

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes findings from in-depth interviews with 44 women aged 50-70 regarding their perceptions of and experiences with non-surgical cosmetic procedures such as Botox injections, laser hair removal, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and injectable fillers. While 21 of the women had used a range of non-surgical cosmetic procedures, 23 women had not. The data are discussed in light of feminist theorizing on cosmetic surgery which has tended to ignore the experiences of older women and has been divided in terms of the portrayal of cosmetic surgery as either oppressive or liberating. We found that some of the women used the procedures to increase their physical attractiveness and self-esteem, others viewed the procedures as excessively risky, and still others argued that the procedures stemmed from the social devaluation of later life. Treatments that involved the alteration of the surface of the body tended to be viewed as less risky than the injection of foreign substances into the body.

  16. Oxalate nephropathy: An important cause of renal failure after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S P Nagaraju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health issue all over the world. Bariatric surgery is increasingly becoming popular as a surgical treatment for morbid obesity. Nephrologists need to be aware of possible renal complications after bariatric surgery. We report a 54-year-old male patient who presented with progressive worsening of renal function following a duodenal switch procedure for morbid obesity, and he was found to have oxalate nephropathy on renal biopsy.

  17. A new surgical procedure for hallux limitus treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, José; Moreno, Manuel; Gallart, José; González, David; Salcini, Jose L.; Gordillo, Luis; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the new Double-V osteotomy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1stMPJ) in patients with hallux limitus (HL). A study of 66 patients was performed, 33 patients were treated Cheilectomy and 33 were treated Double-V. All patients underwent an assessment of the passive mobility of the 1stMPJ before the procedure, reevaluated 12 months later evaluating dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, and patients status using both the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) for Hallux Metatarsophalangeal–Interphalangeal Scale. In comparing the improvement achieved regarding the increase of mobility obtained with surgical treatment, the feet operated with procedure Double-V gained significant degrees of movement increased in all analyzed parameters (P < .05). We achieved 13.33° more than average in dorsiflexion motion and 2.12° more than average in plantarflexion with regard to the feet that were operated with Cheilectomy procedure. Double-V scores on the AOFAS scale improved significantly (P = .000) 91.48 points postoperative, while with the following Cheilectomy only 79.30 points. This new surgical technique, easy to perform and with low complexity in surgical execution and a minimum of complications, produces better clinical and functional results that Cheilectomy alone. PMID:28953644

  18. Pediatric abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: diagnosis through surgical and non-surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Arthur Almeida; Lima, Luciana Cavalvanti; Araújo, Cláudia Corrêa de; Gallindo, Rodrigo Melo

    2017-12-29

    To describe the success rate and the complications after procedures to diagnose abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and adolescents. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted with a population consisting of children and adolescents with abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma diagnosed between September 1994 and December 2012. The sample comprised of 100 patients who underwent 113 diagnostic procedures, including urgent surgery (n=21), elective surgery (n=36), and non-surgical diagnosis (n=56). The most frequent procedures were laparotomy (46.9%) and ultrasound-guided core biopsy (25.6%). The rate of diagnostic success was 95.2% for urgent surgeries; 100% for elective surgeries and 82.1% for non-surgical procedures (pHodgkin's lymphoma are an effective option with low morbidity rate, allowing an earlier resumption of a full diet and chemotherapy initiation. Furthermore, non-surgical procedures should also be considered for obtaining tumor samples from patients with extensive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  19. Recent advances in bariatric/metabolic surgery: appraisal of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are becoming a serious medical issue worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective and durable therapy for the treatment of morbid obese patients. Increasing data indicates bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery is an effective and novel therapy for not well controlled obese T2DM patients. The review of recent developments in bariatric/metabolic surgery covers 4 major fields. 1) Improvement of safety: recent advances in laparoscopic/metabolic surgery has made this minimal invasive surgery more than ten times safer than a decade ago. The safety profile of laparoscopic/metabolic surgery is compatible with that of laparoscopic cholecystectomy now. 2) New bariatric/metabolic surgery: laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is becoming the leading bariatric surgery because of its simplicity and efficacy. Other new procedures, such as gastric plication, banded plication, single anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass and Duodeno-jejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy have all been accepted as treatment modalities for bariatric/metabolic surgery. 3) Mechanism of bariatric/metabolic surgery: Restriction is the most important mechanism for bariatric surgery. Weight regain after bariatric surgery is usually associated with loss of restriction. Recent studies demonstrated that gut hormone, microbiota and bile acid changes after bariatric surgery may play an important role in durable weight loss as well as in T2DM remission. However, weight loss is still the cornerstone of T2DM remission after metabolic surgery. 4) PATIENT SELECTION: patients who may benefit most from bariatric surgery was found to be patients with insulin resistance. For Asian T2DM patients, the indication of metabolic surgery has been set to those with not well controlled (HbA1c > 7.5%) disease and with their BMI > 27.5 Kg/m(2). A novel diabetes surgical score, ABCD score, is a simple system for predicting the success of surgical therapy

  20. Bariatric Surgery and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    Background As the prevalence of obesity increases, so are the prevalences of weight related diseases and the incidence of surgical procedures to promote weight loss. It is important for neuro-ophthalmologists to be familiar with these procedures and possible downstream effects on afferent and efferent visual function. Evidence acquisition Review of ophthalmology, neurology, general surgery, obesity, endocrinology, nutrition, psychiatry and neurosurgery literature. Results Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective treatment for weight loss in obese individuals. There is level IV evidence that it is associated with improvement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension(IIH). Laboratory nutrient deficiencies are common following some types of bariatric procedures. Symptomatic deficiencies are less common but can be devastating. Thiamine deficiency can cause nystagmus and other symptoms in weeks to months following surgery, B12 or copper deficiency can cause optic neuropathy in the years to decades following bariatric surgery. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be a treatment for IIH. Postoperative vitamin deficiencies may present with nystagmus, optic neuropathy, nyctalopia and/or ophthalmoparesis weeks to years after surgery. PMID:26764529

  1. Bariatric Surgery and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Heather E

    2016-03-01

    As the prevalence of obesity increases, so, too, do the prevalences of weight-related diseases and surgical procedures to promote weight loss. It is important for neuro-ophthalmologists to be familiar with these procedures and possible downstream effects on afferent and efferent visual function. Review of ophthalmology, neurology, general surgery, obesity, endocrinology, nutrition, psychiatry, and neurosurgery literature. Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective treatment for weight loss in obese individuals. There is Level IV evidence that it is associated with improvement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Laboratory nutrient deficiencies are common following some types of bariatric procedures. Symptomatic deficiencies are less common but can be devastating. Thiamine deficiency can cause nystagmus and other symptoms in weeks to months after surgery, whereas B12 or copper deficiency can cause optic neuropathy in years to decades following bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is a potential treatment for IIH. Postoperative vitamin deficiencies may cause nystagmus, optic neuropathy, nyctalopia, and/or ophthalmoparesis weeks to years after surgery.

  2. Devices and Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Katherine H; Igel, Leon I; Saumoy, Monica; Sharaiha, Reem Z; Aronne, Louis J

    2018-04-17

    In this review, we describe the FDA-approved and investigational devices and endoscopic bariatric therapies for the treatment of obesity. We focus on literature published in the past few years and present mechanisms of action as well as efficacy and safety data. Devices and endoscopic procedures are emerging options to fill the significant treatment gap in the management of obesity. Not only are these devices and procedures minimally invasive and reversible, but they are potentially more effective than antiobesity medications, often safer for poor surgical candidates and possibly less expensive than bariatric surgery. As many patients require a variety of management strategies (medications, devices, procedures, and/or surgery) in addition to lifestyle modifications to achieve clinically significant weight loss, the future of obesity treatment involves a multidisciplinary approach. Combinations of advanced treatment strategies can lead to additive or synergistic weight loss. This is an area that requires further investigation.

  3. The evolution of minimally invasive bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, Andrew J; Williams, Robert; Sutton, Christopher; Khanna, Achal

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a pandemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This historical article charts the progress of successful strategies that have been used to tackle weight loss from dietary modifications to the development of surgical interventions that have subsequently evolved. It also provides a précis of the reported outcome data following minimally invasive bariatric procedures. A literature review was performed. All articles relevant to the progression of bariatric surgery and minimally invasive surgery were assessed, as were those articles that described the ultimate evolution, combination, and establishment of the two techniques. This article charts the progression of early weight loss strategies, from early dietary modifications and pharmacologic interventions to initial techniques in small bowel bypass procedures, banding techniques, and sleeve gastrectomies. It also describes the simultaneous developments of endoscopic interventions and laparoscopic procedures. A range of procedures are described, which differ in their success in terms of loss of excess weight and in their complication rates. Weight loss is greatest for biliopancreatic diversion followed by gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy and least for adjustable gastric banding. Bariatric surgery is an evolving field, which will continue to expand given current epidemiologic trends. Developments in instrumentation and surgical techniques, including single access and natural orifice approaches, may offer further benefit in terms of patient acceptability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Economic analyses of stress urinary incontinence surgical procedures in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Tanner; Zimmern, Philippe E

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the quality of economic analysis (EA) of surgical procedures for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women. A MEDLINE search on EA for SUI surgical procedures for the years 2000-2014 included the MeSH terms "tension-free vaginal tape," "TVT," "trans-obturator tape," "TOT," "Burch colposuspension" (BC), "stress urinary incontinence," "economic analysis," and "cost-effectiveness analysis." Important criteria for evaluating articles were selected from panels that set out criteria to evaluate EA [Scales CD, Jr., Christopher SS, American Urological Association 32:121-128, 2013], [Hsieh MH, Maxwell MV, J Urol 178 1867-1874, 2007], [Wu JM, Catherine CM, Conover MM, et al., Obstet Gynecol 123 1201-1206, 2014]. Thirteen articles were identified: TVT compared to BC (6), to other surgical procedures for SUI (1), to TOT (3) and to the mini-sling (1); open BC compared to laparoscopic BC (1), and analysis of various slings and meshes for various types of incontinence (1). Articles originated from: United States (3), Europe (4), United Kingdom (4), and Canada (2). Eight described cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), two cost-utility analysis, and three cost comparison. Follow-up time for patients ranged from 6 to 24 months in eight articles, with four having a minimum of 24 months follow-up. Studies mostly adhered to the criteria, however indirect costs, sensitivity analysis, and efficacy parameters varied. Long-term synthetic sling-related complications were not included. Although CEA for SUI surgery is a burgeoning field, study comparisons remain difficult due to some variability, including health care delivery systems. As women live longer, long-term data will become critical as complications and reoperations can affect the real cost of SUI corrective procedures. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:1040-1045, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Meconium Ileus–Is a Single Surgical Procedure Adequate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagith Nagar

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Meconium ileus is one of the gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF, and affects 15% of neonates. The condition results from the accumulation of sticky inspissated meconium. Both nonoperative and operative therapies may be effective in relieving obstruction. The treatment of choice for uncomplicated meconium ileus is the use of enteral N-acetylcysteine or Gastrografin enemata. Once such therapy fails, surgery is indicated. A number of operative procedures are in use, including Bishop-Koop enterostomy, T-tube irrigation, resection and primary anastomosis, and enterotomy with irrigation and primary closure. During the period 1991-2003, five newborns required surgical intervention for uncomplicated meconium ileus. None responded to conservative management. All were males, including one set of twins. All underwent laparotomy, enterotomy, appendectomy, irrigation and closure of enterotomy. None required a second surgical procedure. CF was confirmed in all, and in each case, both parents were found to be genetic carriers of a mutational form of CF. A single surgical intervention is preferable in these patients, in view of the high rate of pulmonary involvement in CF patients. Enterotomy, irrigation and primary closure are the treatment of choice for uncomplicated meconium ileus.

  6. Changing Epidemiology of Bariatric Surgery in the UK: Cohort Study Using Primary Care Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Helen P; Khan, Omar; Fildes, Alison; Prevost, A Toby; Reddy, Marcus; Charlton, Judith; Gulliford, Martin C

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to use primary care electronic health records to evaluate the epidemiology of bariatric surgery in the UK. A cohort comprising all obese patients with a bariatric surgical procedure was drawn from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Rates of bariatric surgery were estimated using the registered CPRD population as denominator. There were 3039 adult obese patients with first bariatric surgery procedures between 2002 and 2014, including laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), 1297; gastric bypass (GBP), 1265; and sleeve gastrectomy (SG), 477. Annual procedures increased from one in 2002 to a maximum of 525 in 2010. Intervention rates were greatest among those aged 35-54, with a peak of 37 procedures per 100,000 population per year in women and 10 per 100,000 per year in men. The mean age and body mass index of participants increased, as did the proportion of men and proportion with diabetes. Between 2002 and 2006, LAGB accounted for >90 % of procedures; in 2014, GBP accounted for 52 % and SG 26 %. Among patients initially receiving LAGB, the rate of band removal was 1.6 (95 % confidence interval 1.3-2.0) per 100 patient years; the rate of a second procedure of a different type was 1.2 (0.9-1.5) per 100 patient years. Numbers of bariatric surgical procedures have increased with increasing use of GBP and SG. Rates of bariatric surgery per 100,000 population remain low and provide evidence of limited access to bariatric surgical procedures in relation to need.

  7. Augmentation mastopexy after bariatric surgery: evaluation of patient satisfaction and surgical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Wilson Cintra; Modolin, Miguel Luiz Antonio; Rocha, Rodrigo Itocazo; Gemperli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate patient satisfaction and surgical results obtained after mastopexy with breast implant inclusion. we conducted a prospective study of 20 consecutive female patients with a mean age of 39.9 years, submitted to augmentation mastopexy. We applied semi-directed psychological interviews pre and postoperatively. The answers to the evaluations were tabulated, categorized, and allowed patient satisfaction analysis. We evaluated surgical results through photographic analysis of three independent plastic surgeons, in the pre and postoperative periods, when scores were attributed to the following items: breasts shape, breasts volume, breasts symmetry, nipple-areolar complex position, and scar quality and extent. nineteen patients (95%) referred satisfaction with the surgical results attained (pimplantes mamários. estudo prospectivo com 20 pacientes consecutivas do sexo feminino, com média etária de 39,9 anos, que foram submetidas à mastopexia de aumento. Foram aplicadas entrevistas psicológicas semidirigidas nos períodos pré e pós-operatórios e cujas respostas foram tabuladas, divididas em categorias, e possibilitaram a avaliação da satisfação das pacientes. Foi realizada avaliação dos resultados cirúrgicos através da análise fotográfica por três cirurgiões plásticos independentes, nos períodos pré e pós-operatórios, que atribuíram notas aos seguintes itens: forma da mama, volume da mama, simetria entre as mamas, posicionamento do complexo aréolo-papilar e qualidade e extensão das cicatrizes. dezenove pacientes (95%) referiram satisfação com o resultado cirúrgico obtido (p<0,001). A média das somatórias das notas atribuídas pelos três cirurgiões, referentes a cada paciente, variou entre 4,7 e 10, sendo a média geral de 7,28. Os resultados foram considerados bons ou ótimos para 65% da amostra e pobres para 8,4%. houve satisfação de 95% das pacientes com os resultados obtidos pela mastopexia de aumento. A análise fotogr

  8. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...... data from the National Patient Registry in the period from 2005 through 2007: annual number of operations, type of operation, laparoscopic versus open procedure. Furthermore, the centres were compared. RESULTS: A total of 2,098 bariatric procedures were performed in the years 2005 to 2007. Apart from...

  9. Techniques, assessment, and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in combating obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K Papamargaritis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dimitrios K Papamargaritis, Dimitrios J Pournaras, Carel W Le RouxImperial Weight Centre, Imperial College London, London, UKAbstract: Obesity is an epidemic disease, and its prevalence is predicted to rise in the future. Many health and social comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, arthritis, infertility, eating disorders, unemployment, and low quality of life, have been associated with obesity. Nowadays, bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for severe obesity. An increasing body of literature demonstrates significant remission of obesity-related comorbidities and an increase in life expectancy after surgical treatment. Unfortunately, serious complications can appear after surgery, and the careful preoperative assessment of patients is necessary to estimate the indications and contraindications of bariatric surgery. Recent studies report the lower complication and mortality rates when bariatric procedures are performed in high-volume centers. The purpose of this review is to describe the techniques of the currently used surgical procedures and the clinical effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Additionally, the possible complications and mortality rates after bariatric surgery are discussed.Keywords: obesity, surgery, assessment, clinical effectiveness, complications

  10. Major mandibular surgical procedures as an indication for intraoperative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Gbara, Ali; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated 3-dimensional (3D) imaging with intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in major mandibular reconstruction procedures. The study group was comprised of 125 patients (83 males, 42 females) admitted for surgical treatment of the mandible. The patients ranged in age from 3 months to 91 years (average age, 40.72 +/- 22.843 years). Surgical procedures of the mandible were subdivided into repair of body fractures (17 patients), angle fractures (21 patients), condylar fractures (14 patients), and multiple fractures (30 patient). In addition, the study group included 21 patients undergoing orthognatic surgery and 22 undergoing reconstructive surgery on the mandible. Intraoperatively, 3D images were generated with a mobile CBCT scanner (Arcadis Orbic 3D; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). During open reduction of mandibular fractures, not all fracture sites can be readily exposed for direct visual control. For example, the lingual cortical bone of the mandible is difficult to assess intraoperatively. This structure and others can be effectively visualized using the 3D mode of CBCT. Furthermore, screw placement can be evaluated, specifically in insertions near the alveolar nerve. The intraoperative acquisition of the data sets is uncomplicated, and the image quality is sufficient to allow evaluation of the postoperative result in all cases. Intraoperative CBCT has proven to be a reliable imaging technique for providing visual control during major mandibular procedures.

  11. Nitrousoxide as a conscious sedative in minor oral surgical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N 2 O is the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic in dentistry and is commonly used in emergency centers and ambulatory surgery centers as well. When used alone, it is incapable of producing general anesthesia reliably. However, as a single agent, it has an impressive safety and is excellent for providing minimal and moderate sedation for apprehensive minor oral surgical procedure. In this article, action of N 2 O in overcoming the anxiety and pain of the patient during the minor oral surgery and its advantages and disadvantages, have been reviewed.

  12. Bariatric metabolic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopinaro, N

    2014-08-01

    lifespan of severely obese individuals is decreased by an estimated 5-20 years depending on gender, age, and race. Weight loss and maintenance are the obvious aims of bariatric surgery. The ideal bariatric operation should be easy and quick to perform, with minimal perioperative and long-term complications. It should result in excellent weight loss and indefinite weight maintenance in the vast majority of operated patients, necessitating minimal follow-up care, and be equally suitable for all patients, independent of individual characteristics such as compliance, age, and different degrees of overweight. It is immediately apparent that such a surgical procedure does not exist, and therefore we must carefully evaluate all the different features and characteristics of each operation and of each patient to try to select the procedure that provides the greatest probability of long-term success for a particular patient, with the best cost/benefit ratio. Bariatric surgery has proven to be the most effective mode of treatment for morbidly obese patients, with recent long-term studies providing evidence of a substantial reduction of mortality in bariatric surgery patients, as well as a decreased risk of developing new health-related comorbidities. Furthermore, a reduction in the use of healthcare services and therefore a reduction in direct healthcare costs was also observed. Bariatric surgery is an established and integral part of the comprehensive management of morbidly obese patients.

  13. Preoperative testing before low-risk surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Kyle R.; Wijeysundera, Duminda N.; Pendrith, Ciara; Ng, Ryan; Tu, Jack V.; Laupacis, Andreas; Schull, Michael J.; Levinson, Wendy; Bhatia, R. Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is concern about increasing utilization of low-value health care services, including preoperative testing for low-risk surgical procedures. We investigated temporal trends, explanatory factors, and institutional and regional variation in the utilization of testing before low-risk procedures. Methods: For this retrospective cohort study, we accessed linked population-based administrative databases from Ontario, Canada. A cohort of 1 546 223 patients 18 years or older underwent a total of 2 224 070 low-risk procedures, including endoscopy and ophthalmologic surgery, from Apr. 1, 2008, to Mar. 31, 2013, at 137 institutions in 14 health regions. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to assess patient- and institution-level factors associated with electrocardiography (ECG), transthoracic echocardiography, cardiac stress test or chest radiography within 60 days before the procedure. Results: Endoscopy, ophthalmologic surgery and other low-risk procedures accounted for 40.1%, 34.2% and 25.7% of procedures, respectively. ECG and chest radiography were conducted before 31.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.9%–31.1%) and 10.8% (95% CI 10.8%–10.8%) of procedures, respectively, whereas the rates of preoperative echocardiography and stress testing were 2.9% (95% CI 2.9%–2.9%) and 2.1% (95% CI 2.1%–2.1%), respectively. Significant variation was present across institutions, with the frequency of preoperative ECG ranging from 3.4% to 88.8%. Receipt of preoperative ECG and radiography were associated with older age (among patients 66–75 years of age, for ECG, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 18.3, 95% CI 17.6–19.0; for radiography, adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 2.8–3.0), preoperative anesthesia consultation (for ECG, adjusted OR 8.7, 95% CI 8.5–8.8; for radiography, adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 2.1–2.2) and preoperative medical consultation (for ECG, adjusted OR 6.8, 95% CI 6.7–6.9; for radiography, adjusted OR 3.6, 95% CI 3.5–3.6). The median ORs

  14. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison; Kuk, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to comple...

  15. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...

  16. Pregnancy following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Carla B

    2004-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity is considered an appropriate intervention when other weight-loss measures have proven unsuccessful. Weight loss often brings about improvement in overall health by lessening the effects of obesity-related comorbidities such as chronic hypertension and diabetes. In fact, the ability to become pregnant is enhanced, as weight loss often allows for a normalization of sex hormones. However, the nutrition challenges brought about by the surgery may have a profound impact on maternal health and pregnancy outcome. Surgical procedures for morbid obesity may be classified according to the digestive aftereffects brought about by the particular procedure. These categories include the "restrictive" procedures, "restrictive-malabsorptive" procedures, and the less common "malabsorptive" procedures. Deficiencies in iron, vitamin B12, folate, and calcium can result in maternal complications, such as severe anemia, and in fetal complications, such as neural tube defect, intrauterine growth restriction, and failure to thrive. Nutrient supplementation following bariatric surgery and close supervision before, during, and after pregnancy can help prevent nutrition-related complications and improve maternal and fetal health.

  17. [Mammary prosthesis: considerations about a choreography of the surgical procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolleau, J-L; Gangloff, D; Garrido, I; Chavoin, J-P

    2005-10-01

    Breast augmentation offers a high rate of satisfaction but the local complications remain frequent. These are mainly capsular contracture, malpositions of implant, acute or infraclinical infections. The causes of these complications are multifactorials. The goal of this chapter is to determine the effect of the surgical technique on the result. We think that if no routine procedure can be proposed, a reflexion on the objectives of the breast augmentation and the adaptation of the surgical technique is necessary for each surgeon. We identify twelve aims and discuss them: rigorous preoperative planning, determination of the position of the implant, creation of an adapted implant pocket, as much atraumatic as possible dissection, no bacterial contamination, no foreign particles, respect of the implant, drainage or not, efficient suture, pain and discomfort control, need for contension and clear postoperative advices. These objectives being precised, we integrate them in a chronological surgical process under the form of questions. Each surgeon can then choose his answers by evaluating the arguments, which led to his choices.

  18. Specialized care for women pregnant after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amy A; Barger, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Growing numbers of women today will seek bariatric surgery before pregnancy. Protein-calorie malnutrition; hyperemesis; intestinal hernias; dumping syndrome; anemia; and deficiencies in calcium, folic acid, and vitamins B12, D, and K are all possible complications that can impact pregnancy. This article reviews the nutritional and pregnancy-related consequences of current surgical procedures and summarizes existing research showing positive and negative effects of weight-loss surgery on pregnancy outcomes. Practice-based clinical recommendations will help guide clinicians caring for the increasing number of women who become pregnant after having bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of different surgical procedures on hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chen; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Atique, Suleman; Islam, Md. Mohaimenul; Li, Yu-Chuan (Jack); Jian, Wen-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of this study is to investigate the outcome between surgical procedures and the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism followed by surgical procedure in patients with thyroid disorders. We analyzed the data acquired from Taiwan's Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) research database from 1998 to 2011 and found 9316 patients with thyroid surgery. Cox regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR). A count of 314 cases (3.4%) of hypoparathyroidism was identified. The 9 years cumulated incidence of hypoparathyroidism was the highest in patient undergone bilateral total thyroidectomy (13.5%) and the lowest in the patient with unilateral subtotal thyroidectomy (1.2%). However, in the patients who had undergone unilateral subtotal, the risk was the highest in bilateral total (HR: 11.86), followed by radical thyroidectomy with unilateral neck lymph node dissection (HR: 8.56), unilateral total (HR, 4.39), and one side total and another side subtotal (HR: 2.80). The extent of thyroid resection determined the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism. It is suggested that the association of these factors is investigated in future studies. PMID:29068988

  20. Essential bariatric emergencies for the acute care surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernick, B; Jansen, M; Noria, S; Stawicki, S P; El Chaar, M

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. Due to the high volume of weight loss procedures worldwide, the general surgeon will undoubtedly encounter bariatric patients in his or her practice. Liberal use of CT scans, upper endoscopy and barium swallow in this patient population is recommended. Some bariatric complications, such as marginal ulceration and dyspepsia, can be effectively treated non-operatively (e.g., proton pump inhibitors, dietary modification). Failure of conservative management is usually an indication for referral to a bariatric surgery specialist for operative re-intervention. More serious complications, such as perforated marginal ulcer, leak, or bowel obstruction, may require immediate surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for these complications despite "negative" radiographic studies, and diagnostic laparoscopy performed when symptoms fail to improve. Laparoscopic-assisted gastric band complications are usually approached with band deflation and referral to a bariatric surgeon. However, if acute slippage that results in gastric strangulation is suspected, the band should be removed immediately. This manuscript provides a high-level overview of all essential bariatric complications that may be encountered by the acute care surgeon.

  1. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented.

  2. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented. PMID:26316771

  3. Effects of Frequent Glove Change on Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgical Procedures - A Multicenter Study on Surgical Gloves

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    Nishit Palo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intact surgical gloves are a barrier to microorganisms migration between surgical team members and the patient. The surgical gloves are changed at various junctures but the effects of changing gloves during surgical procedures on various surgical parameters or clinical outcomes are not established. Aim: To determine rationale of glove change during orthopaedic procedures, differences amongst surgical parameters with and without changing the surgical gloves and whether frequent glove change affected surgical parameters or clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: A prospective multicenter study conducted at three centers from January 2014 to January 2016. A 250 patients were divided into 2 groups (n=125 each in Group 1, surgical team operated with regular changing of gloves. In Group 2, only 1 set of double gloves were worn throughout the procedure. Surgical parameters or clinical outcomes were assessed for both the groups. Statistical analyses included the median, mode, range, Interquartile Range (IQR and sample standard deviation (s and independent-samples t-test. Bacterial counts were expressed as median with (IQR. Results: Surgical Timing Difference was 10 (S.D.- 4.2 minutes more in Group-1 (<0.05, Surgical Cost was higher in Group-1 by Rs.150-450 (<0.05. Outer glove micro-perforation rate was 5.85% and 8.15% in group-1 and 2 respectively with no inner glove perforation or Surgical Site Infections. Outer glove micro perforations were proportional to duration of surgery; operations lasting 120-210 and 61-120 minutes had 66.6% and 37.2% micro perforation rates respectively (p<0.05. Conclusion: Under standard operating conditions, procedures performed without glove change are shorter and cost effective than procedures performed with regular glove change with similar surgical and functional results. Judicious use of surgical gloves is a patient and environment friendly option, thereby reducing the hospital’s biomedical waste load.

  4. Should bariatric surgery be performed in adolescents?

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    Beamish, Andrew J; Reinehr, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has markedly increased worldwide in both its extent and prevalence in recent decades and obesity prevention strategies are failing. As a result, effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. As behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches have only moderate effects in severe obesity, bariatric surgery has begun to emerge as a treatment option. In this debate article, we offer arguments opposing and supporting bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has superior therapeutic outcomes with respect to weight loss and resolution of comorbid diseases over other existing treatments. However, long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery in adolescents are only just beginning to emerge. Furthermore, the procedures are generally considered irreversible, apart from gastric banding. Most importantly, not all adolescents seem to benefit greatly from bariatric surgery and we are not yet able to reliably identify those who stand to gain the greatest benefit. The authors agree that adolescent bariatric surgery should be offered exclusively within formal adolescent obesity programs, delivered by specialist multidisciplinary child/adolescent obesity teams, and within specialist centers, in order to optimize outcomes and minimize potential detrimental effects. Patients and their family/carers must be educated regarding the benefits and risks, potential side effects, expected changes in eating behavior and the lifelong requirement for regular medical follow-up after surgery. Before embarking upon a surgical treatment pathway in adolescents with severe obesity, it may also be beneficial to ensure compliance to treatment is demonstrated, in order to minimize the risk of nutritional deficiencies and associated potential complications. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  5. Bariatric surgery outcomes in the elderly: an ACS NSQIP study.

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    Dorman, Robert B; Abraham, Anasooya A; Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Parsons, Helen M; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Habermann, Elizabeth B

    2012-01-01

    Mortality and complications following bariatric surgery occur at acceptable rates, but its safety in the elderly population is unknown. We hypothesized that short-term operative outcomes in bariatric surgery patients ≥65 years would be comparable to younger persons. Patients with a body mass index ≥35 kg/m(2) who underwent bariatric surgery in the 2005-2009 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program were identified. Controlling for confounders, multivariate regression was used to predict the impact of age on mortality, major events and prolonged length of stay at 30 days. We identified 48,378 patients who underwent bariatric procedures between 2005 and 2009. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated advancing age trended towards predicting mortality, but was not statistically significant. Additionally, patients ≥65 years did not experience higher risk of major complications for either open or laparoscopic procedures. However, patients age ≥65 years were more likely to experience prolonged length of stay for both open and laparoscopic procedures. This multi-hospital study demonstrates older age predicts short-term prolonged length of stay but not major events following bariatric surgery. Older age trends toward predicting mortality, but it is not statistically significant.

  6. Operative Treatments for Reflux After Bariatric Surgery: Current and Emerging Management Options.

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    Treitl, Daniela; Nieber, Derek; Ben-David, Kfir

    2017-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that has a well-established connection with obesity. To ameliorate the morbidity associated with obesity, bariatric procedures have become an established pathway to accomplish sustained weight loss. In some procedures, such as with the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, weight loss is also accompanied by the resolution of GERD symptoms. However, other popular bariatric surgeries, such as the sleeve gastrectomy, have a controversial impact on their effect on reflux. Consequently, increased attention has been given to the development of strategies for the management of de novo or recurrent reflux after bariatric surgery. This article aims to discuss medical and surgical strategies for reflux after bariatric surgery, and their outcomes.

  7. Marijuana use and mortality following orthopedic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Andrew S; Smith, Walter; Mullen, Sawyer; Ponce, Brent A; McGwin, Gerald; Shah, Ashish; Naranje, Sameer M

    2018-03-20

    The association between marijuana use and surgical procedures is a matter of increasing societal relevance that has not been well studied in the literature. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between marijuana use and in-hospital mortality, as well as to assess associated comorbidities in patients undergoing commonly billed orthopedic surgeries. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2010 to 2014 was used to determine the odds ratios for the associations between marijuana use and in-hospital mortality, heart failure (HF), stroke, and cardiac disease (CD) in patients undergoing five common orthopedic procedures: hip (THA), knee (TKA), and shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), spinal fusion, and traumatic femur fracture fixation. Of 9,561,963 patients who underwent one of the five selected procedures in the four-year period, 26,416 (0.28%) were identified with a diagnosis of marijuana use disorder. In hip and knee arthroplasty patients, marijuana use was associated with decreased odds of mortality compared to no marijuana use (p<0.0001), and increased odds of HF (p = 0.018), stroke (p = 0.0068), and CD (p = 0.0123). Traumatic femur fixation patients had the highest prevalence of marijuana use (0.70%), which was associated with decreased odds of mortality (p = 0.0483), HF (p = 0.0076), and CD (p = 0.0003). For spinal fusions, marijuana use was associated with increased odds of stroke (p<0.0001) and CD (p<0.0001). Marijuana use in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty was associated with decreased odds of mortality (p<0.001) and stroke (p<0.001). In this study, marijuana use was associated with decreased mortality in patients undergoing THA, TKA, TSA and traumatic femur fixation, although the significance of these findings remains unclear. More research is needed to provide insight into these associations in a growing surgical population.

  8. 40 years of advances in Bariatric Surgery

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    Aniceto Baltasar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bariatric surgical practice changes in the community setting may be under-reported. We present the developments in a Spanish bariatric surgical practice in the community setting of Alcoy from 1977 through the present. Methods: Bariatric surgical techniques employed in a country community setting over the course of nearly four decades were reviewed retrospectively and qualitatively. Results: Surgeons and medical professionals from Alcoy, Spain were involved in the evolution of bariatric surgery patient management and surgical technique from 1977s through 2017. During the last 40 years, 1,495 patients were treated in our clinics. Spanish bariatric surgeons contributed to advances in gastric bypass (GBP in the 1970s, vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG in the 1980s, bilio-pancreatic diversion/duodenal switch (BPD/DS in the 1990s, and innovations associated with laparoscopy from the 1990s onward. Outcomes and approaches to prevention and treatment of bariatric surgical complications are reviewed from a community perspective. Contributions to the bariatric surgical nomenclature and weight-loss reporting are noted. Conclusions: The practice of bariatric surgery in the community hospital and private clinic must be updated continuously, as in any human and surgical endeavor. Medical professionals in community bariatric practices should contribute their experiences to the field through all avenues of scientific interaction and publication.

  9. SERUM VITAMIN B12, IRON AND FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCIES IN OBESE INDIVIDUALS SUBMITTED TO DIFFERENT BARIATRIC TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, Rafaella de Andrade; MALTA, Flávia Monteiro França; CORREIA, Maria Flora Ferreira Sampaio Carvalho; BURGOS, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Different surgical techniques to combat obesity combine malabsorption with restrictive procedures and can lead to metabolic problems, such as micronutrient deficiencies. Aim: Assess vitamin B12, iron and folic acid deficiencies associated with the lifestyle of obese individuals having been submitted to different bariatric techniques. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the electronic charts of patients submitted to bariatric surgery involving adjus...

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Image-guidance for surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terry M.

    2006-07-01

    Contemporary imaging modalities can now provide the surgeon with high quality three- and four-dimensional images depicting not only normal anatomy and pathology, but also vascularity and function. A key component of image-guided surgery (IGS) is the ability to register multi-modal pre-operative images to each other and to the patient. The other important component of IGS is the ability to track instruments in real time during the procedure and to display them as part of a realistic model of the operative volume. Stereoscopic, virtual- and augmented-reality techniques have been implemented to enhance the visualization and guidance process. For the most part, IGS relies on the assumption that the pre-operatively acquired images used to guide the surgery accurately represent the morphology of the tissue during the procedure. This assumption may not necessarily be valid, and so intra-operative real-time imaging using interventional MRI, ultrasound, video and electrophysiological recordings are often employed to ameliorate this situation. Although IGS is now in extensive routine clinical use in neurosurgery and is gaining ground in other surgical disciplines, there remain many drawbacks that must be overcome before it can be employed in more general minimally-invasive procedures. This review overviews the roots of IGS in neurosurgery, provides examples of its use outside the brain, discusses the infrastructure required for successful implementation of IGS approaches and outlines the challenges that must be overcome for IGS to advance further.

