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Sample records for bariatric surgery patients

  1. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

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    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison; Kuk, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to comple...

  2. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23% participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P=0.03 and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P=0.0069. Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery.

  3. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients.

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    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m(2), P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery.

  4. Bariatric surgery: nutritional considerations for patients.

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    Rickers, Lisa; McSherry, Ciara

    Nutritional deficiencies are common in patients who are obese and therefore individuals considering bariatric surgery may require dietary supplementation with multivitamins and minerals before surgery. Nutritional deficiencies following bariatric surgery are often proportional to the degree of malabsorption created by the surgical procedure or the extent of weight loss. Eating habits often contribute to nutritional deficiencies, so appropriate dietary and lifestyle counselling are essential following bariatric procedures to ensure appropriate macronutrient and micronutrient status. Nutritional supplementation following bariatric surgery commonly includes calcium with vitamin D, iron and vitamin B12 in addition to a daily multivitamin and mineral tablet. Although general guidelines exist, individual monitoring and tailoring are frequently required. This article provides an update of guidelines regarding the most common nutritional concerns and myths surrounding bariatric surgery.

  5. Recommended nutritional supplements for bariatric surgery patients.

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    Malone, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    To review nutritional supplements commonly required after bariatric surgery to provide a practical guide and reference source for generalist healthcare providers. A PubMed literature search (1988-July 2008) was conducted, using the search term nutritional deficiency after bariatric surgery, and was limited to English-language literature on adult (aged >19 y) human subjects. Additional references from the selected literature were also included. Data were extracted from large clinical series and practice guidelines whenever possible. Case reports were used only when they were the sole information source. Nutritional deficiencies that occur after bariatric surgery depend significantly on the type of surgery performed. Restrictive procedures such as gastric banding are the least likely to cause nutritional deficits, since none of the intestine is bypassed. Malabsorptive procedures such as biliopancreatic diversion or mixed restrictive/malabsorptive procedures (eg, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) can result in serious nutritional problems when patients do not take required supplements after surgery. Vitamins and minerals that are commonly deficient in this circumstance include vitamin B(12), calcium, vitamin D, thiamine, folic acid, iron, zinc, and magnesium. Rare ocular complications have been reported with hypovitaminosis A. Healthcare professionals, especially those who practice outside large bariatric centers, must be aware of the supplements required by patients who have had bariatric surgery. Many patients fail to follow up with the surgery centers and are managed by their primary care teams and community pharmacists, especially in the selection of multivitamin and nutritional supplements.

  6. Patients' preferences for information in bariatric surgery.

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    Coblijn, Usha K; Lagarde, Sjoerd M; de Raaff, Christel A L; van Wagensveld, Bart A; Smets, Ellen M A

    2018-01-31

    The decision to undergo bariatric surgery is multifactorial and made both by patient and doctor. Information is of the utmost importance for this decision. To investigate the bariatric surgery patient's preferences regarding information provision in bariatric surgery. A teaching hospital, bariatric center of excellence in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. All patients who underwent a primary laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy between September 2013 and September 2014 were approached by mail to participate. A questionnaire was used to elicit patient preferences for the content and format of information. Sociodemographic characteristics, clinicopathologic factors, and psychologic factors were explored as predictors for specific preferences. Of the 356 eligible patients, 112 (31.5%) participated. The mean age was 49.2 (±10.7) years, and 91 (81.3%) patients were female. Patients deemed the opportunity to ask questions (96.4%) the most important feature of the consult, followed by a realistic view on expectations-for example, results of the procedure (95.5%) and information concerning the consequences of surgery for daily life (89.1%). Information about the risk of complications on the order of 10% was desired by 93% of patients; 48% desired information about lower risks (.1%). Only 25 patients (22.3%) desired detailed information concerning their weight loss after surgery. Bariatric patients wished for information about the consequences of surgery on daily life, whereas the importance of information concerning complications decreased when their incidence lessened. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

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    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  8. Revisional bariatric surgery in a transplant patient

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    Salman Al Sabah

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective procedure to assist renal transplant patients in losing weight. In addition, it has proven to be effective in the management of the co-morbidities that are associated with renal failure. Our study was also able to prove that converting form an SG to a bypass in a transplant patient is a safe and feasible option.

  9. Bariatric surgery

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    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  10. The bariatric surgery patient--nutrition considerations.

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    Shannon, Caroline; Gervasoni, Ashlee; Williams, Trudy

    2013-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective method of weight loss for the treatment of morbid obesity. It is more effective when combined with nutritional care, which is sometimes complex, always ongoing and differs between surgical procedures. In Australia, the three most common bariatric surgical procedures are the adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. This article introduces the nutritional and dietary considerations for each procedure, and provides practical advice to support the general practitioner's role in managing patients who are considering, or who have had, bariatric surgery. While bariatric procedures influence the volume of food consumed, none of the procedures necessarily improve the quality of food consumed or compliance with recommended supplement usage, leaving nutrition care and food choice important lifelong considerations. Ongoing coordinated care by the GP, that links with the bariatric dietitian and others in the health management team, maximises the benefits and health outcomes for the patient through ongoing monitoring of nutritional status, prevention of nutrient deficiencies and maximising long term weight loss.

  11. Bariatric surgery patients: reasons to visit emergency department after surgery.

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    Gonzalez-Sánchez, Juan A; Corujo-Vázquez, Omar; Sahai-Hernández, Mrisa

    2007-01-01

    Morbid obesity prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions in Western society. Long-term weight loss can be achieved by bariatric surgery. This surgery also has a positive impact in the reduction of obesity related co-morbid conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery. A retrospective chart review study was performed at the UPR Hospital in Carolina. Patients with the diagnosis of morbid obesity who had bariatric surgery were identified. Of the 283 patients who met the criteria, the following information was obtained: gender, age, height, weight, pre-operative BMI, obesity-related comorbid conditions, post operative length of stay (LOS), and reasons and length of stay of Emergency Department (ED) visits within a 3 month period after surgery. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. The same profile of gender and BMI was obtained between the population that had the surgery and the sample that visited the ED, the group of patients between 20-29 years old was more likely to visit the ED. No correlation was found between a longer post operative length of stay and an increased probability of visiting the ED. Of the population, 5% had to visit ED within a three month period. The most common post operative complications were: Abdominal Pain (46.2%), Emesis (38.5%), and Dehydration (30.8%). Other less frequent complications were nausea, DVT, pneumonia, dizziness, gastritis, infected wound and upper GI bleeding. The most common reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery were: abdominal pain, emesis, dehydration and nausea. These complications could most likely be attributed to patient poor compliance with diet, resulting in the classical symptoms of the dumping syndrome which is common in patients that have undergone

  12. PROFILE OF PATIENTS WHO SEEK THE BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    da SILVA, Paola Turchiello; PATIAS, Luciana Dapieve; ALVAREZ, Glauco da Costa; KIRSTEN, Vanessa Ramos; COLPO, Elis?ngela; de MORAES, Cristina Machado Bragan?a

    2015-01-01

    Background : Nowadays obesity is a chronic disease considered one of the greatest problems in public healthy. Showing to be effective in a short and long term, the bariatric surgery has emerged as an optional treatment for morbid obesity. Aim: Identify the profile of patients seeking bariatric surgery. Methods: Were interviewed 100 patients in preoperative nutritional monitoring of bariatric surgery. The study was conducted by applying a questionnaire prepared according to the research ob...

  13. Body Contouring Surgery in Post-Bariatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, E.S.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    The dramatic rise of morbid obesity worldwide and the success of bariatric surgery results in a significant rise in the demand for post-bariatric body contouring surgery, a new field in plastic surgery. This makes a national clinical guideline for patient selection and treatment mandatory. In

  14. Nutritional management of patients after bariatric surgery.

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    Parkes, Emmy

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method of sustainable weight loss among morbidly obese patients. The types of bariatric surgeries can be divided into three categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and combination (restrictive and malabsorption) procedures. In general, patients undergoing restrictive procedures have the least risk for long-term diet-related complications, whereas patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures have the highest risk. For many patients, the benefits of weight loss, such as decreased blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure and increased mobility, will outweigh the risks of surgical complications. Most diet-related surgical complications can be prevented by adhering to strict eating behavior guidelines and supplement prescriptions. Eating behavior guidelines include restricting portion sizes, chewing foods slowly and completely, eating and drinking separately, and avoiding foods that are poorly tolerated. Supplement prescriptions vary among practitioners and usually involve at least a multivitamin with minerals. Some practitioners may add other supplements only as needed for diagnosed deficiencies; others may prescribe additional prophylactic supplements. The most common nutrient deficiencies are of iron, folate, and vitamin B12. However, deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins have been reported in patients with malabsorption procedures, and thiamin deficiency has been reported among patients with very poor intake and/or nausea and vomiting. Frequent monitoring of nutrition status for all patients can aid in preventing severe clinical deficiencies.

  15. The bariatric surgery patient: a growing role for registered dietitians.

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    Kulick, Doina; Hark, Lisa; Deen, Darwin

    2010-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2004, the total number of bariatric procedures increased almost 10-fold, from 13,386 procedures in 1998 to 121,055 in 2004. Current estimates suggest the number of bariatric operations will exceed 220,000 in 2010. Bariatric surgery encompasses several surgical techniques classified as restrictive or malabsorptive, based on the main mechanism of weight loss. Clinical studies and meta-analyses show that bariatric surgery decreases morbidity and mortality when compared with nonsurgical treatments. A successful long-term outcome of bariatric surgery is dependent on the patient's commitment to a lifetime of dietary and lifestyle changes. The registered dietitian (RD) is an important member of the bariatric team and provides critical instructions to help patients adhere to the dietary changes consistent with surgery. Referencing current literature, this article outlines the indications, contraindications, and types of bariatric surgery. The role of the RD for preoperative and postoperative nutrition assessment and medical nutrition therapy is highlighted. Management of long-term nutrition issues is also reviewed. The current recommendations include a multivitamin/mineral supplement plus vitamin B-12, calcium, vitamin D-3, iron, and folic acid. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity and bariatric surgery procedures, caring for patients who have undergone surgery will be an expanding role for the RD. Close postoperative follow-up and careful monitoring will improve the odds for successful surgical outcomes, and RDs play a very important part in this process. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

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    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  17. Bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost six decades different surgical techniques have been developed to treat patients with morbid obesity. Various surgical techniques are generally divided with respect to their effect into restrictive, malabsorbtive and humoral and a combination of these. Surgically modified human metabolism ameliorates metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes, even in nonobese patients. The understanding of metabolic effects changed the traditional paradigm of bariatric surgery from simple weight-loss procedure to metabolic surgery affecting whole-body metabolism. Proper surgical technique for individual patient is the most important factor influencing long- term results, comorbidities and quality of life. Recommendations for patient selection, surgical methods and pre- and postoperative patient management are to be respected. Metabolic surgery principles and current concepts are presented.

  18. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

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    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  19. Depressive Symptoms in Bariatric Surgery Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Fisher, Carolyn J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lapin, Brittany; Aminian, Ali; Sullivan, Amy B

    2018-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a safe and effective intervention for patients with comorbid obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, this sub-population may be at heightened risk for pre- and postoperative depressive symptoms. This current exploratory study aims to describe the prevalence and nature of depressive symptoms in a sample of patients with MS who undergo bariatric surgery. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who received bariatric surgery and had a diagnosis of MS (n = 31) and a control sample of non-surgical MS patients with severe obesity (n = 828). Longitudinal outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Multiple Sclerosis Performance Scale (MSPS). There were no significant differences in PHQ-9 total and item scores between groups at baseline. PHQ-9 scores significantly improved at years 1 (p bariatric surgery when compared to non-surgical controls. Higher BMI (p = 0.03) and worse overall quality of life (p bariatric group. When compared to controls, the bariatric group demonstrated improved MSPS scores on a trend level 1 year post-surgery (p = 0.08). Consistent with the literature on more general bariatric surgery populations, current findings highlight the possible early benefits of bariatric surgery for reducing depressive symptoms in this population when compared to controls. Importantly, results should be viewed as preliminary and additional research is needed to examine bariatric surgery and associations with depressive symptoms and performance in the MS population.

  20. A psychiatric perspective view of bariatric surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Brandão; Ana Luísa Fernandes; Eva Osório; Maria da Conceição Calhau; Rui Coelho

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Bariatric surgery is the only procedure that has significant results in weight loss and improvements in medical comorbidities in morbid obese patients. Severely obese patients are also associated with a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders and poor quality of life. Objective To evaluate specific areas of psychopathology in individuals undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods A review of the literature was conducted from January 2002 to March 2014 by researching PubMe...

  1. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Bariatric Surgery Patient

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    Susan E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has proven to be a life-saving measure for some, but for others it has precipitated a plethora of metabolic complications ranging from mild to life-threatening, sometimes to the point of requiring surgical revision. Obesity was previously thought to be bone protective, but this is indeed not the case. Morbidly obese individuals are at risk for metabolic bone disease (MBD due to chronic vitamin D deficiency, inadequate calcium intake, sedentary lifestyle, chronic dieting, underlying chronic diseases, and the use of certain medications used to treat those diseases. After bariatric surgery, the risk for bone-related problems is even greater, owing to severely restricted intake, malabsorption, poor compliance with prescribed supplements, and dramatic weight loss. Patients presenting for bariatric surgery should be evaluated for MBD and receive appropriate presurgical interventions. Furthermore, every patient who has undergone bariatric surgery should receive meticulous lifetime monitoring, as the risk for developing MBD remains ever present.

  2. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

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    Carlene Johnson Stoklossa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain.

  3. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

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    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented.

  4. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

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    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented. PMID:26316771

  5. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review.

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    Giordano, Salvatore; Victorzon, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (%) with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I (2) test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone.

  6. The Inequity of Bariatric Surgery: Publicly Insured Patients Undergo Lower Rates of Bariatric Surgery with Worse Outcomes.

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    Hennings, Dietric L; Baimas-George, Maria; Al-Quarayshi, Zaid; Moore, Rachel; Kandil, Emad; DuCoin, Christopher G

    2018-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective method of achieving weight loss and alleviating obesity-related comorbidities. Yet, it is not being used equitably. This study seeks to identify if there is a disparity in payer status of patients undergoing bariatric surgery and what factors are associated with this disparity. We performed a case-control analysis of National Inpatient Sample. We identified adults with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 who underwent bariatric surgery and matched them with overweight inpatient adult controls not undergoing surgery. The sample was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. We identified 132,342 cases, in which the majority had private insurance (72.8%). Bariatric patients were significantly more likely to be privately insured than any other payer status; Medicare- and Medicaid-covered patients accounted for a low percentage of cases (Medicare 5.1%, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.29-0.37, p bariatric surgery had an increased risk of complications compared to privately insured patients. Publicly insured patients are significantly less likely to undergo bariatric surgery. As a group, these patients experience higher rates of obesity and related complications and thus are most in need of bariatric surgery.

  7. Long-term pharmacotherapy considerations in the bariatric surgery patient.

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    Bland, Christopher M; Quidley, April Miller; Love, Bryan L; Yeager, Catherine; McMichael, Bliss; Bookstaver, P Brandon

    2016-08-15

    Pharmacists' role in optimizing long-term pharmacotherapy for bariatric surgery patients is detailed. Bariatric surgery patients provide a difficult challenge in terms of many pharmacotherapy issues, especially in the chronic care setting, where data on long-term effects of bariatric surgery are limited. The most common procedures are Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy. Sleeve gastrectomy has become the most common procedure in the United States, primarily because it has less overall chronic malabsorption effects than RYGB. Pharmacotherapy management is complicated by rapid weight loss combined with a number of pharmacokinetic changes, such as decreased absorption of some medications due to altered gastrointestinal tract anatomy and potentially increased concentrations of some medications due to a decreased volume of distribution resulting from weight loss. Nutritional and metabolic supplementation are of the utmost importance in order to limit deficiencies that can lead to a number of conditions. Many chronic diseases, including hypertension, diabetes, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and urinary incontinence, are improved by bariatric surgery but require close monitoring to ensure the effectiveness of maintenance pharmacotherapy and avoidance of adverse effects. Psychotropic medication management is also an important pharmacotherapy concern, as evidenced by antidepressants being the most commonly used medication class among preoperative bariatric surgery patients. Pharmacists have an increasing role in the chronic management of the bariatric surgery patient due to their knowledge of medication dosage forms and expertise in disease states affected by bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mandatory Risk Assessment Reduces Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

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    Nimeri, Abdelrahman A; Bautista, Jejomar; Ibrahim, Maha; Philip, Ruby; Al Shaban, Talat; Maasher, Ahmed; Altinoz, Ajda

    2018-02-01

    Bariatric surgery patients are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), and chemoprophylaxis is recommended. Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) is an American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) member since 2009. We report the rates of VTE in bariatric surgery patients from 2010 to 2016 compared to ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs before and after switching from heparin to low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), initiating mandatory risk assessment using Caprini scoring for VTE and adopting an aggressive strategy for high-risk patients regarding dosage of LMWH and chemoprophylaxis after discharge. During the study period, there were 1152 cases (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) 625 and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) 527) at Bariatric & Metabolic Institute (BMI) Abu Dhabi compared to 65,693 cases (LRYGB 32,130 and LSG 33,563) at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs. VTE rates remained stable at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs from 2010 to 2016 (0.45, 0.45, 0.45, 0.25, 0.35, 0.3, and 0.3%). In contrast, VTE rates at BMI Abu Dhabi decreased from 2.2% in 2011 to 0.35% after we adopted an aggressive strategy to VTE without an increase in bleeding complications. LRYGB patients with VTE had higher OR time, leak, collection, and mortality at ACS NSQIP hospitals compared to those at BMI Abu Dhabi. In contrast, rates were similar in LSG patients with VTE. Changing our approach to VTE management led our VTE rates to decrease and become like those of ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery patients in LSG and LRYGB.

  9. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

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    Vidal, Eduardo Arevalo; Rendon, Francisco Abarca; Zambrano, Trino Andrade; García, Yudoco Andrade; Viteri, Mario Ferrin; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Ramos, Manoela Galvão; Ramos, Almino Cardoso

    Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. Má-rotação intestinal é rara anomalia congênita em adultos de difícil reconhecimento devido à falta de sintomas. O diagnóstico é feito geralmente incidentalmente durante procedimentos cirúrgicos ou durante autópsia. Verificar a ocorrência e reconhecimento não eventual

  10. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Giordano,1 Mikael Victorzon2,3 1Department of Plastic and General Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, 3University of Turku, Turku, Finland Abstract: Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (% with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I2 test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone. Keywords: morbid obesity, bariatric surgery, elderly, gastric bypass, weight loss, laparoscopy

  11. A psychiatric perspective view of bariatric surgery patients

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    Isabel Brandão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bariatric surgery is the only procedure that has significant results in weight loss and improvements in medical comorbidities in morbid obese patients. Severely obese patients are also associated with a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders and poor quality of life. Objective To evaluate specific areas of psychopathology in individuals undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods A review of the literature was conducted from January 2002 to March 2014 by researching PubMed database using the following query: “morbid AND obesity AND bariatric AND surgery AND (psychiatry OR psychology”. Results Overall improvements in eating behaviors, mood disorders and body image are reported after bariatric surgery, and the mechanism is not enlightened. Risk of suicide and consumption of substances of abuse, especially alcohol, after gastric bypass surgery are problems that clinicians must be aware. Discussion Bariatric patients should be monitored after surgery to identify who did not show the expected benefits postoperatively and the ones who develop psychiatric symptoms after an initial positive response.

  12. [Management of the post-bariatric surgery patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide the obesity epidemic is becoming one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity. The rates of bariatric surgery procedures are sharply increasing. Today it is the only treatment option for a substantial and durable long-term weight loss. However, bariatric surgery is not a guarantee of successful weight loss and maintenance. For all patients undergoing bariatric surgery, education and clinical management to prevent and detect nutritional deficiencies are recommended. Particularly for patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures, the management of potential nutritional deficiencies is important. Strategies should be employed to compensate for food intolerance aiming at risk reduction for nutritional deficiencies. All patients should receive care from a multidisciplinary team and be considered for comprehensive perioperative program for nutrition and lifestyle management.

  13. [Nutritional deficiencies in bariatric surgery patients: prevention, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Chaya; Keidar, Andrei

    2010-11-01

    The number of people suffering from surgery and obesity in the western world is constantly growing. In 1997 the World Health Organization (WHO) defined obesity as a plague and one of greatest public health hazards of our time. The National Institution of Health (NIH) declared that surgery is the only long-term solution for obesity. Today there are four different types of bariatric surgery. Each variation has different implications on the nutritional status of bariatric surgery patients. Bariatric surgery candidates are at risk of developing vitamin and mineral nutritional deficiencies in the post-operative stage, due to vomiting, decrease in food intake, food intolerance, diminution of gastric secretions and bypass of absorption area. It is easier and more efficient to treat nutritional deficiencies in the preoperative stage. Therefore, preoperative detection and correction are crucial. Blood tests before surgery to detect and treat nutritional deficiencies are crucial. In the postoperative period, blood tests should be conducted every 3 months in the first year after operation, every six months in the second year and annually thereafter. Multivitamin is recommended to prevent nutritional deficiencies in all bariatric surgery patients. Furthermore, iron, calcium, Vitamin D and B12 are additionally recommended for Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass patients. Patients with Biliopancreatic diversion and Duodenal Switch should also take fat soluble vitamins.

  14. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano S; Victorzon M

    2015-01-01

    Salvatore Giordano,1 Mikael Victorzon2,3 1Department of Plastic and General Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, 3University of Turku, Turku, Finland Abstract: Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and...

  15. The use of contraception for patients after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Lech, Medard; Stefańska, Ewa; Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Smarkusz, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Obesity in women of reproductive age is a serious concern regarding reproductive health. In many cases of infertility in obese women, reduction of body weight may lead to spontaneous pregnancy, without the need for more specific methods of treatment. Bariatric surgery is safe and is the most effective method for body weight reduction in obese and very obese patients. In practice there are two bariatric techniques; gastric banding, which leads to weight loss through intake restriction, and gastric bypass, leads to weight loss through food malabsorption. Gastric bypass surgery (the more frequently performed procedure), in most cases, leads to changes in eating habits and may result in vomiting, diarrhea and rapid body mass reduction. There are reliable data describing the continuous increase in the number of women who are trying to conceive, or are already pregnant, following bariatric surgery. Most medical specialists advise women to avoid pregnancy within 12-18 months after bariatric surgery. This allows for time to recover sufficiency from the decreased absorption of nutrients caused by the bariatric surgery. During this period there is a need for the use of reliable contraception. As there is a risk for malabsorption of hormones taken orally, the combined and progestogen-only pills are contraindicated, and displaced by non-oral hormonal contraception or non-hormonal methods, including intrauterine devices and condoms.

  16. Bariatric surgery rapidly improves mitochondrial respiration in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Sheetal; Richards, William; O'Hea, Martha F; Audia, Jonathon P; Alvarez, Diego F

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its attendant comorbidities are an emerging epidemic. Chronic metabolic inflammation (metainflammation) is thought to precipitate obesity-associated morbidities; however, its mechanistic progression is poorly understood. Moreover, although interventions such as diet, exercise, and bariatric surgery can control body weight, their effects on metainflammation are also poorly understood. Recently, metainflammation and the pathobiology of obesity have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein we examined the effects of bariatric surgery on mitochondrial respiration as an index of resolving metainflammation in morbidly obese patients. This institutional review board-approved study involved morbidly obese patients (body mass index > 35 kg/m(2)) undergoing sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in peripheral blood monocytes and in skeletal muscle samples before surgery and at 12 weeks after surgery. Patient biometrics, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile were analyzed. Twenty patients were enrolled and showed an average percent excess body weight loss of 30.3% weight loss at 12 weeks after surgery. Average HOMA-IR score decreased from 3.0 to 1.2 in insulin-resistant patients. C-reactive protein, an index of metainflammation, showed a modest decrease. Lipid profile remained stable. Intriguingly, mitochondrial basal and maximal respiration rates in peripheral blood monocytes increased after surgery. Basal rates of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration were unchanged, but the maximal respiration rate trended toward an increase after surgery. Cellular and tissue mitochondrial respiration increased in a morbidly obese patient cohort after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. These changes were consistent in patients with postsurgical weight loss. Importantly, no significant changes or improvements occurred in canonical indices used to

  17. Bariatric surgery and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Divya K; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2010-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most reliable way to sustain weight loss in the morbidly obese. Reproductive age women comprise the majority of bariatric patients, and many may be interested in conceiving after surgery. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the recent literature on bariatric surgery and fertility to assist providers in patient counseling. Obesity adversely impacts fecundability and IVF outcomes through a variety of mechanisms. The body of literature on reproductive outcome after bariatric surgery is sparse and of mixed quality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to improve menstrual cyclicity in anovulatory women, but little is published on the impact of surgical weight loss on spontaneous or IVF-treatment-related pregnancy rates. The increased risk of miscarriage in obese women may decline after bariatric surgery. There are currently insufficient data to support recommendations regarding the ideal timing for pregnancy after bariatric surgery. Obesity has been shown to adversely impact fertility, and weight loss is associated with significant improvement in many parameters of reproductive function. Further research is required as to the specific impact of surgical weight loss on pregnancy and miscarriage rates, as well as the optimal timing of pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

  18. Bariatric Surgery in Moderately Obese Patients: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cerci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Moderate obesity (BMI 30–35 kg/m2 affects 25% of the western population. The role of bariatric surgery in this context is currently debated, reserved for patients with comorbidity, as an alternative to conservative medical treatment. We describe our experience in moderately obese patients treated with bariatric surgery. Materials and Methods. Between September 2011 and September 2012, 25 patients with grade I obesity and comorbidities underwent bariatric surgery: preoperative mean BMI 33.2 kg/m2, 10 males, mean age 42 years. In presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM (56%, gastric bypass was performed; in cases with hypertension (64% and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA (12%, sleeve gastrectomy was performed. All operations were performed laparoscopically. Results. Mean follow-up was 12.4 months. A postoperative complication occurred: bleeding from the trocar site was resolved with surgery in local anesthesia. Reduction in average BMI was 6 points, with a value of 27.2 kg/m2. Of the 14 patients with T2DM, 12 (86% discontinued medical therapy because of a normalization of glycemia. Of the 16 patients with arterial hypertension, 14 (87% showed remission and 2 (13% improvement. Complete remission was observed in patients with OSAS. Conclusions. The results of our study support the validity of bariatric surgery in patients with BMI 30–35 kg/m2. Our opinion is that, in the future, bariatric surgery could be successful in selected cases of moderately obese patients.

  19. PROFILE OF PATIENTS WHO SEEK THE BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Paola Turchiello; Patias, Luciana Dapieve; Alvarez, Glauco da Costa; Kirsten, Vanessa Ramos; Colpo, Elisângela; de Moraes, Cristina Machado Bragança

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays obesity is a chronic disease considered one of the greatest problems in public healthy. Showing to be effective in a short and long term, the bariatric surgery has emerged as an optional treatment for morbid obesity. Identify the profile of patients seeking bariatric surgery. Were interviewed 100 patients in preoperative nutritional monitoring of bariatric surgery. The study was conducted by applying a questionnaire prepared according to the research objectives. From the individuals that were seeking bariatric surgery, 78% were female, 62% were married and 69% reported physical activity. The average age of those surveyed was 37±10.83 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 43.51± 6.25 kg/m². The comorbidity more prevalent in this group was high blood pressure (51%). In previous treatments for weight reduction, 92% have already done hypocaloric diet followed by anorectic drug (83%). The success of these treatments was reported by 92% of patients; however, the weight lost was recovered in less than one year of 75%. Patients with diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia had higher BMI values. The patients with comorbidities showed lower levels of BMI. The profile of patients who sought surgical treatment for their obesity were predominantly women with a family background of obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, especially hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  20. Screening of adult ADHD among patients presenting for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsson, Sven; Parling, Thomas; Ghaderi, Ata

    2012-06-01

    In the field of bariatric surgery, research on symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their interrelationships with other psychological risk factors such as depression and anxiety is scarce. The symptoms of adult ADHD seem to be common in the obese population, but they are rarely investigated before bariatric surgery. ADHD-related symptoms such as impulsivity have at the same time been identified as potential risk factors for less successful weight loss among bariatric surgery patients. The aims of the current study were to screen for symptoms of adult ADHD and to investigate their relationships with other psychological risk factors. Candidates for bariatric surgery (N = 187) were anonymously screened for symptoms of anxiety, depression, and adult ADHD, in addition to disordered eating patterns, by means of questionnaires. The relations between these symptoms were investigated. In the current sample, 10% of patients screened positively for adult ADHD, and the symptoms of adult ADHD were significantly correlated with those of anxiety, depression, and disordered eating. The results show that adult ADHD is more common in this clinical group than in the general population (4%) and that adult ADHD is associated with disordered eating patterns, depression, and anxiety. Further prospective research, using multivariate analysis, is needed to investigate whether the symptoms of adult ADHD, and their interaction with anxiety, depression, or disordered eating, may possibly constitute a risk factor in terms of difficulties in adhering to the post-surgery regime and its potential unfavorable outcome.

  1. Bariatric surgery: An HIV-positive patient's successful journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, F; Elvin, S; Sanmani, L

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is becoming increasingly common in the UK. Little has been done to evaluate its place in HIV-positive patients. Here, we discuss a successful case and the complexities surrounding highly active antiretroviral therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Information needs among adolescent bariatric surgery patients and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nicole M; Tully, Carrie B; Washington, Gia A; Price, Karin L

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery is an invasive medical treatment for morbid obesity that requires behavioral maintenance for physical success. Patient knowledge, motivation, and adherence are important factors in optimizing results. The purpose of the present study was to identify perceived informational gaps of adolescent and young adult bariatric surgery patients with morbid obesity (body mass index≥40 kg/m(2)). This study took place in a pediatric tertiary care academic medical center. Thirty-one adolescents/young adults who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery at the authors' institution were recruited to complete questionnaires at their postsurgical visits (≥3 months postsurgery). Seventeen caregivers also participated in this study. The questionnaire used in the present study prompted patients and caregivers to reflect on information they wish they had known before surgery; questionnaire items included multiple choice and open-ended questions. Participants indicated that their informational needs were generally well met before surgery, although there were more needs noted by patients than by caregivers. Adolescent/young adult participants expressed a desire to have had more information about the necessity of taking vitamins daily and about having more gas. An association between informational needs and satisfaction was also found. Qualitative data revealed the importance of conveying cognitive-behavioral aspects of surgery to families (e.g., adherence, motivation). Despite most patients and caregivers being satisfied with the adolescent bariatric surgery program at the authors' institution, informational gaps exist. Teen-friendly ways to disseminate information would be helpful in influencing patients' satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patients' perceptions of waiting for bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Deborah M; Temple Newhook, Julia; Twells, Laurie K

    2013-10-18

    In Canada waiting lists for bariatric surgery are common, with wait times on average > 5 years. The meaning of waiting for bariatric surgery from the patients' perspective must be understood if health care providers are to act as facilitators in promoting satisfaction with care and quality care outcomes. The aims of this study were to explore patients' perceptions of waiting for bariatric surgery, the meaning and experience of waiting, the psychosocial and behavioral impact of waiting for treatment and identify health care provider and health system supportive measures that could potentially improve the waiting experience. Twenty-one women and six men engaged in in-depth interviews that were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis between June 2011 and April 2012. The data were subjected to re-analysis to identify perceived health care provider and health system barriers to accessing bariatric surgery. Thematic analysis identified inequity as a barrier to accessing bariatric surgery. Three areas of perceived inequity were identified from participants' accounts: socioeconomic inequity, regional inequity, and inequity related to waitlist prioritization. Although excited about their acceptance as candidates for surgery, the waiting period was described as stressful, anxiety provoking, and frustrating. Anger was expressed towards the health care system for the long waiting times. Participants identified the importance of health care provider and health system supports during the waiting period. Recommendations on how to improve the waiting experience included periodic updates from the surgeon's office about their position on the wait list; a counselor who specializes in helping people going through this surgery, dietitian support and further information on what to expect after surgery, among others. Patients' perceptions of accessing and waiting for bariatric surgery are shaped by perceived

  4. [Treatment of anemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency in patients with morbid obesity can occur before bariatric surgery due to its inflammatory component and after surgery as the result of implementing the malabsorptive techniques. For patients with morbid obesity, micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron and folate, should be suspected. Iron deficiency and other hematinics should be corrected, even when anemia has not been established. Normal ferritin levels do not allow us to rule out a possible iron deficiency, given that ferritin can increase due to the chronic inflammatory condition of obesity. After bariatric surgery, patients should take iron supplements; however, these supplements are frequently poorly tolerated. Rapid and effective correction of hemoglobin levels might require the intravenous administration of iron preparations. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: Morbidly Obese Patients with Pulmonary Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a well-known major risk factor of cardiovascular disease and is associated with various comorbidities. The impact of obesity on pulmonary function remains unclear. Reductions in chest wall compliance and respiratory muscle strength due to a high percent body fat and localized fat distribution contributes to impaired pulmonary function and the occurrence of adverse respiratory symptoms. Dietary modifications and pharmaceutical agents are not effective in the long-term treatment of obesity. Treatment of morbidly obese patients using bariatric surgery has increased each year, especially after the introduction of video laparoscopic techniques. Effective weight loss after bariatric surgery may improve cardiovascular disease risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Bariatric surgery has also been associated with significantly improved respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function. We currently present a review of principal studies that evaluated the effects of obesity on pulmonary function and the identification of anthropometric factors of obesity that correspond to the reversal of respiratory symptoms and impaired pulmonary function after bariatric surgery.

  6. Psychometric evaluation of disordered eating measures in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katrina; Mitchell, Sarah; O'Brien, Paul; Brennan, Leah

    2015-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective weight loss intervention for obese persons. However, accurate assessment is essential to identify disordered eating that may impair achievement of optimal post-surgical outcomes. Measures of disordered eating are yet to be thoroughly psychometrically evaluated in bariatric surgery patients, therefore their utility is unknown. Participants were 108 adults who completed psychological measures approximately 12 months after bariatric surgery. The fit of the original scale structures was tested using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and alternative factor solutions were generated using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). Reliability (internal consistency) and construct validity (convergent and divergent) were also assessed. Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), Questionnaire of Eating and Weight Patterns Revised (QEWP-R), Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA). CFA revealed none of the original disordered eating measures met adequate fit statistics. EFA produced revised scales with improved reliability (original scales α=0.47-0.94; revised scales α=0.76-0.98) and correlational analyses with measures of psychological wellbeing and impairment demonstrated adequate convergent validity. Reported prevalence of disordered eating behaviours differed between the EDE-Q and QEWP-R. Psychometric evaluation did not support the use of the commonly used disordered eating measures in bariatric patients in their original form. The revised version of the EDE-Q replicates findings from recent research in bariatric surgery candidates. The alternate structures of the CIA and TFEQ suggest differences in the manifestation of disordered eating following surgery. Results suggest that revised measures are required to overcome the limitations of existing measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin D deficiency in preoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, Kelly; Santry, Heena P; Prachand, Vivek N; Alverdy, John C

    2009-01-01

    Obese patients are at risk of hypovitaminosis D. This is particularly concerning for those considering bariatric surgery because of the risk of postoperative nutritional deficiency. We hypothesized that it is necessary to screen for vitamin D deficiency preoperatively and conducted a study to identify the patterns of vitamin D deficiency among prospective bariatric surgery patients. A retrospective analysis of available preoperative laboratory values was conducted for all consecutive patients (n = 312) scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery from January 2004 to October 2006. Of the 312 patients, 179 (57.4%) were deficient in vitamin D preoperatively (25-hydroxyvitamin D deficient; of the 156 white patients evaluated, 57 (36.5%) were vitamin D deficient; and of the 14 Hispanic patients evaluated, 11 (78.6%) were vitamin D deficient. We also evaluated serum red blood cell folate, vitamin B(12), and free retinol vitamin A levels preoperatively. Of the 312 patients, 39 (12.5%) were vitamin A deficient and 11 (3.5%) were vitamin B(12) deficient. No patient had a red blood cell folate deficiency. Patients with hypovitaminosis D were also checked for secondary hyperparathyroidism; 42 patients (23.5%) fit the criteria (parathyroid hormone levels >75 pg/mL). Many patients with low vitamin D levels were being considered for the duodenal switch procedure. The results of our study have shown that prospective bariatric surgery patients, particularly candidates for highly malabsorptive procedures, should be screened for hypovitaminosis D preoperatively. Our findings also showed that blacks are particularly at risk of vitamin D deficiency.

  8. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Stoklossa, Carlene; Atwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews ...

  9. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  10. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-11-27

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and those with BMI > 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  11. Reactivation of adiponectin expression in obese patients after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, A Katharine; Edwards, Claire; McCaffrey, Tim; Fu, Sidney W; Brody, Fred

    2010-06-01

    Bariatric surgery can resolve type 2 diabetes in morbidly obese patients. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study aimed to identify potential biomarkers or molecular pathways that are altered after bariatric surgery in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. The study enrolled 17 morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Eight of the patients were diabetic, and nine were nondiabetic. In addition, a control group of four nonobese, nondiabetic volunteers was included. Patient blood samples were drawn before and after the operation. All blood samples were stabilized in Paxgene tubes (PreAnalytix). Total RNA was extracted and purified using the Paxgene Blood RNA Kit. For each sample, 100 ng of total RNA was amplified and labeled using the Ovation RNA Amplification System V2 with the Ovation Whole Blood reagent before hybridization to an Affymetrix Focus array containing more than 8,500 verified genes. Microarray results were analyzed with the GeneSpring GX 10.0 program, which uses an analysis of variance (ANOVA), and verified with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) using SYBR green (ABI). Microarray analysis showed that 167 genes were upregulated and 39 were downregulated in the obese diabetic patients. Preoperatively, adiponectin was downregulated 1.5-fold in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients. This was confirmed with quantitative PCR analysis. Preoperatively, morbidly obese patients showed a 3.12-fold downregulation of adiponectin expression versus the control group (p = 0.05). Interestingly, postoperative adiponectin levels were upregulated 2.79-fold (p = 0.02), which is close to the level of the normal control group. Adiponectin is dysregulated in obese patients and significantly dysregulated in obese diabetic patients. These findings correlate with the association between low levels of adiponectin and a predisposition to insulin resistance or diabetes. The data suggest that reactivation of adiponectin expression may

  12. Use of bariatric outcomes longitudinal database (BOLD) to study variability in patient success after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stephen C; Hunter, Tina D; Francis, Diane M; De La Cruz-Munoz, Nestor

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the contributions of various predictors to the large variations in absolute weight loss and percent body mass index (BMI) loss after bariatric surgery. The data source was the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database(SM) by the Surgical Review Corporation. Eligibility criteria included a first bariatric surgery for adjustable gastric band (AGB), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYBG), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) between January 2007 and February 2010; age 21 years or older; presurgery BMI > 30 kg/m2; and at least one preoperative visit within 6 months and at least one postoperative visit 30 days or more after surgery. Potential predictor variables included procedural details, patient demographics, comorbidities, and prior surgical history. Linear regression models of absolute weight loss and %BMI loss were fitted at 12, 18, and 24 months. The 12-month absolute weight loss endpoint was then chosen for a more in-depth analysis of variability through variable transformations and separate models by procedure. A total of 31,443 AGB, 40,352 RYGB, and 2,194 SG patients met all inclusion criteria. Regression models explained 37 to 55% of the variability in %BMI loss and 52 to 65% of variability in absolute weight loss. The key predictors for absolute weight loss at 12 months were procedure (44.8%) and baseline weight (18.5%), with 34.2% of the variability unexplained. Other significant predictors, each of which accounted for bariatric surgery.

  13. Nutritional status and life quality in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Paulo Roberto Bezerra; de Souza, Marcela Ramos; da Silva, Evane Moises; da Silva, Silvia Alves

    2014-01-01

    The obesity has achieved an alarming increase in recent years, which led this disease to global epidemic condition. To evaluate the nutritional status as well as the quality of life of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A transversal study was conducted with obese adults of both genders who underwent bariatric surgery by Fobi-Capella technique for at least 30 days. It was evaluated: age, gender, marital status, occupation, weight before surgery, current weight, height, preoperative and current BMI, weight loss and loss of excess weight percentages, presence of clinical manifestations and food intolerances. The sample consisted of 70 patients, being 81.4% female, 37.1% aged 30 to 39 years, 58.6% were married, 41.4% have undergone the bariatric surgery in the last 12 months. It was observed a reduction in BMI from 37.2 kg/m2 (one to three months) to 28.9 kg/m2 (>12 months) and consequent increase in weight loss and loss of excess weight percentages. The most frequent clinical manifestation was alopecia (62.9%). The most reported food intolerance was on the red meat (24%). According to the Baros questionnaire, 50% of patients were classified as having good quality of life. The operation of Fobi-Capella proved to be effective in promoting gradual and lasting weight loss. Quality of life was considered good in most patients, indicating that the operation had a positive impact on their lives.

  14. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Estonian Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja Šebunova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (Hp is one of the most important human pathogens that can cause duodenal and gastric ulcers, gastritis and stomach cancer. Hp infection is considered to be a cause of limiting access to bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Hp in patients with obesity going into bariatric surgery and to reveal the relationship between Hp and clinical data. The study group was formed of 68 preoperative bariatric surgery patients (body mass index (BMI 44.7 ± 4.8. Gastric biopsies (antrum and corpus were used for histological and molecular (caqA and glmM genes examinations. The PCR method revealed Hp infection in 64.7% of obese patients that is higher in comparison with histological analysis (55.9%. The prevalence of cagA and glmM genes in antrum mucosa was 45.6% and 47.0% while in the corpus it was 41.2% and 38.3%, respectively. The coincidence of both cagA and glmM virulence genes in the antrum and corpus mucosa was 33.8% and 22.1%, respectively. Either of the genes was found in 58.8% of antrum and 57.3% of corpus mucosa. Presence of caqA and glmM genes was in association with active and atrophic chronic gastritis. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that two thirds of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery are infected with Hp and have a high prevalence of cagA and glmM virulence genes that points out the necessity for diagnostics and treatment of this infection before surgery.

  15. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Who is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery Life ... Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity 100 SW 75th Street, Suite 201, Gainesville, FL, ...

  16. Menstrual Concerns and Intrauterine Contraception Among Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel J.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Adolescent obesity has dramatically increased in recent decades, and along with that so have other medical comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and pseudotumor cerebri. Obesity and related comorbidites may be contraindications to hormonal contraception, making contraception counseling of morbidly obese adolescents more challenging. Obese adolescent females seeking bariatric surgery need effective contraception in the postoperative period. This study is designed to determine the acceptance rate of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) and describe common menstrual problems in obese adolescent bariatric surgery patients. Methods This is a historic cohort study of adolescent females who underwent bariatric surgery over a 2-year period at a tertiary referral center for pediatric obesity. Data were systematically abstracted. The percent of patients with menstrual problems and the acceptance rate for the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD were determined. Results Twenty-five adolescents met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 17.4 years (standard deviation [SD] 2.6), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 51.4 (SD 6.3) kg/m2. Eighty-four percent were white. Twenty-eight percent had menorrhagia, 32% had oligomenorrhea, 40% had dysmenorrhea, and 36% had PCOS. Ninety-two percent (23 of 25) underwent IUD placement. Conclusions There was a high prevalence of menstrual problems among this sample of severely obese adolescent females. The majority accepted the IUD, indicating it is a viable option among this population. PMID:21413894

  17. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications.

  18. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications

  19. Nutritional Recommendations for Adult Bariatric Surgery Patients: Clinical Practice12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherf Dagan, Shiri; Goldenshluger, Ariela; Globus, Inbal; Schweiger, Chaya; Kessler, Yafit; Kowen Sandbank, Galit; Ben-Porat, Tair; Sinai, Tali

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its associated metabolic complications. To ensure long-term postoperative success, patients must be prepared to adopt comprehensive lifestyle changes. This review summarizes the current evidence and expert opinions with regard to nutritional care in the perioperative and long-term postoperative periods. A literature search was performed with the use of different lines of searches for narrative reviews. Nutritional recommendations are divided into 3 main sections: 1) presurgery nutritional evaluation and presurgery diet and supplementation; 2) postsurgery diet progression, eating-related behaviors, and nutritional therapy for common gastrointestinal symptoms; and 3) recommendations for lifelong supplementation and advice for nutritional follow-up. We recognize the need for uniform, evidence-based nutritional guidelines for bariatric patients and summarize recommendations with the aim of optimizing long-term success and preventing complications. PMID:28298280

  20. Nutritional Recommendations for Adult Bariatric Surgery Patients: Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherf Dagan, Shiri; Goldenshluger, Ariela; Globus, Inbal; Schweiger, Chaya; Kessler, Yafit; Kowen Sandbank, Galit; Ben-Porat, Tair; Sinai, Tali

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its associated metabolic complications. To ensure long-term postoperative success, patients must be prepared to adopt comprehensive lifestyle changes. This review summarizes the current evidence and expert opinions with regard to nutritional care in the perioperative and long-term postoperative periods. A literature search was performed with the use of different lines of searches for narrative reviews. Nutritional recommendations are divided into 3 main sections: 1 ) presurgery nutritional evaluation and presurgery diet and supplementation; 2 ) postsurgery diet progression, eating-related behaviors, and nutritional therapy for common gastrointestinal symptoms; and 3 ) recommendations for lifelong supplementation and advice for nutritional follow-up. We recognize the need for uniform, evidence-based nutritional guidelines for bariatric patients and summarize recommendations with the aim of optimizing long-term success and preventing complications. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. A nomogram for predicting surgical complications in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Patricia L; Saager, Leif; Dalton, Jarrod; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; Roberman, Dmitry; Melara, Pamela; Kurz, Andrea; Turan, Alparslan

    2011-05-01

    To minimize morbidity and mortality associated with surgery risks in the obese patient, algorithms offer planning operative strategy. Because these algorithms often classify patients based on inadequate category granularity, outcomes may not be predicted accurately. We reviewed patient factors and patient outcomes for those who had undergone bariatric surgical procedures to determine relationships and developed a nomogram to calculate individualized patient risk. From the American College of Surgeons National Security Quality Improvement Program database, we identified 32,426 bariatric surgery patients meeting NIH criteria and treated between 2005 and 2008. We defined a composite binary outcome of 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality. A predictive model based on preoperative variables was developed using multivariable logistic regression; a multiple imputation procedure allowed inclusions of observations with missing data. Model performance was assessed using the C-statistic. A calibration plot graphically assessed the agreement between predicted and observed probabilities in regard to 30-day morbidity/mortality. The nomogram model was constructed for maximal predictive accuracy. The estimated C-statistic [95% confidence interval] for the predictive nomogram was 0.629 [0.614, 0.645], indicative of slight to moderate discriminative ability beyond that of chance alone, and the greatest impacts on the estimated probability of morbidity/mortality were determined to be age, body mass index, serum albumin, and functional status. By accurately predicting 30-day morbidity and mortality, this nomogram may prove useful in patient preoperative counseling on postoperative complication risk. Our results additionally indicate that neither age nor presence of obesity-related comorbidities should exclude patients from bariatric surgery consideration.

  2. Outcomes of 50 patients entering an adolescent bariatric surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Billy; Doyle, Jacqueline; Matschull, Kirsten; Adamo, Marco; Christie, Deborah; Nicholls, Dasha; Kinra, Sanjay; Wong, Ian Chi Kei; Viner, Russell M

    2017-08-09

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective intervention for weight loss and obesity-related comorbidities currently available. Little is known about adolescents entering National Health Service (NHS) bariatric programmes. We aimed to characterise those entering a pathway and report their outcomes. Prospective service evaluation of patients assessed within a single NHS adolescent bariatric service. 50 patients assessed between 26 July 2007 and 27 January 2014; 6 (12%) were not eligible for surgery, 7 (14%) actively opted out, 8 (16%) were lost to follow-up and 29 (58%) underwent surgery (18 sleeve gastrectomy (SG) 11 Roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB) and 0 adjustable gastric band). Mean (SD) age at initial assessment was 16.0 (1.3) years and 18.3 (1.3) at surgery (youngest 15.7 years). Mean time taken to surgery was 1.8 years; longer in those with higher body mass index (BMI) and aged below 14 at first assessment. Mean (SD) BMI at surgery was 53.1 (8.3) kg/m 2 , lower in those undergoing RYGB (-5.2, 95% CI -11.6 to 1.13). Follow-up was inconsistent and challenging; 1/29 (3.5%) was transferred to a regional centre, 10/29 (34.5%) attended ongoing follow-up within our protocol, 6/29 (20.7%) had intermittent monitoring and 12/29 (41.4%) were lost to follow-up. Mean BMI change at 1 year (-14.0 kg/m 2 ) and complications were similar to published cohorts. Data from 11 lost to follow-up were obtained and outcomes appeared similar to those who actively followed up. Adolescent bariatric surgery in the NHS appears effective, with outcomes similar to those reported internationally. Further work is needed to optimise postsurgical surveillance and reduce age at surgery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF OLDER OBESE PATIENTS CANDIDATES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis PAJECKI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Obesity in the elderly is associated with exacerbation of functional decline (dependency, that occurs with aging, because of decreased muscle mass and strength, and increased joint dysfunction. Consequently, there is progressive loss of independence, autonomy, chronic pain and impaired quality of life. The weight loss can bring benefits in all these aspects, especially when accompanied by exercises. Elderly patients with morbid obesity may be submitted to surgical treatment, taking into account that the massive weight loss, eventually caused by bariatric surgery, may exacerbate the loss of muscle mass and nutritional complications that may bring harm to the overall health and quality of life of these patients. The functional assessment of elderly patients, candidates for bariatric surgery and the extent to which surgery can bring benefits to the patients, in the field of functionality, has still to be determined. Objective To describe profile functionality in obese elderly referred to a bariatric surgery program. Methods Patients with age ≥60 and BMI ≥35 underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment that evaluates co morbidities, medication use, ability to perform basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, and the “Timedupandgo” test to evaluate mobility, whose cut-off point was ≤10 seconds. Statistical analysis was performed in order to see if there is a positive correlation of dependency with BMI and age (over or under 65 years. Results Forty subjects have completed evaluation. The mean age was 64.1 years (60-72 and 75% were women. They had an average weight of 121.1 kg (72.7-204 and a mean BMI of 47.2 kg/m2 (35.8-68.9. 16 patients (40% have shown dependency for activities of daily living, 19 (47,5% for instrumental activities of daily living and 20 patients (50% had a “Timedupandgo” test over 10 seconds. Statistical analysis (t-Student, Mann-Whitney, Binary Logistic Regression has shown

  4. Functional assessment of older obese patients candidates for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajecki, Denis; Santo, Marco Aurélio; Kanagi, Ana Lumi; Riccioppo, Daniel; de Cleva, Roberto; Cecconello, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in the elderly is associated with exacerbation of functional decline (dependency), that occurs with aging, because of decreased muscle mass and strength, and increased joint dysfunction. Consequently, there is progressive loss of independence, autonomy, chronic pain and impaired quality of life. The weight loss can bring benefits in all these aspects, especially when accompanied by exercises. Elderly patients with morbid obesity may be submitted to surgical treatment, taking into account that the massive weight loss, eventually caused by bariatric surgery, may exacerbate the loss of muscle mass and nutritional complications that may bring harm to the overall health and quality of life of these patients. The functional assessment of elderly patients, candidates for bariatric surgery and the extent to which surgery can bring benefits to the patients, in the field of functionality, has still to be determined. To describe profile functionality in obese elderly referred to a bariatric surgery program. Patients with age ≥ 60 and BMI ≥ 35 underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment that evaluates co morbidities, medication use, ability to perform basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, and the "Timedupandgo" test to evaluate mobility, whose cut-off point was ≤ 10 seconds. Statistical analysis was performed in order to see if there is a positive correlation of dependency with BMI and age (over or under 65 years). Results Forty subjects have completed evaluation. The mean age was 64.1 years (60-72) and 75% were women. They had an average weight of 121.1 kg (72.7-204) and a mean BMI of 47.2 kg/m2 (35.8-68.9). 16 patients (40%) have shown dependency for activities of daily living, 19 (47,5%) for instrumental activities of daily living and 20 patients (50%) had a "Timedupandgo" test over 10 seconds. Statistical analysis (t-Student, Mann-Whitney, Binary Logistic Regression) has shown positive correlation of dependency in

  5. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  6. Patients' Reported Usage of Weight Management Skills Following Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essayli, Jamal H; LaGrotte, Caitlin A; Fink-Miller, Erin L; Rigby, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    Little is known about which specific weight management skills bariatric patients find most and least valuable. Participants completed a measure assessing their usage of weight management skills at a follow-up appointment one or more years after undergoing bariatric surgery. Decreased usage of skills was associated with unsuccessful weight outcome, defined as losing less than 50% of excess weight, as well as weight regain. Weighing regularly was the skill selected most often by successful participants as helpful, and was chosen by a significantly smaller percentage of unsuccessful participants and those who regained a clinically significant amount of weight. A majority of both successful and unsuccessful participants indicated that they had discontinued food journaling. Weighing regularly may be perceived as a more useful method of self-monitoring.

  7. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...... data from the National Patient Registry in the period from 2005 through 2007: annual number of operations, type of operation, laparoscopic versus open procedure. Furthermore, the centres were compared. RESULTS: A total of 2,098 bariatric procedures were performed in the years 2005 to 2007. Apart from...

