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Sample records for bare silicate grain

  1. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, M.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; de Koter, A.; Hovenier, J.W.; Keller, L.P.; Markwick-Kemper, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effects of the amount of magnesium and iron in the silicate lattice are studied in detail. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu m extinction feature as observed towards the ga

  2. Probing the Surfaces of Interstellar Dust Grains: The Adsorption of CO at Bare Grain Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, H J; Pontoppidan, K M; Van Dishoeck, A G; Fraser, Helen J.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Dishoeck, Alexander G.G.M. Tielens & Ewine F. van

    2004-01-01

    A solid-state feature was detected at around 2175 cm-1 towards 30 embedded young stellar objects in spectra obtained using the ESO VLT-ISAAC. We present results from laboratory studies of CO adsorbed at the surface of Zeolite wafers, where absorption bands were detected at 2177 and 2168 cm-1 (corresponding to CO chemisorbed at the Zeolite surface), and 2130 cm-1 (corresponding to CO physisorbed at the Zeolite surface), providing an excellent match to the observational data. We propose that the main carrier of the 2175-band is CO chemisorbed at bare surfaces of dust grains in the interstellar medium. This result provides the first direct evidence that gas-surface interactions do not have to result in the formation of ice mantles on interstellar dust. The strength of the 2175-band is estimated to be ~ 4 x 10-19 cm molecule-1. The abundance of CO adsorbed at bare grain surfaces ranges from 0.06 to 0.16 relative to H2O ice, which is, at most, half of the abundance (relative to H2O ice) of CO residing in H2O-domin...

  3. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    CERN Document Server

    Min, M; De Koter, A; Hovenier, J W; Keller, L P; Markwick-Kemper, F

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effect of the amount of magnesium in the silicate lattice is studied. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu extinction feature as observed towards the galactic center. We use very irregularly shaped coated and non-coated porous Gaussian Random Field particles as well as a statistical approach to model shape effects. For the dust materials we use amorphous and crystalline silicates with various composition and SiC. The results of our analysis of the 10 mu feature are used to compute the shape of the 20 mu silicate feature and to compare this with observations. By using realistic particle shapes we are, for the first time, able to derive the magnesium fraction in interstellar silicates. We find that the interstellar silicates are highly magnesium rich (Mg/(Fe+Mg)>0.9) and that the stoichiometry lies between pyroxene and olivine type silicates. This composition is not consistent with that o...

  4. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  5. Oxygen diffusion and reactivity at low temperature on bare amorphous olivine-type silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2014-02-01

    The mobility of O atoms at very low temperatures is not generally taken into account, despite O diffusion would add to a series of processes leading to the observed rich molecular diversity in space. We present a study of the mobility and reactivity of O atoms on an amorphous silicate surface. Our results are in the form of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption spectra of O2 and O3 produced via two pathways: O + O and O2 + O, investigated in a submonolayer regime and in the range of temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. All the experiments show that ozone is formed efficiently on silicate at any surface temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. The derived upper limit for the activation barriers of O + O and O2 + O reactions is ˜150 K/kb. Ozone formation at low temperatures indicates that fast diffusion of O atoms is at play even at 6.5 K. Through a series of rate equations included in our model, we also address the reaction mechanisms and show that neither the Eley-Rideal nor the hot atom mechanisms alone can explain the experimental values. The rate of diffusion of O atoms, based on modeling results, is much higher than the one generally expected, and the diffusive process proceeds via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism enhanced by tunnelling. In fact, quantum effects turn out to be a key factor that cannot be neglected in our simulations. Astrophysically, efficient O3 formation on interstellar dust grains would imply the presence of huge reservoirs of oxygen atoms. Since O3 is a reservoir of elementary oxygen, and also of OH via its hydrogenation, it could explain the observed concomitance of CO2 and H2O in the ices.

  6. Oxygen diffusion and reactivity at low temperature on bare amorphous olivine-type silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F

    2014-02-21

    The mobility of O atoms at very low temperatures is not generally taken into account, despite O diffusion would add to a series of processes leading to the observed rich molecular diversity in space. We present a study of the mobility and reactivity of O atoms on an amorphous silicate surface. Our results are in the form of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption spectra of O2 and O3 produced via two pathways: O + O and O2 + O, investigated in a submonolayer regime and in the range of temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. All the experiments show that ozone is formed efficiently on silicate at any surface temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. The derived upper limit for the activation barriers of O + O and O2 + O reactions is ∼150 K/kb. Ozone formation at low temperatures indicates that fast diffusion of O atoms is at play even at 6.5 K. Through a series of rate equations included in our model, we also address the reaction mechanisms and show that neither the Eley-Rideal nor the hot atom mechanisms alone can explain the experimental values. The rate of diffusion of O atoms, based on modeling results, is much higher than the one generally expected, and the diffusive process proceeds via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism enhanced by tunnelling. In fact, quantum effects turn out to be a key factor that cannot be neglected in our simulations. Astrophysically, efficient O3 formation on interstellar dust grains would imply the presence of huge reservoirs of oxygen atoms. Since O3 is a reservoir of elementary oxygen, and also of OH via its hydrogenation, it could explain the observed concomitance of CO2 and H2O in the ices.

  7. Oxygen diffusion and reactivity at low temperature on bare amorphous olivine-type silicate

    CERN Document Server

    Minissale, M; Dulieu, F

    2014-01-01

    The mobility of O atoms at very low temperatures is not generally taken into account, despite O diffusion would add to a series of processes leading to the observed rich molecular diversity in space. We present a study of the mobility and reactivity of O atoms on an amorphous silicate surface. Our results are in the form of RAIRS and temperature-programmed desorption spectra of O2 and O3 produced via two pathways: O + O and O2 + O, investigated in a submonolayer regime and in the range of temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. All the experiments show that ozone is formed efficiently on silicate at any surface temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. The derived upper limit for the activation barriers of O + O and O2 + O reactions is 150 K/kb. Ozone formation at low temperatures indicates that fast diffusion of O atoms is at play even at 6.5 K. Through a series of rate equations included in our model, we also address the reaction mechanisms and show that neither the Eley Rideal nor the Hot atom mechanisms alone can expla...

  8. Identification of an Extremely 180-Rich Presolar Silicate Grain in Acfer 094

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Messenger, S.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar silicate grains have been abundantly identified since their first discovery less than a decade ago [1,2,3]. The O isotopic compositions of both silicate and oxide stardust indicate the vast majority (>90%) condensed around Orich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Though both presolar phases have average sizes of 300 nm, grains larger than 1 m are extremely uncommon for presolar silicates. Thus, while numerous isotopic systems have been measured in presolar oxide grains [4], very few isotopic analyses for presolar silicates exist outside of O and Si [2,5]. And still, these measurements suffer from isotopic dilution with surrounding matrix material [6]. We conduct a search for presolar silicates in the primitive carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 and in some cases obtain high spatial resolution, high precision isotopic ratios.

  9. MINERALOGY OF PRESOLAR SILICATE AND OXIDE GRAINS OF DIVERSE STELLAR ORIGINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott, E-mail: lan-anh.n.nguyen@nasa.gov [Robert M. Walker Laboratory for Space Science, EISD Directorate, Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We report the chemical and structural analysis of nine presolar silicate grains and one presolar oxide grain from the ungrouped chondrite Acfer 094 and the CR chondrite Queen Alexandra Range 99177. Oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that five of these grains condensed in the outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, four have supernova (SN) origins, and one grain likely has a nova origin. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that most of the grains are amorphous with widely varying non-stoichiometric chemical compositions. Three crystalline AGB grains were identified: a clinoenstatite-containing grain assemblage, a Fe-rich olivine grain, and a nanocrystalline enstatite grain encased in an amorphous silicate shell. An amorphous stoichiometric enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) SN grain likely condensed as a crystal and was later rendered amorphous. We do not observe a systematic difference in the chemistries and mineralogies of presolar silicates from different stellar sources, suggesting that the grains formed under a similar range of conditions.

  10. Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Distant Galaxies Probed by Quasar Absorption Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2015-01-01

    Dust grains are a fundamental component of the interstellar medium, and significantly impact many of the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, including star formation, and the heating, cooling and ionization of interstellar material. Using the absorption features produced by dust in the spectra of luminous background quasars, it is possible to study the properties of extragalactic interstellar dust grains. We will present results from an ongoing program utilizing existing Spitzer Space Telescope infrared quasar spectra to probe silicate dust grain properties in z<1.4 quasar absorption systems. In combination with complementary ground-based data on associated gas-phase metal absorption lines, we explore connections between the interstellar dust and gas in the quasar absorption systems. Our project yields clear detections of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the studied systems, as well as detections of the 18 micron silicate dust absorption feature in sources with adequate spectral coverage. Based on measured variations in the breath, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 micron absorption features, there appear to be differences in the silicate dust grain properties from system-to-system. We also show indications of trends between the gas-phase metal properties, such as metallicity and gas velocity spread, with the silicate dust grain absorption properties. Support for this work is provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech and through NASA grant NNX14AG74G, and from National Science Foundation grants AST-0908890 and AST-1108830 to the University of South Carolina.

  11. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Quasar Absorption Systems at Redshifts z<1.4

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Welty, Daniel E; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2014-01-01

    Absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars whose sightlines pass through foreground galaxies provide a valuable tool to probe the dust and gas compositions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. The first evidence of silicate dust in a quasar absorption system (QAS) was provided through our detection of the 10 micron silicate feature in the z=0.52 absorber toward the quasar AO 0235+164. We present results from 2 follow-up programs using archival Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectra to study the interstellar silicate dust grain properties in a total of 13 QASs at 0.1silicate feature in the QASs studied. We also detect the 18 micron silicate feature in the sources with adequate spectral coverage. We find variations in the breadth, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 micron interstellar silicate absorption features among the absorbers. This suggests that the silicate dust grain properties in these distant galaxies may differ relat...

  12. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Quasar Absorption Systems at Redshifts z<1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, M.; Kulkarni, V. P.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.; Vladilo, G.; Som, D.

    Absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars whose sightlines serendipitously pass through foreground galaxies provide a valuable tool to simultaneously probe the dust and gas compositions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. In particular, the damped and sub-damped Lyman- α (DLA/sub-DLA) absorbers trace gas-rich galaxies, independent of the intrinsic luminosities or star-formation rates of the associated galaxy stellar populations. The first evidence of silicate dust in a quasar absorption system was provided through our detection of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the z=0.52 DLA absorber toward the quasar AO 0235+164. We present results from 2 follow-up programs using archival Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectra to study the interstellar silicate dust grain properties in a total of 13 quasar absorption systems at 0.1 < z < 1.4. We find clear detections of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the quasar absorption systems studied. In addition, we also detect the 18 µ m silicate feature in the sources with adequate spectral coverage. We find variations in the breadth, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 µ m interstellar silicate absorption features among the absorbers. This suggests that the silicate dust grain properties in these distant galaxies may differ relative to one another, and relative to those in the Milky Way. We also find suggestions in several sources, based on comparisons with laboratory-derived profiles from the literature, that the silicate dust grains may be significantly more crystalline than those in the amorphous Milky Way ISM. This is particularly evident in the z=0.89 absorber toward the quasar PKS 1830-211, where substructure near 10 µ m is consistent with a crystalline olivine composition. If confirmed, these grain property variations may have implications for both dust and galaxy evolution over the past 9 Gyrs, and for the commonly-made assumption that highredshift dust is similar to local dust. We also discuss

  13. Resolving the stellar sources of isotopically rare presolar silicate grains through Mg and Fe isotopic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Messenger, Scott, E-mail: lan-anh.n.nguyen@nasa.gov [Robert M. Walker Laboratory for Space Science, Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We conducted multi-element isotopic analyses of 11 presolar silicate grains from the Acfer 094 meteorite having unusual O isotopic compositions. Eight grains are {sup 18}O-rich, one is {sup 16}O-rich, and two are extremely {sup 17}O-rich. We constrained the grains' stellar sources by measuring their Si and Mg isotopic ratios, and also the {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe and {sup 57}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios for five grains. The Mg and Fe isotopic measurements were conducted after surrounding matrix grains were removed for more accurate ratios. Most of the {sup 18}O-rich silicates had anomalous Mg isotopic ratios, and their combined isotopic constraints are consistent with origins in low-mass Type II supernovae (SNe II) rather than high-metallicity stars. The isotopic ratios of the {sup 16}O-rich silicate are also consistent with an SN origin. Mixing small amounts of interior stellar material with the stellar envelope replicated all measured isotopic ratios except for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si and {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe in some grains. The {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si ratios of all SN-derived grains are matched by doubling the {sup 29}Si yield in the Ne- and Si-burning zones. The {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios of the grains imply elemental fractionation in the Si/S zone, or introduction of isotopically solar Fe by secondary processing. The two highly {sup 17}O-rich silicates exhibited significant {sup 25}Mg and/or {sup 26}Mg enrichments and their isotopic ratios are best explained by strong dilution of 1.15 M {sub ☉} CO nova matter. We estimate that ∼12% and 1% of presolar silicates have SN and nova origins, respectively, similar to presolar SiC and oxides. This implies that asymptotic giant branch stars are the dominant dust producers in the galaxy.

  14. Mineralogical Characterization of Fe-Bearing AGB and Supernova Silicate Grains From the Queen Alexandra Range 99177 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the circumstellar envelopes of evolved O-rich stars indicate the dust is mostly amorphous silicate with olivine-like compositions. Spectral modeling suggests these grains are Fe-rich [Mg/(Mg+Fe) 0.5], but it is not known whether the Fe is distributed within the silicate matrix or exists as metal inclusions. In contrast, the crystalline silicates are inferred to be extremely Mg-rich [Mg/(Mg+Fe) > 0.95]. The mineralogies and chemical compositions of dust in supernova (SN) remnants are not as well constrained, but abundant silicates of olivine-like and enstatite-like compositions have been fit to the infrared emission features. Silicates in the interstellar medium (ISM) are >99% amor-phous and Fe-bearing. The dearth of crystalline silicates in the ISM requires that some amorphization or destruction mechanisms process these grains.

  15. Identification of Highly Fractionated (18)O-Rich Silicate Grains in the Queen Alexandra Range 99177 CR3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain a mixture of solar system condensates, presolar grains, and primitive organic matter. The CR3 chondrite QUE 99177 has undergone minimal al-teration [1], exemplified by abundant presolar silicates [2, 3] and anomalous organic matter [4]. Oxygen isotopic imaging studies of this meteorite have focused on finding submicrometer anomalous grains in fine-grained regions of thin sections. Here we present re-sults of an O isotopic survey of larger matrix grains.

  16. Interpreting the I-Xe system in individual silicate grains from Toluca IAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Petaev, M.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed isotopic and mineralogical studies of silicate inclusions separated from a troilite nodule of the Toluca IAB iron meteorite reveal the presence of radiogenic 129Xe in chlorapatite, plagioclase, perryite, and pyroxene grains. Subsequent I-Xe studies of 32 neutron-irradiated pyroxene grains indicate that high-Mg and low-Mg pyroxenes have distinctive I-Xe signatures. The I-Xe system in high-Mg pyroxenes closed at 4560.5 ± 2.4 Ma, probably reflecting exsolution of silicates from the melt, while the low-Mg pyroxenes closed at 4552.0 ± 3.7 Ma, 8.5 Ma later, providing a means for determining the cooling rate at the time of exsolution. If the host Toluca graphite-troiliterich inclusion formed after the breakup and reassembly of the IAB parent body as has been suggested, the I-Xe ages of the high-Mg pyroxenes separated from this inclusions indicate that this catastrophic impact occurred not later than 4560.5 Ma, 6.7 Ma after formation of CAIs. The cooling rate at the time of silicates exsolution in Toluca is 14.5 ± 10.0 °C/Ma.

  17. Laboratory Annealing Experiments Of Refractory Silicate Grain Analogs Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Tsukamota, Katsuo; Kaito, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    Exothermic reactions during the annealing of laboratory synthesized amorphous magnesium-bearing silicate particles used as grain analogs of cosmic dust were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in air. With infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we show that cosmic dust could possibly undergo fusion to larger particles, with oxidation of magnesium silicide and crystallization of forsterite as exothermic reactions in the early solar system. The reactions begin at approximately 425, approximately 625, and approximately 1000 K, respectively, and the reaction energies (enthalpies) are at least 727, 4151, and 160.22 J per gram, respectively. During the crystallization of forsterite particles, the spectral evolution of the 10 micrometer feature from amorphous to crystalline was observed to begin at lower temperature than the crystallization temperature of 1003 K. During spectral evolution at lower temperature, nucleation and/or the formation of nanocrystallites of forsterite at the surface of the grain analogs was observed.