  11. A population-based analysis of the drivers of short-term costs after bariatric surgery within a publicly funded regionalized center of excellence system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, Aristithes G; Saleh, Fady; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Hong, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    The most significant driver of healthcare utilization for bariatric surgery is the index admission and readmissions within the first 30 days after a procedure. Identifying areas to create efficiencies during this period is essential to decreasing overall healthcare costs. The objective of the study was to characterize the short-term costs of bariatric surgery within a regionalized center of excellence bariatric care system. The Ontario Bariatric Network is a regionalized bariatric care system with 4 high-volume Bariatric Centers of Excellence. We performed a population-based retrospective analysis including all adult patients who received a bariatric surgical procedure in Ontario from April 2009 until March 2012. Total hospital cost and number of days in hospital was calculated for all index admissions and all readmissions within 30 days of a bariatric surgical procedure. An inverse Gaussian generalized linear model was utilized to model the effect of covariates on costs. A Poisson regression was used to determine the effect on covariates on total days in hospital. After multivariable adjustment, the sleeve gastrectomy procedure decreased costs by $1447 over gastric bypass (95% confidence interval [CI] $1578 to-$1315]); Pcomplications were the major drivers of increased cost as anastomotic leaks added $24,397 (95% CI $20,688-$28,106; Pcomplications, such as respiratory failure/infection ($19,465) (95% CI $11,007-$27,924; Pcomplications, such as anastomotic leaks and respiratory failure/infection. Days in hospital were affected more by medical complications than surgical complications. Sleeve gastrectomy resulted in a clear short-term cost advantage over Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and this was likely related to the procedure itself as opposed to differences across procedures in co-morbidity and complication rates. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exposure of the surgical team to ionizing radiation during orthopedic surgical procedures,

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    Evandro Pereira Palácio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study was to assess the degree of exposure of the orthopedic surgical team to fluoroscopic ionizing radiation.METHODS: the ionizing radiation to which the orthopedic surgical team (R1, R2 and R3 was exposed was assayed using thermoluminescent dosimeters that were distributed in target anatomical regions (regions with and without protection using a lead apron. This was done during 45 hip osteosynthesis procedures to treat transtrochanteric fractures that were classified as 31-A2.1 (AO.RESULTS: the radioactive dose received by R3 was 6.33 mSv, R2 4.51 mSv and R3 1.99 mSv (p = 0.33. The thyroid region received 0.86 mSv of radiation, the thoracic region 1.24 mSv and the gonadal region 2.15 mSv (p = 0.25. There was no record of radiation at the dosimeters located below the biosafety protectors or on the team members' backs.CONCLUSIONS: the members of the surgical team who were located closest to the fluoroscope received greater radiation doses than those located further away. The anatomical regions located below the waistline were the ones that received most ionizing radiation. These results emphasize the importance of using biosafety devices, since these are effective in preventing radiation from reaching the vital organs of the medical team.

  13. A review of studies comparing three laparoscopic procedures in bariatric surgery: sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding.

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    Franco, Juan Victor A; Ruiz, Pablo Adrian; Palermo, Mariano; Gagner, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide problem in public health, reaching epidemic proportions in many countries, especially in urbanized regions. Bariatric procedures have been shown to be more effective in the management of morbid obesity, compared to medical treatments in terms of weight loss and its sustainability. The two most commonly performed procedures are laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), and the novel laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The MEDLINE database (cutoff date September 2010), LILACS, and the Cochrane Library were searched using the key words "gastric bypass," "sleeve gastrectomy," and "gastric banding." Only studies that compared at least two of the laparoscopic procedures were included. Reviews and meta-analysis, editorial letters or comments, case reports, animal or in vitro studies, comparisons with medical treatment, comparisons with open (non-laparoscopic) procedures were excluded. Most studies indicated that LRYGB and LSG could be more effective achieving weight loss than LAGB. However, LAGB seems to be a safer procedure with frequent, but less severe, long-term complications. Although not uniformly reported, a resolution of obesity-related comorbidities was achieved with most bariatric procedures. The three procedures have acceptable efficacy and safety. We believe that patients should be informed in detail on the advantages and disadvantages of each available procedure, possibly in several interviews and always accompanied by a specialized interdisciplinary team, warranting long-term follow-up.

  14. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery.

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    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications.

  15. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications

  16. Present status of bariatric surgery in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Janik, Micha? R.; Stanowski, Edward; Pa?nik, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The first survey of bariatric surgery in Poland was published in 2007. New trends are observed worldwide, and there is a current need to investigate the status of bariatric surgery in Polish institutions. This survey was initiated to gain an overview of Polish bariatric surgery during 2007–2014. Aim : To analyze the number and types of bariatric procedures performed in Polish institutions in 2014 and to perform a trend analysis from 2007 to 2014. Material and methods ...

  17. Reoperations in bariatric surgery - indications and initial evaluation of postoperative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinka, Jakub; Nawacki, Łukasz; Bryk, Piotr; Matykiewicz, Jarosław; Wawrzycka, Iwona; Kozieł, Dorota; Rogula, Tomasz; Głuszek, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Obesity, at present, seems to be a very serious health problem all over the world. The surgery is said to be the most successful treatment of obesity. With the increase in the quantity of conducted bariatric procedures, the number of revision treatments increases as well. The aim of the study was to analyze the indications, results and complications after repeated bariatric surgeries. The repeated bariatric procedures performed in 2009-2015 have been retrospectively analyzed. The endpoint of the study was the evaluation of early surgical treatment results-up to 30th day after repeated surgery. Overall, amongs 103 obese patients with a BMI over 35 kg / m2, qualified for bariatric treatment 7 revision surgeries were conducted (6.8%). Two operations were carried out by laporotomy, other by laparoscopy. In the study group, neither any deaths were noted in perioperative period nor life-threatening complications. The frequency of complications-Surgical site infection and bleeding from the staple lines of stapler in the study group appeared to be 28.6%. Qualification for repeated bariatric surgeries should be based on a thorough analysis of the condition of the patient, previous outcome of the bariatric treatment: evaluation of weight loss as well as possible complications of the original surgery.

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and bariatric surgery: a comprehensive review

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    Everton Cazzo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been increasingly diagnosed worldwide and is now recognized as a source of public health concern. It comprises a wide spectrum of histological features that range from simple steatosis to severe forms of fibrosis, steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. The impact of bariatric surgery on the course of NAFLD in individuals with obesity has been extensively studied. DESIGN AND SETTING: Narrative review; public university hospital. METHODS: A comprehensive review was conducted based on an online search on the electronic databases MEDLINE and LILACS using the MeSH terms “fatty liver” and “bariatric surgery”. RESULTS: The exact mechanisms that lead to improvement in NAFLD following bariatric surgery are not completely understood. Since Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is the bariatric surgical procedure most performed worldwide, it is also the one from which the effects on NAFLD have been most studied, although there is also consistent evidence regarding the effects from gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and biliopancreatic diversions. CONCLUSION: According to the currently available evidence, bariatric surgery leads to significant improvement in NAFLD. Further research, especially by means of randomized controlled trials enrolling larger cohorts of individuals, is needed to determine the optimal procedure for this group of subjects.

  19. Nutritional management of patients after bariatric surgery.

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    Parkes, Emmy

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method of sustainable weight loss among morbidly obese patients. The types of bariatric surgeries can be divided into three categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and combination (restrictive and malabsorption) procedures. In general, patients undergoing restrictive procedures have the least risk for long-term diet-related complications, whereas patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures have the highest risk. For many patients, the benefits of weight loss, such as decreased blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure and increased mobility, will outweigh the risks of surgical complications. Most diet-related surgical complications can be prevented by adhering to strict eating behavior guidelines and supplement prescriptions. Eating behavior guidelines include restricting portion sizes, chewing foods slowly and completely, eating and drinking separately, and avoiding foods that are poorly tolerated. Supplement prescriptions vary among practitioners and usually involve at least a multivitamin with minerals. Some practitioners may add other supplements only as needed for diagnosed deficiencies; others may prescribe additional prophylactic supplements. The most common nutrient deficiencies are of iron, folate, and vitamin B12. However, deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins have been reported in patients with malabsorption procedures, and thiamin deficiency has been reported among patients with very poor intake and/or nausea and vomiting. Frequent monitoring of nutrition status for all patients can aid in preventing severe clinical deficiencies.

  20. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  1. Review of contemporary role of robotics in bariatric surgery

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    Vivek Bindal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rise in a number of bariatric procedures, surgeons are facing more complex and technically demanding surgical situations. Robotic digital platforms potentially provide a solution to better address these challenges. This review examines the published literature on the outcomes and complications of bariatric surgery using a robotic platform. Use of robotics to perform adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch and revisional bariatric procedures (RBP is assessed. A search on PubMed was performed for the most relevant articles in robotic bariatric surgery. A total of 23 articles was selected and reviewed in this article. The review showed that the use of robotics led to similar or lower complication rate in bariatric surgery when compared with laparoscopy. Two studies found a significantly lower leak rate for robotic gastric bypass when compared to laparoscopic method. The learning curve for RYGB seems to be shorter for robotic technique. Three studies revealed a significantly shorter operative time, while four studies found a longer operative time for robotic technique of gastric bypass. As for the outcomes of RBP, one study found a lower complication rate in robotic arm versus laparoscopic and open arms. Most authors stated that the use of robotics provides superior visualisation, more degrees of freedom and better ergonomics. The application of robotics in bariatric surgery seems to be a safe and feasible option. Use of robotics may provide specific advantages in some situations, and overcome limitations of laparoscopic surgery. Large and well-designed randomised clinical trials with long follow-up are needed to further define the role of digital platforms in bariatric surgery.

  2. Bariatric Surgery in the Elderly Is Associated with Similar Surgical Risks and Significant Long-Term Health Benefits.

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    Kaplan, Uri; Penner, Scott; Farrokhyar, Forough; Andruszkiewicz, Nicole; Breau, Ruth; Gmora, Scott; Hong, Dennis; Anvari, Mehran

    2018-03-10

    Older age (> 60) has been considered a relative contraindication for bariatric surgery due to increased complication risk. This study examined the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery for patients older than 60 years in Canadian population. This was a retrospective cohort study of the Ontario Bariatric Registry: a database recording peri-operative and post-operative outcomes of publicly funded bariatric surgeries across the province. Patients who completed 1 year follow-up, who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) between January 2010 and May 2013, were divided into older (> 60) and younger (> 60) cohorts, and outcomes were compared. Between January 2010 and May 2013, 3166 registry patients underwent LRYGB or LSG and completed 1-year follow-up. Of these, 204 (6.5%) were older than 60 years, with 175 (85.8%) undergoing LRYGB and 29 (14.2%) LSG. Demographics were similar, except for a higher number of males in the older group (59 (28.9%) versus 452 (15.3%) (p < 0.001)). No significant difference in complication rate was noted (15% for younger cohort versus 13.8% (p = 0.889)). The average percentage of excess weight loss was significantly higher in the younger population (60.72% versus 56.25% (p < 0.05)) overall, however not significantly in the LSG group. Reduction in medication use post-surgery for management of co-morbidities was significantly higher in the older patients (- 0.91 versus - 2.03 (p < 0.001)). The older cohort who underwent LRYGB or LSG was at no greater risk for intra-operative and post-operative complications and showed greater reduction in medication use post-surgery when compared to the younger cohort.

  3. Polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial hyperplasia: an overview of the role of bariatric surgery in female fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampakis, Vasileios; Tahrani, Abd A; Helmy, Ahmed; Gupta, Janesh K; Singhal, Rishi

    2016-12-01

    One of the most effective methods to tackle obesity and its related comorbidities is bariatric surgery. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometrial hyperplasia (EH), which are associated with increased risk of endometrial carcinoma, have been identified as potentially new indications for bariatric surgery. PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women in the reproductive age and is associated with several components of the metabolic syndrome such as obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. EH is a pre-cancerous condition which arises in the presence of chronic exposure to estrogen unopposed by progesterone such as both in PCOS and obesity. The main bariatric procedures are Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. These procedures are well established and when correctly selected and performed by experienced bariatric surgeons, they can achieve significant weight loss and remission of obesity related co-morbidities. Studies have shown that bariatric surgery can play an important role in the management of patients with PCOS and improve fertility. Similarly, bariatric surgery has a positive effect on endometrial hyperplasia, making surgically induced weight loss a potentially attractive option for endometrial cancer prevention and treatment. Obesity has an adverse impact on spontaneous pregnancy, assisted reproduction methods and feto-maternal outcomes. After bariatric surgery obese women with subfertility can achieve spontaneous pregnancy. However, while bariatric surgery reduces the risk of pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes, there is an increased risk of small for gestational age and possible increased risk of stillborn or neonatal death. In this article we will review the evidence regarding the use of bariatric surgery as a treatment modality in patients with PCOS and EH. We also provide an overview of the common bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  4. Current concepts in post-bariatric body contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Amy S

    2010-08-01

    The advent of bariatric surgery has led to a new subspecialty in plastic surgery for contouring the skin and fat remaining after massive weight loss. This field is increasingly recognized as a vital component to the multi-disciplinary treatment approach to care for the obese patient. The author sought to review key concepts in patient selection, technical advancements, and post-operative care in body contouring following weight loss surgery. A literature review in PubMed identified articles relevant to the care of massive weight loss patients presenting for plastic surgical contouring. These articles were combined with a retrospective review of the author's personal experience in management of these patients. The best candidates for post-bariatric plastic surgery are those who have achieved weight loss stability with a BMI of 35 or less and who have adequate nutrition to heal the surgical excisions. Truncal deformity is the most common presenting complaint of massive weight loss patients, and the procedure of choice to address this region is a lower body lift. Post-operative care focuses on patient safety prioritizing in DVT prophylaxis and seroma prevention. Bariatric procedures routinely achieve sustained decreases in body mass index; however, the remaining skin in the massive-weight-loss patient serves as a reminder of their previous obese existence. Post-bariatric body contouring aims to correct this deformity and restore a sense of normalcy. By reshaping the body into its ideal proportions, the true success of the weight loss surgery is fully realized.

  5. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas L. Ioannou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon’s rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth.

  6. ERCP after bariatric surgery - literature review and case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorgulescu, A; Turcu, F; Iordache, N

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is a disease which has become more prevalent in Romania. Bariatric surgical procedures are among the treatment options for obese patients. Obesity and the metabolic disorders induced by it are risk factors for gallstones formation and their complications. ERCP is a minimally invasive therapeutic procedure indicated in the treatment of choledochal lithiasis and its complications. ERCP is generally considered the most difficult endoscopic procedure from the technical point of view. The authors have proposed to consider the possibility of performing therapeutic ERCP in patients who have undergone bariatric procedures. Literature data are reviewed and the case of a patient treated in a minimally invasive (laparoendoscopic) way for cholecyst and choledocholithiasis after longitudinal gastrectomy is presented PMID:25408751

  7. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process. PMID:25164369

  8. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arterburn, David E; Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-08-27

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2014.

  9. The mini-fellowship concept: a six-week focused training program for minimally invasive bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottam, Daniel; Holover, Spencer; Mattar, Samer G; Sharma, Sunil K; Medlin, Walt; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Schauer, Philip

    2007-12-01

    To devise a six-week hands-on training program customized to meet the needs of practicing general surgeons. The aim of this program is to provide the required training experience that will bestow the knowledge and skill necessary to implement a successful practice in laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Ten board-certified/board-eligible practicing general surgeons with no prior hands-on or formal training in laparoscopic bariatric surgery. We report on the participants training experience and the impact that the program had on their subsequent laparoscopic bariatric clinical activity. Ten surgeons completed training programs from 9/01 to 3/03. None of the trainees had prior experience in laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Program operative experience averaged 42 cases (range 29-66). Trainees were integrated into all preoperative and postoperative hospital and outpatient care on the service, including workshops and seminars. Seven graduates are in practice performing laparoscopic bariatric surgery and three are implementing new bariatric programs. The active surgeons report performing an average of 101 laparoscopic bariatric procedures (range 18-264) over a mean practice period of 10 months (range 4-16) A six-week focused mini-fellowship with hands-on operative and clinical participation enables practicing surgeons to acquire the skill and experience necessary to successfully implement a laparoscopic bariatric surgical practice.

  10. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Integrated Health Nutritional Guidelines for the Surgical Weight Loss Patient 2016 Update: Micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Julie; Frank, Laura; Rabena, Rebecca; Craggs-Dino, Lillian; Isom, Kellene A; Greiman, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Optimizing postoperative patient outcomes and nutritional status begins preoperatively. Patients should be educated before and after weight loss surgery (WLS) on the expected nutrient deficiencies associated with alterations in physiology. Although surgery can exacerbate preexisting nutrient deficiencies, preoperative screening for vitamin deficiencies has not been the norm in the majority of WLS practices. Screening is important because it is common for patients who present for WLS to have at least 1 vitamin or mineral deficiency preoperatively. The focus of this paper is to update the 2008 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Nutrition in Bariatric Surgery Guidelines with key micronutrient research in laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, biliopancreatic diversion, and biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch. Four questions regarding recommendations for preoperative and postoperative screening of nutrient deficiencies, preventative supplementation, and repletion of nutrient deficiencies in pre-WLS patients have been applied to specific micronutrients (vitamins B1 and B12; folate; iron; vitamins A, E, and K; calcium; vitamin D; copper; and zinc). Out of the 554 articles identified as meeting preliminary search criteria, 402 were reviewed in detail. There are 92 recommendations in this update, 79 new recommendations and an additional 13 that have not changed since 2008. Each recommendation has a corresponding graded level of evidence, from grade A through D. Data continue to suggest that the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies is increasing, while monitoring of patients at follow-up is decreasing. This document should be viewed as a guideline for a reasonable approach to patient nutritional care based on the most recent research, scientific evidence, resources, and information available. It is the responsibility of the registered dietitian nutritionist and WLS program to determine

  11. Long-term changes in leptin, chemerin and ghrelin levels following different bariatric surgery procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Ximena; Auguet, Teresa; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Orellana-Gavaldà, Josep Maria; Hernández, Mercè; Sabench, Fàtima; Porras, Jose Antonio; Llutart, Jordi; Martinez, Salomé; Aguilar, Carmen; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2013-11-01

    Different studies have evaluated changes in adipo/cytokine levels after bariatric surgery and have given conflicting results. The adipo/cytokines, leptin and chemerin, and the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, have been shown to play a role in the regulation of metabolism and appetite. The aims of our study were to test the levels of these molecules after bariatric surgery and to compare the results between Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. We analysed circulating levels of chemerin, ghrelin and leptin in 30 morbidly obese women (body mass index of >40 kg/m2). Subjects were studied at three time points: baseline (before the surgery started), and after 6 and 12 months. After surgery, chemerin (baseline, 95.03 ± 23.79; after 12 months, 76.80 ± 21.51; p = 0.034) and leptin levels (baseline, 248.17 ± 89.16; after 12 months, 63.85 ± 33.48; p surgery in terms of weight reduction, general metabolic state or adipo/cytokine levels after surgery. Our study demonstrates a marked decrease in fasting leptin and chemerin levels, and an increase in ghrelin levels, after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss, independently of the type of surgery performed. Further studies are needed on the interrelation between the changes in the circulating levels of these molecules and the efficacy of the bariatric surgery procedures to induce the beneficial metabolic changes and to sustain body weight loss.

  12. Need for Intensive Nutrition Care After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétry, Cécile; Disse, Emmanuel; Chambrier, Cécile; Barnoud, Didier; Gelas, Patrick; Baubet, Sandrine; Laville, Martine; Pelascini, Elise; Robert, Maud

    2017-02-01

    Severe nutrition complications after bariatric surgery remain poorly described. The aim of this case series was to identify specific factors associated with nutrition complications after bariatric surgery and to characterize their nutrition disorders. We retrospectively reviewed all people referred to the clinical nutrition intensive care unit of our university hospital after bariatric surgery from January 2013 to June 2015. Twelve persons who required artificial nutrition supplies (ie, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition) were identified. Seven persons underwent a "one-anastomosis gastric bypass" (OAGB) or "mini gastric bypass," 2 underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 2 had a sleeve gastrectomy, and 1 had an adjustable gastric band. This case series suggests that OAGB could overexpose subjects to severe nutrition complications requiring intensive nutrition care and therefore cannot be considered a "mini" bariatric surgery. Even if OAGB is often considered a simplified surgical technique, it obviously requires as the other standard bariatric procedures a close follow-up by experimented teams aware of its specific complications.

  13. Vitamin D alteration associated with obesity and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespessailles, Eric; Toumi, Hechmi

    2017-05-01

    Obesity and severe obesity constitute growing serious health problems reaching epidemic proportion in most countries. Interactions and relationships between obesity and bone tissue and its metabolism are complex but are more and more studied and recognized. Obesity is associated with an altered hormonal profile including particularly bone-regulating hormones like vitamin D. Bariatric surgery procedures, thanks to their effectiveness to achieve therapeutic endpoints for comorbidities associated with obesity, have had an increasing success. However, these surgeries by producing mechanical restriction and or malabsorption syndrome lead to nutritional deficiencies including vitamin D. In this review, we aim to (1) discuss the nutritional deficiency of vitamin D in the obese, (2) to summarize the different surgical options in bariatric surgery and to present the evidence concerning these procedures and their associated profile in vitamin D post-operative insufficiency, (3) to present the different recommendations in clinical practice to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiencies or insufficiencies in patients treated by bariatric surgery and finally to introduce emerging assumptions on the relationship between vitamin D, microbiota composition and circulating bile acids. Impact statement Obesity and severe obesity constitute growing serious health problems reaching epidemic proportion in most countries with a prevalence increasing from 6.4 in 1975 to 14.9% in 2014. This present review summarizes currently available data on vitamin D deficiencies in the obese population before and after bariatric surgery. The important evidence emerging from our evaluation confirms that obese patients are at risk of multiple nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamin D deficiency, before bariatric surgery. Our survey confirms that the precise role of the gut microbiome and its associated changes on the vitamin D metabolism after the different bariatric surgery procedures has not yet been

  14. Management of late postoperative complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, K; Somers, S; Chand, M

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide and the past decade has witnessed an exponential rise in the number of bariatric operations performed. As a consequence, an increasing number of patients are presenting to non-specialist units with complications following bariatric procedures. This article outlines the management of the most common late postoperative complications that are likely to present to the general surgeon. A search was conducted for late postoperative complications after bariatric surgery using PubMed, Embase, OVID and Google search engines, and combinations of the terms bariatric surgery, gastric bypass, gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy, and late or delayed complications. Only studies with follow-up longer than 6 months were included. The most common long-term complications after gastric banding include band slippage and erosion. Deflation or removal of the band is often required. Internal hernia, adhesions and anastomotic stenosis are common causes of intestinal obstruction after gastric bypass surgery. Hepatobiliary complications pose a particular challenge because of the altered anatomy. Functional disorders such as reflux and dumping, and nutritional deficiencies are common and should be differentiated from conditions that require urgent investigations and timely surgical intervention. The immediate management of bariatric patients presenting with complications outside the immediate postoperative period requires adherence to basic surgical principles. Accurate diagnosis often relies on high-quality contrast and cross-sectional imaging, and effective surgical intervention necessitates a broad understanding of the altered anatomy, advanced surgical skills and liaison with specialists in the field when necessary. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Novel treatments for complications after bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez, Juli?n; Boza, Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been considered one of best treatments for obesity. As every surgical procedure?and any medical intervention, it is not exempt of complications, among which leaks, strictures, acute hemorrhages and fistulae highlight. Leaks are more common in the gastro-jejunal anastomosis (GJA) in the case of Roux-en-y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), while in Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) they locate in the stapler line. Stenosis can be seen in the gastro-jejunostomy in the RYGB and in the gastric tu...

  16. Long-term Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery: A National Institutes of Health Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courcoulas, Anita P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Bonds, Denise; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Horlick, Mary; Staten, Myrlene A.; Arterburn, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Importance The clinical evidence base demonstrating bariatric surgery’s health benefits is much larger than it was when the NIH last held a Consensus Panel in 1991. Still, it remains unclear whether ongoing studies will address critical questions about long-term complication rates and the sustainability of weight loss and comorbidity control. Objective The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a multidisciplinary workshop in May 2013 to summarize the current state of knowledge of bariatric surgery, review research findings on the long-term outcomes of bariatric surgery, and establish priorities for future research directions. Evidence Review The evidence presented at the workshop was selected by the planning committee for both its quality and duration of follow up. The data review emphasized RCTs and large observational studies with long-term follow up, with or without a control group. Findings Several small RCTs showed greater weight loss and T2DM remission compared to non-surgical treatments within the first 2 years of follow-up after bariatric surgery. Large, long-term observational studies show durable (>5 years) weight loss, diabetes and lipid improvements with bariatric surgery. Still unclear are predictors of outcomes, long-term complications, long-term survival, micro- and macro-vascular events, mental health outcomes, and costs. The studies needed to address these knowledge gaps would be expensive and logistically difficult to perform. Conclusions and Relevance High-quality evidence shows that bariatric surgical procedures result in greater weight loss than non-surgical treatments and are more effective at inducing initial T2DM remission in obese patients. More information is needed about the long term durability of comorbidity control and complications after bariatric procedures and this evidence will most likely come from carefully designed

  17. Obesity and co-morbid psychiatric disorders as contraindications for bariatric surgery?-A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterhänsel, C; Wagner, B; Dietrich, A; Kersting, A

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing bariatric surgery report current or past psychiatric disorders and controversy exists regarding their outcome after bariatric surgery. We present a case of an obese patient with a borderline personality disorder, a recurrent depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress symptoms and binge eating episodes who underwent bariatric surgery. Although the psychiatric disorders remained, the procedure contributed to an improvement of the health status and well-being of the patient. Adequate psychological care after the surgical procedure is necessary to enable a long-term stabilization of patients with mental co-morbidities. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidities should not be excluded from the procedure if adequate post-operative support is provided. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparison of the Bariatric Procedures that Are Performed in the Treatment of Super Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kohei; Seki, Yosuke; Kasama, Kazunori; Wakamatsu, Kotaro; Umezawa, Akiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Kurokawa, Yoshimochi

    2017-10-01

    We have experienced numerous cases of super morbid obesity (SMO), defined by a BMI of ≥50 kg/m 2 , in which laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) was not able to achieve a sufficient weight loss effect. However, the most appropriate procedure for the treatment of SMO has not yet been established. The subjects included 248 successive patients who underwent surgery at our hospital from June 2006 to December 2012. We divided the subjects into an SMO group (BMI, 50 to <70 kg/m 2 ) and a morbid obesity (MO) group (BMI, 35 to <50 kg/m 2 ). The subjects underwent LSG, LSG with duodenojejunal bypass (LSG/DJB), or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). The weight loss effects, safety of surgery, and metabolic profile changes were compared. Sixty-two subjects were classified into the SMO group (25%). The percent excess weight loss (%EWL) after LSG among the patients in the SMO group was not significantly different from that of patients who underwent other procedures. LSG was associated with a significantly lower success rate in terms of weight loss (%EWL ≥ 50%), in comparison to the weight loss at 1 year after LRYGB and at 2 years after LSG/DJB and LRYGB. Among the patients in the MO group, the %EWL and the rate of successful weight loss did not differ to a statistically significant extent. This study demonstrated that in patients with SMO, LSG/DJB and LRYGB can achieve superior weight loss effects in comparison to LSG.

  19. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Bruce M.; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by non-surgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the co-morbidities, quality of life and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors following weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality following weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. PMID:27230645

  20. Recent national trends in the use of adolescent inpatient bariatric surgery: 2000 through 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Deirdre C; Merrill, Chaya T; Cottrell, Linda T; Nadler, Evan P; Burd, Randall S

    2013-02-01

    To determine the current rate of inpatient bariatric surgical procedures among adolescents and to analyze national trends of use from 2000 to 2009. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Discharge data obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database, 2000 through 2009. Adolescents (defined herein as individuals aged 10-19 years) undergoing inpatient bariatric procedures. Inpatient bariatric surgery. The primary outcome measure was the national population-based bariatric procedure rate. The secondary outcome measures were trends in procedure rates and type, demographics, complication rate, length of stay, and hospital charges from 2000 through 2009. The inpatient bariatric procedure rate increased from 0.8 per 100 000 in 2000 to 2.3 per 100 000 in 2003 (328 vs 987 procedures) but did not change significantly in 2006 (2.2 per 100 000) or 2009 (2.4 per 100 000), with 925 vs 1009 procedures. The use of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding approached one-third (32.1%) of all procedures by 2009. The cohort was predominantly female and older than 17 years. The prevalence of comorbidities increased from 2003 (49.3%) to 2009 (58.6%) (P = .002), while the complication rate remained low and the in-hospital length of stay decreased by approximately 1 day (P bariatric procedures among adolescents has plateaued since 2003. The predominant procedure type has changed to minimally invasive techniques, including laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Trends show low complication rates and decreasing length of stay, despite increasing comorbid conditions among patients.

  1. [Nutrient Deficiencies after Bariatric Surgery - Systematic Literature Review and Suggestions for Diagnostics and Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, C; Benedix, F; Meyer, F; Manger, T

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of morbid obesity in Germany is associated with an increasing number of metabolic surgical interventions. Short-term surgical and long-term metabolic complications such as nutrient deficiencies can be considered the main risks of metabolic surgery and its restrictive and malabsorbant surgical procedures. The aim of this compact short overview based on a selective literature search and our own clinical experience is to characterise the long-term metabolic complications, which are specific for the various bariatric procedures, and to refine the published guidelines for supplementation. Restrictive bariatric procedures can be associated with well-known surgical problems such as pouch dilatation or band migration, e.g., after gastric banding. After sleeve gastrectomy, emerging reflux disease can become a substantial problem. The most frequent deficiencies after restrictive procedures are related to B-vitamins whereas iron, folate, vitamin B1 and B12 and vitamin D deficiencies are associated with the malabsorptive procedure such as biliopancreatic diversion, duodenal switch and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Due to possible metabolic and surgical complications after bariatric surgery, patients need to undergo life-long medical follow-up investigations. The currently available guidelines of German Society of Treatment of Obesity (CAADIP) of DGAV for supplementation should be known and followed, in particular, by the physicians who i) are exceptionally involved in medical care of obese people and ii) do it in full awareness of the obligatory postoperative clinical observation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techn...

  3. Medical complications of bariatric surgery: focus on malabsorption and dumping syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Heinz F

    2012-01-01

    Gastroenterologists increasingly see patients with symptoms after bariatric surgery. A number of gastrointestinal or extra-gastrointestinal symptoms should raise the suspicion of malabsorption or dumping syndrome. Little is known about long-term consequences of disordered intestinal anatomy and physiology resulting from bariatric surgical procedures. The latency phase of clinical problems is unknown, but may potentially be long, and postoperative courses over many decades have to be considered regarding the consequences of surgical alterations of gastrointestinal structure and function. Long-term nutritional requirements in patients with bariatric procedures are incompletely understood. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of long-limb Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) because it has become the most common bariatric procedure in many parts of the world. Although several potential mechanisms for nutritional deficiencies after RYGB like deficiency of dietary intake, lack of gastric secretions, exclusion of proximal duodenum and jejunum, or asynergia between food bolus and biliopancreatic secretions have been postulated, it was only very recently that in-depth studies have been carried out to measure the extent to which the long-limb RYGB causes malabsorption. In order to improve care for these patients, specialists who are trained in understanding pathophysiological changes in digestion and absorption after bariatric surgery and who recognize and treat clinical symptoms and nutritional deficits after bariatric surgery are needed. In addition, clinical researchers should take advantage of the experimental setups provided by standardized surgical procedures, and scientific societies should design courses and scientific meetings which combine the expertise in gastroenterology, surgery and nutrition. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Older adults fighting obesity with bariatric surgery: Benefits, side effects, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy L Marihart

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aging population is growing exponentially worldwide. Associated with this greater life expectancy is the increased burden of chronic health conditions, many of which are exacerbated by the continued rise in obesity. In the US, the prevalence of obesity in adults aged 60 years and older increased from 23.6% to 37% in 2010. Objectives: This review examines bariatric surgery as a treatment option for obese adults > 60 years old. The most common types of weight-loss surgery are laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and the duodenal switch. Methods: A comprehensive literature search found 349 articles that referred to bariatric surgery in older adults. Of these, 70 relevant articles on bariatric surgery for older adults were utilized for this article. Results: Weight-loss surgery procedures were found to be equally safe for both older adults and their younger counterparts. Pre-surgical psychological assessment is critical for positive outcomes for older adults. Benefits of bariatric surgery include a decrease in comorbidities, chronic disease risk, and medication use coupled with improved mobility and quality of life outcomes. Side effects include surgical failure, changes in psychological status, and increased physical and mental stress. Conclusions: Bariatric surgery can offer patients an effective and long-lasting treatment for obesity and related diseases. There does not appear to be any one bariatric procedure that is recommended for older adults, so individual needs should be taken into consideration when exploring options. Costs range from US$17,000 for laparoscopic procedures to US$26,000 for open gastric surgeries. Estimated savings start accruing within 3 months of surgery making bariatric surgery a serious cost saving consideration.

  5. Endoscopic extraction of adjustable gastric bands after intragastric migration as a complication of bariatric surgery: technique and advice

    OpenAIRE

    Collado-Pacheco, David; R?bago-Torre, Luis Ramon; Arias-Rivera, Maria; Ortega-Carbonel, Alejandro; Olivares-Valles, Ana; Alonso-Prada, Alicia; V?zquez-Echarri, Jaime; Herrera-Merino, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery has been the method most widely used to manage the extraction of gastric bands with inclusion as a late complication of bariatric surgery; however, surgical extraction entails morbidity and limits future surgical procedures. The development of endoscopic techniques has provided an important means of improving the treatment of this complication, enabling minimally invasive and safe procedures that have a high success rate. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of ...

  6. PRE- AND POSTOPERATIVE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: SOME BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    TEDESCO, Amanda Kaseker; BIAZOTTO, Rafaela; GEBARA, Telma Souza e Silva; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The bariatric surgery may cause some nutritional deficiencies. Aim: To compare the serum levels of biochemical markers, in iimmediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods: Non-concurrent prospective cross-sectional study. The analysis investigated data in medical charts of pre-surgical and immediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery, focusing total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerid...

  7. Patient Selection and Surgical Management of High-Risk Patients with Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Guerron, A; Portenier, Dana D

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective way to improve comorbidities related to obesity. Since the introduction of minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery in the bariatric surgery techniques, the number of procedures has increased substantially; advances in techniques and the transition from open to minimally invasive procedures have decreased morbidity and mortality. Multidisciplinary teams in charge of the operative planning, surgical act, and postoperative recovery are determinant in the success of the management of high-risk bariatric patients; careful identification and preoperative management of these higher-risk patients is crucial in decreasing complications after weight loss surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical and procedural skills training at medical school - a national review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Toll, Edward C; Bates, Anthony S; Cole, Matthew D; Smith, Frank C T

    2014-01-01

    This national study quantifies procedural and surgical skills training at medical schools in the United Kingdom (UK), a stipulated requirement of all graduates by the General Medical Council (GMC). A questionnaire recorded basic procedural and surgical skills training provided by medical schools and surgical societies in the UK. Skills were extracted from (1) GMC Tomorrows Doctors and (2) The Royal College of Surgeons Intercollegiate Basic Surgical Skills (BSS) course. Data from medical school curricula and extra-curricular student surgical societies were compared against the national GMC guidelines and BSS course content. Data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Representatives from 23 medical schools completed the survey (71.9% response). Thirty one skills extracted from the BSS course were split into 5 categories, with skills content cross referenced against GMC documentation. Training of surgical skills by medical schools was as follows: Gowning and gloving (72.8%), handling instruments (29.4%), knot tying (17.4%), suturing (24.7%), other surgical techniques (4.3%). Surgical societies provided significantly more training of knot tying (64.4%, P = 0.0013) and suturing (64.5%, P = 0.0325) than medical schools. Medical schools provide minimal basic surgical skills training, partially supplemented by extracurricular student surgical societies. Our findings suggest senior medical students do not possess simple surgical and procedural skills. Newly qualified doctors are at risk of being unable to safely perform practical procedures, contradicting GMC Guidelines. We propose a National Undergraduate Curriculum in Surgery and Surgical Skills to equip newly qualified doctors with basic procedural skills to maximise patient safety. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical revision of loop ("mini") gastric bypass procedure: multicenter review of complications and conversions to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William H; Fernanadez, Adolfo Z; Farrell, Timothy M; Macdonald, Kenneth G; Grant, John P; McMahon, Ross L; Pryor, Aurora D; Wolfe, Luke G; DeMaria, Eric J

    2007-01-01

    The claim that the "mini"-gastric bypass (MGB) procedure with its loop gastrojejunostomy is safer and equally effective to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure has been promoted before validation. Rumors of unreported complications and the accuracy of follow-up are additional concerns. This study was undertaken to identify MGB patients who require or required revisional surgery at 5 hospitals within the region of the United States where the MGB procedure originated to assess the claim that revision to RYGB is rarely needed. The databases of 5 medical centers were retrospectively searched to identify patients undergoing surgical revision after a MGB procedure, all of which had been done elsewhere. A total of 32 patients were identified who presented with complications after undergoing an MGB procedure and required or require revisional surgery. The complications included gastrojejunostomy leak in 3, bile reflux in 20, intractable marginal ulcer in 5, malabsorption/malnutrition in 8, and weight gain in 2. Of the 32 patients, 21 required conversion to RYGB and an additional 5 have planned revisions in the future. Also, 2 patients were treated with Braun enteroenterostomies and 4 required 1 or more abdominal explorations. The results of this preliminary review have confirmed that MGB does require revision in some patients and that conversion to RYGB is a common form of revision. A national registry to record the complications and number of revisions is proposed to gain insight into the need for revision after MGB and other nontraditional bariatric procedures.