  8. Bariatric surgery: a viable treatment option for patients with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Sarah R; Labott, Susan; Stout, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    Although bariatric surgery has become a recognized treatment for obesity, its utility among patients with severe psychiatric disorders has not been extensively studied. A few studies have reported similar weight loss outcomes in these patients, but psychiatric status after bariatric surgery has been studied only minimally, and it is unknown if exacerbation of the mental illness affects weight loss. The aim of this study was to shed greater light on the issue of serious mental illness and bariatric surgery. Specifically, do patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II have poorer weight loss outcomes postbariatric surgery than the general bariatric surgery population? Also, do patients with these diagnoses experience an exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms after bariatric surgery, and if so, is the exacerbation of these disorders linked to poorer weight loss results? Midwest university medical center. A medical record review of approximately 1500 bariatric patients in a Midwest university medical center was conducted to identify those patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II. Information was gathered on bariatric surgery outcomes and changes in psychiatric status postsurgery. Eighteen patients were identified as undergoing bariatric surgery and having a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar I, or bipolar II. Weight loss in this group was significant and comparable to expected outcomes of absolute weight lost, changes in body mass index, and percentage excess weight loss for patients in the typical bariatric population. Postsurgery psychiatric status was known on 10 patients. All 10 patients experienced some exacerbation of psychiatric problems yet weight loss outcomes were still as expected. Bariatric surgery is a viable obesity treatment option for patients with schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II disorders. Symptom exacerbations occurred postsurgery, although it is not clear if these were due to the surgery or

  9. The prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanbhai, M; Dubb, S; Patel, K; Ahmed, A; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    As bariatric surgery rates continue to climb, anaemia will become an increasing concern. We assessed the prevalence of anaemia and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Prospective data (anaemia [haemoglobin bariatric surgery. Results from a prospective database of 1530 patients undergoing elective general surgery were used as a baseline. Fifty-seven patients (14%) were anaemic pre-operatively, of which 98% were females. Median MCV (fL) and overall median ferritin (μg/L) was lower in anaemic patients (83 vs. 86, p=0.001) and (28 vs. 61, psurgery patients, prevalence of anaemia was similar (14% vs. 16%) but absolute iron deficiency was more common in those undergoing bariatric surgery; microcytosis pbariatric surgery. In bariatric patients with anaemia there was an overall increased length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient and Referring Provider Characteristics Associated With the Likelihood of Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke M.; Jolles, Sally; Fischer, Laura E.; Voils, Corrine I

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although bariatric surgery is the most cost-effective treatment for severe obesity, less than 1% of severely obese patients undergo it. Reasons for low utilization are unclear. Objectives To identify patient and referring provider characteristics associated with the likelihood of undergoing bariatric surgery. Evidence Review PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane databases were searched for reports published between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2014. Reports were eligible if they presented descriptive data regarding facilitators or barriers to bariatric surgery or if they reported statistical associations between patient or provider characteristics and referral to or receipt of bariatric surgery. Frequency effect sizes were calculated as the proportion of studies reporting a finding. Findings Of the 7,212 reports identified in the initial search, 53 were included in full-text review. Nine reports met our inclusion criteria and were included in analyses. Of those, four included descriptive findings, six reported statistical associations, and one included both. One report included providers as study participants, whereas eight included patients. Four of nine studies identified an association between female gender and a greater willingness to undergo bariatric surgery. Lack of knowledge about bariatric surgery was a barrier in two studies. Five of nine cited patient concerns about the outcomes and safety of bariatric surgery as a barrier to undergoing it. Patients were more likely to pursue bariatric surgery when it was recommended by referring providers. Providers who believed that obesity treatment should be covered by insurance were more likely to recommend bariatric surgery. Conclusions and Relevance Limited patient and referring provider knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery are important barriers to bariatric surgery utilization. Future efforts focused on improving knowledge and identification of the critical

  11. Satisfaction and complications in post-bariatric surgery abdominoplasty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M; Polat, F; Stook, F P; Oostenbroek, R J; Plaisier, P W; Hesp, W L E M

    2007-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is an expanding field, with subsequent increases in the number of patients seeking additional corrective procedures including abdominoplasty. Complication rates and body image changes may be different from the general population seeking corrective procedures. We performed a retrospective study by questionnaire and chart-based review of the patients who underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and abdominoplasty at our hospital between 1995 and 2004. Outcome variables included minor and major complications and satisfaction with body image and functional outcome. Patients who returned the completed questionnaire were included in the study (n = 25). The most prevalent complications were seroma formation (25%) and wound infections requiring antibiotics (13%). Hygiene, mobility and general functional capacity improved in 68%, 72%, and 80%, respectively. Body satisfaction and body mass index (BMI) did not markedly change, while self-efficacy improved after abdominoplasty. Abdominoplasty is a safe and effective method of body contour correction in patients with massive weight loss after bariatric surgery. However, a BMI as close to the ideal as possible is necessary for the complication rate to approach that of the general population undergoing abdominoplasty. Patients should be made aware of the difference in body image changes after abdominoplasty as compared to post-LAGB, as well as the trend towards an unchanged BMI.

  12. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes before and after bariatric surgery: evolution and microvascular complications

    OpenAIRE

    L. L. Chuah; Carel W. le Roux

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly seen as a treatment option for patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe complex obesity (SCO). There is however no consensus on how to manage this cohort preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients with T2DM having cardiac surgery benefit from glycaemic optimisation prior to surgery. National Health Service Diabetes in the United Kingdom recommends that glucose is optimised prior to all elective surgery. However, bariatric surgery such as gastric bypas...

  13. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... action of certain hormones, such as ghrelin —“the hunger hormone.” People have these types of surgery if ... organizations to further patient education on hormone related issues. Network Sponsors The Hormone Health Network is supported ...

  14. No more broken hearts: weight loss after bariatric surgery returns patients' postoperative risk to baseline following coronary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Hennings, Dietric L; Al-Qurayshi, Zaid; Emad Kandil; DuCoin, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    The obesity epidemic is associated with a rise in coronary surgeries because obesity is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Bariatric surgery is linked to improvement in cardiovascular co-morbidities and left ventricular function. No studies have investigated survival advantage in postoperative bariatric patients after coronary surgery. To determine if there is a benefit after coronary surgery in patients who have previously undergone bariatric surgery. National Inpatient Sample. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database from 2003 to 2010. We selected bariatric surgical patients who later underwent coronary surgery (n = 257). A comparison of postoperative complications and mortality after coronary surgery were compared with controls (n = 1442) using χ 2 tests, linear regression analysis, and multivariate logistical regression models. A subset population was identified as having undergone coronary surgery (n = 1699); of this population, 257 patients had previously undergone bariatric surgery. They were compared with 1442 controls. The majority was male (67.2%), white (82.6%), and treated in an urban environment (96.8%). Patients with bariatric surgery assumed the risk of postoperative complications after coronary surgery that was associated with their new body mass index (BMI) (BMI999.9, 95% CI .18 to>999.9, P = .07). Length of stay was significantly longer in postbariatric patients (BMIbariatric patients have a return to baseline risk of morbidity and mortality after coronary surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. C-Reactive protein level in morbidly obese patients before and after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Rojano-Rodríguez

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Preoperative CRP had a significant lineal relation to weight and body mass index. Patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a significant decrease in CRP, weight, and fasting glucose at 6 months after surgery.

  16. Cognitive behavioral therapy and predictors of weight loss in bariatric surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Linda; van der Heiden, Colin; Hoek, Hans W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. However, 20-30% of patients undergoing bariatric surgery experience premature weight stabilization or weight regain postoperatively. We report on the recent literature of predictors of weight loss and the

  17. Bariatric surgery influences the number and quality of oocytes in patients submitted to assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofolini, Juliana; Bianco, Bianca; Santos, Gustavo; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2014-03-01

    To determine differences in follicle stimulation, oocyte retrieval, maturation, and fertilization among patients who underwent bariatric surgery, obese patients, and patients with 18 assisted reproduction techniques and check that these patients may have some impairment in ovarian response. The study comprised three groups: GI: 29 patients who had undergone restrictive and/or malabsorptive bariatric surgery; GII: 57 obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m²); and GIII: 94 patients (18 reproductive process can be impaired. Bariatric surgery appears to have an important impact on the formation of follicles and oocytes. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  18. Pregnancy and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K

    2017-12-01

    A large number of women experience pregnancy after bariatric surgery. The purpose of this review was to understand the evidence base in this area to come up with practical, evidence-based recommendations. We examined PubMed for all published articles on pregnancy in patients who have previously undergone a bariatric surgery. There is an increasing body of evidence pointing towards a beneficial effect of weight loss induced by bariatric surgery on female and male fertility prompting calls for recognition of infertility as a qualifying co-morbidity for patients between the Body Mass Index of 35.0 kg/m2 and 40.0 kg/m2. Women in childbearing age group should be routinely offered contraceptive advice after bariatric surgery and advised to avoid pregnancy until their weight has stabilized. Until more focused studies are available, the advice to wait for 12 months or 2 months after the weight loss has stabilized, whichever is latter, seems reasonable. Patients should be advised to seek clearance from their bariatric teams prior to conception and looked after by a multi-disciplinary team of women health professionals, bariatric surgeons, and dietitians during pregnancy. The main objective of care is to ensure adequate nutritional state to allow for a satisfactory weight gain and fetal growth. There is a relative lack of studies and complete lack of Level 1 evidence to inform practice in this area. This review summarizes current literature and makes a number of practical suggestions for routine care of these women while we develop evidence to better inform future practice.

  19. The effect of bariatric surgery on psychiatric course among patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ameena T; Warton, E Margaret; Schaefer, Catherine A; Shen, Ling; McIntyre, Roger S

    2013-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy for severe obesity. People with bipolar disorder have increased risk of obesity, yet are sometimes considered ineligible for bariatric surgery due to their bipolar disorder diagnosis. This study aimed to determine if bariatric surgery alters psychiatric course among stable patients with bipolar disorder. A matched cohort study (2006-2009) with mean follow-up of 2.17 years was conducted within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a group practice integrated health services delivery organization that provides medical and psychiatric care to 3.3 million people. Participants were 144 severely obese patients with bipolar disorder who underwent bariatric surgery, and 1,440 control patients with bipolar disorder, matched for gender, medical center, and contemporaneous health plan membership. Controls met referral criteria for bariatric surgery. Hazard ratio for psychiatric hospitalization, and change in rate of outpatient psychiatric utilization from baseline to Years 1 and 2, were compared between groups. A total of 13 bariatric surgery patients (9.0%) and 153 unexposed to surgery (10.6%) had psychiatric hospitalization during follow-up. In multivariate Cox models adjusting for potential confounding factors, the hazard ratio of psychiatric hospitalization associated with bariatric surgery was 1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83-1.23]. In fully saturated multivariate general linear models, change in outpatient psychiatric utilization was not significantly different for surgery patients versus controls, from baseline to Year 1 (-0.4 visits/year, 95% CI: -0.5 to 0.4) or baseline to Year 2 (0.4 visits/year, 95% CI: -0.1 to 1.0). Bariatric surgery did not affect psychiatric course among stable patients with bipolar disorder. The results of this study suggest that patients with bipolar disorder who have been evaluated as stable can be considered for bariatric surgery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John

  20. Assessment of disordered eating in bariatric surgery patients: diagnosis, measurement and psychometric evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Eating disorders and disordered eating are prevalent in adults seeking surgical interventions for weight loss. While bariatric surgery is more effective than non-surgical interventions for weight loss and amelioration of physical health comorbidities, research findings are inconsistent regarding the impact of surgery on disordered eating and the impact of disordered eating on surgical outcomes. Not all bariatric surgery patients achieve optimal outcomes following surgery, and disordered eatin...

  1. Quality of life among morbid obese and patients submitted to bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Moreira Barros

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess Quality of Life (QoL among obese waiting for bariatric surgery and post-surgery patients. A cross-sectional quantitative study conducted in a hospital reference in bariatric surgery in Fortaleza-CE. The sample was composed by 64 pre- and 92 post-surgery patients. Data was collected through the QoL questionnaire Moorehead-Ardelt II from the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS protocol. Most individuals at pre-surgery stage classified their QoL as minimal – 57,8% (37, while the post-surgery group observed a significant change where 75% (69 of participants considered their QoL very good after the procedure (p< 0,001. In both groups, the QoL aspects that presented worse evaluation were: physical activity, sexual interest and eating behavior. Bariatric surgery represents improvement in quality of life of individuals.

  2. Exploring Partners' Experiences in Living with Patients Who Undergo Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwork, Anna; Tremblay, Lynn; Chi, Monica; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is effective in assisting persons with severe obesity in achieving significant weight loss and improved health; however, success depends on one's lifelong commitment to lifestyle modifications post-operatively. Life partners can be essential to the success of bariatric patients as they can serve as a primary resource to patients and healthcare teams. This study aimed to explore bariatric patients' partner's experiences in order to help inform clinical practice in bariatric care to better address patient and partner needs. This study utilized a grounded theory analysis of ten semi-structured interviews of male partners of bariatric surgery patients to form a general explanatory framework of the partner experience. Participants described three interconnected processes of change that followed after their spouses surgeries: (1) effort put forth to engage in the surgical process with their spouses, (2) adoption of the behavioural changes made by their spouses and (3) adjustment to a "new normal". For those who engaged in all three processes, optimism for the future and an enriching and synergistic harmonized lifestyle with their spouse was reached. Bariatric surgery in one partner can impact couples' dietary behaviours, physical and leisure activities, physical and emotional intimacy and relationship quality as a whole. Pursuing bariatric surgery as a couple is a unique process. This study highlights the necessity to approach bariatric care in a way that targets the whole spousal unit as engaging both members in lifestyle modification may improve the quality of both their health and relationship overall.

  3. Sex, race, and consideration of bariatric surgery among primary care patients with moderate to severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Christina C; Huskey, Karen W; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Colten, Mary Ellen; Davis, Roger B; Hamel, Marybeth

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of few obesity treatments to produce substantial weight loss but only a small proportion of medically-eligible patients, especially men and racial minorities, undergo bariatric surgery. To describe primary care patients' consideration of bariatric surgery, potential variation by sex and race, and factors that underlie any variation. Telephone interview of 337 patients with a body mass index or BMI > 35 kg/m(2) seen at four diverse primary care practices in Greater-Boston. Patients' consideration of bariatric surgery. Of 325 patients who had heard of bariatric surgery, 34 % had seriously considered surgery. Men were less likely than women and African Americans were less likely than Caucasian patients to have considered surgery after adjustment for sociodemographics and BMI. Comorbid conditions did not explain sex and racial differences but racial differences dissipated after adjustment for quality of life (QOL), which tended to be higher among African American than Caucasian patients. Physician recommendation of bariatric surgery was independently associated with serious consideration for surgery [OR 4.95 (95 % CI 2.81-8.70)], but did not explain variation in consideration of surgery across sex and race. However, if recommended by their doctor, men were as willing and African American and Hispanic patients were more willing to consider bariatric surgery than their respective counterparts after adjustment. Nevertheless, only 20 % of patients reported being recommended bariatric surgery by their doctor and African Americans and men were less likely to receive this recommendation; racial differences in being recommended surgery were also largely explained by differences in QOL. High perceived risk to bariatric surgery was the most commonly cited barrier; financial concerns were uncommonly cited. Single geographic region; examined consideration and not who eventually proceeded with bariatric surgery. African Americans and men were less likely to

  4. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; DE Luca, Francesco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Garraffo, Claudia; Santonocito, Veronica C; Privitera, Agata

    2017-04-01

    Pregnancy after bariatric surgery has some peculiarities related to obesity, type of surgery, amount of weight loss, time elapsed from the surgery and adherence to medical prescriptions. Pregnant woman is at risk of nutritional deficiencies and it is unclear whether there is an increased incidence of intestinal complications during pregnancy after bariatric surgery and whether this kind of complications are more frequent during cesarean section. The fetus is at high risk of prematurity and fetal growth restriction, but they seem not at increased risk of birth defects (DTN) except in individual cases of folic acid deficiency (DTN) or vitamin K defect (similar abnormalities in patients receiving oral anticoagulants). In addition, the incidence of gestational diabetes and hypertension results to be decreased. Other postnatal outcomes from possible epigenetic modifications need to be evaluated in the long-term postnatal follow-up.

  5. Preoperative immobility significantly impacts the risk of postoperative complications in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rana M; Helm, Melissa; Gould, Jon C; Kindel, Tammy L

    2018-03-05

    Preoperative immobility in general surgery patients has been associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. It is unknown if immobility affects bariatric surgery outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of immobility on 30-day postoperative bariatric surgery outcomes. This study took place at a university hospital in the United States. The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program 2015 data set was queried for primary minimally invasive bariatric procedures. Preoperative immobility was defined as limited ambulation most or all the time. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine if immobile patients are at increased risk (odds ratio [OR]) for 30-day complications. There were 148,710 primary minimally invasive bariatric procedures in 2015. Immobile patients had an increased risk of mortality (OR 4.59, Pbariatric surgery outcomes. Immobile patients have a significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study provides an opportunity for the development of multiple quality initiatives to improve the safety and perioperative complication profile for immobile patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Outcomes of Patients With Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Behzadi, Jennifer; Hinton, Alice; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, Jeffery R; Hussan, Hisham; Hart, Phil A; Conwell, Darwin L

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity and number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery are increasing. Obesity has adverse effects in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). We investigated whether bariatric surgery affects outcomes of patients with AP. We performed a retrospective study, collecting data from the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2007-2011) on all adult inpatients (≥18 years) with a principal diagnosis of AP (n = 1,342,681). We compared primary clinical outcomes (mortality, acute kidney injury, and respiratory failure) and secondary outcomes related to healthcare resources (hospital stay and charges) among patient groups using univariate and multivariate analyses. We performed a propensity score-matched analysis to compare outcomes of patients with versus without bariatric surgery. Of patients admitted to the hospital with a principal diagnosis of AP, 14,332 (1.07%) had undergone bariatric surgery. The number of patients that underwent bariatric surgery doubled, from 1801 in 2007 to 3928 in 2011 (P < .001). AP in patients that had undergone bariatric surgery was most frequently associated with gallstones. Multivariate analysis associated prior bariatric surgery with decreased mortality (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.92), shorter duration of hospitalization (0.65 days shorter; P < .001), and lower hospital charges ($3558 lower) than in patients with AP not receiving bariatric surgery (P < .001). A propensity score-matched cohort analysis found that mortality and odds of acute kidney injury were similar between patients with versus without history of bariatric surgery, whereas respiratory failure was less frequent in patients who received bariatric surgery (1.34% vs 4.42%; P < .001). Prior bariatric surgery in patients hospitalized with AP is not adversely associated with in-hospital mortality, development of organ failure, or healthcare resource use. Bariatric surgery may mitigate the obesity-associated adverse prognostication in AP

  7. Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers, 2011-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers, 2011-2016 Published July 2016 2011 2012 ... Search Treat your Obesity | Patient Learning Center Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity ...

  8. Nutritional considerations after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    Malnutrition is a risk that is associated with all bariatric surgeries. Malnutrition is largely preventable after these surgeries if proper patient selection, thorough preoperative nutrition education, and postoperative nutritional follow-up take place along with patient compliance. Bariatric surgery is divided into 2 major categories: restrictive or malabsorptive (with or without the restrictive aspect). The more dramatic weight loss is generally associated with procedures that are malabsorptive in nature. There is an increased risk of specific nutritional deficiencies associated with these surgeries. With proper supplementation these deficiencies are largely avoidable. This article reviews the more common bariatric surgeries and the nutritional considerations associated specifically with each surgery. The article then summarizes the typical diet advancement schedule and reviews critical care nutrition in regards to total parenteral nutrition administration for the morbidly obese individual, following bariatric surgery.

  9. Pre-surgical Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Asthma Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Yasemin; van Huisstede, Astrid; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Taube, Christian; Braunstahl, Gert-Jan

    2017-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to investigate the feasibility of pre-surgical pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in morbidly obese patients with uncontrolled asthma, undergoing bariatric surgery. Four morbidly obese female patients with asthma participated in a 12-week PR program (exercise, diet, and psychological intervention) before undergoing bariatric surgery, and the outcomes were compared to a matched group of seven female controls (bariatric surgery only). In patients who participated in PR, asthma control and asthma quality of life improved dramatically after 3 months of PR. Besides, asthma control was better at the moment of surgery. The results of this pilot study show that PR is feasible in morbidly obese asthmatics and should be considered for a selected group of patients with uncontrolled asthma before undergoing bariatric surgery.

  10. Physicians' attitudes about referring their type 2 diabetes patients for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Ritter, Scott; Wadden, Thomas A; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Vetter, Marion L; Moore, Reneé H

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence about the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery, little is known about physicians' attitudes toward it as a treatment of type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to investigate physicians' attitudes about referring patients with type 2 diabetes for bariatric surgery. Physicians were identified from the Pennsylvania Integrated Clinical and Administrative Research Database and other databases. Physicians at an academic medical center (n = 142) and community-based physicians (n = 197) in the Philadelphia area in specialties likely to treat type 2 diabetes were sent a survey about their perceptions of the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Of the physicians, 93 returned the survey, for a combined response rate of 27.4%. Respondents reported having positive impressions of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes (79.6% and 67.4%, respectively). Only 20.8% of respondents indicated that they would be likely to refer their patients with type 2 diabetes with a body mass index of 30-34.9 kg/m(2) to a randomized research trial of bariatric surgery. In general, physicians who treat patients with type 2 diabetes had favorable impressions about bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, only a few were willing to refer their patients with type 2 diabetes and a body mass index of 30-34.9 kg/m(2) to randomized research trials of bariatric surgery. This reluctance to refer patients represents an important barrier to the successful completion of studies of the efficacy of bariatric surgery for those with type 2 diabetes and a body mass index Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Renal Function in Obese Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Zou, Jianan; Ye, Zhibin; Di, Jianzhong; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Weijie; Ren, Qinggui; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor of development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on the benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with impaired kidney function have been conflicting. To explore whether there is improvement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proteinuria or albuminuria after bariatric surgery. We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, Embase, web of science and Cochrane for randomized, controlled trials and observational studies that examined bariatric surgery in obese subjects with impaired kidney function. Outcomes included the pre- and post-bariatric surgery GFR, proteinuria and albuminuria. In obese patients with hyperfiltration, we draw conclusions from studies using measured GFR (inulin or iothalamate clearance) unadjusted for BSA only. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. 32 observational studies met our inclusion criteria, and 30 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No matter in dichotomous data or in dichotomous data, there were statistically significant reduction in hyperfiltration, albuminuria and proteinuria after bariatric surgery. The main limitation of this meta-analysis is the lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Another limitation is the lack of long-term follow-up. Bariatric surgery could prevent further decline in renal function by reducing proteinuria, albuminuria and improving glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients with impaired renal function. However, whether bariatric surgery reverses CKD or delays ESRD progression is still in question, large, randomized prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed.

  12. Physical activity and sitting time in bariatric surgery patients 1-16 years post-surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, K M; Carver, T E; Christou, N V; Andersen, R E

    2014-10-01

    Physical activity (PA) is an important adjunct to bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity; however, patient PA levels prior to and in the short-term following surgery are usually low. Scarce data exist describing PA and sedentary behaviours in the long term following surgery. The objectives were to describe PA and sitting time in bariatric patients 1-16 years post-surgery and assess their associations with patient, surgery and weight-loss characteristics. A total of 398 bariatric patients (73% female; mean age 47 ± 11 years, mean 6 ± 4 years since surgery) completed a telephone questionnaire. Patients reported moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA: # sessions week(-1)  ≥30 min), sitting time (h d(-1)) and change in PA and sitting time vs. pre-surgery (more/same/less). Associations with patient, surgery and weight-loss characteristics were assessed. Only 53% of patients reported ≥1 session week(-1) MVPA, mean sitting time was 7 ± 4 h d(-1), 74% of patients reported more PA and 53% reported less sitting, now vs. pre-surgery. Age, sex, smoking status, pre-surgery body mass index, time-since-surgery and percent excess weight lost were significantly associated with PA and/or sitting outcomes. Patients currently experiencing ≥50% excess weight loss had over three times the odds of reporting ≥1 session week(-1) MVPA (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 3.28 [1.57, 6.89]) and almost four times greater odds of reporting 'more' PA vs. pre-surgery (3.78 [2.15, 6.62]) compared with their less successful counterparts. Results point to low PA and high sedentariness among bariatric patients in the long-term following surgery, associated with several characteristics. Associations with long-term weight management highlight the need for tailored interventions to promote active living in this patient population. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  13. Totally changed, yet still the same: patients' lived experiences 5 years beyond bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Råheim, Målfrid

    2013-09-01

    Bariatric surgery provides sustainable weight loss and increased quality of life for most, but not all patients. To increase the knowledge of this complex patient group and their needs during follow-up, we aimed to describe the essential meaning of bariatric surgery patients' long-term experiences by using a phenomenological lifeworld approach. Eight patients were interviewed between 5 and 7 years after bariatric surgery. Life after bariatric surgery was described as living with tension, ambivalence, and reinforced attention toward one's own body. The tension was related to embodied change and altered relations to the social world. The patients express an ongoing demand for control of health-related habits and practices, and to not lose control over the body again. Surgical weight loss and improved physical function do not necessarily mean changed health-related habits and practices in the long term. Experiencing weight regain is connected with emotional stress, shame, and self-contempt.

  14. Nutritional deficiency of post-bariatric surgery body contouring patients: what every plastic surgeon should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha-Mohammadi, Siamak; Hurwitz, Dennis J

    2008-08-01

    Bariatric surgery, particularly the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is currently the most effective method of sustainable weight loss for the morbidly obese patient population. Unfortunately, the nutritional adequacy of the postoperative diet has frequently been overlooked, and in the months to years that follow, many nutritional deficiencies have become apparent. Furthermore, once weight loss has reached a plateau, many patients become candidates for body contouring surgery and other aesthetic operations. The aim of this review was to highlight the nutritional deficiencies of post-bariatric surgery patients as related to planned body contouring surgery. This review was prepared by an extensive search of the bariatric surgery literature. The current data indicate that many post-bariatric surgery patients have protein-calorie malnutrition as well as various vitamins and mineral deficiencies that may limit optimal health and healing. It is essential that those plastic surgeons who treat post-bariatric surgery patients are aware of these nutritional deficiencies, which can be minimized by adhering to eating guidelines and supplemental prescriptions. Although there are many studies documenting relationships between malnutrition and poor wound healing, the optimal nutrient intake in the post-bariatric surgery state to promote wound healing is unknown. It is, however, clear that proteins, vitamin A, vitamin C, arginine, glutamine, zinc, and selenium have significant beneficial effects on wound healing and optimizing the immune system.

  15. Influence of a rural environment on patient access and outcomes for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Kristie L; Cox, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E

    2017-04-01

    Despite a higher rate of obesity in rural populations, there is a 23% decrease in performed bariatric procedures. The influence of a rural environment on surgical outcomes and treatment efficacy is unknown. We retrospectively reviewed all bariatric surgeries performed in a large university hospital in West Virginia from September 2012 to September 2014. Patients were categorized based on their rural-urban commuting area codes. Subject demographic characteristics, insurance provider, type of surgery, completion of program, preoperative body mass index (BMI), percent excess weight loss (%EWL), and percent total weight loss (%TWL) at 6 and 12 months postoperatively, and follow-up appointment attendance were collected. Logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted. A total of 122 patients were evaluated with 82 receiving surgery. Of these patients, 77 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 5 had Sleeve Gastrectomy. Nine patients out of 82 were lost to follow-up at 6 months (n = 73), and 12 patients out of 62 were lost to follow-up at 12 months (n = 50). Rural patients were .283 times less likely to receive bariatric surgery, (P = .004). However, this relationship was confounded by insurance provider; after controlling for this variable, the relationship between rural status and surgery completion was nonsignificant (P = .066). Rural status did not predict change in BMI, %EWL, or %TWL at 6 months (P = .738; P = .848; P = .334) or 12 months (P = .902; P = .143; P = .195), or compliance for follow-up appointments (P = .232). Rural bariatric patients seem to have decreased success at completing bariatric programs, which is likely confounded by insurance type. Yet, when the rural patient is able to realize the benefits of bariatric surgery, their outcomes are unchanged compared with urban patients. Although the study is limited by sample size, it highlights the need for reducing obstacles for bariatric surgery in an already underserved population, the rural community

  16. Bariatric surgery in patients with bipolar spectrum disorders: Selection factors, postoperative visit attendance, and weight outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kelli E; Applegate, Katherine; Portenier, Dana; McVay, Megan A

    2017-04-01

    As many as 3% of bariatric surgery candidates are diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder. 1) To describe differences between patients with bipolar spectrum disorders who are approved and not approved for surgery by the mental health evaluator and 2) to examine surgical outcomes of patients with bipolar spectrum disorders. Academic medical center, United States. A retrospective record review was conducted of consecutive patients who applied for bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2009. Patients diagnosed with bipolar spectrum disorders who were approved for surgery (n = 42) were compared with patients with a bipolar spectrum disorder who were not approved (n = 31) and to matched control surgical patients without a bipolar spectrum diagnosis (n = 29) on a variety of characteristics and surgical outcomes. Of bariatric surgery candidates diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder who applied for surgery, 57% were approved by the psychologist and 48% ultimately had surgery. Patients with a bipolar spectrum disorder who were approved for surgery were less likely to have had a previous psychiatric hospitalization than those who were not approved for surgery. Bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder were less likely to attend follow-up care appointments 2 or more years postsurgery compared to matched patients without bipolar disorder. Among patients with available data, those with a bipolar spectrum disorder and matched patients had similar weight loss at 12 months (n = 21 for bipolar; n = 24 for matched controls) and at 2 or more years (mean = 51 mo; n = 11 for bipolar; n = 20 for matched controls). Patients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder have a high rate of delay/denial for bariatric surgery based on the psychosocial evaluation and are less likely to attend medical follow-up care 2 or more years postsurgery. Carefully screened patients with bipolar disorder who engage in long-term follow-up care may benefit from bariatric

  17. Bariatric Surgery as a Bridge to Renal Transplantation in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahri, Shadi; Fakhry, Tannous K; Gonzalvo, John Paul; Murr, Michel M

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is a relative contraindication to organ transplantation. Preliminary reports suggest that bariatric surgery may be used as a bridge to transplantation in patients who are not eligible for transplantation because of morbid obesity. The Bariatric Center at Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. We reviewed the outcomes of 16 consecutive patients on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent bariatric surgery from 1998 to 2016. Demographics, comorbidities, weight loss, as well as transplant status were reported. Data is mean ± SD. Six men and ten women aged 43-66 years (median = 54 years) underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n = 12), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 3), or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n = 1). Preoperative BMI was 48 ± 8 kg/m 2 . Follow-up to date was 1-10 years (median = 2.8 years); postoperative BMI was 31 ± 7 kg/m 2 ; %EBWL was 62 ± 24. Four patients underwent renal transplantation (25%) between 2.5-5 years after bariatric surgery. Five patients are currently listed for transplantation. Five patients were not listed for transplantation due to persistent comorbidities; two of these patients died as a consequence of their comorbidities (12.5%) more than 1 year after bariatric surgery. Two patients were lost to follow-up (12.5%). Bariatric surgery is effective in patients with ESRD and improves access to renal transplantation. Bariatric surgery offers a safe approach to weight loss and improvement in comorbidities in the majority of patients. Referrals of transplant candidates with obesity for bariatric surgery should be considered early in the course of ESRD.

  18. Bariatric Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Carel W; Heneghan, Helen M

    2018-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the indications for and the published outcomes of commonly performed bariatric procedures, including weight loss, perioperative morbidity and mortality, late complications, as well as the impact of bariatric surgery on comorbidities, cardiovascular risk, and mortality. They also briefly discuss the mechanisms by which bariatric/metabolic surgery causes such significant weight loss and health gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jonathan G; Yazdi, Farshid; Reisin, Efrain

    2017-12-08

    Obesity continues to increase in prevalence worldwide. Hypertension has long been associated with obesity, and weight loss continues to be a first-line therapy in the treatment of hypertension. Lifestyle modification and pharmacologic therapy, however, often meet with treatment failure. Bariatric surgery continues to be the most successful approach to sustained weight loss. This review focuses on the underlying physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the impact of bariatric surgery on the treatment of hypertension. Current available literature on the physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the major trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the impact of bariatric surgery procedures on hypertension are reviewed. Evidence suggests significant improvement in obesity-hypertension in patients who undergo surgical weight-reduction procedures. Malabsorptive techniques such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or surgical resection techniques such as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appear to offer superior results in regards to hypertension control over restrictive techniques such as Gastric Banding. Though long-term control of hypertension following surgery remains a concern, available follow-up post-operative data of up to 10 years suggests a sustained, if lessened, effect on hypertension control over time. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The impact of bariatric surgery on nutritional status of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Currently, surgical treatment is considered to be the most efficient method of dealing with morbid obesity. To evaluate changes in nutritional status after surgical treatment of obesity in the early postoperative period. The study included 50 patients (30 women and 20 men) treated surgically due to morbid obesity. During the preliminary visit and during control visits measurements of body mass, height, and waist and hip circumference were conducted. Also, analysis of body content was performed and blood was taken for biochemical analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted using the program Statistica 10. Six months after the surgery, in the group of women, significant reduction of average body mass, average waist circumference, average hip circumference and average body mass index (BMI) was observed. Also, significant reduction of the percentage of body fat and an increase in the percentage of fat-free body mass were observed. A significant decrease in muscle mass was also noted. Both in women and in men, 6 months after the surgery, a significant decrease in fasting glucose concentration, fasting insulin and triglycerides in blood serum was observed. Bariatric procedures lead to significant body mass, BMI, waist and hip circumference reduction. Loss of body mass is caused mainly by the reduction of fat tissue. Application of surgical procedures in morbid obesity treatment also allowed us to achieve improvement in insulin, glucose and lipid metabolism.

  1. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina F; Cortes-Oliveira, Cristiana; Pinhel, Marcela A S; Nonino, Carla B

    2017-09-06

    This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient's genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  2. Depression, Obesity and Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Lopes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Overweight is an increasing problem worldwide. Data from  2008 show that, in Portugal, 60% of the adult population was overweight and 25% was obese. The relation between mood disorders and obesity is well known and about 2/3 of those who search for bariatric surgery have a psychiatric diagnosis, being depression the most common. Aims: We reviewed the relation between depression and obesity before and after bariatric surgery and evaluated its impact in the pharmacokinetics of antidepressant medication and nutrients that influence depressive symptomatology. Methods: We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature published in English between 1988 and 2015, through research in MEDLINE with the keywords absorption, bioavailability, bariatric surgery, obesity, depression, antidepressants. Results: Depression and obesity potentiates each other in a bidirectional way and the strength of this association is modulated by gender, physical activity, diet and antidepressant medication usage. Bariatric surgery leads to changes in the pharmacokinetics of antidepressant medication and nutrients that have a regulatory role on mood symptomatology. Discussion and Conclusions: Available data show we need to pay special attention to obese depressive patients proposed for bariatric surgery. The existence of depressive symptoms leads to a greater risk of not losing weight after a bariatric surgery but, in the opposite direction, bariatric surgery leads to a lower bioavailability of antidepressant medication.

  3. Prevalence and predictors of atrial fibrillation among patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, M Benjamin; Gidfar, Sanaz; Pipilas, Daniel C; Tamboli, Robyn A; Savio Galimberti, Eleonora; Williams, D Brandon; Clements, Ronald H; Darbar, Dawood

    2014-04-01

    While AF is a disease of the elderly, it can occur earlier in the presence of risk factors such as obesity. Bariatric surgery patients are significantly younger and more obese than previously described populations with AF. Therefore, it remains to be determined whether current estimates of the prevalence and predictors for AF remain true in the bariatric surgery population. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1,341 consecutive patients who underwent bariatric surgery from January 2008 to October 2012. Baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without AF. For additional comparison, 176 patients with AF and body mass index (BMI) >40 kg/m(2) were identified from the Vanderbilt AF Registry. A multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of AF within the bariatric surgery cohort. The prevalence of AF in the bariatric surgery cohort was 1.9 % (25/1,341). Patients with AF were older (median 56 years (interquartile range [52-64) vs.46 [38-56] years, p bariatric surgery. Risk of AF was found to increase with age and male gender, but not with higher BMI.

  4. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  5. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes before and after bariatric surgery: evolution and microvascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, L L; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly seen as a treatment option for patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe complex obesity (SCO). There is however no consensus on how to manage this cohort preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients with T2DM having cardiac surgery benefit from glycaemic optimisation prior to surgery. National Health Service Diabetes in the United Kingdom recommends that glucose is optimised prior to all elective surgery. However, bariatric surgery such as gastric bypass (RYGB) is distinct from general surgery. Glycaemic control improves immediately after RYGB and thus all T2DM patients need a review of their glucose lowering medications postoperatively. Preoperatively most bariatric centres use a low calorie diet (LCD) which improved glycaemic control and may predisposed patients using insulin or sulphonylureas to risks of hypoglycaemia. There are no protocols and consensus among bariatric centres on how best to manage patients with T2DM preoperatively and postoperatively. Moreover patients with difficult to control T2DM are at risk of microvascular complications of diabetes. So far, there is little evidence on the impact of bariatric surgery on diabetes nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy. In conclusion, bariatric surgery improves glycaemic control; however, there are limited studies, and no guidelines on how to manage patients with T2DM pre and postoperatively. Given the increasing proportion of T2DM patients referred for bariatric surgery, there is a need to review current practice on how to manage these patients in the short term and long term with a specific focus on improving end organ damage such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS IN A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR SEVERE OBESITY AND PREOPERATIVE BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    MAGNO, Fernanda Cristina Carvalho Mattos; da SILVA, Monique Silveira; COHEN, Larissa; SARMENTO, Luciana d'Abreu; ROSADO, Eliane Lopes; CARNEIRO, Jo?o R?gis Ivar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Along with the augmentation in obesity rates in recent years, the demand for bariatric surgery has startlingly increased. Nutritional counseling in the preoperative period is very important because it contributes to higher success rate in the post-operative period. AIM: To assess the nutritional status of patients in a multidisciplinary program for the treatment of severe obesity and pre-operatively for bariatric surgery, characterizing the consumption of healthy nutrients. METHOD...

  7. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  8. Re-embodying eating: patients' experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2014-12-01

    Health experts advise and expect patients to eat healthily after bariatric surgery. For patients, difficulties with eating might have been a long-standing, problematic part of life-a part that is not necessarily healed by surgery. Empirical research on patients' experiences of eating practices after bariatric surgery is lacking. Aiming to contribute to the development of clinical practice, we explored meanings attached to eating in the long term and sought descriptions of change and bodily sensations. We interviewed 14 patients at least 5 years after bariatric surgery. The surgical restriction forced changes in the way patients sensed their own body in eating, but the uncertainty related to maintaining weight loss in the long term remained. Meanings attached to eating transcended food as choices situated in a nourishment and health perspective, and were not necessarily changed. Eating was an existential and embodied practice, which remained an ambiguous and sensitive matter after surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Anthropometric and clinical profiles of post-bariatric patients submitted to procedures in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Simone Corrêa; Macedo, Jefferson Lessa Soares DE; Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Canedo, Lucas Ribeiro; Marques, João Vitor Almeida

    2018-01-01

    to evaluate the profile of patients submitted to post-bariatric plastic surgery at the North Wing Regional Hospital, Brasília, DF. we conducted a prospective, descriptive and analytical study of patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastroplasty, and subsequently to plastic surgery, from January 2011 to December 2016. We assessed body mass index before gastroplasty and after surgery plastic surgery, postoperative complications and comorbidities. we studied 139 patients (130 women and nine men), with a mean age of 41 years, who underwent 233 operations. The mean BMI at the time of plastic surgery was 27.44kg/m2. The mean weight loss was 47.02kg and the mean maximum BMI was 45.17kg/m2. The mean time between bariatric surgery and plastic surgery was 42 months. The most important co-morbidities before plastic surgery were arterial hypertension (11.5%), arthropathy (5.4%), diabetes mellitus (5%) and metabolic syndrome (4.3%) (pprofile of post-bariatric patients who underwent plastic surgery was similar to that reported in the literature, except for the low rate of associated surgeries and postoperative complications. Plastic surgery in post-bariatric patients has led to an improvement in the quality of life in most of these patients.

  10. Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Bencsath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS; however, safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in this population remain unclear. A database of 2,918 was retrospectively reviewed, yielding 22 (0.75% severely obese patients with MS who underwent bariatric surgery. Sixteen surgical patients with complete follow-up data were matched to a nonsurgical control group of MS patients, based on age, BMI, MS subtype, and length of follow-up. MS relapse rates and trends in the timed twenty-five foot walk test (T25FW were compared. In the surgical group (gastric bypass n=19, sleeve gastrectomy n=3, preoperative BMI was 46.5 ± 7.2 Kg/m2 and average excess weight was 60.4 kg. Follow-up data was collected at 59.0 ± 29.8 months. There were two major and four minor complications. Five patients required readmission and there were no mortalities. Percent excess weight loss was 75.5 ± 27.0%. In the 16 patients with follow-up data, patients who underwent bariatric surgery were significantly faster on the T25FW compared to the nonsurgical population. In conclusion, bariatric surgery is relatively safe and effective in achieving weight loss in patients with MS. In addition, surgery may help patients maintain ambulation. Findings support the need for further studies on bariatric surgery and disease-specific outcomes in this population.

  11. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techn...

  12. Ophthalmic Complications of Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo Guerreiro, R; Ribeiro, R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is increasing vastly in the world, and the number of bariatric surgeries being performed is also increasing. Patients being submitted to bariatric surgeries, especially malabsorptive procedures, have an increased risk of developing nutrient deficiencies, which can culminate in symptomatic hypovitaminosis, if supplementation is not done correctly. The eye and the optic system need an adequate level of several vitamins and minerals to perform properly, especially vitamin A, and this art...

  13. Barriers in the Approach of Obese Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery in Flemish Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesquiere, Ina; Augustijns, Patrick; Lannoo, Matthias; Matthys, Christophe; Van der Schueren, Bart; Foulon, Veerle

    2015-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is associated not only with weight loss and improvement of comorbidities of obesity but also with short and long-term complications. Preoperative screening and lifelong follow-up of these patients are important to optimize the effect of bariatric surgery and minimize complications. The objective of this study was to create an inventory of the current care offered to bariatric patients before and after surgery in Flemish hospitals, Belgium and to identify barriers for optimal care. Semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals involved in screening and follow-up of bariatric patients in 12 hospitals in Flanders, Belgium were performed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with NVivo 10.0. In each participating hospital, except one, biochemical screening before and after bariatric surgery was performed, but the extent and timing varied between hospitals. In ten hospitals, a standard multivitamin preparation was started in all patients after surgery, but there was a large variation for timing of initiation and duration between hospitals. The interviewees indicated that the knowledge about appropriate dosage and formulation adjustments after surgery was limited. Most of the performed drug adjustments were due to improvement of comorbidities. In 9 out of 12 hospitals, a multidisciplinary team was involved, but the approach varied widely. Only in 3 out of 12 hospitals, eligibility of patients for bariatric surgery was discussed in team meetings. Strategies to implement existing guidelines are required in order to obtain more uniform, interdisciplinary support for bariatric patients, resulting in an increase of efficiency of surgery and improved patient care.

  14. PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS ELIGIBLE FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Graziela Aparecida Nogueira de Almeida; Giampietro, Helenice Brizolla; Belarmino, Lídia Barbieri; Salgado-Júnior, Wilson

    The psychologist who works in bariatric surgery has a role to receive, evaluate, prepare and educate the patient who will undergo the surgical procedure. Psychological evaluation becomes important in so far as allows us to obtain data on personal and familiar history and allow tracing of possible psychopathology. To collect data on psychological evaluations of patients in a bariatric surgery service of a public hospital in order to describe the psychological profile of patients in this service. Data were collected from 827 patients between 2001 and 2015, using data from an interview, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Binge Eating Scale (BES). The mean age of patients before surgery was 39 years+/- 10, the mean BMI was 51 kg/m²+7, and most patients (81%) were female. The average score on the BDI was 14.8+8 and women had significantly higher scores than men. On the BAI the average score was 11+8 and on the ECAP was 14+8, both with no difference between groups. Psychosocial characteristics of the patients points to the significant presence of indicators of depression, with low levels of anxiety and binge eating. O psicólogo que atua na área da cirurgia bariátrica tem papel de acolher, avaliar, preparar e conscientizar o paciente que vai ser submetido ao procedimento cirúrgico. A avaliação psicológica reveste-se de importância na medida em que obtém dados sobre história pessoal e familiar, além do rastreio de possíveis alterações psicopatológicas. Analisar as avaliações psicológicas dos pacientes de um serviço de cirurgia bariátrica de um hospital público, buscando traçar o perfil psicológico dos pacientes deste serviço. Foram coletados dados de 827 pacientes entre 2001 e 2015, utilizando-se dados de uma entrevista, Inventário Beck de Depressão (BDI), Inventário Beck de Ansiedade (BAI) e Escala de Compulsão Alimentar Periódica (ECAP). A idade média dos pacientes antes da operação foi 39 anos+10 e o IMC m

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Tedizolid in an Obese Patient after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Matthieu; Libois, Julia Brochard; Waast, Denis; Gaborit, Benjamin; Dauty, Marc; Deslandes, Guillaume; Dailly, Eric; Touchais, Sophie; Boutoille, David; Grégoire, Nicolas; Couet, William

    2018-04-01

    An obese woman was treated with oral tedizolid 200 mg once daily for pseudoarthrosis 10 years after Roux-en-Y bypass surgery. Total plasma peak concentration was 2.12 mg/liter 3 h after intake, and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC 0-24 ) was 28.3 mg/liter · h. The AUC 0-24 /MIC ratio for unbound concentrations and for sensitive Staphylococcus and Streptococcus strains was ≥10.8, higher than the target ratio of 3. These results support the use of tedizolid without adjustment after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Nursing Care in Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Aydin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is caused by increased amounts of fatty tissue in the body and increasingly common serious health problem. The prevalence of obesity is increasing in all age groups throughout the world. This increase in the rate of obesity increases the incidence of obesity-related chronic diseases. In this respect, obesity is considered a risk factor for the chronic diseases. People who are more than 30 Body Mass Index called as obese and people who are over 40 called morbidly obese. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment providing in permanent weight loosing for obesity. Bariatric surgery techniques are applied as three different types. These techniques include; limit food intake, reduce nutrient absorption (malabsorption, and restricting food intake and malabsorption surgeries. In bariatric surgery, patient care is becoming increasingly important at before and after surgery due to the presence of concomitant diseases in obese patients. During this period, there are special nursing practices which include reducing the risks in the care of patients who are candidates for bariatric surgery, preventing the development of complications and supplying the recovery from illness as soon as possible. In this article nursing care of obese patients before and after surgery is to be discussed. In addition, bariatric surgery, complications and difficulties in live patients are to be examined [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 77-82

  17. [Impact of bariatric surgery on vitamin metabolisms in obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunova, N A; Askerkhanov, R G; Khatkov, I E; Sabelnikova, E A; Parfenov, A I; Tkachenko, E V; Varvanina, G G; Feydorov, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the impact of bariatric surgery (BS) on the level of vitamins in obese patients. One hundred obese patients (78 women and 22 men) aged 19 to 61 years were examined. Controlled gastric banding (CGB) was carried out in 20 patients (mean body mass index (BMI), 41.3 ± 8.2 kg/m2); gastric sleeve resection (GSR) in 40 patients, and gastric shunting (GS) in 40 (the mean BMI in these groups were 41.1 ± 17.8 and 45.9 ± 6.2 kg/m2, respectively). A control group consisted of 10 apparently healthy individuals (BMI, 24.9 ± 3.2 kg/m2). An enzyme immunoassay was used to determine the serum concentrations of vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B9, B12, C, and D, niacin, biotin, and retinol-binding protein (RBP) before and 1 year after surgery. All the three groups showed a considerable decrease in the levels of vitamins C, B5, B6, and D, and RBP both prior to and following BS. More than 50% of the patients who had undergone GSR had also a lower baseline niacin level. A year after CGB, GSR, and GS, the number of patents with deficiency of these vitamins remained the same or increased. The majority of patients with the same level of vitamin B2, niacin, and folic acid (FA) were observed to have its decrease a year postsurgery. The concentration of the other test vitamins was also reduced a year after all operations; however, it remained within the normal range. GS had no substantial impact on the concentrations of FA, vitamins B2, B12, B1, and biotin. The lower serum vitamin levels were not accompanied by clinical symptoms in most patients following BS. In 80% of the patients with obesity, the levels of vitamins C, B6, and D were decreased to a variable degree. After BS, there was a rise in the number of patients with low serum vitamin C, D, B6, B5, niacin, FA, and RBP concentrations, at the same time the number of patients with FA deficiency increased by more than twice. BS did not significantly affect the metabolism of vitamins B1 B2 B12, and biotin.

  18. Nutritional Status of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Aliaa Al-Mutawa; Alfred Kojo Anderson; Salman Alsabah; Mohammad Al-Mutawa

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting populations globally. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, and has increased dramatically. Bariatric surgery candidates frequently have pre-existing nutritional deficiencies that might exacerbate post-surgery. To provide better health care management pre- and post-bariatric surgery, it is imperative to establish the nutritional status of prospective patients before surgery. The aim of this study was to assess and provide baseli...

  19. A systematic review of musculoskeletal pain among bariatric surgery patients: implications for physical activity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Rebecca M; Bond, Dale S; Sarwer, David B; Farrar, John T

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) can play an integral role in protecting the success of bariatric surgery by promoting weight loss and preventing weight regain. Although engagement in PA before surgery predicts postoperative PA levels, this may be undermined by weight-related co-morbidities. The importance of preoperative and postoperative musculoskeletal pain as a limitation to PA is unknown. The objective of this study was to review evidence on preoperative and postoperative pain in bariatric surgery patients, summarize the relationship between musculoskeletal pain and PA, and discuss areas of future research. The MEDLINE database was searched for published articles on musculoskeletal pain in bariatric surgery patients from January 1946 through December 2012. Outcomes of interest included preoperative pain prevalence, postoperative pain prevalence and incidence, and preoperative to postoperative changes in pain. Preoperative musculoskeletal pain is highly common among candidates for bariatric surgery. Most individuals with presurgical pain experience significant improvement postoperatively. However, the characteristics of pain sufferers vary and few risk factors have been identified. New pain issues that present postsurgically are limited primarily to neurologic complications and are not common. To date, no study has tested the hypothesis that pain is a barrier to PA levels in bariatric surgery patients. Gaps in knowledge regarding pain in bariatric surgery patients may present challenges for clinicians and exercise professionals on how to best advise patients about increasing their PA. Future research should include prospective evaluation of musculoskeletal pain via validated measures at multiple time points. This data will inform the time course of pain resolution, potential onset, and correlation with surgical weight loss. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy in patients with a history of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereau, Nathalie; Vuillermet, Cindy; Tilly, Camille; Buffet, Camille; Trésallet, Christophe; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Menegaux, Fabrice

    2017-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a common complication after total thyroidectomy. Previous bariatric surgery could be a higher factor risk for hypocalcemia due to alterations in calcium absorption and vitamin D deficiency. To evaluate incidence and factors involved in the risk of hypocalcemia (transient and permanent) and the postoperative outcomes of these patients after total thyroidectomy. University hospital in Paris, France. All patients who had previously undergone obesity surgery (i.e., Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, or adjustable gastric band) who had a total thyroidectomy from 2006 to 2015 were included. No patient was lost to follow-up. Each patient was matched 1:1 with a patient who had no previous bariatric surgery for age, gender, body mass index, and year of surgery. Forty-eight patients were identified (43 female; mean age 48.9±9.2 yr). Nineteen patients (40%) had a postoperative hypocalcemia: transient in 14 patients (29.2%) and permanent in 5 patients (10.4%). No significant predictive clinical or biochemical factors were found for hypocalcemia risk, except for the type of bariatric procedure: Bypass surgery had a 2-fold increased risk of hypocalcemia compared to others procedures (60% versus 30%, P = .05). In the matched pair analysis, the risk of hypocalcemia was significantly higher in patients with previous bariatric surgery than in the matched cohort (40% versus 15%, P = .006). Patients with previous bariatric surgery have an increased risk for hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy, especially after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Careful and prolonged follow-up of calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone levels should be suggested for these patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Health Literacy on Help-seeking Behavior in Morbidly Obese Patients Agreeing to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayci, Haci Murat; Erdogdu, Umut Eren; Demirci, Hakan; Ardic, Aykut; Topak, Nevruz Yildirim; Taymur, İbrahim

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of health literacy on agreement for bariatric surgery among morbidly obese patients. The data of 242 morbidly obese patients (body mass index-BMI ≥ 40 kg/m 2 ) were evaluated in a cross-sectional case-control pattern. The patients were classified into two groups as those who were attending the clinic for the purpose of receiving bariatric surgery (n = 138) and those who did not (n = 104). The Turkish version of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q47), consisting of 47 questions, was used for the health literacy evaluation. It was seen that patients who accepted bariatric surgery were younger and had higher weight and BMI values (p bariatric surgery and 26.04 (8.33:46.88) in the group who did not agree to bariatric surgery, and a statistically significant difference was determined between the two groups (p bariatric surgery and 45.2% of the group who did not (p  25-33) (respectively, 36.2%, 37.5%, p = 0.840). A sufficient level (> 33-42) and a perfect level were higher in the group who agreed to bariatric surgery (respectively, 42.8%, 18.1%, p bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients. The higher the health literacy level, the more the agreement to bariatric surgery increased.

  2. Food consumption in patients referred for bariatric surgery with and without binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Jaqueline Driemeyer Correia; Kops, Natália Luiza; de Castro, Mariana Laitano Dias; Friedman, Rogério

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is high in obese patients referred to bariatric surgery. Although the total energy intake is increased, the risk of nutritional deficiencies in these patients is unknown. This study proposes to evaluate and compare the intakes of candidate patients for bariatric surgery with and without BED, using for this purpose the Dietary Reference Intakes. 116 patients referred for bariatric surgery were submitted to nutritional, laboratory and psychological assessments. Among the patients, 46.6% had BED, of these, 25.9% had the severe form. The patients with current depression (31.9%) were more compulsive than those without depression (p eat more carbohydrates and have larger mid-upper arm circumference in the face of similar body weight, suggesting a higher percentage of fat mass.