  18. Grain growth across protoplanetary discs: 10-micron silicate feature versus millimetre slope

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, Dave J P; Wright, Chris M; Maddison, Sarah T; Min, Michiel; Wilner, David J; Salter, Demerese M; van Langevelde, Huib Jan; Bourke, Tyler L; van der Burg, Remco F J; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Young stars are formed within dusty discs. The grains in the disc are originally of the same size as interstellar dust. Models predict that these grains will grow in size through coagulation. Observations of the silicate features at micron wavelengths are consistent with growth to micron sizes whereas the slope of the SED at longer wavelengths traces growth up to mm sizes. We here look for a correlation between these two grain growth indicators. A large sample of T-Tauri and Herbig-Ae/Be stars was observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 5-13 micron; a subsample was observed at mm wavelengths. We complement this subsample with data from the literature to maximise the overlap between micron and mm observations and search for correlations. Synthetic spectra are produced to determine which processes may produce the dust evolution. Dust disc masses in the range <1 to 7 x 10^-4 MSun are obtained. Most sources have a mm spectral slope consistent with grain growth. There is a tentative correlation between the...

  19. Soft X-ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications on Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaravella, A; Chen, Y -J; Caro, G M Muñoz; Huang, C -H; Jiménez-Escobar, A; Venezia, A M

    2016-01-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate ?lms submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted solgel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  20. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications for Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Huang, C.-H.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Venezia, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate films submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted sol-gel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray-irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  1. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  2. The Globe laid bare

    CERN Multimedia

    Fortunati, Lucien

    2015-01-01

    If you’re at CERN at the moment, you will certainly have noticed the work under way on the Globe. The structure, which has been in pride of place opposite the Laboratory for over ten years, has never been so completely laid bare. But, as we explained in a previous article (see here), it is all for a good cause. The Globe is built entirely from wood and certain parts of it need to be replaced.

  3. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  4. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Jäger, C.; Simionovici, A.; Lemaire, J. L.; Sabri, T.; Foy, E.; Yagoubi, S.; Henning, T.; Salomon, D.; Martinez-Criado, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei contain X-ray-dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Aims: Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. Methods: We prepared enstatite (MgSiO3) nanograins, which are analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared in X-ray transparent substrates and were irradiated with hard X-rays nanobeams (29.4 keV) provided by beamline ID16B of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble). X-ray diffraction images were recorded in transmission mode, and the ensuing diffractograms were analyzed as a function of the total X-ray exposure time. Results: We detected the amorphization of polycrystalline silicates embedded in an organic matrix after an accumulated X-ray exposure of 6.4 × 1027 eV cm-2. Pure crystalline silicate grains (without resin) do not exhibit amorphization. None of the amorphous silicate samples (pure and embedded in resin) underwent crystallization. We analyze the evolution of the polycrystalline sample embedded in an organic matrix as a function of X-ray exposure. Conclusions: Loss of diffraction peak intensity, peak broadening, and the disappearance of discrete spots and arcs reveal the amorphization

  5. The Globe laid bare

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    If you’re at CERN at the moment, you will certainly have noticed the work under way on the Globe. The structure, which has been in pride of place opposite the Laboratory for over ten years, has never been so completely laid bare. But, as we explained in a previous article (see here), it is all for a good cause. The Globe is built entirely from wood and certain parts of it need to be replaced.   The Globe after the removal of all the sun baffles. Image: Lucien Fortunati. Picture the general structure of the Globe. In simple terms, the building consists of two spheres, one inside the other. The inner sphere houses the Universe of Particles exhibition and the conference room and is connected to the outer sphere by two access ramps. “Each of these two spheres is made up of eighteen large supporting arcs,” explains Amaya Martínez García of the GS department, who is supervising the Globe renovation project. “These eighteen arcs are ...

  6. Influence of silicate on the transport of bacteria in quartz sand and iron mineral-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe; Yang, Haiyan; Wu, Dan; Ni, Jinren; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping

    2014-11-01

    The influence of silicate on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media were examined at a constant 20 mM ionic strength with different silicate concentrations (from 0 to 1 mM) at pH 7. Transport experiments were performed in two types of representative porous media, both bare quartz sand and iron mineral-coated quartz sand. In bare quartz sand, the breakthrough plateaus in the presence of silicate in suspensions were lower and the corresponding retained profiles were higher than those without silicate ions, indicating that the presence of silicate in suspensions decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand. Moreover, the decrease of bacteria transport in quartz sand induced by silicate was more pronounced with increasing silicate concentrations from 0 to 1 mM. However, when EPS was removed from cell surfaces, the presence of silicate in cell suspensions (with different concentrations) did not affect the transport behavior of bacteria in quartz sand. The interaction of silicate with EPS on cell surfaces negatively decreased the zeta potentials of bacteria, resulting in the decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand when silicate was copresent in bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the presence of silicate in suspensions increased cell transport in iron mineral-coated sand. Silicate ions competed with bacteria for the adsorption sites on mineral-coated sand, contributing to the increased cell transport in mineral-coated sand with silicate present in cell suspensions.

  7. Solid Bare Strange Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, R X

    2003-01-01

    The reason, we need three terms of `strange', `bare', and `solid' before quark stars, is presented concisely though some fundamental issues are not certain. Observations favoring these stars are introduced.

  8. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Gavilan, L; Simionovici, A; Lemaire, J L; Sabri, T; Foy, E; Yagoubi, S; Henning, T; Salomon, D; Martinez-Criado, G

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei, contain X-ray dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in-situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments, and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. We prepared enstatite nanograins, analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared i...

  9. 3 - 14 Micron Spectroscopy of Comets C/2002 O4 (Honig), C/2002 V1 (NEAT), C/2002 X5 (Kudo-Fujikawa), C/2002 Y1 (Juels-Holvorcem), 69P/Taylor, and the Relationships among Grain Temperature, Silicate Band Strength and Structure among Comet Families

    CERN Document Server

    Sitko, M L; Russell, R W; Hanner, M S; Sitko, Michael L.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Hanner, Martha S.

    2004-01-01

    We report 3 - 13 micron spectroscopy of 4 comets observed between August 2002 and February 2003: C/2002 O4 (Honig) on August 1, 2002, C/2002 V1 (NEAT) on Jan. 9 and 10, 2003, C/2002 X5 (Kudo-Fujikawa) on Jan. 9 and 10, 2003, and C/2002 Y1 (Juels-Holvorcem) on Feb. 20, 2003. In addition, we include data obtained much earlier on 69P/Taylor (February 9, 1998) but not previously published. For Comets Taylor, Honig, NEAT, and Kudo-Fujikawa, the silicate emission band was detected, being approximately 23%, 12%, 15%, and 10%, respectively, above the continuum. The data for Comet Juels-Holvorcem were of insufficient quality to detect the presence of a silicate band of comparable strength to the other three objects, and we place an upper limit of 24% on this feature. The silicate features in both NEAT and Kudo-Fujikawa contained structure indicating the presence of crystalline material. Combining these data with those of other comets, we confirm the correlation between silicate band strength and grain temperature of G...

  10. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous Ooze Sediments, Ormen Lange Field, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Skeletal remains of siliceous algae form biogenic fine grained highly porous pelagic siliceous ooze sediments that were found above the reservoir of the Ormen Lange gas field which is located in the southern part of the Norwegian Sea (Figure 1a). The Palaeocene sandstone of the “Egga” Formation i...

  11. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when those small grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing the dipole moment per atom ($\\beta$) and can reach $P\\sim 20\\%$ for $\\beta\\sim 0.1$D at grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space $(\\beta,Y_{Si})$ for silicate nanoparticles in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the ob...

  12. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  13. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  14. Discovery of ancient silicate stardust in a meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ann N; Zinner, Ernst

    2004-03-05

    We have discovered nine presolar silicate grains from the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Their anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions indicate formation in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Two grains are identified as pyroxene, two as olivine, one as a glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS), and one as an Al-rich silicate. One grain is enriched in 26Mg, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of 26Al and provides information about mixing processes in the parent star. This discovery opens new means for studying stellar processes and conditions in various solar system environments.

  15. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  16. Grain Destruction in Interstellar Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar shock waves can erode and destroy grains present in the shocked gas, primarily as the result of sputtering and grain-grain collisions. Uncertainties in current estimates of sputtering yields are reviewed. Results are presented for the simple case of sputtering of fast grains being stopped in cold gas. An upper limit is derived for sputtering of refractory grains in C-type MHD shocks: shock speeds $v_s \\gtrsim 50 \\kms$ are required for return of more than 30\\% of the silicate to t...

  17. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  18. Matrix methods for bare resonator eigenvalue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, W P; Dente, G C

    1980-05-15

    Bare resonator eigenvalues have traditionally been calculated using Fox and Li iterative techniques or the Prony method presented by Siegman and Miller. A theoretical framework for bare resonator eigenvalue analysis is presented. Several new methods are given and compared with the Prony method.

  19. Bare strange quark stars formation and emission

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, R X

    2002-01-01

    Recent achievements of bare strange stars are briefly reviewed. A nascent protostrange star should be bare because of strong mass ejection and high temperature after the supernova detonation flame, and a crust can also hardly form except for a super-Eddington accretion. The magnetosphere of a bare strange star is composed mainly of electron-positron pair plasma, where both inner and outer vacuum gaps work for radio as well as high energy nonthermal emission. A featureless thermal spectrum is expected since no ion is above the quark surface, whilst electron cyclotron lines could appear in some bare strange stars with suitable magnetic fields. Various astrophysical implications of bare strange stars are discussed.

  20. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...... silicate nanocomposites and their structure-properties relationship. In the first part of the thesis, thermoplastic layered silicates were obtained by extrusion. Different modification methods were tested to observe the intercalation treatment effect on the silicate-modifier interactions. The silicate...

  1. Leaf application of silicic acid to upland rice and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Si (stabilized silicic acid, Silamol® leaf application on mineral nutrition and yield in upland rice and corn crops. The treatments were the control (without Si and Si foliar split spraying using 2 L ha-1 of the Silamol® commercial product, with 0.8% soluble Si as concentrated stabilized silicic acid. Silicon leaf application increased the concentrations of K, Ca and Si in rice and corn leaves, the number of panicles per m2 of rice and the number of grains per ear of corn; accordingly, the Si leaf application provided a higher grain yield in both crops.

  2. Silicic Large Igneous Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott Bryan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are the end-product of huge additions of magma to the continental crust both at the surface and at depth. Since the first categorisation of LIPs by Coffin & Eldholm (1994), it has been recognised that LIPs are more varied inform, age and character, and this includes the recognition of Silicic LIPs. Silicic LIPs are the largest accumulations of primary volcaniclastic rocks at the Earth's surface with areal extents >0.1 Mkm2 and extrusive and subvolcanic intrusive volumes >0.25 Mkm3. The Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic Silicic LIP events are the best recognised and are similar in terms of their dimension, crustal setting, volcanic architecture and geochemistry.

  3. A hidden reservoir of Fe/FeS in interstellar silicates?

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, M; Ysard, N

    2014-01-01

    The depletion of iron and sulphur into dust in the interstellar medium and the exact nature of interstellar amorphous silicate grains is still an open question. We study the incorporation of iron and sulphur into amorphous silicates of olivine- and pyroxene-type and their effects on the dust spectroscopy and thermal emission. We used the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory to construct the optical constants for a mixture of silicates, metallic iron, and iron sulphide. We also studied the effects of iron and iron sulphide in aggregate grains. Iron sulphide inclusions within amorphous silicates that contain iron metal inclusions shows no strong differences in the optical properties of the grains. A mix of amorphous olivine- and pyroxene-type silicate broadens the silicate features. An amorphous carbon mantle with a thickness of 10 nm on the silicate grains leads to an increase in absorption on the short-wavelength side of the 10 $\\mu$m silicate band. The assumption of amorphous olivine-type and pyroxene-typ...

  4. Silicate Dust in Evolved Protoplanetary Disks: Growth, Sedimentation, and Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Watson, Dan; Bohac, Chris; Henning, Thomas; Bouwman, Jeroen; 10.1086/512121

    2009-01-01

    We present the Spitzer IRS spectra for 33 young stars in Tr 37 and NGC 7160. The sample includes the high- and intermediate-mass stars with MIPS 24 microns excess, the only known active accretor in the 12 Myr-old cluster NGC 7160, and 19 low-mass stars with disks in the 4 Myr-old cluster Tr 37. We examine the 10 microns silicate feature, present in the whole sample of low-mass star and in 3 of the high- and intermediate-mass targets, and we find that PAH emission is detectable only in the Herbig Be star. We analyze the composition and size of the warm photospheric silicate grains by fitting the 10 microns silicate feature, and study the possible correlations between the silicate characteristics and the stellar and disk properties (age, SED slope, accretion rate, spectral type). We find indications of dust settling with age and of the effect of turbulent enrichment of the disk atmosphere with large grains. Crystalline grains are only small contributors to the total silicate mass in all disks, and do not seem t...

  5. A New Determination of the Binding Energy of Atomic Oxygen on Dust Grain Surfaces: Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Hopkins, Tyler; Vidali, Gianfranco; Kaufman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The energy to desorb atomic oxygen from an interstellar dust grain surface, $E_{\\rm des}$, is an important controlling parameter in gas-grain models; its value impacts the temperature range over which oxygen resides on a dust grain. However, no prior measurement has been done of the desorption energy. We report the first direct measurement of $E_{\\rm des}$ for atomic oxygen from dust grain analogs. The values of $E_{\\rm des}$ are $1660\\pm 60$~K and $1850\\pm 90$~K for porous amorphous water ice and for a bare amorphous silicate film, respectively, or about twice the value previously adopted in simulations of the chemical evolution of a cloud. We use the new values to study oxygen chemistry as a function of depth in a molecular cloud. For $n=10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ and $G_0$=10$^2$ ($G_0$=1 is the average local interstellar radiation field), the main result of the adoption of the higher oxygen binding energy is that H$_2$O can form on grains at lower visual extinction $A_{\\rm V}$, closer to the cloud surface. A higher ...

  6. Trends in the adsorption and reactivity of hydrogen on magnesium silicate nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Ichraf; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bromley, Stefan T

    2015-04-14

    We study nanoclusters of Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene (having (MgO)6(SiO2)3 and (MgO)4(SiO2)4 compositions) with respect to their reactivity towards hydrogen atoms, using density functional calculations. Ultrasmall silicate particles are fundamental intermediates in cosmic dust grain formation and processing, and are thought to make up a significant mass fraction of the grain population. Due to their nanoscale dimensions and high surface area to bulk ratios, they are likely to also have a disproportionately large influence on surface chemistry in the interstellar medium. This work investigates the potential role of silicate nanoclusters in vital interstellar hydrogen-based chemistry by studying atomic H adsorption and H2 formation. Our extensive set of calculations confirm the generality of a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relation between the H2 reaction barrier and the 2Hchem binding energy, suggesting it to be independent of silicate dust grain shape, size, crystallinity and composition. Our results also suggest that amorphous/porous grains with forsteritic composition would tend to dissociate H2, but relatively Mg-poor silicate grains (e.g. enstatite composition) and/or more crystalline/compact silicate grains would tend to catalyse H2 formation. The high structural thermostability of silicate nanoclusters with respect to the heat released during exothermic H2 formation reactions is also verified.

  7. Interstellar Extinction by Spheroidal Dust Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ranjan; Mukai, Tadashi; Vaidya, D. B.; Sen, Asoke K.; Okada, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Observations of interstellar extinction and polarization indicate that the interstellar medium consists of aligned non-spherical dust grains which show variation in the interstellar extinction curve for wavelengths ranging from NIR to UV. To model the extinction and polarization, one cannot use the Mie theory which assumes the grains as solid spheres. We have used a T-matrix based method for computing the extinction efficiencies of spheroidal silicate and graphite grains of different shapes (...

  8. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  9. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  10. Fishbone Instability Excited by Barely Trapped Electrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-Tian; LONG Yong-Xing; DONG Jia-Qi; WANG Long; Fulvio Zonca

    2006-01-01

    Fishbone instability excited by barely trapped suprathermal electrons (BTSEs) in tokamaks is investigated theoretically. The frequency of the mode is found to close to procession frequency of BTSEs. The growth rate of the mode is much smaller than that of the ideal magnetohytrodynamic (MHD) internal kink mode that is in contrast to the case of trapped ion driven fishbone instability. The analyses also show that spatial density gradient reversal is necessary for the instability. The correlation of the results with experiments is discussed.

  11. Hvorfor siger vi ikke bare ugh?!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pálfi, Loránd-Levente

    2009-01-01

    Det danske sprog er ramt af en flerdobbelt katastrofe: De unge i folkeskolerne og gymnasierne taler og skriver et stadigt dårligere dansk, og forskningen i dansk sprog går i stå. Og Dansk Sprognævn, som burde stå vagt om sproget, lader ikke bare stå til, men ophæver forfaldet til lov. Er en "B-fi...