  10. Attitudes about the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery among patients with type 2 diabetes and a body mass index of 30-40 kg/m2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Ritter, Scott; Wadden, Thomas A; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Vetter, Marion L; Moore, Reneé H

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing awareness within the medical community about the benefits of bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), little is known about patients' attitudes toward bariatric surgery as a treatment for T2DM. The objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of individuals with T2DM and a body mass index of 30 to 40 kg/m(2) concerning bariatric surgery for the treatment of T2DM. Patients identified from the Pennsylvania Integrated Clinical and Administrative Research Database (PICARD) were surveyed about perceptions of the safety profile and efficacy of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and T2DM and their willingness to be randomly assigned to receive a surgical procedure. A total of 130 individuals of 513 (25.3%) responded. Respondents had a median (interquartile range) age of 58.0 (range 51.0-63.0) years and self-reported body mass index of 32.9 (range 30.9-35.2) kg/m(2). Roughly half (66 of 130) were female. Overall, only 20.3% of respondents had positive views of bariatric surgery, with few reporting that it is a safe (14.3%) and effective (28.5%) treatment for T2DM. Less than 20% of respondents were willing to be randomly assigned to undergo a surgical procedure for the treatment of diabetes (16.1%) or obesity (17.5%). Few obese individuals with T2DM who responded to the survey had positive views about bariatric surgery. Patients' concerns about the procedure's safety profile and efficacy must be addressed to improve the acceptability of bariatric surgery as well as the feasibility of randomized, controlled trials of bariatric surgery for these individuals. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective and efficient learning in the operating theater with intraoperative video-enhanced surgical procedure training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Det, M.J.; Meijerink, W.J.; Hoff, C.; Middel, B.; Pierie, J.P.

    INtraoperative Video Enhanced Surgical procedure Training (INVEST) is a new training method designed to improve the transition from basic skills training in a skills lab to procedural training in the operating theater. Traditionally, the master-apprentice model (MAM) is used for procedural training

  12. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23% participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P=0.03 and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P=0.0069. Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery.

  13. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m(2), P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery.

  14. Surgical management of hepatocellular carcinoma after Fontan procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Steve; Scovel, Lauren; Yeh, Matthew; Dorsey, David; Dembo, Gregory; Krieger, Eric V; Bakthavatsalam, Ramassmy; Park, James O; Riggle, Kevin M; Riehle, Kimberly J; Yeung, Raymond S

    2015-06-01

    The Fontan operation has successfully prolonged the lives of patients born with single-ventricle physiology. A long-term consequence of post-Fontan elevation in systemic venous pressure and low cardiac output is chronic liver inflammation and cirrhosis, which lead to an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Surgical management of patients with post-Fontan physiology and HCC is challenging, as the requirement for adequate preload in order to sustain cardiac output conflicts with the low central venous pressure (CVP) that minimizes blood loss during hepatectomy. Consequently, liver resection is rarely performed, and most reports describe nonsurgical treatments for locoregional control of the tumors in these patients. Here, we present a multidisciplinary approach to a successful surgical resection of a HCC in a patient with Fontan physiology.

  15. Comparison of hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of wound infection after clean surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalique, M.S.; Shukr, I.; Khalique, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To compare hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of infections after clean surgical procedures. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Rawalpindi from 22 Jan 2010 to 22 Aug 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 400 patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were randomly allocated in two equal groups, A and B by lottery method. In group A. simple gauze dressing was applied after clean surgical procedures while in group B hydrocolloid dressing was used. On 7th post operative day, patients were observed for presence of infection. Results: Mean age of sample was 42.08 +-11.112 years. In group A out of 200 Patients, 14 (7.0%) while in group B 10 (5%) developed infection postoperatively (p=0.709). Conclusion: There is no difference in the rate of infection when using a gauze dressing or a hydrocolloid dressing after clean surgical procedure. (author)

  16. Chronic subdural hematoma : a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    Object. In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods. The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting

  17. Novel surgical procedures in glaucoma: advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippopoulos, Theodoros; Rhee, Douglas J

    2008-03-01

    Despite late modifications and enhancements, traditional penetrating glaucoma surgery is not without complications and is reserved for patients in whom pharmacologic treatment and/or laser trabeculoplasty do not suffice to control the intraocular pressure. This article critically reviews recent advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery with particular attention paid to two novel surgical approaches: ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome and implantation of the Ex-PRESS shunt. Ab interno trabeculectomy (Trabectome) achieves a sustained 30% reduction in intraocular pressure by focally ablating and cauterizing the trabecular meshwork/inner wall of Schlemm's canal. It has a remarkable safety profile with respect to early hypotonous or infectious complications as it does not generate a bleb, but it can be associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may necessitate additional glaucoma surgery. The Ex-PRESS shunt is more commonly implanted under a partial thickness scleral flap, and appears to have similar efficacy to standard trabeculectomy offering some advantages with respect to the rate of early complications related to hypotony. Penetrating glaucoma surgery will continue to evolve. As prospective randomized clinical trials become available, we will determine the exact role of these surgical techniques in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium.

  18. Ophthalmic Complications of Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo Guerreiro, R; Ribeiro, R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is increasing vastly in the world, and the number of bariatric surgeries being performed is also increasing. Patients being submitted to bariatric surgeries, especially malabsorptive procedures, have an increased risk of developing nutrient deficiencies, which can culminate in symptomatic hypovitaminosis, if supplementation is not done correctly. The eye and the optic system need an adequate level of several vitamins and minerals to perform properly, especially vitamin A, and this art...

  19. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Bruce M; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-05-27

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health, which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by nonsurgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the comorbidities, quality of life, and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea, and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors after weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality after weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed, and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Leach Matthew C; Flecknell Paul A; Coulter Claire A; Richardson Claire A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgi...

  1. Is Elective Gastroscopy Prior to Bariatric Surgery in an Asian Cohort Worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jing Yu; Cheng, Anton K S; Kim, Guowei; Kong, Lucy W C; Soe, Khin T; Lomanto, Davide; So, Jimmy B Y; Shabbir, Asim

    2016-09-01

    The preoperative use of gastroscopy for patients undergoing bariatric surgery remains controversial. We aim to evaluate the diagnostic yield of gastroscopy and the clinical significance in asymptomatic individuals undergoing bariatric surgery in Asia. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients undergoing gastroscopy prior to bariatric surgery at the National University Hospital and Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore, between Jan 2006 and June 2013. Gastroscopy findings were classified into four groups: group 1 (normal study), group 2 (abnormal findings that do not modify surgical approach), group 3 (abnormal findings that modify surgical approach) and group 4 (absolute contraindications to immediate surgery). During the study period, 208 asymptomatic individuals were evaluated by gastroscopy prior to bariatric surgery. Gastroscopy was normal in 70 (33.6 %). Group 2 comprised 67 (32.2 %) patients with mild gastritis or oesophagitis. Group 3 included 69 (33.2 %) patients diagnosed with erosive gastritis or oesophagitis, peptic ulcer disease, hiatal hernia or mass lesions. There were 2 patients (1.0 %) in group 4. One patient had a gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, and 1 had a gastrointestinal stroma tumour. In group 3, modification of surgical approach included concurrent hiatal hernia repair, institution of medical therapy with delay in surgery, further evaluation of mass lesions and change in choice of surgical procedures. Routine gastroscopy for asymptomatic bariatric patients has a high diagnostic yield. Given the high percentage of patients with clinically important lesions, our current experience supports the use of routine preoperative gastroscopy prior to bariatric surgery in Singapore.

  2. Catheter for Cleaning Surgical Optics During Surgical Procedures: A Possible Solution for Residue Buildup and Fogging in Video Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Igor Renato Louro Bruno; Abrão, Fernando Conrado; Silva, Alessandra Rodrigues; Corrêa, Larissa Teresa Cirera; Younes, Riad Nain

    2015-05-01

    Currently, there is a tendency to perform surgical procedures via laparoscopic or thoracoscopic access. However, even with the impressive technological advancement in surgical materials, such as improvement in quality of monitors, light sources, and optical fibers, surgeons have to face simple problems that can greatly hinder surgery by video. One is the formation of "fog" or residue buildup on the lens, causing decreased visibility. Intracavitary techniques for cleaning surgical optics and preventing fog formation have been described; however, some of these techniques employ the use of expensive and complex devices designed solely for this purpose. Moreover, these techniques allow the cleaning of surgical optics when they becomes dirty, which does not prevent the accumulation of residue in the optics. To solve this problem we have designed a device that allows cleaning the optics with no surgical stops and prevents the fogging and residue accumulation. The objective of this study is to evaluate through experimental testing the effectiveness of a simple device that prevents the accumulation of residue and fogging of optics used in surgical procedures performed through thoracoscopic or laparoscopic access. Ex-vivo experiments were performed simulating the conditions of residue presence in surgical optics during a video surgery. The experiment consists in immersing the optics and catheter set connected to the IV line with crystalloid solution in three types of materials: blood, blood plus fat solution, and 200 mL of distilled water and 1 vial of methylene blue. The optics coupled to the device were immersed in 200 mL of each type of residue, repeating each immersion 10 times for each distinct residue for both thirty and zero degrees optics, totaling 420 experiments. A success rate of 98.1% was observed after the experiments, in these cases the device was able to clean and prevent the residue accumulation in the optics.

  3. Surgical procedures in liver transplant patients: A monocentric retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommacale, Daniele; Nagarajan, Ganesh; Lhuaire, Martin; Dondero, Federica; Pessaux, Patrick; Piardi, Tullio; Sauvanet, Alain; Kianmanesh, Reza; Belghiti, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    Pre-existing chronic liver diseases and the complexity of the transplant surgery procedures lead to a greater risk of further surgery in transplanted patients compared to the general population. The aim of this monocentric retrospective cohort study was to assess the epidemiology of surgical complications in liver transplanted patients who require further surgical procedures and to characterize their post-operative risk of complications to enhance their medical care. From January 1997 to December 2011, 1211 patients underwent orthotropic liver transplantation in our center. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was performed considering patients who underwent surgical procedures more than three months after transplantation. We recorded liver transplantation technique, type of surgery, post-operative complications, time since the liver transplant and immunosuppressive regimens. Among these, 161 patients (15%) underwent a further 183 surgical procedures for conditions both related and unrelated to the transplant. The most common surgical procedure was for an incisional hernia repair (n = 101), followed by bilioenteric anastomosis (n = 44), intestinal surgery (n = 23), liver surgery (n = 8) and other surgical procedures (n = 7). Emergency surgery was required in 19 procedures (10%), while 162 procedures (90%) were performed electively. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were 1% and 30%, respectively. According to the Dindo-Clavien classification, the most common grade of morbidity was grade III (46%), followed by grade II (40%). Surgical procedures on liver transplanted patients are associated with a significantly high risk of complications, irrespective of the time elapsed since transplantation. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Percentage Pathological Findings in Obese Patients Suggest that Esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy Should Be Made Mandatory Prior to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Mizelle; Bhasker, Aparna Govil; Kantharia, Nimisha S; Lakdawala, Muffazal

    2018-04-21

    ᅟ: Obesity is a global epidemic and will soon become the number one priority in healthcare management. Bariatric surgery causes a significant improvement in obesity and its related complications. Pre-operative esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) is done by several bariatric surgical teams across the world but is still not mandatory. To study the percentage of symptomatic and asymptomatic pathological EGD findings in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery and to analyze whether these findings influence the eventual choice of bariatric surgery. All patients posted for bariatric surgery at our institute from January 2015 to March 2017 had a pre-operative EGD done by the same team of endoscopists. In this study, totally, 675 patients were assessed prior to routine bariatric surgery. 78.52% of all pre-operative patients had an abnormal EGD. The most common endoscopic abnormalities found were hiatus hernia (52.44%), gastritis (46.22%), presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori (46.67%), reflux esophagitis (16.89%), Barrett's esophagus (1.78%), gastric erosions (13.19%), and polyps (7.41%). Fifty patients had upper gastrointestinal polyps: 41 in the stomach, 3 in the esophagus, and 6 in the duodenum, mostly benign hyperplastic or inflammatory polyps. Two patients had gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 6 leiomyoma, and 6 neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Of those with endoscopic evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 70 (60.03%) of patients were asymptomatic. The pre-operative EGD findings resulted in a change of the planned surgical procedure in 67 (9.93%) patients. Our study suggests that a large percentage of patients undergoing bariatric surgery have pathologically significant endoscopic findings of which a significant number are asymptomatic; this can lead to a change in the planned bariatric procedure in a section of patients; hence, we believe that EGD should be made mandatory as a pre-operative investigation in all bariatric surgery patients.

  5. Use of Home Parenteral Nutrition in Post-Bariatric Surgery-Related Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Davidson, Jacob B; McMahon, Megan T; Bonnes, Sara L; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective techniques for achieving sustained weight loss but can be associated with surgical complications or malabsorption so significant that it leads to malnutrition. Parenteral nutrition (PN) may be necessary to help treat surgical complications or malnutrition from these procedures. There are limited data describing this patient population and role for home PN (HPN). A retrospective review of our HPN database was conducted to identify patients who were initiated on HPN between January 1, 2003, and August 31, 2015, and had a history of bariatric surgery. A total of 54 HPN patients (6.3%) had a history of bariatric surgery. Average age was 52.1 ± 12.8 years, and 80% were female. The most common surgical procedure was Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (72%), with malnutrition or failure to thrive being the most common HPN indication (57%). Weight at the time of HPN initiation was 71.9 ± 20.4 kg and significantly increased to 78.9 ± 24.4 kg by the end of treatment ( P = .0001). Serum albumin levels rose from 2.8 ± 0.77 g/dL to 3.7 ± 0.58 g/dL by the end of HPN ( P surgery. The results of this retrospective review support initiation of HPN in the malnourished post-bariatric surgery patient both nutritionally and as a bridge to revision surgery.

  6. Large Bariatric-Specific Stents and Over-the-Scope Clips in the Management of Post-Bariatric Surgery Leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Hany; Abdallah, Emad; Gawdat, Khaled; Elattar, Inas

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic stents are successful in the management of surgical leaks; however, stent migration remains a significant problem. In this study, we present our approach depending on a large bariatrics-specific stent (Mega stent) and over-the-scope clips in the management of post-bariatric surgery leaks. A retrospective analysis of all patients with post-bariatric surgery leaks treated at our institution using an approach reliant on Mega stents and over-the-scope clips was conducted. Potential factors associated with procedure success and occurrence of complications were also evaluated. A total of 81 stents were inserted in 62 patients with post-bariatric surgery leaks, 46 sleeve gastrectomies (73%) and 16 Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (27%). Over-the-scope clips were applied in 29 patients (46%). Leak closure was achieved in 51 patients (82%). Median number of procedures per patient was 3 (range 2-8). Complications included the following: stent migration (11/62, 18%), intolerance necessitating premature removal (7/62, 11%), esophageal stricture (8/62, 13%), bleeding (4/62, 6%), perforation (4/62, 6%). One stent-induced mortality was encountered (bleeding). The presence of open surgery (vs laparoscopic) was significantly associated with the occurrence of stent-induced complications (p 0.002). The approach combining Mega stents and over-the-scope clips is highly effective in the management of post-bariatric surgery leaks and is associated with a low rate of stent migration and a low number of procedures and stents per patient. Mega stents, however, should be used with great caution due to the significant morbidity associated with their use.

  7. Preoperative thiamine deficiency in obese population undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrodeguas, Lester; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Szomstein, Samuel; Antozzi, Priscila; Rosenthal, Raul

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are a recognized complication of bariatric surgery. Thiamine deficiency has been reported as a possible consequence of both restrictive and malabsorptive bariatric procedures. Most of the reported cases occurred after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; fewer were described after biliopancreatic diversion, vertical banded gastroplasty, or duodenal switch. Adults who have a high carbohydrate intake derived mainly from refined sugars and milled rice are at greater risk of developing thiamine deficiency, because thiamine is absent from fats, oils, and refined sugars. Currently, no reports have evaluated the preoperative thiamine status of bariatric patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of thiamine deficiency in obese patients before bariatric surgery at our institution. The medical records of consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding at our institution between March 2003 and February 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were selected for this study on the basis of predetermined criteria. Preoperative thiamine levels were retrospectively recorded. Excluded from this study were patients who had been taking multivitamins or other nutritional supplements before surgical intervention, had a history of frequent alcohol consumption, any malabsorptive diseases, or previous restrictive-malabsorptive surgical interventions, such as RYGB, biliopancreatic diversion, or adjustable gastric banding, according to the initial evaluation and questionnaire. Of 437 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, 303 were included in the study. Forty-seven patients (15.5%) presented with low preoperative thiamine levels. The mean age and body mass index of these patients was 46 years and 60 kg/m(2), respectively. Male patients presented with greater mean preoperative thiamine levels (3.2 microg /dL) than female patients (2

  8. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-11-07

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techniques have contributed to reduced operative time, length of stay, and complications. The development in bariatric surgery has been exceptional, resulting in a dramatic increase of the number of procedures performed world wide during the last decades. Although, a complex bariatric procedure can be performed with operative mortality no greater than cholecystectomy, specific procedure-related complications and other drawbacks must be taken into account. The evolution of laparoscopy will be the legacy of the 21(st) century and at present, day-care surgery and further reduction of the operative trauma is in focus. The impressive effects on comorbid conditions have prompted the adoption of minimal invasive bariatric procedures into the field of metabolic surgery.

  9. Which postoperative complications matter most after bariatric surgery? Prioritizing quality improvement efforts to improve national outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Christopher R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Tu, Chao; Petrick, Anthony T; Morton, John M; Schauer, Philip R; Aminian, Ali

    2018-01-12

    National quality programs have been implemented to decrease the burden of adverse events on key outcomes in bariatric surgery. However, it is not well understood which complications have the most impact on patient health. To quantify the impact of specific bariatric surgery complications on key clinical outcomes. The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) database. Data from patients who underwent primary bariatric procedures were retrieved from the MBSAQIP 2015 participant use file. The impact of 8 specific complications (bleeding, venous thromboembolism [VTE], leak, wound infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, myocardial infarction, and stroke) on 5 main 30-day outcomes (end-organ dysfunction, reoperation, intensive care unit admission, readmission, and mortality) was estimated using risk-adjusted population attributable fractions. The population attributable fraction is a calculated measure taking into account the prevalence and severity of each complication. The population attributable fractions represents the percentage reduction in a given outcome that would occur if that complication were eliminated. In total, 135,413 patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (67%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (29%), adjustable gastric banding (3%), and duodenal switch (1%) were included. The most common complications were bleeding (.7%), wound infection (.5%), urinary tract infection (.3%), VTE (.3%), and leak (.2%). Bleeding and leak were the largest contributors to 3 of 5 examined outcomes. VTE had the greatest effect on readmission and mortality. This study quantifies the impact of specific complications on key surgical outcomes after bariatric surgery. Bleeding and leak were the complications with the largest overall effect on end-organ dysfunction, reoperation, and intensive care unit admission after bariatric surgery. Furthermore, our findings suggest that an initiative targeting reduction of post-bariatric surgery

  10. Influence of a rural environment on patient access and outcomes for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Kristie L; Cox, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E

    2017-04-01

    Despite a higher rate of obesity in rural populations, there is a 23% decrease in performed bariatric procedures. The influence of a rural environment on surgical outcomes and treatment efficacy is unknown. We retrospectively reviewed all bariatric surgeries performed in a large university hospital in West Virginia from September 2012 to September 2014. Patients were categorized based on their rural-urban commuting area codes. Subject demographic characteristics, insurance provider, type of surgery, completion of program, preoperative body mass index (BMI), percent excess weight loss (%EWL), and percent total weight loss (%TWL) at 6 and 12 months postoperatively, and follow-up appointment attendance were collected. Logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted. A total of 122 patients were evaluated with 82 receiving surgery. Of these patients, 77 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 5 had Sleeve Gastrectomy. Nine patients out of 82 were lost to follow-up at 6 months (n = 73), and 12 patients out of 62 were lost to follow-up at 12 months (n = 50). Rural patients were .283 times less likely to receive bariatric surgery, (P = .004). However, this relationship was confounded by insurance provider; after controlling for this variable, the relationship between rural status and surgery completion was nonsignificant (P = .066). Rural status did not predict change in BMI, %EWL, or %TWL at 6 months (P = .738; P = .848; P = .334) or 12 months (P = .902; P = .143; P = .195), or compliance for follow-up appointments (P = .232). Rural bariatric patients seem to have decreased success at completing bariatric programs, which is likely confounded by insurance type. Yet, when the rural patient is able to realize the benefits of bariatric surgery, their outcomes are unchanged compared with urban patients. Although the study is limited by sample size, it highlights the need for reducing obstacles for bariatric surgery in an already underserved population, the rural community

  11. Pregnancy Following Bariatric Surgery-Medical Complications and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ram Prakash; Syed, Akheel A

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is most commonly carried out in women of childbearing age. Whilst fertility rates are improved, pregnancy following bariatric surgery poses several challenges. Whilst rates of many adverse maternal and foetal outcomes in obese women are reduced after bariatric surgery, pregnancy is best avoided for 12-24 months to reduce the potential risk of intrauterine growth retardation. Dumping syndromes are common after bariatric surgery and can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in pregnancy. Early dumping occurs due to osmotic fluid shifts resulting from rapid gastrointestinal food transit, whilst late dumping is characterized by a hyperinsulinemic response to rapid absorption of simple carbohydrates. Dietary measures are the mainstay of management of dumping syndromes but pharmacotherapy may sometimes become necessary. Acarbose is the least hazardous pharmacological option for the management of postprandial hypoglycemia in pregnancy. Nutrient deficiencies may vary depending on the type of surgery; it is important to optimize the nutritional status of women prior to and during pregnancy. Dietary management should include adequate protein and calorie intake and supplementation of vitamins and micronutrients. A high clinical index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of surgical complications of prior weight loss procedures during pregnancy, including small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, gastric band erosion or migration and cholelithiasis.

  12. Is bariatric surgery safe in the elderly population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirante, Federico Perez; Montorfano, Lisandro; Rammohan, Rajmohan; Dhanabalsamy, Nisha; Lee, Aaron; Szomstein, Samuel; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2017-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven to be the most effective treatment for morbid obesity in all age groups and is considered superior to medical treatment. The aim of our study was to report the outcomes of bariatric surgery in patients over 65 years of age at our institution. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted of all patients > 65 years who underwent a bariatric procedure between 2005 and 2015 at our institution. We compared this group to a control group of patients 65 years of age at time of surgery. There was a significant difference in proportion of male patients among groups; 42 % in Group B were male compared to 30 % in Group A (p Elderly patients had longer length of stay (LOS) by one day on average (LOS = 3 days, p Elderly patients are usually sicker in terms of comorbidities than the younger population. However, age does not seem to represent a risk of surgical complications after bariatric surgery.

  13. Safety of the surgeon: 'Double-gloving' during surgical procedures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surgeon and the first assistant double-gloved in all the 1 050 procedures performed between 2009 and 2013, and ... physician's hands.[1]. Recently, the protection of physicians and other medical personnel from the percutaneous transmission of HIV, hepatitis-B virus and other pathogens by direct contact with infected ...

  14. Factors Leading to Self-Removal from the Bariatric Surgery Program After Attending the Orientation Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Binghao; Kastanias, Patti; Wang, Wei; Okraniec, Allan; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery orientation sessions are often the first point of contact and a recommended component of pre-bariatric surgery assessment. Self-removal rates after bariatric program orientation are as high as 25 % despite the proven efficacy of this procedure. The objective of this study was to identify factors contributing to patient self-removal after orientation using a mixed method approach. Patients who attended the Toronto Western Hospital Bariatric Surgery Program orientation between 2012 and 2013 and then self-removed from the program (N = 216) were included in the study. Subjects were interviewed via telephone using a semi-structured interview guide, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Factors leading to discontinuation were rated on a five-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was analyzed using constant comparative methodology. The response rate was 59 % with a 40.7 % completion rate (N = 88). Concerns about potential surgical risks and complications and the ability to adapt to changes in eating and drinking post-operatively were identified as the top two factors for patients' self-removal from the program. Thematic analysis uncovered 11 major themes related to patient self-removal. Unexpected themes include perceived personal suitability for the surgery, family impact of surgery, miscommunication with the family physician, and fears related to the orientation information. This is one of the first studies examining barriers to bariatric surgery in the pre-operative setting and offers new insights into the reasons patients self-remove from bariatric surgery programs. This study may inform bariatric orientation program changes resulting in improved access to this effective surgical intervention.

  15. [E-learning in surgical procedure manuals and blogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape-Köhler, C; Chmelik, C; Heiss, M M; Jauch, K W

    2010-01-01

    E-learning is the constant companion for every surgeon in the initial years of training. Later they will be mostly used as reliable reference works. With the spread of computers and the possibilities of the World Wide Web there is an increasingly large selection of electronic learning options on the market. In this review the most important current surgical e-learning options will be presented. Inclusion criteria were determined according to a defined term which must be fulfilled for e-learning in operation techniques. Options were identified by an online search and analyzed using a criteria catalogue. This catalogue contained a total of 31 criteria for the fields of "content presentation", "infrastructure" and "evaluation". A differentiation was made between online and offline options. A total of five online and five offline options which fulfilled the inclusion criteria could be identified. None of the options currently encompass a similarly high number of operations compared to those offered in conventional operation textbooks. The use and combination of media, such as video and animation, are limited to online options and are available in various forms and combinations. The use of options is mostly free of charge and at most registration is necessary. Some of the options are multilingual. The range of e-learning options for general and visceral surgical operations is at present still limited and reduced to a few platforms. The scientific content and validity of the contents are not always guaranteed. It remains to be seen how the options presented here will develop further and what the results of the necessary scientific evaluation will be.

  16. Technical and surgical aspects of the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) microstimulator insertion procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A T; Hillerup, S; Rostgaard, J

    2016-01-01

    procedure. Perioperative surgical sequelae included sensory disturbances, pain, and swelling. Follow-up procedures included placement of a second microstimulator on the opposite side (n=2), adjustment of the microstimulator lead location (n=13), re-placement after initial unsuccessful placement (n=1...

  17. Nutritional considerations after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    Malnutrition is a risk that is associated with all bariatric surgeries. Malnutrition is largely preventable after these surgeries if proper patient selection, thorough preoperative nutrition education, and postoperative nutritional follow-up take place along with patient compliance. Bariatric surgery is divided into 2 major categories: restrictive or malabsorptive (with or without the restrictive aspect). The more dramatic weight loss is generally associated with procedures that are malabsorptive in nature. There is an increased risk of specific nutritional deficiencies associated with these surgeries. With proper supplementation these deficiencies are largely avoidable. This article reviews the more common bariatric surgeries and the nutritional considerations associated specifically with each surgery. The article then summarizes the typical diet advancement schedule and reviews critical care nutrition in regards to total parenteral nutrition administration for the morbidly obese individual, following bariatric surgery.

  18. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  19. Bariatric surgery for severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugerman, H J

    2001-07-01

    Severe obesity is associated with multiple comorbidities and is refractory to dietary management with or without behavioral or drug therapies. There are a number of surgical procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity, including purely gastric restrictive, a combination of malabsorption and gastric restriction or primary malabsorption. The purely gastric restrictive procedures, including vertical banded gastroplasty and laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding, do not provide adequate weight loss. African-American patients do especially poorly after the banding procedure with the loss of only 11% of excess weight in one study. Gastric bypass (GBP) is associated with the loss of 66% of excess weight at 1 to 2 years after surgery, 60% at 5 years and 50% at 10 years. For unknown reasons, African-American patients lose significantly less weight than Caucasians after GBP. There is a risk of micronutrient deficiencies after GBP, including iron deficiency anemia in menstruating women, vitamin B12, and calcium deficiencies. Prophylactic supplementation of these nutrients is necessary. Recurrent vomiting after bariatric surgery may be associated with a severe polyneuropathy and must be aggressively treated with endoscopic dilatation before this complication is allowed to develop. The malabsorptive procedures include the partial biliopancreatic bypass (BPD) and BPD with duodenal switch (BPD/DS). The BPD appears to cause severe protein-calorie malnutrition in American patients; the BPD/DS may be associated with less malnutrition. Weight loss failure after GBP does not respond to tightening a dilated gastrojejunal stoma or reducing the size of the gastric pouch. These patients may require conversion to a malabsorptive distal GBP, similar to the BPD. However, because of the risk of severe protein-calorie malnutrition and calcium deficiency BPD should be reserved for patients with severe obesity comorbidity. The risk of death following bariatric surgery is between 1

  20. Identifying Barriers to Appropriate Use of Metabolic/Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment: Policy Lab Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jennifer K.; Hesketh, Rachel; Martin, Adam; Herman, William H.; Rubino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, few patients who may be appropriate candidates and may benefit from this type of surgery avail themselves of this treatment option. To identify conceptual and practical barriers to appropriate use of surgical procedures, a Policy Lab was hosted at the 3rd World Congress on Interventional Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes on 29 September 2015. Twenty-six stakeholders participated in the Policy Lab, including academics, clinicians, policy-makers, industry leaders, and patient representatives. Participants were provided with a summary of available evidence about the cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery and the costs of increasing the use of bariatric/metabolic surgery, using U.K. and U.S. scenarios as examples of distinct health care systems. There was widespread agreement among this group of stakeholders that bariatric/metabolic surgery is a legitimate and cost-effective approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes in obese patients. The following four building blocks were identified to facilitate policy changes: 1) communicating the scale of the costs and harms associated with rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes; 2) properly articulating the role of bariatric/metabolic surgery for certain population groups; 3) identifying new funding sources for bariatric/metabolic surgery; and 4) incorporating bariatric/metabolic surgery into the appropriate clinical pathways. Although more research is needed to identify specific clinical scenarios for the prioritization of bariatric/metabolic surgery, the case appears to be strong enough to engage relevant policy-makers and practitioners in a concerted discussion of how to better use metabolic surgical resources in conjunction with other interventions in good diabetes practice. PMID:27222554

  1. [Safety and accuracy of surgical procedures: case law evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Gaudin, A; Lermite, E; Arnaud, J-P; Penneau, M

    2008-01-01

    Surgeons, like other doctors, practice their profession within a framework of contractual liability defined by statute in 1936. This established that the doctor was subject to a contractual obligation to provide appropriate and diligent care. Care and technical acts should conform to those which would have been provided by a prudent doctor within the standards of knowledge and practice of his field; care which deviates from this standard would be considered medical error or fault. This standard of care is referred to as "sound professional conduct". However, while not calling this basic principle into question, civil jurisdictions have progressively held surgeons liable whenever injury has occurred following surgical acts, without considering whether care deviates from sound professional conduct. Since 2000, judges have begun to attribute a requirement for absolute safety of results in cases where the surgeon had injured an organ unrelated to the planned operation. However it seems that the rare judgments given on this topic in the last 2-3 years have become less frequent. The creation of a compensation regime for medical accidents, via the law dated March 4, 2002, has contributed to this evolution. It is to be hoped that the flaws described in this system do not encourage jurisdictions to reconsider previous case law decisions.

  2. A new surgical procedure for hallux limitus treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Valero, José; Moreno, Manuel; Gallart, José; González, David; Salcini, Jose L.; Gordillo, Luis; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the new Double-V osteotomy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1stMPJ) in patients with hallux limitus (HL). A study of 66 patients was performed, 33 patients were treated Cheilectomy and 33 were treated Double-V. All patients underwent an assessment of the passive mobility of the 1stMPJ before the procedure, reevaluated 12 months later evaluating dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, and patients status using both the Americ...

  3. Impact of bariatric surgery on depression and anxiety symptons, bulimic behaviors and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Tae

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess psychiatric symptoms, substance use, quality of life and eating behavior of patients undergoing bariatric surgery before and after the procedure. METHODS: We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of 32 women undergoing bariatric surgery. To obtain data, the patients answered specific, self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: We observed a reduction in depressive and anxious symptoms and also in bulimic behavior, as well as an improved quality of life in the physical, psychological and environmental domains. There was also a decrease in use of antidepressants and appetite suppressants, but the surgery was not a cessation factor in smoking and / or alcoholism. CONCLUSION: a decrease in psychiatric symptoms was observed after bariatric surgery, as well as the reduction in the use of psychoactive substances. In addition, there was an improvement in quality of life after surgical treatment of obesity.

  4. Mechanisms underlying weight loss and metabolic improvements in rodent models of bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing health risk with few successful treatment options and fewer still that target both obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities. Despite ongoing scientific efforts, the most effective treatment option to date was not developed from basic research but by surgeons observing outcomes in the clinic. Bariatric surgery is the most successful treatment for significant weight loss, resolution of type 2 diabetes and the prevention of future weight gain. Recent work with animal models has shed considerable light on the molecular underpinnings of the potent effects of these ‘metabolic’ surgical procedures. Here we review data from animal models and how these studies have evolved our understanding of the critical signalling systems that mediate the effects of bariatric surgery. These insights could lead to alternative therapies able to accomplish effects similar to bariatric surgery in a less invasive manner. PMID:25374275

  5. Outcomes of bariatric surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J Esteban; Wilson, Samuel E; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2006-10-01

    The Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee recently concluded that evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in the general adult population. However, more information is needed on the role of bariatric surgery in the elderly. The aim of this study was to examine the outcome of bariatric surgery in the elderly performed at academic centers. Using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision diagnosis and procedure codes, we obtained data from the University HealthSystem Consortium Clinical Data Base for all elderly (>60 years) and nonelderly (19-60 years) patients who underwent bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity between 1999 and 2005. Outcome measures, including patient characteristics, length of stay, 30-day readmission, morbidity, and observed and expected (risk-adjusted) mortality, were compared between groups. Bariatric surgery in the elderly represents 2.7 per cent (n = 1,339) of all bariatric operations being performed at academic centers. Of the 99 University HealthSystem Consortium centers performing bariatric surgery, 78 centers (79%) perform bariatric surgery in the elderly. Compared with nonelderly patients, elderly patients who underwent bariatric surgery had more comorbidities, longer lengths of stay (4.9 days vs 3.8 days, P elderly group (0.7% vs 0.3%, P = 0.03). When risk adjusted, the observed-to-expected mortality ratio for the elderly group was 0.9. In a subset of elderly patients with a pre-existing cardiac condition (n = 236), the in-hospital mortality was 4.7 per cent. Bariatric surgery in the elderly represents only a small fraction of the number of bariatric operations performed at academic centers. Although the morbidity and mortality is higher in the elderly, bariatric surgery in the elderly is considered as safe as other gastrointestinal procedures because the observed mortality is better than the expected (risk-adjusted) mortality.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Ganji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20 patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI & (GI, Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS, Probing depth (PD, and Biologic Width (BW. Statistical Analysis Used. Student “t” Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  7. Virtual reality surgical simulation for lower urinary tract endoscopy and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyak, Michael J; Santangelo, Kristin; Hahn, James; Kaufman, Roger; Carleton, Thurston; Hua, Xing Cheng; Walsh, Raymond J

    2002-04-01

    To provide a realistic experience of lower urinary tract endoscopic procedures, we have developed and continue to expand a computer-based surgical simulator that incorporates a surgical tool interface with anatomic detail and haptic feedback. Surface-based geometric data for the lower urinary tract were generated from the National Library of Medicine Visible Human dataset. The three-dimensional texture map of the surface geometry was developed from recorded endoscopic video procedures. Geometry and associated texture maps were rendered in real time using the Silicon Graphics Extreme Impacts program. The surgical interface device incorporated all normal ranges of motion and resistance that occur within an actual operative environment. The hands-on endoscopic device attached to the interface device was provided by Circon-ACMI, Inc. Urologic residents evaluated the program for correlation with actual endoscopic procedures. Texture-mapped digitized images provided a close anatomic similarity to actual videoendoscopic images. Virtual endoscopy of the lower urinary tract was reproducible and closely simulated actual visual and tactile endoscopic experience. Virtual reality surgical simulation is feasible for a variety of lower urinary tract procedures. This system coordinates visual perception with appropriate haptic feedback in both longitudinal and rotational axes. These types of procedures may be incorporated into future educational experiences for urologists to introduce new techniques and to provide documentation of surgical experience.