  3. Gastrointestinal Hormones, Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Homeostasis in Obese Patients: Effect of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Dallio, Marcello; Tolone, Salvatore; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Patrone, Vania; Romano, Marco; Tuccillo, Concetta; Mozzillo, Anna Licia; Amoroso, Vincenzo; Misso, Gabriella; Morelli, Lorenzo; Docimo, Ludovico; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven efficacy in the modulation of a number of gut peptides that can contribute to improvement of diabetes and its associated metabolic changes. In order to evaluate dietary intake, nutritional assessment and plasma levels of gastrointestinal peptides, we enrolled severely obese patients before and after bariatric surgery. We evaluated food intake, plasma levels of peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1/2 (GLP-1/2), ghrelin (GHR), orexin (ORE) and cholecystokinin (CCK), body composition and fecal microbiota in 28 severely obese patients and 28 healthy normal-weight controls. All parameters were evaluated at 0 time and 6 months after bariatric surgery. In obese patients we found a higher intake of nutrients, a decrease of free fat mass and an increase of BMI (body mass index), a significant decrease of GLP-1 and an increase of GLP-2, GHR and PYY with respect to controls, further increase in GLP-2, GHR and PYY, as well as increase over control values of GLP-1 after bariatric surgery. Obese individuals were found to harbor a community dominated by members of the Clostridial clusters XIVa and IV, whereas prominent bands after surgery were identified as Lactobacillus crispatus and Megasphaera elsdenii-related phylotype. The beneficial effects of bariatric surgery may at least in part be accounted for changes in circulating gastrointestinal (GI) peptides and fecal microbiota. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel de; FREITAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de; ALMEIDA, Andréa Adriana de

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. Aim: To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. Method: A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were ...

  5. Body image and quality of life in patients with and without body contouring surgery following bariatric surgery: a comparison of pre- and post-surgery groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Martina; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Stroh, Christine E; Teufel, Martin; Köhler, Hinrich; Tengler, Maxi; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Massive weight loss (MWL) following bariatric surgery frequently results in an excess of overstretched skin causing physical discomfort and negatively affecting quality of life, self-esteem, body image, and physical functioning. In this cross-sectional study 3 groups were compared: (1) patients prior to bariatric surgery (n = 79), (2) patients after bariatric surgery who had not undergone body contouring surgery (BCS) (n = 252), and (3) patients after bariatric surgery who underwent subsequent BCS (n = 62). All participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing body image (Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, MBSRQ), quality of life (IWQOL-Lite), symptoms of depression (PHQ-9), and anxiety (GAD-7). Overall, 62 patients (19.2%) reported having undergone a total of 90 BCS procedures. The most common were abdominoplasties (88.7%), thigh lifts (24.2%), and breast lifts (16.1%). Post-bariatric surgery patients differed significantly in most variables from pre-bariatric surgery patients. Although there were fewer differences between patients with and without BCS, patients after BCS reported better appearance evaluation (AE), body area satisfaction (BAS), and physical functioning, even after controlling for excess weight loss and time since surgery. No differences were found for symptoms of depression and anxiety, and most other quality of life and body image domains. Our results support the results of longitudinal studies demonstrating significant improvements in different aspects of body image, quality of life, and general psychopathology after bariatric surgery. Also, we found better AE and physical functioning in patients after BCS following bariatric surgery compared to patients with MWL after bariatric surgery who did not undergo BCS. Overall, there appears to be an effect of BCS on certain aspects of body image and quality of life but not on psychological aspects on the whole.

  6. Body image and quality of life in patients with and without body contouring surgery following bariatric surgery: a comparison of pre- and post-surgery groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Martina; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Stroh, Christine E.; Teufel, Martin; Köhler, Hinrich; Tengler, Maxi; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Massive weight loss (MWL) following bariatric surgery frequently results in an excess of overstretched skin causing physical discomfort and negatively affecting quality of life, self-esteem, body image, and physical functioning. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 3 groups were compared: (1) patients prior to bariatric surgery (n = 79), (2) patients after bariatric surgery who had not undergone body contouring surgery (BCS) (n = 252), and (3) patients after bariatric surgery who underwent subsequent BCS (n = 62). All participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing body image (Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, MBSRQ), quality of life (IWQOL-Lite), symptoms of depression (PHQ-9), and anxiety (GAD-7). Results: Overall, 62 patients (19.2%) reported having undergone a total of 90 BCS procedures. The most common were abdominoplasties (88.7%), thigh lifts (24.2%), and breast lifts (16.1%). Post-bariatric surgery patients differed significantly in most variables from pre-bariatric surgery patients. Although there were fewer differences between patients with and without BCS, patients after BCS reported better appearance evaluation (AE), body area satisfaction (BAS), and physical functioning, even after controlling for excess weight loss and time since surgery. No differences were found for symptoms of depression and anxiety, and most other quality of life and body image domains. Discussion: Our results support the results of longitudinal studies demonstrating significant improvements in different aspects of body image, quality of life, and general psychopathology after bariatric surgery. Also, we found better AE and physical functioning in patients after BCS following bariatric surgery compared to patients with MWL after bariatric surgery who did not undergo BCS. Overall, there appears to be an effect of BCS on certain aspects of body image and quality of life but not on psychological aspects on the whole. PMID:25477839

  7. Body image and quality of life in patients with and without body contouring surgery following bariatric surgery: a comparison of pre- and post-surgery groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eDe Zwaan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Massive weight loss (MWL following bariatric surgery frequently results in an excess of overstretched skin causing physical discomfort and negatively affecting quality of life, self-esteem, body image and physical functioning.Methods: In this cross-sectional study 3 groups were compared: 1 patients prior to bariatric surgery (n=79, 2 patients after bariatric surgery who had not undergone BCS (n=252, and 3 patients after bariatric surgery who underwent subsequent body contouring surgery (BCS (n=62. All participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing body image (MBSRQ, quality of life (IWQOL-Lite, symptoms of depression (PHQ-9 and anxiety (GAD-7.Results: Overall, 62 patients (19.2% reported having undergone a total of 90 BCS procedures. The most common were abdominoplasties (88.7%, thigh lifts (24.2%, and breast lifts (16.1%. Post-bariatric surgery patients differed significantly in most variables from pre-bariatric surgery patients; however, there were fewer differences between patients with and without BCS. Patients after BCS reported better appearance evaluation, body area satisfaction, and physical functioning, even after controlling for excess weight loss and time since surgery. No differences were found for symptoms of depression and anxiety, and most other quality of life and body image domains. Discussion: Our results support the results of longitudinal studies demonstrating significant improvements in different aspects of body image, quality of life, and general psychopathology after bariatric surgery. Also, we found better appearance evaluation and physical functioning in patients after BCS following bariatric surgery compared to patients with MWL after bariatric surgery who did not undergo BCS. Overall, there appears to be an effect of BCS on certain aspects of body image and quality of life but not on psychological aspects on the whole.

  8. Bariatric Outcomes: Self-Management for Sustained Surgical Success: A Multicomponent Treatment for Dysregulated Overeating in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura M; Chacko, Thomas P

    Binge eating disorder, food addiction, and dysregulated overeating are common among people with severe obesity and prevalent among bariatric surgery populations. These problematic eating habits share commonalities with other addictions. Effective, holistic self-management is needed to promote long-term weight loss and psychosocial adjustment among patients who are severely obese who undergo surgery, especially those with clinically remarkable levels of binge eating, food addiction, or dysregulated overeating.This article aims to briefly review binge eating disorder, food addiction, and obesity-as well as issues surrounding surgery for individuals who are severely obese-and introduce the Bariatric Outcomes: Self-management for Sustained Surgical Success (BOSSSS) program. The BOSSSS program is holistic, skill based, and designed to promote weight loss, prevent weight regain, and improve well-being in patients with severe obesity with a history of bariatric surgery.Preliminary survey data suggest that bariatric surgery patients report a lack of skill-based emotional and behavioral support designed to help them over the long term. The BOSSSS program is rooted in self-determination theory, integrating mobile health technology across program components. Self-determination theory-based interventions are personalized and encourage autonomy, competence, and social support among participating patients and providers. The behavioral self-regulation training within BOSSSS is energy balance self-monitoring and titration. Emotional self-regulation is addressed via a specialized version of dialectical behavior skills therapy, emphasizing promotion of coping skills and use of adaptive, healthy substances in immediate environments. The BOSSSS program has been well received by patients and could be implemented by nurses and other health professionals with minimal support.

  9. Bariatric metabolic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopinaro, N

    2014-08-01

    lifespan of severely obese individuals is decreased by an estimated 5-20 years depending on gender, age, and race. Weight loss and maintenance are the obvious aims of bariatric surgery. The ideal bariatric operation should be easy and quick to perform, with minimal perioperative and long-term complications. It should result in excellent weight loss and indefinite weight maintenance in the vast majority of operated patients, necessitating minimal follow-up care, and be equally suitable for all patients, independent of individual characteristics such as compliance, age, and different degrees of overweight. It is immediately apparent that such a surgical procedure does not exist, and therefore we must carefully evaluate all the different features and characteristics of each operation and of each patient to try to select the procedure that provides the greatest probability of long-term success for a particular patient, with the best cost/benefit ratio. Bariatric surgery has proven to be the most effective mode of treatment for morbidly obese patients, with recent long-term studies providing evidence of a substantial reduction of mortality in bariatric surgery patients, as well as a decreased risk of developing new health-related comorbidities. Furthermore, a reduction in the use of healthcare services and therefore a reduction in direct healthcare costs was also observed. Bariatric surgery is an established and integral part of the comprehensive management of morbidly obese patients.

  10. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, Tamar; Sheiner, Eyal

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has put the spotlight on two different aspects of pregnancy after bariatric surgery: safety of the mother and fetus, and the procedure's effectiveness in preventing the complications surrounding reproduction and pregnancy often seen in the obese woman. To evaluate the pregnancy outcome foLlowing bariatric surgery. Although there are severaL reports documenting poor perinatal outcomes and late surgical complications during pregnancies subsequent to bariatric surgery, systematic studies have generaLLy not proven such an association. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safe, and in general perinatal outcome is better when compared to pregnancies of obese women. Providers should be familiar with potential complications related to postoperative pregnancies and be prepared to provide appropriate interventions such as nutritional supplementation and band adjustment when necessary.

  11. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life than someone who is normal weight. Bariatric surgery results in highly significant improvement in psychosocial well- ... affecting an individual’s weight, such as psychological issues. Weight gain generally occurs when there is an energy imbalance ...

  12. News media reports of patient deaths following 'medical tourism' for cosmetic surgery and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article identifies and describes twenty-six reported cases of deaths of individuals who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Over half of the reported deaths occurred in two countries. Analysis of these news reports cannot be used to make causal claims about why the patients died. In addition, cases identified in news media accounts do not provide a basis for establishing the relative risk of traveling abroad for care instead of seeking elective cosmetic surgery at domestic health care facilities. Acknowledging these limitations, the case reports suggest the possibility that contemporary peer-reviewed scholarship is underreporting patient mortality in medical travel. The paper makes a strong case for promoting normative analyses and empirical studies of medical travel. In particular, the paper argues that empirically informed ethical analysis of 'medical tourism' will benefit from rigorous studies tracking global flows of medical travelers and the clinical outcomes they experience. The paper contains practical recommendations intended to promote debate concerning how to promote patient safety and quality of care in medical travel. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Pre-Operative History of Depression and Cognitive Changes in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Obesity associated cognitive impairments may be partially reversible through bariatric surgery. Depression, a prevalent comorbidity in bariatric surgery candidates, is linked with cognitive impairment and poorer surgical outcomes in other populations. No study has examined the effects of pre-operative depression on cognitive changes in bariatric surgery patients. 67 bariatric surgery patients completed a computerized cognitive test battery prior to surgery and 12-months post-operatively. The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I disorders assessed Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Pre-surgery history of MDD was found in 47.8% of patients, but was not associated with greater baseline cognitive impairments. Repeated measures revealed improved cognitive abilities 12-months after surgery. Pre-surgery history of MDD did not influence post-operative cognitive function. Pre-operative history of MDD did not limit post-operative cognitive improvements. Larger studies with extended follow-ups are needed to clarify our findings and identify factors (e.g., older age) that may modify cognitive changes following surgery. PMID:25222138

  14. Impact of bariatric surgery on life expectancy in severely obese patients with diabetes: A Decision analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Daniel P.; Arterburn, David E.; Livingston, Edward H.; Coleman, Karen J.; Sidney, Steve; Fisher, David; O'Connor, Patrick; Fischer, David; Eckman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create a decision analytic model to estimate the balance between treatment risks and benefits for severely obese patients with diabetes. Summary Background Data Bariatric surgery leads to many desirable metabolic changes, but long-term impact of bariatric surgery on life expectancy in patients with diabetes has not yet been quantified. Methods We developed a Markov state transition model with multiple Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression models as inputs to compare bariatric surgery versus no surgical treatment for severely obese diabetic patients. The model is informed by data from three large cohorts: 1) 159,000 severely obese diabetic patients (4,185 had bariatric surgery) from 3 HMO Research Network sites, 2) 23,000 subjects from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), and 3) 18,000 subjects from the National Health Interview Survey linked to the National Death Index. Results In our main analyses, we found that a 45 year-old female with diabetes and a BMI of 45 kg/m2 gained an additional 6.7 years of life expectancy with bariatric surgery (38.4 years with surgery vs. 31.7 without). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the gain in life expectancy decreased with increasing BMI, until a BMI of 62 kg/m2 is reached, at which point nonsurgical treatment was associated with greater life expectancy. Similar results were seen for both men and women in all age groups. Conclusions For most severely obese patients with diabetes, bariatric surgery appears to improve life expectancy; however, surgery may reduce life expectancy for the super obese with BMIs over 62 kg/m2. PMID:25844968

  15. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...

  16. Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBingham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas (CP are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb, is often severe and refractory to therapy.Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven truly effective in the treatment of CP-HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be well defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome and patients with melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective trials with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of all types of hypothalamic

  17. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  18. New look at nutritional care for obese patient candidates for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina F; Lima, Tatiana P; Donadelli, Simara P; Salgado, Wilson; Marchini, Júlio S; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The combination of preoperative deficiencies and the restrictions and malabsorption possibly induced by bariatric surgery could lead patients to experience important nutritional deficits during the late postoperative period. Our objective was to characterize the eating, anthropometric, and biochemical profiles of obese candidates for bariatric surgery at a bariatric surgery center of a university hospital. A retrospective study with the analysis of medical records of candidates for bariatric surgery from 2007 to 2008 was performed. A total of 80 adult patients, aged 45 ± 11 years, were included in the present study. The mean patient weight was 145 ± 24 kg, and the mean body mass index was 54 ± 8 kg/m(2). Of the 80 patients, 78% had ≥1 co-morbidities related to obesity. The reported daily energy intake before surgery was 1981 ± 882 kcal, with 48% ± 11% consisting of carbohydrate, 29% ± 8% of lipids, and 23% ± 8% of protein. The mean number of daily meals was 4 ± 1. Patients with a greater body mass index ingested a smaller amount of calories per kilogram of current weight. The occurrence of hyperglycemia, hyperuricemia, and dyslipidemia and of nutritional deficiencies, among them magnesium (19%), vitamin A (15%), vitamin C (16%), iron (9%), β-carotene (3%), and vitamin B12 (3%), was high. The high occurrence of micronutrient deficiency detected by biochemical analysis in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery, representing a disabsorptive process, might involve a poorer prognosis during the late postoperative period. A preoperative evaluation of the nutritional parameters and the food intake pattern is recommended for these patients, together with the necessary interventions. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  20. Cardiovascular effects of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Olbers, Torsten; Kelly, Aaron S; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem, and its multisystem effects are inextricably linked with elevated cardiovascular risk and adverse outcomes. The cardiovascular benefits of reversing obesity in adults are well-established. Compared with other weight-loss strategies, programmes that incorporate bariatric surgery for weight loss are beneficial for sustained BMI reduction. A marked improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidaemia, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been observed after bariatric surgery. This broad improvement in cardiovascular risk profile has led to substantial reductions in the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. As with all procedures, the benefits of bariatric surgery must be weighed against its potential risks. Modern bariatric surgery has an excellent safety profile, but important limitations remain, including the potential for surgical complications and nutritional deficiencies, and the lifelong requirement for nutritional supplementation. Surgery should be considered in patients with severe obesity, especially those with cardiovascular comorbidities. In this Review, we summarize the current management options for patients with obesity, and discuss the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes.

  1. Long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery in patients visited at home outside the study environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery results in sustained weight loss in the majority of patients. The controlled setting of a trial, however, does not necessarily reflect the everyday routine practice. Therefore, to investigate the results of bariatric surgery in a more natural setting, patients were

  2. Interest, views and perceived barriers to bariatric surgery in patients with morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, S; Serodio, K J; Kuk, J L; Sivapalan, N; Craik, A; Aarts, M-A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the interest, views and patient-perceived barriers to bariatric surgery among surgery-eligible patients. Surveys were completed at a weight management clinic and local hospital in Ontario, Canada. Patients were ≥18 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg m(-2) or BMI > 35 kg m(-2) with ≥1 comorbidity. The sample included 105 participants, 73.3% female, with a mean BMI of 46.6 ± 7.1 kg m(-2) . Only 33.3% of participants were interested in surgery; 50.5% of participants were not interested and 16.2% had mixed feelings. Participants identified risks (69.5%) and side effects (57.1%) as significant surgical barriers. Interested participants were more likely to perceive themselves as obese, were unhappy with their current weight loss method and were less likely to fear surgery (P bariatric surgery, the majority of qualified patients are not interested in surgery mainly due to the perceived risk of surgery in general and satisfaction with current non-surgical weight loss efforts. The self-perception of obesity, as opposed to medical comorbidities, may be a stronger driver of the decision to have bariatric surgery. It is unclear if patients are aware of the effectiveness of bariatric surgery to help improve comorbidities or if bariatric surgery is perceived as being more cosmetic in nature. © 2016 World Obesity.

  3. Psychological characterisation of severely obese patients: pre- and post-bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ferreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although psychological disorders are more prevalent among candidates for bariatric surgery than among non-obese populations, there is limited knowledge about the impact of this type of surgery on psychopathology. The main goal of this study was to characterize the evolution of psychopathological morbidity among obese patients after surgery. This was an observational longitudinal study. All patients submitted to bariatric surgery between March 2008 and June 2010, in a general hospital located in the south of Portugal were invited to participate. Psychological assessment was done through structured clinical interviews and administration of MCMI-III. Participants were assessed with the same protocol before and after surgery (minimum, 12 months after surgery. Overall, 20 patients (19 women were assessed. The most prevalent clinical syndromes (axis I before surgery were: anxiety (40%, dysthymia disorder (20%, somatoform disorder and delusional disorder (both 15%. After surgery, the most prevalent clinical syndromes were: anxiety (40%, bipolar disorder, dysthymia disorder, and delusional disorder (all with 15%. Before surgery, compulsive personality was the most prevalent personality disorder (15%. After surgery, the most prevalent ones were: histrionic personality, compulsive personality disorder, and paranoia (all with 10%. These findings may suggest that bariatric surgery per se is not enough as treatment for the remission of psychopathology among severe obese patients.

  4. Understanding the post-surgical bariatric experiences of patients two or more years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rebecca H; Irwin, Jennifer D

    2017-11-01

    In Canada, one year after bariatric surgery follow-up appointments become less frequent and surgical recipients must cope with weight management more independently. Up to 50% of patients experience weight regain by two years post-surgery. Understanding the lived experiences of those who have gone through the bariatric process may shed light on what is needed to support others moving forward. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the physical, psychological, social, and clinic-related experiences of individuals who have undergone bariatric surgery at least two years prior. The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the physical, psychological, social, and clinic-related experiences of individuals who have undergone bariatric surgery at least two years prior. In-depth, individual semi-structured interviews lasting approximately 60 min were conducted. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and inductive content analysis was used to identify emerging themes. Methods were employed throughout to support data trustworthiness. Participants (n = 28; 21 female) were primarily middle-aged (mean: 49.7 ± 12.7 years old), Caucasian (71%), and completed bariatric surgery more than three years. The data fell naturally into four primary themes, namely physical changes and challenges, psychological experiences, social functioning and support, and clinic-related experiences and reflections. Generally, participants described positive improvements in their physical, psychological, and social state since surgery. However, concerns pertaining to several unanticipated outcomes of the surgery were underscored and informed the recommendations for other patients to be prepared to relearn about ones' body, utilize the support services available, and be aware that social relationships may change and/or require tending. Participants' insights can be used to help others meet with long-term success post-bariatric surgery.

  5. Revisional Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Noah J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Gill, Richdeep S; Sherman, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    Revisional bariatric procedures are increasingly common. With more primary procedures being performed to manage severe obesity and its complications, 5% to 8% of these procedures will fail, requiring revisional operation. Reasons for revisional bariatric surgery are either primary inadequate weight loss, defined as less than 25% excess body weight loss, or weight recidivism, defined as a gain of more than 10 kg based on the nadir weight; however, each procedure also has inherit specific complications that can also be indications for revision. This article reviews the history of each primary bariatric procedure, indications for revision, surgical options, and subsequent outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Plastic surgery in bariatric patients: a nationwide study of 17,000 patients on the national administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati, Andrea; Katsahian, Sandrine; Maladry, David; Gerard, Emma; Gaucher, Sonia

    2018-01-12

    Bariatric patients are often candidates for plastic surgery. However, the rate of postbariatric procedures is not known. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of plastic surgery, and factors related to surgery, in bariatric patients. University hospital, France. This was a cohort study based on administrative data. All adult patients who received bariatric surgery in France between 2007 and 2013 were included to estimate the rate of plastic surgery and related predictive factors. Data are reported according to the reporting of studies conducted using observational routinely collected data guidelines for observational studies on administrative data. Among the 183,514 patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the study period, 23,120 plastic surgeries were performed on 17,695 patients, including abdominoplasty (62%), dermolipectomy of the upper or lower limbs (25%), and reconstruction of the breast (14%). The rates of plastic surgery were 13%, 18%, and 21% at 3, 5, and 7 years post-bariatric surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients who had a biliopancreatic diversion or a gastric bypass had a hazard ratio of 2.67 and 2.67 for subsequent plastic surgery, respectively, compared with patients who had adjustable gastric banding. Women had a 2-fold probability of surgery compared with men (hazard ratio 2.02). Important variability in the rate of surgery was found among different hospitals; rates ranged from 6.1% to 41.3% at 5 years. This study showed that 21% of bariatric patients undergo plastic surgery. Large variability exists among hospitals, suggesting that several unmeasured factors may limit access to contouring surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  8. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-11-07

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techniques have contributed to reduced operative time, length of stay, and complications. The development in bariatric surgery has been exceptional, resulting in a dramatic increase of the number of procedures performed world wide during the last decades. Although, a complex bariatric procedure can be performed with operative mortality no greater than cholecystectomy, specific procedure-related complications and other drawbacks must be taken into account. The evolution of laparoscopy will be the legacy of the 21(st) century and at present, day-care surgery and further reduction of the operative trauma is in focus. The impressive effects on comorbid conditions have prompted the adoption of minimal invasive bariatric procedures into the field of metabolic surgery.

  9. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in patients with post-bariatric surgery complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Gossum, A; Pironi, L; Chambrier, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obesity is a worldwide health problem. Bariatric surgery (BS) is becoming one of the most commonly used methods for fighting obesity and its associated comorbidities. However, current BS techniques can be associated with early or late complications that may require nutritional...... support. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to determine the indications and outcomes for patients on Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) due to post-bariatric surgery complications. METHODS: A specific questionnaire was designed by the ESPEN HAN/CIF working group and submitted to HPN...... centers. This questionnaire included: patient demographics, type of surgery, BMI before surgery and at start of HPN, indications for HPN including technical and nutritional complications (early within 2 months after surgery or late), outcome, PN regimen, and HPN complications. Patients were...

  10. Outcomes of bariatric surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J Esteban; Wilson, Samuel E; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2006-10-01

    The Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee recently concluded that evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in the general adult population. However, more information is needed on the role of bariatric surgery in the elderly. The aim of this study was to examine the outcome of bariatric surgery in the elderly performed at academic centers. Using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision diagnosis and procedure codes, we obtained data from the University HealthSystem Consortium Clinical Data Base for all elderly (>60 years) and nonelderly (19-60 years) patients who underwent bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity between 1999 and 2005. Outcome measures, including patient characteristics, length of stay, 30-day readmission, morbidity, and observed and expected (risk-adjusted) mortality, were compared between groups. Bariatric surgery in the elderly represents 2.7 per cent (n = 1,339) of all bariatric operations being performed at academic centers. Of the 99 University HealthSystem Consortium centers performing bariatric surgery, 78 centers (79%) perform bariatric surgery in the elderly. Compared with nonelderly patients, elderly patients who underwent bariatric surgery had more comorbidities, longer lengths of stay (4.9 days vs 3.8 days, P elderly group (0.7% vs 0.3%, P = 0.03). When risk adjusted, the observed-to-expected mortality ratio for the elderly group was 0.9. In a subset of elderly patients with a pre-existing cardiac condition (n = 236), the in-hospital mortality was 4.7 per cent. Bariatric surgery in the elderly represents only a small fraction of the number of bariatric operations performed at academic centers. Although the morbidity and mortality is higher in the elderly, bariatric surgery in the elderly is considered as safe as other gastrointestinal procedures because the observed mortality is better than the expected (risk-adjusted) mortality.

  11. Ophthalmic complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Rui Azevedo; Ribeiro, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is increasing vastly in the world, and the number of bariatric surgeries being performed is also increasing. Patients being submitted to bariatric surgeries, especially malabsorptive procedures, have an increased risk of developing nutrient deficiencies, which can culminate in symptomatic hypovitaminosis, if supplementation is not done correctly. The eye and the optic system need an adequate level of several vitamins and minerals to perform properly, especially vitamin A, and this article wants to cover the main nutrients involved, the possible ophthalmic complications that can arise by their deficiency, and the management of those complications.

  12. Bariatric surgery waiting times in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Nicolas V; Efthimiou, Evangelos

    2009-06-01

    Severe obesity is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the world, including Canada. The only permanent treatment of severe or morbid obesity is bariatric surgery. Access to bariatric surgery is very limited in Canada. We sought to collect accurate data on waiting times for the procedure. We carried out a survey of members of the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons and performed a more detailed analysis within Quebec and at one Canadian bariatric surgery centre where a prospectively collected bariatric surgery registry has been maintained since 1983. The survey response rate was 85%. All centres determined whether patients were eligible for bariatric surgery based on the National Institutes of Health criteria. Patients entered the queue as "office contacts" and moved through the queue, with the exit point being completion of the procedure. In 2007, a total of 6783 patients were waiting for bariatric surgery and 1313 procedures were performed in Canada. Assuming these trends are maintained, the calculated average waiting time for bariatric surgery in Canada is just over 5 years (6783/1313). The Fraser Institute and the Wait Times Alliance benchmarks for reasonable surgical waiting times vary from 8 weeks for cancer surgery to 18 months for cosmetic surgery. At one Canadian centre, 12 patients died while waiting for bariatric surgery. The waiting times for bariatric surgery are the longest of any surgically treated condition. Given the significant reduction in the relative risk of death with bariatric surgery (40%-89% depending on the study), the current waiting times for the procedure in Canada are unacceptable.

  13. Psychologists' Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Candidates Influenced by Patients' Attachment Representations and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Floor; Hinnen, Chris; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Acherman, Yair; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    This study examines whether patients self-reported attachment representations and levels of depression and anxiety influenced psychologists' evaluations of morbidly obese patients applying for bariatric surgery. A sample of 250 patients (mean age 44, 84 % female) who were referred for bariatric

  14. Application of BAROS’ questionnaire in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery with 2 years of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano de QUEIROZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND -In recent decades, the high prevalence of obesity in the general population has brought serious concerns in terms of public health. Contrarily to conventional treatment involving dieting and physical exercising, often ineffective in generating long term results, bariatric operations have been an effective method for sustained weight loss in morbidly obese individuals. The Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS is an objective and recognized system in the overall evaluation of results after bariatric surgery. OBJECTIVE To investigate results concerning a casuistic of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery over a 2-year follow-up in terms of weight loss, related medical conditions, safety and changes in quality of life. METHODS A total of 120 obese (17 male and 103 female patients, who underwent bariatric surgery, were assessed and investigated using the BAROS system after a 2- year follow-up. RESULTS Patients obtained a mean excess weight loss of 74.6 (±15.9 % and mean body mass index reduction of 15.6 (±4.4 Kg/m2. Pre-surgical comorbidities were present in 71 (59% subjects and they were totally (86% or partially (14% resolved. Complications resulting specifically from the surgical procedure were observed in 4.2% of cases (two bowel obstructions requiring re-operation, and three stomal stenosis treated with endoscopic dilation. Sixteen subjects (13% of total number of patients presented minor clinical complications managed through outpatient care. The final scores for the BAROS questionnaire showcased excellent to good results in 99% of cases (excellent 44%, very good 38%, good 23%, acceptable 1%. CONCLUSION According to the BAROS questionnaire, bariatric surgery is a safe and effective method for managing obesity and associated clinical comorbidities, allowing for satisfactory results after a 2-year follow-up. Future studies should address other clinical and psychosocial variables that impact

  15. Application of BAROS' questionnaire in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery with 2 years of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Caetano de; Sallet, José Afonso; DE Barros E Silva, Pedro Gabriel Melo; Queiroz, Luzia da Gloria Pereira de Sousa; Pimentel, Jélis Arenas; Sallet, Paulo Clemente

    2017-01-01

    -In recent decades, the high prevalence of obesity in the general population has brought serious concerns in terms of public health. Contrarily to conventional treatment involving dieting and physical exercising, often ineffective in generating long term results, bariatric opera-tions have been an effective method for sustained weight loss in morbidly obese individuals. The Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) is an objective and recognized system in the overall evaluation of results after bariatric surgery. - To investigate results concerning a casuistic of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery over a 2-year follow-up in terms of weight loss, related medical conditions, safety and changes in quality of life. - A total of 120 obese (17 male and 103 female) patients, who underwent bariatric surgery, were assessed and investigated using the BAROS system after a 2- year follow-up. - Patients obtained a mean excess weight loss of 74.6 (±15.9) % and mean body mass index reduction of 15.6 (±4.4) Kg/m2. Pre-surgical comorbidities were present in 71 (59%) subjects and they were totally (86%) or partially (14%) resolved. Complications resulting specifically from the surgical procedure were observed in 4.2% of cases (two bowel obstructions requiring re-operation, and three stomal stenosis treated with endoscopic dilation). Sixteen subjects (13% of total number of patients) presented minor clinical complications managed through outpatient care. The final scores for the BAROS questionnaire showcased excellent to good results in 99% of cases (excellent 44%, very good 38%, good 23%, acceptable 1%). - According to the BAROS questionnaire, bariatric surgery is a safe and effective method for managing obesity and associated clinical comorbidities, allowing for satisfactory results after a 2-year follow-up. Future studies should address other clinical and psychosocial variables that impact outcome as well as allow for longer follow-ups.

  16. The Outcome of Bariatric Surgery in Patients Aged 75 years and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor Hanipah, Zubaidah; Punchai, Suriya; Karas, Linden A; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Rahul J; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali; Schauer, Philip R

    2017-12-30

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be safe and effective in patients aged 60-75 years; however, outcomes in patients aged 75 or older are undocumented. Patients aged 75 years and older who underwent bariatric procedures in two academic centers between 2006 and 2015 were studied. A total of 19 patients aged 75 years and above were identified. Eleven (58%) were male, the median age was 76 years old (range 75-81), and the median preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 41.4 kg/m 2 (range 35.8-57.5). All of the bariatric procedures were primary procedures and performed laparoscopically: sleeve gastrectomy (SG) (n = 11, 58%), adjustable gastric band (AGB) (n = 4, 21%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) (n = 2, 11%), banded gastric plication (n = 1, 5%), and gastric plication (n = 1, 5%). The median operative time was 120 min (range 75-240), and the median length of stay was 2 days (range 1-7). Three patients (16%) developed postoperative atrial fibrillation which completely resolved at discharge. At 1 year, the median percentage of total weight loss (%TWL) was 18.4% (range 7.4-22.0). The 1-year %TWL varied among the bariatric procedures performed: SG (21%), RYGB (22%), AGB (7%), and gastric plication (8%). There were no 30-day readmissions, reoperations, or mortalities. Our experience suggests that bariatric surgery in selected patients aged 75 years and older would be safe and effective despite being higher risk. Age alone should not be the limiting factor for selecting patients for bariatric surgery.

  17. Mental Healthcare Utilization in Patients Seeking Bariatric Surgery : The Role of Attachment Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Floor; Hinnen, Chris; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Geenen, Rinie

    2013-01-01

    Obesity may be a factor contributing to mental health in patients seeking bariatric surgery. Whether a person uses mental healthcare may have its roots in attachment behavior. The present study (N=260) identified that attachment anxiety was associated with more mental healthcare visits (OR=1.86, 95%

  18. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini eGeorgiadou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09 after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI Mpost = 30.54 kg/m2, SDpost = 5.14 were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group (BMI Mpre = 48.01 kg/m2, SDpre = 6.56. To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders. No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms and impulse control disorders. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms should be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions.

  19. Assessment of dietary habits, nutritional status and blood biochemical parameters in patients prepared for bariatric surgery: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Morbid obesity needs to be treated by bariatric procedures. Proper dietary preparation of patients before surgery conditions their postoperative status. Aim Assessment of dietary habits, nutritional status and biochemical parameters of the blood in patients being prepared for different bariatric procedures. Material and methods The study involved a group of 27 obese adults: 19 women (mean age: 40.4 ±13.9 years) and 8 men (mean age: 39.6 ±12.7 years) qualified for bariatric proced...

  20. Bariatric Surgery and Kidney-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alex R; Grams, Morgan E; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of severe obesity in both the general and the chronic kidney disease (CKD) populations continues to rise, with more than one-fifth of CKD patients in the United States having a body mass index of ≥35 kg/m 2 . Severe obesity has significant renal consequences, including increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and nephrolithiasis. Bariatric surgery represents an effective method for achieving sustained weight loss, and evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that bariatric surgery is also effective in improving blood pressure, reducing hyperglycemia, and even inducing diabetes remission. There is also observational evidence suggesting that bariatric surgery may diminish the long-term risk of kidney function decline and ESRD. Bariatric surgery appears to be relatively safe in patients with CKD, with postoperative complications only slightly higher than in the general bariatric surgery population. The use of bariatric surgery in patients with CKD might help prevent progression to ESRD or enable selected ESRD patients with severe obesity to become candidates for kidney transplantation. However, there are also renal risks in bariatric surgery, namely, acute kidney injury, nephrolithiasis, and, in rare cases, oxalate nephropathy, particularly in types of surgery involving higher degrees of malabsorption. Although bariatric surgery may improve long-term kidney outcomes, this potential benefit remains unproved and must be balanced with potential adverse events.

  1. Iron deficiency and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-05-15

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients' outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients undergoing bariatric surgery: preventive strategies and key recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Soriano, Jose; Louie Cruz, Allan; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2013-01-01

    Advances in bariatric surgery have brought about a paradigm shift in the management of obesity, with benefits extending beyond weight loss. However, nutritional deficiencies are an inherent problem in the postoperative period and often require lifelong supplementation. Vitamin B12, also referred to as cobalamin, is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies affecting this population. This review explores the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficiency in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and provides an overview of the effectiveness of various available vitamin B12 formulations. To identify the relevant literature, a systematic review of MEDLINE was conducted from the earliest dates through September 2012 for English-language articles describing the prevention and management of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Intramuscular vitamin B12 continues to be the gold standard of therapy for vitamin B12 deficiency, especially in symptomatic patients. In select patients with asymptomatic vitamin B12 deficiency after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), high-dose oral cyanocobalamin should be given a consideration, especially when there are concerns with the adherence to intramuscular therapy or if compliance comes into question. Unlike patients post-RYGB, those undergoing restrictive procedures such as gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy may be maintained postoperatively on a lower-dose daily vitamin B12 supplementation. Efficacy data of nasal and sublingual routes for maintenance therapy is currently awaited. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery must be continuously educated on proper nutrition, the risk of developing significant vitamin B12 deficiency, and the role of supplements in avoiding catastrophic consequences. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of the prevalence of atelectasis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Baltieri

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: To observe the prevalence of atelectasis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and the influence of the body mass index (BMI, gender and age on the prevalence of atelectasis. Method: Retrospective study of 407 patients and reports on chest X-rays carried out before and after bariatric surgery over a period of 14 months. Only patients who underwent bariatric surgery by laparotomy were included. Results: There was an overall prevalence of 37.84% of atelectasis, with the highest prevalence in the lung bases and with greater prevalence in women (RR = 1.48. There was a ratio of 30% for the influence of age for individuals under the age of 36, and of 45% for those older than 36 (RR = 0.68. There was no significant influence of BMI on the prevalence of atelectasis. Conclusion: The prevalence of atelectasis in bariatric surgery is 37% and the main risk factors are being female and aged over 36 years.

  4. Analysis of the prevalence of atelectasis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltieri, Letícia; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Rasera-Junior, Irineu; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima; Costa, Dirceu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli Maria

    To observe the prevalence of atelectasis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and the influence of the body mass index (BMI), gender and age on the prevalence of atelectasis. Retrospective study of 407 patients and reports on chest X-rays carried out before and after bariatric surgery over a period of 14 months. Only patients who underwent bariatric surgery by laparotomy were included. There was an overall prevalence of 37.84% of atelectasis, with the highest prevalence in the lung bases and with greater prevalence in women (RR=1.48). There was a ratio of 30% for the influence of age for individuals under the age of 36, and of 45% for those older than 36 (RR=0.68). There was no significant influence of BMI on the prevalence of atelectasis. The prevalence of atelectasis in bariatric surgery is 37% and the main risk factors are being female and aged over 36 years. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. [Analysis of the prevalence of atelectasis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltieri, Letícia; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Rasera-Junior, Irineu; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima; Costa, Dirceu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli Maria

    To observe the prevalence of atelectasis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and the influence of the body mass index (BMI), gender and age on the prevalence of atelectasis. Retrospective study of 407 patients and reports on chest X-rays carried out before and after bariatric surgery over a period of 14 months. Only patients who underwent bariatric surgery by laparotomy were included. There was an overall prevalence of 37.84% of atelectasis, with the highest prevalence in the lung bases and with greater prevalence in women (RR=1.48). There was a ratio of 30% for the influence of age for individuals under the age of 36, and of 45% for those older than 36 (RR=0.68). There was no significant influence of BMI on the prevalence of atelectasis. The prevalence of atelectasis in bariatric surgery is 37% and the main risk factors are being female and aged over 36 years. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  6. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron, before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  7. The relationship between duration of stay and readmissions in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lois, Alex W; Frelich, Matthew J; Sahr, Natasha A; Hohmann, Samuel F; Wang, Tao; Gould, Jon C

    2015-08-01

    Hospital readmissions are a quality indicator in bariatric surgery. In recent years, duration of stay after bariatric surgery has trended down greatly. We hypothesized that a shorter postoperative hospitalization does not increase the likelihood of readmission. The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of academic medical centers and affiliated hospitals. The UHC's clinical database contains information on inpatient stay and returns (readmissions) up to 30 days after discharge. A multicenter analysis of outcomes was performed by the use of data from the January 2009 to December 2013 for patients 18 years and older. Patients were identified by bariatric procedure International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes and restricted by diagnosis codes for morbid obesity. A total of 95,294 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 45.4 (±0.11) years, and 73,941 (77.6%) subjects were female. There were 5,423 (5.7%) readmissions within the study period. Patients with hospitalizations of 3 days and more than 3 days were twice and four times as likely to be readmitted than those with hospitalizations of one day, respectively (P bariatric surgery. Early discharge does not appear to be associated with increased readmission rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    J?uregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  9. Incidence and Prognosis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Psoriasis and obesity are strongly linked, and weight loss appears to improve psoriasis symptoms and severity. Bariatric surgery may induce remission of psoriasis, but data are limited to small studies and case series. Objective: To examine the incidence and prognosis of psoriasis...... and psoriatic arthritis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery (gastric bypass and gastric banding). Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study used individual-level linkage of administrative and public health registers in Denmark. All Danish citizens who received gastric bypass...... and 41.0 (10.0) years at the time of surgery. The gastric banding subset was composed of 800 (74.7%) women and 271 (25.3) men; the mean (SD) age of these patients was 32.3 (10.1) years at the study start and 41.7 (10.0) years at the time of surgery. Adjusted HRs of psoriasis were 0.52 (95% CI, 0...

  10. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa A. Kamel

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms.

  11. Perioperative Risks of Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea in the Bariatric Surgery Patient: a Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wing Tai; Chopra, Shawn; Kopf, Michael; Morales, Carlos; Khan, Shahzad; Zuccala, Keith; Choi, Laura; Chronakos, John

    2016-12-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) perioperatively in bariatric surgery patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been controversial. Although studies have demonstrated that CPAP use is safe in bariatric patients, prior studies have not shown improvement in outcomes in these patients. A retrospective review of patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2005 to 2009 was performed. All patients underwent polysomnography preoperatively. Patient age, sex, BMI, comorbidities, polysomnogram data, type of bariatric procedure, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications were reviewed. The Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis. Among the 352 patients studied, 47 with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 did not receive CPAP postoperatively. A total of 7/47 (14.9 %) developed postoperative pulmonary complications. There were no non-pulmonary complications. Some 9/305 (2.95 %) with CPAP developed pulmonary complications. There were 26/305 patients with all-cause complications (8.52 %). The AHI was higher in the group receiving treatment. There was a statistically significant difference in pulmonary complications between patients with and those without treatment (p value 0.0002). The average length of stay was 3.0 and 3.2 days in treatment and comparison groups, respectively, a difference that did not reach statistical significance. Patients who did not receive CPAP postoperatively developed more pulmonary complications than those with CPAP, suggesting that CPAP might be beneficial in decreasing pulmonary complications in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. However, further investigation is warranted to better delineate other risk factors due to small sample size in our study group.

  12. Nutritional consequences of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthakos, Stavra A; Inge, Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is being increasingly used to help treat morbidly obese adults and adolescents. As a greater percentage of this population faces a lifetime of living with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology, increased awareness of the nutritional consequences is critical for all health care practitioners, as many of these patients may be lost to follow-up and can present with significant nutritional complications years after surgery. Nutritional deficiencies can occur after bariatric surgery, although to a lesser degree after restrictive procedures. Risk may increase over time, perhaps due to poor compliance with supplementation, continued inadequate intake and/or ongoing malabsorption. Adolescent patients may be at greater risk due to poor compliance and longer life span. Nutritional monitoring and supplementation among bariatric programs has been widely variable and few prospective studies of outcomes exist. Bariatric surgery can carry significant risk of nutritional complications. Compliance with dietary recommendations should be monitored and encouraged, with annual screening for selected deficiencies. Prospective longitudinal research is needed to identify the true prevalence and significance of nutritional deficiency in these patients and to determine optimum dietary recommendations.

  13. Feasibility and Safety of Bariatric Surgery in High-Risk Patients: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusef Moulla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the feasibility and safety of bariatric procedures nowadays, high-risk patients with vast obesity and severe comorbidities demonstrate relatively high perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and, therefore, form a distinguished challenge for the bariatric surgeons. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed high-risk patients, who underwent bariatric surgery in University Hospital Leipzig between May 2012 and December 2016. High-risk patients were defined when (Bergeat et al., 2016 at least one of the following risk factors was met: age ≥ 70 years, body mass index (BMI > 70 kg/m2, liver cirrhosis, end-organ failure, or immunosuppression by status after organ transplantation along with (Birkmeyer et al., 2010 at least two comorbidities associated with obesity. Our analysis included early postoperative complications. Results. A total of 25 high-risk obese patients were identified. All patients had a standardized postoperative management with a mean length of hospital stay of 4 ± 1.4 days. One patient required an operative revision due to a stapler line leak after sleeve gastrectomy. No other major postoperative complications occurred. Conclusion. Bariatric surgery for severe high-risk patients can be performed safely in high-volume centers following standardized procedures.

  14. Pregnancy outcome of patients following bariatric surgery as compared with obese women: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shai, Daniel; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Amsalem, Doron; Silverberg, Daniel; Levi, Isaac; Sheiner, Eyal

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate pregnancy outcome and rates of anemia in patients following bariatric operation in comparison with obese pregnant women. A retrospective population-based study comparing pregnancy outcome of patients following bariatric with the obese population was conducted. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to control for confounders. To evaluate the change in hemoglobin levels, we included women who had one pregnancy before the bariatric surgery and one following the surgery or two pregnancies for women with obesity. This study included 326 women who had one pregnancy before and after a bariatric surgery and 1612 obese women who had at least two consecutive deliveries. Using a multivariable logistic regression model, controlling for confounders such as maternal age, patients following bariatric surgery had lower rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.5-0.9; p = 0.49) and macrosomia (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.2-0.5; p bariatric surgery were more likely to be anemic (hemoglobin bariatric surgery (a decline of 0.33 g/dL versus 0.18 g/dL between two consecutive pregnancies of obese women). Using another multivariable model with anemia as the outcome variable, bariatric was noted as a risk factor for anemia (adjusted OR = 1.45, 95%CI 1.13-1.86, p = 0.004). Women following bariatric surgery have lower risk for gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia as compared with obese parturients. Nevertheless, bariatric surgery is a risk factor for anemia.

  15. Cushing's Syndrome in a Morbidly Obese Patient Undergoing Evaluation before Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Borsoi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cushing's syndrome (CS is extremely rare in morbidly obese patients. To date, no occurrences in obese patients with BMI above 60 kg/m2 have been reported in the literature. Case Report: This case report describes a patient who was admitted to the ward of the Clinical Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism of the Medical University of Vienna in preparation for bariatric surgery. The patient was a 49-year-old female who showed morbid obesity (BMI 61.6 kg/m2, hypertension, and substituted hypothyroidism. Preoperative work-up revealed CS due to an adrenal adenoma. Therefore, the patient underwent unilateral adrenalectomy followed by bariatric surgery 6 months later. Conclusion: Since undiagnosed CS might result in severe perioperative complications in a population already at increased risk, this case report underlines the importance of careful endocrine evaluation of morbidly obese patients. After all, even rare endocrine causes should be excluded.

  16. Nutrient deficiencies in patients with obesity considering bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Patrick; Letois, Flavie; Sultan, Ariane; Nocca, David; Mura, Thibaut; Galtier, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are common after bariatric surgery, but few studies have examined them preoperatively. The objective of this study was to evaluate several vitamins, nutrients, and nutritional markers and their determinants in patients with obesity considering bariatric surgery. Preoperative values of fasting plasma glucose, insulin, lipid profile, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), parathyroid hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, calcium, phosphate, albumin, magnesium, total proteins, liver function tests, iron, ferritin, folate, vitamin A, vitamin B12, selenium, and zinc were evaluated in 267 Caucasian outpatients (74.2% women, aged 40.5±12.6 years) who were considering bariatric surgery. The determinants of nutrient variability were analyzed by linear regression for nutrients with a prevalence of deficiency>10%, i.e., serum 25(OH)D, iron, phosphate, magnesium, and vitamin A. Prevalence of inadequate concentrations was high for 25(OH)D (67.9% with values ≤ 20 ng/mL), magnesium (35.4%), phosphate (21.6%), iron (18.8%), and vitamin A (16.9%). Multiple deficiencies were common; 28.5%, 12.1%, and 6.3% of patients had 2, 3, and 4 deficiencies, respectively. In multivariate analyses, metabolic characteristics had an important impact on deficiencies, with lower values of 25(OH)D and vitamin A with increasing body mass index, lower values of 25(OH)D and magnesium with increasing fasting plasma glucose, and a positive correlation between vitamin A and triglycerides. Elevated TSH was associated with low iron concentrations. At all ages, micronutrient deficiencies were common, with high prevalence of concentration inadequacies for 25(OH)D, magnesium, phosphate, iron, and vitamin A. High body mass index and high fasting plasma glucose increased the risk of deficiencies, particularly for 25(OH)D. Preoperative screening and correction of deficiencies should be advised. © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and

  17. Psychiatric and Psychosocial Aspects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzin Mukaddes Sevincer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is a treatment modality which is becoming increasingly popular in the last decade in our country and around the world. Patients who treated with a conventional methods are unable to loose sufficient weight and even they regained most of their lost weight easily. The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery are increasing day by day considering the success of bariatric surgery with regard to lose weight fast and the improvement in co-morbid conditions. Obesity and bariatric surgery are in a reciprocal relationship both with psychiatric disorders and psychosocial variables. Relations are begin with the evaluation of a patients eligibility for surgery in terms of psychiatric and psychosocial issues at a very early stage of the process. Presence of psychopathology, level of knowledge related to the surgical procedure and patients expectations about physical, psychological and social changes that may occur after surgery are the significant parts of the evaluation of bariatric surgery patients. These components should be considered in assessing capacity of patients to comply with medical advice in post-operative stage. In this article the needs for assesment of psychiatric and psychosocial aspects of obese patients who will undergo bariatric surgery is reviewed in the light of current literature . Possible medical, psychiatric and psychosocial complications of bariatric surgery and related issues are reviewed and psycosocial factors that may be predictors of the successful outcome of bariatric surgery are discussed.Discussions around the nature of specific eating disorders seen frequently in bariatric surgery patients, wheter it is a separate entities from well known eating disorders and controversial issues such as presence or absence of psychopathology like suicide as directly consequence of the surgical procedures are summarized. Discussions about performing of psychiatric and psychosocial assesment (i.e by whom, how and

  18. Psychological and Psychiatric Traits in Post-bariatric Patients Asking for Body-Contouring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Chiara; Marini, Massimo; De Antoni, Eleonora; Scarpa, Carlotta; Brambullo, Tito; Bassetto, Franco; Mazzotta, Annapina; Vindigni, Vincenzo

    2017-02-01

    Obese patients, mainly females, feel uncomfortable and unsatisfied with their physical appearance; they have a wrong perception of their image and consequently diminish their self-esteem, sometimes showing difficulties in functional areas such as work, relationship, social activity. Beside health concerns, improving their appearance and body image are often common motives for weight loss in obese individuals and after weight loss about 30% of bariatric surgery patients undergo plastic surgical correction of excessive skin. The authors investigated psychological and psychiatric traits in post-bariatric patients undergoing body-contouring surgery to underline the strong correlation between psychiatry and obesity and avoid unsatisfactory results in post-bariatric patients. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Beck Depression Inventory II, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, Body Uneasiness Test, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11, and Binge Eating Scale were performed in 36 post-bariatric patients looking for plastic surgery and 21 controls, similar for clinical features, not seeking shape remodelling. Much different psychiatric pathology characterizes cases, including current body dysmorphic disorder and previous major depression and anxiety disorders, impulsivity, binging and body uneasiness are other common traits. In post-obesity rehabilitation, a strong collaboration between the plastic surgeon and psychiatrist is recommended to reduce the number of non-compliant patients. Preoperative psychological assessment of the body-contouring patient should be a central part of the initial plastic surgery consultation, as it should be for all plastic surgery patients. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to

  19. A Validation of an Intelligent Decision-Making Support System for the Nutrition Diagnosis of Bariatric Surgery Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Magda RR; Martins, Cristina; Dias, Jo?o; Pinto, Jos? S

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an important method for treatment of morbid obesity. It is known that significant nutritional deficiencies might occur after surgery, such as, calorie-protein malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia, and lack of vitamin B12, thiamine, and folic acid. Objective The objective of our study was to validate a computerized intelligent decision support system that suggests nutritional diagnoses of patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods There were fifteen clinic...

  20. Breast Reshaping Following Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindigni, Vincenzo; Scarpa, Carlotta; Tommasini, Antonio; Toffanin, Maria Cristina; Masetto, Laura; Pavan, Chiara; Bassetto, Franco

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide problem that affects millions of people from a medical and psychological point of view. To solve the related complications, patients should lose weight with the consequent need to be subjected to body contouring due to the presence of a loose and redundant skin. We report our experience in the treatment of the post-bariatric breast. We considered all the post-bariatric patients subjected to a breast reshaping, and we viewed the features of the breast, the type of surgery performed, the outcomes, and the complications. All patients filled out BREAST-Q surveys both preoperatively and after 6 months to study the rate of satisfaction. Ninety post-bariatric patients underwent breast reshaping in the last 5 years. The average age was 40 years old. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 5 years. The most represented ptosis was second grade; the favorite technique has been mastopexy with parenchymal remodelling and augmentation with autologous tissue. The mean duration of the surgery has been 3 h. The most represented complications have been delayed healing, unfavorable scarring, hematoma, and seroma. Statistically significant improvements were observed in satisfaction with breast appearance, psychological, and physical well-being. Breast reshaping in post-bariatric patients is a big challenge and only a careful analysis of the degree of ptosis of the breast, its volume and shape, and a clear communication with the patients about the real outcomes and complications can make the winning surgeon.