  12. The silicate absorption profile in the ISM towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    CERN Document Server

    Roche, P F; Gonzalez-Martin, O

    2015-01-01

    The 9.7-micron silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse interstellar medium is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile towards the very heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418, the galaxy with the deepest known silicate absorption feature, and compare it to the profiles seen in the Milky Way. Comparison between the 8-13 micron spectrum obtained with TReCS on Gemini and the larger aperture spectrum obtained from the Spitzer archive indicates that the former isolates the nuclear emission, while Spitzer detects low surface brightness circumnuclear diffuse emission in addition. The silicate absorption profile towards the nucleus is very similar to...

  13. Ubiquitous high-FeO silicates in enstatite chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusby, David; Scott, Edward R. D.; Keil, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    SEM and EMPA were used to determine the mineral contents of four EH3 chondrites. All four showed the dominant enstatite peak, Fs 0-5, with 4-8 percent of FeO-rich pyroxene with Fs 5-20. Among the 542 objects found to contain high-FeO silicates, 18 were chondrules, 381 were rimmed or unrimmed grains, and 143 were aggregates. The high-FeO silicates in these objects are very largely pyroxene with Fs 5-23. Large grains of both FeO-rich and FeO-poor silicates were found to be present in the FeO-rich chondrules. This fact, together with the absence of clasts of FeO-rich chondritic material in the EH3 chondrites, suggests that FeO-rich grains were introduced before or during chondrule formation. It is concluded that FeO-rich and FeO-poor silicates were both present in the nebular region where E chondrites originated.

  14. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at... conductors are less than 7 feet above the rail, they shall be guarded at all points where persons work...

  15. Ikke bare porno på mobilen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tem Frank

    2013-01-01

    Den britiske børne- og ungdomsforsker professor Sonia Livingstone ved London School of Economics viser gennem en række interviews, at billeder af eksplicitte sexhandlinger er en velkendt del af den ungdommelige cirkulation af ’hverdagspornografisk’ materiale (Ringrose et al. 2012). ’Sexting’ er...... altså ikke bare porno på en mobilplatform. Det er handlinger og værgestrategier, som unge piger er nødt til at forholde sig til i hverdagen, mens drengene umiddelbart ser ud til at slippe relativt let udenom den chikane, der kan ligge i ’sexting’....

  16. Chirality in Bare and Passivated Gold Nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Garzon, I L; Rodrigues-Hernandez, J I; Sigal, I; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Chiral structures have been found as the lowest-energy isomers of bare (Au$_{28}$ and Au$_{55}) and thiol-passivated (Au$_{28}(SCH$_{3})$_{16}$ and Au$_{38}$(SCH$_{3}$)$_{24}) gold nanoclusters. The degree of chirality existing in the chiral clusters was calculated using the Hausdorff chirality measure. We found that the index of chirality is higher in the passivated clusters and decreases with the cluster size. These results are consistent with the observed chiroptical activity recently reported for glutahione-passivated gold nanoclusters, and provide theoretical support for the existence of chirality in these novel compounds.

  17. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Fuller's Earth, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the extensive pulmonary damage in humans was the result of direct occupational inhalation of the dusts and noted that lesions seen in animals were affected by particle size, fiber length, and concentration. The Panel considers that most of the formulations are not respirable and of the preparations that are respirable, the concentration of the ingredient is very low. Even so, the Panel considered that any spray containing these solids should be formulated to minimize their inhalation. With this admonition to the cosmetics industry, the CIR Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe as currently used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel did note that the cosmetic ingredient, Talc, is a hydrated magnesium silicate

  18. Do Bare Rocks Exist on the Moon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton; Bandfield, Joshua; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Hayne, Paul; Leader, Frank; Paige, David

    2017-01-01

    Astronaut surface observations and close-up images at the Apollo and Chang'e 1 landing sites confirm that at least some lunar rocks have no discernable dust cover. However, ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) measurements as well as astronaut and LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) orbital observations and laboratory experiments possibly suggest that a fine fraction of dust is levitated and moves across and above the lunar surface. Over millions of years such dust might be expected to coat all exposed rock surfaces. This study uses thermal modeling, combined with Diviner (a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter experiment) orbital lunar eclipse temperature data, to further document the existence of bare rocks on the lunar surface.

  19. Ion-induced Processing of Cosmic Silicates: A Possible Formation Pathway to GEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, C.; Sabri, T.; Wendler, E.; Henning, Th.

    2016-11-01

    Ion-induced processing of dust grains in the interstellar medium and in protoplanetary and planetary disks plays an important role in the entire dust cycle. We have studied the ion-induced processing of amorphous MgFeSiO4 and Mg2SiO4 grains by 10 and 20 keV protons and 90 keV Ar+ ions. The Ar+ ions were used to compare the significance of the light protons with that of heavier, but chemically inert projectiles. The bombardment was performed in a two-beam irradiation chamber for in situ ion-implantation at temperatures of 15 and 300 K and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy to monitor the alteration of the silicate composition under ion irradiation. A depletion of oxygen from the silicate structure by selective sputtering of oxygen from the surface of the grains was observed in both samples. The silicate particles kept their amorphous structure, but the loss of oxygen caused the reduction of ferrous (Fe2+) ions and the formation of iron inclusions in the MgFeSiO4 grains. A few Si inclusions were produced in the iron-free magnesium silicate sample pointing to a much less efficient reduction of Si4+ and formation of metallic Si inclusions. Consequently, ion-induced processing of magnesium-iron silicates can produce grains that are very similar to the glassy grains with embedded metals and sulfides frequently observed in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The metallic iron inclusions are strong absorbers in the NIR range and therefore a ubiquitous requirement to increase the temperature of silicate dust grains in IR-dominated astrophysical environments such as circumstellar shells or protoplanetary disks.

  20. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  1. Cometary Refractory Grains: Interstellar and Nebular Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2008-07-01

    Comets are heterogeneous mixtures of interstellar and nebular materials. The degree of mixing of interstellar sources and nebular sources at different nuclear size scales holds the promise of revealing how cometary particles, cometesimals, and cometary nuclei accreted. We can ascribe cometary materials to interstellar and nebular sources and see how comets probe planet-forming process in our protoplanetary disk. Comets and cometary IDPs contain carbonaceous matter that appears to be either similar to poorly-graphitized (amorphous) carbon, a likely ISM source, or highly labile complex organics, with possible ISM or outer disk heritage. The oxygen fugacity of the solar nebula depends on the dynamical interplay between the inward migration of carbon-rich grains and of icy (water-rich) grains. Inside the water dissociation line, OH- reacts with carbon to form CO or CO2, consuming available oxygen and contributing to the canonical low oxygen fugacity. Alternatively, the influx of water vapor and/or oxygen rich dust grains from outer (cooler) disk regions can raise the oxygen fugacity. Low oxygen fugacity of the canonical solar nebula favors the condensation of Mg-rich crystalline silicates and Fe-metal, or the annealing of Fe-Mg amorphous silicates into Mg-rich crystals and Fe-metal via Fe-reduction. High oxygen fugacity nebular conditions favors the condensation of Fe-bearing to Fe-rich crystalline silicates. In the ISM, Fe-Mg amorphous silicates are prevalent, in stark contrast to Mg-rich crystalline silicates that are rare. Hence, cometary Mg-rich crystalline silicates formed in the hot, inner regions of the canonical solar nebula and they are the touchstone for models of the outward radial transport of nebular grains to the comet-forming zone. Stardust samples are dominated by Mg-rich crystalline silicates but also contain abundant Fe-bearing and Fe-rich crystalline silicates that are too large (≫0.1 μm) to be annealed Fe-Mg amorphous silicates. By comparison

  2. Mineralogical Studies of a Highly O-17-Depleted and an O-17-Rich Presolar Grain from the Acfer 094 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicate grains are the most abundant condensate around O-rich evolved stars, including red giants, supernovae (SNe) and binary systems. These grains have been identified in abundance in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles [1,2]. Astronomical observations of the silicate spectroscopic features around circumstellar disks indicate that most silicates are amorphous olivine-like grains, though some sources show a large crystalline portion [3]. Fewer astronomical observations of SN and nova silicates exist, but amorphous Mg-rich grains predominate [4,5]. The laboratory analysis of presolar silicates by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers more details on the structure and chemistry of individual grains. These studies provide information on the physical and chemical conditions of the parent stellar atmosphere during grain condensation. Moreover, be-cause silicates are susceptible to secondary alteration, processing events succeeding condensation can be traced. Thus far, similar microstructures have been observed for silicates that condensed in SN outflows and in the envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, but not as many of the comparatively rare SN grains have been analyzed. Here we examine the mineralogies of two presolar silicate grains having different origins.

  3. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  4. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Rige, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  5. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques (OPASI-T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Astronomical dust is observed in a variety of astrophysical environments and plays an important role in radiative processes and chemical evolution in the galaxy. Depending upon the environment, dust can be either carbon-rich or oxygen-rich (silicate grains). Both astronomical observations and ground-based data show that the optical properties of silicates can change dramatically with the crystallinity of the material, and recent laboratory research provides evidence that the optical properties of silicate dust vary as a function of temperature as well. Therefore, correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies on the understanding of the properties of silicate dust as functions of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. The OPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project addresses the need for high quality optical characterization of metal-enriched silicate condensates using a variety of techniques. A combination of both new and established experiments are used to measure the extinction, reflection, and emission properties of amorphous silicates across the infrared (near infrared to millimeter wavelengths), providing a comprehensive data set characterizing the optical parameters of dust samples. We present room temperature measurements and the experimental apparatus to be used to investigate and characterize additional metal-silicate materials.

  6. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years On

    CERN Document Server

    Wickramasinghe, N Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance - a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  7. Interstellar Grains: Effect of Inclusions on Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Vaidya, D B

    2011-01-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1$\\mu m$ using the extinction efficiencies of the composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  8. Interstellar grains: Effect of inclusions on extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, N.; Gupta, R.; Vaidya, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1 μm using the extinction efficiencies of composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  9. Discrete dipole approximation models of chrystalline forsterite: Applications to cometary crystalline silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sean Stephen

    The shape, size, and composition of crystalline silicates observed in comet comae and external proto-planetary disks are indicative of the formation and evolution of the dust grains during the processes of planetary formation. In this dissertation, I present the 3 -- 40 mum absorption efficiencies( Qabs) of irregularly shaped forsterite crystals computed with the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT developed by Draine and Flatau and run on the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility Pleiades. An investigation of grain shapes ranging from spheroidal to irregular indicate that the strong spectral features from forsterite are sensitive to grain shape and are potentially degenerate with the effects of crystal solid state composition (Mg-content). The 10, 11, 18, 23, and 33.5 mum features are found to be the most crystal shape sensitive and should be avoided in determining Mg-content. The distinct spectral features for the three shape classes are connected with crystal formation environment using a condensation experiment by (Kobatake et al., 2008). The condensation experiment demonstrates that condensed forsterite crystal shapes are dependent on the condensation environmental temperature. I generate DDSCAT target analog shapes to the condensed crystal shapes. These analog shapes are represented by the three shape classes: 1) equant, 2) a, c-columns, and 3) b-shortened platelets. Each of these shape classes exhibit distinct spectral features that can be used to interpret grain shape characteristics from 8 --- 40 mum spectroscopy of astronomical objects containing crystalline silicates. Synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the coma of Hale-Bopp at rh = 2.8 AU are generated by thermally modeling the flux contributions of 5 mineral species present in comets. The synthetic SEDs are constrained using a chi2- minimization technique. The mineral species are amorphous carbon, amorphous pyroxene, amorphous olivine, crystalline enstatite, and crystalline

  10. Immiscible silicate liquids and phosphoran olivine in Netschaëvo IIE silicate: Analogue for planetesimal core-mantle boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roosbroek, Nadia; Hamann, Christopher; McKibbin, Seann; Greshake, Ansgar; Wirth, Richard; Pittarello, Lidia; Hecht, Lutz; Claeys, Philippe; Debaille, Vinciane

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated a piece of the Netschaëvo IIE iron meteorite containing a silicate inclusion by means of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Netschaëvo contains chondrule-bearing clasts and impact melt rock clasts were also recently found. The examined inclusion belongs to the latter and is characterized by a porphyritic texture dominated by clusters of coarse-grained olivine and pyroxene, set in a fine-grained groundmass that consists of new crystals of olivine and a hyaline matrix. This matrix material has a quasi-basaltic composition in the inner part of the inclusion, whereas the edge of the inclusion has a lower SiO2 concentration and is enriched in MgO, P2O5, CaO, and FeO. Close to the metal host, the inclusion also contains euhedral Mg-chromite crystals and small (olivine crystallites containing up to 14 wt% P2O5, amorphous material, and interstitial Cl-apatite crystals. The Si-rich silicate glass globules show a second population of Fe-rich silicate glass droplets, indicating they formed by silicate liquid immiscibility. Together with the presence of phosphoran olivine and quenched Cl-apatite, these textures suggest rapid cooling and quenching as a consequence of an impact event. Moreover, the enrichment of phosphorus in the silicate inclusion close to the metal host (phosphoran olivine and Cl-apatite) indicates that phosphorus re-partitioned from the metal into the silicate phase upon cooling. This probably also took place in pallasite meteorites that contain late-crystallizing phases rich in phosphorus. Accordingly, our findings suggest that oxidation of phosphorus might be a general process in core-mantle environments, bearing on our understanding of planetesimal evolution. Thus, the Netschaëvo sample serves as a natural planetesimal core-mantle boundary experiment and based on our temperature estimates, the following sequence of events takes place: (i) precipitation of olivine (1400-1360 °C), (ii) re

  11. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  12. Inorganic phosphors in lead-silicate glass for white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorov, N. V.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Aseev, V. A.; Bibik, A. Yu.; Nekrasova, Ya. A.; Tuzova, Yu. V.; Novogran, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    Luminescent composites of the "phosphor-in-glass" type, based on a highly reflective lead-silicate matrix and fine-grained powders of YAG:Ce3+ and SiAlON:Eu2+ crystals, are developed and synthesized. Phosphor and glass powders are sintered at a temperature of 550°C to obtain phosphor samples for white LEDs. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction and luminescence spectroscopy. The dependence of the light quantum yield on the SiAlON:Eu2+ content in the samples is investigated. A breadboard of a white LED is designed using a phosphor-in-glass composite based on lead-silicate glass with a low glasstransition temperature. The total emission spectra of a blue LED and glass-based composites are measured. The possibility of generating warm white light by choosing an appropriate composition is demonstrated.

  13. A Syntactic Study on Bare Infinitive and Infinitival to

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing

    2014-01-01

    Infinitives which consist of bare infinitive and infinitival to are imperative in linguistic studies. And both of the two kinds of infinitives do not indicate person, tense and number. This research aims to analyze the properties, similarities and differ-ences between bare infinitive and infinitival to from the perspective of syntax. Thus, it enables us to attain a uniform characteriza-tion of the infinitival to and bare infinitive on the syntactic level and help us to understand these two kinds of infinitives better.

  14. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Silicate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng; NING Congqin; ZHOU Yue; CHEN Lei; LIN Kaili; CHANG Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Four kinds of pure silicate ceramic particles, CaSiO3, Ca3SiO5, bredigite and akermanite were prepared and their bactericidal effects were systematically investigated. The phase compositions of these silicate ceramics were characterized by XRD. The ionic concentration meas urement revealed that the Calcium (Ca) ion concentration were relatively higher in Ca3SiO5 and bredigite, and much lower in CaSiO3 and akermanite. Accordingly, the pH values of the four silicate ceramics extracts showed a positive correlation with the particle concentrations. Meanwhile, by decreasing the particle size, higher Ca ion concentrations can be achieved, leading to the increase of aqueous pH value as well. In summary, all of the four silicate ceramics tested in our study showed antibacterial effect in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, the order of their antibacterial activity against E.coli from strong to weak is Ca3SiO5, bredigite, CaSiO3 and akermanite.

  16. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  17. Mid-infrared Extinction and Fresh Silicate Dust towards the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.; Henning, Thomas; Il’in, Vladimir B.

    2017-03-01

    We interpret the interstellar extinction observed toward the Galactic center (GC) in the wavelength range λ = 1–20 μm. Its main feature is the flat extinction at 3–8 μm whose explanation is still a problem for cosmic dust models. We search for the structure and chemical composition of dust grains that could explain the observed extinction. In contrast to earlier works, we use laboratory measured optical constants and consider particles of different structures. We show that a mixture of compact grains of aromatic carbon and of some silicate is better suited for reproducing the flat extinction in comparison with essentially porous grains or aliphatic carbon particles. Metallic iron should be located inside the particle, i.e., it cannot form layers on silicate grains as the extinction curves then become very peculiar. We find a model including aromatic carbonaceous particles and three-layered particles with an olivine-type silicate core, a thin, very porous layer and a thin envelope of magnetite that provides a good (but still not perfect) fit to the observational data. We suggest that such silicate dust should be fresh, i.e., recently formed in the atmospheres of late-type stars in the central region of the Galaxy. We assume that this region has a radius of about 1 kpc and produces about half of the observed extinction. The remaining part of extinction is caused by a “foreground” material being practically transparent at λ =4{--}8 μ {{m}}.