  8. Post-operative bariatric surgery complications: Deficiency of nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abdul Majid Mufaqam1, Soni Dhwani Satishkumar2, Patel Palak Arvindkumar2

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since more than half of the population in America falls under the category of obesity, scientists have discovered a surgical technique to reduce the weight of the obese patients. Bariatric surgery or gastric bypass surgery is a procedure that has been successful in reducing the weight for obese people. This technique requires a permanent gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y where part of the stomach and duodenum is removed. Since the size of the stomach is reduced to 20% of its original size along with the removal of duodenum – this may lead to improper absorption of several vitamins and minerals. This review showed that several vitamins and mineral deficiencies are observed in patients, post-operative bariatric surgery. Thiamin, folate, and B12 deficiencies were most commonly observed, and Vitamin A, D, C and B6 deficiencies were also seen in some cases. Iron and calcium deficiencies were also reported by some of the studies.

  9. The Kiricuta procedure in reconstructive surgical treatment of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.F.; Bouchet, Y.; Dupre, A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 50 patients with carcinoma of the breast underwent omental transposition. This palliative procedure is indicated for recurrences after conservative treatment, radiation necrosis and Stage III or IV ulcerated tumors. The operative technique is described in detail. Omentoplasties were performed upon 33 right and 17 left mammary areas. Forty-five right pedicled flaps and only four left areas were used. One patient died on the fourth postoperative day because of massive pulmonary embolus. Local repair was satisfactory in 76 per cent of the patients. Four patients presented with herniation of the abdominal wall at the site of omental tunneling. In three, the treatment consisted of sectioning the vascular pedicle and reinforcing the parietal closure with Dacron (polyester fiber) mesh

  10. The effect of economic downturn on the volume of surgical procedures: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Nasa; Lark, Meghan E; Fujihara, Yuki; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-08-01

    Economic downturn can have a wide range of effects on medicine at both individual and national levels. We aim to describe these effects in relation to surgical volume to guide future planning for physician specialization, patient expectations in the face of economic crises, or estimating healthcare expenditure. We hypothesized that because of high out-of-pocket costs, cosmetic procedure volumes would be most affected by economic decline. A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, Embase, and ABI/INFORMS. The main search terms were "economic recession" and "surgical procedures, operative". Studies were included if surgical volumes were measured and economic indicators were used as predictors of economic conditions. Twelve studies were included, and the most common subject was cosmetic (n = 5), followed by orthopedic (n = 2) and cardiac surgeries (n = 2). The majority of studies found that in periods of economic downturn, surgical volume decreased. Among the eight studies using Pearson's correlation analysis, there were no significant differences between cosmetic procedures and other elective procedures, indicating that cosmetic procedures may display trends similar to those of non-cosmetic elective procedures in periods of economic downturn. Surgical volume generally decreased when economic indicators declined, observed for both elective and non-elective surgery fields. However, a few specific procedure volumes such as vasectomy and caesarean section for male babies increased during the economic downturn. Knowledge of these trends can be useful for future surgical planning and distribution of healthcare resources. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Surgical treatment of morbid obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasheim, Erlend T; Mala, Tom; Søvik, Torgeir T; Kristinsson, Jon; Bøhmer, Thomas

    2007-01-04

    Patients with morbid obesity are prone to weight-related disease, reduced quality of life and shortened life expectancy. Long-term weight loss is unsatisfactory with conservative treatment and weight-reducing surgery is increasingly performed in all Norwegian health regions. This review is based on electronic database searches. We describe the two procedures most commonly performed in Norway, i.e. gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, including preoperative workup and expected results after surgery. The domestic use of different surgical techniques is also outlined. In Norway, around 750 bariatric procedures were planned in 2006. Gastric bypass yields a weight reduction of 30% two years after the operative. Resolution of type 2-diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea has been demonstrated in most patients. A majority of patients report improved quality of life. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% and surgical complications occur in approximately 20%. Nutritional deficiencies are frequent. Weight loss is somewhat greater after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, but the procedure is more complex. Life-long follow-up is recommended after bariatric surgery. In selected patients with morbid obesity, bariatric surgery is a viable treatment. However, prospective long- term studies are needed.

  12. Local Anesthesia for Surgical Procedures of the Upper Eyelid Using Filling Cannula: Our Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trapasso, MD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Sometimes, after local anesthetic injection for surgical procedures of the upper eyelid, it is possible to observe superficial preseptal hematomas or excessive lid swelling that may distort the tissues and obscure surgical landmarks. We present a technique to perform local anesthesia of the upper eyelids, using a 27-gauge needle and a 26-gauge filling cannula, that may decrease the incidence of hematomas and bruising.

  13. Costs and Outcomes of Increasing Access to Bariatric Surgery: Cohort Study and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Using Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Martin C; Charlton, Judith; Prevost, Toby; Booth, Helen; Fildes, Alison; Ashworth, Mark; Littlejohns, Peter; Reddy, Marcus; Khan, Omar; Rudisill, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    To estimate costs and outcomes of increasing access to bariatric surgery in obese adults and in population subgroups of age, sex, deprivation, comorbidity, and obesity category. A cohort study was conducted using primary care electronic health records, with linked hospital utilization data, for 3,045 participants who underwent bariatric surgery and 247,537 participants who did not undergo bariatric surgery. Epidemiological analyses informed a probabilistic Markov model to compare bariatric surgery, including equal proportions with adjustable gastric banding, gastric bypass, and sleeve gastrectomy, with standard nonsurgical management of obesity. Outcomes were quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and net monetary benefits at a threshold of £30,000 per QALY. In a UK population of 250,000 adults, there may be 7,163 people with morbid obesity including 1,406 with diabetes. The immediate cost of 1,000 bariatric surgical procedures is £9.16 million, with incremental discounted lifetime health care costs of £15.26 million (95% confidence interval £15.18-£15.36 million). Patient-years with diabetes mellitus will decrease by 8,320 (range 8,123-8,502). Incremental QALYs will increase by 2,142 (range 2,032-2,256). The estimated cost per QALY gained is £7,129 (range £6,775-£7,506). Net monetary benefits will be £49.02 million (range £45.72-£52.41 million). Estimates are similar for subgroups of age, sex, and deprivation. Bariatric surgery remains cost-effective if the procedure is twice as costly, or if intervention effect declines over time. Diverse obese individuals may benefit from bariatric surgery at acceptable cost. Bariatric surgery is not cost-saving, but increased health care costs are exceeded by health benefits to obese individuals. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical outcomes of isolated tricuspid valve procedures: repair versus replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiofor, Julius I; Neely, Robert C; Yammine, Maroun; McGurk, Siobhan; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Leacche, Marzia; Cohn, Lawrence H; Shekar, Prem S

    2017-05-01

    Isolated tricuspid valve (ITV) operations are infrequent and the decision to operate is controversial. We report a series of ITV operations to outline the current disease status requiring this uncommon procedure with an emphasis on the results of tricuspid valve repair (TVr) versus replacement (TVR). Using our prospective cardiac surgery database, 57 patients who underwent ITV operations between 01/02-03/14 were identified. Median follow up time was 3.5 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.8-6.7 years]. Fifty-seven patients underwent ITV surgery with a mean age of 54.4±14.9 yrs and 61% were women. Baseline characteristics were similar between patients who underwent TVr (n=18) or TVR (n=39). The etiologies of TV dysfunction were: ITV endocarditis 14/57 (25%), persistent TV regurgitation after left-sided valve surgery in 12/57 (21%), traumatic biopsies and iatrogenic injury from pacing leads in 11/57 (19%), orthotopic heart transplant 9/57 (16%), carcinoid syndrome 3/57 (5%), congenital 2/57 (5%) and idiopathic 5/57 (9%). Overall, 32/57 (56%) patients had prior heart surgery; of which 10/32 (31%) were TV procedures. Bioprosthetic prostheses were used in 34/39 (87%) patients. Of those who had repair, 11/18 (61%) had ring annuloplasty, 3/18 (17%) bicuspidization, and 3/18 (17%) De Vega annuloplasty and one had vegetectomy. Operative mortality was 5.1% (n=2) and 16.7% (n=3) for TVR and TVr groups, respectively (P=0.32), with an overall mortality rate of 8.6%. Postoperative complications included new onset renal failure in 6/39 (15%) of TVr and 2/18 (11%) of TVR (P=0.71) and there were no strokes. Overall survival rates and degree of residual RV dysfunction were similar for the two groups (both P=0.3). Five-year survival was 77% and 84% for TVr and TVR respectively (P=0.52). There was no difference in rates of recurrent tricuspid regurgitation for TVr and TVR (35.7% vs. 23.5%, respectively, P=0.4). ITV surgery is associated with improved but still relatively high

  15. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia F. Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates.

  16. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Patrícia F; Fantoni, Denise T; Miranda, Bruna C; Matera, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva) was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates.

  17. Complications of bariatric surgery: dumping syndrome, reflux and vitamin deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jan; Deloose, Eveline

    2014-08-01

    Bariatric surgical procedure are increasingly and successfully applied in the treatment of morbid obesity. Nevertheless, these procedures are not devoid of potential long-term complications. Dumping syndrome may occur after procedures involving at least partial gastric resection or bypass, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy. Diagnosis is based on clinical alertness and glucose tolerance testing. Treatment may involve dietary measures, acarbose and somatostatin analogues, or surgical reintervention for refractory cases. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be aggravated by vertical banded gastroplasty and sleeve gastrectomy procedures, but pre-existing GERD may improve after RYGB and with adjustable gastric banding. Nutrient deficiencies constitute the most important long-term complications of bariatric interventions, as they may lead to haematological, metabolic and especially neurological disorders which are not always reversible. Malabsorptive procedures, poor postoperative nutrient intake, recurrent vomiting and poor compliance with vitamin supplement intake and regular follow-up are important risk factors. Preoperative nutritional assessment and rigourous postoperative follow-up plan with administration of multi-vitamin supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended in all patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Pain intensity on the first day after surgery: a prospective cohort study comparing 179 surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Hans J; Aduckathil, Sanjay; van Wijck, Albert J M; Peelen, Linda M; Kalkman, Cor J; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-04-01

    Severe pain after surgery remains a major problem, occurring in 20-40% of patients. Despite numerous published studies, the degree of pain following many types of surgery in everyday clinical practice is unknown. To improve postoperative pain therapy and develop procedure-specific, optimized pain-treatment protocols, types of surgery that may result in severe postoperative pain in everyday practice must first be identified. This study considered 115,775 patients from 578 surgical wards in 105 German hospitals. A total of 70,764 patients met the inclusion criteria. On the first postoperative day, patients were asked to rate their worst pain intensity since surgery (numeric rating scale, 0-10). All surgical procedures were assigned to 529 well-defined groups. When a group contained fewer than 20 patients, the data were excluded from analysis. Finally, 50,523 patients from 179 surgical groups were compared. The 40 procedures with the highest pain scores (median numeric rating scale, 6-7) included 22 orthopedic/trauma procedures on the extremities. Patients reported high pain scores after many "minor" surgical procedures, including appendectomy, cholecystectomy, hemorrhoidectomy, and tonsillectomy, which ranked among the 25 procedures with highest pain intensities. A number of "major" abdominal surgeries resulted in comparatively low pain scores, often because of sufficient epidural analgesia. Several common minor- to medium-level surgical procedures, including some with laparoscopic approaches, resulted in unexpectedly high levels of postoperative pain. To reduce the number of patients suffering from severe pain, patients undergoing so-called minor surgery should be monitored more closely, and postsurgical pain treatment needs to comply with existing procedure-specific pain-treatment recommendations.

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: a cooperative surgical approach to a complex surgical procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-01-01

    Single stage en bloc abdominoperineal resection and sacrectomy, with a myocutaneous flap closure is a relatively uncommon procedure. Our case study of a 77 year old man with a locally invasive rectal adenocarcinoma highlights the complex intraoperative management of such a patient.

  20. Use of 0.5% bupivacaine with buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Varun; Kaur, Tejinder; Kapila, Sarika; Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Yashmeet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Minor oral surgical procedures are the most commonly performed procedures by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Performance of painless surgical procedure is highly appreciated by the patients and is possible through the use of local anesthesia, conscious sedation or general anesthesia. Postoperative pain can also be controlled by the use of opioids, as opioid receptors exist in the peripheral nervous system and offers the possibility of providing postoperative analgesia in the surgical patient. The present study compares the efficacy of 0.5% bupivacaine versus 0.5% bupivacaine with 0.3 mg buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures. Patients and Methods: The present study was conducted in 50 patients who required minor oral surgical procedures under local anesthesia. Two types of local anesthetic solutions were used- 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200000 epinephrine in group I and a mixture of 39 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 1 ml of 300 μg buprenorphine (3 μg/kg)in group II. Intraoperative and postoperative evaluation was carried out for both the anesthetic solutions. Results: The mean duration of postoperative analgesia in bupivacaine group (508.92 ± 63.30 minutes) was quite less than the buprenorphine combination group (1840.84 ± 819.51 minutes). The mean dose of postoperative analgesic medication in bupivacaine group (1.64 ± 0.99 tablets) was higher than buprenorphine combination group (0.80 ± 1.08 tablets). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the onset of action of the anesthetic effect and duration of anesthesia. Conclusion: Buprenorphine can be used in combination with bupivacaine for patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures to provide postoperative analgesia for a longer duration. PMID:29386814

  1. Impact of Residency Training Level on the Surgical Quality Following General Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiero, Dominik; Slankamenac, Maja; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Slankamenac, Ksenija

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the safety of surgical performance by residents of different training level performing common general surgical procedures. Data were consecutively collected from all patients undergoing general surgical procedures such as laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic appendectomy, inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernia repair from 2005 to 2011 at the Department of Surgery of the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland. The operating surgeons were grouped into junior residents, senior residents and consultants. The comprehensive complication index (CCI) representing the overall number and severity of all postoperative complications served as primary safety endpoint. A multivariable linear regression analysis was used to analyze differences between groups. Additionally, we focused on the impact of senior residents assisting junior residents on postoperative outcome comparing to consultants. During the observed time, 2715 patients underwent a general surgical procedure. In 1114 times, a senior resident operated and in 669 procedures junior residents performed the surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity quantified by the CCI was for consultants 5.0 (SD 10.7), for senior residents 3.5 (8.2) and for junior residents 3.6 (8.3). After adjusting for possible confounders, no difference between groups concerning the postoperative complications was detected. There is also no difference in postoperative complications detectable if junior residents were assisted by consultants then if assisted by senior residents. Patient safety is ensured in general surgery when performed by surgical junior residents. Senior residents are able to adopt the role of the teaching surgeon in charge without compromising patients' safety.

  2. [Neuropsychological and psychopathologic changes following cardiac surgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, T A; Herrmann, M

    1998-02-01

    Neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders following open heart surgery are estimated to occur in as many as 80 per cent of all patients. They have been recognised from the very beginning of modern heart surgery. Despite a huge amount of scientific literature, data concerning incidence, the phenomenology and duration of symptoms diverge. This finding may be explained by heterogeneous aetiopathogenetic concepts and methodological and terminological problems associated with the investigation of postoperative delirium or neuropsychological and psychopathological sequelae of cardiac surgery. Nowadays, most authors agree in respect of a multifactorial pathogenesis of cognitive deficits following cardiac surgery. Factors influencing the psychopathological and neuropsychological outcome of cardiac surgery can be divided into pre-, intra- and postoperative variables. Advanced age, degree of cardiovascular impairment and other case histories, as well as history of drug abuse, are those preoperative variables that may be responsible for a postoperative cognitive decline. The predictive value of personality traits (depression and/or anxiety), however, is most controversial. Among the intraoperative variables related to the postoperative cognitive state, are e.g. the type of operation and technical procedure (micro-/macroembolism due to the way of oxygenation, pulsatile/-non-pulsatile flow) and duration of extracorporeal circulation. In the postoperative period, the duration of intubation or ICU stay and related variables (like sleep or sensory deprivation/hyperstimulation) were identified as significant predictors of neuropsychological and psychopathological alterations. Modern research focusses on neurobiochemical markers of brain injury which may serve as early predictors of a postoperative cognitive decrease. These parameters may indicate an early postoperative diagnosis and neuroprotective treatment in patients at risk.

  3. Is laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy a lower risk bariatric procedure compared with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellmer, Jonathan D; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kallies, Kara J; Kothari, Shanu N

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is the current "gold standard" bariatric procedure in the United States. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has recently become a commonly performed procedure for many reasons, including patients' perception that LSG has less complexity and invasiveness, and lower risk. Our objective was to review the literature and compare the leak rates, morbidity, and mortality for LRYGB versus LSG. Publications from 2002 to 2012 with n greater than or equal to 25 and postoperative leak rate reported were included. Statistical analysis included chi-square according to patient number. Twenty-eight (10,906 patients) LRYGB and 33 (4,816 patients) LSG articles were evaluated. Leak rates after LRYGB versus LSG were 1.9% (n = 206) versus 2.3% (n = 110), respectively (P = .077). Mortality rates were .4% (27/7,117) for LRYGB and .2% (7/3,594) for LSG (P = .110). Timing from surgery to leak ranged from 1 to 12 days for LRYGB versus 1 to 35 days for LSG. Leak and mortality rates after LRYGB and LSG were comparable. The appropriate procedure should be tailored based on patient factors, comorbidities, patient and surgeon comfort level, surgeon experience, and institutional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. “Reality Surgery” — A Research Ethics Perspective on the Live Broadcast of Surgical Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Judson B.; Mathews, Robin; D'Amico, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the live broadcasting of medical and surgical procedures has gained worldwide popularity. While the practice has appropriately been met with concerns for patient safety and privacy, many physicians tout the merits of real time viewing as a form of investigation, accelerating the process leading to adoption or abolition of newer techniques or technologies. This view introduces a new series of ethical considerations that need to be addressed. As such, this article considers, from a research ethics perspective, the use of live surgical procedure broadcast for investigative purposes. PMID:21292217

  5. Patient experiences of adjusting to life in the first 2 years after bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Y; Hayes, C; Small, P K; Mahawar, K; Ling, J

    2017-10-01

    There is currently little research into the experiences of those who have undergone bariatric surgery, or how surgery affects their lives and social interactions. Adopting a constructivist grounded theory methodological approach with a constant comparative analytical framework, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 18 participants (11 female, 7 male) who had undergone permanent bariatric surgical procedures 5-24 months prior to interview. Findings revealed that participants regarded social encounters after bariatric surgery as underpinned by risk. Their attitudes towards social situations guided their social interaction with others. Three profiles of attitudes towards risk were constructed: Risk Accepters, Risk Contenders and Risk Challengers. Profiles were based on participant-reported narratives of their experiences in the first two years after surgery. The social complexities which occurred as a consequence of bariatric surgery required adjustments to patients' lives. Participants reported that social aspects of bariatric surgery did not appear to be widely understood by those who have not undergone bariatric surgery. The three risk attitude profiles that emerged from our data offer an understanding of how patients adjust to life after surgery and can be used reflexively by healthcare professionals to support both patients pre- and post-operatively. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  6. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  7. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-11-27

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and those with BMI > 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  8. Quick fix or long-term cure? Pros and cons of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, James A; Dibaise, John K

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has seen an enormous increase in the number of bariatric, or weight loss, operations performed. This trend is likely to continue, mirroring the epidemic of obesity around the world and its rising prevalence among children. Bariatric surgery is considered by many to be the most effective treatment for obesity in terms of maintenance of long-term weight loss and improvement in obesity-related comorbid conditions. Although overly simplified, the primary mechanisms of the surgical interventions currently utilized to treat obesity are the creation of a restrictive or malabsorptive bowel anatomy. Operations based on these mechanisms include the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band and laparoscopic vertical sleeve gastrectomy (considered primarily restrictive operations), the laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversion with or without a duodenal switch (primarily malabsorptive operation), and the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (considered a combination restrictive and selective malabsorptive procedure). Each operation has pros and cons. Important considerations, for the patient and surgeon alike, in the decision to proceed with bariatric surgery include the technical aspects of the operation, postoperative complications including long-term nutritional problems, magnitude of initial and sustained weight loss desired, and correction of obesity-related comorbidities. Herein, the pros and cons of the contemporary laparoscopic bariatric operations are reviewed and ongoing controversies relating to bariatric surgery are discussed: appropriate patient selection, appropriate operation selection for an individual patient, surgeon selection, and how to measure success after surgery.

  9. Surgical resident involvement is safe for common elective general surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Warren H; Jin, Leah; Canter, Robert J; Martinez, Steve R; Khatri, Vijay P; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Bold, Richard J; Wisner, David; Taylor, Sandra; Chen, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    Outcomes of surgical resident training are under scrutiny with the changing milieu of surgical education. Few have investigated the effect of surgical resident involvement (SRI) on operative parameters. Examining 7 common general surgery procedures, we evaluated the effect of SRI on perioperative morbidity and mortality and operative time (OpT). The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (2005 to 2007) was used to identify 7 cases of nonemergent operations. Cases with simultaneous procedures were excluded. Logistic regression was performed across all procedures and within each procedure incorporating SRI, OpT, and risk-stratifying American College of Surgery National Surgical Quality Improvement Program morbidity and mortality probability scores, which incorporate multiple prognostic individual patient factors. Procedure-specific, SRI-stratified OpTs were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. A total of 71.3% of the 37,907 cases had SRI. Absolute 30-day morbidity for all cases with SRI and without SRI were 3.0% and 1.0%, respectively (p < 0.001); absolute 30-day mortality for all cases with SRI and without SRI were 0.1% and 0.08%, respectively (p < 0.001). After multivariate analysis by specific procedure, SRI was not associated with increased morbidity but was associated with decreased mortality during open right colectomy (odds ratio 0.32; p = 0.01). Across all procedures, SRI was associated with increased morbidity (odds ratio 1.14; p = 0.048) but decreased mortality (odds ratio 0.42; p < 0.001). Mean OpT for all procedures was consistently lower for cases without SRI. SRI has a measurable impact on both 30-day morbidity and mortality and OpT. These data have implications to the impact associated with surgical graduate medical education. Further studies to identify causes of patient morbidity and prevention strategies in surgical teaching environments are warranted. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons

  10. Bariatric surgery: to whom and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaiges, D; Goday, A; Pedro-Botet, J; Más, A; Chillarón, J J; Flores-Le Roux, J A

    2015-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity. Its effects go beyond weight loss, in a high percentage of cases achieving remission of comorbidities associated with obesity and reducing mortality. However, not all patients achieve satisfactory weight loss or resolution of comorbidities and perioperative complications are a constant risk. Correct preoperative evaluation is essential to predict the likelihood of success and choose the most appropriate surgical technique for this purpose. The aim of this review was to ascertain which obese subjects will benefit from bariatric surgery taking into account body mass index, age, comorbidities, risk of complications and the impact of different bariatric surgery techniques.

  11. Guidelines on the facilities required for minor surgical procedures and minimal access interventions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2012-02-01

    There have been many changes in healthcare provision in recent years, including the delivery of some surgical services in primary care or in day surgery centres, which were previously provided by acute hospitals. Developments in the fields of interventional radiology and cardiology have further expanded the range and complexity of procedures undertaken in these settings. In the face of these changes there is a need to define from an infection prevention and control perspective the basic physical requirements for facilities in which such surgical procedures may be carried out. Under the auspices of the Healthcare Infection Society, we have developed the following recommendations for those designing new facilities or upgrading existing facilities. These draw upon best practice, available evidence, other guidelines where appropriate, and expert consensus to provide sensible and feasible advice. An attempt is also made to define minimal access interventions and minor surgical procedures. For minimal access interventions, including interventional radiology, new facilities should be mechanically ventilated to achieve 15 air changes per hour but natural ventilation is satisfactory for minor procedures. All procedures should involve a checklist and operators should be appropriately trained. There is also a need for prospective surveillance to accurately determine the post-procedure infection rate. Finally, there is a requirement for appropriate applied research to develop the evidence base required to support subsequent iterations of this guidance.

  12. Surgical treatment of gingival recessions using Emdogain gel : Clinical procedure and case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, F; Wennstrom, J; Van der Weijden, F; Schneiders, T; Van der Velden, U

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the clinical procedure and outcome of surgical treatment of gingival recessions with the adjunctive use of Emdogain gel, an enamel matrix derivative bioactive material for periodontal reconstructive surgery. Six cases with gingival recession on maxillary canines are presented

  13. Bariatric surgery and intellectual disability: Furthering evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Emma; Casey, Amanda Faith; Brewster, Keith Z

    2017-01-01

    Rates of morbid obesity are higher for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). Individuals with ID may find nutritional guidelines difficult to follow and many face personal and environmental barriers for physical activity. Bariatric surgery may reduce obesity related health comorbidities while promoting sustained weight loss in diverse populations. Yet no study has reviewed the feasibility of conducting bariatric surgery on individuals with ID. To conduct a scoping review of literature on bariatric procedures performed on individuals with ID. Authors searched electronic database via PubMED, Science Direct, Wiley and Medline (1975-2014). Extracted articles were evaluated independently following scoping reviews guidelines. Reviewers included sixteen studies. Nine surgical interventions were reported on 49 patients with ID. Studies followed either case report or case series design. The most common procedure patients received was biliopancreatic diversion (n = 24) followed by Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (n = 12). Degree of weight loss was the primary outcome in each study. Excess weight loss (%EWL) ranged from 12% to 86%. Further benefits included improved quality of life, decreased psychological tension within family and resolution of sleep apnea, hypertension, respiratory distress and type II diabetes. Six studies included a post-operative follow-up period below two years. Bariatric surgery may be a viable option to treat obesity in individuals with ID but there is no consensus which procedure is preferred and which associated interventions should be in place to warrant long lasting results. Further research featuring randomized control trials may be beneficial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethical and legal aspects of bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isac Jorge Filho

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The development fo bariatric surgery made it necessary to define theethical an legal basis of the specialty. The bioethical principles mustbe followed: benefit the patient; do not cause prohibitive colatheraleffects; be avaible to anyone withot discrimination; the pacient haveto have the possibility to choose it´s treatment. The Ministery ofHealth and the Federal Medical Counsil have regulates the indicationsfor the surgical treatment, the techniques that are availble andnecessary of a multidisciplinary team for Bariatric Surgery Centre.

  15. Application of BAROS’ questionnaire in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery with 2 years of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano de QUEIROZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND -In recent decades, the high prevalence of obesity in the general population has brought serious concerns in terms of public health. Contrarily to conventional treatment involving dieting and physical exercising, often ineffective in generating long term results, bariatric operations have been an effective method for sustained weight loss in morbidly obese individuals. The Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS is an objective and recognized system in the overall evaluation of results after bariatric surgery. OBJECTIVE To investigate results concerning a casuistic of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery over a 2-year follow-up in terms of weight loss, related medical conditions, safety and changes in quality of life. METHODS A total of 120 obese (17 male and 103 female patients, who underwent bariatric surgery, were assessed and investigated using the BAROS system after a 2- year follow-up. RESULTS Patients obtained a mean excess weight loss of 74.6 (±15.9 % and mean body mass index reduction of 15.6 (±4.4 Kg/m2. Pre-surgical comorbidities were present in 71 (59% subjects and they were totally (86% or partially (14% resolved. Complications resulting specifically from the surgical procedure were observed in 4.2% of cases (two bowel obstructions requiring re-operation, and three stomal stenosis treated with endoscopic dilation. Sixteen subjects (13% of total number of patients presented minor clinical complications managed through outpatient care. The final scores for the BAROS questionnaire showcased excellent to good results in 99% of cases (excellent 44%, very good 38%, good 23%, acceptable 1%. CONCLUSION According to the BAROS questionnaire, bariatric surgery is a safe and effective method for managing obesity and associated clinical comorbidities, allowing for satisfactory results after a 2-year follow-up. Future studies should address other clinical and psychosocial variables that impact

  16. Application of BAROS' questionnaire in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery with 2 years of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Caetano de; Sallet, José Afonso; DE Barros E Silva, Pedro Gabriel Melo; Queiroz, Luzia da Gloria Pereira de Sousa; Pimentel, Jélis Arenas; Sallet, Paulo Clemente

    2017-01-01

    -In recent decades, the high prevalence of obesity in the general population has brought serious concerns in terms of public health. Contrarily to conventional treatment involving dieting and physical exercising, often ineffective in generating long term results, bariatric opera-tions have been an effective method for sustained weight loss in morbidly obese individuals. The Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) is an objective and recognized system in the overall evaluation of results after bariatric surgery. - To investigate results concerning a casuistic of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery over a 2-year follow-up in terms of weight loss, related medical conditions, safety and changes in quality of life. - A total of 120 obese (17 male and 103 female) patients, who underwent bariatric surgery, were assessed and investigated using the BAROS system after a 2- year follow-up. - Patients obtained a mean excess weight loss of 74.6 (±15.9) % and mean body mass index reduction of 15.6 (±4.4) Kg/m2. Pre-surgical comorbidities were present in 71 (59%) subjects and they were totally (86%) or partially (14%) resolved. Complications resulting specifically from the surgical procedure were observed in 4.2% of cases (two bowel obstructions requiring re-operation, and three stomal stenosis treated with endoscopic dilation). Sixteen subjects (13% of total number of patients) presented minor clinical complications managed through outpatient care. The final scores for the BAROS questionnaire showcased excellent to good results in 99% of cases (excellent 44%, very good 38%, good 23%, acceptable 1%). - According to the BAROS questionnaire, bariatric surgery is a safe and effective method for managing obesity and associated clinical comorbidities, allowing for satisfactory results after a 2-year follow-up. Future studies should address other clinical and psychosocial variables that impact outcome as well as allow for longer follow-ups.

  17. Risk of Abdominal Surgery in Pregnancy Among Women Who Have Undergone Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Andrea; Källen, Karin

    2017-05-01

    To compare the rates of abdominal surgery during pregnancy among women with previous bariatric surgery (women in the case group) and women with first-trimester body mass index (BMI) greater than 35 and no previous bariatric surgery (women in the control group). We conducted a national cohort study, merging data from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and the Swedish National Patient Registry, comparing women who had bariatric surgery from 1987 to 2011 with women in a control group with first-trimester BMI greater than 35 who had not had bariatric surgery. Primary outcome variables were diagnosis and surgical procedure codes grouped as five outcome categories: 1) intestinal obstruction, 2) gallbladder disease, 3) appendicitis, 4) hernia, and 5) diagnostic laparoscopy or laparotomy without the presence of a diagnosis or surgical code for outcomes in outcome categories 1-4. Odds ratios were computed using multivariate linear regression analysis for each separate pregnancy. For all pregnancies in a given woman, general estimating equations with robust variance estimation were used. Adjustment was made for smoking, year of delivery, maternal age, and previous abdominal surgery. During the first pregnancy after bariatric surgery, the rate of surgery for intestinal obstruction was 1.5% (39/2,543; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.0%) in women in the case group compared with 0.02% (4/21,909; 95% CI 0.0-0.04%) among women in the control group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 34.3, 95% CI 11.9-98.7). Similarly, the rate of diagnostic laparoscopy or laparotomy was 1.5% (37/2,542; 95% CI 1.0-1.9%) among women in the case group compared with 0.1% (18/21,909; 95% CI 0.0-0.1%) among women in the control group (adjusted OR 11.3, 95% CI 6.9-18.5). Bariatric surgery is associated with an increased risk of abdominal surgery during pregnancy.

  18. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrine Society. www.hormone.org How are postoperative nutritional deficiencies managed? Because your body absorbs fewer nutrients after bariatric surgery, especially malabsorptive procedures, you need to keep a ...

  19. The effect of Surgical Care Improvement Project measures on national trends on surgical site infections in open vascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan S; Seabrook, Gary R; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Rossi, Peter J; Edmiston, Charles E; Lee, Cheong J

    2014-12-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national initiative to reduce surgical complications, including postoperative surgical site infection (SSI), through protocol-driven antibiotic usage. This study aimed to determine the effect SCIP guidelines have had on in-hospital SSIs after open vascular procedures. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was retrospectively analyzed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis codes to capture SSIs in hospital patients who underwent elective carotid endarterectomy, elective open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and peripheral bypass. The pre-SCIP era was defined as 2000 to 2005 and post-SCIP was defined as 2007 to 2010. The year 2006 was excluded because this was the transition year in which the SCIP guidelines were implemented. Analysis of variance and χ(2) testing were used for statistical analysis. The rate of SSI in the pre-SCIP era was 2.2% compared with 2.3% for carotid endarterectomy (P = .06). For peripheral bypass, both in the pre- and post-SCIP era, infection rates were 0.1% (P = .22). For open, elective AAA, the rate of infection in the post-SCIP era increased significantly to 1.4% from 1.0% in the pre-SCIP era (P < .001). Demographics and in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between the groups. Implementation of SCIP guidelines has made no significant effect on the incidence of in-hospital SSIs in open vascular operations; rather, an increase in SSI rates in open AAA repairs was observed. Patient-centered, bundled approaches to care, rather than current SCIP practices, may further decrease SSI rates in vascular patients undergoing open procedures. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Physiologic, psychologic, and metabolic consequences of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Victoria L; Frishman, William H

    2006-01-01

    The successful management of obesity is essential to treat effectively its associated comorbidities such as systemic hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemias, and obstructive sleep apnea. Current weight loss recommendations include reduced caloric intake, exercise, and pharmacologic treatments that often result in a minimal weight loss that is rarely maintained. Conversely, surgical procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, vertical banded gastroplasty, or biliopancreatic diversion result in a more successful and maintained long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery-induced weight loss is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk factors such as systemic hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, hypercholesterolemia does not appear to benefit from surgically induced weight loss. Patients also note improvement in associated respiratory comorbidities such as asthma and obstructive sleep apnea as well as diabetes. Although the risks of bariatric surgery are numerous, including gastrointestinal and respiratory complications and associated nutritional deficiencies, in an appropriately selected surgical candidate, as detailed by National Institutes of Health guidelines, the surgical treatment of obesity warrants serious consideration.

  1. Anesthetic management of patients undergoing bariatric surgery: two year experience in a single institution in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Bastian; Steurer, Marc P; Müller, Markus K; Dullenkopf, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In the field of anesthesia for bariatric surgery, a wide variety of recommendations exist, but a general consensus on the perioperative management of such patients is missing. We outline the perioperative experiences that we gained in the first two years after introducing a bariatric program. The perioperative approach was established together with all relevant disciplines. Pertinent topics for the anesthesiologists were; successful airway management, indications for more invasive monitoring, and the planning of the postoperative period and deposition. This retrospective analysis was approved by the local ethics committee. Data are mean [SD]. 182 bariatric surgical procedures were performed (147 gastric bypass procedures (GBP; 146 (99.3%) performed laparascopically). GBP patients were 43 [10] years old, 78% female, BMI 45 [7] kg/m(2), 73% ASA physical status of 2. 42 patients (28.6%) presented with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. 117 GBP (79.6%) patients were intubated conventionally by direct laryngoscopy (one converted to fiber-optic intubation, one aspiration of gastric contents). 32 patients (21.8%) required an arterial line, 10 patients (6.8%) a central venous line. Induction lasted 25 [16] min, the procedure itself 138 [42] min. No blood products were required. Two patients (1.4%) presented with hypothermia (bariatric patients demand a tailored approach from both the anesthesiologist and the perioperative team. The interaction of a multi-disciplinary team is key to achieving good outcomes and a low rate of complications. DRKS00005437 (date of registration 16(th) December 2013).