  1. Bariatric surgery in patients with bipolar spectrum disorders: Selection factors, post-operative visit attendance, and weight outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kelli E.; Applegate, Katherine; Portenier, Dana; McVay, Megan

    2017-01-01

    Background As many of 3% of bariatric surgery candidates are diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder. Objectives 1) To describe differences between patients with bipolar spectrum disorders who are approved and not approved for surgery by the mental health evaluator. 2) To examine surgical outcomes of patients with bipolar spectrum disorders. Setting Academic medical center, United States. Methods A retrospective record review was conducted of consecutive patients who applied for bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2009. Patients diagnosed with bipolar spectrum disorders who were approved for surgery (n=42) were compared with patients with a bipolar spectrum disorder who were not approved (n=31) and to matched control surgical patients without a bipolar spectrum diagnosis (n=29) on a variety of characteristics and surgical outcomes. Results Of bariatric surgery candidates diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder who applied for surgery, 57% were approved by the psychologist and 48% ultimately had surgery. Patients with a bipolar spectrum disorder who were approved for surgery were less likely to have had a previous psychiatric hospitalizations than those who were not approved for surgery. Bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder were less likely to attend follow-up care appointments 2 or more years post-surgery compared to matched patients without bipolar disorder. Among patients with available data, those with a bipolar spectrum disorder and matched patients had similar weight loss at 12 months (n=21 for bipolar, n=24 for matched controls) and at 2 or more years (mean=51 months; n=11 for bipolar, n=20 for matched controls). Conclusions Patients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder have a high rate of delay/denial for bariatric surgery based on the psychosocial evaluation and are less likely to attend medical follow-up care 2 or more years post-surgery. Carefully screened patients with bipolar disorder who engage in long

  2. [Follow-up after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsø, Dag; Aasheim, Erlend T; Søvik, Torgeir T; Jakobsen, Gunn Signe; Johnson, Line Kristin; Sandbu, Rune; Aas, Alf Tore; Kristinsson, Jon; Hjelmesæth, Jøran

    2011-10-04

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures in Norway is increasing. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery may experience surgical, medical and nutritional complications. Follow-up of these patients is therefore important. The article is based on non-systematic literature searches in PubMed and on the clinical experience of the authors. Bariatric surgery induces significant and sustained weight loss and improves obesity-related disorders. Gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in Norway. This procedure is associated with a 30-day mortality of below 0.5 %, while severe complications occur in approximately 5 % of patients. Late complications include internal herniation, intestinal ulcers and gallbladder disease. After surgery all patients are given iron, vitamin D/calcium and vitamin B12 supplements to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Gastrointestinal symptoms and postprandial hypoglycaemia after surgery can be improved by dietary modifications, and the need for anti-diabetic and blood pressure lowering medications is reduced. Dose adjustment of other medications may also be necessary. Pregnancy is not recommended during the first year after bariatric surgery. Many patients need plastic surgery after the operation. Complications after bariatric surgery may manifest in the long term. Regular follow-up is required. General practitioners should be responsible for follow-up in the long term, and should be familiar with common and serious complications as well as normal symptomatology after bariatric surgery.

  3. Patients' experiences after bariatric surgery: a qualitative study at 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Susana Sofia Pereira; Maia, Ângela da Costa

    2013-12-01

    This study used a qualitative approach to understand patients' experiences in post-surgery adaptation related to bariatric surgery, 12 months after this procedure. The study population included 30 obese adults, with a mean age of 40.17 years, who were interviewed 12 months after bariatric surgery. Individual interviews, using open-ended questions, were audiotaped, transcribed and coded according to the grounded theory methodology. The data showed that the subjects described themselves as belonging to one of two opposite and separate groups: success or failure. In both groups, two core categories emerged from the data: outcomes and treatment. Previous expectations were reached by the patients who described themselves as successful, with some remaining concerns related to future weight maintenance and aesthetics issues. The failure group emphasized their unmet expectations and the expectancy that surgery would change their lives remained. Treatment in the successful cases integrated lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery, highlighting the personal commitment required to achieve the objectives. The failure group emphasized bariatric surgery without personal commitment, and healthy eating behaviour was understood as a sacrifice. The post-surgical adaptation experiences were diverse: the cases that were described as a success highlighted lifestyle changes, personal efforts and commitment with the global treatment process. External understanding and the desire for a miracle surgery characterized the cases described as a failure. According to these results, it is necessary to promote adequate information about the whole process and skills required to ensure commitment in all treatment dimensions. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  4. Anesthetic management of patients undergoing bariatric surgery: two year experience in a single institution in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Bastian; Steurer, Marc P; Müller, Markus K; Dullenkopf, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In the field of anesthesia for bariatric surgery, a wide variety of recommendations exist, but a general consensus on the perioperative management of such patients is missing. We outline the perioperative experiences that we gained in the first two years after introducing a bariatric program. The perioperative approach was established together with all relevant disciplines. Pertinent topics for the anesthesiologists were; successful airway management, indications for more invasive monitoring, and the planning of the postoperative period and deposition. This retrospective analysis was approved by the local ethics committee. Data are mean [SD]. 182 bariatric surgical procedures were performed (147 gastric bypass procedures (GBP; 146 (99.3%) performed laparascopically). GBP patients were 43 [10] years old, 78% female, BMI 45 [7] kg/m(2), 73% ASA physical status of 2. 42 patients (28.6%) presented with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. 117 GBP (79.6%) patients were intubated conventionally by direct laryngoscopy (one converted to fiber-optic intubation, one aspiration of gastric contents). 32 patients (21.8%) required an arterial line, 10 patients (6.8%) a central venous line. Induction lasted 25 [16] min, the procedure itself 138 [42] min. No blood products were required. Two patients (1.4%) presented with hypothermia (bariatric patients demand a tailored approach from both the anesthesiologist and the perioperative team. The interaction of a multi-disciplinary team is key to achieving good outcomes and a low rate of complications. DRKS00005437 (date of registration 16(th) December 2013).

  5. Patient experiences of adjusting to life in the first 2 years after bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Y; Hayes, C; Small, P K; Mahawar, K; Ling, J

    2017-10-01

    There is currently little research into the experiences of those who have undergone bariatric surgery, or how surgery affects their lives and social interactions. Adopting a constructivist grounded theory methodological approach with a constant comparative analytical framework, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 18 participants (11 female, 7 male) who had undergone permanent bariatric surgical procedures 5-24 months prior to interview. Findings revealed that participants regarded social encounters after bariatric surgery as underpinned by risk. Their attitudes towards social situations guided their social interaction with others. Three profiles of attitudes towards risk were constructed: Risk Accepters, Risk Contenders and Risk Challengers. Profiles were based on participant-reported narratives of their experiences in the first two years after surgery. The social complexities which occurred as a consequence of bariatric surgery required adjustments to patients' lives. Participants reported that social aspects of bariatric surgery did not appear to be widely understood by those who have not undergone bariatric surgery. The three risk attitude profiles that emerged from our data offer an understanding of how patients adjust to life after surgery and can be used reflexively by healthcare professionals to support both patients pre- and post-operatively. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  6. Nutritional Status of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Aliaa; Anderson, Alfred Kojo; Alsabah, Salman; Al-Mutawa, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting populations globally. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, and has increased dramatically. Bariatric surgery candidates frequently have pre-existing nutritional deficiencies that might exacerbate post-surgery. To provide better health care management pre- and post-bariatric surgery, it is imperative to establish the nutritional status of prospective patients before surgery. The aim of this study was to assess and provide baseline data on the nutritional status of bariatric candidates. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2008 to 2015. The medical records of 1538 patients were reviewed for this study. Pre-operatively, the most commonly observed vitamin deficiencies were Vitamin D (76%) and Vitamin B12 (16%). Anemia and iron status parameters were low in a considerable number of patients before surgery, as follows: hemoglobin 20%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 48%, ferritin 28%, serum iron 51%, and transferrin saturation 60%. Albumin and transferrin were found to be low in 10% and 9% of the patients, respectively, prior to surgery. In addition to deficiencies, a great number of patients had hypervitaminosis pre-operatively. Excess levels of Vitamin B6 (24%) was the most remarkable. The findings in this study advocate a close monitoring and tailored supplementation pre- and post-bariatric surgery. PMID:29324643

  7. Nutritional Status of Bariatric Surgery Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Aliaa; Anderson, Alfred Kojo; Alsabah, Salman; Al-Mutawa, Mohammad

    2018-01-11

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting populations globally. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, and has increased dramatically. Bariatric surgery candidates frequently have pre-existing nutritional deficiencies that might exacerbate post-surgery. To provide better health care management pre- and post-bariatric surgery, it is imperative to establish the nutritional status of prospective patients before surgery. The aim of this study was to assess and provide baseline data on the nutritional status of bariatric candidates. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2008 to 2015. The medical records of 1538 patients were reviewed for this study. Pre-operatively, the most commonly observed vitamin deficiencies were Vitamin D (76%) and Vitamin B 12 (16%). Anemia and iron status parameters were low in a considerable number of patients before surgery, as follows: hemoglobin 20%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 48%, ferritin 28%, serum iron 51%, and transferrin saturation 60%. Albumin and transferrin were found to be low in 10% and 9% of the patients, respectively, prior to surgery. In addition to deficiencies, a great number of patients had hypervitaminosis pre-operatively. Excess levels of Vitamin B₆ (24%) was the most remarkable. The findings in this study advocate a close monitoring and tailored supplementation pre- and post-bariatric surgery.

  8. Nutritional Status of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa Al-Mutawa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a global epidemic affecting populations globally. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, and has increased dramatically. Bariatric surgery candidates frequently have pre-existing nutritional deficiencies that might exacerbate post-surgery. To provide better health care management pre- and post-bariatric surgery, it is imperative to establish the nutritional status of prospective patients before surgery. The aim of this study was to assess and provide baseline data on the nutritional status of bariatric candidates. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2008 to 2015. The medical records of 1538 patients were reviewed for this study. Pre-operatively, the most commonly observed vitamin deficiencies were Vitamin D (76% and Vitamin B12 (16%. Anemia and iron status parameters were low in a considerable number of patients before surgery, as follows: hemoglobin 20%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV 48%, ferritin 28%, serum iron 51%, and transferrin saturation 60%. Albumin and transferrin were found to be low in 10% and 9% of the patients, respectively, prior to surgery. In addition to deficiencies, a great number of patients had hypervitaminosis pre-operatively. Excess levels of Vitamin B6 (24% was the most remarkable. The findings in this study advocate a close monitoring and tailored supplementation pre- and post-bariatric surgery.

  9. The Relationship Between Length of Stay and Readmissions in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lois, Alex W.; Frelich, Matthew J.; Sahr, Natasha A.; Hohmann, Samuel F.; Wang, Tao; Gould, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmissions are a quality indicator in bariatric surgery. In recent years, length of stay following bariatric surgery has trended down significantly. We hypothesized that a shorter postoperative hospitalization does not increase the likelihood of readmission. Methods The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of academic medical centers and affiliated hospitals. The UHC’s clinical database contains information on inpatient stay and returns (readmissions) up to 30 days post-discharge. A multicenter analysis of outcomes was performed using data from the January 2009 to December 2013 for patients 18 years and older. Patients were identified by bariatric procedure ICD-9 codes and restricted by diagnosis codes for morbid obesity. Results A total of 95,294 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 45.4 (±0.11) years and 73,941 (77.6%) subjects were female. There were 5,423 (5.7%) readmissions within the study period. Patients with hospitalizations of 3 days and more than 3 days were twice and four times as likely to be readmitted than those with hospitalizations of one day, respectively (pbariatric surgery. Early discharge does not appear to be associated with increased readmission rates. PMID:26032831

  10. Impact of Spanish-language information sessions on Spanish-speaking patients seeking bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Allison N; Marino, Miguel; Killerby, Marie; Rosselli-Risal, Liliana; Isom, Kellene A; Robinson, Malcolm K

    2017-06-01

    Bariatric centers frequently provide preoperative educational programs to inform patients about the risks and benefits of weight loss surgery. However, most programs are conducted in English, which may create barriers to effective treatment and access to care for non-English speaking populations. To address this concern, we instituted a comprehensive Spanish-language education program consisting of preoperative information and group nutrition classes conducted entirely in, and supported with Spanish-language materials. The primary aim was to examine the effect of this intervention on Spanish-speaking patients' decision to undergo surgery in a pilot study. University Hospital/Community Health Center, United States. Three cohorts of patients seeking bariatric surgery between January 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012 were identified: 1) primary English speakers attending English-language programs ("English-English"); 2) primary Spanish speakers attending Spanish-language programs ("Spanish-Spanish"); and 3) primary Spanish speakers attending English-speaking programs with the assistance of a Spanish-to-English translator ("Spanish-English"). 26% of the English-English cohort ultimately underwent surgery compared with only 12% of the Spanish-Spanish cohort (P = .009). Compared with the English-English group, time to surgery was 35 days longer for the Spanish-Spanish and 185 days longer for the Spanish-English group (both P< .001). Spanish-speaking patients were less likely to undergo bariatric surgery regardless of the language in which educational sessions are provided. For those choosing surgery, providing Spanish-language sessions can shorten time to surgery. A barrier to effective obesity treatment may exist for Spanish speakers, which may be only partially overcome by providing support in Spanish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Interventions to improve long-term weight loss in patients following bariatric surgery: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrice M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Melanie McGrice, Kathlene Don Paul Nutrition Plus Enterprises, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Bariatric surgery aims to provide long-term weight loss and improvement in weight-related comorbidities. Unfortunately, some patients do not achieve predicted weight loss targets and many regain a portion of their lost weight within 2–10 years postsurgery. A review of the literature found that behavioral, dietary, psychological, physical, and medical considerations can all play a role in suboptimal long-term weight loss. Recommendations to optimize long-term weight loss include ensuring that the patient understands how the procedure works, preoperative and postoperative education sessions, tailored nutritional supplements, restraint with liquid kilojoules, pureed foods, grazing and eating out of the home, an average of 60 minutes of physical activity per day, and lifelong annual medical, psychological, and dietary assessments.Keywords: weight, bariatric, surgery

  12. Online and smartphone based cognitive behavioral therapy for bariatric surgery patients: Initial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M; Cassin, Stephanie E; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The respective rates of obesity in Canada and the United states are estimated to be 24.1% and 34.1%. Due to the increased incidence of obesity, Bariatric surgery has been recognized as one of the treatment options. Despite the success of Bariatric surgery, studies have proposed that it has neglected the contributions of other factors, such as psychological factors in the causation as well as the maintenance of obesity amongst individuals. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is largely a psychosocial intervention that has been shown to be efficacious, as studies have demonstrated that even brief CBT interventions could help in the reduction of binge eating and maintenance of weight loss. Previously identified problems with regards to the integration and the provision of such interventions include that of geographical barriers. In order to overcome the geographical barriers, telephone-based CBT has been conceptualized. Over the past decade, there has been massive advancement and development in Internet, Web-based and smartphone technologies, but there is still a paucity of applications in this area. Our current research objective is to determine if bariatric surgery patients will be receptive towards an online and smartphone based CBT intervention. The Bariatric Surgery Online CBT portal and Smartphone companion application was developed between July 2013 and December 2013. A low-cost methodology of developing the online portal was adopted. In terms of development, 4 core development phases were adopted. These included that of: a) Formulation of users' requirements, b) System design and development, c) System evaluation and d) System deployment and pilot application. The bariatric surgery workgroup from the Toronto Western Hospital helped with the recruitment of the subjects from the outpatient specialist service. Links to the web-portal was provided to each of the participants recruited. Since the inception of the online portal to date, in terms of usage rates, there

  13. ANALYSIS OF FOOD TOLERANCE IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY USING THE QUESTIONNAIRE QUALITY OF ALIMENTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Matheo Augusto Morandi; Rodrigues, Marcos Ricardo da Silva; Kluthcovsky, Ana Claudia Garabeli Cavalli; Travalini, Fabiana; Milléo, Fábio Quirillo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increased prevalence of obesity in many countries, the number of bariatric surgeries is increasing. They are considered the most effective treatment for obesity. In the postoperative there may be difficulties with the quality of alimentation, tolerance to various types of food, as well as vomiting and regurgitation. Few surveys are available to assess these difficulties in the postoperative. To perform a systematic literature review about food tolerance in patients undergoing bariatric surgery using the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation", and compare the results between different techniques. A descriptive-exploratory study where the portals Medline and Scielo were used. The following headings were used in english, spanish and portuguese: quality of alimentation, bariatric surgery and food tolerance. A total of 88 references were found, 14 used the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation" and were selected. In total, 2745 patients were interviewed of which 371 underwent to gastric banding, 1006 to sleeve gastrectomy, 1113 to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 14 to biliopancreatic diversion associated with duodenal switch, 83 were non-operated obese, and 158 non-obese patients. The questionnaire showed good acceptability. The biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared to other techniques, but it was evaluated in a single article with a small sample. The longer the time after the operation, the better is the food tolerance. Comparing the sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there are still controversial results in the literature. The gastric banding had the worst score of food tolerance among all the techniques evaluated. The questionnaire is easy and fast to assess the food tolerance in patients after bariatric surgery. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared to sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric

  14. Which facets of mindfulness are related to problematic eating among patients seeking bariatric surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Michael E.; Dalrymple, Kristy; Himes, Susan; Zimmerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There has been growing research indicating the potential positive benefits of mindfulness-based interventions for obesity, but few studies have examined the relationship of mindfulness processes to obesity-related behaviors, particularly among clinical populations such as bariatric surgery candidates. The current study examined the relationship of specific mindfulness facets to a variety of problematic eating behaviors assessed through diagnostic interviews in a clinical sample of 820 patient...

  15. Successful laparoscopic bariatric surgery in peritoneal dialysis patients without interruption of their CKD6 treatment modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Gabriel A; Kissane, Barbara E; de la Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    During the past several decades, the conventional management of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery required a transition to hemodialysis on a temporary basis. In recent years, that protocol has been challenged by various authors who successfully repaired hernias in such subjects without interruption of their PD modality. However, that new approach was reserved for abdominal wall procedures and was not used for intra-abdominal surgery. The rapid evolution of laparoscopic surgery and the development and refinement of minimally invasive surgical techniques have revolutionized the field of surgery by providing superior outcomes for an ever-increasing list of indications including morbid obesity. The present study, the first of its kind involving elective intra-abdominal surgery, sought to determine the safety of uninterrupted PD therapy in morbidly obese patients with stage 6 chronic kidney disease undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery as a precursor to transplantation.

  16. Bariatric Surgery Patients' Perceptions of Weight-Related Stigma in Healthcare Settings Impair Post-surgery Dietary Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raves, Danielle M.; Brewis, Alexandra; Trainer, Sarah; Han, Seung-Yong; Wutich, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Weight-related stigma is reported frequently by higher body-weight patients in healthcare settings. Bariatric surgery triggers profound weight loss. This weight loss may therefore alleviate patients' experiences of weight-related stigma within healthcare settings. In non-clinical settings, weight-related stigma is associated with weight-inducing eating patterns. Dietary adherence is a major challenge after bariatric surgery. Objectives: (1) Evaluate the relationship between weight-related stigma and post-surgical dietary adherence; (2) understand if weight loss reduces weight-related stigma, thereby improving post-surgical dietary adherence; and (3) explore provider and patient perspectives on adherence and stigma in healthcare settings. Design: This mixed methods study contrasts survey responses from 300 postoperative bariatric patients with ethnographic data based on interviews with 35 patients and extensive multi-year participant-observation within a clinic setting. The survey measured experiences of weight-related stigma, including from healthcare professionals, on the Interpersonal Sources of Weight Stigma scale and internalized stigma based on the Weight Bias Internalization Scale. Dietary adherence measures included patient self-reports, non-disordered eating patterns reported on the Disordered Eating after Bariatric Surgery scale, and food frequencies. Regression was used to assess the relationships among post-surgical stigma, dietary adherence, and weight loss. Qualitative analyses consisted of thematic analysis. Results: The quantitative data show that internalized stigma and general experiences of weight-related stigma predict worse dietary adherence, even after weight is lost. The qualitative data show patients did not generally recognize this connection, and health professionals explained it as poor patient compliance. Conclusion: Reducing perceptions of weight-related stigma in healthcare settings and weight bias internalization could

  17. The potential for cross-addiction in post-bariatric surgery patients: Considerations for primary care nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Melissa; Seibold-Simpson, Susan M; Darling, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Possible mental health issues for post-bariatric surgery patients include the development of cross-addictions after the rapid weight loss period. No validated screening tool to assess for possible cross-addictions exists. The main purpose of this study was to develop recommendations for modifying an existing addiction screening tool (the Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire) for use by primary care providers. A qualitative descriptive design was used with triangulation of input from the scholarly literature, content experts (CEs), and post-bariatric surgery patients. Three focus groups were conducted with post-bariatric surgery patients (n = 12) with the same questions asked of the CEs (n = 3). Content analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. The following themes regarding addictions after bariatric surgery were identified through consensus: alcohol, gambling, shopping, exercise, food starving/bingeing, and sexuality/relationships. Dissonant themes included caffeine and tobacco by the post-bariatric surgery patients and prescription/illicit medications by the CEs. Targeted screening for early identification of problem behaviors by primary care providers may result in appropriate referral to and management by mental health providers, assisting ongoing success of bariatric surgery. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Financial costs and patients' perceptions of medical tourism in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David H; Sheppard, Caroline E; de Gara, Christopher J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Birch, Daniel W

    2016-02-01

    Many Canadians pursue surgical treatment for severe obesity outside of their province or country - so-called "medical tourism." We have managed many complications related to this evolving phenomenon. The costs associated with this care seem substantial but have not been previously quantified. We surveyed Alberta general surgeons and postoperative medical tourists to estimate costs of treating complications related to medical tourism in bariatric surgery and to understand patients' motivations for pursuing medical tourism. Our analysis suggests more than $560 000 was spent treating 59 bariatric medical tourists by 25 surgeons between 2012 and 2013. Responses from medical tourists suggest that they believe their surgeries were successful despite some having postoperative complications and lacking support from medical or surgical teams. We believe that the financial cost of treating complications related to medical tourism in Alberta is substantial and impacts existing limited resources.

  19. Resistance to levothyroxine in a bariatric surgery patient: an indication for liquid formulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Christophe; Delgrange, Etienne

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old female patient with hypothyroidism who underwent bariatric surgery and developed severe hypothyroidism despite high doses of oral levothyroxine (L-T4) tablets. Initially, a high-dose L-T4 tablets absorption test was performed to exclude pseudo-malabsorption. In view of a modest increase in serum T4 levels, L-T4 liquid formulation absorption test was performed, and showed faster and more efficient absorption of thyroid hormones. We discuss the issue of distinguishing malabsorption from pseudo-malabsorption, review the literature concerning the benefits of liquid L-T4 in cases of impaired absorption such as bariatric surgery and consider the socio-economic implications of different liquid formulations.

  20. Which facets of mindfulness are related to problematic eating among patients seeking bariatric surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E; Dalrymple, Kristy; Himes, Susan; Zimmerman, Mark

    2014-04-01

    There has been growing research indicating the potential positive benefits of mindfulness-based interventions for obesity, but few studies have examined the relationship of mindfulness processes to obesity-related behaviors, particularly among clinical populations such as bariatric surgery candidates. The current study examined the relationship of specific mindfulness facets to a variety of problematic eating behaviors assessed through diagnostic interviews in a clinical sample of 820 patients seeking bariatric surgery. Results indicated that greater mindfulness on specific facets, particularly acting with awareness, was related to less binge and emotional eating. Greater mindfulness was also related, though less consistently, to less habitual overeating and grazing. The observing facet was generally unrelated to problematic eating, but in a few cases being more observant related to having greater eating problems. The results of the study and future directions are discussed in relation to research on problematic eating in obesity and mindfulness-based interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Clinical features and weight loss in patients with morbid obesity after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, J A; Vaz, F J; López-Ibor, J J; Rubio, M A

    2001-01-01

    To analyze the psychological status of morbidly obese patients suffering changes after surgical procedure for weight reduction. We analyze the weight loss in 100 morbidly obese patients (85 female, 15 male) after bariatric surgery (vertical banded gastroplasty). We correlated the percentage of weight loss with the age of these patients, initial weight (body mass index at surgery), quality of life, eating behaviour, psychopathology, personality, and marital status. We have found relation between initial weight and weight loss (heavier patients lose more weight). The percentage of weight loss is associated with the Eating Behaviour (Body Dissatisfaction, Disinhibition), the Quality of Life (Positive Affect), the Psychopathology (Hostility), the Personality Traits (Narcissist), and the Marital Status (Idealistic Distortion). The weight loss in morbidly obese patients after surgery is major in the more obese one. The satisfactory weight loss after surgery improve the eating behaviour, quality of life, psychological and marital status.

  2. Corneal ulceration in a LASIK patient due to vitamin a deficiency after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Kendall E; Fishler, Jane

    2012-12-01

    To review the case of a 41-year-old woman who underwent bariatric surgery in 2000. She subsequently underwent laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery in 2008 and complained of dry eye since the LASIK surgery. In November 2010, she was diagnosed with a corneal melt and was treated with aggressive lubrication, followed by eventual amniotic membrane placement and a tarsorrhaphy. She then presented for consultation at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute when she developed a corneal infiltrate. She was diagnosed with fungal keratitis with corneal xerosis. At that time, vitamin A levels were measured and were less than 2 μ/dL. The patient admitted noncompliance with nutritional supplements. Case report. The patient was treated with aggressive lubrication and natamycin. Vitamin supplements were restarted, and the patient experienced dramatic improvement in symptoms with resolution of the infection. A central corneal scar with corneal thinning remains. The patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty for visual rehabilitation. Patient education with emphasis on compliance with nutritional supplements is essential after bariatric surgery. Consider vitamin A deficiency in the differential diagnosis of dry eye after LASIK surgery.

  3. Presence of Serum Ferritin before and after Bariatric Surgery: Analysis in Dentate and Edentulous Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Aparecido Foratori

    Full Text Available Society has changed its own lifestyle, specially its eating habits and physical activities, leading to excessive weight and a sedentary behavior, which has contributed to obesity increase. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to obesity, allowing weight loss and its maintenance. However, it has been related high levels of iron deficiency after surgery. A person's nutritional status might be affected by total or partial tooth loss. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study was to evaluate the levels of serum ferritin before and after bariatric surgery and to identify if there is a relation with tooth loss. The sample was composed of 50 patients selected and assisted at Amaral Carvalho Hospital, located in Jaú city, Brazil. The use and necessity of prosthesis, dental absence or presence, and serum ferritin dosage were evaluated. Student's t test, Univariate analysis, Chi-square and Odds Ratio were adopted (p<0.05. There was no significant difference regarding the serum ferritin levels between dentate and edentulous patients prior to surgery (p = 0.436. After surgery, the serum ferritin levels were higher in edentulous patients (prosthesis users when compared to the pre-surgical levels, and the post-surgical levels presented significant difference regarding the dentate patients (p = 0.024. It can be concluded that rehabilitated patients in postoperative period showed better levels of serum ferritin after surgical intervention.

  4. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina F. Nicoletti; Cristiana Cortes-Oliveira; Marcela A. S. Pinhel; Carla B. Nonino

    2017-01-01

    This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient’s genetic and epigenetic variables on the response t...

  5. Bariatric surgery: to whom and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaiges, D; Goday, A; Pedro-Botet, J; Más, A; Chillarón, J J; Flores-Le Roux, J A

    2015-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity. Its effects go beyond weight loss, in a high percentage of cases achieving remission of comorbidities associated with obesity and reducing mortality. However, not all patients achieve satisfactory weight loss or resolution of comorbidities and perioperative complications are a constant risk. Correct preoperative evaluation is essential to predict the likelihood of success and choose the most appropriate surgical technique for this purpose. The aim of this review was to ascertain which obese subjects will benefit from bariatric surgery taking into account body mass index, age, comorbidities, risk of complications and the impact of different bariatric surgery techniques.

  6. Nutritional assessment of bariatric surgery patients presenting for plastic surgery: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghshineh, Nima; O'Brien Coon, Devin; McTigue, Kathleen; Courcoulas, Anita P; Fernstrom, Madelyn; Rubin, J Peter

    2010-08-01

    Assessment of nutritional status in the growing postbariatric patient population remains controversial. Previous literature suggests that these patients have poor nutrition that may have adverse effects on surgical outcomes. The authors sought to determine the optimal method of nutritional assessment in postbariatric patients. One hundred patients presenting for body contouring after bariatric surgery were consecutively enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. A trained nutritionist assessed protein and calorie intake. All patients underwent baseline laboratory assessment. Eighteen percent of subjects had less than the recommended daily protein intake. Hypoalbuminemia was observed in 13.8 percent of subjects, with hypoprealbuminemia in 6.5 percent. Nearly forty percent of all patients had evidence of iron deficiency, with vitamin B12 deficiency present in 14.5 percent. Ten percent of subjects (all women) were confirmed to have iron deficiency anemia. Impaired fasting glucose was seen in 6.2 percent of subjects, whereas 3.6 percent had hemoglobin A1c levels greater than 6.5. Increasing age (odds ratio, 1.07) and greater change in body mass index (odds ratio, 1.11) were predictors of low protein intake. Dumping syndrome led to 13.3 times increased odds of low albumin levels. The results suggest that inadequate nutrition is common among postbariatric patients presenting for body contouring. The lack of correlation between methods of nutritional assessment supports the combination of multiple methods in determining overall nutritional status. The presence of dumping syndrome, a large change in body mass index, and advanced age may help to identify patients with an increased risk of nutritional deficiency.

  7. [Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Depression and Eating Disorders in Patients Submitted to Bariatric Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Isabel; Marques Pinho, Ana; Arrojado, Filipa; Pinto-Bastos, Ana; Maia da Costa, José; Coelho, Rui; Calhau, Conceição; Conceição, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with a great number of complications, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and psychiatric pathology. Bariatric surgery is the best solution to weight loss and improvement of complications in morbid obese patients. This study aims to analyze the evolution of type 2 diabetes mellitus and psychopathologic variables before and after bariatric surgery and assess the importance of different variables in weight loss. This is a longitudinal study, which evaluates 75 patients before and after bariatric surgery (47 - LAGB - laparoscopic adjustable gastric band; 19 - RYGB - Roux-en-Y gastric bypass; 9 - sleeve) with a follow-up time between 18 and 46 months. A clinical interview and self report questionnaires were applied - Eating Disorder Examination questionnaire - EDE-Q and Beck Depression Inventory - BDI. Results show an improvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus after surgery (X2 (1) = 26.132, p diabetes mellitus, depression and eating disorders in post-operative period are associated with less weight loss. This model explains 27% of weight variance after surgery (R2 = 0.265) and it is significant F (3.33) = 2.981, p = 0.038. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, psychiatric pathology and eating disorders after surgery influenced weight loss. It was not clear in what way this relation was verified, neither the relation that these metabolic and psychological variables may have during the postoperative period. Type 2 diabetes mellitus improved after surgery. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, depression and eating disorders influenced weight loss in the postoperative period. These variables did not influence weight loss in the preoperative period.

  8. Predicting postoperative complications after bariatric surgery: the Bariatric Surgery Index for Complications, BASIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coblijn, U.K. (Usha K.); J. Karres (Julian); de Raaff, C.A.L. (Christel A. L.); S.M.M. de Castro (Steve); S.M. Lagarde (Sjoerd); W.F. van Tets (Willem); H.J. Bonjer (H. Jaap); B.A. van Wagensveld (Bart)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Around 20% of bariatric surgery patients develop a short- or long-term complication. Objective: Aim of this study was to develop a risk model predicting complications: the Bariatric Surgery Index for Complications (BASIC). Setting: The Obesity Center Amsterdam, located in a

  9. Social phobia and quality of life in morbidly obese patients before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirijello, Antonio; D'Angelo, Cristina; Iaconelli, Amerigo; Capristo, Esmeralda; Ferrulli, Anna; Leccesi, Laura; Cossari, Anthony; Landolfi, Raffaele; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Morbidly obesity is characterized by physical and psychological comorbidities which are associated with reduced quality of life. Bariatric surgery has been linked to a reduction of psychopathology other than to a reduction of weight and improvement in physical functioning. Aim of the present study was to compare psychological features of two groups of morbidly obese patients, before and after bariatric surgery, assessing social phobia and quality of life. A total of 46 morbidly obese patients were enrolled in the study. Of them, 20 were waiting for bilio-pancreatic diversion (group A), while 26 had already undergone surgical procedure (group B). Psychometric evaluation assessed social phobia, fear for the body-shape and quality of life, using appropriate psychometric tests. The percentage of patients showing social phobia was significantly higher compared to a sample of healthy controls (p=0.004), both in group A (p=0.003) and in group B (p=0.029). No differences in percentage of patients affected by social phobia were found between groups. A significantly higher percentage of patients affected by distress about the body (pphobia in a population of morbidly obese patients, both before and after surgery. A general reduction of quality of life was also observed, with a partial improvement after surgery. Future studies are needed to clarify the relationship between social phobia and quality of life in surgically-treated morbidly obese patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Place of upper endoscopy before and after bariatric surgery: A multicenter experience with 3219 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ellatif, Mohamed E; Alfalah, Haitham; Asker, Walid A; El Nakeeb, Ayman E; Magdy, Alaa; Thabet, Waleed; Ghaith, Mohamed A; Abdallah, Emad; Shahin, Rania; Shoma, Asharf; Dawoud, Ibraheim E; Abbas, Ashraf; Salama, Asaad F; Ali Gamal, Maged

    2016-05-25

    To study the preoperative and postoperative role of upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in morbidly obese patients. This is a multicenter retrospective study by reviewing the database of patients who underwent bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass, or laparoscopic minigastric bypass) in the period between 2001 June and 2015 August (Jahra Hospital-Kuwait, Hafr Elbatin Hospital and King Saud Medical City-KSA, and Mansoura University Hospital - Egypt). Patients with age 18-65 years, body mass index (BMI) > 40, or > 35 with comorbidities after failure of many dietetic regimen and acceptable levels of surgical risk were included in the study after having an informed signed consent. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of all morbidly obese patients. The patients' preoperative data included clinical history including upper digestive symptoms and preoperative full workup including EGD. Only patients whose charts revealed weather they were symptomatic or not were studied. We categorized patients accordingly into two groups; with (group A) or without (group B) upper digestive symptoms. The endoscopic findings were categorized into 4 groups based on predetermined criteria. The medical record of patients who developed stricture, leak or bleeding after bariatric surgery was reviewed. Logestic regression analysis was used to identify preoperative predictors that might be associated with abnormal endoscopic findings. Three thousand, two hundred and nineteen patients in the study period underwent bariatric surgery (75% LSG, 10% LRYDB, and 15% MGB). Mean BMI was 43 ± 13, mean age 37 ± 9 years, 79% were female. Twenty eight percent had presented with upper digestive symptoms (group A). EGD was considered normal in 2414 (75%) patients (9% group A vs 66% group B, P = 0.001). The abnormal endoscopic findings were found high in those patients with upper digestive symptoms. Abnormal findings (one or more) were found in

  11. 40 years of advances in Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniceto Baltasar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bariatric surgical practice changes in the community setting may be under-reported. We present the developments in a Spanish bariatric surgical practice in the community setting of Alcoy from 1977 through the present. Methods: Bariatric surgical techniques employed in a country community setting over the course of nearly four decades were reviewed retrospectively and qualitatively. Results: Surgeons and medical professionals from Alcoy, Spain were involved in the evolution of bariatric surgery patient management and surgical technique from 1977s through 2017. During the last 40 years, 1,495 patients were treated in our clinics. Spanish bariatric surgeons contributed to advances in gastric bypass (GBP in the 1970s, vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG in the 1980s, bilio-pancreatic diversion/duodenal switch (BPD/DS in the 1990s, and innovations associated with laparoscopy from the 1990s onward. Outcomes and approaches to prevention and treatment of bariatric surgical complications are reviewed from a community perspective. Contributions to the bariatric surgical nomenclature and weight-loss reporting are noted. Conclusions: The practice of bariatric surgery in the community hospital and private clinic must be updated continuously, as in any human and surgical endeavor. Medical professionals in community bariatric practices should contribute their experiences to the field through all avenues of scientific interaction and publication.

  12. Modification of cardiometabolic profile in obese diabetic patients after bariatric surgery: changes in cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujante, Pedro; Hellín, María D; Fornovi, Aisa; Martínez Camblor, Pablo; Ferrer, Mercedes; García-Zafra, Victoria; Hernández, Antonio M; Frutos, María D; Luján-Monpeán, Juan; Tébar, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is a valuable tool for metabolic control in obese diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine changes in weight and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in obese diabetic patients during the first 4 years after bariatric surgery. A retrospective study was performed in 104 patients (71 women; mean age, 53.0 [0.9] years; mean body mass index, 46.8 [0.7]) with type 2 diabetes mellitus (median duration, 3 years) who underwent laparoscopic proximal gastric bypass. Blood glucose levels and glycated hemoglobin concentrations decreased during the first 1-3 postoperative months. Values stabilized for the rest of the study period, allowing hypoglycemic treatment to be discontinued in 80% of the patients. No significant differences were observed as a function of the body mass index, diabetes mellitus duration, or previous antidiabetic treatment. Weight decreased during the first 15-24 months and slightly increased afterward. Levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein significantly decreased, and target values were reached after 12 months in 80% of the patients. No correlation was found between these reductions and weight loss. Similarly, high-density lipoprotein concentrations decreased until 12 months after surgery. Although concentrations showed a subsequent slight increase, target or lower high-density lipoprotein values were achieved at 24 months postintervention in 85% of the patients. Bariatric surgery is effective for the treatment of obese diabetic patients, contributing to their metabolic control and reducing their cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Place of upper endoscopy before and after bariatric surgery: A multicenter experience with 3219 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ellatif, Mohamed E; Alfalah, Haitham; Asker, Walid A; El Nakeeb, Ayman E; Magdy, Alaa; Thabet, Waleed; Ghaith, Mohamed A; Abdallah, Emad; Shahin, Rania; Shoma, Asharf; Dawoud, Ibraheim E; Abbas, Ashraf; Salama, Asaad F; Ali Gamal, Maged

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the preoperative and postoperative role of upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in morbidly obese patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter retrospective study by reviewing the database of patients who underwent bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass, or laparoscopic minigastric bypass) in the period between 2001 June and 2015 August (Jahra Hospital-Kuwait, Hafr Elbatin Hospital and King Saud Medical City-KSA, and Mansoura University Hospital - Egypt). Patients with age 18-65 years, body mass index (BMI) > 40, or > 35 with comorbidities after failure of many dietetic regimen and acceptable levels of surgical risk were included in the study after having an informed signed consent. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of all morbidly obese patients. The patients’ preoperative data included clinical history including upper digestive symptoms and preoperative full workup including EGD. Only patients whose charts revealed weather they were symptomatic or not were studied. We categorized patients accordingly into two groups; with (group A) or without (group B) upper digestive symptoms. The endoscopic findings were categorized into 4 groups based on predetermined criteria. The medical record of patients who developed stricture, leak or bleeding after bariatric surgery was reviewed. Logestic regression analysis was used to identify preoperative predictors that might be associated with abnormal endoscopic findings. RESULTS: Three thousand, two hundred and nineteen patients in the study period underwent bariatric surgery (75% LSG, 10% LRYDB, and 15% MGB). Mean BMI was 43 ± 13, mean age 37 ± 9 years, 79% were female. Twenty eight percent had presented with upper digestive symptoms (group A). EGD was considered normal in 2414 (75%) patients (9% group A vs 66% group B, P = 0.001). The abnormal endoscopic findings were found high in those patients with upper digestive symptoms. Abnormal findings (one

  14. Management of biliary symptoms after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Joel R; Grover, Brandon T; Kallies, Kara J; Kothari, Shanu N

    2015-12-01

    Biliary disease requiring intervention can be complicated in the postbariatric surgery patient. A retrospective review was completed to identify patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy from September 2001 to September 2014, and those who underwent biliary intervention were identified. A total of 1527 patients underwent bariatric surgery during the study period. Of the 1,112 patients without prior cholecystectomy, 91 (8%) had biliary symptoms requiring intervention. Ninety patients underwent cholecystectomy, with 86 successfully completed laparoscopically. Six patients required laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography along with cholecystectomy to clear gallstones from the common bile duct. Three patients who had undergone cholecystectomy before bariatric surgery developed primary common bile duct stones. Surgery for biliary disease after bariatric surgery can be completed successfully with minimal complications, and percutaneous transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has a high success rate of access to and clearance of the biliary tree. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Bariatric surgery: how and why to supplement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo, Livia Azevedo; Teixeira, Tatiana Fiche Sales; Bressan, Josefina; Mourão, Denise Machado

    2011-01-01

    Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies from limited food intake and absorption of different nutrients. A systematic review of several database websites (PubMed and ISI Web of Science) was conducted from September 1983 to April 2010 to identify literature related to micronutrient deficiencies occurring after bariatric surgery. Keywords used individually or in various combinations in the search were bariatric surgery, obesity, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, protein deficiency, nutrient absorption and nutrient supplementation. Literature suggests that to prevent or treat nutritional deficiencies resulting from anatomical changes due to surgical techniques nutritional supplementation is usually necessary. The success of oral nutritional supplementation to correct or prevent nutritional deficiencies depends on several factors. Thus, to understand how nutrients can be administered is very important for clinical practice. This review aims to provide help for the best selection of nutrients to ensure an adequate replacement of nutrients in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery.

  16. Screening for Psychiatric Disorders in Bariatric Surgery Candidates with the German Version of the Patient Health Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Palm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity has been linked to psychiatric disorders in several studies. Prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders are high in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Thus, psychiatric assessment of bariatric surgery candidates has become a standard procedure. However, socially desirable responding leads to biased results in self-reported questionnaires. Here, bariatric surgery candidates were screened with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-D additionally to the psychiatric examination. Method. 355 bariatric surgery candidates filled in the PHQ-D before the psychiatric examination as a part of the surgery assessment procedure. PHQ-D results were compared to psychiatric diagnoses and body mass index (BMI. Results. Gender ratio, mean BMI, and age were comparable to earlier studies. Depressive and somatization symptoms did not correlate to BMI. However, females showed higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders with elevated syndrome severity in depressive and somatization disorders, as well as more frequent antidepressant intake. Eating disorders and addiction disorders were rarely reported. Conclusion. The findings suggest a socially desirable responding when filling in the PHQ-D before bariatric surgery. The use of the PHQ-D in this patient sample could be augmented by psychometric tests with internal correction and validation scales. Furthermore, psychiatric examination should be separated from the surgery evaluation process.

  17. Patient experiences of outcomes of bariatric surgery: a systematic review and qualitative synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKichan, Fiona; Blazeby, Jane M.; Owen‐Smith, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Summary Although bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe and complex obesity, less is known about its psychosocial impact. This systematic review synthesizes qualitative studies investigating the patient perspective of living with the outcomes of surgery. A total of 2,604 records were screened, and 33 studies were included. Data extraction and thematic synthesis yielded three overarching themes: control, normality and ambivalence. These were evident across eight organizing sub‐themes describing areas of life impacted by surgery: weight, activities of daily living, physical health, psychological health, social relations, sexual life, body image and eating behaviour and relationship with food. Throughout all these areas, patients were striving for control and normality. Many of the changes experienced were positive and led to feeling more in control and ‘normal’. Negative changes were also experienced, as well as changes that were neither positive nor negative but were nonetheless challenging and required adaptation. Thus, participants continued to strive for control and normality in some aspects of their lives for a considerable time, contributing to a sense of ambivalence in accounts of life after surgery. These findings demonstrate the importance of long‐term support, particularly psychological and dietary, to help people negotiate these challenges and maintain positive changes achieved after bariatric surgery. PMID:28273694

  18. Patient experiences of outcomes of bariatric surgery: a systematic review and qualitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulman, Karen D; MacKichan, Fiona; Blazeby, Jane M; Owen-Smith, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    Although bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe and complex obesity, less is known about its psychosocial impact. This systematic review synthesizes qualitative studies investigating the patient perspective of living with the outcomes of surgery. A total of 2,604 records were screened, and 33 studies were included. Data extraction and thematic synthesis yielded three overarching themes: control, normality and ambivalence. These were evident across eight organizing sub-themes describing areas of life impacted by surgery: weight, activities of daily living, physical health, psychological health, social relations, sexual life, body image and eating behaviour and relationship with food. Throughout all these areas, patients were striving for control and normality. Many of the changes experienced were positive and led to feeling more in control and 'normal'. Negative changes were also experienced, as well as changes that were neither positive nor negative but were nonetheless challenging and required adaptation. Thus, participants continued to strive for control and normality in some aspects of their lives for a considerable time, contributing to a sense of ambivalence in accounts of life after surgery. These findings demonstrate the importance of long-term support, particularly psychological and dietary, to help people negotiate these challenges and maintain positive changes achieved after bariatric surgery. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  19. Presence of Serum Ferritin before and after Bariatric Surgery: Analysis in Dentate and Edentulous Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foratori, Gerson Aparecido; Andrade, Francisco Juliherme Pires de; Mosquim, Victor; Sales Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Chaim, Elinton Adami; Sales Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Society has changed its own lifestyle, specially its eating habits and physical activities, leading to excessive weight and a sedentary behavior, which has contributed to obesity increase. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to obesity, allowing weight loss and its maintenance. However, it has been related high levels of iron deficiency after surgery. A person's nutritional status might be affected by total or partial tooth loss. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study was to evaluate the levels of serum ferritin before and after bariatric surgery and to identify if there is a relation with tooth loss. The sample was composed of 50 patients selected and assisted at Amaral Carvalho Hospital, located in Jaú city, Brazil. The use and necessity of prosthesis, dental absence or presence, and serum ferritin dosage were evaluated. Student's t test, Univariate analysis, Chi-square and Odds Ratio were adopted (psurgery (p = 0.436). After surgery, the serum ferritin levels were higher in edentulous patients (prosthesis users) when compared to the pre-surgical levels, and the post-surgical levels presented significant difference regarding the dentate patients (p = 0.024). It can be concluded that rehabilitated patients in postoperative period showed better levels of serum ferritin after surgical intervention.

  20. Presence of Serum Ferritin before and after Bariatric Surgery: Analysis in Dentate and Edentulous Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquim, Victor; Sales Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Chaim, Elinton Adami

    2016-01-01

    Society has changed its own lifestyle, specially its eating habits and physical activities, leading to excessive weight and a sedentary behavior, which has contributed to obesity increase. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to obesity, allowing weight loss and its maintenance. However, it has been related high levels of iron deficiency after surgery. A person’s nutritional status might be affected by total or partial tooth loss. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study was to evaluate the levels of serum ferritin before and after bariatric surgery and to identify if there is a relation with tooth loss. The sample was composed of 50 patients selected and assisted at Amaral Carvalho Hospital, located in Jaú city, Brazil. The use and necessity of prosthesis, dental absence or presence, and serum ferritin dosage were evaluated. Student’s t test, Univariate analysis, Chi-square and Odds Ratio were adopted (psurgery (p = 0.436). After surgery, the serum ferritin levels were higher in edentulous patients (prosthesis users) when compared to the pre-surgical levels, and the post-surgical levels presented significant difference regarding the dentate patients (p = 0.024). It can be concluded that rehabilitated patients in postoperative period showed better levels of serum ferritin after surgical intervention. PMID:27695053

  1. Ethical and legal aspects of bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isac Jorge Filho

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The development fo bariatric surgery made it necessary to define theethical an legal basis of the specialty. The bioethical principles mustbe followed: benefit the patient; do not cause prohibitive colatheraleffects; be avaible to anyone withot discrimination; the pacient haveto have the possibility to choose it´s treatment. The Ministery ofHealth and the Federal Medical Counsil have regulates the indicationsfor the surgical treatment, the techniques that are availble andnecessary of a multidisciplinary team for Bariatric Surgery Centre.

  2. Data Investigation of Bariatric Surgery Outcome and Economic Savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    estimates of the management of obesity and its complications in patients eligible for bariatric surgery , and the impact of the potential use of different...than 5 days for bariatric admission; (3) no complications is defined as survived beyond 30 days from bariatric surgery , no PLOS, and no hospital...

  3. Analysis of patient attrition in a publicly funded bariatric surgery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Adam; Milner, Joseph; Cleghorn, Michelle; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Okrainec, Allan; Jackson, Timothy D; Quereshy, Fayez A

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic, and several surgical programs have been created to combat this public health issue. Although demand for bariatric surgery has grown, so too has the attrition rate. In this study we identify patient characteristics and operational interventions that have contributed to high attrition in a multistage, multidisciplinary bariatric surgery program. A retrospective study was conducted of 1,682 patients referred for bariatric surgery at the University Health Network in Toronto, Canada, from June 2008 to July 2011. Demographic information, presurgical assessment dates, and records describing operational changes were collected. Several penalized likelihood and mixed effects multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine whether patient characteristics, operational changes, and previous experience affected program completion and intermediate transitions between assessments. Although the majority of attrition appears to be the result of patient self-removal, males (odds ratio [OR] 0.511, 95% CI 0.392 to 0.663, p 40 kg/m(2) (OR 1.756, 95% CI 1.233 to 2.515, p = 0.002) and those who lived within 25 to 300 km of the center (OR > 1.633, p < 0.001) were more likely to undergo surgery. Certain subgroups in the referral population were found to be at a higher risk of noncompletion. Specialized care pathways must be implemented to address this issue. Furthermore, careful consideration must be given to operational decisions because they may negatively affect access to care, as we have shown. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rehabilitation needs after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faintuch, J; Souza, S A F; Fabris, S M; Cecconello, I; Capodaglio, P

    2013-06-01

    Bariatric surgery has grown from an obscure experimental procedure to one of the most popular operations in the world. Such accelerated progress left many gaps, notably concerning subsequent rehabilitation needs of this population. In the present study, a brief description of both the patients and the interventions is provided, along with potentially disabling features especially concerning the locomotor system, which has received comparatively little attention . Based on reported protocols and actual experience, major issues are addressed. Bariatric patients are initially managed in the hospital, however long-term and even lifetime needs may be recognized, requiring major lifestyle and physical activity changes. These have to be focused in all settings, inside and outside the healthcare institutions. Initially only adults were considered bariatric candidates, however currently also adolescents and the elderly are admitted in many centers. Bariatric weight loss is certainly successful for remission or prevention of metabolic, cardiovascular and cancer comorbidities. Yet benefits for bones, joints and muscles, along with general physical performance are still incompletely established. This should be no reason for denying continued care to such individuals, within the context of well-designed protocols, as available evidence points toward favorable rehabilitation in the realms of physical, social and workplace activities. The importance of a physiatric curriculum in medical schools has been emphasized. Even more crucial is the presence of such a specialists in obesity and bariatric teams, a requirement recognized in a few countries but not in others. The relevance of obesity as a disabling condition is reviewed, along with the positive changes induced by surgical weight loss. Although obesity alleviation is a legitimate end-point it is not a sufficient one. The shortcomings of such result from the point of view of physical normalization are outlined, and

  5. Bariatric surgery: impact on pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiner, Eyal; Willis, Kent; Yogev, Yariv

    2013-02-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity in women of reproductive age has resulted in approximately 1 in 5 women being obese when they conceive. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective long-term weight loss strategy in obese women in this age group. Clinicians should be aware of the effects of bariatric surgery on fertility and future pregnancies. Regarding certain complications, pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safer than pregnancy in the obese. In patients where nutrition is properly maintained and monitored, the risks for obesity-related obstetric complications, such as gestational diabetes mellitus and hypertension, are significantly reduced, but possibly at the expense of an increase in neonates born small-for-gestational-age. At the present, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn concerning the risk for Caesarian delivery, differences in type of bariatric procedure, or the optimal surgery-to-conception interval.

  6. Influence of psychological variables in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery after 24 months of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hurtado, José; Ferrer-Márquez, Manuel; Fontalba-Navas, Andrés; García-Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Olvera-Porcel, M Carmen

    Bariatric surgery is considered a more effective means of achieving weight loss than non-surgical options in morbid obesity. Rates of failure or relapse range from 20 to 30%. The study aims to analyse the influence of psychological variables (self-esteem, social support, coping strategies and personality) in the maintenance of weight loss after bariatric surgery. A cohort study was conducted involving 64 patients undergoing bariatric surgery for 24 months. At the end of the follow-up period, patients were divided into 2sub-cohorts classified as successes or failures. Success or favorable development was considered when the value of percent excess weight loss was 50 or higher. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2groups in any variable studied. All patients had high self-esteem (87,3 those who failed and 88,1 those who are successful) and social support (90,2 and 90,9). Patients who succeed presented higher scores for cognitive restructuring (57,1) and were more introverted (47,1), while those who failed scored more highly in desiderative thinking (65,7) and were more prone to aggression (50,7) and neuroticism (51,7). High self-esteem and social support does not guarantee successful treatment. The groups differed in how they coped with obesity but the data obtained do not justify the weight evolution. In the absence of psychopathology, personality trait variability between patients is insufficient to predict the results. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina F. Nicoletti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient’s genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  8. The relationship among food addiction, negative mood, and eating-disordered behaviors in patients seeking to have bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koball, Afton M; Clark, Matthew M; Collazo-Clavell, Maria; Kellogg, Todd; Ames, Gretchen; Ebbert, Jon; Grothe, Karen B

    2016-01-01

    Food addiction (FA) may be related to poor weight loss outcomes; however, the literature on food addiction in bariatric surgery-seeking populations is limited. The aim of the present study was to identify the prevalence of FA in a bariatric surgery-seeking population and its association with mood, problematic eating behaviors, and substance use. The relationship between prebariatric surgery food addiction screening and postsurgical outcomes was assessed. Academic medical center. Adult outpatients (n = 923) seeking bariatric surgery underwent psychological evaluation between January 2012 and May 2014. Patients were administered the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) to assess FA. Of the original sample, 195 patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Patients returned for medical follow-up at 6 (n = 169) and 12 (n = 113) months postsurgery; 26 (13%) patients at 6 months and 82 (42%) patients at 12 months were lost to follow-up or had not reached 1 year postsurgery. Fourteen percent of patients met FA criteria. Patients positive for FA were more likely to endorse greater levels of depression, anxiety, binge eating episodes, nighttime eating syndrome, and low eating self-efficacy. No relationship was observed between FA and current substance use. FA did not predict postoperative outcomes including weight loss, rehospitalization, or attendance at follow-up medical appointments. FA is related to psychological distress and eating disordered behaviors among bariatric patients. However, FA was not predictive of short-term (6-12 mo) bariatric surgery outcomes. Future research should determine how FA affects long-term postoperative outcomes and mood stability. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in morbidly obese patients is normalized one year after bariatric surgery.