  18. Experiments in chondrule formation: simulations of gas-grain collisions using plasma arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Morlock, Andreas; Sutton, Yvonne; Braithwaite, Nicholas St.J.; Grady, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the formation of chondrules in gas-grain collisions, we conducted experiments where mineral mixtures were melted in plasma arcs. First results already show silicate-rich spheres quite similar to chondrules.

  19. EAARL Bare Earth Topography-Fire Island National Seashore

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of Fire Island National Seashore was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  20. EAARL Coastal Topography--Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi was produced from remotely sensed,...

  1. EAARL Coastal Topography--Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey was produced from...

  2. Temporal construals of bare predicates in Mandarin Chinese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Hongyuan

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to the research on tense and eventualities across languages. It presents the first systematic investigation and detailed theoretical analysis of the temporal interpretations of sentences with bare (aspectually unmarked) predicates in Mandarin. Traditionally considered

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography--Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth digital elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, was produced from remotely...

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the northern Gulf of Mexico barrier islands and Naval Live Oaks was produced from...

  5. EAARL Topography-Vicksburg National Millitary Park 2008: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi was produced from remotely...

  6. Bare and effective fluid description in brane world cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Universidad de Santiago, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile); Lepe, Samuel; Saavedra, Joel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco [Universidad de La Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile)

    2010-03-15

    An effective fluid description, for a brane world model in five dimensions, is discussed for both signs of the brane tension. We found several cosmological scenarios where the effective equation differs widely from the bare equation of state. For universes with negative brane tension, with a bare fluid satisfying the strong energy condition, the effective fluid can cross the barrier {omega} {sub eff}=-1. (orig.)

  7. Cohesion of Amorphous Silica Spheres: Toward a Better Understanding of the Coagulation Growth of Silicate Dust Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Senshu, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion forces between submicrometer-sized silicate grains play a crucial role in the formation of silicate dust agglomerates, rocky planetesimals, and terrestrial planets. The surface energy of silicate dust particles is the key to their adhesion and rolling forces in a theoretical model based on the contact mechanics. Here we revisit the cohesion of amorphous silica spheres by compiling available data on the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in various circumstances. It turned out that the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in a vacuum is a factor of 10 higher than previously assumed. Therefore, the previous theoretical models underestimated the critical velocity for the sticking of amorphous silica spheres, as well as the rolling friction forces between them. With the most plausible value of the surface energy for amorphous silica spheres, theoretical models based on the contact mechanics are in harmony with laboratory experiments. Consequently, we conclude that silicate grains ...

  8. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  9. Grain destruction in shocks in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hollenbach, D. J.; McKee, C. F.

    1994-10-01

    Destruction of interstellar dust occurs predominantly in supernova shock waves in the warm neutral/ionized medium (density approximately = 0.25/cu cm, temperature approximately = 104 K). Recent theoretical developments and laboratory data for sputtering processes and grain-grain collisional vaporization allows us to better evaluate the grain destruction rate in interstellar shocks in the warm medium. We find that, independent of composition, grain destruction in supernova blast waves is dominated by nonthermal sputtering for shock velocities greater than 50 km/s and less than or equal to 150 km/s and thermal sputtering at higher shock velocities. We use a detailed scheme for the vaporization of grains colliding at high velocities (vs greater than or equal to 20 km/s) and show that the grain-grain collision destruction process is only dominant for shock velocities of less than or equal to 50-80 km/s and is less important than previously assumed. Nevertheless, the grain-grain destruction rates are of order 30%-90% of the sputtering rates at vs greater than 100 km/s and less than 200 km/s and are important in vaporizing the cores of grains. Detailed results for grain destruction as a function of grain size and composition are presented. We also present results for silicon carbide, iron, ice, and porous test particles. For carbonaceous grains we find that the fractional destruction is less than or equal to 0.29, and for silicate it is less than or equal to 0.45, for vs less than or equal to 200 km/s. We have calculated grain lifetimes, using the three-phase model of the interstellar medium, and find lifetimes of 4 x 108 yr for carbonaceous grains and 2.2 x 108 yr for silicate grains. Given that the typical stardust injection timescale of 2.5 x 109 yr, we conclude that efficient mechanisms for grain growth in the interstellar medium must exist in order that a significant fraction of the refractory elements be incorporated in dust, as observed. Therefore, although our

  10. Coordinated Analyses of Presolar Grains in the Allan Hills 77307 and Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Ann N; Stadermann, Frank J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Alexander, Conel M O'D

    2010-01-01

    We report the identification of presolar silicates (~177 ppm), presolar oxides (~11 ppm), and one presolar SiO2 grain in the ALHA 77307 chondrite. Three grains having Si isotopic compositions similar to SiC X and Z grains were also identified, though the mineral phases are unconfirmed. Similar abundances of presolar silicates (~152 ppm) and oxides (~8 ppm) were also uncovered in the primitive CR chondrite QUE 99177, along with 13 presolar SiC grains and one presolar silicon nitride. The O isotopic compositions of the presolar silicates and oxides indicate that most of the grains condensed in low-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. Interestingly, unlike presolar oxides, few presolar silicate grains have isotopic compositions pointing to low-metallicity, low-mass stars (Group 3). The 18O-rich (Group 4) silicates, along with the few Group 3 silicates that were identified, likely have origins in supernova outflows. This is supported by their O and Si isotopic compositions. Elemental compositions for...

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  12. Surface characterization of silicate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Marta

    2012-03-28

    The success of an implanted prosthetic material is determined by the early events occurring at the interface between the material and the body. These events depend on many surface properties, with the main ones including the surface's composition, porosity, roughness, topography, charge, functional groups and exposed area. This review will portray how our understanding of the surface reactivity of silicate bioceramics has emerged and evolved in the past four decades, owing to the adoption of many complementary surface characterization tools. The review is organized in sections dedicated to a specific surface property, each describing how the property influences the body's response to the material, and the tools that have been adopted to analyse it. The final section introduces the techniques that have yet to be applied extensively to silicate bioceramics, and the information that they could provide.

  13. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  14. Electrical conductivity studies of nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate synthesized by sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nallamuthu, N.; Prakash, I. [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Satyanarayana, N., E-mail: nallanis2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Venkateswarlu, M. [R and D, Amara Raja Batteries Ltd., Tirupati 517520, AP (India)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Nanocrystalline La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} material was synthesized by sol-gel method. > TG/DTA curves predicted the thermal behavior of the material. > FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of SiO{sub 4} and La-O network in the La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27}. > XRD patterns confirmed the formation of pure crystalline La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} phase. > The grain interior and the grain boundary conductivities are evaluated. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline apatite type structured lanthanum silicate (La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27}) sample was synthesized by sol-gel process. Thermal behavior of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate sample was studied using TG/DTA. The structural coordination of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate, calcined at various temperatures, was identified from the observed FTIR spectral results. The observed XRD patterns of the calcined dried gel were compared with the ICDD data and confirmed the formation of crystalline lanthanum silicate phase. The average crystalline size of La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} was calculated using the Scherrer formula and it is found to be {approx}80 nm. The observed SEM images of the lanthanum silicate indicate the formation of the spherical particles and the existence of O, Si and La in the lanthanum silicate are confirmed from the SEM-EDX spectrum. The grain and grain boundary conductivities are evaluated by analyzing the measured impedance data, using winfit software, obtained at different temperatures, of La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} sample. Also, the observed grain and grain boundary conductivity behaviors of the La{sub 10}Si{sub 6}O{sub 27} sample are analysed using brick layer model. The electrical permittivity and electrical modulus were calculated from the measured impedance data and were analyzed by fitting through the Havriliak and Negami function to describe the dielectric relaxation behavior of the nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate.

  15. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF Al-RICH SILICATE STARDUST FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christian [Institute for Mineralogy, University of Muenster, Correnssstr. 24, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Hoppe, Peter [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Brenker, Frank E., E-mail: christian.vollmer@wwu.de [Institute of Geoscience/Mineralogy, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-05-20

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content < 0.5 at%), structurally undisturbed orthopyroxene (MgSiO{sub 3}) with an unusually high Al content (1.8 {+-} 0.5 at%). This is the first TEM documentation of a single crystal pyroxene within the complete stardust silicate data set. We interpret the microstructure and chemistry of this grain as being a direct condensate from a gas of locally non-solar composition (i.e., with a higher-than-solar Al content and most likely also a lower-than-solar Mg/Si ratio) at (near)-equilibrium conditions. From the overabundance of crystalline olivine (six reported grains to date) compared to crystalline pyroxene (only documented as a single crystal in this work) we infer that formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  16. Contracts for Grain Biosecurity and Grain Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Abougamos, Hoda; White, Benedict; Sadler,Rohan

    2012-01-01

    The export of grain from Western Australia depends upon a grain supply network that takes grain from farm to port through Cooperative Bulk Handling receival and storage sites. The ability of the network to deliver pest free grain to the port and onto ship depends upon the quality of grain delivered by farmers and the efficacy of phosphine based fumigation in controlling stored grain pests. Phosphine fumigation is critical to the grain supply network because it is the cheapest effective fumiga...

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Al-rich Silicate Stardust from Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Christian; Hoppe, Peter; Brenker, Frank E.

    2013-05-01

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  18. Oleochemical-tethered SBA-15-type silicates with tunable nanoscopic order, carboxylic surface, and hydrophobic framework: cellular toxicity, hemolysis, and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pędziwiatr-Werbicka, Elżbieta; Miłowska, Katarzyna; Podlas, Marta; Marcinkowska, Monika; Ferenc, Małgorzata; Brahmi, Younes; Katir, Nadia; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Felczak, Aleksandra; Boruszewska, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna; Bryszewska, Maria; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-28

    Novel silicates were prepared by using silylated natural fatty acids (derived from triglyceride renewable oils) as co-condensing reagents in presence of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and the triblock copolymer, pluronic P123, as a structure directing agent. A series of carboxylic acid functionalized SBA-15-type mesoporous silicates were obtained with tunable nanoscopic order and reactive functional groups that allow the conjugation of amino probes by peptide coupling. Photophysical studies of the covalently linked aminopyrene substantiated that the internal framework of these materials have pronounced hydrophobicity. Moreover, phase separation that can emanate from the bulkiness of the starting fatty silanes has been ruled out owing to the absence of excimers after aminopyrene grafting. The hemotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and antimicrobial activity of these novel silicates were then evaluated. Without discrimination, the functionalized silicates show a significant decrease of red blood cell hemolysis as compared to bare SBA-15-silica material. Within the modified silicate series, germanium-free mesoporous silicates induce only a slight decrease in cell viability and, more interestingly, they exhibit negligible hemolytic effect. Moreover, increasing their concentration in the medium reduces the concentration of released hemoglobin as a result of Hb adsorption. Promising antimicrobial properties were also observed for these silicates with a slight dependency on whether phenylgermanium fragments were present within the silicate framework.

  19. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-04

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system.

  20. Semantic coherence in English accusative-with-bare-infinitive constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on usage-based cognitively oriented construction grammar, this paper investigates the patterns of coattraction of items that appear in the two VP positions (the VP in the matrix clause, and the VP in the infinitive subordinate clause) in the English accusative-with-bare-infinitive constru......Drawing on usage-based cognitively oriented construction grammar, this paper investigates the patterns of coattraction of items that appear in the two VP positions (the VP in the matrix clause, and the VP in the infinitive subordinate clause) in the English accusative......-with-bare-infinitive construction. The main methodological framework is that of covarying collexeme analysis, which, through statistical corpus analysis, allows for the analyst to address the semantics of a construction. Using this method on data from the BNC, the ultimate purpose of the paper is to address the underlying semantic...... relations of English accusatives-with-bare-infinitives through the relations of semantic coherence between the two VPs....

  1. Analyses of Cometary Silicate Crystals: DDA Spectral Modeling of Forsterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Comets are the Solar System's deep freezers of gases, ices, and particulates that were present in the outer protoplanetary disk. Where comet nuclei accreted was so cold that CO ice (approximately 50K) and other supervolatile ices like ethane (C2H2) were preserved. However, comets also accreted high temperature minerals: silicate crystals that either condensed (greater than or equal to 1400 K) or that were annealed from amorphous (glassy) silicates (greater than 850-1000 K). By their rarity in the interstellar medium, cometary crystalline silicates are thought to be grains that formed in the inner disk and were then radially transported out to the cold and ice-rich regimes near Neptune. The questions that comets can potentially address are: How fast, how far, and over what duration were crystals that formed in the inner disk transported out to the comet-forming region(s)? In comets, the mass fractions of silicates that are crystalline, f_cryst, translate to benchmarks for protoplanetary disk radial transport models. The infamous comet Hale-Bopp has crystalline fractions of over 55%. The values for cometary crystalline mass fractions, however, are derived assuming that the mineralogy assessed for the submicron to micron-sized portion of the size distribution represents the compositional makeup of all larger grains in the coma. Models for fitting cometary SEDs make this assumption because models can only fit the observed features with submicron to micron-sized discrete crystals. On the other hand, larger (0.1-100 micrometer radii) porous grains composed of amorphous silicates and amorphous carbon can be easily computed with mixed medium theory wherein vacuum mixed into a spherical particle mimics a porous aggregate. If crystalline silicates are mixed in, the models completely fail to match the observations. Moreover, models for a size distribution of discrete crystalline forsterite grains commonly employs the CDE computational method for ellipsoidal platelets (c:a:b=8

  2. Grain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  3. Temperature fluctuations of interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Kobi; Biham, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The temperatures of interstellar dust grains are analyzed using stochastic simulations, taking into account the grain composition and size and the discreteness of the photon flux. [...] The distribution of grain temperatures is calculated for a broad range of grain sizes and for different intensities of the interstellar radiation field, relevant to diffuse clouds and to PDRs. The dependence of the average grain temperature on its size is shown for different irradiation intensities. It is found that the average temperatures of grains with radii smaller than about 0.02 $\\mu$m are reduced due to the fluctuations. The average temperatures of grains of radii larger than about 0.35 $\\mu$m are also slightly reduced due to their more efficient emission of infrared radiation, particularly when exposed to high irradiation intensities. The average temperatures of silicate and carbonaceous grains are found to depend on the radiation field intensity X_MMP according to ~X_MMP^gamma, where the exponent gamma depends on the...

  4. Coordinated STEM/FIB/NanoSIMS Analyses of Presolar Silicates in Comet Dust and Primitive Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay; Nguyen, A.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicate grains were among the most abundant mineralogical building blocks of our Solar System. These grains were the detritus from earlier generations of stars that have been recycled in the early solar nebula. Rare sub-micrometer survivors of this processing have been identified in meteorites, micrometeorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). These silicate grains are recognized as presolar in origin because of their extremely anomalous isotopic compositions that reflect nucleosynthetic processes in their stellar sources (evolved stars, novae and supernovae). We perform coordinated chemical, mineralogical and isotopic studies of these grains to determine their origins and histories. We examine the complex mineralogy and petrography of presolar silicates using imaging, diffraction and chemical data obtained from thin sections with the JSC JEOL 2500 field-emission STEM equipped with a Noran thin window energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer and a Gatan Tridiem GIF. Quantitative element x-ray maps (spectrum images) are acquired by rastering a 4 nm incident probe whose dwell time is minimized to avoid beam damage and element diffusion during mapping. Successive image layers are acquired and combined in order to achieve approx 1% counting statistics for major elements. The IDP samples are prepared by ultramicrotomy of particles embedded in epoxy or elemental sulfur. After EDX mapping, the sections are subjected to C, N, and O isotopic imaging with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe. We prepare sections of some meteorite grains using the JSC FEI Quanta 3D focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. The specimen surface is protected from the FIB milling process by layers of electron beam-deposited C and Pt followed by an ion-deposited Pt layer. We also use the FIB to preferentially remove surrounding grains to reduce the background in subsequent NanoSIMS measurements. For mineralogical studies, we again employ the FIB instrument to deposit a protective cap over the

  5. Flared Disks and Silicate Emission in Young Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, S; Natta, A; Fujiyoshi, T; Tamura, M; Barrado y Navascués, D; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Jayawardhana, Ray; Natta, Antonella; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Tamura, Motohide; Navascues, David Barrado y

    2004-01-01

    We present mid-infrared photometry of three very young brown dwarfs located in the $\\rho$ Ophiuchi star-forming region -- GY5, GY11 and GY310 --obtained with the Subaru 8-meter telescope. All three sources were detected at 8.6 and 11.7$\\mu$m, confirming the presence of significant mid-infrared excess arising from optically thick dusty disks. The spectral energy distributions of both GY310 and GY11 exhibit strong evidence of flared disks; flat disks can be ruled out for these two brown dwarfs. The data for GY5 show large scatter, and are marginally consistent with both flared and flat configurations. Inner holes a few substellar radii in size are indicated in all three cases (and especially in GY11), in agreement with magnetospheric accretion models. Finally, our 9.7$\\mu$m flux for GY310 implies silicate emission from small grains on the disk surface (though the data do not completely preclude larger grains with no silicate feature). Our results demonstrate that disks around young substellar objects are analog...