  2. [Stenosis and ulceration after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S; Runkel, N

    2015-09-01

    The increasing number of morbidly obese patients leads to a rising number of bariatric procedures in Germany. The operative techniques are highly standardized but such a standardization is lacking for the management of postoperative complications such as stenosis and ulceration after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). The current literature is reviewed and a complication management is developed and presented in this article. Postoperative stenoses occure with a frequency of 0.1-3.9% after SG and 3-27% after RYGB. Stenosis is secondary to inadequate surgical technique or microinsufficiency. Ulcers can be due to reaction to foreign body, local ischemia, peptic lesion, fistula and microinsufficiency. Endoscopic interventions are successful in most cases for stenosis after RYGB and for short stenoses after SG. After SG long stenoses require redo surgery and conversion to RYGB. Ulcers can be managed by medication with the exception of perforation and hemorrhage, which require emergency laparoscopy.

  3. EVALUATION OF OUTCOME OF VARIOUS SURGICAL PROCEDURES FOR UPPER EYELID PTOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There are various procedures available for ptosis correction. Successful outcome not only depends on correct technique but also choosing appropriate procedure for each patient. Selection of procedure is based on available levator function and also other factors like etiology, severity, Bell’s phenomenon etc. If such varied procedure s are performed in a group of patients based on standard criteria and results are evaluated systematically we can determine what works best for a given patient . AIM : Evaluation of outcome of various surgical procedures for upper eyelid ptosis . METHODOLOGY : 25 eyelids of 20 patients who presented to a tertiary centre in south India with complaint of drooping of upper lid were considered. All subjects underwent complete ocular examination corrected visual acuity and detailed ptosis evaluation with particular emphasis on measurement of levator muscle function, MRD1 (margin reflex distance - 1, palpebral fissure width in different gazes and margin crease distance. The effect of various factors like MRD1, MCD, levator function were assessed, the amount of correction required and appropriate surgical procedure was chosen. Surgical procedure of Levator resection, frontalis sling operation, anterior levator aponeurosis advancement, o r other ptosis correction procedures under appropriate anaesthesia were performed. Post - operative evaluation in terms of visual acuity, MRD, Interpalpebral fissure height, lid symmetry, lagophthalmos and complications (if any was done. RESULTS : Levator muscle resection was done in 28% of eyelids, frontal sling surgery in 60% of eyelids, Levator muscle plication in 8% eyelids and levator muscle disinsertion with frontal sling surgery in 4% eyes. Undercorrection was seen in about 44% of eyelids in varying degrees. 56% of the eyes had optimal correction. Symmetric correction was achieved in 76% of eyelids. CONCLUSION: The influence of various preoperative factors on the

  4. Variation in Outcomes at Bariatric Surgery Centers of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Andrew M; Ghaferi, Amir A; Thumma, Jyothi R; Dimick, Justin B

    2017-07-01

    In the United States, reports about perioperative complications associated with bariatric surgery led to the establishment of accreditation criteria for bariatric centers of excellence and many bariatric centers obtaining accreditation. Currently, most bariatric procedures occur at these centers, but to what extent they uniformly provide high-quality care remains unknown. To describe the variation in surgical outcomes across bariatric centers of excellence and the geographic availability of high-quality centers. This retrospective review analyzed the claims data of 145 527 patients who underwent bariatric surgery at bariatric centers of excellence between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2013. Data were obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient Database. This database included unique hospital identification numbers in 12 states (Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, Iowa, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Washington, and Wisconsin), allowing comparisons among 165 centers of excellence located in those states. Participants were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Those included in the study cohort were patients with a primary diagnosis of morbid obesity and who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric band placement, or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Excluded from the cohort were patients younger than 18 years or who had an abdominal malignant neoplasm. Data were analyzed July 1, 2016, through January 10, 2017. Risk-adjusted and reliability-adjusted serious complication rates within 30 days of the index operation were calculated for each center. Centers were stratified by geographic location and operative volume. In this analysis of claims data from 145 527 patients, wide variation in quality was found across 165 bariatric centers of excellence, both nationwide and

  5. Pharmacokinetics in Morbid Obesity: Influence of Two Bariatric Surgery Techniques on Paracetamol and Caffeine Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goday Arno, Albert; Farré, Magí; Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Ramon, Jose M; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Papaseit, Esther; Civit, Ester; Langohr, Klaus; Lí Carbó, Marcel; Boix, David Benaiges; Nino, Olga Castañer; Le Roux, Juana Antonia Flores; Pera, Manuel; Grande, Luis; de la Torre, Rafael

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to study the impact of the two most common bariatric surgery techniques on paracetamol pharmacokinetics (a marker of gastric emptying) and caffeine metabolism (a marker of liver function). In the present prospective study, we studied 24 morbid obese patients before, at 4 weeks, and 6 months after having undergone sleeve gastrectomy (n = 10) or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 14). For comparative purposes, 28 healthy controls (14 normal weights and 14 overweights) were also included in the study. Paracetamol pharmacokinetics was altered in the obese participants leading to lower bioavailability. Bariatric surgery resulted in faster absorption and normalized pharmacokinetic parameters, prompting an increase in paracetamol bioavailability. No differences were found between surgical procedures. In the case of caffeine, the ratio paraxanthine/caffeine did not differ between morbid obese and healthy individuals. This ratio remained unmodified after surgery, indicating that the liver function (assessed by cytochrome P450 1A2 activity) was unaffected by obesity or bariatric surgery. Paracetamol pharmacokinetics and caffeine plasma levels are altered in severely obese patients. The two studied bariatric surgical techniques normalize paracetamol oral bioavailability without impairing the liver function (measured by cytochrome P450 1A2 activity).

  6. Guidelines for Perioperative Care in Bariatric Surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, A; MacCormick, A D; Awad, S; Reynolds, N; Roulin, D; Demartines, N; Vignaud, M; Alvarez, A; Singh, P M; Lobo, D N

    2016-09-01

    During the last two decades, an increasing number of bariatric surgical procedures have been performed worldwide. There is no consensus regarding optimal perioperative care in bariatric surgery. This review aims to present such a consensus and to provide graded recommendations for elements in an evidence-based "enhanced" perioperative protocol. The English-language literature between January 1966 and January 2015 was searched, with particular attention paid to meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials and large prospective cohort studies. Selected studies were examined, reviewed and graded. After critical appraisal of these studies, the group of authors reached a consensus recommendation. Although for some elements, recommendations are extrapolated from non-bariatric settings (mainly colorectal), most recommendations are based on good-quality trials or meta-analyses of good-quality trials. A comprehensive evidence-based consensus was reached and is presented in this review by the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) Society. The guidelines were endorsed by the International Association for Surgical Metabolism and Nutrition (IASMEN) and based on the evidence available in the literature for each of the elements of the multimodal perioperative care pathway for patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

  7. Surgical reconstruction of pressure ulcer defects: a single- or two-stage procedure?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, Tereze A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical management of pressure ulcers traditionally involved staged procedures, with initial debridement of necrotic or infected material followed by reconstruction at a later date when the wound was deemed viable and free of gross infection. However, over the past decade, it has been suggested that a single-stage procedure, combining initial debridement and definitive reconstruction, may provide advantages over staged surgery. We present our experience with the staged approach and review the current evidence for both methods. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS: : We reviewed medical records of all patients referred to our service for pressure ulcer management between October 2001 and October 2007. The National Rehabilitation Hospital is the national center in Ireland for primary rehabilitation of adults and children suffering from spinal and brain injury, serving patients locally and from around the country. METHODS: All subjects who were managed surgically underwent a 2-stage procedure, with initial debridement and subsequent reconstruction. The main outcome measures were length of hospital stay, postoperative morbidity and mortality, and time to complete ulcer healing. RESULTS: Forty-one of 108 patients with 58 pressure ulcers were managed surgically. All patients underwent initial surgical debridement and 20 patients underwent subsequent pressure ulcer reconstruction. Postreconstructive complications occurred in 5 patients (20%). The mean time to complete ulcer healing was 17.4 weeks. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 3 patients, but there were no episodes of flap failure. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved favorable results with a 2-stage reconstruction technique and suggest that the paucity of evidence related to single-stage procedures does not support a change in surgical management.

  8. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  9. Ophthalmic complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Rui Azevedo; Ribeiro, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is increasing vastly in the world, and the number of bariatric surgeries being performed is also increasing. Patients being submitted to bariatric surgeries, especially malabsorptive procedures, have an increased risk of developing nutrient deficiencies, which can culminate in symptomatic hypovitaminosis, if supplementation is not done correctly. The eye and the optic system need an adequate level of several vitamins and minerals to perform properly, especially vitamin A, and this article wants to cover the main nutrients involved, the possible ophthalmic complications that can arise by their deficiency, and the management of those complications.

  10. Influence of surgical and minimally invasive facial cosmetic procedures on psychosocial outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imadojemu, Sotonye; Sarwer, David B; Percec, Ivona; Sonnad, Seema S; Goldsack, Jennifer E; Berman, Morgan; Sobanko, Joseph F

    2013-11-01

    Millions of surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures of the face are performed each year, but objective clinical measures that evaluate surgical procedures, such as complication rates, have limited utility when applied to cosmetic procedures. While there may be subjective improvements in appearance, it is important to determine if these interventions have an impact on patients in other realms such as psychosocial functioning. This is particularly important in light of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and its emphasis on patient-centered outcomes and effectiveness. To review the literature investigating the impact of facial cosmetic surgery and minimally invasive procedures on relevant psychological variables to guide clinical practice and set norms for clinical performance. English-language randomized clinical trials and prospective cohort studies that preoperatively and postoperatively assessed psychological variables in at least 10 patients seeking surgical or minimally invasive cosmetic procedures of the face. Only 1 study investigating minimally invasive procedures was identified. Most studies reported modest improvement in psychosocial functioning, which included quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. Unfortunately, the overall quality of evidence is limited owing to an absence of control groups, short follow-up periods, or loss to follow-up. The current literature suggests that a number of psychosocial domains may improve following facial cosmetic surgery, although the quality of this evidence is limited (grade of recommendation 2A). Despite the dramatic rise in nonsurgical cosmetic procedures, there is a paucity of information regarding the impact of chemodenervation and soft-tissue augmentation on psychosocial functioning.

  11. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  12. Robotic bariatric surgery: A general review of the current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minoa K; Hagen, Monika E; Buchs, Nicolas C; Buehler, Leo H; Morel, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    While conventional laparoscopy is the gold standard for almost all bariatric procedures, robotic assistance holds promise for facilitating complex surgeries and improving clinical outcomes. Since the report of the first robotic-assisted bariatric procedure in 1999, numerous publications, including those reporting comparative trials and meta-analyses across bariatric procedures with a focus on robotic assistance, can be found. This article reviews the current literature and portrays the perspectives of robotic bariatric surgery. While there are substantial reports on robotic bariatric surgery currently in publication, most studies suffer from low levels of evidence. As such, although robotics technology is without a doubt superior to conventional laparoscopy, the precise role of robotics in bariatric surgery is not yet clear. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS: PERCUTANEOUS SURGERY, CHOICE OF A SURGICAL PROCEDURE, CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux rigidus is observed in approximately 2.5% of the adult population. Until now neither a unified classification of hallux rigidus appears to exist nor any clear principles to choose the surgical method. The variety of clinical and radiological signs explains the difficulties in establishing a comprehensive classification system and in selection of the criteria for surgical procedure. There are few published reports about hallux rigidus percutaneous surgical treatment. Existing papers are dedicated to a limited number of percutaneous techniques.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous techniques for surgical treatment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis; to specify factors determining the choice of procedure; to develop a grading system of the hallux rigidus severity which will help in selection of surgery. Materials and methods. Based on 156 surgeries (107 patients the author demonstrated the possibilities of percutaneous techniques in the surgical treatment of hallux rigidus of different stages as well as provided a brief description of used surgical techniques.Results. The mean age of patients was 48.8 years (ranged from 18 to 73. The mean follow-up was 7 months (ranged from 3 to 54. At the specified time the treatment outcomes of 103 patients (150 feet were analyzed. Mean hospital stay was 0.78 days (ranged from 0 to 1. No infectious or wound-healing problems were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 89 surgical treatment, qualified satisfaction was reported with patients in respect of outcomes of 57 surgeries. Four unsatisfactory outcomes were observed. The role of the relatively long first metatarsal in the development of hallux rigidus was confirmed. Conclusion. Percutaneous techniques provide successful treatment for all stages of hallux rigidus. The choice of a specific surgical technique may be challenging and requires

  14. The use of multimedia consent programs for surgical procedures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Jean; El-Khani, Ussamah; Chow, Andre; Hakky, Sherif; Ahmed, Ahmed R; Purkayastha, Sanjay

    2013-02-01

    To compare multimedia and standard consent, in respect to patient comprehension, anxiety, and satisfaction, for various surgical/interventional procedures. Electronic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase, and Google Scholar were performed. Relevant articles were assessed by 2 independent reviewers. Comparative (randomized and nonrandomized control trials) studies of multimedia and standard consent for a variety of surgical/interventional procedures were included. Studies had to report on at least one of the outcome measures. Studies were reviewed by 2 independent investigators. The first investigator extracted all relevant data, and consensus of each extraction was performed by a second investigator to verify the data. Overall, this review suggests that the use of multimedia as an adjunct to conventional consent appears to improve patient comprehension. Multimedia leads to high patient satisfaction in terms of feasibility, ease of use, and availability of information. There is no conclusive evidence demonstrating a significant reduction in preoperative anxiety.

  15. [Extra-hippocampal temporal lesions inducing symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsies. Which surgical procedure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchet, G; Marchal, C; Loiseau, H; Rougier, A

    2005-05-01

    In partial symptomatic epilepsy due to discrete brain lesion, total removal of the epileptogenic lesion generally yields major reduction of seizures, achieved in 85% of the patients. However, prognosis is worse in patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy. Implication of the temporo-mesial structures in the seizures genesis is generally considered. Careful electroclinical and radiological analysis can provide useful but insufficient information. In order to evaluate the criteria we used to guide our surgical strategy, we analyzed retrospectively a series of 47 patients with drug-resistant symptomatic extra hipocampic temporal epilepsy surgically treated either by isolated lesionectomy (group 1, n=17) or by resection of temporo-mesial structures and associated lesionectomy (group 2, n=30). Patients with extrahippocampal lesions and hippocampal sclerosis (dual pathology) were excluded from this study. With a mean follow-up of 72 months, overall results showed that 84% of group 2 patients (Engel's grade Ia) were seizure-free compared with only 47% of group 1 patients. Statistical analysis showed that the type of surgical procedure was the main prognostic factor. In conclusion, the optimal surgical procedure cannot be defined only with the criteria usually retained for temporo-mesial involvement in seizure genesis. Taking into account the prognostic value of such implication, although complex, is of paramount importance. Our results could be explained by the presence of an acquired dual functional pathology.

  16. Risk Prediction Model for Severe Postoperative Complication in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Erik; Cao, Yang; Szabo, Eva; Näslund, Erik; Näslund, Ingmar; Ottosson, Johan

    2018-01-12

    Factors associated with risk for adverse outcome are important considerations in the preoperative assessment of patients for bariatric surgery. As yet, prediction models based on preoperative risk factors have not been able to predict adverse outcome sufficiently. This study aimed to identify preoperative risk factors and to construct a risk prediction model based on these. Patients who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure in Sweden between 2010 and 2014 were identified from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg). Associations between preoperative potential risk factors and severe postoperative complications were analysed using a logistic regression model. A multivariate model for risk prediction was created and validated in the SOReg for patients who underwent bariatric surgery in Sweden, 2015. Revision surgery (standardized OR 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-0.24, p prediction model. Despite high specificity, the sensitivity of the model was low. Revision surgery, high age, low BMI, large waist circumference, and dyspepsia/GERD were associated with an increased risk for severe postoperative complication. The prediction model based on these factors, however, had a sensitivity that was too low to predict risk in the individual patient case.

  17. Complications of bariatric surgery--What the general surgeon needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Paul; Clarke, Christopher; Reynolds, Ian; Arumugasamy, Mayilone; McNamara, Deborah

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important cause of physical and psychosocial morbidity and it places a significant burden on health system costs and resources. Worldwide an estimated 200 million people over 20 years are obese and in the U.K. the Department of Health report that 61.3% of people in the U.K. are either overweight or obese. Surgery for obesity (bariatric surgery) is being performed with increasing frequency in specialist centres both in the U.K. and Ireland and abroad due to the phenomenon of health tourism. Its role and success in treating medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension in obese patients will likely lead to an even greater number of bariatric surgery procedures being performed. Patients with early postoperative complications may be managed in specialist centres but patients with later complications, occurring months or years after surgery, may present to local surgical units for assessment and management. This review will highlight the late complications of the 3 most commonly performed bariatric surgery procedures that the emergency general surgeon may encounter. It will also highlight the complications that require urgent intervention by the emergency general surgeon and those that can be safely referred to a bariatric surgeon for further management after initial assessment and investigations. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial fingertip necrosis following a digital surgical procedure in a patient with primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur, Safak; Tuncer, Serhan

    2014-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder consisting of recurrent, long-lasting and episodic vasospasm of the fingers and toes often associated with exposure to cold. In this article, we present a case of partial fingertip necrosis following digital surgical procedure in a patient with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Hypnosis as a Valuable Tool for Surgical Procedures in the Oral and Maxillofacial Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Gil; Alves, Luiza; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro; de Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista

    2017-04-01

    Hypnosis is a valuable tool in the management of patients who undergo surgical procedures in the maxillofacial complex, particularly in reducing and eliminating pain during surgery and aiding patients who have dental fear and are allergic to anesthesia. This case report demonstrates the efficacy of hypnosis in mitigating anxiety, bleeding, and pain during dental surgery without anesthesia during implant placement of tooth 14, the upper left first molar.

  20. Phaeochromocytoma Crisis: Two Cases of Undiagnosed Phaeochromocytoma Presenting after Elective Nonrelated Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Johnston

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phaeochromocytoma is a catecholamine producing tumour and an uncommon cause of hypertension. We present two cases of relatively asymptomatic individuals, in which previously undiagnosed phaeochromocytoma was unmasked by elective nonadrenal surgical procedures, manifesting as postoperative hypertensive crisis and subsequent cardiogenic shock. The initial management in intensive care is discussed, in addition to the clinical and biochemical diagnostic challenges present. Successful adrenalectomy was performed in each case.

  1. Post-surgical infections and perioperative antibiotics usage in pediatric genitourinary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellett, Justin; Prasad, Michaella M; Purves, J Todd; Stec, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    Post-surgical infections (PSIs) are a source of preventable perioperative morbidity. No guidelines exist for the use of perioperative antibiotics in pediatric urologic procedures. This study reports the rate of PSIs in non-endoscopic pediatric genitourinary procedures at our institution. Secondary aims evaluate the association of PSI with other perioperative variables, including wound class (WC) and perioperative antibiotic administration. Data from consecutive non-endoscopic pediatric urologic procedures performed between August 2011 and April 2014 were examined retrospectively. The primary outcome was the rate of PSIs. PSIs were classified as superficial skin (SS) and deep/organ site (D/OS) according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, and urinary tract infection (UTI). PSIs were further stratified by WC1 and WC2 and perioperative antibiotic usage. A relative risk and chi-square analysis compared PSI rates between WC1 and WC2 procedures. A total of 1185 unique patients with 1384 surgical sites were reviewed; 1192 surgical sites had follow-up for inclusion into the study. Ten total PSIs were identified, for an overall infection rate of 0.83%. Of these, six were SS, one was D/OS, and three were UTIs. The PSI rate for WC1 (885 sites) and WC2 (307 sites) procedures was 0.34% and 2.28%, respectively, p antibiotics (0.35% vs. 0.33%). All WC2 procedures received antibiotics. Post-surgical infections are associated with significant perioperative morbidity. In some studies, PSI can double hospital costs, and contribute to hospital length of stay, admission to intensive care units, and impact patient mortality. Our study demonstrates that the rate of PSI in WC1 operations is low, irrespective of whether the patient received perioperative antibiotics (0.35%) or no antibiotics (0.33%). WC2 operations were the larger source of morbidity with an infection rate of 2.28% and a 6.7 fold higher increase in relative risk. WC1 procedures have a rate of

  2. Control of bleeding in surgical procedures: critical appraisal of HEMOPATCH (Sealing Hemostat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis KM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kevin Michael Lewis,1 Carl Erik Kuntze,2 Heinz Gulle3 1Preclinical Safety and Efficacy, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Baxter Healthcare SA, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Surgical Sciences and Engineering, Baxter Medical Products GmbH, Vienna, Austria Abstract: The need for advanced hemostatic agents increases with the complexity of surgical procedures and use of anticoagulation and antiplatelet treatments. HEMOPATCH (Sealing Hemostat is a novel, advanced hemostatic pad that is composed of a synthetic, protein-reactive monomer and a collagen backing. The active side is covered with a protein-reactive monomer: N-hydroxysuccinimide functionalized polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG. NHS-PEG rapidly affixes the collagen pad to tissue to promote and maintain hemostasis. The combined action of the NHS-PEG and collagen is demonstrated to have benefit relative to other hemostatic agents in surgery and preclinical surgical models. This paper reviews the published investigations and case reports of the hemostatic efficacy of HEMOPATCH, wherein HEMOPATCH is demonstrated to be an effective, easy-to-use hemostatic agent in open and minimally invasive surgery of patients with thrombin- or platelet-induced coagulopathies. Keywords: HEMOPATCH, hemostasis, surgical hemostasis, sealing, surgical sealant

  3. [Bariatric surgery: how and why to supplement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo, Livia Azevedo; Teixeira, Tatiana Fiche Sales; Bressan, Josefina; Mourão, Denise Machado

    2011-01-01

    Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies from limited food intake and absorption of different nutrients. A systematic review of several database websites (PubMed and ISI Web of Science) was conducted from September 1983 to April 2010 to identify literature related to micronutrient deficiencies occurring after bariatric surgery. Keywords used individually or in various combinations in the search were bariatric surgery, obesity, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, protein deficiency, nutrient absorption and nutrient supplementation. Literature suggests that to prevent or treat nutritional deficiencies resulting from anatomical changes due to surgical techniques nutritional supplementation is usually necessary. The success of oral nutritional supplementation to correct or prevent nutritional deficiencies depends on several factors. Thus, to understand how nutrients can be administered is very important for clinical practice. This review aims to provide help for the best selection of nutrients to ensure an adequate replacement of nutrients in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery.

  4. Systematic review on reoperative bariatric surgery: American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Revision Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brethauer, Stacy A; Kothari, Shanu; Sudan, Ranjan; Williams, Brandon; English, Wayne J; Brengman, Matthew; Kurian, Marina; Hutter, Matthew; Stegemann, Lloyd; Kallies, Kara; Nguyen, Ninh T; Ponce, Jaime; Morton, John M

    2014-01-01

    Reoperative bariatric surgery has become a common practice in many bariatric surgery programs. There is currently little evidence-based guidance regarding specific indications and outcomes for reoperative bariatric surgery. A task force was convened to review the current evidence regarding reoperative bariatric surgery. The aim of the review was to identify procedure-specific indications and outcomes for reoperative procedures. Literature search was conducted to identify studies reporting indications for and outcomes after reoperative bariatric surgery. Specifically, operations to treat complications, failed weight loss, and weight regain were evaluated. Abstract and manuscript reviews were completed by the task force members to identify, grade, and categorize relevant studies. A total of 819 articles were identified in the initial search. After review for inclusion criteria and data quality, 175 articles were included in the systematic review and analysis. The majority of published studies are single center retrospective reviews. The evidence supporting reoperative surgery for acute and chronic complications is described. The evidence regarding reoperative surgery for failed weight loss and weight regain generally demonstrates improved weight loss and co-morbidity reduction after reintervention. Procedure-specific outcomes are described. Complication rates are generally reported to be higher after reoperative surgery compared to primary surgery. The indications and outcomes for reoperative bariatric surgery are procedure-specific but the current evidence does support additional treatment for persistent obesity, co-morbid disease, and complications. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B; Havens, Joaquim M; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-07-01

    Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006-2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age diverticulitis. Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (-7.2%, 95% CI [-7.78 to -6.62]; pdiverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (-1.8%, 95% CI [-2.1 to -1.5]; pdiverticulitis increased, while ED admission rates and surgical rates declined, with comorbidity, sociodemographic factors predicting hospitalization. Future work should focus on determining if these differences reflect increased disease prevalence, increased diagnosis, or changes in management.

  6. Impact of gastrectomy procedural complexity on surgical outcomes and hospital comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay; Paruch, Jennifer; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Cohen, Mark; Strong, Vivian E; Weber, Sharon M

    2015-08-01

    Most risk adjustment approaches adjust for patient comorbidities and the primary procedure. However, procedures done at the same time as the index case may increase operative risk and merit inclusion in adjustment models for fair hospital comparisons. Our objectives were to evaluate the impact of surgical complexity on postoperative outcomes and hospital comparisons in gastric cancer surgery. Patients who underwent gastric resection for cancer were identified from a large clinical dataset. Procedure complexity was characterized using secondary procedure CPT codes and work relative value units (RVUs). Regression models were developed to evaluate the association between complexity variables and outcomes. The impact of complexity adjustment on model performance and hospital comparisons was examined. Among 3,467 patients who underwent gastrectomy for adenocarcinoma, 2,171 operations were distal and 1,296 total. A secondary procedure was reported for 33% of distal gastrectomies and 59% of total gastrectomies. Six of 10 secondary procedures were associated with adverse outcomes. For example, patients who underwent a synchronous bowel resection had a higher risk of mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.14; 95% CI, 1.07-4.29) and reoperation (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.26-3.47). Model performance was slightly better for nearly all outcomes with complexity adjustment (mortality c-statistics: standard model, 0.853; secondary procedure model, 0.858; RVU model, 0.855). Hospital ranking did not change substantially after complexity adjustment. Surgical complexity variables are associated with adverse outcomes in gastrectomy, but complexity adjustment does not affect hospital rankings appreciably. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying Barriers to Appropriate Use of Metabolic/Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment:Policy Lab Results

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Jennifer K.; Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Hesketh, Rachel; Martin, Adam; Herman, William H.; Rubino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, few patients who may be appropriate candidates and may benefit from this type of surgery avail themselves of this treatment option. To identify conceptual and practical barriers to appropriate use of surgical procedures, a Policy Lab was hosted at the 3rd World Congress on Interventional Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes on 29 September 2015. Twenty-si...

  8. Perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion are major risk factors for venous thromboembolism following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alexander W; Helm, Melissa C; Kindel, Tammy; Higgins, Rana; Lak, Kathleen; Helmen, Zachary M; Gould, Jon C

    2018-05-01

    Morbidly obese patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) after bariatric surgery. Perioperative chemoprophylaxis is used routinely with bariatric surgery to decrease the risk of VTE. When bleeding occurs, routine chemoprophylaxis is often withheld due to concerns about inciting another bleeding event. We sought to evaluate the relationship between perioperative bleeding and postoperative VTE in bariatric surgery. The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) dataset between 2012 and 2014 was queried to identify patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Gastric bypass (n = 28,145), sleeve gastrectomy (n = 30,080), bariatric revision (n = 324), and biliopancreatic diversion procedures (n = 492) were included. Univariate and multivariate regressions were used to determine perioperative factors predictive of postoperative VTE within 30 days in patients who experience a bleeding complication necessitating transfusion. The rate of bleeding necessitating transfusion was 1.3%. Bleeding was significantly more likely to occur in gastric bypass compared to sleeve gastrectomy (1.6 vs. 1.0%) (p surgeries, increased age, length of stay, operative time, and comorbidities including hypertension, dyspnea with moderate exertion, partially dependent functional status, bleeding disorder, transfusion prior to surgery, ASA class III/IV, and metabolic syndrome increased the perioperative bleeding risk (p Bariatric surgery patients who receive postoperative blood transfusion are at a significantly increased risk for VTE. The etiology of VTE in those who are transfused is likely multifactorial and possibly related to withholding chemoprophylaxis and the potential of a hypercoagulable state induced by the transfusion. In those who bleed, consideration should be given to reinitiating chemoprophylaxis when safe, extending treatment after discharge, and screening ultrasound.

  9. Body contouring following massive weight loss resulting from bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2006-01-01

    A sharp increase in bariatric surgery has resulted in spike in the population of patients seeking body-contouring procedures. Skin and soft tissue redundancy of the trunk, buttocks, breasts, upper arms, and thighs following massive weight loss is unsightly and results in medical problems such as musculoskeletal strain from increased tissue weight, intertrigo or functional limitation with walking, maintaining adequate hygiene, bowel and bladder habits and sexual activity. These elements compound the inherent psychosocial issues related to massive weight loss. Using time-tested plastic surgical techniques, several operations have been designed and perfected to address the needs of these patients. These include breast, thigh and lower body lift, abdominoplasty, face and neck lifts as well as brachioplasty or arm lift. Recognizing that there is a qualitative as well as a quantitative difference in the type and amount of tissues in postbariatric patients these techniques have been suitably refined to optimize outcomes and provide safe and durable re-contouring. Consequently, bariatric surgery and the subsequent weight loss require an additional 2-3 years commitment towards body contouring procedures. Restoring their body image through reshaping procedures is an integral part of completing the treatment of post-weight-loss patients. Strategic skills in terms of assessment of each patient, careful planning, timing, especially for patient safety and technique are fundamental for the success of these often complex and extensive procedures.

  10. Assessment of the efficiency of language interpreter services in a busy surgical and procedural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Christopher M; Anderson, Kathleen A; Xiong, YaPa; Guerra, Andrea E; Tschida-Reuter, Daniel A

    2017-07-04

    Surgical and procedural patient care settings require efficient patient flow. The primary goal of this study was to assess use and efficiency of language services for our limited English proficiency (LEP) patients undergoing surgical and outpatient procedures. Patient language services needs were recorded from our operating room and procedural locations over a two and a half month period in 2016. Time from in-person interpreter request to arrival was recorded. Frequency of language service modality used and reason for telephone and professional video remote interpreting (VRI) rather than in person professional services was queried. Mean time from in-person interpreter request until arrival was 19 min. Variation was high. No cases were cancelled due to lack of available interpretive services and no LEP patient underwent a procedure without requested interpretative service assistance. Time for in person professional interpreter assistance was short but highly variable. Access to telephone interpretive services and VRI services ensured assistance when in person interpreters were immediately unavailable. With the numbers of LEP patients increasing over time along with any new mandates for providing language assistance, the stress on hospital patient service units and the financial implications for many health care facilities will likely continue as challenges.

  11. Doctors' perspectives of informed consent for non-emergency surgical procedures: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Fiona; Martin, Sean Michael; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Elwyn, Glyn; Precious, Elizabeth; Kinnersley, Paul

    2016-06-01

    The need to involve patients more in decisions about their care, the ethical imperative and concerns about ligation and complaints has highlighted the issue of informed consent and how it is obtained. In order for a patient to make an informed decision about their treatment, they need appropriate discussion of the risks and benefits of the treatment. To explore doctors' perspectives of gaining informed consent for routine surgical procedures. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews selected by purposive sampling. Data were analysed thematically. Twenty doctors in two teaching hospitals in the UK. Doctors described that while consent could be taken over a series of consultations, it was common for consent to be taken immediately prior to surgery. Juniors were often taking consent when they were unfamiliar with the procedure. Doctors used a range of communication techniques to inform patients about the procedure and its risks including quantifying risks, personalizing risk, simplification of language and use of drawings. Barriers to effective consent taking were reported to be shortage of time, clinician inexperience and patients' reluctance to be involved. Current consent processes do not appear to be ideal for many doctors. In particular, junior doctors are often not confident taking consent for surgical procedures and require more support to undertake this task. This might include written information for junior staff, observation by senior colleagues when undertaking the task and ward-based communication skills teaching on consent taking. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  13. Protein and amino acid status before and after bariatric surgery: a 12-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina Ferreira; Morandi Junqueira-Franco, Marcia Varella; dos Santos, Jose Ernesto; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Salgado, Wilson; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Patients with obesity submitted to bariatric surgery present altered ingestion of macronutrient and micronutrient levels and nutrients deficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protein and amino acid nutritional status of obese adults before and after bariatric surgery, with emphasis on plasma free amino acids. Thirty obese women were submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric shunt (bariatric surgery). Food and protein intake, anthropometric and bioimpedance data (body composition analysis), and serum total protein, albumin, and plasma amino acids levels were collected before the surgery (preoperative) and 3, 6, and 12 months after the surgical procedure. The mean protein intake was 47±2 g/day. The total weight loss during the study period was 39±8 kg; the fat-free mass decreased 7±5 kg. The amino acid profile showed increased concentrations of most amino acids 3 months after surgery; at 6 months, glutamic acid, serine, arginine, alanine, methionine, valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, and tyrosine concentrations decreased. The total protein and albumin concentrations dropped along the 12-month follow-up. The amino acid profile changes after RYGB are evidence that total protein and albumin levels may not be good indicators of protein profile after the surgery. © 2013 Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery on behalf of American Society for Bariatric Surgery.

  14. Cost-effectiveness analyses of elective orthopaedic surgical procedures in patients with inflammatory arthropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osnes-Ringen, H.; Kvamme, M. K.; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar

    2011-01-01

    . The health benefit from surgery was subsequently translated into QALYs. The direct treatment costs in the first year were, for each patient, derived from the hospital's cost per patient accounting system (KOSPA). The costs per QALY were estimated and future costs and benefits were discounted at 4%. Results......: Improvement in utility at 1-year follow-up was 0.10 with EQ-5D and 0.03 with SF-6D (p procedures. The 5-year cost per QALY was EUR 17...... 800 for non-replacement surgical procedures measured by EQ-5D (SF-6D: EUR 67 500). Conclusions: Elective orthopaedic surgery in patients with inflammatory arthropathies was cost-effective when measured with EQ-5D, and some procedures were also cost-effective when SF-6D was used in the economic...

  15. Four decades of bariatric surgery in a community hospital of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltasar, Aniceto; Bou, Rafael; Bengochea, Marcelo; Serra, Carlos; Ferri, Lirios; Pérez, Nieves; Arlandis, Francisco; Martínez, Rosa; Cipagauta, Luis

    2017-07-28

    Bariatric surgical practice changes in the community setting may be under-reported. We present the developments in a Spanish bariatric surgical practice in the community setting of Alcoy from its origin in 1977 through the present. Bariatric surgical techniques employed in a country community setting over the course of nearly four decades were reviewed retrospectively and qualitatively. Surgeons and medical professionals from Alcoy, Spain were involved in the evolution of bariatric surgery patient management and surgical technique from 1977s through 2017. During the last 40 years, 1,475 patients were treated in our clinics. Spanish bariatric surgeons contributed to advances in gastric bypass in the 1970s, vertical banded gastroplasty in the 1980s, bilio-pancreatic diversion/duodenal switch in the 1990s, and innovations associated with laparoscopy from the 1990s onward. Outcomes and approaches to prevention and treatment of bariatric surgical complications are reviewed from a community perspective. Contributions to the bariatric surgical nomenclature and weight-loss reporting are noted. The practice of bariatric surgery in the community setting must be updated continuously, as in any human and surgical endeavor. Medical professionals in community bariatric practices should contribute their experiences to the field through all avenues of scientific interaction and publication.