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    Vijgen, Guy H E J; Bouvy, Nicole D; Hoeks, Joris; Wijers, Sander; Schrauwen, Patrick; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial metabolism. As an intrinsic characteristic of an individual, skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction could be a risk factor for weight gain and obesity-associated co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, impaired skeletal muscle metabolism could be a consequence of obesity. We hypothesize that marked weight loss after bariatric surgery recovers skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial function as assessed by high-resolution respirometry was measured in 8 morbidly obese patients (body mass index [BMI], 41.3±4.7 kg/m(2); body fat, 48.3%±5.2%) before and 1 year after bariatric surgery (mean weight loss: 35.0±8.6 kg). The results were compared with a lean (BMI 22.8±1.1 kg/m(2); body fat, 15.6%±4.7%) and obese (BMI 33.5±4.2 kg/m(2); body fat, 34.1%±6.3%) control group. Before surgery, adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated (state 3) respiration on glutamate/succinate was decreased compared with lean patients (9.5±2.4 versus 15.6±4.4 O2 flux/mtDNA; Psurgery, mitochondrial function was comparable to that of lean controls (after weight loss, 12.3±5.5; lean, 15.6±4.4 O2 flux/mtDNA). In addition, we observed an increased state 3 respiration on a lipid substrate after weight loss (10.0±3.2 versus 14.0±6.6 O2 flux/mtDNA; Pweight loss. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Using the presurgical psychological evaluation to predict 5-year weight loss outcomes in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Dulmen, Manfred H M van; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2017-03-01

    Psychosocial factors contribute to poorer weight loss outcomes following bariatric surgery; however, findings on associations between preoperative psychiatric diagnoses, psychological testing, and weight loss are inconsistent. Examine associations between presurgical psychiatric diagnoses derived from a semi-structured clinical interview and test scores from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality-Inventory-2 - Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) and 5-year Body Mass Index (BMI) outcomes. Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute METHODS: 446 consecutively consented patients who underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) at least 5 years prior were included in the study. A majority were women (74.2%) and Caucasian (66.2%). Patients' mean presurgical BMI was 49.14 kg/m 2 [SD = 9.50 kg/m 2 ]. Psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from a presurgical, semi-structured clinical interview and all participants were administered the MMPI-2-RF at their presurgical evaluations. BMIs were collected at 4 postoperative time points across a 5-year trajectory. This prospective design utilized latent growth curve modeling. Older patients evidenced a slower rate of BMI reduction over time. A presurgical diagnosis of Binge Eating Disorder predicted higher BMIs at the 5-year outcome. Scores on MMPI-2-RF measures of emotional and behavioral dysfunction domains incrementally predicted poorer weight loss outcomes. Preoperative indicators of psychopathology, notably indicators that are dimensional in nature, are important in predicting postoperative outcomes. Closer follow-up with patients who evidence presurgical psychological factors, both before and after surgery, may help improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Discovery of Cushing's Syndrome After Bariatric Surgery: Multicenter Series of 16 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorsky, Bradley R; Carroll, Ty B; Tritos, Nicholas A; Salvatori, Roberto; Heaney, Anthony P; Fleseriu, Maria; Biller, Beverly M K; Findling, James W

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the importance of considering Cushing's syndrome (CS) as a potential etiology for weight gain and metabolic complications in patients undergoing bariatric surgery (BS). This is a retrospective chart review case series of patients (n = 16) with CS from five tertiary care centers in the USA who had BS. Median age at BS surgery was 35.5 years (median 2.5 years between BS and CS surgery). CS was not identified in 12 patients prior to BS. Four patients had CS surgery prior to BS, without recognition of recurrent or persistent CS until after BS. Median body mass index (BMI) values before BS, nadir after BS, prior to surgery for CS, and after surgery for CS were 47, 31, 38, and 35 kg/m(2), respectively. Prior to BS, 55 % of patients had hypertension and 55 % had diabetes mellitus. Only 17 % had resolution of hypertension or diabetes mellitus after BS. CS may be under-recognized in patients undergoing BS. Testing for CS should be performed prior to BS in patients with features of CS and in post-operative BS patients with persistent hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or excessive weight regain. Studies should be conducted to determine the role of prospective testing for CS in subjects considering BS.

  12. Response of recurrent binge eating and weight gain to topiramate in patients with binge eating disorder after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdjikova, Anna I; Kotwal, Renu; McElroy, Susan L

    2005-02-01

    The effectiveness of topiramate was evaluated in the treatment of recurrent binge eating and weight gain in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity who had undergone initially successful bariatric surgery. The records of 3 consecutive patients with BED and obesity who presented to our clinic with recurrent binge eating and weight gain after undergoing initially successful bariatric surgery were reviewed. They were treated with topiramate for an average of 10 months. All three patients reported complete amelioration of their binge eating symptoms and displayed weight loss (31.7 kg in 17 months, 14.5 kg in 9 months, 2 kg in 4 months, respectively) in response to topiramate (mean dose 541 mg). Although anecdotal, these observations suggest that topiramate may be an effective treatment for patients with BED and obesity who experience recurrent binge eating and weight gain after initially successful bariatric surgery.

  13. Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-06-01

    The increasing utilization of bariatric surgery has been accompanied by an increased incidence and awareness of related neurologic complications. The purpose of this review is to provide up-to-date information on the neurologic complications related to bariatric surgery. Neurologic complications related to bariatric surgery are predominantly due to nutrient deficiencies. Common early complications include Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, and late complications include myelopathy or myeloneuropathy due to vitamin B12 or copper deficiency. Early recognition and prompt institution of treatment is essential to prevent long-term disability. Often, life-long supplementation may be required.

  14. Prevalence of Micronutrient Deficiency in Patients with Morbid Obesity Before Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzizek, Eva-Christina; Brix, Johanna Maria; Herz, Carsten Thilo; Kopp, Hans Peter; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Schernthaner, Guntram; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2018-03-01

    Postoperative micronutrient deficiency is a known side effect of bariatric surgery. In this study, we examined the prevalence of micronutrient deficiency in patients with morbid obesity (MO) preoperatively. A total of 1732 patients with MO wishing to undergo bariatric surgery (age: 40 ± 12 years, mean BMI: 44 ± 9 kg/m 2 , means ± SD, 77.3% female) were analyzed in this cross-sectional examination. Iron state, vitamin B12, folic acid, 25hydroxy(OH)-vitamin D, PTH, vitamin A, and vitamin E levels were determined. Subsequently, patients underwent nutritional counseling and were substituted accordingly. A total of 63.2% (n = 1094) of the patients had a deficit in folic acid ( 56.9 pg/ml). A total of 5.1% (n = 88) of the patients presented with a deficit in vitamin B12 (deficiency (ferritin deficiency (women 11.8% vs. men 1.5%, p prevalence of micronutrient deficiency in patients with morbid obesity preoperatively and emphasize the importance of exact preoperative evaluation and adequate substitution as well as postoperative surveillance.

  15. Bariatric Surgery and Infertility: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvo, Vincenzo; Canero, Antonio; Salsano, Vincenzo

    2017-12-22

    Obesity is a worldwide disease affecting 13% of the world's adult female population. The reasons and the fetal risk are still unclear. The effect of weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery seems to induce an improvement in fertility in obese women. The main purpose of this prospective study is to demonstrate if there is an association between bariatric surgery-induced weight loss and an improvement in the fertility of women at reproductive age. From June 2013 to April 2016, all bariatric female patients from our institutes were prospectively evaluated for suitability in this study. A pool of 52 eligible patients was extracted from our database in the recruitment period. Of these, 28 underwent bariatric surgery and 24 did not. Both groups were observed for two-year follow-up. During follow-up, anthropometrics parameters, blood analysis, and comorbidities were checked and a gynaecological consultation was prescribed. Fifty participants were studied. Twenty-seven successfully underwent bariatric surgery with a percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) >70% at 24 months, while 23 accepted the observation and control for 24 months as an integral part of the pre-surgical bariatric program. The contingency table analysis showed an extremely significant association (Pbariatric surgery) and event (pregnancy), with a relative risk (RR) = 15.33 and confidence interval (CI) 95%=2.213 to 106.26. Bariatric surgery improves fertility in obese women at two years' postoperative. Every obese woman with difficulties becoming pregnant should undergo a bariatric surgery consultation. Further studies are necessary to confirm our results.

  16. Medical tourism and bariatric surgery: who pays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Caroline E; Lester, Erica L W; Chuck, Anderson W; Kim, David H; Karmali, Shahzeer; de Gara, Christopher J; Birch, Daniel W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the short-term cost impact that medical tourism for bariatric surgery has on a public healthcare system. Due to long wait times for bariatric surgery services, Canadians are venturing to private clinics in other provinces/countries. Postoperative care in this population not only burdens the provincial health system with intervention costs required for complicated patients, but may also impact resources allotted to patients in the public clinic. A chart review was performed from January 2009 to June 2013, which identified 62 medical tourists requiring costly interventions related to bariatric surgery. Secondarily, a survey was conducted to estimate the frequency of bariatric medical tourists presenting to general surgeons in Alberta, necessary interventions, and associated costs. A threshold analysis was used to compare costs of medical tourism to those from our institution. A conservative cost estimate of $1.8 million CAD was calculated for all interventions in 62 medical tourists. The survey established that 25 Albertan general surgeons consulted 59 medical tourists per year: a cost of approximately $1 million CAD. Medical tourism was calculated to require a complication rate ≤ 28% (average intervention cost of $37,000 per patient) to equate the cost of locally conducted surgery: a rate less than the current supported evidence. Conducting 250 primary bariatric surgeries in Alberta is approximately $1.9 million less than the modeled cost of treating 250 medical tourists returning to Alberta. Medical tourism has a substantial impact on healthcare costs in Alberta. When compared to bariatric medical tourists, the complication rate for locally conducted surgery is less, and the cost of managing the complications is also much less. Therefore, we conclude that it is a better use of resources to conduct bariatric surgery for Albertan residents in Alberta than to fund patients to seek surgery out of province/country.

  17. Psychological Correlates to Dysfunctional Eating Patterns among Morbidly Obese Patients Accepted for Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Hege; Rosenvinge, Jan Harald; Hjelmesæth, Jøran; Friborg, Oddgeir

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationships between dysfunctional eating patterns, personality, anxiety and depression in morbidly obese patients accepted for bariatric surgery. Objective The study used cross-sectional data collected by running a randomized controlled trial (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01403558). Subjects A total of 102 patients (69 women, 33 men) with a mean (SD) age of 42.6 (9.8) years and a mean BMI of 43.5 (4.4) kg/m2 participated. Measurements Measurements included the NEO-PI-R (personality: neuroticism, extroversion, openness, conscientiousness and agreeableness), the TFEQ-R-21 (dysfunctional eating: emotional eating (EE), uncontrolled eating (UE) and cognitive restraint of eating (CR)) and the HADS (anxiety and depression). Results The personality traits neuroticism and conscientiousness were more strongly correlated with dysfunctional eating than anxiety and depression. These differences were most pronounced for emotional and cognitive restraint of eating. Emotional eating occurred more often in female than in male patients, a finding that was partially mediated by neuroticism but not by anxiety and depression. Conclusion Personality traits may be important to address in the clinical management of morbidly obese patients seeking bariatric surgery as neuroticism is particularly salient in female patients displaying an emotional eating behaviour. PMID:24685661

  18. Psychological Correlates to Dysfunctional Eating Patterns among Morbidly Obese Patients Accepted for Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Gade

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the relationships between dysfunctional eating patterns, personality, anxiety and depression in morbidly obese patients accepted for bariatric surgery. Design: The study used cross-sectional data collected by running a randomized controlled trial (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01403558. Subjects: A total of 102 patients (69 women, 33 men with a mean (SD age of 42.6 (9.8 years and a mean BMI of 43.5 (4.4 kg/m2 participated. Measurements: Measurements included the NEO-PI-R (personality: neuroticism, extroversion, openness, conscientiousness and agreeableness, the TFEQ-R-21 (dysfunctional eating: emotional eating (EE, uncontrolled eating (UE and cognitive restraint of eating (CR and the HADS (anxiety and depression. Results: The personality traits neuroticism and conscientiousness were more strongly correlated with dysfunctional eating than anxiety and depression. These differences were most pronounced for emotional and cognitive restraint of eating. Emotional eating occurred more often in female than in male patients, a finding that was partially mediated by neuroticism but not by anxiety and depression. Conclusion: Personality traits may be important to address in the clinical management of morbidly obese patients seeking bariatric surgery as neuroticism is particularly salient in female patients displaying an emotional eating behaviour.

  19. Update on micronutrients in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Daniel; Sriram, Krishnan; Shankar, Padmini

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic. Obese patients are often deficient in micronutrients despite macronutrient excess. Bariatric surgery is an increasingly utilized modality in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related conditions. Bariatric surgery itself may cause or exacerbate micronutrient deficiencies with serious sequelae. This review will focus on perioperative strategies to detect, prevent and treat micronutrient deficiencies in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, and will highlight practical and clinical aspects of these nutritional problems. Micronutrient deficiency is common in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery both preoperatively and postoperatively. Bariatric procedures with a malabsorptive component are more likely to result in postoperative micronutrient deficiency. A system-based approach will facilitate clinical suspicion of specific or combined micronutrient deficiencies, leading to appropriate laboratory tests for confirmation. Supplementation by the oral route is always tried first, reserving parenteral administration for specific situations. Clinicians should be aware that micronutrient deficiencies are common in obese patients who may have macronutrient excess. Micronutrient deficiency may exist preoperatively or be caused by bariatric procedures themselves. A systematic and team-based approach will decrease morbidity associated with delays in diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Role of routine pre-operative screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Praveen Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It is well established that obesity is a strongly associated risk factor for post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Physical effects and pro-thrombotic, pro-inflammatory and hypofibrinolytic effects of severe obesity may predispose to idiopathic DVT (pre-operatively because of which bariatric patients are routinely screened before surgery. The aim of this study was to audit the use of routine screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients before undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 180 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from August 2013 to August 2014 who had undergone pre-operative screening bilateral lower-extremity venous duplex ultrasound for DVT. Data were collected on patient's demographics, history of venous thromboembolism, prior surgeries and duplex ultrasound details of the status of the deep veins and superficial veins of the lower limbs. Results: No patients had symptoms or signs of DVT pre-operatively. No patient gave history of DVT. No patient was found to have iliac, femoral or popliteal vein thrombosis. Superficial venous disease was found in 17 (8%. One patient had a right lower limb venous ulcer. Conclusion: Thromboembolic problems in the morbidly obese before bariatric surgery are infrequent, and screening venous duplex ultrasound can be done in high-risk patients only.

  1. Non-surgical complications following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Snežana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment for obesity and comorbidities. This treatment modality is the most potent for weight reduction with long-term weight maintenance and positive metabolic effects. The effect on weight loss and possible side effect depends of type of surgery. Micro and macronutrient deficiencies can occur after malapsorptive procedures. Iron deficiency occurs in almost half of patients following RYGB (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The main causes of iron deficiency are insufficient meat ingestion and lack of hydrochloric acid after removal of pylorus. B12 deficiency occured 6 months after RYGB in patients with oral supplementation of B12. Bone turnover increased three months after RYGB, and the levels of bone turnover markers increased 200% in next 12-18 months. Impaired vitamin D absorption leads to decreased calcium absorption and secondary hyperparathyroidism with lower bone mineral density. After the bariatric surgery, testosterone level becomes higher and all sexual quality indicators improving. Malapsorptive procedures with nutritive deficiency can cause oligo-astenozooteratospermia and male infertility. Due to the same reason pregnancy is not recommended in the first year bariatric surgery. Possible side effect of pregnancy within 12 months after surgery is fetal growth retardation. There is twice higher incidence for developing alcohol or other addition after bariatric surgery then in non-operated obese patients. The frequency of depressive episodes and suicide attempt is higher after bariatric surgery.

  2. Endocrine and nutritional management of the post-bariatric surgery patient: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, David; Greenway, Frank L; Kaplan, Lee M; Livingston, Edward; Salvador, Javier; Still, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    We sought to provide guidelines for the nutritional and endocrine management of adults after bariatric surgery, including those with diabetes mellitus. The focus is on the immediate postoperative period and long-term management to prevent complications, weight regain, and progression of obesity-associated comorbidities. The treatment of specific disorders is only summarized. The Task Force was composed of a chair, five additional experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. It received no corporate funding or remuneration. Bariatric surgery is not a guarantee of successful weight loss and maintenance. Increasingly, patients regain weight, especially those undergoing restrictive surgeries such as laparoscopic banding rather than malabsorptive surgeries such as Roux-en-Y bypass. Active nutritional patient education and clinical management to prevent and detect nutritional deficiencies are recommended for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Management of potential nutritional deficiencies is particularly important for patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures, and strategies should be employed to compensate for food intolerance in patients who have had a malabsorptive procedure to reduce the risk for clinically important nutritional deficiencies. To enhance the transition to life after bariatric surgery and to prevent weight regain and nutritional complications, all patients should receive care from a multidisciplinary team including an experienced primary care physician, endocrinologist, or gastroenterologist and consider enrolling postoperatively in a comprehensive program for nutrition and lifestyle management. Future research should address the effectiveness of intensive postoperative nutritional and endocrine care in reducing morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated chronic diseases.

  3. Feasibility of liver stiffness measurement in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery using XL probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Johannes; Rau, Monika; Meertens, Jan; Hering, Ilona; Reichert, Lisa; Kudlich, Theodor; Koschker, Ann-Kathrin; Jurowich, Christian; Geier, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is rising in the Western world and reaches up to 90% in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Fibroscan(®) as a non-invasive tool for liver stiffness measurement (LSM) has several limitations in morbidly obese patients. Only few data exist about the technical feasibility and accuracy of LSM in these patients. We aimed to analyse the feasibility of LSM by Fibroscan(®) in bariatric patients. In morbidly obese patients, LSM was performed using XL probe. Measurements were termed reliable if 10 successful measurements with a success rate ≥60% and an interquartile range/median (IQR/M) successful measurements were obtained but the IQR/M was >0.3, and they were termed failed if they were neither reliable nor unreliable. A total of 149 patients were included (87 with liver biopsies); mean BMI was 51.6 ± 8.5 kg/m(2). In 41% LSM using XL-probe was reliable, in 22% unreliable and in 37% failed. Failed LSM was significantly more frequent in patients with higher BMI compared to reliable and unreliable measurements (p successfully be differentiated by LSM from patients without fibrosis. LSM with XL probe is feasible in almost two-thirds of morbidly obese patients with a BMI ≥50 kg/m(2). Reliable prediction of advanced fibrosis appears to be possible even if formal criteria of successful measurements are not met.

  4. Incidence of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients submitted to Fobi-Capella Roux-en-Y bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Iara Ribeiro; Loscalzo, Izabella Tesoto; Freitas, Mayteé Fernandes Borges de; Jordão, Regina Esteves; Friano, Tatiane de Cássia

    2012-01-01

    Patients undergoing bariatric surgery may develop over time, some complications and anemia is an important one due to gastric resection, leading to iron, folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency. To determine the incidence of deficiency of vitamin B12 and other anthropometric and biochemical data comparing the preoperative and postoperative (six months) period in patients who underwent bariatric surgery with Fobi-Capella (Roux-en-Y) technique. Retrospective and descriptive analysis of 91 charts of patients who underwent surgery. It was collected personal information, date of surgery and pre-and postoperative (six months) values, weight loss, comorbidities, serum analysis of total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, vitamin B12, hemoglobin and hematocrit. For statistical analysis, it was considered significance level of 5% (pdeficiency of vitamin B12 after six months of surgery could not be observed; this fact can be attributed to the use of nutritional supplements or to the short follow-up time after surgery.

  5. The support needs of patients waiting for publicly funded bariatric surgery - implications for health service planners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, M J; Venn, A J; Jose, K A; Williams, D; Hensher, M; Palmer, A J; Wilkinson, S; Ezzy, D

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the experience of waiting for publicly funded bariatric surgery in an Australian tertiary healthcare setting. Focus groups and individual interviews involving people waiting for or who had undergone publicly funded bariatric surgery were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. A total of 11 women and 6 men engaged in one of six focus groups in 2014, and an additional 10 women and 9 men were interviewed in 2015. Mean age was 53 years (range 23-66); mean waiting time was 6 years (range 0-12), and mean time since surgery was 4 years (range 0-11). Waiting was commonly reported as emotionally challenging (e.g. frustrating, depressing, stressful) and often associated with weight gain (despite weight-loss attempts) and deteriorating physical health (e.g. development of new or worsening obesity-related comorbidity or decline in mobility) or psychological health (e.g. development of or worsening depression). Peer support, health and mental health counselling, integrated care and better communication about waitlist position and management (e.g. patient prioritization) were identified support needs. Even if wait times cannot be reduced, better peer and health professional supports, together with better communication from health departments, may improve the experience or outcomes of waiting and confer quality-of-life gains irrespective of weight loss. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  6. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Irene T.; Madura, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical proc...

  7. Early improvement of postprandial lipemia after bariatric surgery in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffo, E; Nosso, G; Lupoli, R; Cotugno, M; Saldalamacchia, G; Vitolo, G; Angrisani, L; Cutolo, P P; Rivellese, A A; Capaldo, B

    2014-05-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) is able to positively influence fasting lipid profile in obese type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM), but no data is available on the impact of BS on postprandial lipid metabolism neither on its relation with incretin hormones. We evaluated the short-term (2 weeks) effects of BS on fasting and postprandial lipid metabolism in obese T2DM patients and the contribution of changes in active GLP-1. We studied 25 obese T2DM patients (age = 46 ± 8 years, BMI = 44 ± 7 kg/m2), of which 15 underwent sleeve gastrectomy and 10 underwent gastric bypass. Lipid and incretin hormone concentrations were evaluated for 3 h after ingestion of a liquid meal before and 2 weeks after BS. After BS, there was a significant reduction in body weight (p lipids (p postprandial lipemia. The fall in fasting triglycerides is associated with an improvement of insulin resistance, while the reduction of postprandial lipemia is likely related to reduced intestinal lipid absorption consequent to bariatric surgery.

  8. EARLY COMPLICATIONS IN BARIATRIC SURGERY:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio SANTO

    Full Text Available ContextBariatric surgery has proven to be the most effective method of treating severe obesity. Nevertheless, the acceptance of bariatric surgery is still questioned. The surgical complications observed in the early postoperative period following surgeries performed to treat severe obesity are similar to those associated with other major surgeries of the gastrointestinal tract. However, given the more frequent occurrence of medical comorbidities, these patients require special attention in the early postoperative follow-up. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of these complications are directly associated with a greater probability of control.MethodThe medical records of 538 morbidly obese patients who underwent surgical treatment (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery were reviewed. Ninety-three (17.2% patients were male and 445 (82.8% were female. The ages of the patients ranged from 18 to 70 years (average = 46, and their body mass indices ranged from 34.6 to 77 kg/m2.ResultsEarly complications occurred in 9.6% and were distributed as follows: 2.6% presented bleeding, intestinal obstruction occurred in 1.1%, peritoneal infections occurred in 3.2%, and 2.2% developed abdominal wall infections that required hospitalization. Three (0.5% patients experienced pulmonary thromboembolism. The mortality rate was 0,55%.ConclusionThe incidence of early complications was low. The diagnosis of these complications was mostly clinical, based on the presence of signs and symptoms. The value of the clinical signs and early treatment, specially in cases of sepsis, were essential to the favorable surgical outcome. The mortality was mainly related to thromboembolism and advanced age, over 65 years.

  9. Pregnancy following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Carla B

    2004-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity is considered an appropriate intervention when other weight-loss measures have proven unsuccessful. Weight loss often brings about improvement in overall health by lessening the effects of obesity-related comorbidities such as chronic hypertension and diabetes. In fact, the ability to become pregnant is enhanced, as weight loss often allows for a normalization of sex hormones. However, the nutrition challenges brought about by the surgery may have a profound impact on maternal health and pregnancy outcome. Surgical procedures for morbid obesity may be classified according to the digestive aftereffects brought about by the particular procedure. These categories include the "restrictive" procedures, "restrictive-malabsorptive" procedures, and the less common "malabsorptive" procedures. Deficiencies in iron, vitamin B12, folate, and calcium can result in maternal complications, such as severe anemia, and in fetal complications, such as neural tube defect, intrauterine growth restriction, and failure to thrive. Nutrient supplementation following bariatric surgery and close supervision before, during, and after pregnancy can help prevent nutrition-related complications and improve maternal and fetal health.

  10. [Impact of bariatric surgery on obstetric prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumery, L; Pigeyre, M; Fournier, C; Arnalsteen, L; Rivaux, G; Subtil, D; Deruelle, P

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery and analysis of follow-up particularities of such pregnancies. A retrospective study of 63 post-bariatric surgery pregnancies compared to 259 pregnancies of obese un-operated patients. Pregnancy outcomes, neonatal datas, delay influence between surgery and pregnancy beginning, bariatric surgery type and gastric banding (GB) loosening consequences were analysed. In the surgical brand were developed less gestational diabetes (DG) (P=0,05), deliveries were more often normal (P=0,004) and births shown less macrosomias and small for gestational age newborns (P=0,04). Neonatal state was improved among operated patients: less Apgar scores less than 7 at 1 minute (P=0,05) and less cord blood pH less than 7,2 (P=0,03). They gained more weight during the pregnancy (P=0,0003) and only 53% had a nutritional management and assessment. Patients with GB loosening gained more weight (P=0,0003). Lastly, there were no difference due to the different bariatric surgery techniques or nutritional follow-up in the pregnancy course and neonatal state. Bariatric surgery improves obstetric and neonatal prognosis. Improvements have to be developed in the multidisciplinary follow-up in order to avoid nutritional deficiencies or important weight gain pregnancy in case of GB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of liquid ingestion after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity; however, after surgery the patient may have difficulty in swallowing liquid and solid foods. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate liquid ingestion in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery. METHOD: We studied 43 volunteers with normal body mass index (BMI (BMI: 18.5-24.9 kg/m², 55 subjects with class III obesity (BMI: >40.0 kg/m², and 48 subjects with bariatric surgery for treatment of class III obesity. The method chosen for evaluation was the water swallowing test. The subjects drank in triplicate 50 mL of water while being precisely timed and the number of swallows were counted. RESULTS: There was no difference between subjects with normal BMI and subjects with class III obesity. During the first 2 months after bariatric surgery the patients showed an increase in the time needed to drink the entire volume, in the number of swallows, and in the inter-swallow interval, and a decrease in the volume swallowing capacity (volume/swallowing and swallowing flow rate (volume swallowed/second. After 2 months, the results of the swallowing measurements moved in the direction of normal values. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery may cause more intense alterations of liquid bolus swallowing within 2 months after the procedure, which moved to normal values after this time.

  12. [Care of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pardo Martínez, M; de Torres Aured, M L; Díaz Gómez, J

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of problems are caused by obesity, since patients are affected not only physically, but also psychologically, socially and in their working life, with major socio-economic consequences. The application of technical surgical has opened a new field in the treatment of this complex illness, long term treatment being the only effective kind for morbid obesity. With most surgical techniques, the patient should control food intake for life and maintain some adapted habits of physical activity. For this reason it is necessary for professionals in different areas to help patients to develop strategies to persevere with their programs. Evaluation of the patient's physical and psychological needs should be carried out prior to the planning of appropriate measures. Outpatient follow-up must focus on educating, motivating, training and advising the patient nutritionally, so that he or she is able to modify his or her eating habits and maintain a healthy lifestyle during the pre- and postoperative phases. Evaluation using Patterns serves as a tool to analyze disorders in the patient. Once the situation has been evaluated, we can proceed to the nursing diagnoses (NIC) on which we will base the interventions and pertinent activities which, in combination with those carried out by other members of the multidisciplinary team, will achieve optimum results. With all the information obtained, properly organized and discussed by the team, it is possible to personalize the Planning of Care with food registration, food choice, elaboration of a weekly diet, and the general dietary recommendations. Each of the results obtained (NOC) is evaluated in terms of the possible indicators, on the corresponding scale of measurement. In addition to patient motivation, effective instructions about changes in lifestyle and the need to accept treatment and follow-up are the key to positive collaboration with the multi-professional team in the application of strategies.

  13. The Utility of Diagnostic Laparoscopy in Post-Bariatric Surgery Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain of Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulaimy, Mohammad; Punchai, Suriya; Ali, Fouzeyah A; Kroh, Matthew; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Chronic abdominal pain after bariatric surgery is associated with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of laparoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in post-bariatric surgery patients with chronic abdominal pain who had negative imaging and endoscopic studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on post-bariatric surgery patients who underwent laparoscopy for diagnosis and treatment of chronic abdominal pain at a single academic center. Only patients with both negative preoperative CT scan and upper endoscopy were included. Total of 35 post-bariatric surgery patients met the inclusion criteria, and all had history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Twenty out of 35 patients (57%) had positive findings on diagnostic laparoscopy including presence of adhesions (n = 12), chronic cholecystitis (n = 4), mesenteric defect (n = 2), internal hernia (n = 1), and necrotic omentum (n = 1). Two patients developed post-operative complications including a pelvic abscess and an abdominal wall abscess. Overall, 15 patients (43%) had symptomatic improvement after laparoscopy; 14 of these patients had positive laparoscopic findings requiring intervention (70% of the patients with positive laparoscopy). Conversely, 20 (57%) patients required long-term medical treatment for management of chronic abdominal pain. Diagnostic laparoscopy, which is a safe procedure, can detect pathological findings in more than half of post-bariatric surgery patients with chronic abdominal pain of unknown etiology. About 40% of patients who undergo diagnostic laparoscopy and 70% of patients with positive findings on laparoscopy experience significant symptom improvement. Patients should be informed that diagnostic laparoscopy is associated with no symptom improvement in about half of cases.

  14. Nutritional and Micronutrient Care of Bariatric Surgery Patients: Current Evidence Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Michael A; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2017-09-01

    The continued success of bariatric surgery to treat obesity and obesity-associated metabolic conditions creates a need for a strong understanding of clinical nutrition both before and after these procedures. Surgically induced alteration of gastrointestinal physiology can affect the nutrition of individuals, especially among those who have undergone malabsorptive procedures. While uncommon, a subset of patients may develop protein-calorie malnutrition. In these cases, nutrition support should be tailored to the severity of malnutrition. Among all patients who undergo bariatric surgery, high rates of micronutrient deficiencies have been observed. To mitigate these deficiencies, empiric supplementation with multivitamins, calcium citrate, and vitamin D is generally recommended. Periodic surveillance should be performed for commonly deficient micronutrients, including thiamin (B1), folate (B9), cobalamin (B12), iron, and vitamin D. Following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, serum levels of copper and zinc should also be monitored. In addition, lipid-soluble vitamins should be monitored following biliopancreatic diversion with/without duodenal switch.

  15. PRE- AND POSTOPERATIVE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: SOME BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    TEDESCO, Amanda Kaseker; BIAZOTTO, Rafaela; GEBARA, Telma Souza e Silva; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The bariatric surgery may cause some nutritional deficiencies. Aim: To compare the serum levels of biochemical markers, in iimmediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods: Non-concurrent prospective cross-sectional study. The analysis investigated data in medical charts of pre-surgical and immediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery, focusing total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerid...

  16. Routine Postoperative Monitoring after Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Patients with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea: ICU Admission is not Necessary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goucham, Amin B.; Coblijn, Usha K.; Hart-Sweet, Helga B.; de Vries, Nico; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; van Wagensveld, Bart A.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in 70-80% of bariatric surgery patients. Patients with severe OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) >30/h) are postoperatively admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) for continuous monitoring, to prevent complications. The aim of this study was to assess the

  17. Bariatric surgery in 1119 patients with preoperative body mass index<35 (kg/m(2)): results at 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Cristóbal; Alvarado, Juan; Quezada, Nicolás; Salinas, José; Funke, Ricardo; Boza, Camilo

    2015-01-01

    The use of body mass index (BMI) as the only criterion to indicate bariatric surgery is currently under discussion. There is growing evidence that supports bariatric surgery in carefully selected patients with lower BMI. To report our experience in bariatric surgery in>1000 patients with BMI<35 kg/m(2) and their results at 1 year. University hospital (censored). A retrospective analysis was performed in patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with preoperative BMI<35 kg/m(2) from January 2008 to December 2011. Demographic and anthropometric data, preoperative co-morbidities, and perioperative variables were retrieved. Weight loss and co-morbidities progression were analyzed 1 year after surgery and compared among procedures. A P value<.05 was considered significant. We identified 1119 patients: mean age 38.8±11.4, 951 (85%) women, preoperative weight 87.5±9.3 kg and BMI 33.1 (31.9-34.1) kg/m(2). Preoperatively, 11.7% had type 2 diabetes mellitus, 25.9% arterial hypertension, 55.6% insulin resistance, and 53.2% dyslipidemia. In total, 283 patients (25.2%) underwent LRYGB and 836 (74.8%) SG. One year after surgery (follow-up: 66.67%) patients reached 24.5 (22.8-26.4) BMI and the percentage of excess of weight loss (%EWL) was 107.9±36.6%. Diabetes, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia remission/improvement rates were 54/39%, 58/29%, 72/17%, and 54/30%, respectively. Bariatric surgery in selected class I obesity patients can safely be performed. We have observed good results in terms of weight loss and co-morbidity improvement/remission. Long-term follow-up is required. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Remission of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Patients After Different Types of Bariatric Surgery : A Population-Based Cohort Study in the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; van Roon, Eric N; de Boer, Anthonius; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Wilffert, Bob; de Heide, Loek J M; de Vries, Frank; Lalmohamed, Arief

    2015-01-01

    Importance: To our knowledge, an observational study on the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after different types of bariatric surgery based on data from general practice has not been carried out. Objective: To assess the effect of different types of bariatric surgery in patients with

  19. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients after different types of bariatric surgery : A population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; Van Roon, Eric N.; De Boer, Anthonius; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Wilffert, Bob; De Heide, Loek J M; De Vries, Frank; Lalmohamed, Arief

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: To our knowledge, an observational study on the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after different types of bariatric surgery based on data from general practice has not been carried out. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of different types of bariatric surgery in patients with

  20. Ethnicity influences weight loss 1 year after bariatric surgery: a study in Turkish, Moroccan, South Asian, African and ethnic Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W. M.; Bouter, K.; Celik, F.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Klaassen, R. A.; van Dielen, F. M. H.; van Ramshorst, B.; van Wagensveld, B. A.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Holleman, F.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies conducted in the USA have demonstrated that the effectiveness of bariatric surgery differs between patients from African and European origin. However, little is known on differences in outcomes after bariatric surgery between individuals from other ethnic backgrounds. In this

  1. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in patients with post-bariatric surgery complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gossum, A; Pironi, L; Chambrier, C; Dreesen, M; Brandt, C F; Santarpia, L; Joly, F

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem. Bariatric surgery (BS) is becoming one of the most commonly used methods for fighting obesity and its associated comorbidities. However, current BS techniques can be associated with early or late complications that may require nutritional support. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to determine the indications and outcomes for patients on Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) due to post-bariatric surgery complications. A specific questionnaire was designed by the ESPEN HAN/CIF working group and submitted to HPN centers. This questionnaire included: patient demographics, type of surgery, BMI before surgery and at start of HPN, indications for HPN including technical and nutritional complications (early within 2 months after surgery or late), outcome, PN regimen, and HPN complications. Patients were retrospectively included from January 2008 to June 2014. Eighteen HPN centers responded to the survey. A total of 2880 HPN patients were treated during the study period, 77 of whom had BS (65 females; mean age 51 ± 7 years); gastric bypass was performed in 69% of the patients; mean BMI was 44.4 before surgery and 23.2 at the start of HPN. Indications for HPN were early complications in 17 cases and late complications in 60 cases. Early complications were mostly anastomotic leakage/fistula; late complications were hypoalbuminemia, and vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Out of 77 patients, 16 needed a surgical re-intervention, 29 were weaned off HPN, and 6 died (no HPN-related deaths). During the HPN period, 58% of the patients were re-hospitalized and central venous complications were observed in 41%. Diabetes mellitus was described in 17/77 patients. HPN was supportive in 60 patients and exclusive in 17 patients (mean caloric intake: 23 ± 6 kcal/k BW/day and 1.2 g/kBW/day). Only 7/77 patients resumed their professional activities on HPN. This is the largest observational multicenter study describing the

  2. Copper, selenium and zinc levels after bariatric surgery in patients recommended to take multivitamin-mineral supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamargaritis, Dimitris; Aasheim, Erlend T; Sampson, Barry; le Roux, Carel W

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is widely performed to improve obesity-related disorders, but can lead to nutrient deficiencies. In this study we examined serum trace element concentrations before and after bariatric surgery. We obtained serum trace element concentrations by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method in 437 patients (82% women, median preoperative body-mass index 46.7 kg/m(2) [interquartile range 42-51]) undergoing either gastric banding (22.7%), sleeve gastrectomy (20.1%), or gastric bypass (57.3%) procedures. Trace element data were available for patients preoperatively (n = 44); and 3 (n = 208), 6 (n = 174), 12 (n = 122), 18 (n = 39), 24 (n = 44) and 36 months (n = 14) post-operatively. All patients were recommended to take a multivitamin-mineral supplement after surgery. Copper deficiency was found in 2% of patients before surgery; and after surgery deficiency rates ranged from 0 to 5% with no significant change in median concentrations during follow-up (p = 0.68). Selenium deficiency was reported in 2% of patients before surgery; and after surgery deficiency rates ranged from 11 to 15% with a near-significant change in median concentrations (p = 0.056). Zinc deficiency was reported in 7% before surgery; and after surgery deficiency rates ranged from 7 to 15% with no significant change in median concentrations (p = 0.39). In bariatric surgery patients recommended to take multivitamin-mineral supplements, serum copper, zinc and selenium concentrations were mostly stable during the first years after bariatric surgery. There was a possible tendency for selenium concentrations to decline during the early postoperative period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Laparoscopic transgastric ERCP in bariatric surgery patients: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Espinel

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB is the surgical treatment of choice for morbid obesity. Several therapeutic options to remove common bile duct (CBD stones have been proposed in these patients. Laparoscopy-assisted transgastric ERCP (LATERCP has a high success rate. However, the procedure is not fully standardized and some technical variations have been proposed. We introduce two cases in which laparoscopic transgastric ERCP has been used to treat choledocholithiasis after LRYGB.

  4. Laparoscopic transgastric ERCP in bariatric surgery patients: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, María Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; Guerra Del Río, María

    2017-07-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is the surgical treatment of choice for morbid obesity. Several therapeutic options to remove common bile duct (CBD) stones have been proposed in these patients. Laparoscopy-assisted transgastric ERCP (LATERCP) has a high success rate. However, the procedure is not fully standardized and some technical variations have been proposed. We introduce two cases in which laparoscopic transgastric ERCP has been used to treat choledocholithiasis after LRYGB.

  5. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF OLDER OBESE PATIENTS CANDIDATES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    PAJECKI,Denis; SANTO,Marco Aurélio; KANAGI,Ana Lumi; RICCIOPPO,Daniel; CLEVA,Roberto de; CECCONELLO,Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Context Obesity in the elderly is associated with exacerbation of functional decline (dependency), that occurs with aging, because of decreased muscle mass and strength, and increased joint dysfunction. Consequently, there is progressive loss of independence, autonomy, chronic pain and impaired quality of life. The weight loss can bring benefits in all these aspects, especially when accompanied by exercises. Elderly patients with morbid obesity may be submitted to surgical treatment, taking i...

  6. Changing trends in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Menzo, E; Szomstein, S; Rosenthal, R J

    2015-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered the only long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity. Techniques and procedures have changed dramatically. We report on some of the major changes in the field. We reviewed some of the major changes in trends in bariatric surgery based on some landmark paper published in the literature. We identified three major phases in the evolution of bariatric surgery. The pioneer phase was mostly characterized by discovery of weight loss procedures serendipitously from procedures done for other purposes. The second phase can be identified with the advent of laparoscopic techniques. This is considered the phase of greatest expansion of bariatric surgery. The metabolic phase derives from the improved understanding of the mechanisms of actions of the bariatric operations at the hormonal and molecular level. Bariatric surgery has changed significantly over the years. The safety of the laparoscopic approach, along with the better understanding of the metabolic changes obtained postoperatively, has led to a more individualized approach and also an attempt to expand the indications for these procedures. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  7. Micronutrient Deficiencies in Patients Candidate for Bariatric Surgery: A Prospective, Preoperative Trial of Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Luigi; Scalera, Giuseppe; Pilone, Vincenzo; De Sena, Gabriele; Capuozzo, Vincenza; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2016-05-10

    Bariatric surgery candidates often show preoperative micronutrient deficiency. Although it is documented that a comprehensive micronutrient assessment should be conducted preoperatively to correct the deficiencies before surgery, no previous studies have been effective in correcting deficiencies in sufficient time prior to surgery. Our aim was to identify micronutrient deficiencies preoperatively and correct them before surgery. 50 patients (18 female, 32 male) scheduled for bariatric surgery were assessed for micronutrient status 20 weeks prior to surgery. Baseline levels of vitamin B12, folic acid, 25-vitamin D, vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, iron, zinc, magnesium, and selenium were measured. Data were compared with accepted clinical cutoff values. Patients found to have one or more micronutrient deficiencies were instructed to take daily micronutrient supplements specially formulated for obese patients and were evaluated every 5 weeks over a 20-week period. Nutrient intake was also evaluated before and after supplementation. Micronutrient deficiencies were observed in 40 patients (80 %, 13 female, 27 male). All 40 patients started prescribed supplementation immediately. 20 patients (10 female, 10 male) completed a follow-up at 20 weeks. Herein we found that 10 weeks of preoperative micronutrient supplementation is capable of effectively treating micronutrient deficiencies in our candidates for bariatric surgery. Considering that: 1) no new medication was allowed during the study; 2) patients already under pharmacological treatment did not change their therapy; 3) no statistically differences in nutrient intake were observed before and after the supplementation, we are confident to attribute the improvements in patients' micronutrient status directly to the supplement.

  8. Single-incision laparoscopic bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chih-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bariatric surgery has been established as the best option of treatment for morbid obesity. In recent years single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS has emerged as another modality of carrying out the bariatric procedures. While SILS represents an advance, its application in morbid obesity at present is limited. In this article, we review the technique and results of SILS in bariatric surgery. Methods: The PubMed database was searched and totally 11 series reporting SILS in bariatric surgery were identified and analyzed. The case reports were excluded. Since 2008, 114 morbidly obese patients receiving SILS bariatric surgeries were reported. Results: The procedures performed included SILS gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass. No mortality was reported in the literatures. Sixteen patients (14.05% needed an additional incision for a liver retractor, a trocar or for conversion. Only one complication of wound infection was reported in these series. All the surgeons reported that the patients were highly satisfied with the scar. Conclusion: Because of abundant visceral and subcutaneous fat and multiple comorbidities in morbid obesity, it is more challenging for surgeons to perform the procedures with SILS. It is clear that extensive development of new instruments and technical aspects of these procedures as well as randomized studies to compare them with traditional laparoscopy are essential before these procedures can be utilized in day-to-day clinical practice.

  9. [Prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with severe obesity waiting for bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Sofía; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Vargas-Martínez, Angeles; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco; Vázquez-Velázquez, Verónica; Arcila-Martínez, Denise; González-Barranco, Jorge; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F; Salín-Pascual, Rafael J

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition, in which different systems of the body are affected. There are some previous studies in which the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in extreme obese patients has been reported, but there are some methodological problems. As far as we know this is the first report of the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in obese patients that need to have a surgical treatment for this disorder in Mexico. The main goal of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of psychiatric disorders in extreme obese patients candidates to bariatric surgery. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) axis I disorders, were performed in 70 obese patients that will undergo for bariatric surgery. Also the medical files were reviewed in order to obtain the main medical conditions related to obesity. There were 25 men and 35 women in this study (average age +/- s.d = 39.0 +/- 10.4). The Body Mass Index (BMI) was 53.8 +/- 11.9. Sixty percent of the patients had some psychiatric disorder in the axis I of DSM-IV. The most frequent psychiatric problem that was observed was anxiety disorders. The main medical problems observed were: arterial hypertension (59%), diabetes mellitus type 2 (29%) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (29%). The BMI and diabetes mellitus were associated with a lower risk for presenting a psychiatric disorder (for a BMI of 65.5 +/- 10.3 kg/m2: OR 0.26, CI 0.05-1.15, p = 0.04; for diabetes mellitus: OR 0.20, CI 0.03-1.05, p = 0.02). More than half of the patients had at least one psychiatric disorder in axis 1 of DSM-IV, related mostly to anxiety and mood disorders. Our findings point out the importance of psychiatric and psychological intervention in this group of patients, in which a follow up and adherence of medical, nutritional and psychological problems could be the difference, between a good or bad prognosis. Follow-up studies with obese patients after bariatric surgery, will be important to support our findings.

  10. High frequency of serum chromium deficiency and association of chromium with triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in patients awaiting bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Karla V G; Lima, Raquel P A; Gonçalves, Maria C R; Faintuch, Joel; Morais, Liana C S L; Asciutti, Luiza S R; Costa, Maria J C

    2014-05-01

    To our knowledge, the frequency of serum chromium deficiency in patients awaiting bariatric surgery has not been determined. This study was designed to assess chromium concentration and its association with glycemic levels and lipid profile in patients prior to bariatric surgery. This study recruited 73 candidates for bariatric surgery between March and September 2012. Their sociodemographic, anthropometric, and biochemical data were collected. Of the 73 patients, 55 (75.3%) were women (75.34%). Mean patient age was 37.20 ± 9.92 years, and mean body mass index was 47.48 kg/m2 (range, 43.59 to 52.50 kg/m2). Chromium deficiency was observed in 64 patients (87.7%). Correlation analysis showed significant negative relationships between chromium concentration and BMI and zinc concentration and a significant positive relationship between chromium and glycated hemoglobin. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that serum chromium concentration was significantly associated with total cholesterol (β = 0.171, p = 0.048) and triglyceride (β = -0.181, p = 0.039) concentrations. Serum chromium deficiency is frequent in candidates for bariatric surgery and is associated with total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Early nutritional interventions are needed to reduce nutritional deficiencies and improve the lipid profile of these patients.

  11. Treatment of Adult Obesity with Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Robin; Harrison, T Daniel; McGraw, Shaniqua L

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, approximately 179,000 bariatric surgery procedures were performed in the United States, including the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (42.1%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (34.2%), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (14.0%). Choice of procedure depends on the medical conditions of the patient, patient preference, and expertise of the surgeon. On average, weight loss of 60% to 70% of excess body weight is achieved in the short term, and up to 50% at 10 years. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs in 60% to 80% of patients two years after surgery and persists in about 30% of patients 15 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. The Roux-en-Y procedure carries an increased risk of malabsorption sequelae, which can be minimized with nutritional supplementation and surveillance. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5%. Cohort studies show that bariatric surgery reduces all-cause mortality by 30% to 50% at seven to 15 years postsurgery compared with patients with obesity who did not have surgery. Dietary changes, such as consuming protein first at every meal, and regular physical activity are critical for patient success after bariatric surgery. The family physician is well positioned to counsel patients about bariatric surgical options, the risks and benefits of surgery, and to provide long-term support and medical management postsurgery.

  12. Patient and operational factors affecting wait times in a bariatric surgery program in Toronto: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Adam; Cleghorn, Michelle C; Milner, Joseph; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Okrainec, Allan; Jackson, Timothy D; Quereshy, Fayez A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing rates of obesity have led to growing demand for bariatric surgery. This has implications for wait times, particularly in publicly funded programs. This study examined the impact of patient and operational factors on wait times in a multidisciplinary bariatric surgery program. A retrospective study was conducted involving patients who were referred to a tertiary care centre (University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto) for bariatric surgery between June 2008 and July 2011. Patient characteristics, dates of clinical assessments and records describing operational changes were collected. Univariable analysis and multivariable log-linear and parametric time-to-event regressions were performed to determine whether patient and operational covariates were associated with the wait time for bariatric surgery (i.e., length of preoperative evaluation). Of the 1664 patients included in the analysis, 724 underwent surgery with a mean wait time of 440 (standard deviation 198) days and a median wait time of 445 (interquartile range 298-533) days. Wait times ranged from 3 months to 4 years. Univariable and multivariable analyses showed that patients with active substance use (β = 0.3482, p = 0.02) and individuals who entered the program in more recent operational periods (β = 0.2028, p < 0.001) had longer wait times. Additionally, the median time-to-surgery increased over 3 discrete operational periods (characterized by specific program changes related to scheduling and staffing levels, and varying referral rates and defined surgical targets; p < 0.001). Some patients could be identified at referral as being at risk for longer wait times. We also found that previous operational decisions significantly increased the wait time in the program since its inception. Therefore, careful consideration must be devoted to process-level decision-making for multistage bariatric surgical programs, because managerial and procedural changes can affect timely

  13. Quality of Life After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Laura M; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to quality of life (QOL) outcomes after bariatric surgery and a summary of the current evidence. QOL has been emphasized in bariatric surgery since the NIH Consensus Conference statement in 1991. Initial studies were limited to 1- and 2-year follow-up. More recent findings have expanded the follow-up period up to 12 years, providing a better description of the impact on long-term QOL. Overall, there is little to no consensus regarding the definition of QOL or the ideal survey. Bariatric surgery has the greatest impact on physical QOL, and the impact on mental health remains unclear. There are some specific and less frequently reported threats to quality of life after bariatric surgery that are also discussed. Obesity has a definite impact on quality of life, even without other comorbidities, and surgery for obesity results in significant and lasting improvements in patient-reported quality of life outcomes. This conclusion is limited by a wide variety of survey instruments and absence of consensus on the definition of QOL after bariatric surgery.

  14. Acute kidney injury in bariatric surgery patients requiring intensive care admission: a state-wide, multicenter, cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David J R; Ho, Kwok M

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary bariatric surgical approach is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. However, little is known about how the physiologic impact of weight reduction surgery superimposed on premorbid obesity-related co-morbidities may adversely influence perioperative renal function. This observational, multicenter study investigated all bariatric surgery patients (n = 590) admitted to any intensive care unit (ICU) in Western Australia between 2007 and 2011. Using Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria, we ascertained the incidence and contributing risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI). Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurred in 103 patients, accounting for 17.5% of all ICU admissions after bariatric surgery with 76.8% of the AKI episodes limited to AKIN stage 1. In a multivariate analysis, male gender, premorbid hypertension, higher admission APACHE II scores, and blood transfusions were all associated with AKI, while preexisting chronic kidney disease and body mass index (BMI) appeared not to influence renal decline. Both ICU (6.7 versus 2.5 d, Ppatients required hemodialysis while both ICU mortality (2.9 versus 0%, P = .005) and long-term mortality (18.2 versus 4.7 deaths per 1000 bariatric patient-yr, P = .01) were greater in patients experiencing AKI. AKI is common in bariatric patients requiring critical care support leading to increased healthcare utilization, prolonged hospitalization, and is associated with a higher mortality. BMI, a previously described risk factor, was not predictive of AKI in this cohort. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TCF7L2 expression in diabetic patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, A Katharine; Brody, Fred; Tevar, Rahul; Kluk, Brian; Hill, Sarah; McCaffrey, Timothy; Fu, Sidney

    2009-04-01

    The cause of diabetes in morbidly obese patients is multifactorial, including genetic, social, and dietary components. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) is a gene that is related to the development of diabetes. This pilot study examines TCF7L2 expression in liver samples obtained from morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. TCF7L2 expression is compared between diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Liver samples were obtained from 20 morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Samples were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Total RNA was extracted from tissue samples using the TRIzol reagent (Invitrogen Inc, Carlsbad, CA). Using the iScript cDNA synthesis kit (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules,CA), cDNA was synthesized. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was done using SYBR Green qPCR Reagents (Stratagene, Cedar Creek TX) and the 7300 Real-Time PCR system (Applied Biosystems, Foster City CA). Preoperative demographic and gene expression data were correlated using univariate analysis and logistic regression models. Only associations with a p-value less than 0.05 were considered significant. For the entire group, there was no correlation between body mass index (BMI) and TCF7L2 expression. In morbidly obese nondiabetic patients, there was a positive correlation between TCF7L2 expression and BMI (R(2)=0.21). In morbidly obese diabetic patients, there was an inverse correlation between TCF7L2 expression and BMI (R(2)=0.58). There was no significant relationship between TCF7L2 expression and age or glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The cause of diabetes is multifactorial but the data from our pilot study documents the relationship of TCF7L2 with type 2 diabetes in morbidly obese patients.

  16. Mineral malnutrition following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Wright, Breanne N

    2013-09-01

    Moderate/severe obesity is on the rise in the United States. Weight management includes bariatric surgery, which is effective and can alleviate morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated diseases. However, many individuals are dealing with nutritional complications. Risk factors include: 1) preoperative malnutrition (e.g., vitamin D, iron); 2) decreased food intake (due to reduced hunger and increased satiety, food intolerances, frequent vomiting); 3) inadequate nutrient supplementation (due to poor compliance with multivitamin/multimineral regimen, insufficient amounts of vitamins and/or minerals in supplements); 4) nutrient malabsorption; and 5) inadequate nutritional support (due to lack of follow-up, insufficient monitoring, difficulty in recognizing symptoms of deficiency). For some nutrients (e.g., protein, vitamin B-12, vitamin D), malnutrition issues are reasonably addressed through patient education, routine monitoring, and effective treatment strategies. However, there is little attention paid to other nutrients (e.g., zinc, copper), which if left untreated may have devastating consequences (e.g., hair loss, poor immunity, anemia, defects in neuro-muscular function). This review focuses on malnutrition in essential minerals, including calcium (and vitamin D), iron, zinc, and copper, which commonly occur following popular bariatric procedures. There will be emphasis on the complexities, including confounding factors, related to screening, recognition of symptoms, and, when available, current recommendations for treatment. There is an exceptionally high risk of malnutrition in adolescents and pregnant women and their fetuses, who may be vulnerable to problems in growth and development. More research is required to inform evidence-based recommendations for improving nutritional status following bariatric surgery and optimizing weight loss, metabolic, and nutritional outcomes.