  6. Semantic coherence in English accusative-with-bare-infinitive constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on usage-based cognitively oriented construction grammar, this paper investigates the patterns of coattraction of items that appear in the two VP positions (the VP in the matrix clause, and the VP in the infinitive subordinate clause) in the English accusative-with-bare-infinitive constru......Drawing on usage-based cognitively oriented construction grammar, this paper investigates the patterns of coattraction of items that appear in the two VP positions (the VP in the matrix clause, and the VP in the infinitive subordinate clause) in the English accusative...... relations of English accusatives-with-bare-infinitives through the relations of semantic coherence between the two VPs....

  7. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  8. Mid-IR water and silicate relation in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellini, S.; Bremer, J.; Kamp, I.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Lahuis, F.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Mid-IR water lines from protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars have a detection rate of 50%. Models have identified multiple physical properties of disks such as dust-to-gas mass ratio, dust size power law distribution, disk gas mass, disk inner radius, and disk scale height as potential explanations for the current detection rate. Aims: In this study, we aim to break degeneracies through constraints obtained from observations. We search for a connection between mid-IR water line fluxes and the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. Methods: We analyze observed water line fluxes from three blends at 15.17, 17.22 and 29.85 μm published earlier and compute the 10 μm silicate feature strength from Spitzer spectra to search for possible trends. We use a series of published ProDiMo thermo-chemical models, to explore disk dust and gas properties, and also the effects of different central stars. In addition, we produced two standard models with different dust opacity functions, and one with a parametric prescription for the dust settling. Results: Our series of models that vary properties of the grain size distribution suggest that mid-IR water emission anticorrelates with the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. The models also show that the increasing stellar bolometric luminosity simultaneously enhance the strength of this dust feature and the water lines fluxes. No correlation is found between the observed mid-IR water lines and the 10 μm silicate strength. Two-thirds of the targets in our sample show crystalline dust features, and the disks are mainly flaring. Our sample shows the same difference in the peak strength between amorphous and crystalline silicates that was noted in earlier studies, but our models do not support this intrinsic difference in silicate peak strength. Individual properties of our models are not able to reproduce the most extreme observations, suggesting that more complex dust properties (e.g., vertically changing) are

  9. A MODEL FOR THE DUST ENVELOPE OF THE SILICATE CARBON STAR IRAS 09425-6040

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung-Won, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City, 28644 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 09425-6040 (I09425) is a silicate carbon star with conspicuous crystalline silicate and water-ice features and emission excesses in the far-infrared and millimeter (mm) wavelength ranges. To understand properties of the dust envelope of I09425, we propose a physical model based on the observations and known properties of asymptotic giant branch stars and dust. We perform radiative transfer model calculations using multiple dust shells and disks with various dust species. We compare the model results with the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) acquired with different telescopes. We find that the physical model for I09425 using multiple shells of carbon and silicate dust and multiple disks of amorphous and crystalline silicates reproduces the observed SED fairly well. This object looks to have detached cold O-rich (silicate and water-ice) dust shells, which could be remnants of the recent chemical transition from O to C and an inner C-rich dust shell. A long-lived thin disk of very large silicate grains can reproduce the emission excess in the mm wavelength band and a recently formed thick disk of crystalline silicates can reproduce the prominent emission features in the spectral range 8–45 μm. The highly crystallized silicates could be recently formed by high temperature annealing due to the last O-rich superwind just before the chemical transition of the central star. I09425 could be a rare object that has the remnants of past O-rich stellar winds in the outer shells as well as in the circumbinary disks.

  10. Analysis of organic grain coatings in primitive interplanetary dust particles: Implications for the origin of Solar System organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George

    are consistent with this primitive organic matter being produced by the alternative process of condensation of C-bearing ices onto the grain surfaces and production of refractory organic matter by UV or other ionizing radiation bombardment of the ices [4]. The processes by which primitive grains aggregate to form the first dust of our Solar System are not well understood. Collision experiments indicate that bare rocky grains bounce apart at collision speeds ¡30 to 50 m/s and shatter at larger speeds [5]. However, experiments indicate grains coated with organic matter stick quite easily, even at speeds up to 5 m/s -an order of magnitude higher than the speed at which silicate grains accrete [6]. Thus the organic grain coatings we identified likely played a critical role in dust aggregation in the early Solar System. References: [1] Ishii, H. et al. Science 2009. [2] Flynn, G. J. et al. (2003) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 67, 4791-4806. [3] Keller L. P. et al. GCA (2004) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 68, 2577-2589. [4] Bernstein, M. P. et al. (1995) Astrophys. J., 454, 327-344. [5] Hartmann, W. K. (1978) Icarus, 33, 50-61. [6] Kudo, T. et al. (2002) Meteoritics Planet. Sci., 37, 1975-1983.

  11. Het paracervicale block tijdens de baring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.K. Flu (Peter Kalev)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractDe baring is het enige fysiologische gebeuren dat met pijn gepaard gaat. Dit wordt reeds aangeduid door het Nederlandse woord 11wee" en equivalente woorden in vele andere talen (dolor, douleur, pains, Wehe e.a.). De pijn is aanvankelijk vooral gelocaliseerd in de onderbuik en onder in de

  12. BARE retrotransposons are translated and replicated via distinct RNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    Full Text Available The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon.

  13. Basic science of nuclear medicine the bare bone essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kai H

    2015-01-01

    Through concise, straightforward explanations and supporting graphics that bring abstract concepts to life, the new Basic Science of Nuclear Medicine—the Bare Bone Essentials is an ideal tool for nuclear medicine technologist students and nuclear cardiology fellows looking for an introduction to the fundamentals of the physics and technologies of modern day nuclear medicine.

  14. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  15. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  16. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  17. Ion Probe Study of Silicate Inclusions from Colomera (IIE) Iron Meteorite:the Rare Earth Element Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU Weibiao

    2004-01-01

    Coupled with a petrographical study, I carried out an ion probe study of rare earth element microdistributions in mineral phases of silicate inclusions from the Colomera IIE iron meteorite. Most mineral grains have homogeneous REEs, but show considerable inter-grain variations by a factor of 2 to 100. The whole rock REE abundances for Colomera,estimated by combining REE data with modal abundances, are relatively LREE-enriched with REEs of ~10'CI, which suggest that Colomera silicates were highly differentiated and might represent a low degree partial melt (~10%) of a chondritic source. REE geochemistry of Colomera silicate inclusions points to an origin that involves differentiation,dynamic mixing, remelting, reduction, recrystallization, and subsequent rapid cooling near the surface of a planetary body.

  18. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  19. Terrain classification of ladar data for bare earth determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Magruder, Lori A.

    2011-06-01

    Terrain classification, or bare earth extraction, is an important component to LADAR data analysis. The terrain classification approach presented in this effort utilizes an adaptive lower envelope follower (ALEF) with an adaptive gradient operation for accommodations of local topography and roughness. In order to create a more robust capability, the ALEF was modified to become a strictly data driven process that facilitates a quick production of the data product without the subjective component associated with user inputs. This automated technique was tested on existing LADAR surveys over Wyoming's Powder River Basin and the John Starr Memorial Forest in Mississippi, both locations with dynamic topographic features. The results indicate a useful approach in terms of operational time and accuracy of the final bare earth recovery with the advantage of being fully data driven.

  20. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the chargedinterfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits shortrange in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  1. Nuda vida y goce. // Bare life and jouissance.

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Arias.

    2010-01-01

    From the point of view that connects politics and psychoanalysis, the aim of this essay is to investigate the causes of the annihilation of the subject in the totalitarian regimes, making him a victim of power, reduced to a bare life. This question leads us to analyze the jouissance within the frame of a regime that proposes the unification of a universal jouissance. These questions are considered to be relevant in the field that makes possible the intersection between politics and subjectivi...

  2. The Political Animal: Species-Being and Bare Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hudson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Marxism has been justifiably skeptical of animal rights. Indeed, deep ecology and animal-rights discourse are, in their native habitats, deeply problematic and self-contradictory. But recent theories of “bare life,” when brought into dialogue with Marx’s concept of species-being, offer a perspective from which animal rights discourse and Marxism share a common political horizon.

  3. LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF PRESOLAR SILICATE STARDUST FROM A NOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, J.; Kodolanyi, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Floss, C., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    We report the major element as well as the oxygen, magnesium, and silicon isotope composition of a unique presolar silicate grain found in the fine-grained fraction of the Antarctic CR2 chondrite Graves Nunataks 95229. The grain is characterized by an extremely high {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O ratio (6.3 {+-} 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}) relative to solar values, whereas its {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratio is solar within measurement uncertainty. It also shows enrichments in {sup 25,26}Mg and a significant excess in {sup 30}Si relative to solar system compositions, with {delta}{sup 25}Mg = 79 {+-} 21 per mille , {delta}{sup 26}Mg = 70 {+-} 20 per mille , and {delta}{sup 30}Si = 379 {+-} 92 per mille . This isotopic composition is consistent with an origin in the ejecta of a {approx}1.3-1.4 M{sub Sun} ONe nova with large contributions of material from a main-sequence companion star of roughly solar metallicity. However, many details of the stellar source remain undetermined, owing to the uncertainties of current nova nucleosynthesis models. Auger electron spectroscopic analyses identify O, Mg, Si, and Fe as the grain's major constituents. Its (Mg+Fe)/Si atomic ratios are lower than that of olivine and correspond on average to Fe-Mg-pyroxene. A complex texture and heterogeneous major element distribution within the grain attest to condensation under non-equilibrium conditions, which is consistent with the proposed nova origin.

  4. Bare-Hand Volume Cracker for Raw Volume Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bireswar Laha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of raw volume data generated from different scanning technologies faces a variety of challenges, related to search, pattern recognition, spatial understanding, quantitative estimation, and shape description. In a previous study, we found that the Volume Cracker (VC 3D interaction (3DI technique mitigated some of these problems, but this result was from a tethered glove-based system with users analyzing simulated data. Here, we redesigned the VC by using untethered bare-hand interaction with real volume datasets, with a broader aim of adoption of this technique in research labs. We developed symmetric and asymmetric interfaces for the Bare-Hand Volume Cracker (BHVC through design iterations with a biomechanics scientist. We evaluated our asymmetric BHVC technique against standard 2D and widely used 3D interaction techniques with experts analyzing scanned beetle datasets. We found that our BHVC design significantly outperformed the other two techniques. This study contributes a practical 3DI design for scientists, documents lessons learned while redesigning for bare-hand trackers, and provides evidence suggesting that 3D interaction could improve volume data analysis for a variety of visual analysis tasks. Our contribution is in the realm of 3D user interfaces tightly integrated with visualization, for improving the effectiveness of visual analysis of volume datasets. Based on our experience, we also provide some insights into hardware-agnostic principles for design of effective interaction techniques.

  5. Silicate features in Galactic and extragalactic post-AGB discs

    CERN Document Server

    Gielen, C; Van Winckel, H; Evans, T Lloyd; Woods, P M; Kemper, F; Marengo, M; Meixner, M; Sloan, G C; Tielens, A G G M

    2011-01-01

    Aims. In this paper we study the Spitzer and TIMMI2 infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources, both in the Galaxy and the LMC. Using the observed infrared spectra we determine the mineralogy and dust parameters of the discs, and look for possible differences between the Galactic and extragalactic sources. Methods. Modelling the full spectral range observed allows us to determine the dust species present in the disc and different physical parameters such as grain sizes, dust abundance ratios, and the dust and continuum temperatures. Results. We find that all the discs are dominated by emission features of crystalline and amorphous silicate dust. Only a few sample sources show features due to CO2 gas or carbonaceous molecules such as PAHs and C60 fullerenes. Our analysis shows that dust grain processing in these discs is strong, resulting in large average grain sizes and a very high crystallinity fraction. However, we do not find any correlations between the derived dust parameters and properties of the central...

  6. Leaf application of silicic acid to white oat and wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Peres Soratto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is beneficial to plants in several aspects, but there are doubts about the effectiveness of leaf application. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of Si, applied in a newly developed stabilized silicic acid form to the leaf, on nutrition and yield of irrigated white oat and wheat. Two experiments were performed (one per crop in winter 2008, in Botucatu-SP, Brazil. A completely randomized block design with 14 replications was used. Treatments consisted of a control (without Si application and Si leaf spraying, at a rate of 2.0 L ha-1 of the commercial product containing 0.8 % soluble Si. Silicon rate was divided in three parts, i.e. applications at tillering, floral differentiation and booting stages. Silicon leaf application increased N, P, K, and Si concentrations in white oat flag leaf, resulting in higher shoot dry matter, number of panicles per m², number of grains per panicle and grain yield increase of 34 %. In wheat, Si leaf application increased K and Si concentrations, shoot dry matter and number of spikes per m², resulting in a grain yield increase of 26.9 %.

  7. SILICATES ON IAPETUS FROM CASSINI’S COMPOSITE INFRARED SPECTROMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J. [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Clark, Roger N. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Spencer, John R. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Jennings, Donald E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Poston, Michael J. [Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/N and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ∼855 cm{sup −1} and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm{sup −1} that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm{sup −1} feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn’s icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure have features near 855 and 660 cm{sup −1}. However, peaks can shift depending on temperature and pressure, so measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive feature identifications. As a first investigation, we measured muscovite at 125 K in a vacuum and found that this spectrum does match the emissivity feature near 855 cm{sup −1} and the location of the doublet. Further measurements are needed to robustly identify a specific silicate, which would provide clues regarding the origin and implications of the dark material.

  8. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2010-11-23

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO(2) sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1-5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique.

  9. Silicates on Iapetus from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Cindy L; Clark, Roger N; Spencer, John R; Jennings, Donald E; Hand, Kevin P; Poston, Michael J; Carlson, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal to noise ratios (S/Rs) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/R and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure hav...

  10. Photoluminescence in amorphous MgSiO_3 silicate

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, S P; Day, S J; Connor, L D; Evans, A

    2013-01-01

    Samples of amorphous MgSiO_3 annealed at temperature steps leading up to their crystallisation temperature show a rise in photoluminescence activity, peaking at ~450C. The photoluminescence band has a main peak at 595nm and a weaker peak at 624nm. We present laboratory data to show that the maximum in photoluminescence activity is related to substantial structural reordering that occurs within a relatively narrow temperature range. We attribute the origin of the photoluminescence to non-bridging oxygen hole centre defects, which form around ordered nano-sized domain structures as a result of the breakup of tetrahedral connectivity in the disordered inter-domain network, aided by the loss of bonded OH. These defects are removed as crystallisation progresses, resulting in the decrease and eventual loss of photoluminescence. Thermally processed hydrogenated amorphous silicate grains could therefore represent a potential carrier of extended red emission.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  13. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  14. Rethinking biopower: posthumanism, bare life, and emancipatory work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyes, Kristin G

    2010-01-01

    This article answers a call, recently published in Advances in Nursing Science, to more fully explore the use of Italian political philosopher Giorgio Agamben's theory of biopower in nursing research and scholarship. Giorgio Agamben argues that biopower is not a modern phenomenon, and critical analysis of the historical origins of Western political practice shows how humanist discourse has been complicit in a long tradition of marginalization and violence, accomplished in each era by designating certain classes of human beings as "bare life." I discuss how I have used Agamben's theory to frame my own research, and the challenges of applying this theory in emancipatory work.

  15. Phospholipid bilayer formation at a bare Si surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutberlet, T.; Steitz, R.; Fragneto, G.;

    2004-01-01

    Neutron reflectivity was applied to monitor in situ the adsorption of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles on a solid bare hydrophilic Si interface. The obtained reflectivity curves are consistent with the rupture and fusion model for the adsorption of phosphatidylcholine vesicles to solid...... interfaces. The results show details of the adsorbed bilayer system at ångström resolution and indicate the presence of a thin ∼6 Å thick water leaflet that separates the bilayer from the Si surface. The resolved structural details provide the basis for further investigation of processes such as adsorption...