  16. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis using Frey's procedure: a Brazilian 16-year single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestic, Martinho Antonio; Callejas-Neto, Francisco; Chaim, Elinton Adami; Utrini, Murillo Pimentel; Cazzo, Everton; Pareja, Jose Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis is indicated for intractable pain. Frey's procedure is an accepted treatment for this disease. The aim of the present study was to describe a single-centre experience in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis using Frey's procedure. A retrospective analysis of 73 patients who underwent a Frey's procedure between 1991 to 2007 and had at least 1 year of follow-up. Demographics, indication for surgery, peri-operative complications and late outcomes were analysed. The median age was 39.9 years. Seventy out of the 73 (95.8%) patients were male. The median pre-operative body mass index (BMI) was 19.1 kg/m(2). All patients had abdominal pain, 34 (46.6%) of them daily and 13 (17.8%) weekly, with moderate or severe intensity in 98.6% (n= 72). The aetiology was secondary to alcohol in 70 patients (95.9%), with a median consumption of 278 g per day. The surgical morbidity rate was 28.7%; there were no deaths. Median post-operative follow-up was 77.0 months; 64 patients (91.4%) had complete pain relief and post-operative BMI was 22.4 kg/m(2) (P<0.001). All patients with pre-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiencies showed no reversal of the situation. New onset insufficiencies appeared late. Frey's procedure was a safe and effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  17. Mortality of induced abortion, other outpatient surgical procedures and common activities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Grossman, Daniel; Weaver, Mark A; Toti, Stephanie; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-11-01

    The recent surge of new legislation regulating induced abortion in the United States is ostensibly motivated by the desire to protect women's health. To provide context for interpreting the risk of abortion, we compared abortion-related mortality to mortality associated with other outpatient surgical procedures and selected nonmedical activities. We calculated the abortion-related mortality rate during 2000-2009 using national data. We searched PubMed and other sources for contemporaneous data on mortality associated with other outpatient procedures commonly performed on healthy young women, marathon running, bicycling and driving. The abortion-related mortality rate in 2000-2009 in the United States was 0.7 per 100,000 abortions. Studies in approximately the same years found mortality rates of 0.8-1.7 deaths per 100,000 plastic surgery procedures, 0-1.7deaths per 100,000 dental procedures, 0.6-1.2 deaths per 100,000 marathons run and at least 4 deaths among 100,000 cyclists in a large annual bicycling event. The traffic fatality rate per 758 vehicle miles traveled by passenger cars in the United States in 2007-2011 was about equal to the abortion-related mortality rate. The safety of induced abortion as practiced in the United States for the past decade met or exceeded expectations for outpatient surgical procedures and compared favorably to that of two common nonmedical voluntary activities. The new legislation restricting abortion is unnecessary; indeed, by reducing the geographic distribution of abortion providers and requiring women to travel farther for the procedure, these laws are potentially detrimental to women's health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Defining Optimal Length of Opioid Pain Medication Prescription After Common Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Rebecca E; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart; Chaudhary, Muhammad Ali; Learn, Peter A; Koehlmoos, Tracey; Haider, Adil H; Nguyen, Louis L

    2018-01-01

    The overprescription of pain medications has been implicated as a driver of the burgeoning opioid epidemic; however, few guidelines exist regarding the appropriateness of opioid pain medication prescriptions after surgery. To describe patterns of opioid pain medication prescriptions after common surgical procedures and determine the appropriateness of the prescription as indicated by the rate of refills. The Department of Defense Military Health System Data Repository was used to identify opioid-naive individuals 18 to 64 years of age who had undergone 1 of 8 common surgical procedures between January 1, 2005, and September 30, 2014. The adjusted risk of refilling an opioid prescription based on the number of days of initial prescription was modeled using a generalized additive model with spline smoothing. Length of initial prescription for opioid pain medication. Need for an additional subsequent prescription for opioid pain medication, or a refill. Of the 215 140 individuals (107 588 women and 107 552 men; mean [SD] age, 40.1 [12.8] years) who underwent a procedure within the study time frame and received and filled at least 1 prescription for opioid pain medication within 14 days of their index procedure, 41 107 (19.1%) received at least 1 refill prescription. The median prescription lengths were 4 days (interquartile range [IQR], 3-5 days) for appendectomy and cholecystectomy, 5 days (IQR, 3-6 days) for inguinal hernia repair, 4 days (IQR, 3-5 days) for hysterectomy, 5 days (IQR, 3-6 days) for mastectomy, 5 days (IQR, 4-8 days) for anterior cruciate ligament repair and rotator cuff repair, and 7 days (IQR, 5-10 days) for discectomy. The early nadir in the probability of refill was at an initial prescription of 9 days for general surgery procedures (probability of refill, 10.7%), 13 days for women's health procedures (probability of refill, 16.8%), and 15 days for musculoskeletal procedures (probability of refill, 32.5%). Ideally, opioid prescriptions

  19. [Changes in quality of life in patients undergoing bariatric surgery following 24-months: comparison between gastric bypass and tubular vertical gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hofstadt Román, C J; Escribano Cubas, S; Tirado González, S; Pérez Martínez, E; Estrada Caballero, J L; Ortiz Sebastián, S; Rodríguez-Marín, J; Leal Costa, C

    2017-08-31

    Bariatric surgery has become the procedure of choice to deal with morbid and super-morbid obesity, with the greatest chance of success. The objectives of this study were: a) to analyse the evolution of the percentage of excess BMI lost (PEBMIL) and quality of life in the medium and long term after bariatric surgery; b) to evaluate the differences in PEBMIL and quality of life according to the surgical technique performed; and c) examine the relationship between PEBMIL and quality of life. One hundred and ninety-one subjects participated in the present study, undergoing bariatric surgery with follow-up at 12 and 24 months after surgery. The SF-36 and OP-53 questionnaires were administered to assess the quality of life after surgery. There was a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of excess BMI lost at 12 and 24 months; and a significant improvement in quality of life at 12 months, which remained stable at 24 months for most variables. Taking into account the surgical technique, those undergoing gastric bypass surgery show a greater loss of PEBMIL at 12 and 24 months, and significant improvement at one year of evaluation in most of the dimensions that measure quality of life with respect to the tubular vertical gastrectomy technique. Bariatric surgery is effective in reducing the excess of BMI lost and significantly improving the quality of life of morbidly obese patients in the long term. Key words. Bariatric surgery. Quality of life. Morbid obesity.

  20. Perioperative morbi-mortality associated with bariatric surgery: from systematic biliopancreatic diversion to a tailored laparoscopic gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Matta-Martín, Manuel; Acosta-Martínez, Jesús; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Herrera-González, Augusto

    2012-07-01

    The effectiveness and safety of the different bariatric surgical procedures currently available depend, partly, on the characteristics of the populations under study, the technical approach, the expertise of surgical teams, and on institutional factors. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of these procedures, we compared the surgical results for biliopancreatic diversion surgery versus laparoscopic gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomies performed in our institution. This was a retrospective observational study of 296 patients undergoing bariatric surgery from January 2005 through October 2010. We analyzed mortality rate, cardiocirculatory and pulmonary perioperative complications, duration of surgery, intensive care unit admissions, and length of stay. We describe the changes in the choice of the surgical procedures throughout the study period. We observed a rate of pulmonary complications of 2.3 % and a mortality rate 3 months after discharge of 2.36 % with sepsis secondary to anastomotic leak as the main cause of death. Biliopancreatic diversion surgery was associated with higher mortality rates (p value = 0.014) and longer hospital stay (median of 9 versus 6 days for laparoscopic gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy, p value laparoscopic restrictive and mixed techniques in our institution (from 0 % in 2005 to 87 % of all procedures in 2010). Bariatric surgery in our institution has dramatically shifted from systematic biliopancreatic diversion to a tailored laparoscopic gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy approach, which has made it possible to reduce hospital stay and mortality rates.

  1. Surgical procedure "simplified retrosigmoid approach" for C-P angle lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashima, Tetsumori; Lee, Joung H; Tobias, Samuel; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Chang, Jong Hee; Kwon, Jeong-Taik

    2004-02-01

    Previously, we reported surgical results of the simplified retrosigmoid approach for vestibular nerve sectioning in the cases with intractable vertigo. Here, we introduce in details surgical procedures of the simplified retrosigmoid (also called "subasterional" here for simplification) approach developed by one of the authors (J.H.L.). This approach is to operate cerebello-pontine (C-P) angle lesions through a small upper lateral window below the transverse-sigmoid junction. The retroauricular 4-5 cm skin incision, triangular craniectomy 2 cm in width, dural opening and closure, special considerations, and reconstruction of the skull defect were outlined. The bony landmarks for triangle craniectomy below asterion were described in detail. The C-P angle was appropriately approached for microvascular decompression, removal of C-P angle tumors, and vestibular nerve resection. This subasterional approach was characterized by short operation time of 1-3 h and less postoperative discomforts compared to the conventional retrosigmoid approach.

  2. Incidence of type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery: population-based matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Helen; Khan, Omar; Prevost, Toby; Reddy, Marcus; Dregan, Alex; Charlton, Judith; Ashworth, Mark; Rudisill, Caroline; Littlejohns, Peter; Gulliford, Martin C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of currently used bariatric surgical procedures on the development of diabetes in obese people is not well defined. We aimed to assess the effect of bariatric surgery on development of type 2 diabetes in a large population of obese individuals. We did a matched cohort study of adults (age 20–100 years) identified from a UK-wide database of family practices, who were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) and did not have diabetes. We enrolled 2167 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery between Jan 1, 2002, and April 30, 2014, and matched them--according to BMI, age, sex, index year, and HbA1c--with 2167 controls who had not had surgery. Procedures included laparoscopic gastric banding (n=1053), gastric bypass (795), and sleeve gastrectomy (317), with two procedures undefined. The primary outcome was development of clinical diabetes, which we extracted from electronic health records. Analyses were adjusted for matching variables, comorbidity, cardiovascular risk factors, and use of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs. During a maximum of 7 years of follow-up (median 2·8 years [IQR 1·3–4·5]), 38 new diagnoses of diabetes were made in bariatric surgery patients and 177 were made in controls. By the end of 7 years of follow-up, 4·3% (95% CI 2·9–6·5) of bariatric surgery patients and 16·2% (13·3–19·6) of matched controls had developed diabetes. The incidence of diabetes diagnosis was 28·2 (95% CI 24·4–32·7) per 1000 person-years in controls and 5·7 (4·2–7·8) per 1000 person-years in bariatric surgery patients; the adjusted hazard ratio was 0·20 (95% CI 0·13–0·30, pgestational diabetes, or allowing for competing mortality risk. Bariatric surgery is associated with reduced incidence of clinical diabetes in obese participants without diabetes at baseline for up to 7 years after the procedure. UK National Institute for Health Research.

  3. Hybrid procedure for total laryngectomy with a flexible robot-assisted surgical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Patrick J; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Veit, Johannes A; Rotter, Nicole; Friedrich, Daniel T; Greve, Jens; Scheithauer, Marc O

    2017-06-01

    Total laryngectomy is a standard procedure in head-and-neck surgery for the treatment of cancer patients. Recent clinical experiences have indicated a clinical benefit for patients undergoing transoral robot-assisted total laryngectomy (TORS-TL) with commercially available systems. Here, a new hybrid procedure for total laryngectomy is presented. TORS-TL was performed in human cadavers (n = 3) using a transoral-transcervical hybrid procedure. The transoral approach was performed with a robotic flexible robot-assisted surgical system (Flex®) and compatible flexible instruments. Transoral access and visualization of anatomical landmarks were studied in detail. Total laryngectomy is feasible with a combined transoral-transcervical approach using the flexible robot-assisted surgical system. Transoral visualization of all anatomical structures is sufficient. The flexible design of the robot is advantageous for transoral surgery of the laryngeal structures. Transoral robot assisted surgery has the potential to reduce morbidity, hospital time and fistula rates in a selected group of patients. Initial clinical studies and further development of supplemental tools are in progress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Isokinetic muscle assessment after treatment of pectoralis major muscle rupture using surgical or non-surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Fleury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rupture of the pectoralis major muscle appears to be increasing in athletes. However, the optimal treatment strategy has not yet been established. OBJECTIVES: To compare the isokinetic shoulder performance after surgical treatment to that after non-surgical treatment for pectoralis major muscle rupture. METHODS: We assessed 33 pectoralis major muscle ruptures (18 treated non-surgically and 15 treated surgically. Horizontal abduction and adduction as well as external and internal rotation at 60 and 120 degrees/s were tested in both upper limbs. Peak torque, total work, contralateral deficiency, and the peak torque agonist-to-antagonist ratio were measured. RESULTS: Contralateral muscular deficiency did not differ between the surgical and non-surgical treatment modalities. However, the surgical group presented twice the number of athletes with clinically acceptable contralateral deficiency (<20% for internal rotators compared to the non-surgical group. The peak torque ratio between the external and internal rotator muscles revealed a similar deficit of the external rotation in both groups and on both sides (surgical, 61.60% and 57.80% and non-surgical, 62.06% and 54.06%, for the dominant and non-dominant sides, respectively. The peak torque ratio revealed that the horizontal adduction muscles on the injured side showed similar weakness in both groups (surgical, 86.27%; non-surgical, 98.61%. CONCLUSIONS: This study included the largest single series of athletes reported to date for this type of injury. A comparative analysis of muscular strength and balance showed no differences between the treatment modalities for pectoralis major muscle rupture. However, the number of significant clinical deficiencies was lower in the surgical group than in the non-surgical group, and both treatment modalities require greater attention to the rehabilitation process, especially for the recovery of muscle strength and balance.

  5. Sexual abuse in bariatric surgery candidates: impact on weight loss after surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinig, J; Wagner, B; Shang, E; Dölemeyer, R; Kersting, A

    2012-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is becoming more and more influential as efficient weight loss therapy for the morbidly obese. As many studies propose a relationship between sexual abuse and obesity in general, but especially with regard to weight regain after successful weight loss, sexual abuse might also have a crucial impact on the outcome of the surgical procedures. This review examines the literature comparing weight loss after bariatric surgery in sexually abused and non-abused individuals. We conducted a systematic electronic literature search covering PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, PsychInfo and Web of Science. While 13 studies examined prevalence rates of sexual abuse among bariatric patients, eight studies explicitly investigated the effect of sexual abuse on surgery outcome. We hypothesized that individuals with a history of sexual abuse lose less weight compared to individuals with no such abuse history. At first glance, only three out of eight studies demonstrated significantly reduced weight loss in the sexually abused patients. However, a closer investigation of all studies revealed that patients with abuse experiences may indeed tend to lose less weight initially. Still, this sub-population apparently benefits from the surgical procedure, as revealed by increased weight loss over time. Reasons for these mixed results are discussed, as well as the clinical implications that can be drawn from these studies. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Surgical management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2012-03-10

    Metabolic disturbances are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Obesity is the major link in the association of PCOS with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, low-grade chronic inflammation and increased body iron stores, among others. Metabolic prevention in PCOS women should start as early as possible, usually meaning at diagnosis. Among preventive strategies, those promoting a healthy life-style based on diet, regular exercising and smoking cessation are possibly the most effective therapies, but also are the most difficult to achieve. To this regard, every effort must be made to avoid weight gain and obesity, given the deleterious impact that obesity exerts on the metabolic and cardiovascular associations of PCOS. Unfortunately, classic strategies that address obesity by life-style modification and dieting are seldom successful on a long-term basis, especially in women with severe obesity. In selected cases, metabolic surgery in severely obese women may resolve signs and symptoms of PCOS restoring insulin sensitivity and fertility, and avoiding the long-term risks associated with PCOS and morbid obesity. Surgical techniques for bariatric surgery have evolved in the past decades and newer procedures do not longer carry the severe side effects associated with earlier bariatric procedures. The choice of bariatric procedure should consider both the severity of obesity and the possibility of future pregnancy, since fertility may be restored by the sustained and marked weight loss usually attained after bariatric surgery. Finally, avoidance of the risks associated with morbid obesity compensate for the possible residual risks for pregnancy derived from the previous bariatric procedure itself. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bariatric and metabolic surgery: a shift in eligibility and success criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühbeck, Gema

    2015-08-01

    The obesity epidemic, combined with the lack of available and effective treatments for morbid obesity, is a scientific and public health priority. Worldwide, bariatric and metabolic surgeries are increasingly being performed to effectively aid weight loss in patients with severe obesity, as well as because of the favourable metabolic effects of the procedures. The positive effects of bariatric surgery, especially with respect to improvements in type 2 diabetes mellitus, have expanded the eligibility criteria for metabolic surgery to patients with diabetes mellitus and a BMI of 30-35 kg/m(2). However, the limitations of BMI, both in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients, need to be considered, particularly for determining the actual adiposity and fat distribution of the patients following weight loss. Understanding the characteristics shared by bariatric and metabolic surgeries, as well as their differential aspects and outcomes, is required to enhance patient benefits and operative achievements. For a holistic approach that focuses on the multifactorial effects of bariatric and metabolic surgery to be possible, a paradigm shift that goes beyond the pure semantics is needed. Such a shift could lead to profound clinical implications for eligibility criteria and the definition of success of the surgical approach.

  8. Bariatric surgery complications leading to small bowel transplant: a report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdal Raheem, Sulieman; Deen, Omer J; Corrigan, Mandy L; Parekh, Neha; Quintini, Cristiano; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a major chronic disease affecting the U.S. population. Bariatric surgery has consistently shown greater weight loss and improved outcomes compared with conservative therapy. However, complications after bariatric surgery can be catastrophic, resulting in short bowel syndrome with a potential risk of intestinal failure, ultimately resulting in the need for a small bowel transplant. A total of 6 patients became dependent on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) after undergoing bariatric surgery at an outside facility. Four of the 6 patients required evaluation for small bowel transplant; 2 of the 6 patients were successfully managed with parenteral nutrition and did not require further small bowel transplant evaluation. Catheter-related bloodstream infection, a serious complication of HPN, occurred in 3 patients despite extensive patient education on catheter care and use of ethanol lock. Two patients underwent successful small bowel transplantation, 1 died before transplant could be performed, and 1 was listed for a multivisceral transplantation. Surgical procedures to treat morbid obesity are common and growing in popularity but are not without risk of serious complications, including intestinal failure and HPN dependency. Despite methods to prevent complications, failure of HPN may lead to the need for transplant evaluation. In selected cases, the best therapeutic treatment may be a small bowel transplant to resolve irreversible, post-bariatric surgery intestinal failure.

  9. Metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in mouse models of circadian disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arble, D M; Sandoval, D A; Turek, F W; Woods, S C; Seeley, R J

    2015-08-01

    Mounting evidence supports a link between circadian disruption and metabolic disease. Humans with circadian disruption (for example, night-shift workers) have an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases compared with the non-disrupted population. However, it is unclear whether the obesity and obesity-related disorders associated with circadian disruption respond to therapeutic treatments as well as individuals with other types of obesity. Here, we test the effectiveness of the commonly used bariatric surgical procedure, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG), in mouse models of genetic and environmental circadian disruption. VSG led to a reduction in body weight and fat mass in both Clock(Δ19) mutant and constant-light mouse models (Pdisruption. Interestingly, the decrease in body weight occurred without altering diurnal feeding or activity patterns (P>0.05). Within circadian-disrupted models, VSG also led to improved glucose tolerance and lipid handling (Pdisruption, and that the potent effects of bariatric surgery are orthogonal to circadian biology. However, as the effects of bariatric surgery are independent of circadian disruption, VSG cannot be considered a cure for circadian disruption. These data have important implications for circadian-disrupted obese patients. Moreover, these results reveal new information about the metabolic pathways governing the effects of bariatric surgery as well as of circadian disruption.

  10. Sperm parameters and male fertility after bariatric surgery: three case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermondade, Nathalie; Massin, Nathalie; Boitrelle, Florence; Pfeffer, Jérôme; Eustache, Florence; Sifer, Christophe; Czernichow, Sébastien; Lévy, Rachel

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have underlined the impact of obesity on sperm parameters, but very few data are available on the effect of weight loss on male fertility. This article reports the case series of three male patients who underwent rapid and major weight loss following bariatric surgery and the consequences of this surgery on semen parameters and fertility. A severe worsening of semen parameters was observed during the months after bariatric surgery, including extreme oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, but azoospermia was not observed. This effect may hypothetically be the result of two opposite mechanisms: (i) the suppression of the deleterious effects of obesity; and (ii) the negative impact of both nutritional deficiencies and the release of toxic substances. Information about potential reproductive consequences of bariatric surgery should be given to patients and sperm cryopreservation before surgery proposed. However, for one case, the alterations of spermatogenesis were reversible 2 years after the surgical procedure. Finally, intracytoplasmic sperm injection with fresh spermatozoa after male bariatric surgery can be successful, as demonstrated here, where clinical pregnancies were obtained for two out of the three couples. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The increasing number of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England: analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S I M F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the number and trend of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England. An online search of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data was carried out. Data were available for the 4-year period from 2002-03 until 2005-06. The total number of surgical procedures carried out for female genital fistula steadily increased by 28.7% from 616 in 2002-03 to 793 in 2005-06. The number of surgical procedures performed for rectovaginal fistula exceeded the total number of surgical procedures carried out for vesicovaginal and urethrovaginal fistula in each year of the study period. This pattern needs to be monitored and investigated further.

  12. The surgical procedure is the most important factor affecting continence recovery after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungsoo; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Ha, Hong Koo

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed factors associated with early recovery of continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Among 467 patients treated with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer between 2007 and 2012, 249 patients who underwent a preoperative urodynamic study were enrolled. The patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, pathologic stage, and preoperative urodynamic parameters were recorded. The preoperative membranous and prostatic urethral length on magnetic resonance image, nerve sparing technique, and type of surgical procedure (extrafascial and intrafascial) were analyzed. Patients were considered to have early recovery of continence when they needed no pad in 3 months or less after surgery. Ninety-two patients were in the early recovery group and 157 were in the late recovery group. The membranous urethral lengths were 12.06±2.56 and 11.81±2.87 mm, and prostatic urethral lengths were 36.39±6.15 and 37.45±7.55 mm in each group, respectively. The membranous-posterior urethral length ratios were 0.25±0.06 and 0.24±0.06, and prostatic-posterior urethral length ratios were 0.75±0.06 and 0.76±0.06, respectively. In and of themselves, the membranous and prostatic urethral lengths were not associated with recovery duration however, the membranous-total and prostatic-total urethral length ratios were related (p=0.024 and 0.024, respectively). None of the urodynamic parameters correlated with continence recovery time. In the multivariate analysis, the type of surgical procedure (odds ratio [OR], 7.032; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.660 to 18.590; precovery of continence. The current intrafascial surgical procedure is the most important factor affecting early recovery of continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

  13. Current challenges in providing bariatric surgery in France: A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernichow, Sébastien; Paita, Michel; Nocca, David; Msika, Simon; Basdevant, Arnaud; Millat, Bertrand; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is a well-accepted procedure for severe and massive obesity management. We aimed to determine trends, geographical variations, and factors influencing bariatric surgery and the choice of procedure in France in a large observational study.The Health Insurance Fund for Salaried Workers (Caisse National Assurance Maladie Travailleurs Salariés) covers about 86% of the French population. The Système National d'Information Inter-régimes de l'Assurance Maladie database contains individualized and anonymized patient data on all reimbursements for healthcare expenditure. All types of primary bariatric procedures (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or omega loop, adjustable gastric banding [AGB], or longitudinal sleeve gastrectomy [LSG]) performed during 2011 to 2013 were systematically recorded. Surgical techniques performed by region of residence and age-range relative risks with 95% confidence intervals of undergoing LSG or RYGB versus AGB were computed.In 2013, LSG was performed more frequently than RYGB and AGB (57% vs 31% and 13%, respectively). A total of 41,648 patients underwent a bariatric procedure; they were predominantly female (82%) with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 40 (±12) years and a body mass index ≥40 kg/m for 68% of them. A total of 114 procedures were performed in patients younger than 18 years and 2381 procedures were performed in patients aged 60 years and older. Beneficiaries of the French universal health insurance coverage for low-income patients were more likely to undergo surgery than the general population. Large nationwide variations were observed in the type choice of bariatric surgical procedures. Significant positive predictors for undergoing RYGB compared to those for undergoing AGB were as follows: referral to a center performing a large number of surgeries or to a public hospital, older age, female gender, body mass index ≥50 kg/m, and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, or

  14. Malabsorption as a Therapeutic Approach in Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Adrian T.; Fischer, Lars; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Senft, Jonas; Müller-Stich, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of obese patients will lead to a more frequent use of bariatric procedures in the future. Compared to conservative medical therapy, bariatric procedures achieve greater weight loss and superior control of comorbidities, resulting in improved overall mortality. Methods A search for current literature regarding mechanisms, indications, and outcomes of bariatric surgery was performed. Results In order to care for patients after bariatric surgery properly, it is important to understand its mechanisms of action and effects on gastrointestinal physiology. Recent investigations indicate that the beneficial effects of bariatric procedures are much more complex than simply limiting food intake or an associated malabsorption. Changes in gastrointestinal hormone secretion, energy expenditure, intestinal bacterial colonization, bile acid metabolism, and epigenetic modifications resulting in altered gene expression are likely responsible for the majority of the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures divert the flow of bile and pancreatic enzymes from food and therefore limit the digestion and absorption of nutrients, resulting in reduced calorie intake and subsequent weight loss. Essential micronutrients such as vitamins and trace elements are also absorbed to a lesser extent, potentially leading to severe side effects. Conclusion To prevent malnutrition, dietary supplementation and regular control of micronutrient levels are mandatory for patients undergoing malabsorptive bariatric procedures, in whom the fat-soluble vitamins A and D are commonly deficient. PMID:26288594

  15. Bariatric surgery: unstressing or boosting the beta-cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingrone, G; Castagneto, M

    2009-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy for severe obesity in terms of reduction of morbidity and mortality and quality of life improvement. Different bariatric procedures distinctly differ with regard to their effectiveness to reduce body weight and to improve morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes. In this regard, the most effective procedures are bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) and duodenal switch procedure curing 98.9% of the diabetes patients, followed by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with 83.7% success rate, by gastroplasty with 71.6% and by gastric banding with 47.9%. Interestingly, a net improvement up to resolution of type 2 diabetes has been consistently reported few days after RYGB and BPD. RYGB promotes incretin secretion which, in turn, stimulates insulin secretion while insulin sensitivity is slightly improved. Rarely, the long-term effect of incretin hypersecretion might result in hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the islets of Langerhans, otherwise known as nesidioblastosis, associated with hyperinsulinaemia and severe postprandial hypoglycaemia. In contrast, BDP improves insulin resistance to a greater extent and results, in the long run, in supra-normal values of insulin sensitivity with subsequent reduction of insulin secretion. The mechanism allowing diabetes resolution after surgical intestinal manipulation is extremely interesting but only partially understood.

  16. [Circumscribed and diffuse peritonitis: severe complications in bariatric and metabolic surgery; specifics related to their diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špička, P; Vaverka, P; Gryga, A; Malý, T

    Cases of localized and diffuse peritonitis are severe surgical conditions. Despite expanding possibilities for the diagnosis and therapy, patients with peritonitis, its diffuse form in particular, still suffer from high morbidity and mortality. The management of this condition, both in the healthy and especially seriously ill population, is not satisfactory. Recently, we have witnessed an increase in bariatric and metabolic surgery in response to an ever rising number of extremely obese patients worldwide. Bariatric patients belong to a group of seriously ill patients with a significant risk of post-operative complications due to an infection. Although their treatment is identical to that of the normal population, a great emphasis is put on early recognition of complications, and the decision on any potential surgical revision should be actively approached, often necessitating the absence of frequently lengthy paraclinical assessments. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 346 obese bariatric patients undergoing surgical treatment for morbid obesity between August 2011 and August 2015. A total of 6 patients experienced severe complications including two cases of diffuse peritonitis, two cases of localized peritonitis and two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding. One patient died after her discharge from hospital due to toxic shock caused by stomach perforation. We describe two case reports in greater detail to highlight the importance of early detection of complications and a timely surgical intervention. In principle, bariatric patients are a severely ill population where standard diagnostic procedures for post-operative complications often fail. Clinical findings and the surgeons experience are commonly the only diagnostic signs that trigger a surgical revision. In contrast, surgical treatment of post-operative complications in obese patients with peritonitis is virtually identical to that in patients with normal or slightly increased BMI. It involves thorough

  17. Bariatric surgery: impact on pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiner, Eyal; Willis, Kent; Yogev, Yariv

    2013-02-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity in women of reproductive age has resulted in approximately 1 in 5 women being obese when they conceive. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective long-term weight loss strategy in obese women in this age group. Clinicians should be aware of the effects of bariatric surgery on fertility and future pregnancies. Regarding certain complications, pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safer than pregnancy in the obese. In patients where nutrition is properly maintained and monitored, the risks for obesity-related obstetric complications, such as gestational diabetes mellitus and hypertension, are significantly reduced, but possibly at the expense of an increase in neonates born small-for-gestational-age. At the present, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn concerning the risk for Caesarian delivery, differences in type of bariatric procedure, or the optimal surgery-to-conception interval.

  18. Single-incision laparoscopic bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chih-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bariatric surgery has been established as the best option of treatment for morbid obesity. In recent years single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS has emerged as another modality of carrying out the bariatric procedures. While SILS represents an advance, its application in morbid obesity at present is limited. In this article, we review the technique and results of SILS in bariatric surgery. Methods: The PubMed database was searched and totally 11 series reporting SILS in bariatric surgery were identified and analyzed. The case reports were excluded. Since 2008, 114 morbidly obese patients receiving SILS bariatric surgeries were reported. Results: The procedures performed included SILS gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass. No mortality was reported in the literatures. Sixteen patients (14.05% needed an additional incision for a liver retractor, a trocar or for conversion. Only one complication of wound infection was reported in these series. All the surgeons reported that the patients were highly satisfied with the scar. Conclusion: Because of abundant visceral and subcutaneous fat and multiple comorbidities in morbid obesity, it is more challenging for surgeons to perform the procedures with SILS. It is clear that extensive development of new instruments and technical aspects of these procedures as well as randomized studies to compare them with traditional laparoscopy are essential before these procedures can be utilized in day-to-day clinical practice.

  19. Bariatric Surgery and Infertility: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvo, Vincenzo; Canero, Antonio; Salsano, Vincenzo

    2017-12-22

    Obesity is a worldwide disease affecting 13% of the world's adult female population. The reasons and the fetal risk are still unclear. The effect of weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery seems to induce an improvement in fertility in obese women. The main purpose of this prospective study is to demonstrate if there is an association between bariatric surgery-induced weight loss and an improvement in the fertility of women at reproductive age. From June 2013 to April 2016, all bariatric female patients from our institutes were prospectively evaluated for suitability in this study. A pool of 52 eligible patients was extracted from our database in the recruitment period. Of these, 28 underwent bariatric surgery and 24 did not. Both groups were observed for two-year follow-up. During follow-up, anthropometrics parameters, blood analysis, and comorbidities were checked and a gynaecological consultation was prescribed. Fifty participants were studied. Twenty-seven successfully underwent bariatric surgery with a percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) >70% at 24 months, while 23 accepted the observation and control for 24 months as an integral part of the pre-surgical bariatric program. The contingency table analysis showed an extremely significant association (Pbariatric surgery) and event (pregnancy), with a relative risk (RR) = 15.33 and confidence interval (CI) 95%=2.213 to 106.26. Bariatric surgery improves fertility in obese women at two years' postoperative. Every obese woman with difficulties becoming pregnant should undergo a bariatric surgery consultation. Further studies are necessary to confirm our results.

  20. Update on micronutrients in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Daniel; Sriram, Krishnan; Shankar, Padmini

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic. Obese patients are often deficient in micronutrients despite macronutrient excess. Bariatric surgery is an increasingly utilized modality in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related conditions. Bariatric surgery itself may cause or exacerbate micronutrient deficiencies with serious sequelae. This review will focus on perioperative strategies to detect, prevent and treat micronutrient deficiencies in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, and will highlight practical and clinical aspects of these nutritional problems. Micronutrient deficiency is common in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery both preoperatively and postoperatively. Bariatric procedures with a malabsorptive component are more likely to result in postoperative micronutrient deficiency. A system-based approach will facilitate clinical suspicion of specific or combined micronutrient deficiencies, leading to appropriate laboratory tests for confirmation. Supplementation by the oral route is always tried first, reserving parenteral administration for specific situations. Clinicians should be aware that micronutrient deficiencies are common in obese patients who may have macronutrient excess. Micronutrient deficiency may exist preoperatively or be caused by bariatric procedures themselves. A systematic and team-based approach will decrease morbidity associated with delays in diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Medico-legal analysis of legal complaints in bariatric surgery: a 15-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchtan, Lucile; Kassir, Radwan; Sastre, Bernard; Gouillat, Christian; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Bartoli, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery for severe obesity has become an effective and accepted treatment for sustained weight loss. The aim of our study was to analyze the complications and issues raised by the experts on which jury or judges' decisions were made for the different types of bariatric surgery. University Hospital, France. We have carried out a retrospective study of 59 expert review dossiers over a period of 15 years (1999-2014) on the different types of bariatric surgery (laparoscopic adjustable gastric band [LAGB], sleeve gastrectomy [SG], Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB], vertical banded gastroplasty [VBG], and gastric plication [GP]). Of the cases, 81% were women and the average age was 39 years old (range 19 to 68 years). Among the procedures giving rise to the complaints, 40% were for LAGB, 28% for RYGB, and 23% for SG. The most common initial complications were perforations (30%), fistulae (27%), bowel obstruction (14%), vascular injuries (9.5%), and infections (peritonitis, pleurisy, abscesses, and so forth) (8%). Revision surgery was required in 78% of patients, and perioperative complications accounted for 28.5% of dossiers. The experts concluded that fault had occurred in 40% of case. Negligence arising from an error deemed to be an act of negligence was found in 30% of cases, 67% of which were because of delayed diagnosis. Major long-term complications accounted for 8% of dossiers and minor long-term complications for 22%. Forty-seven percent of patients completely recovered. Delayed diagnosis was the main error established by the experts. Surgeons should remain vigilant postoperatively after every bariatric surgical procedure. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Death within 48 h--adverse events after general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Russell; Scollay, John M; Hecht, Garry; McPhillips, Gillian; Thompson, Alastair M

    2012-02-01

    Comorbidity and emergency intervention are established risk factors for post-operative mortality. This study sought to identify adverse events associated with death within 48 h of general surgical procedures. All general surgical patients who died within 48 h of operative intervention from 2002-2006 in Scotland underwent retrospective peer review using established Scottish Audit of Surgical Mortality (SASM) methodologies (www.SASM.org). During the 5 years, 1299 patients died within 48 h of surgery, 1134 (87.3%) admitted as an emergency, with a mean age of 71 years; 898 patients (69.1%) were ASA grade 3, 4 or 5; 727 (56.0%) patients had cardiovascular, 398 (30.6%) respiratory and 191 (14.7%) renal comorbidity. Over time exploratory laparotomy (443, 34.1%) was carried out less often (p = 0.004) prior to death due to cardiovascular disease (435, 33.5%), mesenteric ischaemia (264, 20.3%) or multi-organ failure (255, 19.6%). The decision to operate by consultant surgeons rose significantly (p surgery are usually elderly, emergency admissions with significant comorbidities who die of cardiovascular events. Timely, appropriate surgery and high quality peri-operative care delivered by consultant staff may prevent early post-operative mortality. Copyright © 2011 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret B. Greenwood-Ericksen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED. Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006-2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13. We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser. We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Results: From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (-7.2%, 95% CI [–7.78 to -6.62]; p<0.001 for trend. The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (-8.4%, 95% CI [–9.6 to –7.2]; p<0.001 for trend. Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (-1.8%, 95% CI [–2.1 to –1.5]; p<0.001 for trend, and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (- 1.8%, 95% CI [–4.5 to –1.7]; p<0.001 for trend. Conclusion: From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased

  4. [Influence of postoperative pelvic floor function on different surgical procedures of hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A L; Hong, L; Zhao, Y Z; Jiang, L

    2017-05-25

    Objective: To compare the influence of postoperative pelvic floor function after different surgical procedures of hysterectomy. Methods: A total of 260 patients who underwent hysterectomy in Renmin hospital of Wuhan University from January 2012 to January 2014 were enrolled in the study, and divided into 5 groups by different surgical procedures, which were total abdominal hysterectomy (A-TH; 46 cases), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (L-TH; 59 cases), total vaginal hysterectomy (V-TH; 42 cases), abdominal intrafascial hysterectomy (A-CISH; 78 cases), laparoscopic intrafascial hysterectomy (L-CISH; 35 cases). Pelvic examination, pelvic organ prolapse quantitation (POP-Q), test of pelvic muscle strength, pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-20) and the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire were measured after 6 months and 12 months. Results: The differences of pelvic organ prolapse incidence after 6 months, A-TH and A-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (2/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (1/35)] were statistically significance (all P CISH was statistically different in degree ( P CISH [59% (27/46) versus 29% (23/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 26% (9/35)] were statistically significant (all P CISH [61% (36/59) versus 29%(23/78)] was statistically different ( P CISH [53% (31/59) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and A-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and L-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 23% (8/35)] were statistically significant (all P CISH [57% (24/42) versus 26%(20/78)] was statistically significant ( P 0.05), PFDI-20 total score was not statistically significant ( P >0.05). FSFI total score after 6 months and 12 months in A-TH and A-CISH, L-TH and A-CISH, A-CISH and L-CISH were statistically significant (all P <0.05). Conclusion: The influences of different surgical procedures to pelvic floor function are no statistical difference; as to the surgical resection of hysterectomy, intrafascia hysterectomy compared with extrafascia

  5. The impact of different surgical procedures on hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chen; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Atique, Suleman; Islam, Md Mohaimenul; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the outcome between surgical procedures and the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism followed by surgical procedure in patients with thyroid disorders.We analyzed the data acquired from Taiwan's Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) research database from 1998 to 2011 and found 9316 patients with thyroid surgery. Cox regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR).A count of 314 cases (3.4%) of hypoparathyroidism was identified. The 9 years cumulated incidence of hypoparathyroidism was the highest in patient undergone bilateral total thyroidectomy (13.5%) and the lowest in the patient with unilateral subtotal thyroidectomy (1.2%). However, in the patients who had undergone unilateral subtotal, the risk was the highest in bilateral total (HR: 11.86), followed by radical thyroidectomy with unilateral neck lymph node dissection (HR: 8.56), unilateral total (HR, 4.39), and one side total and another side subtotal (HR: 2.80).The extent of thyroid resection determined the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism. It is suggested that the association of these factors is investigated in future studies.