  17. [Clinical Practice after Bariatric Surgery: Problems and Complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Martina

    2015-12-09

    The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery because of morbid obesity is increasing rapidly. Therefore, it is an important issue to be aware of outcome and complications after bariatric surgery. This mini-review presents a compilation of important gastrointestinal symptoms, as pain, diarrhea and dumping, and includes treatment options. It characterizes possible micronutrient deficiencies, gives instructions concerning the adaptation of drugs and illustrates possible adverse outcomes, such as excessive weight loss, insufficient weight loss and weight gain after bariatric surgery.

  18. EXPERIENCES OF WOMEN BEFORE AND AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Followell, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportion in the United States. Results of diet, exercise regimens, and/or medications are discouraging for most individuals; therefore, bariatric surgery is on the rise. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery are overwhelmingly female. There is a plethora of research regarding improvement of co-morbidities, but little focus has been placed on the impact of bariatric surgery on positive as well as negative psychosocial outcomes. The purposes of t...

  19. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  20. A Cognitive-Behavioral Mindfulness Group Therapy Intervention for the Treatment of Binge Eating in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Irwin, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Binge eating is a negative indicator of post-surgical weight loss and health outcome in bariatric surgery patients (Hsu, Bentancourt, Sullivan, 1996). Cognitive-behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based practices have been shown to successfully treat binge eating (Agras, Telch, Arnow, Eldredge, & Marnell, 1997; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999). This…

  1. IMPACT OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM DEFICIENCY IN THE BONES OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    CABRAL, Jefry Alberto Vargas; de SOUZA, Gabriela Pereira; NASCIMENTO, Juliana de Almeida; SIMONETI, Luis Fernando; MARCHESE, Carolina; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective tool in the control and treatment of severe obesity, but patients undergoing this procedure are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies by limiting the intake and absorption of many nutrients. Objective: To assess the impact of vitamin D deficiency and calcium in bone in patients after gastric bypass in Roux-en-Y, pointing directly at the type of administration, doses and effects after surgery. Metho...

  2. Nutritional requirements after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnic, Gordana

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an overview of postoperative nutritional requirements and goals following bariatric surgery. It summarizes current diet progression and nutrient intake guidelines geared toward optimizing weight loss and maintaining adequate nutritional status, nutrient absorption, as well as hydration. The article further emphasizes the importance of postoperative follow-up with a bariatric multidisciplinary team for appropriate postoperative care, diet management, and nutrient deficiency screenings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional and metabolic complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Scott S

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for patients with clinically severe obesity. In addition to significant weight loss, it is also associated with improvements in comorbidities. Unfortunately, bariatric surgery also has the potential to cause a variety of nutritional and metabolic complications. These complications are mostly due to the extensive surgically induced anatomical changes incurred by the patient's gastrointestinal tract, particularly with roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. Complications associated with vertical banded gastroplasty are mostly due to decreased intake amounts of specific nutrients. Macronutrient deficiencies can include severe protein-calorie malnutrition and fat malabsorption. The most common micronutrient deficiencies are of vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and vitamin D. Other micronutrient deficiencies that can lead to serious complications include thiamine, folate, and the fat-soluble vitamins. Counseling, monitoring, and nutrient and mineral supplementation are essential for the treatment and prevention of nutritional and metabolic complications after bariatric surgery.

  4. Employment and Professional Outcomes in 803 Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery in a French Reference Center for Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Durand-Moreau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few studies have been performed on small populations about the links between employment and bariatric surgery. Objective: To determine if rates of employment are increased among patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, to assess their post-operative health consequences (post-prandial weakness, diarrhea, and patients' ability to maintain post-operative advice (ie, 30 minutes of daily physical activity, 6 small meals daily compared to non-employed post-surgical patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Regional Reference Centre for Obesity, which is a partnership between the University Hospital and a clinic in Angers, France during 2012 using a self-administrated questionnaire completed by patients hospitalized for post-operative follow-ups after bariatric surgery. Issues investigated were their professional situation before and after the surgery, compliancy to post-operative advice, and any postoperative side effects. Results: Employment rates were 64.4% before and 64.7% after the surgery (p=0.94. Of these, 30.6% maintained 30 minutes of daily physical activity vs. 41.0% of non-workers (p=0.02. 50.5% of employed patients and 57.3% of non-workers maintained 6 small meals a day after surgery (p=0.09. 8% of working patients reported post-prandial weaknesses and 8% reported diarrhea that caused problems at work. Conclusion: Employment rate remained stable after surgery. Having a job seemed to be an obstacle to managing 30 minutes of daily exercise, especially among women, but not maintaining 6 small meals a day. Therefore, working environment needs to be assessed to improve job quality and retention for patients who have undergone bariatric surgery.

  5. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmon, Anatte; Sheiner, Eyal

    2008-05-01

    Obesity continues to be a global epidemic, and strong evidence exists linking it with gestational complications such as macrosomia, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, gestational diabetes, and cesarean section. Bariatric surgery, a highly effective treatment for obesity, may prevent such complications in subsequent pregnancies. This review seeks to describe the risks and benefits of post-bariatric procedure pregnancies, in comparison to both community and obese cohorts. A thorough review of the literature suggests that post-surgery women are not at increased risk for poor perinatal outcomes, and moreover their risks for many obesity-related gestational complications are reduced after bariatric surgery. Data regarding fertility after bariatric surgery are quite ambiguous, however, and studies exist demonstrating both positive and negative associations between weight loss procedures and fertility. Clinicians should be aware that data collected on this subject were often gathered from post-op pregnant women provided with good prenatal care and screening for nutritional deficiencies. Although pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safe, providers should take extra care to properly monitor their post-op pregnant patients for appropriate weight gain and nourishment.

  6. Analyses of balance and flexibility of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Antico Benetti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the postural control and flexibility of obese subjects before and both six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. To verify whether postural control is related to flexibility following weight reductions resulting from bariatric surgery. METHODS: The sample consisted of 16 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery. All assessments were performed before and six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Postural balance was assessed using an Accusuway¯ portable force platform, and flexibility was assessed using a standard chair sit and reach test (Wells’ chair. RESULTS: With the force platform, no differences were observed in the displacement area or velocity from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. The displacement speed from the center of pressure was decreased at the six month after the surgery; however, unchanged from baseline at 12 months post-surgery. Flexibility increased over time according to the three measurements tested. CONCLUSIONS: Static postural balance did not change. The velocity of postural adjustment responses were increased at six months after surgery. Therefore, weight loss promotes increased flexibility. Yet, improvements in flexibility are not related to improvements in balance.

  7. Analyses of balance and flexibility of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Bacha, Ivan Leo; Garrido Junior, Arthur Belarmino; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2016-02-01

    To assess the postural control and flexibility of obese subjects before and both six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. To verify whether postural control is related to flexibility following weight reductions resulting from bariatric surgery. The sample consisted of 16 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery. All assessments were performed before and six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Postural balance was assessed using an Accusuway® portable force platform, and flexibility was assessed using a standard chair sit and reach test (Wells' chair). With the force platform, no differences were observed in the displacement area or velocity from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. The displacement speed from the center of pressure was decreased at the six month after the surgery; however, unchanged from baseline at 12 months post-surgery. Flexibility increased over time according to the three measurements tested. Static postural balance did not change. The velocity of postural adjustment responses were increased at six months after surgery. Therefore, weight loss promotes increased flexibility. Yet, improvements in flexibility are not related to improvements in balance.

  8. Nutritional profile of patients in a multidisciplinary treatment program for severe obesity and preoperative bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Fernanda Cristina Carvalho Mattos; da Silva, Monique Silveira; Cohen, Larissa; Sarmento, Luciana d'Abreu; Rosado, Eliane Lopes; Carneiro, João Régis Ivar

    2014-01-01

    Along with the augmentation in obesity rates in recent years, the demand for bariatric surgery has startlingly increased. Nutritional counseling in the preoperative period is very important because it contributes to higher success rate in the post-operative period. To assess the nutritional status of patients in a multidisciplinary program for the treatment of severe obesity and pre-operatively for bariatric surgery, characterizing the consumption of healthy nutrients. A retrospective analysis of 30 patients was conducted. Personal information, anthropometric data and dietary assessment by 24-hour food record were collected. The analysis of energy intake was performed in Dietpro 5.1 Professional(r) program. The statistical treatment of the caloric intake was performed by an ANOVA test with Bonferroni's post hoc and for anthropometric data the paired t test was used. From the total, 73% of the patients were women and 27% male, mean age was 48.4+12.9 and 49.8+8.1, respectively. A lower weight in the 5th appointment was observed when compared with the 1st one. There was a reduction in caloric intake in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th appointments when compared with the 1st. It was observed that in the 5th appointment more than 50% of the patients underwent six meals a day. There was an increase in the consumption of fruit along the appointments and 72.2% of patients consumed 1-2 servings of fruit a day. Vegetables intake was high in all appointments in the pre-operative period and, although low, the whole grain products consumption has increased during the pre-operative period achieving 30% of the study population. There was a decrease in body weight, a trend in the decrease of the body mass index and waist circumference and quantitative and qualitative improvement of food consumption.

  9. Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hezelgrave, N. L.; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to ...

  10. Alterations in Hydrocortisone Pharmacokinetics in a Patient With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Following Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallappa, Ashwini; Nella, Aikaterini A; Kumar, Parag; Brooks, Kristina M; Perritt, Ashley F; Ling, Alexander; Liu, Chia-Ying; Merke, Deborah P

    2017-07-01

    Management of adult patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is challenging and often complicated by obesity, metabolic syndrome, and adverse cardiovascular risk. Alterations in weight can influence cortisol kinetics. A 19-year-old woman with classic CAH and morbid obesity experienced persistent elevations of androgen levels while receiving oral glucocorticoid therapy. Control of adrenal androgens was improved with continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion therapy, but obesity-related comorbidities persisted. After undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, the patient experienced dramatic weight loss, with improvement in insulin sensitivity and fatty liver in the postbariatric period. Cortisol clearance studies performed to evaluate changes in hydrocortisone dose requirements showed marked alternations in cortisol pharmacokinetics with decreases in volume of distribution and cortisol clearance, along with an increase in area under the curve for cortisol. Hydrocortisone dose was subsequently decreased 34% by 15 months after surgery. Effective control of androgen excess on this lower hydrocortisone dose was achieved and continues 27 months after surgery. This case highlights obesity-related complications of glucocorticoid replacement therapy in the management of CAH. Individual patient factors, such as fatty liver disease and insulin resistance, can have a clinically important effect on cortisol metabolism. Bariatric surgery was a safe and effective treatment of obesity in this patient with CAH and should be considered for patients with CAH and multiple obesity-related comorbidities.

  11. Prevalence of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis Risk Factors in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shinhiti; Neto, Dalísio De Santi; Morita, Flávio Hiroshi Ananias; Morita, Nina Kimie; Lobo, Suzana Margareth Ajeje

    2015-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated with obesity comprises pathological changes ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis; these can evolve to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The objectives of this study are to assess the prevalence of and predictive markers for steatohepatitis in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective study of 184 morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery formed the study cohort. Patients taking potentially hepatotoxic medications and those with viral diseases and a history of excessive alcohol consumption were excluded. Liver biopsies were performed during surgery with a "Trucut" needle. Patients were classified into the following groups according to the histopathological findings: normal, steatosis, mild steatohepatitis, and moderate-severe steatohepatitis. Factors associated with steatohepatitis were evaluated using logistic regression. p values non-invasive predictive markers for the diagnosis and management of steatohepatitis in morbidly obese patients.

  12. Predictors of Vitamin Adherence After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Supreet; Santiago, Vincent A; Gougeon, Lorraine; Warwick, Katie; Okrainec, Allan; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin supplementation in bariatric aftercare is essential to prevent nutrient deficiencies; however, rates of vitamin adherence have been as low as 30 % 6 months post-surgery. Preliminary literature suggests non-adherence to prescribed treatments can be linked to demographic and psychological factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between these factors to vitamin adherence in post-bariatric surgery patients. A total of 92 bariatric patients were assessed 6 months post-surgery. Patients were administered a questionnaire collecting demographic information, psychological scores, and self-reported adherence. Nutrient deficiencies were analyzed through serum vitamin levels measured 3 and 6 months after surgery. Wilcoxon rank-sum and chi-square tests were used for analysis. Non-adherence was associated with male sex and full-time employment (p = 0.027, p = 0.015). There were no differences with respect to living situation, education level, or relationship type. Non-adherent patients did not have significantly higher scores for generalized anxiety, depressive symptoms, or avoidant behaviors. However, non-adherent patients displayed greater attachment anxiety than their adherent counterparts (p = 0.0186). Non-adherence was also associated with lower vitamin B12 levels 6 months post-surgery (p = 0.001). Male gender and full-time work have previously been shown to be associated with non-adherence. This is the first study to demonstrate that attachment anxiety is associated with poor multivitamin adherence in the post-surgical bariatric population. This result is concordant with recent literature that has demonstrated attachment anxiety is associated with poor adherence to dietary recommendations in bariatric patients 6 months postoperatively. Presurgical screening for attachment anxiety could facilitate early interventions to promote better bariatric aftercare in this group.

  13. Comparison Between Marital Satisfaction and Self-Esteem Before and After Bariatric Surgery in Patients With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Lotfi, Tahereh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Mazaheri Meybod, Azadeh; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Jesmi, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is one of the most common chronic diseases with important medical effects, as well as mental and social health problems. Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatments of morbid obesity. Because of the possible psychological changes, and its effects on weight loss after surgery, the current study aimed to compare marital satisfaction and self-confidence in patients with obesity before and after bariatric surgery in Rasoul-e-Akram hospital in 2013. This prospective observational study was conducted on 69 candidates for bariatric surgery. Marital satisfaction and self-confidence were assessed before and six months after the surgery by Enrich marital satisfaction scale and Coopersmith self-esteem inventory. Descriptive statistics and T-tests were utilized to analyze data. Values of P ≤ 0.01 were considered statistically significant. Despite the improvement of sexual relationship, marital satisfaction scores significantly decreased from141.26 ± 12.75 to 139.42 ± 12.52 six months after the surgery (P = 0.002). Satisfaction in scales of conflict resolution and communication showed a descending pattern (P self-esteem before and after the surgery (P = 0.321). Weight loss after bariatric surgery did not improve self-esteem and marital satisfaction six months post operatively; therefore, psychiatric assessment of patients before and after the surgery is crucial; since even if they are not associated with prognosis of the surgery, it is important to provide treatment for psychiatric problems. Prospective studies are recommended to assess post-operative changes of other psychological aspects.

  14. Advanced laparoscopic bariatric surgery Is safe in general surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckelman, John; Bingham, Jason; Barron, Morgan; Lallemand, Michael; Martin, Matthew; Sohn, Vance

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery makes up an increasing percentage of general surgery training. The safety of resident involvement in these complex cases has been questioned. We evaluated patient outcomes in resident performed laparoscopic bariatric procedures. Retrospective review of patients undergoing a laparoscopic bariatric procedure over seven years at a tertiary care single center. Procedures were primarily performed by a general surgery resident and proctored by an attending surgeon. Primary outcomes included operative volume, operative time and leak rate with perioperative outcomes evaluated as secondary outcomes. A total of 1649 bariatric procedures were evaluated. Operations included laparoscopic bypass (690) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (959). Average operating time was 136 min. Eighteen leaks (0.67%) were identified. Graduating residents performed an average of 89 laparoscopic bariatric cases during their training. There were no significant differences between resident levels with concern to operative time or leak rate (p 0.97 and p = 0.54). General surgery residents can safely perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. When proctored by a staff surgeon, a resident's level of training does not significantly impact leak rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Adolescent bariatric surgery: review on nutrition considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Isadora; Hrovat, Kathleen

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adolescents has dramatically increased over the past 3 decades in the United States. Weight loss surgery is becoming a viable treatment option for obese adolescents. The number of surgeries being performed yearly is rising, and this trend is likely to continue. Adolescent patients present a unique challenge to clinicians. There are currently best-practice recommendations and evidence-based nutrition guidelines for the treatment of the adolescent bariatric patient. A review of the current literature was performed to discuss bariatric surgery and nutrition for the adolescent patient. Studies show that most adolescents with obesity will become obese adults, thus increasing their risk of developing serious and debilitating health conditions. It is recommended that the candidates for surgery be referred to a practice that has a multidisciplinary team experienced in meeting the distinct physical and psychological needs of adolescents. Specific nutrition concerns for the adolescent bariatric patient include preoperative educational pathway, postoperative dietary progression, female reproduction, compliance with vitamin/supplementation recommendations, laboratory tests, and long-term monitoring. The medical literature has reported positive outcomes of bariatric surgery in adolescents with severe obesity. Before surgery is offered as an option, unique factors to adolescents must be addressed. The multidisciplinary clinical team must consider the adolescents' cognitive, social, and emotional development when considering their candidacy for surgery. As the number of adolescent bariatric surgery programs increases, continued research and long-term outcome data need to be collected and shared to base future treatment decisions. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Should bariatric surgery be performed in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Reinehr, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has markedly increased worldwide in both its extent and prevalence in recent decades and obesity prevention strategies are failing. As a result, effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. As behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches have only moderate effects in severe obesity, bariatric surgery has begun to emerge as a treatment option. In this debate article, we offer arguments opposing and supporting bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has superior therapeutic outcomes with respect to weight loss and resolution of comorbid diseases over other existing treatments. However, long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery in adolescents are only just beginning to emerge. Furthermore, the procedures are generally considered irreversible, apart from gastric banding. Most importantly, not all adolescents seem to benefit greatly from bariatric surgery and we are not yet able to reliably identify those who stand to gain the greatest benefit. The authors agree that adolescent bariatric surgery should be offered exclusively within formal adolescent obesity programs, delivered by specialist multidisciplinary child/adolescent obesity teams, and within specialist centers, in order to optimize outcomes and minimize potential detrimental effects. Patients and their family/carers must be educated regarding the benefits and risks, potential side effects, expected changes in eating behavior and the lifelong requirement for regular medical follow-up after surgery. Before embarking upon a surgical treatment pathway in adolescents with severe obesity, it may also be beneficial to ensure compliance to treatment is demonstrated, in order to minimize the risk of nutritional deficiencies and associated potential complications. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  17. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients. A comparison between gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy with five years of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, Mario; Milone, Marco; Maietta, Paola; Bianco, Paolo; Coretti, Guido; Pisapia, Anna; Gaudioso, Dario; Milone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising progressively, even among elderly patients. Many studies investigated about safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery among aged obese patients. The objective of this review is to assess the benefits relative to risks of weight loss that may be obtained by performing two common bariatric procedures in obese elderly patient. We retrospectively evaluated 10 morbid obese patients older than 60 years reaching 5 years of follow up who respectively underwent Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) or Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB). Eventual changes in comorbidities, weight loss, EWL% were investigated. Although LSG patients required a longer postoperative hospital stay than LAGB patients (p elderly patients. Whereas all patients showed comorbidities resolution, no significant difference in weight loss between LAGB group and LSG group was found at 1 year (EWL% p = 0.87; BMI p = 0.32), 3 years (EWL% p = 0.62; BMI p = 0.79) and 5 years (EWL% p = 0.52; BMI p = 0.46) of follow up. Bariatric surgery is safe and effective to reach obesity related comorbidities resolution among elderly obese patients. Both LAGB and LSG determine a weight loss lesser than observed in a standard bariatric population. In this study LSG is significantly less cost effective than LAGB. Larger studies with longer follow up are however needed to evaluate the real impact of bariatric surgery on weight loss, resolution of comorbidities and improvement of quality of life in elderly obese patients. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Primary care physician decision making regarding referral for bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Hepp, Nicola; Juhl, Anna Julie Aavild

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity. It results in significant and sustained weight loss and reduces obesity-related co-morbidities. Despite an increasing prevalence of severe obesity, the number of bariatric operations performed in Denmark has decreased...... during the past years. This is only partly explained by changes in the national guidelines for bariatric surgery. The purpose of the cross-sectional study is to investigate referral patterns and possible reservations regarding bariatric surgery among Danish primary care physicians (PCPs). Setting......: Primary care physicians in Denmark. Methods: A total of 300 Danish PCPs were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey regarding experiences with bariatric surgery, reservations about bariatric surgery, attitudes to specific patient cases, and the future treatment of severe obesity. Most questions...

  19. A comparison of revisional and primary bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Courtney; Sheppard, Caroline; Birch, Daniel; Karmali, Shazeer; de Gara, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Revisional surgery is an important component of addressing weight regain and complications following primary bariatric surgery. Owing to provincial need and the complexity of this patient population, a specialized multidisciplinary revision clinic was developed. We sought to characterize patients who undergo revision surgery and compare their outcomes with primary bariatric surgery clinic data. We completed a retrospective chart review of bariatric revision clinic patients compared with primary bariatric surgery patients from December 2009 to June 2014. We reviewed the charts of 2769 primary bariatric clinic patients, 886 of whom had bariatric surgery, and 534 revision bariatric clinic patients, 83 of whom had revision surgery. Fewer revision clinic patients underwent surgery than primary clinic patients (22% v. 32%). The mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 44.7 ± 9.5 in revision patients compared with 45.7 ± 7.6 in primary bariatric surgery patients. Most revision patients had a prior vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG; 48%) or a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB; 24%). Bands were removed in 36% of all LAGB patients presenting to clinic. Of the 134 procedures performed in the revision clinic, 83 were bariatric weight loss surgeries, and 51 were band removals. Revision clinic patients experienced a significant decrease in BMI (from 44.7 ± 9.5 to 33.8 ± 7.5, p bariatric revision clinic manages a wide variety of complex patients distinct from those seen in a primary clinic. Operative candidates at the revision clinic are chosen based on favourable medical, anatomic and psychosocial factors, keeping in mind the resource constraints of a public health care system.

  20. Super-Obesity in the Elderly: Is Bariatric Surgery Justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Emma Rose; Bond, Amanda; Reddy, Marcus; Khan, Omar A; Wan, Andrew C

    2015-09-01

    Although the prevalence of obese elderly patients is increasing, the outcomes of bariatric surgery in this potentially high-risk cohort remain poorly understood, especially those relating to quality of life. Furthermore, there is no data on the efficacy of bariatric surgery in the super-obese elderly. We identified 50 consecutive patients undergoing bariatric surgery aged 60 years or over, and compared the outcomes of the super-obese (BMI ≥ 50; n = 26) with those of BMI Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) 3.5 vs. 3.1; p = 0.64).

  1. Nutrient deficiencies secondary to bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I

    2004-09-01

    The number of adolescent and adult patients submitting to bariatric surgery is increasing rapidly around the world. This review describes the literature published in the last few years concerning nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery as well as their etiology, incidence, treatment and prevention. Although bariatric surgery was first introduced in the 1950s, safe and successful surgical management has progressed over the last two decades and longer post-surgical follow-up data are now available. Most of the patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures will develop some nutritional deficiency, justifying mineral and multivitamin supplementation to all postoperatively. Nutrient deficiency is proportional to the length of absorptive area and to the percentage of weight loss. Low levels of iron, vitamin B12, vitamin D and calcium are predominant after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Protein and fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies are mainly detected after biliopancreatic diversion. Thiamine deficiency is common in patients with frequent vomiting. As the incidence of these deficiencies progresses with time, the patients should be monitored frequently and regularly to prevent malnutrition. Nutritional deficiencies can be prevented if a multidisciplinary team regularly assists the patient. Malnutrition is generally reverted with nutrient supplementation, once it is promptly diagnosed. Especial attention should be given to adolescents, mainly girls at reproductive age who have a substantial risk of developing iron deficiency. Future studies are necessary to detect nutrient abnormalities after new procedures and to evaluate the safety of bariatric surgery in younger obese patients.

  2. Evaluation of quality of life in severely obese patients after bariatric surgery carried out in the public healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawali, Cristina; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi; Zanella, Maria Tereza; Ferreira, Sandra R G

    2012-02-01

    To assess QoL of obese patients in the Brazilian public healthcare system, before and after bariatric surgery, and to determine the appropriateness of the Moorehead-Ardelt Questionnaire II (M-A-QoLQII) compared with the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Forty-one severe obese patients in a waiting-list, and 84 patients who underwent bariatric surgery were included. Correlations were tested and reliability determined by the Cronbach's coefficient. BMI differed between the pre- and post-surgery groups (52.3 ± 8.3 kg/m(2) vs. 32.5 ± 6.4 kg/m(2), p surgery. SF-36 and M-A-QoLQII categories were correlated (r = 0.53, 0.49 and 0.47, for vitality, mental health, and general health domains, p bariatric surgery obtained in a Brazilian public healthcare center were successful. M-A-QoLII represents a useful tool to assess surgery outcomes, including QoL.

  3. High-Percentage Pathological Findings in Obese Patients Suggest that Esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy Should Be Made Mandatory Prior to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Mizelle; Bhasker, Aparna Govil; Kantharia, Nimisha S; Lakdawala, Muffazal

    2018-04-21

    ᅟ: Obesity is a global epidemic and will soon become the number one priority in healthcare management. Bariatric surgery causes a significant improvement in obesity and its related complications. Pre-operative esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) is done by several bariatric surgical teams across the world but is still not mandatory. To study the percentage of symptomatic and asymptomatic pathological EGD findings in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery and to analyze whether these findings influence the eventual choice of bariatric surgery. All patients posted for bariatric surgery at our institute from January 2015 to March 2017 had a pre-operative EGD done by the same team of endoscopists. In this study, totally, 675 patients were assessed prior to routine bariatric surgery. 78.52% of all pre-operative patients had an abnormal EGD. The most common endoscopic abnormalities found were hiatus hernia (52.44%), gastritis (46.22%), presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori (46.67%), reflux esophagitis (16.89%), Barrett's esophagus (1.78%), gastric erosions (13.19%), and polyps (7.41%). Fifty patients had upper gastrointestinal polyps: 41 in the stomach, 3 in the esophagus, and 6 in the duodenum, mostly benign hyperplastic or inflammatory polyps. Two patients had gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 6 leiomyoma, and 6 neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Of those with endoscopic evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 70 (60.03%) of patients were asymptomatic. The pre-operative EGD findings resulted in a change of the planned surgical procedure in 67 (9.93%) patients. Our study suggests that a large percentage of patients undergoing bariatric surgery have pathologically significant endoscopic findings of which a significant number are asymptomatic; this can lead to a change in the planned bariatric procedure in a section of patients; hence, we believe that EGD should be made mandatory as a pre-operative investigation in all bariatric surgery patients.

  4. Endocrine Function after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2017-06-18

    Obesity increases the risks of metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Bariatric surgery is the most successful therapeutic option that causes sustained weight loss and improvements in obesity comorbidities. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) are two of the most frequently performed bariatric surgeries. Despite their different anatomical rearrangement, they have remarkably similar success in both weight loss and T2DM remission. Interestingly, they also both cause a wide range of endocrine changes. Many of these endocrine changes are reflected specifically within the intestine and are implicated as mechanisms for the metabolic success of surgery. However, while most of the work shows that these hormonal changes are associated with the metabolic changes after surgery, causation has been difficult to ascertain. Here, we review the endocrine changes after RYGB and VSG and explore their mechanistic role in the success of bariatric surgery. Further, we explore important changes in gastrointestinal function and the role of these changes in the increase in postprandial endocrine responses after bariatric surgery. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:783-798, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene T; Madura, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch.

  6. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  7. Mid-term results of bariatric surgery in morbidly obese Japanese patients with slow progressive autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kohei; Seki, Yosuke; Kasama, Kazunori; Wakamatsu, Kotaro; Hashimoto, Kenkichi; Umezawa, Akiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Kurokawa, Yoshimochi

    2017-12-11

    Bariatric surgery is recognized as an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, but data on its efficacy for type 1 diabetes mellitus, especially slowly progressive insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, are limited. We investigated five Japanese patients with slowly progressive insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who underwent bariatric surgery at our center. Five morbidly obese glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive diabetic patients underwent two different types of bariatric surgery. The mean titer of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody was 4.6 U/mL, and the mean preoperative bodyweight and BMI were 113 kg and 39.6 kg/m 2 , respectively. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 8.4%. The mean fasting serum C-peptide was 5.0 ng/mL. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was performed in two patients, while laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with duodenojejunal bypass was performed in three patients. At one year after surgery, the mean bodyweight and BMI significantly dropped, and the mean percentage of excess weight loss was 96.4%. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 5.7%. This favorable trend was maintained at mid-term. Bariatric surgery for morbidly obese patients with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive type 1 diabetes mellitus, especially slow progressive autoimmune diabetes, seemed effective in achieving mid-term glycemic control. Longer follow-up with a larger number of patients, as well as validation with more advanced patients with slowly progressive insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, will be needed. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Relevance of Adipose Tissue Stiffness Evaluated by Transient Elastography (AdipoScan™) in Morbidly Obese Patients before Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Magali; Abdennour, Meriem; Liu, Yuejun; Hazrak, Hecham; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Le Naour, Gilles; Bedossa, Pierre; Torjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Miette, Véronique

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) in human obesity undergoes severe alteration such as fibrosis which is related to metabolic alterations and to less efficiency in losing weight after bariatric surgery. There is currently no non-invasive tool to assess fibrosis in scAT. Vibration Controlled Transient Elastography (VCTE) using FibroScan® is widely used to assess liver fibrosis in clinical practice. A novel device named AdipoScan™ which is based on VCTE has been developed by Echosens (Paris) so as to assess scAT. The objective of this study is to show the first AdipoScan clinical results. AdipoScan™ was assessed in vivo on 73 morbidly obese patients candidate for bariatric surgery who were enrolled in the Pitié Salpêtrière hospital. scAT shear wave speed measured by AdipoScan™ is significantly associated with scAT fibrosis, gender, hypertension status, total body fat mass assessed by DXA, hypertension status, glycemic, lipid, hepatic parameters and adiponectin. Results suggest that scAT evaluation before bariatric surgery can be useful in clinical practice since it is related to scAT fibrosis -who plays in role in weight loss resistance after bariatric surgery- and to obesity induced co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension liver dysfunction.

  9. Bariatric surgery, a risk factor for rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, M L; Campillo-Soto, A; Martín-Lorenzo, J G; Torralba-Martínez, J A; Lirón-Ruiz, R; Aguayo-Albasini, J L

    2013-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of bariatric surgery. We report a case of this complication and its consequences, in a patient who had undergone bariatric surgery, with a very high creatine kinase (CK) concentration, and whose renal function failed. Obesity causes a range of effects on all major organ systems. Knowledge of these effects and issues specific to the intensive care unit care of bariatric patients can help to predict and manage this underestimated complication in this population in which early diagnosis can alter the outcome. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Present status of bariatric surgery in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Janik, Micha? R.; Stanowski, Edward; Pa?nik, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The first survey of bariatric surgery in Poland was published in 2007. New trends are observed worldwide, and there is a current need to investigate the status of bariatric surgery in Polish institutions. This survey was initiated to gain an overview of Polish bariatric surgery during 2007–2014. Aim : To analyze the number and types of bariatric procedures performed in Polish institutions in 2014 and to perform a trend analysis from 2007 to 2014. Material and methods ...

  11. Restoration of the jawline and the neck after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P

    2005-02-01

    Bariatric surgery can result in massive, rapid weight loss. Patients who undergo this surgery can be left with significant facial and neck skin redundancy and may request restorative facial plastic surgery. Optimal results require a thorough understanding of the unique physiologic, metabolic, and anatomic findings in these patients. Modifications of standard rhytidectomy techniques are necessary to suit the specific features of the patient after bariatric surgery.

  12. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues

    OpenAIRE

    Lupoli, Roberta; Lembo, Erminia; Saldalamacchia, Gennaro; Avola, Claudia Kesia; Angrisani, Luigi; Capaldo, Brunella

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recognized as a highly effective therapy for obesity since it accomplishes sustained weight loss, reduction of obesity-related comorbidities and mortality, and improvement of quality of life. Overall, bariatric surgery is associated with a 42% reduction of the cardiovascular risk and 30% reduction of all-cause mortality. This review focuses on some nutritional consequences that can occur in bariatric patients that could potentially hinder the clinical benefits of this the...

  13. Value of routine polysomnography in bariatric surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raaff, C.A.L.; Pierik, A.S.; Coblijn, U.K.; de Vries, N.; Bonjer, H.J.; van Wagensveld, B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), present in 60–70 % of bariatric surgery patients, is a potentially life-threatening condition when not detected and managed appropriately. The best available method to identify the severity of OSA is polysomnography. However, routine polysomnography

  14. Postprandial Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Bariatric Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heide, L. J.M.; Emous, M.; van Beek, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (PHH) is a complication of bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The true incidence is not known as the definition of PHH is not clear. Continuous glucose monitoring shows a prevalence of hypoglycemia in 75% of patients, with only 1 in 5

  15. Monitoring respiration and oxygen saturation in patients during the first night after elective bariatric surgery: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickerts, Liselott; Forsberg, Sune; Bouvier, Frederic; Jakobsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background : Obstructive sleep apnoea and obese hypoventilation is not uncommon in patients with obesity. Residuals effect from surgery/anaesthesia and opioid analgesics may worsen respiration during the first nights after bariatric surgery. The aim of this observational study was to monitor respiration on the first postoperative night following elective bariatric surgery. Methods : This observational study aimed to determine the incidence and severity of hypo/apnoea in low risk obsess patients undergoing elective bariatric surgery in general anesthaesia. Patients with known or suspected sleep respiratory disturbances was not included. ESS was scored prior to surgery. Oxygen desaturation was analyzed by continuous respiratory monitoring. Mean oxygen saturation (SpO2), nadir SPo2, apnoea/hypopnea index and oxygen desaturation index was assess by standard tools. Results : 45 patients were monitored with portable polygraphy equipment (Embletta, ResMed) during the first postoperative night at the general ward following elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery. The prop ESS was 0-5 in 22, 6-10 in 14 and 11-16 in 6 of the patients studied (missing data 3). Mean SpO2 was 93%; 10 patients had a mean SpO2 of less than 92% and 4 of less than 90%. The lowest mean SpO2 was 87%. There were 16 patients with a nadir SpO2 of less than 85%, lowest nadir SpO2 being 63%. An Apnoea Hypo/apnoea Index (AHI) > 5 was found in 2 patients only (AHI 10 and 6), and an Oxygen Desaturation index (ODI) > 5 was found in 3 patients (24, 10 and 6, respectively). 3 patients had more prolonged (> 30 seconds) apnoea with nadir SpO2 81%, 83% and 86%. ESS score and type of surgery did not impact on respiration/oxygenation during the observation period. Conclusions : A low mean SpO2 and episodes of desaturation were not uncommon during the first postoperative night following elective bariatric surgery in patients without history of night time breathing disturbance. AHI and/or ODI of more than 5 were only

  16. EDITORIAL Bariatric surgery, addictive-like eating behaviour and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bariatric surgery, addictive-like eating behaviour and obesity. The obesity epidemic in South Africa is completely ... bariatric surgery may reverse or cure type 2 diabetes in the majority of severely obese patients, added ... whose blood pressure, diabetes and asthma are controlled by. 30% by 2020. The implementation of the ...

  17. Influence of bariatric surgery on the use of medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; van der Meer, Douwe H.; Dreijer, Albert R.; Eilander, Willeke; Apers, Jan A.; Emous, Marloes; Totte, Erik R. E.; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    PURPOSE: Bariatric surgery can influence the prevalence and incidence of comorbidities, as well as the pharmacokinetics of drugs. This might lead to changes in the use of drugs. This study aimed to assess the influence of bariatric surgery on the use of medication in patients before and after

  18. Attitudes about the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery among patients with type 2 diabetes and a body mass index of 30-40 kg/m2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Ritter, Scott; Wadden, Thomas A; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Vetter, Marion L; Moore, Reneé H

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing awareness within the medical community about the benefits of bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), little is known about patients' attitudes toward bariatric surgery as a treatment for T2DM. The objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of individuals with T2DM and a body mass index of 30 to 40 kg/m(2) concerning bariatric surgery for the treatment of T2DM. Patients identified from the Pennsylvania Integrated Clinical and Administrative Research Database (PICARD) were surveyed about perceptions of the safety profile and efficacy of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and T2DM and their willingness to be randomly assigned to receive a surgical procedure. A total of 130 individuals of 513 (25.3%) responded. Respondents had a median (interquartile range) age of 58.0 (range 51.0-63.0) years and self-reported body mass index of 32.9 (range 30.9-35.2) kg/m(2). Roughly half (66 of 130) were female. Overall, only 20.3% of respondents had positive views of bariatric surgery, with few reporting that it is a safe (14.3%) and effective (28.5%) treatment for T2DM. Less than 20% of respondents were willing to be randomly assigned to undergo a surgical procedure for the treatment of diabetes (16.1%) or obesity (17.5%). Few obese individuals with T2DM who responded to the survey had positive views about bariatric surgery. Patients' concerns about the procedure's safety profile and efficacy must be addressed to improve the acceptability of bariatric surgery as well as the feasibility of randomized, controlled trials of bariatric surgery for these individuals. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychopathological status and interpersonal functioning following weight loss in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, Juan A; Vaz, Francisco J; Alarcón, Javier; López-Ibor, Juan J; Rubio, Miguel A; Gaite, Luis

    2002-12-01

    We questioned whether differences in psychopathological status and interpersonal relations exist in a group of morbidly obese patients 18 months after bariatric surgery, as related to extent of weight loss. The study group consisted of 100 morbidly obese patients (85 female, 15 male) who had undergone surgical treatment (vertical banded gastroplasty) for weight reduction. Each patient completed the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile European version, the Eating Disorder Inventory, the Symptom Check List-90-Revised, and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. The sample was divided into 2 groups according to the percentage of excess weight loss 18 months after surgery: a greater weight loss group (weight loss > 30%) and a lesser weight loss group (weight loss < 30%). Significant differences were found between the 2 groups in percentage of weight loss (P < 0.0001), negative self-esteem (P < 0.001), drive for thinness (P < 0.001), body dissatisfaction (P < 0.001), global EDI (P < 0.002), anxiety (P < 0.003), GSI (P < 0.002), avoidant (P < 0.001), borderline (P < 0.0001), and passive-aggressive (P < 0.002). Greater weight loss strongly correlates with improved quality of life, less disturbed eating behavior, and lower psychopathology. These results justify the clinical use of surgical procedures and demonstrate that weight loss has powerful psychological and psychosocial implications.

  20. Postoperative metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Timothy R; Finelli, Frederick C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly important method for management of medically complicated obesity. In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, up to 87% with type 2 diabetes mellitus develop improvement or resolution of their disease postoperatively. Bariatric surgery can reduce the number of absorbed calories through performance of either a restrictive or a malabsorptive procedure. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery require indefinite, regular follow-up care by physicians who need to follow laboratory parameters of macronutrient as well as micronutrient malnutrition. Physicians who care for patients after bariatric surgery need to be familiar with common postoperative syndromes that result from specific nutrient deficiencies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of eating habits and lifestyle in patients with obesity before and after bariatric surgery: a single Italian center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Hellas; De Giuseppe, Rachele; Biino, Ginevra; Persico, Francesca; Ciliberto, Ambra; Giovanelli, Alessandro; Stanford, Fatima Cody

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluated and compared the eating habits and lifestyle of patients with moderate to severe obesity who have undergone Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and Sleeve Gastrectomy (SG). Food frequency (FF), food habits (FH), physical activity and life style (PA) as well as smoking habits (SH) were analyzed in 50 RYGB (25 M; aged: 24-64) and 50 SG patients (25 M; aged: 22-63) by means of a validated questionnaire, before (T0) and 6 months (T1) post bariatric surgery. A score for each section (FF, FH, PA, SH) was calculated. ANOVA analysis (age/sex adjusted): FF and FH scores improved at T1 (RYGB and SG: p habits improved, patients did not change their physical activity level or their smoking habits. Patients should receive adequate lifestyle counseling to ensure the maximal benefit from bariatric surgery.

  2. Bariatric surgery for severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugerman, H J

    2001-07-01

    Severe obesity is associated with multiple comorbidities and is refractory to dietary management with or without behavioral or drug therapies. There are a number of surgical procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity, including purely gastric restrictive, a combination of malabsorption and gastric restriction or primary malabsorption. The purely gastric restrictive procedures, including vertical banded gastroplasty and laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding, do not provide adequate weight loss. African-American patients do especially poorly after the banding procedure with the loss of only 11% of excess weight in one study. Gastric bypass (GBP) is associated with the loss of 66% of excess weight at 1 to 2 years after surgery, 60% at 5 years and 50% at 10 years. For unknown reasons, African-American patients lose significantly less weight than Caucasians after GBP. There is a risk of micronutrient deficiencies after GBP, including iron deficiency anemia in menstruating women, vitamin B12, and calcium deficiencies. Prophylactic supplementation of these nutrients is necessary. Recurrent vomiting after bariatric surgery may be associated with a severe polyneuropathy and must be aggressively treated with endoscopic dilatation before this complication is allowed to develop. The malabsorptive procedures include the partial biliopancreatic bypass (BPD) and BPD with duodenal switch (BPD/DS). The BPD appears to cause severe protein-calorie malnutrition in American patients; the BPD/DS may be associated with less malnutrition. Weight loss failure after GBP does not respond to tightening a dilated gastrojejunal stoma or reducing the size of the gastric pouch. These patients may require conversion to a malabsorptive distal GBP, similar to the BPD. However, because of the risk of severe protein-calorie malnutrition and calcium deficiency BPD should be reserved for patients with severe obesity comorbidity. The risk of death following bariatric surgery is between 1

  3. Nutrition and pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaska, Lukasz; Kobiela, Jarek; Abacjew-Chmylko, Anna; Chmylko, Lukasz; Wojanowska-Pindel, Magdalena; Kobiela, Paulina; Walerzak, Anna; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Stefaniak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an escalating problem in all age groups and it is observed to be more common in females than males. About 25% of women meet the criteria of obesity and one-third of them are in the reproductive age. Because morbid obesity requiring surgical treatment is observed with increasing frequency, surgeons and gynecologists are undergoing new challenges. It is not only a matter of women's health and their quality of life but also proper development of the fetus, which should be a concern during bariatric treatment. Therefore complex perinatal care has to be provided for morbid obesity patients. The paper reviews pregnancy and fertility issues in bariatric surgery patients.

  4. Difficulties of Bariatric Surgery after Abdominoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Karip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During laparoscopy, the main problems of patients who have undergone previous abdominoplasty are inadequate pneumoperitoneum secondary to fibrosis and reconstructed anatomic landmarks for trocar placement. In this study, we present our laparoscopic bariatric experience in two patients with previous abdominoplasty. The procedures were a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and a robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Both operations were done successfully by an abdominal wall traction technique, cutting fibrotic tissue and choosing new landmarks. We conclude that after abdominoplasty bariatric surgery can be performed safely either using conventional laparoscopic technique or robotically.

  5. IGF1 modifications after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients: potential implications of nutritional status according to specific surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellitero, Silvia; Granada, María Luisa; Martínez, Eva; Balibrea, Jose María; Guanyabens, Elena; Serra, Assumpta; Moreno, Pau; Navarro, Maruja; Romero, Ramon; Alastrué, Antonio; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2013-11-01

    IGF1 is decreased in morbidly obese (MO) patients and its changes after bariatric surgery weight loss (WL) are not well known. The aim of this study was to analyse IGF1 modifications in MO patients after WL and its relationship to ghrelin and to different types of surgeries. Retrospective follow-up study at the University Medical Center. One hundred and nine MO patients (age 44.19.3, BMI 51.748.75KG/M(2)) were evaluated at baseline and 1 year after surgery: 28 sleeve gastrectomy (SG), 31 distal modified (m), and 50 ringed (r) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) surgery. Changes in IGF1, IGFBP3, ratio IGF1:IGFBP3, and ghrelin were evaluated 1 year after surgery. Baseline prevalence of low IGF1 (defined by s.d. IGF1surgery was 34.9±8.9%. There was a significant decrease in IGFBP3 in all the procedures, an increase in IGF1:IGFBP3 ratio in rRYGBP and SG, but total IGF1 only increased significantly in SG. Albumin concentrations decreased in mRYGBP, did not change in rRYGBP, but increased in SG after surgery. Total ghrelin concentrations increased after both RYGBPs and decreased after SG (Ptechniques. The %albumin change was the only dependent variable associated with the % total IGF1 change. Recovery of low IGF1 after bariatric surgery was specifically related to the albumin modifications induced by surgery and was not related to ghrelin modifications.

  6. Frequency and risk factors of blood transfusion in abdominoplasty in post-bariatric surgery patients: data from the nationwide inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi, Hossein; Rimler, Jonathan; Wirth, Garrett A; Lee, Christine; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Evans, Gregory R D

    2015-05-01

    There are limited data regarding blood transfusion following abdominoplasty, especially in post-bariatric surgery patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate (1) the frequency and outcomes of blood transfusion in post-bariatric surgery patients undergoing abdominoplasty and (2) the predictive risk factors of blood transfusion in this patient population. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, the authors examined the clinical data of patients with a history of bariatric surgery who underwent abdominoplasty from 2007 to 2011 in the United States. A total of 20,130 post-bariatric surgery patients underwent abdominoplasty during this period. Overall, 1871 patients (9.3 percent) received blood transfusion. Chronic anemia patients had the highest rate of blood transfusion (25.6 percent). Post-bariatric surgery patients who received blood transfusion experienced a significantly higher complication rate (10.1 percent versus 4.8 percent; p blood transfusion. The blood transfusion rate in post-bariatric surgery abdominoplasty patients is not insignificant. Chronic anemia and congestive heart failure are the two major predictors of transfusion. Modifying risk factors such as anemia before abdominoplasty might significantly decrease the possibility of blood transfusion. Risk, III.

  7. Analysis of obese patients' medical conditions in the pre and postoperative periods of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Anderson DA Silva; Zulin, Aline; Scolari, Sandro; Marcon, Sônia Silva; Radovanovic, Cremilde Aparecida Trindade

    2017-01-01

    to compare the clinical conditions of obese patients in the pre and postoperative period of bariatric surgery. we carried out a descriptive, retrospective, quantitative study by consulting the charts of 134 patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the period from 2009 to 2014. We collected the data between September and November 2015. We performed a descriptive statistical analysis and comparative analysis of anthropometric, metabolic, biochemical and clinical variables, considering six months before and after surgery. the majority of the patients were female (91.8%), with a higher prevalence (35%) in the age group 18-29 years old, complete high-school education (65.6%) and grade III obesity (60.4%). Six months after surgery, weight and lipid profile reduction were significant in both genders, but the impact on biochemical, anthropometric, metabolic and clinical parameters was significant only in female subjects, with a reduction in morbidities associated with obesity, such as arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome and in the use of drugs to control them. bariatric surgery was effective in weight loss, with improvements in anthropometric, metabolic and biochemical parameters and in the reduction of morbidities associated with obesity. comparar as condições clínicas de pacientes obesos em período pré e pós-operatório de cirurgia bariátrica. estudo descritivo, retrospectivo, de abordagem quantitativa, por meio de consulta ao prontuário de 134 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia bariátrica no período de 2009 a 2014. Os dados foram coletados entre os meses de setembro e novembro de 2015. Foi realizada análise estatística descritiva e comparativa das variáveis antropométricas, metabólicas, bioquímicas e clínicas, considerando seis meses antes e após a cirurgia. a maioria dos pacientes era do sexo feminino (91,8%), com maior prevalência (35%) na faixa etária de 18 aos 29 anos, com ensino médio completo (65

  8. Assessment of dietary habits, nutritional status and blood biochemical parameters in patients prepared for bariatric surgery: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-08-01

    Morbid obesity needs to be treated by bariatric procedures. Proper dietary preparation of patients before surgery conditions their postoperative status. Assessment of dietary habits, nutritional status and biochemical parameters of the blood in patients being prepared for different bariatric procedures. The study involved a group of 27 obese adults: 19 women (mean age: 40.4 ±13.9 years) and 8 men (mean age: 39.6 ±12.7 years) qualified for bariatric procedures. Body composition, dietary habits and selected biochemical parameters of blood were assessed. Statistical analysis of the results was conducted using Statistica 9.0. Daily food rations consumed by women provided 1910.6 ±915.9 kcal/day, and by men 2631 ±1463.2 kcal/day on average. In both groups, the consumption of major nutrients was found to be inadequate. In both groups, deficiency was observed in the dietary intake of folic acid and potassium. Additionally, there was a decrease in the intake of vitamin D(3), calcium and iron in women and magnesium in men. In the two groups, disturbances were noted in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Our study indicates the necessity for dietary instructions in bariatric patients with regard to proper dietary habits and to reduce the risk of malnutrition before and after surgery.

  9. Cardiac dual-source CT for the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tognolini, A.; Arellano, C.S.; Marfori, W.; Sayre, J.W.; Hollada, J.L.; Goldin, J.G.; Dutson, E.P.; Ruehm, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic value of coronary dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) as a comprehensive, non-invasive tool in the preoperative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Materials and methods: Thirty consecutive obese [average body mass index (BMI): 45 ± 7.6, range: 35–59] patients (24 women; six men; median age: 52 ± 15 years) were enrolled in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)-compliant prospective study. Calcium scoring (CaS) and electrocardiography (ECG)-gated images of the coronary arteries were obtained with a large body habitus protocol (120 kV; 430 mAs; 100 ml iodinated contrast medium at 7 ml/s injection rate) on a DSCT machine. Qualitative (four-point: 1 = excellent to 4 = not delineable) coronary segmental analysis, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements were performed. The presence and degree of vascular disease (four-grade scale: mild to severe) was correlated with CaS and cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification blood tests. In patients with severe stenosis (>70%), findings were compared with cardiac nuclear medicine imaging (single photon-emission computed tomography; SPECT) imaging. Results: The average HR, enhancement, and quality score were 64 ± 7 beats/min, 288 ± 66 HU and 1.8 ± .5, respectively. Ninety-three percent (417/450) of the coronary segments were rated diagnostic. The SNRs and CNRs were 17 ± 9 and 12 ± 7 for the right coronary artery; 17 ± 8 and 12 ± 7 for the left main coronary artery; 16 ± 9 and 11 ± 7 for the left anterior descending coronary artery; and 15 ± 7 and 10 ± 6 for the left circumflex coronary artery. Ten of the 30 patients (33%) demonstrated coronary artery disease (CAD) of which two (6%) showed three-vessel disease. Four (13%) patients showed severe disease: in three of which the presence of significant stenosis was confirmed by SPECT and by catheter

  10. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: no problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidiri, Muchabayiwa; Greer, Ian A

    2009-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is highly effective for weight loss in morbid obesity. With the high prevalence of severe obesity in the developed world, and the acknowledgement of the effectiveness of these procedures by National Institute for Clinical Excellence (in the UK) and the Food and Drug Administration (in the USA), women with severe obesity will increasingly seek such treatment. As the majority of these patients are women of reproductive age, obstetricians will encounter these patients frequently during pregnancy. It is therefore important for obstetricians to gain an insight into the types of surgery performed, the potential complications, including nutritional deficiency, and appropriate management of pregnancy following weight-loss surgery. In general, bariatric surgery is associated with a reduction in obesity related complication, with no apparent increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes.

  11. Pregnancy and fertility following bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggard, Melinda A; Yermilov, Irina; Li, Zhaoping; Maglione, Margaret; Newberry, Sydne; Suttorp, Marika; Hilton, Lara; Santry, Heena P; Morton, John M; Livingston, Edward H; Shekelle, Paul G

    2008-11-19

    Use of bariatric surgery has increased dramatically during the past 10 years, particularly among women of reproductive age. To estimate bariatric surgery rates among women aged 18 to 45 years and to assess the published literature on pregnancy outcomes and fertility after surgery. Search of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998-2005) and multiple electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, Controlled Clinical Trials Register Database, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effectiveness) to identify articles published between 1985 and February 2008 on bariatric surgery among women of reproductive age. Search terms included bariatric procedures, fertility, contraception, pregnancy, and nutritional deficiencies. Information was abstracted about study design, fertility, and nutritional, neonatal, and pregnancy outcomes after surgery. Of 260 screened articles, 75 were included. Women aged 18 to 45 years accounted for 49% of all patients undergoing bariatric surgery (>50,000 cases annually for the 3 most recent years). Three matched cohort studies showed lower maternal complication rates after bariatric surgery than in obese women without bariatric surgery, or rates approaching those of nonobese controls. In 1 matched cohort study that compared maternal complication rates in women after laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery with obese women without surgery, rates of gestational diabetes (0% vs 22.1%, P bariatric surgery group. Findings were supported by 13 other bariatric cohort studies. Neonatal outcomes were similar or better after surgery compared with obese women without laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery (7.7% vs 7.1% for premature delivery; 7.7% vs 10.6% for low birth weight, P nutrition, fertility, cesarean delivery, and contraception were limited. Rates of many adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes may be lower in women who become pregnant after having had bariatric surgery compared with rates in pregnant women who are obese; however, further data

  12. Obesity and post-operative complications in patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, S L; Lysaght, J; Reynolds, J V

    2010-12-01

    As the prevalence of obesity continues to rise in society, an increasing number of patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery will be obese. Obesity is known to increase morbidity and mortality in the general population and thus is perceived as a risk factor for adverse post-surgical outcomes. This association is not clear-cut, however, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on the risk between obesity and specific complications, in particular relating to infection, wound healing, respiratory and venous thromboembolism. The paucity of studies, as well as a lack of consistency of definition of obesity, with an over-reliance on body mass index rather than body composition analysis, may underlie this confusion. Emerging concepts position central/visceral adipose tissue as potentially key to the pathogenesis of the comorbidities associated with obesity, thus this article reviews emerging research investigating the association between visceral obesity, the metabolic syndrome and resulting post-operative complications. It is hypothesized that the state of chronic inflammation and dysmetabolism observed in visceral obese patients negatively influences post-operative outcomes and represents a potential target for pharmaconutrition. The need for further research investigating the influence of visceral adiposity on immune function post surgery and its impact on post-operative morbidity and mortality is highlighted. © 2009 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2009 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  13. Severe protein malnutrition in a morbidly obese patient after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tatiana de Castro Pereira; Duarte, Thaís Castro; Mosca, Etelvina Rocha Tolentino; Pinheiro, Conceição de Fátima; Marçola, Maria Alzira; De-Souza, Daurea Abadia

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course of a morbidly obese patient who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and, in the late postoperative period, presented the expected loss of weight, but also presented severe protein malnutrition (PM). A patient with morbid obesity, who in March 2012, presented PM (serum albumin = 2.4 g/dL) 2 y after the completion of RYGB surgery (loss of 52.7% of usual body weight). During the hospitalization, the patient received partial volumes of commercial semi-elemental, high-protein, low-fat diet by tube feeding with gastric positioning, associated with an oral low-fat, low-sodium, and bland-consistency diet. The patient presented a temporary clinical improvement, however, outpatient monitoring identified the need for subsequent hospitalizations due to the recurrence of severe hypoalbuminemia (e.g., 1.39 g/dL), anasarca (increase of 15 kg in 79 d), and normocytic and normochromic anemia (e.g., hemoglobin 9.2 g/dL). In July 2013 the RYGB partial reversal technique was performed with a reduction of 100 cm in the Roux-en-Y arm. Seventy days after surgery, the patient was asymptomatic (albumin 3.7 g/dL), however, she presented rapid and progressive recovery of the body weight (increase of 10.3 kg in 60 d, without edema). The effective treatment of morbid obesity is still a major challenge in clinical practice. Restrictive, malabsorptive bariatric techniques are associated with nutritional deficiencies. Severe PM is rarely reported as a late postoperative complication of RYGB, however, due to the serious consequences associated with this, it requires early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. APOLO-Bari, an internet-based program for longitudinal support of bariatric surgery patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Concei??o, Eva M.; Machado, Paulo P. P.; Vaz, Ana Rita; Pinto-Bastos, Ana; Ramalho, Sofia; Silva, C?tia; Arrojado, Filipa

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite evidence of successful weight loss for bariatric surgery patients, some patients experience considerable weight regain over the long term. Given the strong association between post-surgery health behaviors and outcomes, aftercare intervention to address key behaviors appears to be a reasonable relapse-prevention strategy. As the burden of obesity rates increases in healthcare centers, an internet-based program appears to be a reasonable strategy for supporting bariatric sur...