  16. Interstellar Extinction and Polarization by Graphite-Silicate Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. T.; Draine, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    The geometry of interstellar dust continues to be uncertain. In some models, intertellar grains are assumed to homogeneous spheres, with a suitable mixture of sizes and compositions in order to reproduce observations of of absorption and scattering (e.g., Weingartner & Draine 2001, or Zubko et al. 2004). However, it is often thought that the larger interstellar grains may be formed by agglomeration of smaller particles, with the resulting ``cluster'' being of nonuniform composition and having a ``fluffy'' geometry. The optical properties of such ``fluffy'' grains have sometimes been estimated using ``effective medium theory'' or other approximations, but it is now possible to directly calculate scattering and absorption using the discrete dipole approximation (Draine & Flatau 1994). We construct candidate clusters by random ballistic agglomeration of small graphite and silicate spheres, and calculate their scattering and absorption cross sections using the discrete dipole approximation code DDSCAT 6.x (Draine & Flatau 2004). We consider a model for interstellar dust consisting of very small grains plus clusters built by ballistic agglomeration with a suitable size distribution, and we test the model by trying to reproduce the observed wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and polarization. This research was supported in part by NSF grants AST-0216105 and AST-0406883. References: Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 1994, JOSA, A11, 1491l Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 2004, http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409262l Weingartner, J.C., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 548, 296l Zubko, V., Dwek, E., & Arendt, R.G. 2004, ApJS, 152, 211l

  17. Are All Active Galactic Nuclei Born Equal? The Silicate Dust Mineralogy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aigen

    Dust is the cornerstone of the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This theory proposes that all AGNs are essentially the same object or "born equal" but viewed from different lines of sight; much of the observed diversity arises from different viewing angles toward the central engine and a dusty toroidal structure around it. When the dusty torus is viewed face-on, both the central engine and the broad-line regions can be seen directly causing objects to appear as type 1 AGNs; when the dusty torus is viewed edge- on, the anisotropic obscuration created by the torus causes objects to appear as type 2 AGNs. It is this crucial role played by dust in the unified model of AGNs that makes understanding dust properties very important in understanding AGNs. Little is known about the dust in the circumnuclear torus of AGNs. There is evidence suggesting that the size and composition of the dust in AGNs may differ substantially from that of the Galactic interstellar dust, as reflected by the flat or "gray" extinction, and the anomalous silicate emission or absorption features observed respectively in type 1 and type 2 AGNs. The silicate feature profiles of AGNs are rather diverse in peak wavelengths, widths, strengths, and band ratios of the 18 micrometer O--Si--O feature to the 9.7 micrometer Si--O feature, suggesting that the AGN silicate grains are diverse in composition and size (or probably not "born equal"). We propose a two-year project to study the size and composition of the dust in AGNs, with special attention paid to the silicate mineralogy. We will obtain constraints on the silicate composition and size by modeling the Spitzer IRS spectra of >100 AGNs of various types. We will examine whether (and how) the silicate composition and size properties vary with the properties of an AGN (e.g. type, luminosity). This research will improve our understanding of the physical properties of the dust torus and the origin of the observed silicate emission

  18. Thick Tori around Active Galactic Nuclei - a Comparison of Model Predictions with Observations of the Infrared Continuum and Silicate Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, G. L.; Danese, L.

    1994-05-01

    The continuum expected from active galactic nuclei (AGN) surrounded by thick tori is compared to the data available for a sample of optically selected Seyfert 1 galaxies. The optical and near-IR nuclear fluxes have previously been derived for these objects, and hence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of their active nuclei can be analysed. We perform detailed calculations of the 0.1 to 1000 micron SEDs for AGN surrounded by dust tori with different opening angles. The dust mixture is mimicked by using three silicate and three graphite grains of different sizes. The radiative transfer equation for a cloud having azimuthal symmetry and containing a mixture of dust grains is solved by means of a numerical code that takes absorption, emission and scattering into account. We discuss the optimization of the free parameters by comparing the spectra predicted by the code to available data. The general absence of the silicate emission feature at about 10 microns in the spectra of broad- line AGN and the general presence of the 10 micron silicate absorption feature in narrow-line AGN are addressed. The ensuing constraints are discussed. We show that models of thick tori extending up to a few hundred parsecs in which physical processes such as shocks significantly reduce the silicate grain abundance within the first few tens of parsecs are fully consistent with available broad-band data and high-resolution IR spectra of Seyfert 1 and 2 nuclei.

  19. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@med.uni-marburg.de [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps University of Marburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M., E-mail: anneke.damberg@rwth-aachen.de [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  20. Iron line profiles in Suzaku spectra of bare Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Patrick, A R; Porquet, D; Markowitz, A G; Lobban, A P; Terashima, Y

    2010-01-01

    We methodically model the broad-band Suzaku spectra of a small sample of six 'bare' Seyfert galaxies: Ark 120, Fairall 9, MCG-02-14-009, Mrk 335, NGC 7469 and SWIFT J2127.4+5654. The analysis of bare Seyferts allows a consistent and physical modelling of AGN due to a weak amount of any intrinsic warm absorption, removing the degeneracy between the spectral curvature due to warm absorption and the red-wing of the Fe K region. Through effective modelling of the broad-band spectrum and investigating the presence of narrow neutral or ionized emission lines and reflection from distant material, we obtain an accurate and detailed description of the Fe K line region using models such as laor, kerrdisk and kerrconv. Results suggest that ionized emission lines at 6.7 keV and 6.97 keV (particularly Fe XXVI) are relatively common and the inclusion of these lines can greatly affect the parameters obtained with relativistic models i.e. spin, emissivity, inner radius of emission and inclination. Moderately broad components...

  1. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-11-04

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq(-1) and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm(-2) reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  2. Bare-Bones Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms.

  3. Influence of silicate anions structure on desilication in silicate-bearing sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 张闻; 齐天贵; 彭志宏; 周秋生; 李小斌

    2016-01-01

    The structural changes of silicate anions in the desilication process with the addition of calcium hydrate alumino-carbonate were studied by measuring Raman spectra, infrared spectra and corresponding second derivative spectra. The results show that the desilication ratio in the solution prepared by the addition of sodium silicate (solution-SS) is much greater than that in the solution by the addition of green liquor (solution-GL), and low alumina concentration in the sodium aluminate solutions facilitates the desilication process. It is also shown that alumino-silicate anions in the solution-GL, and Q3 polymeric silicate anions in solution-SS are predominant, respectively. In addition, increasing the concentration of silica favors respectively the formation of the alumino-silicate or the Q3 silicate anions in the solution-GL or the solution-SS. Therefore, it can be inferred that the low desilication ratio in the silicate-bearing aluminate solution is mainly attributed to the existence of alumino-silicate anions.

  4. Low temperature FIR and submm mass absorption coefficient of interstellar silicate dust analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Coupeaud, A; Meny, C; Nayral, C; Delpech, F; Leroux, H; Depecker, C; Creff, G; Brubach, J B; Roy, P

    2011-01-01

    Cold dust grains emission in the FIR/submm is usually expressed as a modified black body law in which the dust mass absorption coefficient (MAC), is described with a temperature- and wavelength-independent emissivity spectral index, beta. However, numerous data from space and balloon-born missions and recently from Herschel and Planck show that dust emission is not well understood, as revealed by the observed anti-correlation of beta with the grain temperature. In order to give astronomers the necessary data to interpret FIR/submm observations, we synthesised analogues of interstellar amorphous and crystalline silicate grains, rich in Mg and Ca, and having stiochiometry of olivine and pyroxene and measured their MAC, in the 100-1000/1500 \\mum range for grain temperatures varying from 300 to 10 K. We find that the grain MAC decreases when the grain temperature decreases and that the local spectral index, beta, defined as the slope of the MAC curve, is anti-correlated with the grain temperature. These variation...

  5. Composite grains: Application to circumstellar dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Vaidya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA we calculate the absorption efficiency of the composite grain, made up of a host silicate spheroid and inclusions of graphite, in the spectral region 5.0-25.0μm. We study the absorption as a function of the voulume fraction of the inclusions. In particular, we study the variation in the 10.0μm and 18.0μm emission features with the volume fraction of the inclusions. Using the extinction efficiencies, of the composite grains we calculate the infrared fluxes at several dust temperatures and compare the model curves with the observed infrared emission curves (IRAS-LRS, obtained for circumstellar dust shells around oxygen rich M-type stars.

  6. Dust in the wind: Crystalline silicates, corundum and periclase in PG 2112+059

    CERN Document Server

    Markwick-Kemper, F; Hines, D C; Bouwman, J

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the mineralogical composition of dust in the Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasar PG 2112+059 using mid-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. From spectral fitting of the solid state features, we find evidence for Mg-rich amorphous silicates with olivine stoichiometry, as well as the first detection of corundum (Al_2O_3) and periclase (MgO) in quasars. This mixed composition provides the first direct evidence for a clumpy density structure of the grain forming region. The silicates in total encompass 56.5% of the identified dust mass, while corundum takes up 38 wt.%. Depending on the choice of continuum, a range of mass fractions is observed for periclase ranging from 2.7% in the most conservative case to 9% in a less constrained continuum. In addition, we identify a feature at 11.2 micron as the crystalline silicate forsterite, with only a minor contribution from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The 5% crystalline silicate fraction requires high temperatures such ...

  7. Abundant crystalline silicates in the disk of a very low mass star

    CERN Document Server

    Merin, B; Van Dishoeck, E F; Kessler-Silacci, J; Dullemond, C P; Blake, G A; Lahuis, F; Brown, J M; Geers, V C; Pontoppidan, K M; Comeron, F; Frasca, A; Guieu, S; Alcalá, J M; Boogert, A C A; II, N J E; D'Alessio, P; Mundy, L G; Chapman, N

    2007-01-01

    We announce the discovery of SST-Lup3-1, a very low mass star close to the brown dwarf boundary in Lupus III with a circum(sub)stellar disk, discovered by the `Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Program from mid-, near-infrared and optical data, with very conspicuous crystalline silicate features in its spectrum. It is the first of such objects with a full 5 to 35 micron spectrum taken with the IRS and it shows strong 10 and 20 micron silicate features with high feature to continuum ratios and clear crystalline features out to 33 micron. The dust in the disk upper layer has a crystalline silicate grain fraction between 15% and 33%, depending on the assumed dust continuum. The availability of the full Spitzer infrared spectrum allows an analysis of the dust composition as a function of temperature and position in the disk. The hot (~ 300 K) dust responsible for the 10 micron feature consists of a roughly equal mix of small (~ 0.1 micron) and large (~ 1.5 micron) grains, whereas the cold (~ 70 K) dust responsible f...

  8. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust in Quasar Absorption Systems at z<1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, V. P.; York, D. G.; Vladilo, G.; Welty, D. E.; Som, D.

    2013-01-01

    Interstellar dust plays a significant role in the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, such as star-formation, and the heating, cooling, and ionization of interstellar material. While interstellar dust has been studied extensively in local galaxies, much less is known about the properties of dust grains in distant galaxies. One technique to study extragalactic interstellar dust is to look for absorption features produced by the dust in the spectra of background luminous objects, such as quasars. We will present results from an ongoing study of the interstellar silicate dust in several quasar absorption systems using infrared absorption spectra obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and complementary ground-based data on associated gas-phase metal absorption lines. Based on the shape of the 10 micron silicate absorption feature, we find suggestions that the interstellar silicate dust grains in the distant universe may be significantly more crystalline in structure than those in our own Galaxy. If confirmed, this may have implications for both dust and galaxy evolution, and for assumptions about the similarity of dust properties at all epochs. Support for this work is provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Additional support comes from National Science Foundation grants AST-0908890 and AST-1108830 to the University of South Carolina.

  9. Radiation pressure on fluffy submicron-sized grains

    CERN Document Server

    Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the claim that the ratio {\\beta} of radiation pressure force to gravitational force on a dust grain in our solar system can substantially exceed unity for some grain sizes, provided that grain porosity is high enough. For model grains consisting of random aggregates of silicate spherules, we find that the maximum value of {\\beta} is almost independent of grain porosity, but for small (<0.3 {\\mu}m) grains, {\\beta} actually decreases with increasing porosity. These results affect the interpretation of the grain trajectories estimated from the Stardust mission, which were modeled assuming {\\beta} values exceeding one. We find that radiation pressure effects are not large enough for particles Orion and Hylabrook captured by Stardust to be of interstellar origin given their reported impact velocities. We also investigate the effect of metallic iron inclusions in the dust grains, and find that metallic iron will increase {\\beta}, but at least half the grain (by mass) must be iron in order to raise...

  10. Corrosion of bare and galvanized steel in gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez, Mercedes

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum is a relatively low-cost building material much abounding in our country. When it is put in contact with steel, it may produce high corrosion rates due to its pH value (close to 7. This work reports the results obtained in studying the corrosion rates of bare and galvanized steel in contact with gypsum and plaster, as well as the influence curing thermal treatment applied to gypsum, enviromental relative humidity and addition of compounds with different natures and purposes may have in such process. In-situ observations, as well as the measurement of the Polarization Resistance and the weight loss have been used as measurement technics. From the results obtained it has been possible to deduce that galvanized steel has better behaviour in dry enviroments than bare steel in the same conditions and moist atmosphere induces proportionally more corrosion in galvanized steel than in bare one. Additions to gypsum do not modified these conclusions, though it may be pointed out that addition of nitrites or lime improves the behaviour of bare steel, while galvanized behaviour is not modified. The addition of lime is not recommended because phenomena of dilated along time expansion may take place.

    El yeso es un material de construcción de relativo bajo coste y que, además, es muy abundante en nuestro país. Debido a su pH cercano a la neutralidad, cuando entra en contacto con el acero, este puede corroerse a elevadas velocidades. En esta comunicación se presentan los resultados de un estudio sobre la velocidad de corrosión del acero desnudo y galvanizado en contacto con yeso y escayola y la influencia que tienen: el tratamiento térmico del curado del yeso, la humedad relativa ambiental y la adición de aditivos de diversa naturaleza y finalidad. Como técnicas de medida se han utilizado la medida de la Resistencia de Polarización y de la pérdida de peso, así como observaciones visuales. De los resultados se puede deducir que en

  11. Interaction of Hg Atom with Bare Si(111) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-Jun; LIU Ying

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between Hg atom and bare Si(111) surface, three types of silicon cluster models of Si4H7, Si7H10 and Si16H20 together with their Hg complexes were studied by using hybrid (U)B3LYP density functional theory method. Optimized geometries and energies for Hg atom on different adsorption sites indicate that: 1) the binding energies at different adsorption sites are small (ranging from ~3 to 8 kJ/mol dependent on the adsorption sites), suggesting a weak interaction between Hg atom and silicon surface; 2) the most favorable adsorption site is the on top (T) site. By analyzing their natural bonding orbitals, the possible reason of this difference is suggested.

  12. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  13. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  14. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  15. Infrared spectrophotometry of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983d) - A bare nucleus revealed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, M. S.; Aitken, D. K.; Knacke, R.; Mccorkle, S.; Roche, P. F.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra of the central core and surrounding coma of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983d) were obtained at 8-13 microns on May 11 and 2-4 microns on May 12, 1983. Spatially resolved measurements at 10 microns with a 4-arcsec beam showed that the central core was more than 100 times brighter than the inner coma only 8 arcsec away; for radially outflowing dust, the brightness ratio would be a factor of 8. The observations of the central core are consistent with direct detection of a nucleus having a radius of approximately 5 km. The temperature of the sunlit hemisphere was greater than 300 K. Spectra of the core are featureless, while spectra of the coma suggest weak silicate emission. The spectra show no evidence for icy grains. The dust production rate on May 11.4 was about 100,000 g/sec, assuming that the gas flux from the dust-producing areas on the nucleus was about 0.00001 g/sq cm per sec.

  16. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  17. Study of grain compositions in comet Levy 1990XX

    CERN Document Server

    Das, H S; Sinha, B K; Sen, A K

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the non-spherical dust grain characteristics of comet Levy 1990XX with different silicate grain compositions (both pyroxene and olivine) are studied using the T-matrix method. Considering amorphous pyroxene grain (Mg$_x$Fe$_{1-x}$SiO$_3$) with $x$ (= 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.95, 1) and amorphous olivine grain (Mg$_{2y}$Fe$_{2-2y}$SiO$_4$) with $y$ (= 0.4, 0.5) (Dorschner et al. 1995), the observed polarization data of comet Levy1990XX are analyzed using the T-matrix code at $\\lambda$ = 0.485 $\\mu m$.

  18. The influence of dust grain porosity on the analysis of debris disc observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunngräber, Robert; Wolf, Sebastian; Kirchschlager, Florian; Ertel, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Debris discs are often modelled assuming compact dust grains, but more and more evidence for the presence of porous grains is found. We aim at quantifying the systematic errors introduced when modelling debris discs composed of porous dust with a disc model assuming spherical, compact grains. We calculate the optical dust properties derived via the fast, but simple effective medium theory. The theoretical lower boundary of the size distribution - the so-called `blowout size' - is compared in the cases of compact and porous grains. Finally, we simulate observations of hypothetical debris discs with different porosities and feed them into a fitting procedure using only compact grains. The deviations of the results for compact grains from the original model based on porous grains are analysed. We find that the blowout size increases with increasing grain porosity up to a factor of 2. An analytical approximation function for the blowout size as a function of porosity and stellar luminosity is derived. The analysis of the geometrical disc set-up, when constrained by radial profiles, is barely affected by the porosity. However, the determined minimum grain size and the slope of the grain size distribution derived using compact grains are significantly overestimated. Thus, the unexpectedly high ratio of minimum grain size to blowout size found by previous studies using compact grains can be partially described by dust grain porosity, although the effect is not strong enough to completely explain the trend.