  6. Bilateral Pulmonary Endarterectomy and Bentall Procedure Completed in One Surgical Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Davide; Cavozza, Corrado; Scoti, Peppino; Mercogliano, Domenico; Minzioni, Gaetano; Medici, Dante

    2012-01-01

    We describe the performance, in one surgical session, of bilateral pulmonary endarterectomy and a button-technique Bentall operation in a 68-year-old man. The patient had chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and an ascending aortic aneurysm with moderate aortic regurgitation. The procedures were concurrently completed during short periods of systemic circulatory arrest, with antegrade cerebral perfusion maintained through the brachiocephalic artery at a flow rate of 10 mL/min/kg. The patient's cerebral perfusion was monitored with use of near-infrared spectroscopy, to prevent symmetric bilateral values from falling below 20% of the base value. The patient experienced no multiorgan failure or neurologic sequelae and, by the 6th postoperative day, improved from New York Heart Association functional class IV to class I. The reliable maintenance of continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion made the lengthy combined operation feasible, with low risk. The use of near-infrared spectroscopy enabled real-time monitoring of the patient's cerebral blood flow. Our experience shows the possibility of safely performing lengthy or multiple procedures in one surgical session. PMID:23109784

  7. Pulmonary CO2 elimination during surgical procedures using intra- or extraperitoneal CO2 insufflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, C E; Viale, J P; Sagnard, P E; Miellet, C C; Ruynat, L G; Counioux, H C; Motin, J P; Boulez, J P; Dargent, D M; Annat, G J

    1993-03-01

    We examined end-tidal CO2 tension (PETCO2) and pulmonary CO2 elimination of CO2 (VECO2) during CO2 insufflation under general anesthesia for three surgical procedures: gynecologic laparoscopy (intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation for 43 +/- 4 min), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation for 125 +/- 14 min), and pelviscopy (extraperitoneal CO2 insufflation for 45 +/- 3 min). All patients (10 in each group) underwent controlled mechanical ventilation. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and VECO2 were measured at 2-min intervals by a system using a mass spectrometer. For the three surgical procedures, VO2 remained stable, whereas VECO2 and PETCO2 increased in parallel from the 8th to the 10th min after the start of CO2 insufflation. A plateau was reached 10 min later in patients having intraperitoneal insufflation, whereas VECO2 and PETCO2 continued to increase slowly throughout CO2 insufflation during pelviscopy. During pelviscopy, the maximum increase in VECO2 and PETCO2 (76 +/- 5% and 71 +/- 7%) was significantly more pronounced than that observed during cholecystectomy (25 +/- 4% and 25 +/- 4%) and gynecologic laparoscopy (15 +/- 3% and 12 +/- 2%). The authors conclude that CO2 diffusion into the body is more marked during extraperitoneal than during intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation but is not influenced markedly by the duration of intraperitoneal insufflation.

  8. Cost-consequence analysis of different active flowable hemostatic matrices in cardiac surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, D; Rock, M; Xiong, Y; Epstein, J D; Arnold, M R; Lattouf, O M; Calcaterra, D

    2017-06-01

    A recent retrospective comparative effectiveness study found that use of the FLOSEAL Hemostatic Matrix in cardiac surgery was associated with significantly lower risks of complications, blood transfusions, surgical revisions, and shorter length of surgery than use of SURGIFLO Hemostatic Matrix. These outcome improvements in cardiac surgery procedures may translate to economic savings for hospitals and payers. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-consequence of two flowable hemostatic matrices (FLOSEAL or SURGIFLO) in cardiac surgeries for US hospitals. A cost-consequence model was constructed using clinical outcomes from a previously published retrospective comparative effectiveness study of FLOSEAL vs SURGIFLO in adult cardiac surgeries. The model accounted for the reported differences between these products in length of surgery, rates of major and minor complications, surgical revisions, and blood product transfusions. Costs were derived from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's National Inpatient Sample (NIS) 2012 database and converted to 2015 US dollars. Savings were modeled for a hospital performing 245 cardiac surgeries annually, as identified as the average for hospitals in the NIS dataset. One-way sensitivity analysis and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed to test model robustness. The results suggest that if FLOSEAL is utilized in a hospital that performs 245 mixed cardiac surgery procedures annually, 11 major complications, 31 minor complications, nine surgical revisions, 79 blood product transfusions, and 260.3 h of cumulative operating time could be avoided. These improved outcomes correspond to a net annualized saving of $1,532,896. Cost savings remained consistent between $1.3m and $1.8m and between $911k and $2.4m, even after accounting for the uncertainty around clinical and cost inputs, in a one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis, respectively. Outcome differences associated with FLOSEAL vs SURGIFLO

  9. Safety and efficacy of immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation to prevent ileus after major gynecologic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, James; Hojat, Rod

    2011-08-01

    Postoperative ileus is a major complication of abdominal surgical procedures To evaluate the incidence of ileus and gastrointestinal morbidity in patients who received immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation after undergoing major gynecologic surgical procedures. During a 5-year period, the authors tracked demographic, surgical outcome, and follow-up information for 707 patients who underwent major gynecologic operations. All patients received the same postoperative orders, including immediate feeding of a diet of choice and bowel stimulation with 30 mL of magnesium hydroxide (milk of magnesia) twice daily until bowel movements occurred. Of 707 patients, 6 (<1%) had postoperative ileus. No patients experienced postoperative bowel obstruction and 2 patients (0.3%) had postoperative intestinal leak. No serious adverse effects associated with bowel stimulation were reported. Immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation is a safe and effective approach to preventing ileus in patients who undergo major gynecologic surgical procedures.

  10. The effects of bariatric surgery: will understanding its mechanism render the knife unnecessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Hajnal, Andras

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity is increasing worldwide at a dramatic rate, accompanied by an associated increase in comorbid conditions. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass being the most commonly performed procedure, yet the underlying mechanisms by which it induces a wide-array of beneficial effects remains obscure. From basic science as well as clinical standpoints, there are several areas of current interest that warrant continued investigation. Several major focus areas have also emerged in current research that may guide future efforts in this field, particularly with regards to using novel, non-surgical approaches to mimic the success of bariatric surgery while minimizing its adverse side effects.

  11. Hypovitaminosis D in bariatric surgery: A systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakhtoura, Marlene Toufic; Nakhoul, Nancy N; Shawwa, Khaled; Mantzoros, Christos; El Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada A

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that carries global and substantial social and economic burden. Relative to non-surgical interventions, bariatric surgery has the most substantial and lasting impact on weight loss. However, it leads to a number of nutritional deficiencies requiring long term supplementation. The aims of this paper are to review 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status pre and post bariatric surgery, describe the dose response of vitamin D supplementation, and assess the effect of the surgical procedure on 25(OH)D level following supplementation. We searched Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE, for relevant observational studies published in English, from 2000 to April 2015. The identified references were reviewed, in duplicate and independently, by two reviewers. We identified 51 eligible observational studies assessing 25(OH)D status pre and/or post bariatric surgery. Mean pre-surgery 25(OH)D level was below 30ng/ml in 29 studies, and 17 of these studies showed mean 25(OH)D levels ≤20ng/ml. Mean 25(OH)D levels remained below 30ng/ml following bariatric surgery, despite various vitamin D replacement regimens, with only few exceptions. The increase in post-operative 25(OH)D levels tended to parallel increments in vitamin D supplementation dose but varied widely across studies. An increase in 25(OH)D level by 9-13ng/ml was achieved when vitamin D deficiency was corrected using vitamin D replacement doses of 1100-7100IU/day, in addition to the usual maintenance equivalent daily dose of 400-2000IU (total equivalent daily dose 1500-9100IU). There was no difference in mean 25(OH)D level following supplementation between malabsorptive/combination procedures and restrictive procedures. Hypovitaminosisis D persists in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, despite various vitamin D supplementation regimens. Further research is needed to determine the optimal vitamin D dose to reach desirable 25(OH)D levels in this population, and to

  12. "They Have to Adapt to Learn": Surgeons' Perspectives on the Role of Procedural Variation in Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apramian, Tavis; Cristancho, Sayra; Watling, Chris; Ott, Michael; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research increasingly acknowledges the existence of significant procedural variation in surgical practice. This study explored surgeons' perspectives regarding the influence of intersurgeon procedural variation on the teaching and learning of surgical residents. This qualitative study used a grounded theory-based analysis of observational and interview data. Observational data were collected in 3 tertiary care teaching hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Semistructured interviews explored potential procedural variations arising during the observations and prompts from an iteratively refined guide. Ongoing data analysis refined the theoretical framework and informed data collection strategies, as prescribed by the iterative nature of grounded theory research. Our sample included 99 hours of observation across 45 cases with 14 surgeons. Semistructured, audio-recorded interviews (n = 14) occurred immediately following observational periods. Surgeons endorsed the use of intersurgeon procedural variations to teach residents about adapting to the complexity of surgical practice and the norms of surgical culture. Surgeons suggested that residents' efforts to identify thresholds of principle and preference are crucial to professional development. Principles that emerged from the study included the following: (1) knowing what comes next, (2) choosing the right plane, (3) handling tissue appropriately, (4) recognizing the abnormal, and (5) making safe progress. Surgeons suggested that learning to follow these principles while maintaining key aspects of surgical culture, like autonomy and individuality, are important social processes in surgical education. Acknowledging intersurgeon variation has important implications for curriculum development and workplace-based assessment in surgical education. Adapting to intersurgeon procedural variations may foster versatility in surgical residents. However, the existence of procedural variations and their active use in surgeons

  13. Bariatric surgery in women of reproductive age: special concerns for pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekelle, Paul G; Newberry, Sydne; Maglione, Margaret; Li, Zhaoping; Yermilov, Irina; Hilton, Lara; Suttorp, Marika; Maggard, Melinda; Carter, Jason; Tringale, Carlo; Chen, Susan

    2008-11-01

    23 individual case reports. We abstracted information about study design, fertility history, fertility outcomes, prepregnancy weight loss, nutritional management, outcomes following pregnancy, and adverse events (during pregnancy) related to surgery. Nationally representative data showed a six-fold increase in bariatric surgery inpatient procedures from 1998 to 2005. Women age 18-45 accounted for about half of the patients undergoing bariatric surgery; over 50,000 have these procedures as inpatients annually. An unknown number have outpatient bariatric procedures. We identified one case-control study that directly addressed some of the key questions, but no randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies, which would be the strongest study designs to answer questions about effectiveness, risk and prognosis. Consequently, all of our conclusions are limited by the available data, and are cautious.The evidence suggests that bariatric surgery results in improved fertility; the strongest evidence is in women with the polycystic ovarian syndrome, where biochemical studies showing normalization of hormones after surgery support case series data. Observational studies (retrospective cohorts and case series) suggest that fertility improves following bariatric procedures and weight loss; similar to that seen when obese women lose weight through nonsurgical means. There is almost no evidence on post-surgical contraceptive efficacy or use. Research is needed to determine whether differences in absorption, particularly for oral contraceptives, affect contraceptive efficacy. Nutrient deficiencies were reported in infants born to women who underwent procedures that resulted in malabsorption, as well as women who did not take prenatal vitamins or had difficulty with their own nutrition (i.e., from chronic vomiting). Literature suggests that gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable band procedures confer only minimal, if any, increased risk of nutritional or congenital

  14. Bleeding control measures during oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini R Akolkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical bleeding can be associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality across all surgical areas. Thus, to avoid complications related to excessive bleeding, numerous products have been developed to achieve hemostasis. The thorough knowledge of these hemostatic measures is required for good results. The aim of the study is to compare the different methods to control bleeding in oral and maxillofacial surgery. An extensive systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Google search using combination of keywords such as bleeding, bleeding control methods, oral surgery, Gelfoam, vasoconstrictors, Chitosan, Floseal, haemcoagulase, Gelatin Sponge, Suturing, and Cautery. The inclusion criteria for the study were articles in English, articles published between January 1, 1990 to June 30, 2016, studies that provide information about bleeding control procedures, complications during head, neck, and face surgery procedures and hemostatic agent and articles based on observational studies and original articles. Exclusion criteria for the study were studies that provided inadequate information, systemic review, research papers, case reports, letters to editor and studies based on animals other than human beings. Total 11 articles were selected for the analysis which included head, face, and neck procedures with/without using bleeding control measures such as pressure application, suturing, cautery, ligation of blood vessel, application of Ankaferd blood stopper, chitosan, Floseal®, thrombin–gelatin matrix (Tissel®/fibrin glue, Gelfoam, and tranexamic acid. Conventional methods are insufficient to control extensive bleeding. However, newer methods or combinations of these methods are required to achieve adequate hemostasis. All hemostatic measures were not covered in this review.

  15. Treatment and management of obesity: is surgical intervention the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Angela; Lord, Sue

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming a major health concern and could be considered equal to smoking as a preventable cause of premature death. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE 2006) estimated that 1.1 billion people are overweight, a number rivalling those who are underweight globally. Recent statistics for England from the National Health Service (NHS 2011) report that in 2009/10 there were 7,214 bariatric surgical procedures performed on people of varying ages.

  16. Beyond BMI: the need for new guidelines governing the use of bariatric and metabolic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David E; Cohen, Ricardo V

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery use is largely governed worldwide by a 1991 National Institutes of Health consensus statement that advocates BMI as the primary operative criterion and restricts surgery to severely obese patients. These guidelines have been enormously valuable in standardising practice, thereby facilitating accumulation of a copious database of information regarding long-term surgical benefits and risks, from vast clinical experience and research. However, the National Institutes of Health recommendations had important limitations from the outset and are now gravely outdated. They do not account for remarkable advances in minimally invasive surgical techniques or the development of entirely new procedures. In the two decades since they were crafted, we have gained far greater understanding of the dramatic, weight-independent benefits of some operations on metabolic diseases, especially type 2 diabetes, and of the inadequacy of BMI as a primary criterion for surgical selection. Furthermore, there is now a substantial and rapidly burgeoning body of level-1 evidence from randomised trials comparing surgical versus non-surgical approaches to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other metabolic diseases, including among only mildly obese or merely overweight patients. Herein, we present arguments to impel the development of new guidelines for the use of bariatric and so-called metabolic surgery to inform clinical practice and insurance compensation. PMID:24622721

  17. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictors of diabetes remission after bariatric surgery in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chong, Keong; Chen, Jung-Chien; Ser, Kong-Han; Lee, Yi-Chih; Tsou, Jun-Juin; Chen, Shu-Chun

    2012-04-01

    Obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are closely related and difficult to control by current medical treatment. Bariatric surgery has been proposed for inadequately controlled T2DM in association with obesity. However, prediction of successful T2DM remission after surgery has not been clearly studied in Asian patients. This information might be helpful for applying gastrointestinal surgery as metabolic surgery for T2DM. This was a retrospective clinical study. From January 2002 to December 2008, 88 consecutive patients with morbid obesity, who were enrolled into a surgically supervised weight loss program, and who had T2DM before surgery with at least 1 year complete follow-up data were included. Sixty-eight (77.2%) patients received gastric bypass procedures, and the remaining 20 (22.8%) received restrictive procedures. We analyzed the available information during the initial evaluation of patients who were referred for bariatric surgery, by logistic regression analysis and data mining methods for predictors of successful diabetes remission after surgery. Overall, 68 (77.2%) of the 88 patients had remission of their T2DM 1 year after surgery. Patients in the bypass group had a higher remission rate than those in the restrictive group [59/68 (86.7%) vs. 9/20 (45.0%), p=0.000]. In univariate analysis, patients who had T2DM remission after surgery were younger, heavier, had a wider waist, less severe disease, shorter duration, and higher C-peptide levels than those without remission. Type of operation and T2DM duration remained independent predictors of success after multivariate logistical regression analysis (pBariatric surgery is a treatment option for T2DM. Duration of diabetes is the most predictor of success after surgery. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Nutrition and pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaska, Lukasz; Kobiela, Jarek; Abacjew-Chmylko, Anna; Chmylko, Lukasz; Wojanowska-Pindel, Magdalena; Kobiela, Paulina; Walerzak, Anna; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Stefaniak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an escalating problem in all age groups and it is observed to be more common in females than males. About 25% of women meet the criteria of obesity and one-third of them are in the reproductive age. Because morbid obesity requiring surgical treatment is observed with increasing frequency, surgeons and gynecologists are undergoing new challenges. It is not only a matter of women's health and their quality of life but also proper development of the fetus, which should be a concern during bariatric treatment. Therefore complex perinatal care has to be provided for morbid obesity patients. The paper reviews pregnancy and fertility issues in bariatric surgery patients.

  20. Bone loss after bariatric surgery: causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emily M; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2014-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective and increasingly common treatment for severe obesity and its many comorbidities. The side-effects of bariatric surgery can include detrimental effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Bone disease in patients who have had bariatric surgery is affected by preoperative abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism related to severe obesity. Changes that arise after bariatric surgery are specific to procedure type: the most pronounced abnormalities in calciotropic hormones and bone loss are noted after procedures that result in the most malabsorption. The most consistent site for bone loss after all bariatric procedures is at the hip. There are limitations of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry technology in this population, including artefact introduced by adipose tissue itself. Bone loss after bariatric surgery is probably multifactorial. Proposed mechanisms include skeletal unloading, abnormalities in calciotropic hormones, and changes in gut hormones. Few data for fracture risk in the bariatric population are available, and this is a crucial area for additional research. Treatment should be geared toward correction of nutritional deficiencies and study of bone mineral density in high-risk patients. We explore the skeletal response to bariatric surgery, potential mechanisms for changes, and strategies for management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of a Compact High-Definition Exoscope for Illumination and Magnification in High-Precision Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Kartik G; Schöller, Karsten; Uhl, Eberhard

    2017-01-01

    The basic necessities for surgical procedures are illumination, exposure, and magnification. These have undergone transformation in par with technology. One of the recent developments is the compact magnifying exoscope system. In this report, we describe the application of this system for surgical operations and discuss its advantages and pitfalls. We used the ViTOM exoscope mounted on the mechanical holding arm. The following surgical procedures were conducted: lumbar and cervical spinal canal decompression (n = 5); laminotomy and removal of lumbar migrated disk herniations (n = 4); anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (n = 1); removal of intraneural schwannomas (n = 2); removal of an acute cerebellar hemorrhage (n = 1); removal of a parafalcine atypical cerebral hematoma caused by a dural arteriovenous fistula (n = 1); and microsutures and anastomoses of a nerve (n = 1), an artery (n = 1), and veins (n = 2). The exoscope offered excellent, magnified, and brilliantly illuminated high-definition images of the surgical field. All surgical operations were successfully completed. The main disadvantage was the adjustment and refocusing using the mechanical holding arm. The time required for the surgical operation under the exoscope was slightly longer than the times required for a similar procedure performed using an operating microscope. The magnifying exoscope is an effective and nonbulky tool for surgical procedures. In visualization around the corners, the exoscope has better potential than a microscope. With technical and technologic modifications, the exoscope might become the next generation in illumination, visualization, exposure, and magnification for high-precision surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of bariatric surgery on nutritional status of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Currently, surgical treatment is considered to be the most efficient method of dealing with morbid obesity. To evaluate changes in nutritional status after surgical treatment of obesity in the early postoperative period. The study included 50 patients (30 women and 20 men) treated surgically due to morbid obesity. During the preliminary visit and during control visits measurements of body mass, height, and waist and hip circumference were conducted. Also, analysis of body content was performed and blood was taken for biochemical analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted using the program Statistica 10. Six months after the surgery, in the group of women, significant reduction of average body mass, average waist circumference, average hip circumference and average body mass index (BMI) was observed. Also, significant reduction of the percentage of body fat and an increase in the percentage of fat-free body mass were observed. A significant decrease in muscle mass was also noted. Both in women and in men, 6 months after the surgery, a significant decrease in fasting glucose concentration, fasting insulin and triglycerides in blood serum was observed. Bariatric procedures lead to significant body mass, BMI, waist and hip circumference reduction. Loss of body mass is caused mainly by the reduction of fat tissue. Application of surgical procedures in morbid obesity treatment also allowed us to achieve improvement in insulin, glucose and lipid metabolism.

  3. Are bariatric operations performed by residents safe and efficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Dworak, Jadwiga; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Małczak, Piotr; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    The growing need for surgeons who are educated and trained in bariatric surgery has raised many issues related to training in this field. This study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) performed by doctors-in-training during their residency in general surgery. Tertiary referral university teaching hospital, Poland. We retrospectively analyzed the data of patients who underwent bariatric surgery. One group underwent surgery performed by at least third-year residents learning particular types of surgeries (trainee group), and the second group underwent surgeries performed by experienced bariatric surgeons (mentor group). The primary endpoint was the safety of the procedures. We analyzed factors related to the intraoperative and postoperative course. The secondary endpoint was long-term weight reduction. A lower body mass index (BMI), fewer co-morbidities, and preferably female sex were the selection criteria for patients in the trainee group. We enrolled 408 patients who met all inclusion criteria. Among them, 233 underwent SG and 175 underwent LRYGB. For both SG and LRYGB, the median maximum preoperative weight was significantly lower in the trainee than mentor group. We found no statistically significant differences in the demographic factors or co-morbidities between the 2 groups. The median duration of SG and LRYGB surgery was significantly longer in the trainee than mentor group. The median number of stapler firings during SG was significantly lower in the trainee than mentor group. The number of stapler firings during LRYGB did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of intraoperative difficulties, which were based on the operator's subjective opinion, was higher in the trainee than mentor group for both SG and LRYGB. However, intraoperative difficulties had no significant impact on the intraoperative complication rate or risk of perioperative

  4. Recommended nutritional supplements for bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    To review nutritional supplements commonly required after bariatric surgery to provide a practical guide and reference source for generalist healthcare providers. A PubMed literature search (1988-July 2008) was conducted, using the search term nutritional deficiency after bariatric surgery, and was limited to English-language literature on adult (aged >19 y) human subjects. Additional references from the selected literature were also included. Data were extracted from large clinical series and practice guidelines whenever possible. Case reports were used only when they were the sole information source. Nutritional deficiencies that occur after bariatric surgery depend significantly on the type of surgery performed. Restrictive procedures such as gastric banding are the least likely to cause nutritional deficits, since none of the intestine is bypassed. Malabsorptive procedures such as biliopancreatic diversion or mixed restrictive/malabsorptive procedures (eg, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) can result in serious nutritional problems when patients do not take required supplements after surgery. Vitamins and minerals that are commonly deficient in this circumstance include vitamin B(12), calcium, vitamin D, thiamine, folic acid, iron, zinc, and magnesium. Rare ocular complications have been reported with hypovitaminosis A. Healthcare professionals, especially those who practice outside large bariatric centers, must be aware of the supplements required by patients who have had bariatric surgery. Many patients fail to follow up with the surgery centers and are managed by their primary care teams and community pharmacists, especially in the selection of multivitamin and nutritional supplements.

  5. Inpatient weight loss as a precursor to bariatric surgery for adolescents with extreme obesity: optimizing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Emily; Davenport, Katherine; Barefoot, Leah C; Qureshi, Faisal G; Davidow, Daniel; Nadler, Evan P

    2013-07-01

    As the obesity epidemic takes its toll on patients stricken with the disease and our health care system, debate continues regarding the use of weight loss surgery and its long-term consequences, especially for adolescents. One subset of patients regarding whom there is increased controversy is adolescents with extreme obesity (BMI > 60 kg/m(2)) because the risk of complications in this weight category is higher than for others undergoing bariatric surgery. Several strategies have been suggested for this patient group, including staged operations, combined operations, intragastric balloon use, and endoluminal sleeve placement. However, the device options are often not available to adolescents, and there are no data regarding staged or combined procedures in this age group. All adolescents with BMI >60 kg/m(2) referred to our program were evaluated for inpatient medical weight loss prior to laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The program utilizes a multidisciplinary approach with a protein-sparing modified fast diet, exercise, and behavioral modification. Three patients completed the program, and each achieved significant preoperative weight loss through the inpatient program and successfully underwent bariatric surgery. Presurgical weight loss via an inpatient program for adolescents with a BMI >60 kg/m(2) results in total weight loss comparable to a primary surgical procedure alone, with the benefit of decreasing the perioperative risk.

  6. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  7. Large Variability in the Diversity of Physiologically Complex Surgical Procedures Exists Nationwide Among All Hospitals Including Among Large Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Thenuwara, Kokila; Lubarsky, David A

    2017-11-22

    Multiple previous studies have shown that having a large diversity of procedures has a substantial impact on quality management of hospital surgical suites. At hospitals with substantial diversity, unless sophisticated statistical methods suitable for rare events are used, anesthesiologists working in surgical suites will have inaccurate predictions of surgical blood usage, case durations, cost accounting and price transparency, times remaining in late running cases, and use of intraoperative equipment. What is unknown is whether large diversity is a feature of only a few very unique set of hospitals nationwide (eg, the largest hospitals in each state or province). The 2013 United States Nationwide Readmissions Database was used to study heterogeneity among 1981 hospitals in their diversities of physiologically complex surgical procedures (ie, the procedure codes). The diversity of surgical procedures performed at each hospital was quantified using a summary measure, the number of different physiologically complex surgical procedures commonly performed at the hospital (ie, 1/Herfindahl). A total of 53.9% of all hospitals commonly performed complex procedures (lower 99% confidence limit [CL], 51.3%). A total of 14.2% (lower 99% CL, 12.4%) of hospitals had >3-fold larger diversity (ie, >30 commonly performed physiologically complex procedures). Larger hospitals had greater diversity than the small- and medium-sized hospitals (P 30 procedures (lower 99% CL, 71.9% of hospitals). However, there was considerable variability among the large teaching hospitals in their diversity (interquartile range of the numbers of commonly performed physiologically complex procedures = 19.3; lower 99% CL, 12.8 procedures). The diversity of procedures represents a substantive differentiator among hospitals. Thus, the usefulness of statistical methods for operating room management should be expected to be heterogeneous among hospitals. Our results also show that "large teaching hospital

  8. The Effect of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery on DNA Methylation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Sonsoles; Macías-González, Manuel; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2017-08-30

    Metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) is considered to be the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only due to the significant weight reduction but also because of the many health benefits associated with it. In the last 5 years, several studies have suggested that epigenetic modifications could be involved in the mechanisms underlying the response to bariatric surgery. In this review, we will compile the different studies (2012-2017) concerning the effect of this surgical procedure on DNA methylation patterns (the most studied epigenetic marker) and its association with metabolic improvement. This is an emerging area, and currently, there are not many studies in the literature. The aim is to show what has been done so far and what the future direction in this emerging area might be. Recent findings have shown how metabolic and bariatric surgery modifies the DNA methylation profile of the specific genes associated with the pathophysiology of the disease. The studies were performed in morbidly obese subjects, mainly in women, with the aim of reducing weight and improving the obesity-associated comorbidities. DNA methylation has been measured both in specific tissue and in peripheral blood samples. In general, studies about site-specific DNA methylation have shown a change in the methylation profile after surgery, whereas the studies analyzing global DNA methylation are not so conclusive. Summing up, metabolic and bariatric surgery can modify the DNA methylation profile of different genes and contributes to the metabolic health benefits that are often seen after metabolic and bariatric surgery. Although there are still many issues to be resolved, the capacity to revert the DNA methylation profile of specific sites opens a window for searching for target markers to treat obesity-related comorbidities.

  9. Rapid Evidence Review of Bariatric Surgery in Super Obesity (BMI ≥ 50 kg/m2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kim; Anderson, Johanna; Boundy, Erin; Ferguson, Lauren; Erickson, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Despite accumulating evidence of the important health benefits of bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients in general, bariatric surgery outcomes are less clear in higher-risk, high-priority populations of patients with BMI ≥ 50 kg/m 2 . To help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Services Research & Development Service (HSR&D) develop a research agenda, we conducted a rapid evidence review to better understand bariatric surgery outcomes in adults with BMI ≥ 50 kg/m 2 . We searched MEDLINE ® , the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2016. We included trials and observational studies. We used pre-specified criteria to select studies, abstract data, and rate internal validity and strength of the evidence (PROSPERO registration number CRD42015025348). All decisions were completed by one reviewer and checked by another. Among 1892 citations, we included 23 studies in this rapid review. Compared with usual care, one large retrospective VA study provided limited evidence that bariatric surgery can lead to increased mortality in the first year, but decreased mortality long-term among super obese veterans. Studies that compared different bariatric surgical approaches suggested some differences in weight loss and complications. Laparoscopic gastric bypass generally resulted in greater short-term proportion of excess weight loss than did other procedures. Duodenal switch led to greater long-term weight loss than did gastric bypass, but with more complications. The published literature that separates the super obese is insufficient for determining the precise balance of benefits and harms of bariatric surgery in this high-risk subgroup. Future studies should evaluate a more complete set of key outcomes with longer follow-up in larger samples of more broadly representative adults.

  10. Nutritional and metabolic complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Scott S

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for patients with clinically severe obesity. In addition to significant weight loss, it is also associated with improvements in comorbidities. Unfortunately, bariatric surgery also has the potential to cause a variety of nutritional and metabolic complications. These complications are mostly due to the extensive surgically induced anatomical changes incurred by the patient's gastrointestinal tract, particularly with roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. Complications associated with vertical banded gastroplasty are mostly due to decreased intake amounts of specific nutrients. Macronutrient deficiencies can include severe protein-calorie malnutrition and fat malabsorption. The most common micronutrient deficiencies are of vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and vitamin D. Other micronutrient deficiencies that can lead to serious complications include thiamine, folate, and the fat-soluble vitamins. Counseling, monitoring, and nutrient and mineral supplementation are essential for the treatment and prevention of nutritional and metabolic complications after bariatric surgery.

  11. Bariatric surgery and implications for stoma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swash, Carolyn

    In the UK, 62% of the population are now described as being either overweight or obese. People with weight-management issues are more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as having an increased risk of cancer, including bowel cancer. Following the initial National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance in 2006, revised in 2014, health professionals have a more proactive role in identifying people with weight-management issues and supporting them to achieve a weight that helps reduce their health risks. This includes referrals to bariatric surgeons for consideration for surgery if appropriate. One particular surgical procedure, the Roux-en-Y, is not reversible and alters the capacity of the stomach and function of the small bowel in order to achieve weight loss. Using a case study, this article will highlight the role of the stoma nurse in managing a patient, who previously had a Roux-en-Y procedure for weight loss and subsequently needed formation of a loop ileostomy after surgery for bowel cancer.