  15. Non-surgical complications following bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Polovina Snežana; Micić Dragan; Micić Dušan; Šumarac-Dumanović Mirjana 0000-0002-6216-6650; Kendereški Aleksandra; Micić J.; Stamenković-Pejković Danica; Cvijović Goran; Zorić S.; Jeremić D.; Bjelović Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment for obesity and comorbidities. This treatment modality is the most potent for weight reduction with long-term weight maintenance and positive metabolic effects. The effect on weight loss and possible side effect depends of type of surgery. Micro and macronutrient deficiencies can occur after malapsorptive procedures. Iron deficiency occurs in almost half of patients following RYGB (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). The main causes of iron deficiency ...

  16. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Healthcare Utilization and Costs among Patients with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Sara N.; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Lau, Bryan; Steele, Kimberly; Clark, Jeanne M.; Richards, Thomas; Weiner, Jonathan P; Wu, Albert W.; Segal, Jodi B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of bariatric surgery on health care utilization and costs among individuals with type 2 diabetes remains unclear. Objective To examine healthcare utilization and costs in an insured cohort of individuals with type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery. Research Design Cohort study derived from administrative data from 2002–2008 from 7 Blue Cross Blue Shield Plans. Subjects 7,806 individuals with type 2 diabetes who had bariatric surgery Measures Cost (inpatient, outpatient, pharmacy, other) and utilization (number of inpatient days, outpatient visits, specialist visits). Results Compared to pre-surgical costs, the ratio of hospital costs (excluding the initial surgery), among beneficiaries who had any hospital costs, was higher in years 2 through 6 of the post-surgery period and increased over time [post 1: OR = 0.58 (95% CI: 0.50, 0.67); post 6: OR = 3.43 (95% CI: 2.60, 4.53)]. In comparison to the pre-surgical period, the odds of having any healthcare costs was lower in the post-surgery period and remained relatively flat over time. Among those with hospitalizations, the adjusted ratio of inpatient days was higher after surgery [post 1: OR = 1.05 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.16); post 6: OR = 2.77 (95% CI: 1.57, 4.90)]. Among those with primary care visits, the adjusted odds ratio was lower after surgery [post 1: OR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.82); post 6: OR = 0.66 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.76)]. Conclusion In the six years following surgery, individuals with type 2 diabetes did not have lower healthcare costs than before surgery. PMID:22167064

  17. Health Disparities in Adolescent Bariatric Surgery: Nationwide Outcomes and Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Lopez, Omar; Jupiter, Daniel C; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S; Bowen-Jallow, Kanika A

    2017-11-01

    Bariatric surgery represents an appropriate treatment for adolescent severe obesity, but its utilization remains low in this patient population. We studied the impact of race and sex on preoperative characteristics, outcomes, and utilization of adolescent bariatric surgery. Retrospective analysis (2007-2014) of adolescent bariatric surgery using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, a national database that collects bariatric surgical care data. We assessed the relationships between baseline characteristics and outcomes (weight loss and remission of obesity-related conditions [ORCs]). Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and U.S. census data, we calculated the ratio of severe obesity and bariatric procedures among races and determined the ratio of ratios to assess for disparities. About 1,539 adolescents underwent bariatric surgery. Males had higher preoperative body mass index (BMI; 51.8 ± 10.5 vs. 47.1 ± 8.7, p adolescents underwent bariatric surgery at a higher proportion than blacks and Hispanics (2.5 and 2.3 times higher, respectively). Preoperative characteristics vary according to race and sex. Race and sex do not impact 12-month weight loss or ORC's remission rates. Minority adolescents undergo bariatric surgery at lower-than-expected rates. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychiatric symptoms and leptin in obese patients who were bariatric surgery candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchien TC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Te-Chang Changchien,1 Chi-Ming Tai,2 Chih-Kun Huang,3 Chia-Chang Chien,1 Yung-Chieh Yen1,4 1Department of Psychiatry, E-Da Hospital, 2Department of Internal Medicine, E-Da Hospital, 3Bariatric and Metabolic International Surgery Center, E-Da Hospital, 4School of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Objective: There is a significant relationship between obesity and common mental symptoms (depression and anxiety symptoms. But the association between depression (or anxiety symptoms and serum leptin is still unclear and controversial, despite the growing body of evidence supporting the existence of “leptin resistance” in obese persons. So we investigated whether common mental symptoms, obesity, and the interactive effect of these two factors have a relationship with leptin in obese patients who were candidates for bariatric surgery.Methods: In all, 139 participants (mean age: 31.4 years, standard deviation: 9.3 years, 73.4% female were enrolled at an obesity treatment center in southern Taiwan. Serum leptin levels and body mass index (BMI were measured. The Chinese Health Questionnaire and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire were administered. Results: The mean BMI of our participants was 39.4 kg/m2 (±6.8, and the mean leptin level was 24.5 ng/mL (±9.4. In the multivariate regression models, Chinese Health Questionnaire-by-BMI and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire-by-BMI interaction terms remained significant predictors of leptin level (β=0.16, P<0.0001; β=0.04, P<0.0001, respectively, after adjustment for age, sex, and history of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia, despite the inverse correlation between Chinese Health Questionnaire (or Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire and leptin. In addition, female patients had significantly higher leptin levels than male patients.Conclusion: The present findings confirmed that the relationship between common mental symptoms and leptin is modulated by obesity in severely obese

  19. Effect of bariatric surgery on diabetic nephropathy in obese type 2 diabetes patients in a retrospective 2-year study: A local pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Anthony Tl; Chee Fang, Sum; Lam, Benjamin Cc; Cheng, Anton Ks; Low, Serena Km; Su Chi, Lim

    2018-03-01

    To determine the effects of bariatric surgery on albuminuria in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Retrospective analyses of clinical records of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had either micro- or macroalbuminuria and had undergone various bariatric surgery were retrieved from a local hospital database. Their clinical data from follow-up appointments including albuminuria were analysed. Of the 46 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 15 subjects had diabetic nephropathy and had pre- and post-bariatric surgery urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio or urine protein-to-creatinine ratio data available for analysis; 13 out of the 15 subjects (86.7%) showed improvement of urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio or urine protein-to-creatinine ratio after surgery; 2 showed equivocal results; 9 of 13 subjects (69.2%) showed remission of diabetic nephropathy; 7 of these 9 patients had microalbuminuria before surgery, 2 had macroalbuminuria before surgery. There were significant improvements to glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure and body weight post surgery. The usage of insulin and oral medications dropped significantly post surgery for all subjects. This study shows that bariatric surgery significantly improves diabetic nephropathy in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects. The results suggest that in our local type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, it is possible not only to improve metabolic parameters, but also to reverse what may be considered established microvascular complications by means of bariatric surgery.

  20. Levothyroxine Dosing Following Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiraju, Silpa; Lee, Clare J; Cooper, David S

    2016-10-01

    Based on the mechanisms of drug absorption, increased levothyroxine requirements are expected after bariatric surgery. However, there are conflicting data on this topic. This review evaluates the effects of bariatric surgery on levothyroxine dosing. Data were obtained from PubMed, Scopus, and review of published bibliographies. Six of 10 studies demonstrated decreased postoperative requirements. Most demonstrated correlations between weight loss and dose. Only 3 case reports and 1 case series demonstrated increased levothyroxine requirements, attributed to malabsorption. The loss of both fat and lean body mass may counteract malabsorptive effects from surgery, resulting in decreased postoperative levothyroxine requirements. In addition, the reversal of impaired levothyroxine pharmacokinetics and an altered set point of thyroid hormone homeostasis may also contribute to postoperative levothyroxine reductions.

  1. Postoperative day one neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a predictor of 30-day outcomes in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Matthew; Cleghorn, Michelle C; Elnahas, Ahmad; Jackson, Timothy D; Okrainec, Allan; Quereshy, Fayez A

    2017-06-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a marker that reflects systemic inflammation and organ dysfunction. Its use as a prognostic marker to predict complications following surgery has been recently described in the literature. The objective of our study was to evaluate the use of postoperative day one (POD1) NLR as a predictor of 30-day outcomes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. University Hospital. We performed a retrospective chart review of 789 patients who underwent bariatric surgery at our institution between March 2012 and May 2014. Data were collected from electronic patient records and administrative databases used for quality improvement. POD1 NLR values were obtained from complete blood counts along with a variety of 30-day clinical outcomes. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to determine whether POD1 NLR ≥10 was associated with 30-day outcomes. Seven-hundred and thirty-seven patients were included in the study. Six-hundred and fifty-three Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries (88.6 %) and 84 sleeve gastrectomy surgeries (11.4 %) were performed. All surgeries were performed laparoscopically. We observed a 4.7 % readmission rate, 2.2 % reoperation rate, 10.7 % postoperative occurrence rate, and 0.1 % mortality rate. After covariate adjustment, POD1 NLR ≥10 was found to be significantly associated with overall complications (OR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.01-3.87), major complications (OR 3.71, 95 % CI 1.76-7.82), reoperation (OR 3.63, 95 % CI 1.14-11.6), and prolonged postoperative length of stay (OR 3.70, 95 % CI 2.2-6.22). POD1 NLR was independently associated with 30-day outcomes following bariatric surgery. This easily obtained inflammatory marker may be used to help identify patients at a higher risk of developing early complications.

  2. Bariatric surgery in the elderly: 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Alana; Young, Monica T; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in the general adult population but more information is needed in patients age 60 years and older (elderly). We previously examined the outcome of bariatric surgery performed in the elderly between 1999 and 2005 using the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Clinical Database. The aim of this study was to analyze contemporary outcomes of bariatric surgery in the elderly and to compare them to previous data from 1999-2005. Using International Classification of Diseases, 9(th) Revision diagnosis and procedure codes, we obtained data from the UHC database for all elderly (age >60 yr) and adult nonelderly (age 19-60 yr) patients who underwent bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity between 2009 and 2013. Outcome measures, such as patient characteristics, LOS, morbidity, and observed-to-expected (risk-adjusted) mortality ratio were compared between elderly and nonelderly patients. Bariatric surgery in the elderly made up 2.7% of all bariatric operations in 1999-2005. This represents an increase to 10.1% of all bariatric operations in 2009-2013. In-hospital mortality was .30% for the nonelderly and .70% for the elderly in 1999-2005, whereas contemporary in-hospital mortality has decreased to .11% for the nonelderly and .05% for the elderly. Our results show that the number of bariatric procedures performed in the elderly is increasing and now represents 10% of all bariatric operations performed at academic centers. In-hospital mortality in bariatric surgery in the elderly has improved so much that it is now even better than in-hospital mortality in the nonelderly in 1999-2005. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A validation of an intelligent decision-making support system for the nutrition diagnosis of bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Magda Rr; Martins, Cristina; Dias, João; Pinto, José S

    2014-07-08

    Bariatric surgery is an important method for treatment of morbid obesity. It is known that significant nutritional deficiencies might occur after surgery, such as, calorie-protein malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia, and lack of vitamin B12, thiamine, and folic acid. The objective of our study was to validate a computerized intelligent decision support system that suggests nutritional diagnoses of patients submitted to bariatric surgery. There were fifteen clinical cases that were developed and sent to three dietitians in order to evaluate and define a nutritional diagnosis. After this step, the cases were sent to four bariatric surgery expert dietitians who were aiming to collaborate on a gold standard. The nutritional diagnosis was to be defined individually, and any disagreements were solved through a consensus. The final result was used as the gold standard. Bayesian networks were used to implement the system, and database training was done with Shell Netica. For the system validation, a similar answer rate was calculated, as well as the specificity and sensibility. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were projected to each nutritional diagnosis. Among the four experts, the rate of similar answers found was 80% (48/60) to 93% (56/60), depending on the nutritional diagnosis. The rate of similar answers of the system, compared to the gold standard, was 100% (60/60). The system sensibility and specificity were 95.0%. The ROC curves projection showed that the system was able to represent the expert knowledge (gold standard), and to help them in their daily tasks. The system that was developed was validated to be used by health care professionals for decision-making support in their nutritional diagnosis of patients submitted to bariatric surgery.

  4. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity can safely undergo bariatric surgery with equivalent success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hans F; Laughter, Vanessa; Harnsberger, Cristina R; Broderick, Ryan C; Berducci, Martin; DuCoin, Christopher; Langert, Joshua; Sandler, Bryan J; Jacobsen, Garth R; Perry, William; Horgan, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychiatric disorder were reported to have a poor outcome in bariatric surgery. Few studies have examined the outcome of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) in patients with psychiatric history. We aimed to compare excess weight loss (%EWL) in patients with and without psychiatric comorbidities who underwent LSG or LAGB. Patients undergoing LSG or LAGB were identified from our prospective database. A multidisciplinary team evaluated all patients preoperatively, including a psychological evaluation. Patients with the diagnosis of depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia were included in the psychiatric comorbidity group (PSY). Others were included in group NON-PSY. All patients were first screened to be psychologically stable to undergo surgery. Initial BMI and %EWL at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively were compared. A total of 590 patients (81.4 % women), with a median BMI of 43.8 kg/m(2) (range 30-99) who underwent LSG (n = 222) or LAGB (n = 368) from January 2006 to June 2013, were identified. Psychiatric comorbidities that were well controlled at the time of surgery were found in 188 patients (31.9%). Diagnostic criteria for depression were met in 154 patients (26.1%), 75 patients suffered from anxiety (12.7%), 9 from bipolar disorder, and 4 from schizophrenia (0.7%). Initial BMI was not different between the two groups. No significant difference in %EWL between the groups was found during follow-up (44.13 vs. 43.37%EWL, respectively, at 1 year; p = 0.76). When LSG and LAGB patients were analyzed as subsets, again no difference in %EWL at 1 year was found for PSY vs. NON-PSY (LSG: 51.56 vs. 54.86%EWL; LAGB: 38.48 vs. 38.45%EWL, all p = ns). In multivariate analysis, the differences from unadjusted analysis persisted. These findings demonstrate that a similar %EWL can be achieved in patients undergoing LSG or LAGB despite the presence of well-controlled psychiatric comorbidity.

  5. Prognostic Value of Negative Coronary CT Angiography in Severely Obese Patients Prior to Bariatric Surgery: a Follow-Up After 6 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Michael; Maywald, Céline; Wälti, Stephan; Warschkow, René; Wildermuth, Simon; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Schiesser, Marc

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to determine the long-term prognostic value of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) prior to bariatric surgery in severely obese patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥35 kg/m 2 . Seventy consecutive patients undergoing cardiac CT for coronary assessment prior to bariatric surgery were prospectively included. Images were analysed for the presence of coronary calcification and for non-obstructive (50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD). A median clinical follow-up of 6.1 years in 54 patients was obtained for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), defined as death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary revascularisation. Weight loss and BMI decrease following bariatric surgery were recorded. The median BMI prior to surgery was 46.9 kg/m 2 . The median percentage of excess BMI loss after surgery was 75%. CT showed coronary calcification in 26 (48%) patients, whereas 28 (52%) patients had no calcification. CCTA revealed normal coronaries in 47 (87%) and non-obstructive CAD in 7 (13%) patients. No obstructive CAD was found. All patients successfully underwent bariatric surgery, and no MACE occurred neither perioperatively nor in the follow-up period. The negative predictive value of CCTA was 100% (95% confidence interval of 90.1-100.0%). In severely obese patients, the absence of obstructive CAD in cardiac CT prior to bariatric surgery with subsequently marked weight reduction has strong long-term prognostic implications for ruling out major adverse cardiac events in the postoperative period.

  6. Patient dose during radiological examination in the follow-up of bariatric surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L.; Cazzani, C.; Tomarchio, O.; Morone, G.; Catona, A.; Fantinato, D.

    2007-01-01

    A patient dose survey was carried out measuring the kerma-area product (KAP) values during radiological evaluation in the follow-up of bariatric surgery. The procedures were performed by three radiologists to adjust laparoscopic gastric bands and to detect postoperative complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures to treat morbid obesity. Total fluoroscopy time, exposure factors and the overall contribution of fluoroscopy to the accumulated KAP value were recorded. The median KAP values were used to estimate organ doses and effective dose to a standard patient; the radiation risk associated with the procedures was also evaluated. The doses were smaller for one of the three radiologists, owing to a more appropriate beam collimation and a reduction of the screening time. The KAP values ranged from 1.6 to 7.1 Gy cm 2 for the laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding management, and from 3.0 and 8.3 Gy cm 2 for the radiological examinations after gastric bypass. As a whole, the effective doses associated to these procedures were between 0.5 and 2.7 mSv. The organs receiving the highest doses were not only breast, stomach, pancreas and liver, but also lungs, owing to of their high radiosensitivity, significantly contributed to the effective dose. (authors)

  7. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Health-Related Quality of Life in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkin, Ronette L.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Litwin, Sheldon; Crosby, Ross D.; Gress, Richard E.; Yanowitz, Frank G.; Hunt, Steven C.; Adams, Ted D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) is impaired in severely obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery. Little is known about the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and HRQOL in these individuals. We hypothesized that better HRQOL would be reported by those with higher CRF. Methods In 326 gastric bypass patients (mean BMI = 46.5 ± 7.0; mean age = 40.9 ± 10.1; 83.4 % female), pre-surgical CRF was quantified as duration (minutes) of a submaximal treadmill test to 80% of age-predicted maximal heart rate (MHR). Patients completed both a general measure of HRQOL [the Medical Outcome Short-Form 36 (SF-36)] and a weight-specific measure of HRQOL [Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite)]. Mean HRQOL scores were examined, controlling for age, gender, and BMI. Results Mean treadmill duration was 9.9 ± 3.1 minutes, and percent age-predicted MHR was 81.2 ± 3.0 percent. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness tended to be associated with better physical and weight-specific HRQOL. Adjustment for differences in gender, age, and BMI attenuated the significance of associations between fitness and physical measures from the SF-36, whereas adjustment eliminated significance of associations between fitness and weight-specific HRQOL in most cases. Conclusions Results suggest that CRF confers some HRQOL benefits in severely obese adults, though these benefits may largely be explained by differences in age, gender, and BMI. PMID:20820940

  8. Bone loss after bariatric surgery: causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emily M; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2014-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective and increasingly common treatment for severe obesity and its many comorbidities. The side-effects of bariatric surgery can include detrimental effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Bone disease in patients who have had bariatric surgery is affected by preoperative abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism related to severe obesity. Changes that arise after bariatric surgery are specific to procedure type: the most pronounced abnormalities in calciotropic hormones and bone loss are noted after procedures that result in the most malabsorption. The most consistent site for bone loss after all bariatric procedures is at the hip. There are limitations of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry technology in this population, including artefact introduced by adipose tissue itself. Bone loss after bariatric surgery is probably multifactorial. Proposed mechanisms include skeletal unloading, abnormalities in calciotropic hormones, and changes in gut hormones. Few data for fracture risk in the bariatric population are available, and this is a crucial area for additional research. Treatment should be geared toward correction of nutritional deficiencies and study of bone mineral density in high-risk patients. We explore the skeletal response to bariatric surgery, potential mechanisms for changes, and strategies for management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Integrated Health Nutritional Guidelines for the Surgical Weight Loss Patient 2016 Update: Micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Julie; Frank, Laura; Rabena, Rebecca; Craggs-Dino, Lillian; Isom, Kellene A; Greiman, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Optimizing postoperative patient outcomes and nutritional status begins preoperatively. Patients should be educated before and after weight loss surgery (WLS) on the expected nutrient deficiencies associated with alterations in physiology. Although surgery can exacerbate preexisting nutrient deficiencies, preoperative screening for vitamin deficiencies has not been the norm in the majority of WLS practices. Screening is important because it is common for patients who present for WLS to have at least 1 vitamin or mineral deficiency preoperatively. The focus of this paper is to update the 2008 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Nutrition in Bariatric Surgery Guidelines with key micronutrient research in laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, biliopancreatic diversion, and biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch. Four questions regarding recommendations for preoperative and postoperative screening of nutrient deficiencies, preventative supplementation, and repletion of nutrient deficiencies in pre-WLS patients have been applied to specific micronutrients (vitamins B1 and B12; folate; iron; vitamins A, E, and K; calcium; vitamin D; copper; and zinc). Out of the 554 articles identified as meeting preliminary search criteria, 402 were reviewed in detail. There are 92 recommendations in this update, 79 new recommendations and an additional 13 that have not changed since 2008. Each recommendation has a corresponding graded level of evidence, from grade A through D. Data continue to suggest that the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies is increasing, while monitoring of patients at follow-up is decreasing. This document should be viewed as a guideline for a reasonable approach to patient nutritional care based on the most recent research, scientific evidence, resources, and information available. It is the responsibility of the registered dietitian nutritionist and WLS program to determine

  10. A pilot randomized controlled trial of telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy for preoperative bariatric surgery patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassin, Stephanie E.; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Du, Chau; Wnuk, Susan; Hawa, Raed; Parikh, Sagar V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychosocial interventions can improve eating behaviours and psychosocial functioning in bariatric surgery candidates. However, those that involve face-to-face sessions are problematic for individuals with severe obesity due to mobility issues and practical barriers. Objective To examine the efficacy of a pre-operative telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy (Tele-CBT) intervention versus standard pre-operative care for improving eating psychopathology and psychosocial functioning. Methods Preoperative bariatric surgery patients (N = 47) were randomly assigned to receive standard preoperative care (n = 24) or 6 sessions of Tele-CBT (n = 23). Results Retention was 74.5% at post-intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that the Tele-CBT group reported significant improvements on the Binge Eating Scale (BES), t (22) = 2.81, p = .01, Emotional Eating Scale (EES), t (22) = 3.44, p = .002, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), t (22) = 2.71, p = .01, whereas the standard care control group actually reported significant increases on the EES, t (23) = 4.86, p bariatric surgery candidates. PMID:26990279

  11. A pilot randomized controlled trial of telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy for preoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassin, Stephanie E; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Du, Chau; Wnuk, Susan; Hawa, Raed; Parikh, Sagar V

    2016-05-01

    Psychosocial interventions can improve eating behaviours and psychosocial functioning in bariatric surgery candidates. However, those that involve face-to-face sessions are problematic for individuals with severe obesity due to mobility issues and practical barriers. To examine the efficacy of a pre-operative telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy (Tele-CBT) intervention versus standard pre-operative care for improving eating psychopathology and psychosocial functioning. Preoperative bariatric surgery patients (N = 47) were randomly assigned to receive standard preoperative care (n = 24) or 6 sessions of Tele-CBT (n = 23). Retention was 74.5% at post-intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that the Tele-CBT group reported significant improvements on the Binge Eating Scale (BES), t (22) = 2.81, p = .01, Emotional Eating Scale (EES), t (22) = 3.44, p = .002, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), t (22) = 2.71, p = .01, whereas the standard care control group actually reported significant increases on the EES, t (23) = 4.86, p bariatric surgery candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery : a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesureur, L; Arvanitakis, M

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered as the only effective durable weight-loss therapy and may be curative for obesity-related comorbidities such as diabetes. Nevertheless this surgery is not devoid of potential long-term complications such as dumping syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease and nutrient deficiencies. For this reason, preoperative nutritional assessment and rigorous postoperative follow-up with administration of multi-vitamins supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended for each patient who is undergoing a bariatric surgery. The aim of this review is to identify and treat the metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  13. Prioritising patients for bariatric surgery: building public preferences from a discrete choice experiment into public policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Jennifer A; Ratcliffe, Julie; Kendall, Elizabeth; Burton, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Harris, Paul; Krinks, Rachael; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To derive priority weights for access to bariatric surgery for obese adults, from the perspective of the public. Setting Australian public hospital system. Participants Adults (N=1994), reflecting the age and gender distribution of Queensland and South Australia. Primary and secondary outcome measures A discrete choice experiment in which respondents indicated which of two individuals with different characteristics should be prioritised for surgery in repeated hypothetical choices. Potential surgery recipients were described by seven key characteristics or attributes: body mass index (BMI), presence of comorbid conditions, age, family history, commitment to lifestyle change, time on the surgical wait list and chance of maintaining weight loss following surgery. A multinomial logit model was used to evaluate preferences and derive priority weights (primary analysis), with a latent class model used to explore respondent characteristics that were associated with variation in preference across the sample (see online supplementary analysis). Results A preference was observed to prioritise individuals who demonstrated a strong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle as well as individuals categorised with very severe (BMI≥50 kg/m2) or (to a lesser extent) severe (BMI≥40 kg/m2) obesity, those who already have obesity-related comorbidity, with a family history of obesity, with a greater chance of maintaining weight loss or who had spent a longer time on the wait list. Lifestyle commitment was considered to be more than twice as important as any other criterion. There was little tendency to prioritise according to the age of the recipient. Respondent preferences were dependent on their BMI, previous experience with weight management surgery, current health state and education level. Conclusions This study extends our understanding of the publics’ preferences for priority setting to the context of bariatric surgery, and derives priority weights

  14. Prioritising patients for bariatric surgery: building public preferences from a discrete choice experiment into public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Jennifer A; Ratcliffe, Julie; Kendall, Elizabeth; Burton, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Harris, Paul; Krinks, Rachael; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-10-15

    To derive priority weights for access to bariatric surgery for obese adults, from the perspective of the public. Australian public hospital system. Adults (N=1994), reflecting the age and gender distribution of Queensland and South Australia. A discrete choice experiment in which respondents indicated which of two individuals with different characteristics should be prioritised for surgery in repeated hypothetical choices. Potential surgery recipients were described by seven key characteristics or attributes: body mass index (BMI), presence of comorbid conditions, age, family history, commitment to lifestyle change, time on the surgical wait list and chance of maintaining weight loss following surgery. A multinomial logit model was used to evaluate preferences and derive priority weights (primary analysis), with a latent class model used to explore respondent characteristics that were associated with variation in preference across the sample (see online supplementary analysis). A preference was observed to prioritise individuals who demonstrated a strong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle as well as individuals categorised with very severe (BMI≥50 kg/m2) or (to a lesser extent) severe (BMI≥40 kg/m2) obesity, those who already have obesity-related comorbidity, with a family history of obesity, with a greater chance of maintaining weight loss or who had spent a longer time on the wait list. Lifestyle commitment was considered to be more than twice as important as any other criterion. There was little tendency to prioritise according to the age of the recipient. Respondent preferences were dependent on their BMI, previous experience with weight management surgery, current health state and education level. This study extends our understanding of the publics' preferences for priority setting to the context of bariatric surgery, and derives priority weights that could be used to assist bodies responsible for commissioning bariatric services. Published

  15. Current Status of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Baik Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is considered to be the most effective treatment modality in maintaining long-term weight reduction and improving obesity-related conditions in morbidly obese patients. In Korea, surgery for morbid obesity was laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy first performed in 2003. Since 2003, the annual number of bariatric surgeries has markedly increased, including adjustable gastric banding (AGB, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, mini-gastric bypass, and others. In Korea, AGB is much more common than in others countries. A large proportion of doctors, the public, and government misunderstand the necessity and effectiveness of bariatric surgery, believing that bariatric surgery has an unacceptably high morbidity, and that it is not superior to non-surgical treatments to improve obesity and obesity-related diseases. The effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery have been well demonstrated. The Korean Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery recommend bariatric surgery confining to morbidly obese patients (body mass index ≥40 or >35 in the presence of significant comorbidities.

  16. The IFSO Website (www.ifso.com): the Online Gateway to Obesity and Metabolic Disorders for Bariatric Surgery Professionals and Patients: On behalf of the IFSO Communications Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Haris; Coelho, António Jamel; Mazzarella, Manuela; Miller, Karl; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ponce, Jaime; Prachand, Vivek; Shikora, Scott; van Wagensveld, Bart; Weiner, Rudolf; Zundel, Natan

    2015-11-01

    The refurbished International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) website ( www.ifso.com ) showcases a wealth of high-quality information for bariatric surgery professionals and patients. The website provides free online access to the organisational structure of IFSO and useful information on IFSO-endorsed congresses, symposia and courses. Online access to the journal, Obesity Surgery, and the IFSO Newsletter can also be obtained via the IFSO website. There is also easy-to-understand information on the topics of obesity and the various bariatric/metabolic surgeries for our patients.

  17. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezelgrave, N L; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to have positive effects on fertility and reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Moreover, there appears to be a reduced incidence of fetal macrosomia post-bariatric procedure, although there remains uncertainty about the increased rates of small-for-gestational age and intrauterine growth restricted infants, as well as premature rupture of membranes in this group. A number of case reports highlight that pregnancy following bariatric surgery is not without complications and it must be managed as high risk by the multidisciplinary team.

  18. Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Hezelgrave

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to have positive effects on fertility and reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Moreover, there appears to be a reduced incidence of fetal macrosomia post-bariatric procedure, although there remains uncertainty about the increased rates of small-for-gestational age and intrauterine growth restricted infants, as well as premature rupture of membranes in this group. A number of case reports highlight that pregnancy following bariatric surgery is not without complications and it must be managed as high risk by the multidisciplinary team.

  19. Timing of food intake is associated with weight loss evolution in severe obese patients after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, T; Vidal, J; de Hollanda, A; Scheer, F A J L; Garaulet, M; Izquierdo-Pulido, M

    2016-12-01

    Recent research has demonstrated a relationship between the timing of food intake and weight loss in humans. However, whether the meal timing can be associated with weight loss in patients treated with bariatric surgery is unknown. To evaluate the role of food-timing in the evolution of weight loss in a sample of 270 patients that underwent bariatric surgery with a follow-up of 6 years. Participants (79% women; age [mean ± SD]: 52 ± 11 years; BMI: 46.5 ± 6.0 kg/m 2 ) were classified according their weight loss response patterns after bariatric surgery: good weight-loss-responders (67.8%), primarily poor weight-loss-responders (10.8%) or secondarily poor weight-loss-responders (21.4%). Then, they were grouped in early-eaters and late-eaters, according to the timing of the main meal (before or after 15:00 h). Obesity and biochemical parameters, energy and macronutrients intake, energy expenditure, sleep duration, and chronotype were studied. The percentage of late eaters (after 15:00 h) was significantly higher in the primarily poor weight-loss-responders (∼70%) than in both secondarily poor weight-loss-responders (∼42%) and good weight-loss-responders (∼37%) (p = 0.011). Consistently, primarily poor weight-loss-responders had lunch later as compared to good and secondarily poor weight-loss-responders (p = 0.034). Age, gender and type of surgery were not determining. Surprisingly, obesity-related variables, biochemical parameters, pre-surgical total energy expenditure, sleep duration, chronotype, calorie intake and macronutrients distribution, were similar among groups. Weight loss effectiveness after bariatric surgery is related to the timing of the main meal. Our preliminary results suggest that the timing of food intake is important for weight regulation and that eating at the right time may be a relevant factor to consider in weight loss therapy even after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical

  20. Earliest signs and management of leakage after bariatric surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcomes of treatment in patients who develop gastrointestinal leaks after different bariatric surgeries. Methods: Retrospective review of 632 consecutive bariatric surgical procedures performed from 1999–2009 in Alexandria University Hospital, ...

  1. Preparing for and Managing a Pregnancy After Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kominiarek, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    The number of bariatric surgeries performed in the United States has risen exponentially. Given that the majority of patients are female and of reproductive age, it is important for clinicians who manage womenȉs health issues to be aware of the surgery, its long term goals, and the potential effect on future pregnancies. Most pregnancies after bariatric surgery have successful outcomes with decreased occurrences of gestational diabetes and hypertension and lower birth weight compared with con...

  2. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, S.; Colledge, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Patel, K.

    2011-01-01

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  3. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, S., E-mail: shaun.quigley@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Colledge, J. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, S. [Bariatric Surgery Unit, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Patel, K. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  4. Psychological, behavioral, and weight-related aspects of patients undergoing reoperative bariatric surgery after gastric band: comparison with primary surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Eva; Pinto-Bastos, Ana; de Lourdes, Marta; Brandão, Isabel; Teixeira, Cristina; Machado, Paulo P P

    2018-02-15

    Patients experiencing insufficient weight loss or weight regain in their first bariatric surgery may represent a high-risk group with greater problematic eating and general psychopathology levels, which may compromise the success of a reoperative procedure. This study seeks to describe and compare disordered eating-related psychological and behavioral features of primary and reoperative surgery candidates after gastric band. Hospital center and university in Portugal. The baseline (preoperative) data from a longitudinal observational study are presented. Patients were interviewed by trained psychologists to identify binge-eating episodes and grazing and responded to a set of self-report measures: disordered eating, grazing, negative urgency, depression, anxiety, and stress. Two hundred twenty-five patients were undergoing primary surgery, and 166 were undergoing reoperative (REOP group) surgery. The groups did not differ in body mass index preoperatively, but the REOP group had greater weight suppression (t 387 = -5.35, P = .001), higher highest (t 387 = -3.40, P = .001) and lower lowest body mass index (t 381 = 2.22, P = .03). The main reasons for reoperative surgery were weight regain/poor weight loss (42.8%) or medical complications (32.5%). REOP patients with objective binge eating reported a higher frequency of these episodes (t 47 = 2.15, P = .04). No significant difference was found for the self-report measures assessed (only shape concern was higher for REOP group, F 1,216 = 8.30, Psurgeries, the differences in binge eating and weight-related variables may associate with postoperative difficulties. The link between binge eating, weight suppression, and weight gain found in other samples suggests that patients undergoing reoperative surgery may be at increased risk for poor weight outcomes. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bariatric surgery - effects on obesity and related co-morbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Maria Saur; Madsbad, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are the three most commonly performed bariatric procedures. Obesity responds well to bariatric surgery, with major long-lasting weight loss that is most pronounced...... vitamins and minerals, and anemia. Some patients have dumping after meals, and a few patients will develop postprandial hypoglycemia after RYGB. About 25% of patients require plastic surgery to provide relief from excessive skin tissue....

  6. Determinants of weight regain after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Emanuelle Cristina Lins; Barbosa, Emília Maria Wanderley Gusmão; Soriano, Graziele Moreira Silva; dos Santos, Ewerton Amorim; Vasconcelos, Sandra Mary Lima

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery leads to an average loss of 60-75% of excess body weight with maximum weight loss in the period between 18 and 24 months postoperatively. However, several studies show that weight is regained from two years of operation. To identify the determinants of weight regain in post-bariatric surgery users. Prospective cross-sectional study with 64 patients who underwent bariatric surgery with postoperative time > 2 years valued at significant weight regain. The variables analyzed were age, sex, education, socioeconomic status, work activity related to food, time after surgery, BMI, percentage of excess weight loss, weight gain, attendance monitoring nutrition, lifestyle, eating habits, self-perception of appetite, daily use of nutritional supplements and quality of life. There were 57 (89%) women and 7 (11%) men, aged 41.76 ± 7.93 years and mean postoperative period of 53.4 ± 18.4 months. The average weight and BMI were respectively 127.48 ± 24.2 kg and 49.56 ± 6.7 kg/m2 at surgery. The minimum weight and BMI were achieved 73.0 ± 18.6 kg and 28.3 ± 5.5 kg/m2, reached in 23.7 ± 12 months postoperatively. Regained significant weight occurred in 18 (28.1%) cases. The mean postoperative period of 66 ± 8.3 months and work activities related to food showed statistical significance (p=000 and p=0.003) for the regained weight. Bariatric surgery promotes adequate reduction of excess body weight, with significant weight regain observed after five years; post-operative time and work activity related to eating out as determining factors for the occurrence of weight regain.

  7. Outcomes of bariatric surgery in the young: a single-institution experience caring for patients under 21 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar K; Zhang, Yang; Kintzer, Emily; Moran-Atkin, Erin; Choi, Jenny; Melvin, W Scott; Camacho, Diego R

    2016-11-01

    Medical weight loss options are rarely successful long term in young patients. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be safe and effective in this population. Patients ≤21 years old who had bariatric surgery at our institution between January 2009 and December 2013 were evaluated to determine the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in this population. The primary end point was excess weight loss (EWL). Secondary end points included surgical morbidity, improvement in obesity-related metabolic parameters, and subjective obesity-related symptoms at 1 year. Fifty-four patients were identified who had a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LGBP) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Fourteen patients were male (25.9 %), and 40 patients were female (74.1 %). Thirty-seven patients (68.5 %) underwent LGBP, and 17 patients (31.5 %) underwent LSG. Median follow-up was 13.3 months. The baseline BMI was 51.7 kg/m 2 for the LGBP group and 51.0 kg/m 2 for the LSG group. EWL was 35.2, 47.6, 62.4, 58.1, and 61.8 % for the LGBP group; 29.7, 44.7, 57.4, 60.3, and 59.0 % for the LSG group at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. Our complications included 1 anastomotic bleed, 1 postoperative stricture, and 1 patient who developed vitamin deficiency that manifested as a peripheral neuropathy in the LGBP group. LGBP was more successful than LSG in improving lipid panel parameters and HbA1c at 1 year, and it also seemed to offer better subjective improvement in obesity-related symptoms. LGBP and LSG seem to confer comparable weight loss benefit in patients ≤21 years old with acceptable surgical morbidity.

  8. A Challenge between Trainee Education and Patient Safety: Does Fellow Participation Impact Postoperative Outcomes Following Bariatric Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Ali; Chaudhry, Rizwan M; Khorgami, Zhamak; Andalib, Amin; Augustin, Toms; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A

    2016-09-01

    Surgical training may potentially influence patient care. A safe, high-quality bariatric and metabolic surgery practice requires dedicated and specialized training commonly acquired during a fellowship. This study evaluates the impact of fellow participation on early postoperative outcomes in bariatric surgery. From the American College of Surgeons (ACS-NSQIP) database, we identified all obese patients who had undergone primary laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) between 2010 and 2012. Logistic regression was used to prognosticate the surgical fellow (PGY-6, 7, or 8) participation in bariatric surgeries on perioperative outcomes, as compared to surgeries with no trainee participation. The study cohort consisted of 10,838 patients (8819 LRYGB, 2019 LSG, 32 % fellow participation). Fellows participated in higher-risk surgeries. Fellow involvement was associated with increased operative time in LRYGB (difference 42.4 ± 1.2 min, p complications (OR = 1.37, 95 % CI 1.16-1.63), serious complications (OR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.00-1.52), surgical complications (OR = 1.42; 95 % CI 1.17-1.73), and reoperation (OR = 1.43, 95 % CI 1.10-1.87). On adjusted analysis, while readmission was higher with fellow involvement in both procedures, mortality rates were comparable. Fellow involvement resulted in a clinically appreciable increase in operative times. Fellow participation in the operating room was also independently associated with worse early postoperative outcomes following LRYGB, but was not the case for LSG. Promoting proficiency in surgical simulation laboratories and a gradual participation of fellows from LSG to LRYGB during fellowship may be associated with a reduction in postoperative complications.

  9. Improving access to bariatric surgery: early surgical and patient-focused outcomes of a rural obesity clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angela W; Hopkins, Julie; Gagnon, Isabelle; Birch, Daniel W

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery is typically offered in larger health care centers, forcing patients to travel long distances to access care. An adult obesity program was established in Whitehorse, Yukon based on the multidisciplinary adult bariatric clinic in Edmonton, to alleviate long-distance care difficulties. This study analyzes patient/health care staff satisfaction and surgical outcomes for this program. A survey was administered to patients and health care staff at Edmonton and Whitehorse. Patient charts were reviewed. A multivariate linear regression predicted the main effect of travel distance and other clinical covariates on follow-up compliance. Postoperative body mass index, complications, and satisfaction scores were similar. Whitehorse patients had higher rates of follow-up (85.6% vs 71.1%, P = .002). The Whitehorse Bariatric Program provides perioperative obesity care comparable to a larger center. Patient follow-up and satisfaction suggest a highly successful program. This may serve as a model for improving access to obesity services across Canada. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Long-term implication of bariatric surgery: beyond deficiencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, L

    2014-03-26

    Bariatric surgery frequently leads to several nutritional deficiencies that are well reported in the literature. However, numerous other aspects of the patients' life are concerned by bariatric interventions, so that the follow-up of these patients after bariatric surgery does not only encompass a mere correction of the well-known nutritional deficiencies. Only a thorough knowledge of all possible consequences of bariatric interventions permits an adequate follow-up of these patients. Overtly addressing all these issues with the patients before performing a bariatric intervention is the best way for them to be prepared for the intervention itself and to understand the need of a life-long follow-up thereafter.

  11. Preoperative micronutrient status in morbidly obese patients before undergoing bariatric surgery: results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eva; Utech, Markus; Stehle, Peter; Büsing, Martin; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Ellinger, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Reliable information on micronutrient status before bariatric surgery is needed to optimize preoperative nutritional status and postoperative nutritional therapy. To investigate the pro-/vitamin and mineral status and its association with nutrient intake in morbidly obese patients seeking bariatric surgery Klinikum Vest, Recklinghausen, Germany. The cross-sectional study investigated retinol, ascorbic acid, tocopherol, and β-carotene (high-pressure liquid chromatography), 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and calcium, phosphate, and magnesium (photometry) in serum/plasma in 43 patients (body mass index: 52.6±10.5 kg/m(2)) before sleeve gastrectomy. Albumin, parathyroid hormone, and alkaline phosphatase were analyzed. Data were compared with accepted cutoff values. Dietary intake was estimated by 3-day food records, and nutrient intake was compared with recommended values. One third of participants had ascorbic acid concentrations2.8 µmol/mmol. Of the patients, 84% had 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels below 50 nmol/L. Parathyroid hormone was elevated in 23% (>6.5 pmol/L). Calcium, magnesium, and alkaline phosphatase were always, and phosphate was mostly (98%) above cutoff values. Intake of retinol (23%), ascorbic acid (55.8%), vitamin D (90.7%), tocopherol (48.8%), and β-carotene (nutritional intake and associations between low concentrations and inadequate intake were not observed. Many morbidly obese patients in Germany suffer from deficiencies in multiple micronutrients, particularly vitamin D, ascorbic acid, and β-carotene before sleeve gastrectomy. Measurement of preoperative micronutrient status will help supplement patients before, and optimize nutritional therapy after, surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Obese patients lose weight independently of nutritional follow-up after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Helena Tess

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: to examine the association between preoperative body weight, adherence to postsurgical nutritional follow-up, length of postoperative period, and weight loss during the first 18 months among adults who have undergone bariatric surgery. Methods: a retrospective cohort study was conducted on 241 consecutive patients who underwent open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP from January 2006 to December 2008, in a teaching hospital in São Paulo (Brazil. Data were collected through hospital records review and the variables analyzed included sex, age, immediate preoperative weight, adherence to postsurgical nutritional visits and length of postoperative period. Proportional body weight reductions during the 18-month follow-up period were examined using generalized estimating equations. Results: 81% (n=195 of participants were female, with overall mean age of 44.4 ± 11.6 years, mean preoperative weight of 123.1± 21.2 kg and mean preoperative body mass index of 47.2± 6.2 kg/m2. The overall adherence to postoperative follow- up schedule was 51% (95%CI: 44.5-57.5%. Preoperative body weight and adherence were not associated with proportional weight reduction (Wald’s test p > 0.18. Weight loss leveled off at the end of the 18-month follow-up period for both compliant and non-compliant patients (Wald’s test p = 0.00. Conclusions: our study showed that weight loss occurred steadily over the first 18 months after RYGBP, leveling off at around 40% weight reduction. It was associated with neither presurgical weight, nor nutritional follow-up and it may be primarily dependent on the surgical body alterations themselves. This finding may have implications for intervention strategies aimed at motivating patients to comply with early postsurgical and life-long follow-up.

  13. Nutrient deficiencies prior to bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roust, Lori R; DiBaise, John K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update of recent additions to our understanding of the prevalence of nutrient deficiencies and the potential role of preoperative weight loss in contributing to these deficiencies in obese individuals planning to undergo bariatric surgery. Recent reports that have included bariatric surgery candidates from sites around the world have shown consistent deficiencies in a variety of nutrients. Although protein-energy malnutrition is uncommon preoperatively, micronutrient deficiencies occur commonly with multiple deficiencies often present in the same individual. No difference in the prevalence of deficiency between men and women is apparent, and a standard profile of susceptibility to deficiency has not been identified. In the only studies that have evaluated dietary intake of total energy, macronutrients and micronutrients preoperatively, despite an excess of calories ingested, micronutrient intake tends to be lower than recommended. A high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies, especially vitamin D, folate, B12 and iron, is present in obese individuals being considered for bariatric surgery. Despite high-caloric intake, the deficiencies present appear to be related to the poor quality of the diet and low micronutrient intake. These findings strengthen prior recommendations of routine preoperative nutritional screening. Because a standard profile of susceptibility to deficiency has not been identified, extensive nutritional screening, including micronutrient testing, should be considered in all patients in the preoperative setting. Finally, we recommend early supplementation of vitamins and minerals based on laboratory assessment and incorporation of a program to optimize eating behaviors prior to surgery.

  14. [Changes in quality of life in patients undergoing bariatric surgery following 24-months: comparison between gastric bypass and tubular vertical gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hofstadt Román, C J; Escribano Cubas, S; Tirado González, S; Pérez Martínez, E; Estrada Caballero, J L; Ortiz Sebastián, S; Rodríguez-Marín, J; Leal Costa, C

    2017-08-31

    Bariatric surgery has become the procedure of choice to deal with morbid and super-morbid obesity, with the greatest chance of success. The objectives of this study were: a) to analyse the evolution of the percentage of excess BMI lost (PEBMIL) and quality of life in the medium and long term after bariatric surgery; b) to evaluate the differences in PEBMIL and quality of life according to the surgical technique performed; and c) examine the relationship between PEBMIL and quality of life. One hundred and ninety-one subjects participated in the present study, undergoing bariatric surgery with follow-up at 12 and 24 months after surgery. The SF-36 and OP-53 questionnaires were administered to assess the quality of life after surgery. There was a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of excess BMI lost at 12 and 24 months; and a significant improvement in quality of life at 12 months, which remained stable at 24 months for most variables. Taking into account the surgical technique, those undergoing gastric bypass surgery show a greater loss of PEBMIL at 12 and 24 months, and significant improvement at one year of evaluation in most of the dimensions that measure quality of life with respect to the tubular vertical gastrectomy technique. Bariatric surgery is effective in reducing the excess of BMI lost and significantly improving the quality of life of morbidly obese patients in the long term. Key words. Bariatric surgery. Quality of life. Morbid obesity.

  15. Bariatric surgery insurance requirements independently predict surgery dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kaitlin M; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Safavian, Dana; Schirmer, Bruce; Malin, Steven K; Hallowell, Peter T; Kirby, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    Many insurance companies have considerable prebariatric surgery requirements despite a lack of evidence for improved clinical outcomes. The hypothesis of this study is that insurance-specific requirements will be associated with a decreased progression to surgery and increased delay in time to surgery. Retrospective data collection was performed for patients undergoing bariatric surgery evaluation from 2010-2015. Patients who underwent surgery (SGY; n = 827; mean body mass index [BMI] 49.1) were compared with those who did not (no-SGY; n = 648; mean BMI: 49.4). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify specific co-morbidity and insurance specific predictors of surgical dropout and time to surgery. A total of 1475 patients using 12 major insurance payors were included. Univariate analysis found insurance requirements associated with surgical drop out included longer median diet duration (no-SGY = 6 mo; SGY = 3 mo; Psurgery dropout. Additionally, surgical patients had an average interval between initial visit and surgery of 5.8±4.6 months with significant weight gain (2.1 kg, Psurgery insurance requirements were associated with lack of patient progression to surgery in this study. In addition, delays in surgery were associated with preoperative weight gain. Although prospective and multicenter studies are needed, these findings have major policy implications suggesting insurance requirements may need to be reconsidered to improve medical care. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring of Diabetic Retinopathy in relation to Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Troels; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Svenningsen, Annette Lykke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the need for closer perioperative monitoring of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. METHODS: Prospective observational clinical study of 56 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. The patients were...... examined with 7-field fundus images and optical coherence tomography scans 2 weeks before and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Worsening was defined as a two-step change in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy scale or appearance or worsening of macular edema...... preoperatively where HbA1c was 6.4 ± 1.9 %. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic retinopathy was clinically stable after bariatric surgery, and none of the observed changes would have resulted in a changed screening interval at our center. This supports adherence to regular diabetic retinopathy screening guidelines following...

  17. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient--2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B; Garvey, W Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues.

  18. Malabsorption as a Therapeutic Approach in Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Adrian T.; Fischer, Lars; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Senft, Jonas; Müller-Stich, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of obese patients will lead to a more frequent use of bariatric procedures in the future. Compared to conservative medical therapy, bariatric procedures achieve greater weight loss and superior control of comorbidities, resulting in improved overall mortality. Methods A search for current literature regarding mechanisms, indications, and outcomes of bariatric surgery was performed. Results In order to care for patients after bariatric surgery properly, it is important to understand its mechanisms of action and effects on gastrointestinal physiology. Recent investigations indicate that the beneficial effects of bariatric procedures are much more complex than simply limiting food intake or an associated malabsorption. Changes in gastrointestinal hormone secretion, energy expenditure, intestinal bacterial colonization, bile acid metabolism, and epigenetic modifications resulting in altered gene expression are likely responsible for the majority of the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures divert the flow of bile and pancreatic enzymes from food and therefore limit the digestion and absorption of nutrients, resulting in reduced calorie intake and subsequent weight loss. Essential micronutrients such as vitamins and trace elements are also absorbed to a lesser extent, potentially leading to severe side effects. Conclusion To prevent malnutrition, dietary supplementation and regular control of micronutrient levels are mandatory for patients undergoing malabsorptive bariatric procedures, in whom the fat-soluble vitamins A and D are commonly deficient. PMID:26288594

  19. Systematic review of bariatric surgery liver biopsies clarifies the natural history of liver disease in patients with severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedossa, Pierre; Tordjman, Joan; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Torcivia, Adriana; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Paradis, Valerie; Ratziu, Vlad; Clément, Karine

    2017-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent complication of morbid obesity, but its severity varies greatly and thus there is a strong need to better define its natural history in these patients. Liver biopsies were systematically performed in 798 consecutive patients with severe obesity undergoing bariatric surgery. Histology was compared with clinical, biological, anthropometrical and body composition characteristics. Patients with presumably normal liver (n=179, 22%) were significantly younger at bariatric surgery than patients with NAFLD (37.0 vs 44.4 years, pliver reported the onset of obesity at a significantly younger age than those with NAFLD (14.8 vs 20.0 year, pliver disease severity (presumably normal liver: 1.00, steatosis: 1.21, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH): 1.34, pliver: 50%, steatosis: 49.1%, NASH: 47.4%, pliver disease but only in female patients (presumably normal liver: 8543 picolitres, steatosis: 9156 picolitres, NASH: 9996 picolitres). These results suggest that young adults are more prone to store fat in subcutaneous tissue and reach the threshold of bariatric surgery indication before their liver is damaged. A shift of fat storage from subcutaneous to visceral adipose tissue compartment is associated with liver damages. Liver might also be targeted by subcutaneous hypertrophic adipocytes in females since hypertrophic adipocytes are more exposed to lipolysis and to the production of inflammatory mediators. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Review of post bariatric surgery effects on common genitourinary physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoubian, Aline A; Nasr, Rami

    2018-02-08

    Obesity is a worldwide challenging health problem. Weight loss through medical management of obesity has not always been successful, thus, giving rise to the need for surgical intervention. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be helpful for morbidly obese patients. However, studies have also shown the effect of surgery on stone formation, fertility and erectile function. This review summarizes the main findings of several studies that analyze stone formation and fertility in men as well as erectile function post bariatric surgery. The underlying pathophysiologic alterations post bariatric surgery include increased absorption of oxalate leading to hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and increased urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation. Contradicting data exist on the effect of bariatric surgery on fertility and erectile function. Further studies are needed to analyze the mechanisms. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  1. Overview of bariatric surgery for the physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hng, Keng Ngee; Ang, Yeng S

    2012-10-01

    The worldwide pandemic of obesity carries alarming health and socioeconomic implications. Bariatric surgery is currently the only effective treatment for severe obesity. It is safe, with mortality comparable to that of cholecystectomy, and effective in producing substantial and sustainable weight loss, along with high rates of resolution of associated comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes. For this reason, indications for bariatric surgery are being widened. In addition to volume restriction and malabsorption, bariatric surgery brings about neurohormonal changes that affect satiety and glucose homeostasis. Increased understanding of these mechanisms will help realise therapeutic benefits by pharmacological means. Bariatric surgery improves long-term mortality but can cause long-term nutritional deficiencies. The safety of pregnancy after bariatric surgery is still being elucidated.