  19. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  20. Stability of calcium silicate in basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Mixture of CaO and SiO2 was sintered at 1 200 or 1 400 ℃ according to the mole ratio of CaO/SiO2 of 1 or 2, and then calcium silicate was leached in pure caustic or soda solution. The results indicated that calcium silicate exists much more stably in caustic solution than that in soda solution, and CaO*SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO*SiO2 whether in caustic solution or in soda solution. The increase of sintering temperature favored the stability of calcium silicate in the leaching process. When β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in soda solution, the increase of leaching temperature and time resulted in decomposing of more calcium silicate. And when β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in caustic solution at high temperature, much 2CaO*SiO2*H2O but little CaO*SiO2*H2O appeared in slag.

  1. Microbiota of kefir grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Pogačić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kefir grains represent the unique microbial community consisting of bacteria, yeasts, and sometimes filamentous moulds creating complex symbiotic community. The complexity of their physical and microbial structures is the reason that the kefir grains are still not unequivocally elucidated. Microbiota of kefir grains has been studied by many microbiological and molecular approaches. The development of metagenomics, based on the identification without cultivation, is opening new possibilities for identification of previously nonisolated and non-identified microbial species from the kefir grains. Considering recent studies, there are over 50 microbial species associated with kefir grains. The aim of this review is to summarise the microbiota composition of kefir grains. Moreover, because of technological and microbiological significance of the kefir grains, the paper provides an insight into the microbiological and molecular methods applied to study microbial biodiversity of kefir grains.

  2. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings cont...

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of select barrier islands and peninsular regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, acquired on June 27-30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey, acquired April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  5. EAARL Topography - Vicksburg National Military Park 2008: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi, acquired on March 6, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography-Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nagle, David B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and submerged topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, acquired March 3, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  7. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the

  8. Interstellar silicate dust in the z = 0.685 absorber toward TXS 0218+357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Liger, Nicholas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vladilo, Giovanni, E-mail: ALLERM@mailbox.sc.edu [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-10

    We report the detection of interstellar silicate dust in the z {sub abs} = 0.685 absorber along the sightline toward the gravitationally lensed blazar TXS 0218+357. Using Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph data, we detect the 10 μm silicate absorption feature with a detection significance of 10.7σ. We fit laboratory-derived silicate dust profile templates obtained from the literature to the observed 10 μm absorption feature and find that the best single-mineral fit is obtained using an amorphous olivine template with a measured peak optical depth of τ{sub 10} = 0.49 ± 0.02, which rises to τ{sub 10} ∼ 0.67 ± 0.04 if the covering factor is taken into account. We also detected the 18 μm silicate absorption feature in our data with a >3σ significance. Due to the proximity of the 18 μm absorption feature to the edge of our covered spectral range, and associated uncertainty about the shape of the quasar continuum normalization near 18 μm, we do not independently fit this feature. We find, however, that the shape and depth of the 18 μm silicate absorption are well matched to the amorphous olivine template prediction, given the optical depth inferred for the 10 μm feature. The measured 10 μm peak optical depth in this absorber is significantly higher than those found in previously studied quasar absorption systems. However, the reddening, 21 cm absorption, and velocity spread of Mg II are not outliers relative to other studied absorption systems. This high optical depth may be evidence for variations in dust grain properties in the interstellar medium between this and the previously studied high redshift galaxies.

  9. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z = 0.685 Absorber Toward TXS 0218+357

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Liger, Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    We report the detection of interstellar silicate dust in the z abs = 0.685 absorber along the sightline toward the gravitationally lensed blazar TXS 0218+357. Using Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph data, we detect the 10 μm silicate absorption feature with a detection significance of 10.7σ. We fit laboratory-derived silicate dust profile templates obtained from the literature to the observed 10 μm absorption feature and find that the best single-mineral fit is obtained using an amorphous olivine template with a measured peak optical depth of τ10 = 0.49 ± 0.02, which rises to τ10 ~ 0.67 ± 0.04 if the covering factor is taken into account. We also detected the 18 μm silicate absorption feature in our data with a >3σ significance. Due to the proximity of the 18 μm absorption feature to the edge of our covered spectral range, and associated uncertainty about the shape of the quasar continuum normalization near 18 μm, we do not independently fit this feature. We find, however, that the shape and depth of the 18 μm silicate absorption are well matched to the amorphous olivine template prediction, given the optical depth inferred for the 10 μm feature. The measured 10 μm peak optical depth in this absorber is significantly higher than those found in previously studied quasar absorption systems. However, the reddening, 21 cm absorption, and velocity spread of Mg II are not outliers relative to other studied absorption systems. This high optical depth may be evidence for variations in dust grain properties in the interstellar medium between this and the previously studied high redshift galaxies.

  10. Role of a silicate phase in the reduction of iron and chromium and their oxidation with carbide formation during the manufacture of carbon ferrochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchin, V. E.; Roshchin, A. V.; Akhmetov, K. T.; Salikhov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    The reactions of reduction of chromium and iron from chromospinelide and the reactions of carbide formation from the reduced metals are separated in space in experiments performed on ore grains with an artificially applied silicate shell. It is found that the silicate layer that isolates spinelide fro direct contact with carbon takes part in the reactions of both reduction and carbide formation. Free carbon extracts oxygen anions from the layer at the contact surface with the formation of CO, and the forming anion vacancies transfer "excess" electrons to the iron and chromium cations in the spinelide lattice and reduce them. Free and carbide-fixed carbon extracts iron and chromium cations from the silicate layer, and carbides form on the surface. The cation vacancies and electron holes (high-charge cations) that form in the silicate phase under these conditions are involved in the oxidation of the metal reduced in spinelide and cause its dissolution in the silicate phase and the precipitation of lower carbides on the surface of the silicate phase. The structure that is characterized of carbon ferrochrome forms on the surface of the silicate phase. Carbide formation is slower than reduction because of higher energy consumed for the formation of high-charge cations and the transfer of cations from the spinelide volume to the outer surface of the silicate phase. In the absence of a silicate layer, a carbide shell blocks the contact of carbon with oxides, which leads to the stop of reduction and, then, carbide formation. In the presence of a silicate (slag) shell around a spinelide grain, the following two concentration galvanic cells operate in parallel: an oxygen (reduction) cell and a metal (oxidation) cell. The parallel operation of the two galvanic cells with a common electrolyte (silicate phase) results in a decrease in the electric potentials between spinelide inside the silicate phase and carbon and carbides on its surface, and each of the processes is

  11. The fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic (NOTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSANKA KITIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The content and composition of fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic were analized by GC. It was found that unsaturated acids prevailed and that the major components were palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The hydrocarbon fractions of pentane extracts were shown to consist of the alkane homologues (C17 to C34 with nonacosane and hentriacontane being prevailing compounds.

  12. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. Electron capture by bare ions on water molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Roberto; Montenegro, Pablo; Monti, Juan; Fojón, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Single electron capture from water molecules by impact of bare ions is theoretically investigated at intermediate and high collision energies. This reaction is of fundamental importance to determine the deposition of energy in biological matter irradiated with ion beams (hadrontherapy), dominating other ionizing processes of the target at low-intermediate impact velocities and giving principal contributions to the energetic region where electronic stopping power maximizes. The dynamics of the interaction between the aggregates is described within the one active-electron continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. The orbitals of the target in the ground state are represented using the approximate self-consistent complete neglect of differential orbitals (SC-CNDO) model. The contribution of different molecular orbitals on the partial cross sections to selected n-principal quantum number projectile states is discriminated as well as the collaboration of these n-states on total cross sections. The latter ones are dominated by capture to n=1 states at high enough energies decreasing their contribution as n increases.

  14. Analysis of thermionic bare tether operation regimes in passive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Chen, Xin; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2017-01-01

    A thermionic bare tether (TBT) is a long conductor coated with a low work-function material. In drag mode, a tether segment extending from anodic end A to a zero-bias point B, with the standard Orbital-motion-limited current collection, is followed by a complex cathodic segment. In general, as bias becomes more negative in moving from B to cathodic end C, one first finds space-charge-limited (SCL) emission covering up to some intermediate point B*, then full Richardson-Dushman (RD) emission reaching from B* to end C. An approximate analytical study, which combines the current and voltage profile equations with results from asymptotic studies of the Vlasov-Poisson system for emissive probes, is carried out to determine the parameter domain covering two limit regimes, which are effectively controlled by just two dimensionless parameters involving ambient plasma and TBT material properties. In one such limit regime, no point B* is reached and thus no full RD emission develops. In an opposite regime, SCL segment BB* is too short to contribute significantly to the current balance.

  15. A Density Functional Study of Bare and Hydrogenated Platinum Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sebetci, A

    2006-01-01

    We perform density functional theory calculations using Gaussian atomic-orbital methods within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation to study the interactions in the bare and hydrogenated platinum clusters. The minimum-energy structures, binding energies, relative stabilities, vibrational frequencies and the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular-orbital gaps of Pt_nH_m (n=1-5, m=0-2) clusters are calculated and compared with previously studied pure platinum and hydrogenated platinum clusters. We investigate any magic behavior in hydrogenated platinum clusters and find that Pt_4H_2 is more stable than its neighboring sizes. Our results do not agree with a previous conclusion that 3D geometries of Pt tetramer and pentamer are unfavored. On the contrary, the lowest energy structure of Pt_4 is found to be a distorted tetrahedron and that of Pt_5 is found to be a bridge site capped tetrahedron which is a new global minimum for Pt_5 cluster. The successive addition of H ...

  16. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  17. AMQ Protocol Based Performance Analysis of Bare Metal Hypervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Deepak Arora

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is one of the most exciting technology because of its cost-reducing approach, flexibility, and scalability. Hypervisor is the essential part of cloud technology; it is a component of software that provides a virtualized hardware environment to support running multiple operating systems concurrently using one physical server. In this paper we took KVM, XEN, Hyper-V and ESXi as hypervisors. We have compared the performance of Virtual Machines (VMs by RabbitMQ message broker server that uses Advanced Message Queuing Protocol(AMQP for breaking messages. We establish the setup on bare metal hypervisor that is installed directly on the hardware of the system. We took SAN (Shared Storage Network server for maintaining the storage of all VMs. By the evaluation of these hyperviosrs we got a brief idea about their performance on different parameters. These results will be beneficial to small enterprise, social group or any private IT firm which is choosing to build small cloud infrastructure with optimal benefits. Experiment results of checking the performance of VMs for all the hypervisors shows that there is performance variation on different applications and workloads of the hypervisors. None of the hypervisors outperform another at every aspect of our comparison.

  18. Effect of soil property on evaporation from bare soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the actual evaporation rate from bare soils remains a challenging task as it not only associates with the atmospheric demand and liquid water saturation on the soil surface, but also the properties of the soils (e.g., porosity, pore size distribution). A physically based analytical model was developed to describe the surface resistance varying with the liquid water saturation near the soil surface. This model considers the soil pore size distribution, hydraulic connection between the main water cluster and capillary water in the soil surface when the soil surface is wet and the thickness of the dry soil layer when the soil surface is dry. The surface resistance model was then integrated to a numerical model based on water balance, heat balance and surface energy balance equations. The integrated model was validated by simulating water and heat transport processes during six soil column drying experiments. The analysis indicates that the when soil surface is wet, the consideration of pore size distribution in the surface resistance model offers better estimation of transient evaporation among different soil types than the estimations given by empirically based surface resistance models. Under fixed atmospheric boundary condition and liquid water saturation, fine sand has greater evaporation rate than coarse sand as stronger capillary force devlivers more water from the main water cluster. When the soil surface becomes dry, the impact of soil property to evaporation becomes trivial as the thickness of the dry soil layer turns to be the key factor to determine the evaporation rate.

  19. FMR Study of the Porous Silicate Glasses with Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zapotoczny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on new magnetic materials for biomedical applications are discussed. These materials are porous silicate glasses with magnetic fillers. To ensure the smallest number of components for subsequent removal from the body, the magnetic fillers are bare magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4. The magnetic properties of these materials have been investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance method (FMR. The FMR analysis has been complemented by scanning electron microscope (SEM measurements. In order to examine the effect of time degradation on filling the porous glass with bare magnetite nanoparticles the FMR measurement was repeated five months later. For the samples with high degree of pore filling, in contrast to the samples with low degree of pore filling, the FMR signal was still strong. The influence of different pH values of magnetite nanoparticles aqueous suspension on the degree of filling the pores of glasses is also discussed. The experimental results are supported by computer simulations of FMR experiment for a cluster of N magnetic nanoparticles locked in a porous medium based on a stochastic version of the Landau-Lifshitz equation for nanoparticle magnetization.

  20. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  1. Measurements, interpretation and climate change effects evaluation for pyroclastic bare soil evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, G.; Pagano, L.; Mercogliano, P.; Montesarchio, M.

    2012-12-01

    A physical model has been designed to achieve the following goals: to mark out the main features of the soil-atmosphere interaction; to quantify the water and energy fluxes through the soil surface during several years; to monitor the trends of the main variables regulating the hydraulic and thermal conditions. It is constituted by a soil volume (about 1mc) exposed to weather forcing; it is instrumented at four depths by sensors for measuring suction, water content and temperature. Therefore, a station allows knowing the meteo variables (rainfall, wind velocity and direction, air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity) and the two directly measurable components of the energy balance at the soil surface (net radiation and soil heat flux). Under the soil specimen, three shear beam load cells measure the soil weight and, hence, because the soil particles weight can be assumed as constant, the sample water storage. As first attempt, the soil surface is kept bare to avoid the complications led by overlapping processes induced by vegetation (interception, transpiration). Since May 2010, the soil involved in testing is pyroclastic material (silty sand) representative of air fall deposits covering a large part of Campania (South Italy) and erupted in the last 10,000 years by different volcanic centres (Phlegrean fields, Vesuvius). Because of their genesis, these soils show peculiar features: high porosity, low weight of soil unit volume, high water retention capacity; they cause an unusual hydraulic behaviour, halfway between coarse and fine soils in terms of saturated hydraulic permeability and mean slope of soil-water characteristic curve. In turn, these elements induce, among other things, that the currently adopted predictive approaches to estimate, for example, infiltration and evaporation processes are not directly suitable for these soils as the available parameters, even for grain sizes comparable to those of pyroclastic soils, fail to reproduce the

  2. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515 Section 77.515 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage...

  3. Hydrodynamic behavior of a bare rod bundle. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzis, J.G.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-06-01

    The temperature distribution within the rod bundle of a nuclear reactor is of major importance in nuclear reactor design. However temperature information presupposes knowledge of the hydrodynamic behavior of the coolant which is the most difficult part of the problem due to complexity of the turbulence phenomena. In the present work a 2-equation turbulence model--a strong candidate for analyzing actual three dimensional turbulent flows--has been used to predict fully developed flow of infinite bare rod bundle of various aspect ratios (P/D). The model has been modified to take into account anisotropic effects of eddy viscosity. Secondary flow calculations have been also performed although the model seems to be too rough to predict the secondary flow correctly. Heat transfer calculations have been performed to confirm the importance of anisotropic viscosity in temperature predictions. All numerical calculations for flow and heat have been performed by two computer codes based on the TEACH code. Experimental measurements of the distribution of axial velocity, turbulent axial velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and radial Reynolds stresses were performed in the developing and fully developed regions. A 2-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer working on the Reference mode with forward scattering was used to perform the measurements in a simulated interior subchannel of a triangular rod array with P/D = 1.124. Comparisons between the analytical results and the results of this experiment as well as other experimental data in rod bundle array available in literature are presented. The predictions are in good agreement with the results for the high Reynolds numbers.

  4. Tracking bubble evolution inside a silicic dike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Okumura, Satoshi; Arzilli, Fabio; Borrajo, Javier; Recio, Clemente; Ban, Masao; Gonzalo, Juan C.; Benítez, José M.; Douglas, Madison; Sasaki, Osamu; Franco, Piedad; Gómez-Barreiro, Juan; Carnicero, Asunción

    2016-10-01

    Pressure estimates from rapidly erupted crustal xenoliths constrain the depth of intrusion of the silicic lavas hosting them. This represents an opportunity for tracking magmatic bubble's evolution and quantifying the variation in bubble volume during rapid magma ascent through a volcanic dike just prior to eruption. The petrology, stable-isotope geochemistry and X-ray micro-tomography of dacites containing crustal xenoliths, erupted from a Neogene volcano in SE Spain, showed an increase in porosity from ~ 1.7 to 6.4% from ~ 19 to 13 km depth, at nearly constant groundmass and crystal volumes. This result provides additional constraints for experimental and numerical simulations of subvolcanic magma-crust degassing processes in silicic systems, and may allow the characterization of volcanic eruptive styles based on volatile content.