  12. All Bariatric Surgeries Are Not Created Equal: Insights from Mechanistic Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefater, Margaret A.; Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E.; Chambers, Adam P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable scientific progress on the biological systems that regulate energy balance, we have made precious little headway in providing new treatments to curb the obesity epidemic. Diet and exercise are the most popular treatment options for obesity, but rarely are they sufficient to produce long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery, on the other hand, results in dramatic, sustained weight loss and for this reason has gained increasing popularity as a treatment modality for obesity. At least some surgical approaches also reduce obesity-related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. This success puts a premium on understanding how these surgeries exert their effects. This review focuses on the growing human and animal model literature addressing the underlying mechanisms. We compare three common procedures: Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). Although many would group together VSG and AGB as restrictive procedures of the stomach, VSG is more like RYGB than AGB in its effects on a host of endpoints including intake, food choice, glucose regulation, lipids and gut hormone secretion. Our strong belief is that to advance our understanding of these procedures, it is necessary to group bariatric procedures not on the basis of surgical similarity but rather on how they affect key physiological variables. This will allow for greater mechanistic insight into how bariatric surgery works, making it possible to help patients better choose the best possible procedure and to develop new therapeutic strategies that can help a larger portion of the obese population. PMID:22550271

  13. Bariatric surgery in the elderly: 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Alana; Young, Monica T; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in the general adult population but more information is needed in patients age 60 years and older (elderly). We previously examined the outcome of bariatric surgery performed in the elderly between 1999 and 2005 using the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Clinical Database. The aim of this study was to analyze contemporary outcomes of bariatric surgery in the elderly and to compare them to previous data from 1999-2005. Using International Classification of Diseases, 9(th) Revision diagnosis and procedure codes, we obtained data from the UHC database for all elderly (age >60 yr) and adult nonelderly (age 19-60 yr) patients who underwent bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity between 2009 and 2013. Outcome measures, such as patient characteristics, LOS, morbidity, and observed-to-expected (risk-adjusted) mortality ratio were compared between elderly and nonelderly patients. Bariatric surgery in the elderly made up 2.7% of all bariatric operations in 1999-2005. This represents an increase to 10.1% of all bariatric operations in 2009-2013. In-hospital mortality was .30% for the nonelderly and .70% for the elderly in 1999-2005, whereas contemporary in-hospital mortality has decreased to .11% for the nonelderly and .05% for the elderly. Our results show that the number of bariatric procedures performed in the elderly is increasing and now represents 10% of all bariatric operations performed at academic centers. In-hospital mortality in bariatric surgery in the elderly has improved so much that it is now even better than in-hospital mortality in the nonelderly in 1999-2005. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A standard operating procedure for the surgical implantation of transmitters in juvenile salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, T.L.; Beeman, J.W.; Gee, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Biotelemetry is a useful tool to monitor the movements of animals and is widely applied in fisheries research. Radio or acoustic technology can be used, depending on the study design and the environmental conditions in the study area. A broad definition of telemetry also includes the use of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags, either separately or with a radio or acoustic transmitter. To use telemetry, fish must be equipped with a transmitter. Although there are several attachment procedures available, surgical implantation of transmitters in the abdominal cavity is recognized as the best technique for long-term telemetry studies in general (Stasko and Pincock, 1977; Winter, 1996; Jepsen, 2003), and specifically for juvenile salmonids, Oncorhynchus spp. (Adams and others, 1998a, 1998b; Martinelli and others, 1998; Hall and others, 2009). Studies that use telemetry assume that the processes by which the animals are captured, handled, and tagged, as well as the act of carrying the transmitter, will have minimal effect on their behavior and performance. This assumption, commonly stated as a lack of transmitter effects, must be valid if telemetry studies are to describe accurately the movements and behavior of an entire population of interest, rather than the subset of that population that carries transmitters. This document describes a standard operating procedure (SOP) for surgical implantation of radio or acoustic transmitters in juvenile salmonids. The procedures were developed from a broad base of published information, laboratory experiments, and practical experience in tagging thousands of fish for numerous studies of juvenile salmon movements near Columbia River and Snake River hydroelectric dams. Staff from the Western Fisheries Research Center's Columbia River Research Laboratory (CRRL) frequently have used telemetry studies to evaluate new structures or operations at hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin, and these evaluations typically

  15. General surgery residents' perception of robot-assisted procedures during surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farivar, Behzad S; Flannagan, Molly; Leitman, I Michael

    2015-01-01

    With the continued expansion of robotically assisted procedures, general surgery residents continue to receive more exposure to this new technology as part of their training. There are currently no guidelines or standardized training requirements for robot-assisted procedures during general surgical residency. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this new technology on general surgery training from the residents' perspective. An anonymous, national, web-based survey was conducted on residents enrolled in general surgery training in 2013. The survey was sent to 240 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved general surgery training programs. Overall, 64% of the responding residents were men and had an average age of 29 years. Half of the responses were from postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY2 residents, and the remainder was from the PGY3 level and above. Overall, 50% of the responses were from university training programs, 32% from university-affiliated programs, and 18% from community-based programs. More than 96% of residents noted the availability of the surgical robot system at their training institution. Overall, 63% of residents indicated that they had participated in robotic surgical cases. Most responded that they had assisted in 10 or fewer robotic cases with the most frequent activities being assisting with robotic trocar placement and docking and undocking the robot. Only 18% reported experience with operating the robotic console. More senior residents (PGY3 and above) were involved in robotic cases compared with junior residents (78% vs 48%, p robotic case. Approximately 64% of residents reported that formal training in robotic surgery was important in residency training and 46% of residents indicated that robotic-assisted cases interfered with resident learning. Only 11% felt that robotic-assisted cases would replace conventional laparoscopic surgery in the future. This study illustrates that although the most residents

  16. Creation of an emergency surgery service concentrates resident training in general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hesham M; Gale, Stephen C; Tinti, Meredith S; Shiroff, Adam M; Macias, Aitor C; Rhodes, Stancie C; Defreese, Marissa A; Gracias, Vicente H

    2012-09-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is increasingly being provided by academic trauma surgeons in an acute care surgery model. Our tertiary care hospital recently changed from a model where all staff surgeons (private, subspecialty academic, and trauma academic) were assigned EGS call to one in which an emergency surgery service (ESS), staffed by academic trauma faculty, cares for all EGS patients. In the previous model, many surgeries were "not covered" by residents because of work-hour restrictions, conflicting needs, or private surgeon preference. The ESS was separate from the trauma service. We hypothesize that by creating a separate ESS, residents can accumulate needed and concentrated operative experience in a well-supervised academic environment. A prospectively accrued EGS database was retrospectively queried for the 18-month period: July 2010 to June 2011. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) databases were queried for operative numbers for our residency program and for national resident data for 2 years before and after creating the ESS. The ACGME operative requirements were tabulated from online sources. ACGME requirements were compared with surgical cases performed. During the 18-month period, 816 ESS operations were performed. Of these, 307 (38%) were laparoscopy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and appendectomy were most common (138 and 145, respectively) plus 24 additional laparoscopic surgeries. Each resident performed, on average, 34 basic laparoscopic cases during their 2-month rotation, which is 56% of their ACGME basic laparoscopic requirement. A diverse mixture of 70 other general surgical operations was recorded for the remaining 509 surgical cases, including reoperative surgery, complex laparoscopy, multispecialty procedures, and seldom-performed operations such as surgery for perforated ulcer disease. Before the ESS, the classes of 2008 and 2009 reported that only 48% and 50% of cases were performed at the main academic

  17. Trends in Bariatric Surgery in Spain in the Twenty-First Century: Baseline Results and 1-Month Follow Up of the RICIBA, a National Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecube, Albert; de Hollanda, Ana; Calañas, Alfonso; Vilarrasa, Núria; Rubio, Miguel Angel; Breton, Irene; Goday, Albert; Vidal, Josep; Iglesias, Paloma; Fernández-Soto, María Luisa; Pellitero, Silvia; de Cos, Ana Isabel; Morales, María José; Campos, Cristina; Masmiquel, Lluís; Tinahones, Francisco; Pujante, Pedro; García-Luna, Pedro P; Bueno, Marta; Cámara, Rosa; Bandrés, Orosia; Caixàs, Assumpta

    2016-08-01

    Specific data is needed to safely expand bariatric surgery and to preserve good surgical outcomes in response to the non-stop increase in obesity prevalence worldwide. The aims of this study are to provide an overview of the baseline characteristics, type of surgery, and 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Spanish public hospitals, and evaluate changes throughout the 2000-2014 period. This is a descriptive study using data from the RICIBA, a computerized multicenter and multidisciplinary registry created by the Obesity Group of the Endocrinology and Nutrition Spanish Society. Three periods according to the date of surgery were created: January 2000 to December 2004 (G1), January 2005 to December 2009 (G2), and January 2010 to December 2014 (G3). Data from 3843 patients were available (44.8 ± 10.5 years, a 3:1 female-to-male ratio, 46.9 ± 8.2 kg/m(2)). Throughout the 15-year period assessed, candidate patients for bariatric surgery were progressively older and less obese, with an increase in associated comorbidities and in the prevalence of men. The global trend also showed a progressive decrease in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the most performed bariatric procedure (75.1 % in G1, 69.3 % in G2, and 42.6 % in G3; p bariatric surgery in response to increasing demand.

  18. Three-dimensional computer graphics for surgical procedure learning: Web three-dimensional application for cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Mori, Ayako; Tanaka, Daigo; Fujino, Toyomi; Chiyokura, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    In surgical procedures for cleft lip, surgeons attempt to use various skin incisions and small flaps to achieve a better and more natural shape postoperatively. They must understand the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the lips. However, they may have difficulty learning the surgical procedures precisely from normal textbooks with two-dimensional illustrations. Recent developments in 3D computed tomography (3D-CT) and laser stereolithography have enabled surgeons to visualize the structures of cleft lips from desired viewpoints. However, this method cannot reflect the advantages offered by specific surgical procedures. To solve this problem, we used the benefits offered by 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) and 3D animation. By using scanning 3D-CT image data of patients with cleft lips, 3D-CG models of the cleft lips were created. Several animations for surgical procedures such as incision designs, rotation of small skin flaps, and sutures were made. This system can recognize the details of an operation procedure clearly from any viewpoint, which cannot be acquired from the usual textbook illustrations. This animation system can be used for developing new skin-flap design, understanding the operational procedure, and using tools in case presentations. The 3D animations can also be uploaded to the World Wide Web for use in teleconferencing.

  19. Changing trends in abdominal surgical complications following cardiac surgery in an era of advanced procedures. A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Awais; Johnson, Daniel J; Chapital, Alyssa B; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Arabia, Francisco A

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal complications following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedures may have mortality rates as high as 25%. Advanced procedures such as ventricular assist devices, artificial hearts and cardiac transplantation are being increasingly employed, changing the complexity of interventions. This study was undertaken to examine the changing trends in complications and the impact of cardiac surgery on emergency general surgery (EGS) coverage. A retrospective review was conducted of all CPB procedures admitted to our ICU between Jan. 2007 and Mar. 2010. The procedures included coronary bypass (CABG), valve, combination (including adult congenital) and advanced heart failure (AHF) procedures. The records were reviewed to obtain demographics, need for EGS consult/procedure and outcomes. Mean age of the patients was 66 ± 8.5 years, 71% were male. There were 945 CPB procedures performed on 914 patients during this study period. Over 39 months, 23 EGS consults were obtained, resulting in 10 operations and one hospital death (10% operative mortality). CABG and valve procedures had minimal impact on EGS workload while complex cardiac and AHF procedures accounted for significantly more EGS consultations (p surgery, advanced technology has increased the volume of complex CPB procedures increasing the EGS workload. Emergency general surgeons working in institutions that perform advanced procedures should be aware of the potential for general surgical complications perioperatively and the resultant nuances that are associated with operative management in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Impact of bariatric surgery on obstetric prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumery, L; Pigeyre, M; Fournier, C; Arnalsteen, L; Rivaux, G; Subtil, D; Deruelle, P

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery and analysis of follow-up particularities of such pregnancies. A retrospective study of 63 post-bariatric surgery pregnancies compared to 259 pregnancies of obese un-operated patients. Pregnancy outcomes, neonatal datas, delay influence between surgery and pregnancy beginning, bariatric surgery type and gastric banding (GB) loosening consequences were analysed. In the surgical brand were developed less gestational diabetes (DG) (P=0,05), deliveries were more often normal (P=0,004) and births shown less macrosomias and small for gestational age newborns (P=0,04). Neonatal state was improved among operated patients: less Apgar scores less than 7 at 1 minute (P=0,05) and less cord blood pH less than 7,2 (P=0,03). They gained more weight during the pregnancy (P=0,0003) and only 53% had a nutritional management and assessment. Patients with GB loosening gained more weight (P=0,0003). Lastly, there were no difference due to the different bariatric surgery techniques or nutritional follow-up in the pregnancy course and neonatal state. Bariatric surgery improves obstetric and neonatal prognosis. Improvements have to be developed in the multidisciplinary follow-up in order to avoid nutritional deficiencies or important weight gain pregnancy in case of GB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Visual spatial ability for surgical trainees: implications for learning endoscopic, laparoscopic surgery and other image-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Patrick; Gallagher, Anthony G; Nugent, Emmeline; Seymour, Neal E; Haluck, Randy S; Hseino, Hazem; Traynor, Oscar; Neary, Paul C

    2018-02-12

    In image-guided procedures, a high level of visual spatial ability may be an advantage for surgical trainees. We assessed the visual spatial ability of surgical trainees. Two hundred and thirty-nine surgical trainees and 61 controls were tested on visual spatial ability using 3 standardised tests, the Card Rotation, Cube Comparison and Map-Planning Tests. Two hundred and twenty-one, 236 and 236 surgical trainees and 61 controls completed the Card Rotation test, Cube Comparison test and Map-Planning test, respectively. Two percent of surgical trainees performed statistically significantly worse than their peers on card rotation and map-planning test, > 1% on Cube Comparison test. Surgical trainees performed statistically significantly better than controls on all tests. Two percent of surgical trainees performed statistically significantly worse than their peers on visual spatial ability. The implication of this finding is unclear, further research is required that can look at the learning and educational portfolios of these trainees who perform poorly on visual spatial ability, and ascertain if they are struggling to learn skills for image-guided procedures.

  2. [Implementation of a post-discharge surgical site infection system in herniorrhaphy and mastectomy procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Sanz, Isabel; Díaz-Agero-Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; Oliva Iñiguez, Lourdes; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring surgical site infection (SSI) performed during hospitalization can underestimate its rates due to the shortening in hospital stay. The aim of this study was to determine the actual rates of SSI using a post-discharge monitoring system. All patients who underwent herniorraphy or mastectomy in the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011 were included. SSI data were collected prospectively according to the continuous quality improvement indicators (Indicadores Clinicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad [INCLIMECC]) monitoring system. Post-discharge follow-up was conducted by telephone survey. A total of 409patients were included in the study, of whom 299 underwent a herniorraphy procedure, and 110 underwent a mastectomy procedure. For herniorrhaphy, the SSI rate increased from 6.02% to 7.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 21.7% of SSI). For mastectomy, the SSI rate increased from 1.8% to 3.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 50% of SSI). Post-discharge monitoring showed an increased detection of SSI incidence. Post-discharge monitoring is useful to analyze the real trend of SSI, and evaluate improvement actions. Post-discharge follow-up methods need to standardised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Autologous fibrin sealant (Vivostat®) in the neurosurgical practice: Part I: Intracranial surgical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Certo, Francesco; Basile, Luigi; Maugeri, Rosario; Grasso, Giovanni; Meccio, Flavia; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhages, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula and infections are the most challenging postoperative complications in Neurosurgery. In this study, we report our preliminary results using a fully autologous fibrin sealant agent, the Vivostat® system, in achieving hemostasis and CSF leakage repair during cranio-cerebral procedures. Methods: From January 2012 to March 2014, 77 patients were studied prospectively and data were collected and analyzed. Autologous fibrin sealant, taken from patient's blood, was prepared with the Vivostat® system and applied on the resection bed or above the dura mater to achieve hemostasis and dural sealing. The surgical technique, time to bleeding control and associated complications were recorded. Results: A total of 79 neurosurgical procedures have been performed on 77 patients. In the majority of cases (98%) the same autologous fibrin glue provided rapid hemostasis and dural sealing. No patient developed allergic reactions or systemic complications in association with its application. There were no cases of cerebral hematoma, swelling, infection, or epileptic seizures after surgery whether in the immediate or in late period follow-up. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, the easy and direct application of autologous fibrin sealant agent helped in controlling cerebral bleeding and in providing prompt and efficient dural sealing with resolution of CSF leaks. Although the use of autologous fibrin glue seems to be safe, easy, and effective, further investigations are strongly recommended to quantify real advantages and potential limitations. PMID:25984391

  4. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspe, Heiner

    2005-11-01

    as an intermediate therapeutical option between conservative and operative management of small lumbar disc herniations or protrusions causing sciatica. Two RCT comparing transforaminal endoscopic procedures with microdiscectomy in patients with sciatica and small non-sequestered disc herniations show comparable short and medium term overall success rates. Concerning speed of recovery and return to work a trend towards more favourable results for the endoscopic procedures is noted. It is doubtful though, whether these results from the eleven and five years old studies are still valid for the more advanced procedures used today. The only RCT comparing the results of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy to those of microdiscectomy showed clearly superior results of microdiscectomy. Furthermore, success rates of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy reported in the RCT (29% differ extremely from success rates reported in case series (between 56% and 92%. The literature search retrieves no controlled trials to assess efficacy and/or effectiveness of laser-discectomy, percutaneous manual discectomy or endoscopic procedures using a posterior approach in comparison to the standard procedures. Results from recent case series permit no assessment of efficacy, especially not in comparison to standard procedures. Due to highly selected patients, modi-fications of operative procedures, highly specialised surgical units and poorly standardised outcome assessment results of case series are highly variable, their generalisability is low. The results of the five economical analyses are, due to conceptual and methodological problems, of no value for decision-making in the context of the German health care system. Discussion: Aside from low methodological study quality three conceptual problems complicate the interpretation of results. 1. Continuous further development of technologies leads to a diversity of procedures in use which prohibits generalisation of study results

  5. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  6. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmon, Anatte; Sheiner, Eyal

    2008-05-01

    Obesity continues to be a global epidemic, and strong evidence exists linking it with gestational complications such as macrosomia, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, gestational diabetes, and cesarean section. Bariatric surgery, a highly effective treatment for obesity, may prevent such complications in subsequent pregnancies. This review seeks to describe the risks and benefits of post-bariatric procedure pregnancies, in comparison to both community and obese cohorts. A thorough review of the literature suggests that post-surgery women are not at increased risk for poor perinatal outcomes, and moreover their risks for many obesity-related gestational complications are reduced after bariatric surgery. Data regarding fertility after bariatric surgery are quite ambiguous, however, and studies exist demonstrating both positive and negative associations between weight loss procedures and fertility. Clinicians should be aware that data collected on this subject were often gathered from post-op pregnant women provided with good prenatal care and screening for nutritional deficiencies. Although pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safe, providers should take extra care to properly monitor their post-op pregnant patients for appropriate weight gain and nourishment.

  7. Patient and operational factors affecting wait times in a bariatric surgery program in Toronto: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Adam; Cleghorn, Michelle C; Milner, Joseph; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Okrainec, Allan; Jackson, Timothy D; Quereshy, Fayez A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing rates of obesity have led to growing demand for bariatric surgery. This has implications for wait times, particularly in publicly funded programs. This study examined the impact of patient and operational factors on wait times in a multidisciplinary bariatric surgery program. A retrospective study was conducted involving patients who were referred to a tertiary care centre (University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto) for bariatric surgery between June 2008 and July 2011. Patient characteristics, dates of clinical assessments and records describing operational changes were collected. Univariable analysis and multivariable log-linear and parametric time-to-event regressions were performed to determine whether patient and operational covariates were associated with the wait time for bariatric surgery (i.e., length of preoperative evaluation). Of the 1664 patients included in the analysis, 724 underwent surgery with a mean wait time of 440 (standard deviation 198) days and a median wait time of 445 (interquartile range 298-533) days. Wait times ranged from 3 months to 4 years. Univariable and multivariable analyses showed that patients with active substance use (β = 0.3482, p = 0.02) and individuals who entered the program in more recent operational periods (β = 0.2028, p < 0.001) had longer wait times. Additionally, the median time-to-surgery increased over 3 discrete operational periods (characterized by specific program changes related to scheduling and staffing levels, and varying referral rates and defined surgical targets; p < 0.001). Some patients could be identified at referral as being at risk for longer wait times. We also found that previous operational decisions significantly increased the wait time in the program since its inception. Therefore, careful consideration must be devoted to process-level decision-making for multistage bariatric surgical programs, because managerial and procedural changes can affect timely

  8. Unsupervised procedures by surgical trainees: a windfall for private insurance at the expense of graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Ara J; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Madan, Atul K; McKenney, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Surgical faculty cannot always be present while trainees perform minor procedures. Fees are not obtained for these unsupervised services because Medicare rules do not allow residents and fellows to bill. Medicare already supplements hospitals via medical education funds and thus reimbursement for trainee services would constitute double billing. Private insurance companies, however, do not supplement trainees' salaries and thus benefit when they are not charged for these procedures. The objective is to determine whether significant revenue is lost to private insurers for unsupervised procedures performed by surgical trainees. We retrospectively evaluated a prospective database of procedures performed by residents and fellows from March 1998 through 2007. All procedures were entered by the trainees into a computerized electronic note system. Unsupervised procedures were not billed to insurance carriers. During the study period, 14,497 minor procedures were performed without attending supervision, of which 13,343 had valid current procedural terminology codes. Total charges for these procedures would have been $10,096,931. For patients with private insurance companies (PICs), $6,876,000 could have been billed. Using our historic collection ratios, $2,269,083 in revenue was lost, or $232,726 annually. Trainees perform a significant number of unsupervised procedures on patients with private insurance without charge. This pro bono service represents a significant amount of lost income for teaching institutions. Private insurance companies benefit financially from Medicare billing regulations without contributing to education. Billing for these services might help offset the costs of graduate medical education.

  9. The Neurological Complications of Nutritional Deficiency following Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Danielle A; Balcer, Laura J; Galetta, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery have become increasingly recognized with the rising numbers of procedures and the increasing prevalence of obesity in the US. Deficits are most commonly seen with thiamine, vitamin B(12), folate, vitamin D, vitamin E, and copper deficiencies. The neurological findings observed with these nutritional deficiencies are variable and include encephalopathy, optic neuropathy, myelopathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and polyneuropathy. We review the neurological complications of bariatric surgery and emphasize that these findings may vary based on the specific type of bariatric surgery and time elapsed from the procedure.

  10. The Neurological Complications of Nutritional Deficiency following Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle A. Becker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery have become increasingly recognized with the rising numbers of procedures and the increasing prevalence of obesity in the US. Deficits are most commonly seen with thiamine, vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D, vitamin E, and copper deficiencies. The neurological findings observed with these nutritional deficiencies are variable and include encephalopathy, optic neuropathy, myelopathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and polyneuropathy. We review the neurological complications of bariatric surgery and emphasize that these findings may vary based on the specific type of bariatric surgery and time elapsed from the procedure.

  11. Retention and attrition in bariatric surgery research: an integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourash, William F; Lockhart, Joan Such; Kalarchian, Melissa A; Courcoulas, Anita P; Nolfi, David

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery research, often longitudinal, bears the challenge of maintaining retention and decreasing attrition of participants to avoid bias. To explore factors influencing the retention and attrition for bariatric surgical research participants. Databases searched included: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and others. As a secondary aim, studies reporting on retention/attrition factors in clinical follow-up visits were included. Of the 1145 articles retrieved, 44 met inclusion criteria, and underwent qualitative analysis. Four descriptive articles focused on longitudinal research participation and 40 on clinical follow-up visits. Willingness to participate in research was high (92%) and decreased with more invasive procedures or extra visits. A large observational longitudinal study presented 24-month retention/attrition data (92% for some data and 66% visit completion) and the retention strategies employed. One study indicated that research follow-up possibly increased clinical follow-up and another demonstrated a higher retention by increasing compensation. No consistent, modifiable demographic or psychosocial variables associated or predictive of retention or attrition in clinical follow-up were identified. Research on factors related to participant retention and attrition is sparse. It is essential for studies to document retention/attrition data. Existing research has demonstrated a patient willingness to participate in research and that retention strategies have been successful in the short term. Further research should explore the motivations, perspectives and attitudes of bariatric surgical research participants regarding participation and explore predictors to develop evidence-based retention strategies. Research has yet to identify consistent and modifiable demographic or psychosocial variables predictive of clinical follow-up, possibly due to the heterogeneity of follow-up across studies. Further investigation into follow-up definition, content

  12. PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS CAUSED BY MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION IN NONCARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the next 20 years, the aging population will be a major factor affecting the characteristics of perioperative anesthesia tactics. Domestic researchers have reported that the incidence of cardiac complications after general surgical procedures in patients with middle and old age is 9.1%, and mortality in these complications reached 45.5%. Analyzed current data on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, the etiopathogenesis of perioperative cardiac complications, recurrence of their development and the possible consequences. It is concluded that prevention and timely treatment of complications resulting from ischemia-reperfusion of the myocardium, with noncardiac surgical interventions is an important tactical (prevention of perioperative myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, cardiac death and policy (prevention of cardiac remodeling and post-hospital disability of patients anaesthesiological tasks. Research carried out in the Nrgovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology showed that in the real practice Detsky index, Lee index and echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction did not provide high accuracy prediction of cardiac events. More informative proved preoperative determination of blood N-terminal part of the pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. In assessing the predictive ability of NT-proBNP area under the ROC-curve achieved 0.86. NT-proBNP value 358 pg/ml and above provided 77% sensitivity and 85% specificity. The comparative assessment and recommendations on the use to reduce the risk of cardiac complications of β-blockers, statins, calcium channel blockers, nitrates, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, levosimendan and phosphocreatine. Phosphocreatine, introduced in practice domestic cardiac surgery and transplantology more than 20 years ago, continues to be studied and used at the moment. Recently demonstrated that perioperative phosphocreatine usage appointment in older oncological patients with a high risk of cardiac

  13. Surgical offloading procedures for diabetic foot ulcers compared to best non-surgical treatment: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Tamir, Eran; Ron, Guy; Wiser, Itay; Agar, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are frequently related to elevated pressure under a bony prominence. Conservative treatment includes offloading with orthopaedic shoes and custom made orthotics or plaster casts. While casting in plaster is usually effective in achieving primary closure of foot ulcers, recurrence rates are high. Minimally invasive surgical offloading that includes correction of foot deformities has good short and long term results. The surgery alleviates the pressure under the bony prominence, thus enabling prompt ulcer healing, negating the patient's dependence on expensive shoes and orthotics, with a lower chance of recurrence. The purpose of this protocol is to compare offloading surgery (percutaneous flexor tenotomy, mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy or Keller arthroplasty) to non-surgical treatment for patients with diabetic foot ulcers in a semi-crossover designed RCT. One hundred patients with diabetic neuropathy related foot ulcers (tip of toe ulcers, ulcers under metatarsal heads and ulcers under the hallux interphalangeal joint) will be randomized (2:3) to a surgical offloading procedure or best available non-surgical treatment. Group 1 (surgery) will have surgery within 1 week. Group 2 (controls) will be prescribed an offloading cast applied for up to 12 weeks (based on clinical considerations). Following successful offloading treatment (ulcer closure with complete epithelization) patients will be prescribed orthopaedic shoes and custom made orthotics. If offloading by cast for at least 6 weeks fails, or the ulcer recurs, patients will be offered surgical offloading. Follow-up will take place till 2 years following randomization. Outcome criteria will be time to healing of the primary ulcer (complete epithelization), time to healing of surgical wound, recurrence of ulcer, time to recurrence and complications. The high recurrence rate of foot ulcers and their dire consequences justify attempts to find better solutions than the non-surgical

  14. Reliability of a CT reconstruction for preoperative surgical planning in the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Loriaut, Philippe; Granger, Benjamin; Neffati, Ahmed; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Gerometta, Antoine

    2018-01-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure has provided reliable results in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. However, this procedure remains technically challenging and is related to several complications. The morphology of the coracoid and the glenoid are inconsistent. Inadequate coracoid and glenoid preparing may lead to mismatching between their surfaces. Inadequate screws lengthening and orientation are a major concern. Too long screws can lead to suprascapular nerve injuries or hardware irritation, whereas too short screws can lead to nonunions, fibrous unions or migration of the bone block. The purpose of the study was to investigate the application of virtual surgical planning and digital technology in preoperative assessment and planning of the Latarjet procedure. Twelve patients planned for an arthroscopic Latarjet had a CT scan evaluation with multi-two-dimensional reconstruction performed before surgery. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were evaluated. The shape of the anterior rim of the glenoid and the undersurface of the coracoid were classified. Coracoid height was measured, respectively, at 5 mm (C1) and 10 mm (C2) from the tip of the coracoid process, corresponding to the drilling zone. Measurements of the glenoid width were then taken in the axial view at 25 % (G1) and 50 % (G2) of the glenoid height with various α angles (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°) 7 mm from the anterior glenoid rim. Shapes of the undersurface of the coracoid and the anterior rim of the glenoid were noted during the surgical procedure. Post-operative measurements included the α angle. Concerning coracoid height measurements, there was an almost perfect to substantial intra- and inter-reliability, with values ranging from ICC = 0.75-0.97. For the shape of the coracoid, concordances were, respectively, perfect (ICC = 1) and almost perfect (0.87 [0.33; 1]) for the intra- and interobserver reliabilities. Concerning the glenoid, concordance was

  15. Obesity/Bariatric Surgery and Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korelitz, Burton I; Sonpal, Niket; Schneider, Judy; Swaminath, Arun; Felder, Joseph; Roslin, Mitchell; Aronoff, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) following bariatric surgery has been previously described. It is not clear whether the clinical entity is due to rapid metabolism of fat, change in the bacterial milieu of the bowel, the loss of defense mechanisms of the stomach, or even a coincidence. To present observations which might serve to sort out these various etiologies. We present 5 cases of colitis, ileocolitis or enteritis, some with fistula formation, with clinical onset following bariatric surgery and add these to the 7 cases previously identified as CD reported elsewhere. We provide the clinical features of these 12 cases to reconcile with causative mechanisms. It remains possible that the onset of CD (or other inflammatory bowel disease) precedes the bariatric surgery which then accelerates the clinical manifestations described. Furthermore, without controls the association could remain a coincidence. We review the evidence for release of proinflammatory cells and cytokines contained in fat following the bariatric surgery, and also consider the roles that the surgical resection of stomach and shortening of the bowel may also bring about this syndrome. The earlier onset is more likely due to surgical loss of defenses of the stomach and the later onset to a metabolic alteration of the presurgical obesity, involving fat metabolism, and/or the microbiome. The role of characteristic creeping fat of CD is also addressed.

  16. Psychological aspects of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Jumbe, S.; Hamlet, C.; Meyrick, J.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the psychological effects on life after bariatric surgery despite the high prevalence of psychological disorders in candidates seeking this procedure. Our review discusses the psychological impact of bariatric surgery, exploring whether the procedure addresses underlying psychological conditions that can lead to morbid obesity and the effect on eating behaviour postoperatively.\\ud \\ud Findings show that despite undisputed significant weight loss and improvements in comor...

  17. Assessment of disordered eating in bariatric surgery patients: diagnosis, measurement and psychometric evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Eating disorders and disordered eating are prevalent in adults seeking surgical interventions for weight loss. While bariatric surgery is more effective than non-surgical interventions for weight loss and amelioration of physical health comorbidities, research findings are inconsistent regarding the impact of surgery on disordered eating and the impact of disordered eating on surgical outcomes. Not all bariatric surgery patients achieve optimal outcomes following surgery, and disordered eatin...

  18. Postoperative metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Timothy R; Finelli, Frederick C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly important method for management of medically complicated obesity. In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, up to 87% with type 2 diabetes mellitus develop improvement or resolution of their disease postoperatively. Bariatric surgery can reduce the number of absorbed calories through performance of either a restrictive or a malabsorptive procedure. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery require indefinite, regular follow-up care by physicians who need to follow laboratory parameters of macronutrient as well as micronutrient malnutrition. Physicians who care for patients after bariatric surgery need to be familiar with common postoperative syndromes that result from specific nutrient deficiencies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Obesity among women. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: a qualitative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanadys, Wiesław Maciej; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is a safe and most effective method of achieving substantial long-term weight loss. Surgery should be considered in case of all patients with a BMI of more than 40 kg/m2 and for those with a BMI of over 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related co-morbidities, after conventional treatment failure. The most frequently used procedures in surgical treatment of obesity performed mostly laparoscopically are restrictive operations limiting energy intake by reducing gastric capacity (vertical banded gastroplasty adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy) and restrictive/ malabsorptive surgeries also inducing decreased absorption of nutrients by shortening the functional length of the small intestine (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). Frequent complications following surgery may include hyperemesis, intragastric band migration, gastric perforation, nutritional deficiencies, anastomotic leak, bleeding, anastomotic stricture, internal hernia, wound infection. It is generally recommended for women after bariatric surgery to wait approximately at least 12 months before becoming pregnant. There exists considerable threat that rapid weight loss (relative starvation phase) may be unhealthy for a mother and a baby. Pregnancy after weight loss surgery is not only safe for the mother and the baby but may also be less risky than pregnancy in morbidly obese patients. Postoperative nutrient supplementation and close supervision before, during, and after pregnancy adjusted to individual requirements of a woman can help to prevent nutrition-related complications such as deficiencies in iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12, vitamin K, folate and calcium, and improve maternal and fetal health.

  20. Effects of bariatric surgery on the body composition of adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Wally Hartwig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The most alarming cases are known as morbidly obese. An effective method to change the anthropometric characteristics of this population with excess body weight and high fat mass is bariatric surgery. The objective of this study was to analyze the body composition of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. In a prospective cohort study, a group of morbidly obese patients was followed up 30 days before and 30 days after surgery. The sample consisted of 123 patients who underwent vertical banded Roux-en-Y gastroplasty between April 2003 and May 2010. Body composition (fat percentage was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The mean age of the patients was 36.1 ± 8.8 years and mean body weight loss was 14.1 ± 6.0 kg (p<0.001. The mean reduction in body mass index (BMI was 5.2 ± 2.1 kg/m2 (p<0.001. Body fat percentage and fat mass were reduced by 2.8% (p<0.001 and 9.7 ± 4.9 kg (p<0.001, respectively. In addition, there was a reduction of 4.4 ± 3.4 kg (p<0.001 in lean mass. We concluded that the surgical procedure significantly reduced body weight, BMI, fat percentage and fat mass and is an alternative when conventional treatments appear ineffective.

  1. Depo-Provera (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) use after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Clarissa; Murthy, Amitasrigowri S

    2016-01-01

    In the US, obesity rates are increasing greatly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 68.5% of Americans, including 63.9% of adult women older than 20 years, are overweight (body mass index between 25 kg/m 2 and 29.9 kg/m 2 ) or obese (body mass index >30 kg/m 2 ). In light of this, it is not surprising that the rates of bariatric surgery have also been increasing. When considering the metabolic changes associated with both bariatric surgery and contraceptive use, in combination with the unique medical considerations of obese women, it is indisputable that clear guidelines are needed when counseling obese patients of reproductive age after bariatric surgery. In this literature review, we focus on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the implications of its use in obese women, preweight and postweight loss following bariatric surgery. Both DMPA use and bariatric surgery are known to cause bone loss, but it is still unclear whether there is an additive effect of the two factors on bone loss and whether either of these factors directly leads to an increased risk of bone fracture. The current consensus guidelines do not impose a restriction on the use of DMPA after bariatric surgery. DMPA use is associated with weight gain, and it is unclear whether weight loss blunting occurs with the use of DMPA after bariatric surgery. Prior studies had demonstrated an association with weight gain in adolescents, and therefore, those prescribing DMPA use after bariatric surgery in adolescents should proceed with caution. Adult women do not have a similar response to the use of DMPA. DMPA use has rarely been associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The obesity-associated increase in VTE should be mitigated by surgically induced weight loss. The concurrent use of DMPA in the post bariatric surgical period should not further increase the risk of VTE.

  2. Depressive Symptoms in Bariatric Surgery Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lapin, Brittany; Aminian, Ali; Sullivan, Amy B

    2018-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a safe and effective intervention for patients with comorbid obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, this sub-population may be at heightened risk for pre- and postoperative depressive symptoms. This current exploratory study aims to describe the prevalence and nature of depressive symptoms in a sample of patients with MS who undergo bariatric surgery. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who received bariatric surgery and had a diagnosis of MS (n = 31) and a control sample of non-surgical MS patients with severe obesity (n = 828). Longitudinal outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Multiple Sclerosis Performance Scale (MSPS). There were no significant differences in PHQ-9 total and item scores between groups at baseline. PHQ-9 scores significantly improved at years 1 (p bariatric surgery when compared to non-surgical controls. Higher BMI (p = 0.03) and worse overall quality of life (p bariatric group. When compared to controls, the bariatric group demonstrated improved MSPS scores on a trend level 1 year post-surgery (p = 0.08). Consistent with the literature on more general bariatric surgery populations, current findings highlight the possible early benefits of bariatric surgery for reducing depressive symptoms in this population when compared to controls. Importantly, results should be viewed as preliminary and additional research is needed to examine bariatric surgery and associations with depressive symptoms and performance in the MS population.

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Groen, Rob J M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) statement, after which only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs were included. At least 2 different neurosurgical procedures in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) had to be evaluated. Included studies were assessed for the risk of bias. Recurrence rates, complications, and outcome including mortality were taken as outcome measures. Statistical heterogeneity in each meta-analysis was assessed using the T(2) (tau-squared), I(2), and chi-square tests. The DerSimonian-Laird method was used to calculate the summary estimates using the fixed-effect model in meta-analysis. Of the 297 studies identified, 19 RCTs were included. Of them, 7 studies evaluated the use of postoperative drainage, of which the meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.36 (95% CI 0.21-0.60; p < 0.001) in favor of drainage. Four studies compared twist drill and bur hole procedures. No significant differences between the 2 methods were present, but heterogeneity was considered to be significant. Three studies directly compared the use of irrigation before drainage. A fixed-effects meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.49 (95% CI 0.21-1.14; p = 0.10) in favor of irrigation. Two studies evaluated postoperative posture. The available data did not reveal a significant advantage in favor of the postoperative supine posture. Regarding positioning of the catheter used for drainage, it was shown that a frontal catheter led to a better outcome. One study compared duration of drainage, showing that 48 hours of drainage was as effective as 96 hours of drainage. Postoperative drainage has the advantage of reducing recurrence without increasing complications

  4. The neurohormonal regulation of energy intake in relation to bariatric surgery for obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Ochner, Christopher N.; Gibson, Charlisa; Carnell, Susan; Dambkowski, Carl; Geliebter, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has reached pandemic proportions, with bariatric surgery representing the only currently available treatment demonstrating long-term effectiveness. Over 200,000 bariatric procedures are performed each year in the US alone. Given the reliable and singular success of bariatric procedures, increased attention is being paid to identifying the accompanying neurohormonal changes that may contribute to the resulting decrease in energy intake. Numerous investigations of postsurgical changes i...

  5. Scheduling Operative Surgical Services to Recover CHAMPUS Surgical Procedures at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    number of deliveries and cesarean sections. Similarly, the number of circumcisions performed under CHAMPUS 50 attributable to the urology service...for accurate scheduling: case length and physician history . More in depth information is needed about the duration of each procedure. Currently, all...4,050.30 $2,025.15 89 TOT AVE CODE PROCEDURE CASES COST COST 7359 OTH MANUALLY ASSISTED DELIVERY 49 $150,376.79 $3,068.91 736 EPISIOTOMY 36 $96,595.63

  6. Influence of usage history, instrument complexity, and different cleaning procedures on the cleanliness of blood-contaminated dental surgical instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, G.; Yu, X.F.

    2009-01-01

    Our study assessed the factors that influence the resistance of blood residues on dental surgical instruments to washer‐disinfector-based cleaning procedures in a clinical setting. The use of 2 additional cleaning methods—presoaking and scrubbing by hand—and the use of newer and/or less structurally

  7. Revisional bariatric surgery in a transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Al Sabah

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective procedure to assist renal transplant patients in losing weight. In addition, it has proven to be effective in the management of the co-morbidities that are associated with renal failure. Our study was also able to prove that converting form an SG to a bypass in a transplant patient is a safe and feasible option.

  8. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Pelizzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG sensors to measure heart rate (HR in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years undergoing laparoscopy (n = 8 or open surgery (n = 22. HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R were use