  2. Nutrient Deficiencies Are Common Prior to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame-Peterson, Leigh A; Megill, Robin D; Carobrese, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index >30 kg/m 2 , is a growing worldwide epidemic currently effecting 1 in 10 adults, with rates as high as 40% in the United States. The only proven long-term treatment of severe obesity on a population level is surgical modification of the gastrointestinal anatomy to induce weight loss, termed bariatric surgery. With adequate physician guidance and appropriate candidate criteria, bariatric surgery is an option for effective long-term treatment of obesity and its related comorbidities. Complications of bariatric surgery can be seen in patients who are not compliant to the recommended lifestyle and dietary changes required following bariatric surgery, including nausea, vomiting, dumping syndrome, acid reflux, and nutrition deficiencies. Despite caloric density, the diet of patients prior to bariatric surgery is often of poor nutrition quality and does not meet recommended dietary guidelines for micronutrient intake, making this an at-risk population for micronutrient malnutrition. Currently, improvements are needed in standardization of nutrition assessment as well as micronutrient cutoffs for deficiency and insufficiency. In the meantime, utilizing our current tools to conduct nutrition assessment at baseline and implement supplementation where necessary may improve the nutrition status of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, both before and after surgery, which may improve their surgical outcomes.

  3. The evolution of minimally invasive bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, Andrew J; Williams, Robert; Sutton, Christopher; Khanna, Achal

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a pandemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This historical article charts the progress of successful strategies that have been used to tackle weight loss from dietary modifications to the development of surgical interventions that have subsequently evolved. It also provides a précis of the reported outcome data following minimally invasive bariatric procedures. A literature review was performed. All articles relevant to the progression of bariatric surgery and minimally invasive surgery were assessed, as were those articles that described the ultimate evolution, combination, and establishment of the two techniques. This article charts the progression of early weight loss strategies, from early dietary modifications and pharmacologic interventions to initial techniques in small bowel bypass procedures, banding techniques, and sleeve gastrectomies. It also describes the simultaneous developments of endoscopic interventions and laparoscopic procedures. A range of procedures are described, which differ in their success in terms of loss of excess weight and in their complication rates. Weight loss is greatest for biliopancreatic diversion followed by gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy and least for adjustable gastric banding. Bariatric surgery is an evolving field, which will continue to expand given current epidemiologic trends. Developments in instrumentation and surgical techniques, including single access and natural orifice approaches, may offer further benefit in terms of patient acceptability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Depo-Provera (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) use after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Clarissa; Murthy, Amitasrigowri S

    2016-01-01

    In the US, obesity rates are increasing greatly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 68.5% of Americans, including 63.9% of adult women older than 20 years, are overweight (body mass index between 25 kg/m 2 and 29.9 kg/m 2 ) or obese (body mass index >30 kg/m 2 ). In light of this, it is not surprising that the rates of bariatric surgery have also been increasing. When considering the metabolic changes associated with both bariatric surgery and contraceptive use, in combination with the unique medical considerations of obese women, it is indisputable that clear guidelines are needed when counseling obese patients of reproductive age after bariatric surgery. In this literature review, we focus on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the implications of its use in obese women, preweight and postweight loss following bariatric surgery. Both DMPA use and bariatric surgery are known to cause bone loss, but it is still unclear whether there is an additive effect of the two factors on bone loss and whether either of these factors directly leads to an increased risk of bone fracture. The current consensus guidelines do not impose a restriction on the use of DMPA after bariatric surgery. DMPA use is associated with weight gain, and it is unclear whether weight loss blunting occurs with the use of DMPA after bariatric surgery. Prior studies had demonstrated an association with weight gain in adolescents, and therefore, those prescribing DMPA use after bariatric surgery in adolescents should proceed with caution. Adult women do not have a similar response to the use of DMPA. DMPA use has rarely been associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The obesity-associated increase in VTE should be mitigated by surgically induced weight loss. The concurrent use of DMPA in the post bariatric surgical period should not further increase the risk of VTE.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF BODY FAT IN OBESE PATIENTS PREOPERATIVELY FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Mônica; Toimil, Rosana Farah; Rasslan, Zied; Ilias, Elias Jirjoss; Gradinar, Ana Lúcia Torloni; Malheiros, Carlos Alberto

    The study of body composition in patient candidates for bariatric surgery is directly related to the increase and distribution of body fat in the development of cardiovascular disease. To correlate anthropometric indicators and bioelectrical impedance in the assessment of body fat in female candidates for bariatric surgery. Cross-sectional, observational study of 88 women. The weight, height, body mass index and waist circumference data were evaluated in the anthropometric analysis. The body fat was determinate by bioelectrical impedance conducted according to the manufacturer´s recommended technique with a specific severe obesity formula. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the average waist circumference and body mass index for better analysis of the results. The group had a mean age of 39.7 years (±7.2), average weight of 125.6 kg (±16.2), mean body mass index of 48.7 kg/m2 (±6.4) and the mean waist circumference 137.6 cm (±12.4). Negative and significant relationship between BMI values waist circumference and resistance obtained by bioelectrical impedance ​​were found. By analyzing the two groups the mean BMI and waist circumference, a significant relationship was observed, ie, the higher the degree of obesity less resistance was obtained by bioelectrical impedance. The higher is the obesity the lower is value found for resistance. The increase of anthropometric indicators (BMI and waist circumference) determined reduction in resistance and reactance obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis in obese women candidates to bariatric surgery. O estudo da composição corporal em pacientes candidatas à cirurgia bariátrica tem relação direta com o aumento e distribuição da gordura corporal e no desenvolvimento de doenças cardiovasculares. Estudar a correlação entre indicadores antropométricos e da bioimpedância elétrica na avaliação da gordura corporal em mulheres candidatas à cirurgia bariátrica. Estudo transversal

  6. Reoperative bariatric surgery for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingliang; Cohen, Ricardo; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Primary bariatric surgery has been proven to be effective in weight loss and improvement of weight-related metabolic co-morbidities. However, a small proportion of patients after bariatric surgery either have persistent hyperglycemia or relapse after initial remission of their metabolic disease. Revisional bariatric surgery has been evaluated extensively for weight recidivism and postoperative complications. However, there has not been any high-level evidence validating the utility of revisional bariatric surgery on recurrent metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. In this review of 30 studies, we aimed to summarize the evidence and determine whether revisional surgery can have a positive impact on metabolic diseases that were not reversed by initial bariatric intervention. Overall, 14-38% of patients had residual diabetes at the time of revisional surgery. Depending on the index surgery and subsequent reconstruction, revisions induced 20-80% additional excess weight loss, or further decrease of body mass index by 10-30%. Improvement of diabetes was seen in 65-100% of patients. Specifically, conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) yielded improvement of diabetes in 79%, 72%, and 62% of patients who previously had vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG), respectively. Converting AGB to SG improved diabetes in 65% of patients, and SG to duodenal switch improved diabetes in 79% of patients. Revision of the gastric pouch or stoma in RYGB yielded improvement of diabetes in 79% of patients. Further clinical and mechanistic research is needed to better delineate the role of revisional bariatric surgery in patients with residual metabolic disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Lembo, Erminia; Saldalamacchia, Gennaro; Avola, Claudia Kesia; Angrisani, Luigi; Capaldo, Brunella

    2017-11-15

    Bariatric surgery is recognized as a highly effective therapy for obesity since it accomplishes sustained weight loss, reduction of obesity-related comorbidities and mortality, and improvement of quality of life. Overall, bariatric surgery is associated with a 42% reduction of the cardiovascular risk and 30% reduction of all-cause mortality. This review focuses on some nutritional consequences that can occur in bariatric patients that could potentially hinder the clinical benefits of this therapeutic option. All bariatric procedures, to variable degrees, alter the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract; this alteration makes these patients more susceptible to developing nutritional complications, namely, deficiencies of macro- and micro-nutrients, which could lead to disabling diseases such as anemia, osteoporosis, protein malnutrition. Of note is the evidence that most obese patients present a number of nutritional deficits already prior to surgery, the most important being vitamin D and iron deficiencies. This finding prompts the need for a complete nutritional assessment and, eventually, an adequate correction of pre-existing deficits before surgery. Another critical issue that follows bariatric surgery is post-operative weight regain, which is commonly associated with the relapse of obesity-related co-morbidities. Nu-tritional complications associated with bariatric surgery can be prevented by life-long nutritional monitoring with the administration of multi-vitamins and mineral supplements according to the patient's needs.

  8. Bariatric Surgery: A Brief Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Frichtel, Christina M

    2004-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is on the rise as treatment for the increasing number of obese patients in the US population. As this procedure becomes more common, primary care physicians are assuming increased responsibility not only for preoperative selection and education of bariatric surgery candidates but also for their postoperative care and monitoring—two factors necessary for a successful surgical outcome. This article highlights some issues relevant for primary care physicians and reports an illu...

  9. Bariatric surgery – An update for the endocrinologist

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Marcio C.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, is associated with increased rates of mortality risk and of developing several comorbidities, and lessens life expectancy. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbidly obese patients, reducing risk of developing new comorbidities, health care utilization and mortality. The establishment of centers of excellence with interdisciplinary staff in bariatric surgery has been reducing operative mortality in the course of time, improving sur...

  10. Trends in adolescent bariatric surgery evaluated by UHC database collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallati, Pradeep; Buettner, Shelby; Simorov, Anton; Meyer, Avishai; Shaligram, Abhijit; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2012-11-01

    With increasing childhood obesity, adolescent bariatric surgery has been increasingly performed. We used a national database to analyze current trends in laparoscopic bariatric surgery in the adolescent population and related short-term outcomes. Discharge data from the University Health System Consortium (UHC) database was accessed using International Classification of Disease codes during a 36 month period. UHC is an alliance of more than 110 academic medical centers and nearly 250 affiliate hospitals. All adolescent patients between 13 and 18 years of age, with the assorted diagnoses of obesity, who underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) were evaluated. The main outcome measures analyzed were morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay (LOS), overall cost, intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate, and readmission rate. These outcomes were compared to those of adult bariatric surgery. Adolescent laparoscopic bariatric surgery was performed on 329 patients. At the same time, 49,519 adult bariatric surgeries were performed. One hundred thirty-six adolescent patients underwent LAGB, 47 had SG, and 146 patients underwent LRYGB. LAGB has shown a decreasing trend (n = 68, 34, and 34), while SG has shown an increasing trend (n = 8, 15, and 24) over the study years. LRYGB remained stable (n = 44, 60, and 42) throughout the study period. The individual and summative morbidity and mortality rates for these procedures were zero. Compared to adult bariatric surgery, 30 day in-hospital morbidity (0 vs. 2.2 %, p adolescent bariatric surgery, while the ICU admission rate (9.78 vs. 6.30 %, p adolescent laparoscopic bariatric surgery reveal the increased use of sleeve gastrectomy and adjustable gastric banding falling out of favor.

  11. Micronutrient deficiencies in the pre-bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Karla Vanessa Gomes; Costa, Maria José de Carvalho; Gonçalves, Maria da Conceição Rodrigues; Sousa, Bruno Soares

    2013-01-01

    Data already demonstrated the increased prevalence of obesity in various segments of the population. In this context, bariatric surgery is accepted nowadays as the most effective tool in the treatment and control of morbid obesity. Several studies have evaluated the nutritional status after bariatric surgery, especially mixed by detecting a reduction in food intake of protein, vitamins and minerals. However, other studies have investigated the presence of nutritional deficiencies prior to surgery, which may be aggravated by the surgical procedure, resulting in serious postoperative complications. To analyze the literature in relationship to micronutrient deficiencies in obese patients before bariatric surgery. Was carried out a systematic review in several electronic databases, such as PubMed/ Medline, Scielo, Lilacs and Bireme. The following keywords were used alone or in combination: bariatric surgery, obesity, preoperative, gastric bypass, vitamin deficiencies, deficiencies and mineral nutrient absorption. Were included 40 review and original articles published between 2005 to 2012. There were consensus on the combination of preoperative nutritional deficiencies, restrictions and malabsorption, possibly induced by bariatric surgery that can lead patients to experience significant nutritional deficits during the late postoperative period, especially of micronutrients, resulting in serious complications. The high occurrence of micronutrient deficiencies preoperatively detected in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery, plus a malabsorptive procedure, may involve worse prognosis during the late postoperative period. Preoperative evaluation of nutritional parameters and food intake is recommended in conjunction with surgical interventions.

  12. Thickening of inner retinal layers in the parafovea after bariatric surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Troels; Laugesen, Caroline S; Floyd, Andrea K

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: We examined 51 patients with T2D 2 weeks before and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Retinal thickness was measured with optical coherence tomography and automated segmentation in the fovea, parafovea and perifovea in each retinal layer. Retinal vessels were semiautomatically...... measured in a zone 0.5-1 disc diameters from the optic disc. RESULTS: The total macula thickened with a peak after 6 months in both univariate (2.7 ± 0.4 μm, p

  13. [Pregnancy and bariatric surgery: Critical points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciangura, C; Nizard, J; Poitou-Bernert, C; Dommergues, M; Oppert, J M; Basdevant, A

    2015-06-01

    More than 200,000 people underwent obesity surgery in France. Most of them are women. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery is becoming a common situation. This surgery results in major nutritional and gastro-intestinal tract modifications that may influence or be influenced by pregnancy, and yields benefits as well as complications. A multidisciplinary management including a nutritionist, an obstetrician, an anesthesiologist, and a bariatric surgeon is required. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of bariatric surgery on pregnancy and vice versa, and to identify the key points of this management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Conversional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, R; Bothe, C; Junghans, T; Pratschke, J; Benzing, C; Krenzien, F

    2016-10-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the therapy of choice in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are showing higher rates of treatment failure, reducing obesity-associated morbidity and body weight insufficiently. Moreover, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can occur refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to RYGB can be reasonable as long as specific conditions are fulfilled.Endoscopic procedures are currently being applied to revise bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20 % of cases. Transoral outlet reduction is the minimally invasive method of choice to reduce gastrojejunal anastomosis of the alimentary limb. The diameter of a gastric sleeve can be unwantedly enlarged as well; that can be reduced by placement of a longitudinal full-thickness suture.Severe hypoglycemic episodes can be present in patients following RYGB. Hypoglycemic episodes have to be diagnosed first and can be treated conventionally. Alternatively, a laparoscopic approach according to Branco-Zorron can be used for non-responders. Hypoglycemic episodes can thus be prevented and body weight reduction can be assured.Conversional and endoscopic procedures can be used in patients with treatment failure following bariatric surgery. Note that non-invasive approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional procedure is performed.

  15. ERCP via gastrostomy vs. double balloon enteroscopy in patients with prior bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Kwang; Chiorean, Michael V; Coté, Gregory A; El Hajj, Ihab I; El Hajj, Ihab; Ballard, Darren; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Lehman, Glen A

    2013-08-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric surgery. The performance of ERCP in bariatric RYGB is challenging due to the long Roux limb. We herein compared the indications and technical outcomes of ERCP via percutaneous gastrostomy (GERCP) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBERCP) for patients with prior bariatric RYGB anatomy. Between December 2005 and November 2011, consecutive ERCP patients who had undergone RYGB were identified using a prospectively maintained electronic ERCP database. Medical records were abstracted for ERCP indications and outcomes. In most cases, the gastrostomy was done by either laparoscopic or open surgery and allowed to mature at least 1 month before performing ERCP. The choice of route for ERCP was at discretion of managing physician. Forty-four patients (F = 42) with GERCP and 28 patients (F = 26) with DBERCP were identified. The mean age was younger in GERCP than DBERCP (44.8 vs. 56.1, p successful in all but two (97 %), whereas duct cannulation and interventions were successful in all. In DBERCP, the success rate of accessing major papilla, cannulation and therapeutic intervention was 78, 63, 56 %, respectively. There was one (3.1 %) post-ERCP pancreatitis in DBERCP. Complications occurred in 11 GERCP procedures (14.5 %) and 10 were related to the gastrostomy. This was significantly higher than that of DBERCP (p = 0.022). GERCP is more effective than DBERCP in gaining access to the pancreatobiliary tree in patients with RYGB, but it is hindered by the gastrostomy maturation delay and a higher morbidity. Technical improvements in each method are needed.

  16. Examination of bariatric surgery Facebook support groups: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koball, Afton M; Jester, Dylan J; Domoff, Sarah E; Kallies, Kara J; Grothe, Karen B; Kothari, Shanu N

    2017-08-01

    Support following bariatric surgery is vital to ensure long-term postoperative success. Many individuals undergoing bariatric surgery are turning to online modalities, especially the popular social media platform Facebook, to access support groups and pages. Despite evidence suggesting that the majority of patients considering bariatric surgery are utilizing online groups, little is known about the actual content of these groups. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a content analysis of bariatric surgery support groups and pages on Facebook. Online via Facebook, independent academic medical center, United States. Data from bariatric surgery-related Facebook support groups and pages were extracted over a 1-month period in 2016. Salient content themes (e.g., progress posts, depression content, eating behaviors) were coded reliably (all κ> .70). More than 6,800 posts and replies were coded. Results indicated that seeking recommendations (11%), providing information or recommendations (53%), commenting on changes since surgery (19%), and lending support to other members (32%) were the most common types of posts. Content surrounding anxiety, eating behaviors, depression, body image, weight bias, and alcohol was found less frequently. Online bariatric surgery groups can be used to receive support, celebrate physical and emotional accomplishments, provide anecdotal accounts of the "bariatric lifestyle" for preoperative patients, and comment on challenges with mental health and experiences of weight bias. Providers should become acquainted with the content commonly found in online groups and exercise caution in recommending these platforms to information-seeking patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Lembo, Erminia; Saldalamacchia, Gennaro; Avola, Claudia Kesia; Angrisani, Luigi; Capaldo, Brunella

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recognized as a highly effective therapy for obesity since it accomplishes sustained weight loss, reduction of obesity-related comorbidities and mortality, and improvement of quality of life. Overall, bariatric surgery is associated with a 42% reduction of the cardiovascular risk and 30% reduction of all-cause mortality. This review focuses on some nutritional consequences that can occur in bariatric patients that could potentially hinder the clinical benefits of this therapeutic option. All bariatric procedures, to variable degrees, alter the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract; this alteration makes these patients more susceptible to developing nutritional complications, namely, deficiencies of macro- and micro-nutrients, which could lead to disabling diseases such as anemia, osteoporosis, protein malnutrition. Of note is the evidence that most obese patients present a number of nutritional deficits already prior to surgery, the most important being vitamin D and iron deficiencies. This finding prompts the need for a complete nutritional assessment and, eventually, an adequate correction of pre-existing deficits before surgery. Another critical issue that follows bariatric surgery is post-operative weight regain, which is commonly associated with the relapse of obesity-related co-morbidities. Nu-tritional complications associated with bariatric surgery can be prevented by life-long nutritional monitoring with the administration of multi-vitamins and mineral supplements according to the patient’s needs. PMID:29204255

  18. [Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients often have nutritional deficiencies, particularly in fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid and zinc. After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures. The latter result in more important weight loss but also increase the risk of more severe deficiencies. The protein deficiency associated with a decrease in the fat-free mass has been described in both procedures. It can sometimes require an enteral or parenteral support. Anemia can be secondary to iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency and even to vitamin B12 deficiency. Neurological disorders such as Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, or peripheral neuropathies may also be observed. Malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients, especially if diagnosed after by-pass surgery, rarely cause clinical symptoms. However, some complications have been reported such as bone demineralization due to vitamin D deficiency, hair loss secondary to zinc deficiency or hemeralopia from vitamin A deficiency. A careful nutritional follow-up should be performed during pregnancy after obesity surgery, because possible deficiencies can affect the health of both the mother and child. In conclusion, increased awareness of the risk of deficiency and the systematic dosage of micronutrients are needed in the pre- and postoperative period in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The case by case correction of these deficiencies is mandatory, and their systematic prevention should be evaluated.

  19. Effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Dysfunctional Eating among Patients Admitted for Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Gade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT alleviates dysfunctional eating (DE patterns and symptoms of anxiety and depression in morbidly obese patients planned for bariatric surgery. Design and Methods. A total of 98 (68 females patients with a mean (SD age of 43 (10 years and BMI 43.5 (4.9 kg/m2 were randomly assigned to a CBT-group or a control group receiving usual care (i.e., nutritional support and education. The CBT-group received ten weekly intervention sessions. DE, anxiety, and depression were assessed by the TFEQ R-21 and HADS, respectively. Results. Compared with controls, the CBT-patients showed significantly less DE, affective symptoms, and a larger weight loss at follow-up. The effect sizes were large (DE-cognitive restraint, g=-.92, P≤.001; DE-uncontrolled eating, g=-.90, P≤.001, moderate (HADS-depression, g=-.73, P≤.001; DE-emotional eating, g=-.67, P≤.001; HADS-anxiety, g=-.62, P=.003, and low (BMI, g=-.24, P=.004. Conclusion. This study supports the use of CBT in helping patients preparing for bariatric surgery to reduce DE and to improve mental health. This clinical trial is registered with NCT01403558.

  20. The role of CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy in patients with clinically severe obesity presenting with complications after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsas, Theodore; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Spyropoulos, Charalambos; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karatzas, Andreas; Kalfarentzos, Fotis

    2010-10-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy in patients presenting with complications after bariatric surgery. From January 2003 up to today, 25 patients (20 women), formerly operated for severe obesity, were referred for gastrostomy, after presenting with a complication. The mean age and body mass index were 38±9.3 years and 46±7.1 kg/m, respectively. A gastrostomy tube was placed under CT in all patients. The procedure's technical success rate was 96%, with mean interventional time of 80±42 minutes. In 14 of 25 (56%) cases submucosal spread of air was noticed during air insufflation into the stomach. No major complications were recorded. There was a statistically significant improvement of both albumin and prealbumin values compared with the initial ones (Pbariatric surgery, provides a reliable alternative for nutritional support. It restores the normal absorption route, reversing metabolic deficiencies.

  1. [Obesity, bariatric surgery and future fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Abraham; Machtinger, Ronit; Segal-Lieberman, Gabriella; Orvieto, R

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is an increasingly widespread health problem. In addition to comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease, obesity has a significant impact on reproductive life, including infertility, miscarriages and high prevalence of pregnancy complications. The present review describes the possible benefits of bariatric surgery regarding fertility and pregnancy outcome. It is well established that bariatric surgery leads to regular ovulatory cycles and improves spontaneous conception rates in obese women. While pregnancy after bariatric surgery is safe and associated with reduced pregnancy complications, pregnant women following bariatric surgery are still at high risk for preterm births and small dimensions of gestational age offsprings. The optimal interval that should be kept between surgery and subsequent pregnancy is controversial, with recent studies emphasizing the importance of nutritional balance rather than the time from surgery to conception as being the most important determinant. Strict peri-conceptional surveillance is mandatory in order to prevent nutritional deficiencies and for the early diagnosis of abnormal fetal growth.

  2. Twelve key nutritional issues in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Ronan; Huber, Olivier; Azagury, Dan E; Pichard, Claude

    2016-02-01

    In morbidly obese patients, i.e. body mass index ≥35, bariatric surgery is considered the only effective durable weight-loss therapy. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) are associated with risks of nutritional deficiencies and malnutrition. Therefore, preoperative nutritional assessment and correction of vitamin and micronutrient deficiencies, as well as long-term postoperative nutritional follow-up, are advised. Dietetic counseling is mandatory during the first year, optional later. Planned and structured physical exercise should be systematically promoted to maintain muscle mass and bone health. In this review, twelve key perioperative nutritional issues are raised with focus on LRYGBP and LSG procedures, the most common current bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing Malnourishment in Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rachel K; Berkelhammer, Charles; Suarez, Victor; Kay, Helen H

    2018-02-01

    Little information exists to guide monitoring and treatment of malnourishment during pregnancy after bariatric surgery. Here we present a case with severe deficiencies and recommendations for testing and treatment. Our patient underwent a duodenal switch procedure resulting in significant weight loss and numerous deficiencies. She then experienced a neonatal demise with multiple congenital abnormalities, including diaphragmatic hernia, possibly related to severe vitamin A deficiency. After high doses of oral and parenteral replacement, pancreatic enzymes, and total parenteral nutrition, she delivered an anatomically normal but growth-restricted neonate in a subsequent pregnancy. Bariatric procedures may result in nutritional deficiencies that affect pregnancy outcome. Women with severe deficiencies require pre-pregnancy counselling, monitoring, aggressive treatment, and a multidisciplinary approach to care. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bariatric surgery and bariatric psychology: general overview and the Dutch approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hout, Gerbrand C M; Leibbrandt, Anke J; Jakimowicz, Jack J; Smulders, J Frans; Schoon, Erik J; Van Spreeuwel, Jan P; Van Heck, Guus L

    2003-12-01

    Obesity is a chronic, multifactorially caused disease with serious somatic and psychosocial comorbidity as well as economical consequences. In the Netherlands, between 1993 and 1997, the prevalence of morbid obesity was 0.2% for men and 0.6% for women. Although bariatric surgery generally is an effective intervention, it does not lead to equal results in every patient. The long-term efficacy is predominantly determined by compliance to adequate dietary rules in which psychosocial factors can play a major role. Questionnaires were sent to the surgery departments of all hospitals in the Netherlands. Subsequently, a second questionnaire was sent to clinical psychology departments of hospitals which perform bariatric surgery. In 28 Dutch hospitals (19%), bariatric surgery is being performed, mostly using restrictive procedures. Almost all hospitals have a multidisciplinary selection-process, and all surgeons and psychologists use multiple selection-criteria. Regarding these criteria, there is more consensus between surgeons than between psychologists. In most hospitals, patients are psychologically assessed prior to surgery. However, postoperative assessment is relatively rare, as is preoperative and postoperative psychological treatment. In the Netherlands, bariatric surgery is still relatively uncommon and mostly limited to restrictive procedures. Irrespective of BMI and eating behavior, the majority of patients will be offered a restrictive procedure. The involvement by the psychological and/or psychiatric discipline is not optimal yet; especially, postoperative assessment and pre- and postoperative treatment are not frequently performed, in spite of the fact that these programs can enhance the success rate of bariatric surgery.

  5. Implementation of the Spanish ERAS program in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Muñoz, José Luis; Royo, Pablo; Duran, Manuel; Redondo, Elisabeth; Ramirez, Jose Manuel

    2018-03-08

    The essence of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) programs is the multimodal approach, and many authors have demonstrated safety and feasibility in fast track bariatric surgery. According to this concept, a multidisciplinary ERAS program for bariatric surgery has been developed by the Spanish Fast Track Group (ERAS Spain). The aim of this study was to analyze the initial implementation of this Spanish National ERAS protocol in bariatric surgery, comparing it with a historical cohort receiving standard care. A multi-centric prospective study was performed, including 233 consecutive patients undergoing bariatric surgery during 2015 and following ERAS protocol. It was compared with a historical cohort of 286 patients, who underwent bariatric surgery at the same institutions between 2013 and 2014 and following standard care. Compliance with the protocol, morbidity, mortality, hospital stay and readmission were evaluated. Bariatric techniques performed were Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. There were no significant differences in complications, mortality and readmission. Postoperative pain and hospital stay were significantly lower in the ERAS group. The total compliance to protocol was 80%. The Spanish National ERAS protocol is a safe issue, obtaining similar results to standard care in terms of complications, reoperations, mortality and readmissions. It is associated with less postoperative pain and earlier hospital discharge.

  6. Bariatric Surgery: What the Rheumatologist Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sobia; Hassan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    A staggering 76 million adults are obese in the United States. It is known that obesity contributes to increased incidence and worse disease outcomes in many rheumatic conditions. Bariatric surgery has emerged as the most effective treatment modality for the morbidly obese, leading to substantial and sustained weight loss. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the findings of studies investigating the effect of substantial weight loss achieved through bariatric surgery on rheumatic disease and outcomes. Second, with an increasing number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important for the rheumatologist to have a basic understanding of the commonly performed bariatric procedures and to be aware of important nutritional deficiencies and medication restrictions that apply to this patient population.

  7. The increasing incidence of adolescent bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwintscher, Nathan P; Azarow, Kenneth S; Horton, John D; Newton, Christopher R; Martin, Matthew J

    2013-12-01

    Morbid obesity continues to be a significant problem within the United States, as overweight/obesity rates are nearing 33%. Bariatric surgery has had success in treating obesity in adults and is becoming a viable treatment option for obese adolescents. We studied 1615 inpatient admissions for children ≤20 years of age undergoing a bariatric procedure for morbid obesity in 2009 using the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Patients had a principal diagnosis of obesity and a bariatric procedure listed as one of their first 5 procedures. Procedures (open gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastroplasty, and laparoscopic gastric band) and complications were defined by ICD-9 codes. There were 90 open gastric bypasses, 906 laparoscopic gastric bypasses, 150 sleeve gastrectomies, 18 laparoscopic gastroplasties, and 445 laparoscopic gastric bandings. The length of stay for each procedure was 2.44, 2.20, 2.33, 1.10, and 1.02 days, respectively (PBariatric surgery is an increasingly utilized option for the treatment of morbid obesity among adolescents. The procedures can be performed safely as evidenced by low complication rates. Additional long-term follow-up is necessary. © 2013.

  8. Recent advances in bariatric/metabolic surgery: appraisal of clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are becoming a serious medical issue worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective and durable therapy for the treatment of morbid obese patients. Increasing data indicates bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery is an effective and novel therapy for not well controlled obese T2DM patients. The review of recent developments in bariatric/metabolic surgery covers 4 major fields. 1) Improvement of safety: recen...

  9. Operative strategies for patients with failed primary bariatric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, Helena; Vines, Larissa; Schiesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat obesity and its sequelae. With the increasing incidence of obesity, the number of bariatric procedures has dramatically increased in recent years. The perioperative morbidity reached a very low level, and nearly all revisional bariatric procedures are primarily minimally invasive today. About 10-25% of the patients undergoing bariatric surgery require a revision at some point after their initial operation. Consequently, revisional bariatric surgery has emerged as a distinct practice, performed mainly at tertiary centers, to resolve complications caused by the primary operation and to provide satisfactory weight loss. In this review, our personal experience with revisional bariatric surgery is discussed against the background of the available literature. We further attempt to define major indications for revisional bariatric surgery and balance them with perioperative and long-term morbidity as well as the surgical outcome.

  10. The Effects of Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss on Knee Pain in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that osteoarthritis (OA is highly associated with obesity, and individuals clinically defined as obese (BMI > 30.0 kg/m2 are four times more likely to have knee OA over the general population. The purpose of this research was to examine if isolated weight loss improved knee symptoms in patients with osteoarthritis. Adult patients (n=24; age 18–70; BMI > 35 kg/m2 with clinical and radiographic evidence of knee OA participated in a one-year trial in which WOMAC and KOOS surveys were administered at a presurgery baseline and six and twelve months postsurgery. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests. Weight loss six and twelve months following bariatric surgery was statistically significant (P<0.05 compared to presurgery measurements. All variables from both KOOS and WOMAC assessments were significantly improved (P<0.05 when compared to baseline. Isolated weight loss occurring via bariatric surgery resulted in statistically significant improvement in patient’s knee arthritis symptoms at both six and twelve months. Further research will need to be done to determine if symptom relief continues over time, and if the benefits are also applicable to individuals with symptomatic knee arthritis that are overweight but not obese.

  11. [Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy on weight loss after two years of bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abilés, V; Abilés, J; Rodríguez-Ruiz, S; Luna, V; Martín, F; Gándara, N; Fernández-Santaella, M C

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in the success of postoperative weight loss after 2 years of CB. A prospective observational study was conducted in consecutive patients with morbid obesity aged between 18 and 59 yrs and enrolled in the bariatric surgery program of the Obesity Surgery Unit of our hospital from June 2007 through June 2010, with two years postoperative follow-up. Participants were divided into two groups according to their participation in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or not. Over a 3-month period, CBT was applied in 12 2-h sessions. The main dependent variables studied were body weight and height, from which we calculated BMI and percentage of excess weight lost (weight lost x 100)/(initial weight-ideal weight), classifying patients as successful (E ) those with EPP > 50%, and unsuccessful (NE) those with EPP bariatric surgery, 30 responded postoperative evaluations, 16 underwent CBT before CB and 14 underwent surgery without receiving psycho-nutritional therapy, (76% female) with a mean age of 41 ± 9.5 years. The mean baseline BMI was 42 ± 10 and 45% of patients were classified as super obese (BMI: 56 ± 6). Mean excess weight loss (EPP) was 77%. According to the EPP were classified as "successful" (S) (59%) and "unsuccessful" (U) (41%). Of the patients assigned to S, 94% received CBT (15 individuals of 17 total), compared with only 12% who did not receive (2 individuals of the 17 total) with statistically significant differences (p 50% of EPP (p successful results in the evolution of weight loss at two years of CB are mostly (94%) who received CBT, presenting lower psychological comorbidity than NE. CBT could positively influence postoperative outcomes. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Bariatric surgery in adolescents and young adults--safety and effectiveness in a cohort of 345 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, B S; Wabitsch, M; Lippert, H; Wolff, S; Knoll, C; Weiner, R; Manger, T; Kiess, W; Stroh, C

    2014-03-01

    To examine the safety and effectiveness of adolescent bariatric surgery and to improve treatment recommendations for this age group. Prospective longitudinal registry. Since January 2005, patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Germany are enlisted in an online registry called 'study for quality assurance in obesity surgeries'. Adolescents and young adults up to the age of 21 years, operated from January 2005 to December 2010. Weight, BMI, comorbidities, complication rates. N=345 primary procedures were recorded by 58 hospitals. N=51 patients were under the age of 18 years. Follow-up information was available for 48% (n=167) of patients, with an average observation period of 544±412 days (median: 388 days). The most common surgical techniques were gastric banding (n=118, 34.2%), gastric bypass (n=116, 33.6%) and sleeve gastrectomy (n=78, 22.6%). Short-term complications (intra-operative; general postoperative; specific postoperative) were slightly lower for gastric banding (0.8%; 2.5%; 0.8%) than for gastric bypass (2.6%; 5.2%; 1.7%) or sleeve gastrectomy (0%; 9.0%; 7.7%). In accordance with published findings, weight and BMI reduction were lower for gastric banding (-28 kg; -9.5 kg m(-2)) compared to gastric bypass (-50 kg; -16.4 kg m(-2)) Pbariatric surgery has low short-term complication rates and results in sustained weight loss in adolescents. However, the missing long-term observations prohibit a final conclusion about lasting effectiveness and safety. Clinical trials with structured follow-up programs and mechanisms to ascertain patient adherences are needed.

  13. Iron deficiency after bariatric surgery: what is the real problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Nele; Van der Schueren, Bart; Mertens, Ann; Lannoo, Matthias; Grauwet, Tara; Augustijns, Patrick; Matthys, Christophe

    2018-04-05

    The growing prevalence of obesity explains the rising interest in bariatric surgery. Compared with non-surgical treatment options, bariatric surgery results in greater and sustained improvements in weight loss, obesity associated complications, all-cause mortality and quality of life. These encouraging metabolic and weight effects come with a downside, namely the risk of nutritional deficiencies. Particularly striking is the risk to develop iron deficiency. Postoperatively, the prevalence of iron deficiency varies between 18 and 53 % after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and between 1 and 54 % after sleeve gastrectomy. Therefore, preventive strategies and effective treatment options for iron deficiency are crucial to successfully manage the iron status of patients after bariatric surgery. With this review, we discuss the risks and the contributing factors of developing iron deficiency after bariatric surgery. Furthermore, we highlight the discrepancy in the diagnosis of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia and highlight the evidence supporting the current nutritional recommendations in the field of bariatric research. In conclusion, we advocate for more nutrition-related research in patient populations in order to provide strong evidence-based guidelines after bariatric surgery.

  14. Psychological Aspects of Bariatric Surgery as a Treatment for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbe, Sandra; Hamlet, Claire; Meyrick, Jane

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the psychological effects on life after bariatric surgery despite the high prevalence of psychological disorders in candidates seeking this procedure. Our review discusses the literature around the psychological impact of bariatric surgery, exploring whether the procedure addresses underlying psychological conditions that can lead to morbid obesity and the effect on eating behaviour postoperatively. Findings show that despite undisputed significant weight loss and improvements in comorbidities, current literature suggests some persisting disorder in psychological outcomes like depression and body image for patients at longer term follow-up, compared to control groups. Lack of postoperative psychological monitoring and theoretical mapping limits our understanding of reasons behind these findings. Reframing bariatric approaches to morbid obesity to incorporate psychological experience postoperatively would facilitate understanding of psychological aspects of bariatric surgery and how this surgical treatment maps onto the disease trajectory of obesity.

  15. Methylation and Expression of Immune and Inflammatory Genes in the Offspring of Bariatric Bypass Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Guénard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Maternal obesity, excess weight gain and overnutrition during pregnancy increase risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease in the offspring. Maternal biliopancreatic diversion is an effective treatment for severe obesity and is beneficial for offspring born after maternal surgery (AMS. These offspring exhibit lower severe obesity prevalence and improved cardiometabolic risk factors including inflammatory marker compared to siblings born before maternal surgery (BMS. Objective. To assess relationships between maternal bariatric surgery and the methylation/expression of genes involved in the immune and inflammatory pathways. Methods. A differential gene methylation analysis was conducted in a sibling cohort of 25 BMS and 25 AMS offspring from 20 mothers. Following differential gene expression analysis (23 BMS and 23 AMS, pathway analysis was conducted. Correlations between gene methylation/expression and circulating inflammatory markers were computed. Results. Five immune and inflammatory pathways with significant overrepresentation of both differential gene methylation and expression were identified. In the IL-8 pathway, gene methylation correlated with both gene expression and plasma C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion. These results suggest that improvements in cardiometabolic risk markers in AMS compared to BMS offspring may be mediated through differential methylation of genes involved in immune and inflammatory pathways.

  16. Managing adolescent obesity and the role of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Shannon; Richmond, Tracy K; Desai, Nirav K

    2015-08-01

    This update explores the current management options for adolescent obesity with a specific focus on bariatric surgery. Research has highlighted the serious health complications associated with adolescent obesity and thus emphasized the need for effective interventions. With the increasing severity of obesity seen in younger populations, coupled with the modest effects of most behavioral and even pharmacologic interventions, there has been increased interest in, and attention on, bariatric surgery in younger populations. Recent adult-focused guidelines regarding the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient outline the importance of careful patient selection, in addition to close monitoring, with a particular focus on preventing nutritional deficiencies. Several recent publications have focused on issues specific to bariatric surgery in the adolescent patient including the relationship between a patient's physical and emotional maturity and timing of surgery. Adolescent obesity is prevalent with increasing severity and long-term health implications. To date nonsurgical interventions have had modest effects. Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and has been shown to be well tolerated and effective in adolescents, but requires careful preoperative screening and postoperative monitoring.

  17. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrine Society. www.hormone.org How are postoperative nutritional deficiencies managed? Because your body absorbs fewer nutrients after bariatric surgery, especially malabsorptive procedures, you need to keep a ...

  18. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about the different surgical procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of each... Find a Provider The ... field of bariatric surgery. Take the IH Compensation Survey Please complete this survey to help ASMBS become ...

  19. A decade of bariatric surgery. What have we learned? Outcome in 520 patients from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, M; Milone, M; Gaudioso, D; Bianco, P; Palumbo, R; Galloro, G; Bellini, M; Milone, F

    2014-01-01

    Today a variety of bariatric surgical procedures is available and, currently, it is difficult to identify the most effective option based on patient characteristics and comorbidities. Aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy of four different techniques; Intragastric Balloon (IB), Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB), Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) and Laparoscopic Mini Gastric Bypass (LMGB), performed in our unit along ten years. Starting from January 2005, 520 patients, 206 men (39.6%) and 314 women (60.4%) were treated at our institution. Among patients candidate to bariatric surgery 145 underwent IB, 120 underwent LAGB, 175 underwent LSG and 80 underwent LMGB. Follow up rate was 93.1% for IB at 6 months; 74.1% and 48% for LAGB at 36 and 60 months respectively; 72.8% and 58.1% for LSG at 36 and 60 months respectively; and 84.2% for LMGB at 36 months. The period 2005-2014 has been considered. Mortality was 1/520 patients (0.19%). The excess weight loss rate (EWL%) has been 32.8 for IB at six months, 53.7 for LAGB and 68.1 for LSG, at 60 months respectively and 79.5 for LMGB at 36 months. Early major postoperative complications requiring surgery were 0.6% for IB and 1.1% for LSG whereas late major postoperative complications were 1.2% for IB, 4.1% for LAGB and 0.5% for LSG. Diabetes resolution rate was 0 for LAGB, 76.9% for LSG and 80% for LMGB at 36 months. If more invasive procedures as LSG or LMGB may entail higher operative and peroperative risks, conversely, in skilled hands their efficacy remains undisputed, especially in the long term, presenting a very low rate of major complications. In general, the efficacy of a bariatric surgery unit seems improved by the capability to offer both different primary procedures and re-do surgery. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Utility of transient elastography (fibroscan) and impact of bariatric surgery on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Harshit; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shalimar; Yadav, Rajni; Datta Gupta, Siddhartha; Agarwal, Lokesh; Agarwal, Samagra

    2018-01-01

    Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) is a novel, noninvasive technique for assessing hepatic steatosis. However, its role in morbidly obese individuals is unclear. The effect of bariatric surgery on inflammation and fibrosis needs to be explored. To assess the utility of CAP for assessment of hepatic steatosis in morbidly obese individuals and evaluate the effect of bariatric surgery on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. A tertiary care academic hospital. Baseline details of anthropometric data, laboratory parameters, FibroScan (XL probe), and liver biopsy were collected. Follow-up liver biopsy was done at 1 year. Of the 124 patients screened, 76 patients were included; mean body mass index was 45.2 ± 7.1 kg/m 2 . FibroScan success rate was 87.9%. The median liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and CAP were 7.0 (5.0-9.5) kPa and 326.5 (301-360.5) dB/m, respectively. On liver histopathology, severe steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis were present in 5.3% and 15.8%; significant fibrosis (≥stage 2) and cirrhosis in 39.5% and 2.6%, respectively. Area under receiver operator characteristic curve of LSM for prediction of significant fibrosis (F2-4 versus F0-1) and advanced fibrosis (F3-4 versus F0-2) was .65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: .52-.77) and .83 (95% CI: .72-.94), respectively. The area under receiver operator characteristic curve of CAP for differentiating moderate hepatic steatosis (S2-3 versus S0-1) and severe hepatic steatosis (S3 versus S0-2) was .74 (95% CI: .62-.86) and .82 (95% CI: .73-.91), respectively. At 1-year follow-up, 32 patients underwent liver biopsy. In these patients, there was significant improvement in hepatic steatosis (P = .001), lobular inflammation (P = .033), ballooning (PBariatric surgery is associated with significant improvement in LSM, CAP, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourman, Matthew M; Saber, Alan A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a nationwide epidemic, and the only evidence-based, durable treatment of this disease is bariatric surgery. This field has evolved drastically during the past decade. One of the latest advances has been the increased use of robotics within this field. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the recent data to determine the safety and efficacy of robotic bariatric surgery. The setting was the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (Cleveland, OH). A PubMed search was performed for robotic bariatric surgery from 2005 to 2011. The inclusion criteria were English language, original research, human, and bariatric surgical procedures. Perioperative data were then collected from each study and recorded. A total of 18 studies were included in our review. The results of our systematic review showed that bariatric surgery, when performed with the use of robotics, had similar or lower complication rates compared with traditional laparoscopy. Two studies showed shorter operative times using the robot for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but 4 studies showed longer operative times in the robotic arm. In addition, the learning curve appears to be shorter when robotic gastric bypass is compared with the traditional laparoscopic approach. Most investigators agreed that robotic laparoscopic surgery provides superior imaging and freedom of movement compared with traditional laparoscopy. The application of robotics appears to be a safe option within the realm of bariatric surgery. Prospective randomized trials comparing robotic and laparoscopic outcomes are needed to further define the role of robotics within the field of bariatric surgery. Longer follow-up times would also help elucidate any long-term outcomes differences with the use of robotics versus traditional laparoscopy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Aortic rupture during reoperative bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Hostiuc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Morbid obesity has become a very common problem worldwide, causing severe health-related consequences including cardiovascular or metabolic diseases, arthritis, sleep apnea, or an increased risk of cancer. Bariatric surgery was shown to be the only way to achieve sustainable weight loss and to decrease the frequency and severity of metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities. The purpose of this article is to present a case of bariatric surgery complicated with lesion of the aorta with a lethal outcome.

  3. Recent advances in bariatric/metabolic surgery: appraisal of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are becoming a serious medical issue worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective and durable therapy for the treatment of morbid obese patients. Increasing data indicates bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery is an effective and novel therapy for not well controlled obese T2DM patients. The review of recent developments in bariatric/metabolic surgery covers 4 major fields. 1) Improvement of safety: recent advances in laparoscopic/metabolic surgery has made this minimal invasive surgery more than ten times safer than a decade ago. The safety profile of laparoscopic/metabolic surgery is compatible with that of laparoscopic cholecystectomy now. 2) New bariatric/metabolic surgery: laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is becoming the leading bariatric surgery because of its simplicity and efficacy. Other new procedures, such as gastric plication, banded plication, single anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass and Duodeno-jejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy have all been accepted as treatment modalities for bariatric/metabolic surgery. 3) Mechanism of bariatric/metabolic surgery: Restriction is the most important mechanism for bariatric surgery. Weight regain after bariatric surgery is usually associated with loss of restriction. Recent studies demonstrated that gut hormone, microbiota and bile acid changes after bariatric surgery may play an important role in durable weight loss as well as in T2DM remission. However, weight loss is still the cornerstone of T2DM remission after metabolic surgery. 4) PATIENT SELECTION: patients who may benefit most from bariatric surgery was found to be patients with insulin resistance. For Asian T2DM patients, the indication of metabolic surgery has been set to those with not well controlled (HbA1c > 7.5%) disease and with their BMI > 27.5 Kg/m(2). A novel diabetes surgical score, ABCD score, is a simple system for predicting the success of surgical therapy

  4. A Pilot Study on Telephone Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Patients Six-Months Post-Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassin, Stephanie E.; Wnuk, Susan; Du, Chau; Jackson, Timothy; Hawa, Raed; Parikh, Sagar V.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a post-operative telephone-based cognitive behavioral therapy intervention (Tele-CBT) in improving eating pathology and psychosocial functioning. Methods Six-month post-operative bariatric surgery patients (n = 19) received six sessions of Tele-CBT. Study outcome variables included binge eating (BES), emotional eating (EES), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), and anxiety symptoms (GAD-7). Results Retention was 73.7 % post-intervention. Tele-CBT resulted in significant reductions in mean difference scores on BES, EES-Total, EES-Anxiety, EES-Anger, PHQ9, and GAD7. Tele-CBT patients experienced a mean weight loss of 8.62 ± 15.02 kg between 6-months post-surgery (pre-Tele-CBT) and 12-months post-surgery. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that post-surgery Tele-CBT is feasible and can improve post-surgery symptoms of psychopathology in this uncontrolled study, supporting the need for a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27491293

  5. Developing a new bariatric surgery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstadt, John; Whipple, Oliver

    2007-11-01

    We initiated a new bariatric surgery program in February 2004. Before starting the program, we initiated a systemic planning process to design, develop, and implement a comprehensive, multidisciplinary program. Between May 2004 and June 2006, 178 patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass to treat morbid obesity at our institution. We have had no pulmonary emboli and no deaths. Twenty-one patients (11.8%) developed wound infection after surgery. Thirteen patients (7.3%) developed stenosis at the gastrojejunostomy. Five patients (2.8%) bled from the gastrojejunostomy. Four patients (2.2%) developed atelectasis. Three patients (1.6%) developed an internal hernia after surgery. One patient (0.5%) developed deep venous thrombosis. Two patients (1.1%) developed small bowel obstruction from adhesions. One patient developed a leak (0.6%). By 6 months after surgery, our patients have lost an average of 85 pounds (53% excess weight loss). By 12 months, they have lost an average of 104 pounds (65% excess weight loss). A focused effort to reduce infection has dropped our wound infection rate to 0 per cent in the past 6 months. Our results indicate that with proper planning, it is possible to initiate a new program and achieve excellent outcomes. Proper planning, systematic implementation, and a focus on patient education are critical to success.

  6. [Recommendations for the peri-operative management of bariatric surgery patients: results of a national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Cassinello, Norberto; Baltasar, Aniceto; Torres, Antonio J

    2012-01-01

    To standardise possible peri-operative bariatric surgery protocols, a survey was prepared to be filled in by members of the Spanish Society for Obesity (Sociedad Española de Cirugía de la Obesidad) (SECO), and to approve it at the XII National Congress. A total of 47 members of SECO from 14 autonomous communities responded, and it unanimously approved by the Congress. As highly recommended peri-operative procedures, were proposed: full laboratory analysis (98%) with an endocrine study (90%), ECG (96%), chest x-ray (98%), an oesophageal-gastric imaging test (endoscopy or gastro-duodenal transit study (98%), antibiotic prophylaxis (92%) and use of low molecular weight heparins pre-operatively (96%), and for 2 weeks (83%). Pre-surgical, abdominal ultrasound (86%), spirometry (80%), diet (88%) and psychological study (76%), and during surgery, use of elastic stockings (76%), leak tests (92%) and drainages (90%), were established as advisable procedures. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Tordjman, Joan; Møller, Holger Jon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Macrophages play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a specific marker of macrophage activation. We aimed to measure sCD163 in morbidly obese patients with varying degrees of NAFLD before and after bariatric surgery (BS...... (NAS), Kleiner fibrosis score, and the fatty liver inhibition of progression (FLIP) algorithm. In a subset, CD163 immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CD163 mRNA were performed. RESULTS: sCD163 was higher in patients with NAS ≥ 5 compared with those with NAS ...). METHODS: Demographic, clinical, and biochemical data, and plasma sCD163 measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, of 196 patients were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months after BS leading to significant weight loss. Peroperative liver biopsies were assessed for the NAFLD Activity Score...

  8. [Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery: why they happen?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo, Lívia A; Mourão, Denise Machado; Bressan, Josefina

    2011-12-01

    Nutritional deficiencies following bariatric surgery are commonly reported in scientific literature on surgery and nutrition. It has been estimated that approximately 400,000 large obeses underwent bariatric surgery in 2010. The surgery technique and consequent altered gastrointestinal function done will particularly imply in variations on those deficiencies and health complications. A systematic review of several database was done from 1978 until 2010, using as keywords protein and micronutrients deficiencies, related to bariatric surgery. The better understand of these studies can provide an important improvement on this obese therapy, assuring a successful and health weight loss maintenance for long term. Therefore, this review provides a significant contribution about this topic, pointing several ways on the nutritional intervention and management of those patients.

  9. Comparison of consumption behavior and appetite sensations among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun; Huang, Hsien-Hao; Chen, Shu-Chun; Chen, Tung-Fang; Ser, Kong-Han; Chen, Chih-Yen

    2017-01-01

    The promising postsurgical weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D) from bariatric surgery can be attributed to modified eating physiology after surgical procedures. We sought to investigate the changes in the parameters of consumption behaviors and appetite sensations induced by a mixed meal tolerance test, and to correlate these alterations with age, body mass index, C-peptide levels, and duration of T2D 1 year after bariatric surgery. A total of 16 obese patients with T2D who underwent mini-gastric bypass (GB) and 16 patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy (SG) were enrolled in this study and evaluated using a mixed meal tolerance test one year after surgery. A visual analogue scale was used for scoring appetite sensation at different time points. The area under the curve (AUC) and the incremental or decremental AUC (ΔAUC) were compared between the two groups. One year after surgery, a decreasing trend in the consumption time was observed in the GB group compared to the SG group, while the duration of T2D before surgery was negatively correlated with the post-operative consumed time in those after GB. Patients who underwent GB had significantly higher fasting scores for fullness and desire to eat, higher AUC 0'-180' of scores for desire to eat, as well as more effective post-meal suppression of hunger and desire to eat compared with those undergoing SG one year after surgery. Post-operative C-peptide levels were negatively correlated with ΔAUC 0'-180' for hunger and ΔAUC 0'-180' for desire to eat in the GB group, while negatively correlated with ΔAUC 0'-180' for fullness in the SG group. Patients with T2D after either GB or SG exhibit distinct nutrient-induced consumption behaviors and appetite sensations post-operatively, which may account for the differential effects on weight loss and glycemic control after different surgery.

  10. [Malabsorption after bariatric surgery can increase the risk of post-operative complications of the following plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanbegovic, Emir; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2014-06-16

    Some obese individuals are able to lose weight through dietary changes and exercise, others do so with the help of bariatric surgery. There is a significantly increased risk of post-operative complications after body contouring surgery in post-bariatric patients compared to non-bariatric. Malnutrition/malabsorption is a possible explanation. This article examines the major abnormalities seen in protein, vitamin and trace elements in patients who have undergone gastric bypass, and their implications for following plastic surgery.

  11. Preparing for and managing a pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komini