  5. Recycle of silicate waste into mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2011-04-15

    Template synthesis of porous carbon materials usually requires selective removal of template silica from the carbon/silica composites. It not only involves waste of valuable chemicals, but also poses significant environmental concerns including high waste treatment cost. Recycling of silicates released from such nanocasting methods is successfully performed for the first time to regenerate valuable mesoporous MCM and SBA type silica materials, which will not only help in saving valuable chemicals, but also in decreasing chemical waste, contributing in improvement of our environmental standards. This approach can thus improve cost effectiveness for the mass production of nanostructured carbon and others utilizing silica directed nanocasting method by recycling otherwise silicate waste into highly desirable valuable mesoporous silica.

  6. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  7. Influences of calcium silicate on chemical forms and subcellular distribution of cadmium in Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Wu, Jingtao; Shen, Yong; Li, Yingwen; Zou, Bi; Tang, Yetao; Zhuang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in grain amaranths (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Cv. ‘K112’) grown in a Cd contaminated soil. Results showed that the dry weight and the photosynthetic pigments contents in grain amaranths increased significantly with the increasing doses of CS treatments, with the highest value found for the treatment of CS3 (1.65 g/kg). Compared with the control, application of CS4 (3.31 g/kg) significantly reduced Cd concentrations in the roots, stems and leaves of grain amaranths by 68%, 87% and 89%, respectively. At subcellular level, CS treatment resulted in redistribution of Cd, higher percentages of Cd in the chloroplast and soluble fractions in leaves of grain amaranths were found, while lower proportions of Cd were located at the cell wall of the leaves. The application of CS enhanced the proportions of pectate and protein integrated forms of Cd and decreased the percentages of water soluble Cd potentially associated with toxicity in grain amaranths. Changes of free Cd ions into inactive forms sequestered in subcellular compartments may indicate an important mechanism of CS for alleviating Cd toxicity and accumulation in plants.

  8. Submarine silicic volcanism: Processes and products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kalangutkar, N.G.; Iyer, S.D.

    and these are supported by several experimental studies (Annen et al., 2006). A silicic calc-alkalic magma can form by differentiation from a more mafic parent magma and by crustal anatexis. Several evidences show the origin of some rhyolitic and andesitic magma... to be related due to similar tectonic settings. Fractional crystallisation: This process produces a series of residual liquids of variable compositions as compared to their parental magmas and is best explained by the Bowen’s reaction principle (Bowen, 1922...

  9. Six White Dwarfs with Circumstellar Silicates

    CERN Document Server

    Jura, M; Zuckerman, B

    2008-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope spectra reveal 10 micron silicate emission from circumstellar dust orbiting six externally-polluted white dwarfs. Micron-size glasses with an olivine stoichiometry can account for the distinctively broad wings that extend to 12 microns; these particles likely are produced by tidal-disruption of asteroids. The absence of infrared PAH features is consistent with a scenario where extrasolar rocky planets are assembled from carbon-poor solids.

  10. High Pressure Response of Siliceous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    BOROFLOAT (borosilicate) SCHOTT X Air & Tin X X Air & Tin Fe-containing soda lime silicate Dulles Glass and Mirror X Air & Tin X Air & Tin Opal...hydrated silica) Excalibur Mineral Corporation X X Glass Ceramic ROBAX SCHOTT X X X Single Crystal Ceramic α-Quartz Jim Coleman Crystal...examined in this study conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Army TARDEC. Some were glasses (fused silica or fused

  11. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  12. The influence of grain size, grain color, and suspended-sediment concentration on light attenuation: why fine-grained terrestrial sediment is bad for coral reef ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Norris, Benjamin; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Sediment has been shown to be a major stressor to coral reefs globally. Although many researchers have tested the impact of sedimentation on coral reef ecosystems in both the laboratory and the field and some have measured the impact of suspended sediment on the photosynthetic response of corals, there has yet to be a detailed investigation on how properties of the sediment itself can affect light availability for photosynthesis. We show that finer-grained and darker-colored sediment at higher suspended-sediment concentrations attenuates photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) significantly more than coarser, lighter-colored sediment at lower concentrations and provide PAR attenuation coefficients for various grain sizes, colors, and suspended-sediment concentrations that are needed for biophysical modeling. Because finer-grained sediment particles settle more slowly and are more susceptible to resuspension, they remain in the water column longer, thus causing greater net impact by reducing light essential for photosynthesis over a greater duration. This indicates that coral reef monitoring studies investigating sediment impacts should concentrate on measuring fine-grained lateritic and volcanic soils, as opposed to coarser-grained siliceous and carbonate sediment. Similarly, coastal restoration efforts and engineering solutions addressing long-term coral reef ecosystem health should focus on preferentially retaining those fine-grained soils rather than coarse silt and sand particles.

  13. Clinical and angiographic outcomes after intracoronary bare-metal stenting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chang Hsieh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Data from a large patient population regarding very long-term outcomes after BMS implantation are inadequate. This study aimed to evaluate the very long-term (8-17 years clinical and long-term (3-5 years angiographic outcomes after intracoronary bare-metal stenting (BMS. METHODS AND RESULTS: From the Cardiovascular Atherosclerosis and Percutaneous TrAnsluminal INterventions (CAPTAIN registry, a total of 2391 patients with 2966 lesions treated with 3190 BMSs between November 1995 and May 2004 were evaluated. In total, 1898 patients with 2364 lesions, and 699 patients with 861 lesions underwent 6-month and 3- to 5- year angiographic follow-up, respectively. During a mean follow-up period of 149 ± 51 months, 18.6% of the patients died (including 10.8% due to cardiac death, 6.1% developed reinfarction, 16.2% had target lesion revascularization (including 81% of the patients within the first year, 14.5% underwent new lesion stenting (including 72% of the patients after 3 years, 2.4% underwent coronary bypass surgery, and 1.6% had definite stent thrombosis. The overall cardiovascular event-free survival rate was 58.5%. The 6-month angiographic study indicated a 20% restenosis rate. The minimal luminal diameter increased from 0.65 ± 0.44 mm to 3.02 ± 0.46 mm immediately after stenting, decreased to 2.06 ± 0.77 mm at the 6-month follow-up, and increased to 2.27 ± 0.68 mm at the 3- to 5-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides clinical and angiographic results from a large population of patients who underwent BMS implantations after a long-term follow-up period (149 ± 51 months. The progression of coronary atherosclerosis developed over time, and presented with new lesion required stent implantation. The follow-up angiographic findings reconfirmed the late and sustained improvement in luminal diameter between 6 months and 3-5 years.

  14. Nuda vida y goce. // Bare life and jouissance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view that connects politics and psychoanalysis, the aim of this essay is to investigate the causes of the annihilation of the subject in the totalitarian regimes, making him a victim of power, reduced to a bare life. This question leads us to analyze the jouissance within the frame of a regime that proposes the unification of a universal jouissance. These questions are considered to be relevant in the field that makes possible the intersection between politics and subjectivity. The direct proposal of this essay is related to thought, by trying to bring thought into play, in conjunction with the concepts of jouissance and the annihilation of the subject in the totalitarian regimes. It deals with the articulation between thought and jouissance and uses these ideas like conceptual tools, with the aim of considering the subjectivity of the time. // Desde el punto de vista que relaciona la política con el psicoanálisis, la propuesta de este ensayo trata de interrogar qué produce la aniquilación del sujeto en los regímenes totalitarios, al convertirlo en víctimas del poder, reducido a nuda vida. Este cuestionamiento nos conduce a preguntarnos sobre el goce en el marco de un régimen que propone la unificación de un goce universal. Consideramos pertinentes estos cuestionamientos en la vertiente que posibilita el cruce entre política y subjetividad. La propuesta expresa de este ensayo se relaciona con el pensar; con la posibilidad de recuperar una reflexión sobre el pensar, tratando de ponerlo en escena, en conjunción con el goce y la aniquilación del sujeto en los regímenes totalitarios. Se trata de una articulación entre pensar y goce y toma estas nociones como herramientas conceptuales, en el interés por considerar la subjetividad de la época.

  15. Olivine and Pyroxene Compositions in Fine-Grained Chondritic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Frank, D.

    2011-01-01

    Our analyses of the Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust Mission have illuminated critical gaps in our understanding of related astromaterials. There is a very large database of olivine and low-calcium pyroxene compositions for coarse-grained components of chondrites, but a sparse database for anhydrous silicate matrix phases. In an accompanying figure, we present comparisons of Wild-2 olivine with the available chondrite matrix olivine major element data. We thus have begun a long-term project measuring minor as well as major element compositions for chondrite matrix and chondritic IDPs, and Wild 2 grains. Finally, we wish to re-investigate the changes to fine-grained olivine and low-Ca pyroxene composition with progressive thermal metamorphism. We have examined the LL3-4 chondrites which because of the Hayabusa Mission have become very interesting.

  16. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  17. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  18. Paleomagnetism and Mineralogy of Unusual Silicate Glasses and Baked Soils on the Surface of the Atacama Desert of Northern Chile: A Major Airburst Impact ~12ka ago?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, P. J.; Blanco, N.; Valenzuela, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Devouard, B.; Lorand, J. P.; Tomlinson, A. J.; Arriagada, C.; Rochette, P.

    2015-12-01

    Unusual silicate glasses were found in northern Chile in one of the driest place on earth, the Atacama Desert. The scoria-type melted rocks are littered on the ground at several localities distributed along a longitudinal band of about 50km. The silicate glasses have a stable natural remanent magnetization carried by fine-grained magnetite and acquired during cooling. At one locality, fine-grained overbank sediments were heated to form a 10 to 20 cm-thick layer of brick-type samples. Magnetic experiments on oriented samples demonstrate that the baked clays record a thermoremanent magnetization acquired in situ above 600°C down to more than 10cm depth and cooled under a normal polarity geomagnetic field with a paleointensity of 40μT. In some samples of the silicate glass, large grains of iron sulphides (troilite) are found in the glass matrix with numerous droplets of native iron, iron sulphides and iron phosphides indicating high temperature and strong redox conditions during melting. The paleomagnetic record of the baked clays and the unusual mineralogy of the silicate glasses indicate a formation mainly by in situ high temperature radiation. Paleomagnetic experiments and chemical analyses indicate that the silicate glasses are not fulgurite type rocks due to lightning events, nor volcanic glasses or even metallurgical slags related to mining activity. The existence of a well-developped baked clay layer indicates that the silicate glasses are not impact-related ejectas. The field, paleomagnetic and mineralogical observations support evidence for a thermal event likely related to a major airburst. The youngest calibrated 14C age on a charcoal sample closely associated with the glass indicates that the thermal event occurred around 12 to 13 ka BP. The good conservation of the surface effects of this thermal event in the Atacama Desert could provide a good opportunity to further estimate the threats posed by large asteroid airbursts.

  19. Aligned submicron grains in archeological potteries with high TRM anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, K.; Ooga, M.; Isobe, H.

    2010-12-01

    Potteries have been often used to obtain archeointensity data because of the extremely high success rates in Thellier experiments. Since high anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) are commonly observed for potteries, anisotropy correction is routinely applied to make archeointensity data reliable. Such a TRM anisotropy is characterized by the foliated structure parallel to the surface and has been interpreted to reflect aligned magnetic minerals during molding. However, the high thermal stability and the higher degrees of TRM anisotropies than those of low-field susceptibility suggest that pottery TRM resides in fine-grained magnetic minerals formed during firing. Molding is not sufficient to explain highly anisotropic TRM of potteries. We measured TRM susceptibility tensors on potteries manufactured from 14th to 17th centuries in Japan. These potteries were fired up to about 1200°C resulting in partial vitrification. The ratios of maximum and minimum eigenvalues of the TRM susceptibility tensors are well distributed and reaches 1.8 for most anisotropic samples. The Curie temperature ranges from 500°C to 550°C implying titanium-poor titanomagnetite as TRM carriers, and the narrow unblocking temperature indicates that the low-titanium titanomagnetites are in or close to the single-domain size range. Submicron titanomagnetite grains were commonly observed on the polished sections under a FE-SEM. Some of the grains occur as inclusions in iron-bearing silicates such as pyroxene or hornblende, and other grains reside in glass matrix. In addition, vesiculated clay minerals contain highly elongated titanomagnetite grains. Such clay minerals seem stretched parallel to the pottery surface and inside titanomagnetite grains are also elongated along the surface. Relative abundance of titanomagnetite inclusions in silicates or glass against in clay minerals should control the degree of TRM anisotropy. Foliated TRM anisotropies originate from both alignment of clay

  20. CONCURRENT FORMATION OF CARBON AND SILICATE DUST IN NOVA V1280 SCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakon, Itsuki; Onaka, Takashi; Usui, Fumihiko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate Schools of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sako, Shigeyuki; Takahashi, Hidenori; Ohsawa, Ryou [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Ohsawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Nozawa, Takaya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kimura, Yuki [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Fujiyoshi, Takuya [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Shimonishi, Takashi [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki aza Aoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Arai, Akira [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto, 603-8555 (Japan); Uemura, Makoto [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nagayama, Takahiro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Koo, Bon-Chul [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University , 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: isakon@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    We present infrared multi-epoch observations of the dust-forming nova V1280 Sco over ∼2000 days from the outburst. The temporal evolution of the infrared spectral energy distributions at 1272, 1616, and 1947 days can be explained by the emissions produced by amorphous carbon dust of mass (6.6–8.7) × 10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} with a representative grain size of 0.01 μm and astronomical silicate dust of mass (3.4–4.3) × 10{sup −7} M{sub ⊙} with a representative grain size of 0.3–0.5 μm. Both of these dust species travel farther away from the white dwarf without apparent mass evolution throughout those later epochs. The dust formation scenario around V1280 Sco suggested from our analyses is that the amorphous carbon dust is formed in the nova ejecta followed by the formation of silicate dust either in the expanding nova ejecta or as a result of the interaction between the nova wind and the circumstellar medium.

  1. Against the Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Ole

    2016-01-01

    Katalog-tekst til udstillingen Against the Grain om atomar-fotografi og det antropocæne. Kurateret af Peter Ole Pedersen på Galleri Image, august-oktober 2016.......Katalog-tekst til udstillingen Against the Grain om atomar-fotografi og det antropocæne. Kurateret af Peter Ole Pedersen på Galleri Image, august-oktober 2016....

  2. Temperature spectra of interstellar dust grains heated by cosmic-rays I: translucent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-01-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas-grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating $f_T$, s$^{-1}$, determines how often a certain temperature $T_{\\rm CR}$, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with comprehensive and updated dataset on the CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of $f_T$ and $T_{\\rm CR}$ spectra for bare olivine grains with radius $a$ of 0.05; 0.1; 0.2 $\\mu$m, and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1$a$ and 0.3$a$. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with $A_V=2$ mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the SRIM program. We report full $T_{\\rm CR}$ spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain te...

  3. GrainSpotter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for indexing multigrain diffraction data is presented. It is based on the use of a monochromatic beam simultaneously illuminating all grains. By operating in sub-volumes of Rodrigues space, a powerful vertex-finding algorithm can be applied, with a running time that is compatible...... with online analysis. The resulting program, GrainSpotter, is sufficiently fast to enable online analysis during synchrotron sessions. The program applies outlier rejection schemes, leading to more robust and accurate data. By simulations it is shown that several thousand grains can be retrieved. A new method...... to derive partial symmetries, called pseudo-twins, is introduced. Uniquely, GrainSpotter includes an analysis of pseudo-twins, which is shown to be critical to avoid erroneous grains resulting from the indexing....

  4. Physics of Grain Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2000-01-01

    Aligned grains provide one of the easiest ways to study magnetic fields in diffuse gas and molecular clouds. How reliable our conclusions about the inferred magnetic field depends critically on our understanding of the physics of grain alignment. Although grain alignment is a problem of half a century standing recent progress achieved in the field makes us believe that we are approaching the solution of this mystery. I review basic physical processes involved in grain alignment and show why mechanisms that were favored for decades do not look so promising right now. I also discuss why the radiative torque mechanism ignored for more than 20 years looks right now the most powerful means of grain alignment.

  5. Ionic Segregation on Grain Boundaries in Thermally Grown Alumina Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study first examined segregation behaviour in the alumina scale formed after 100 h at 1100 C on bare and MCrAlYHfSi-coated single-crystal superalloys with {approx}10 ppma La and Y. For the bare superalloy, Hf and Ti were detected on the grain boundaries of the inner columnar alumina layer. Increasing the oxidation temperature to 1200 C for 2 h did not change the segregation behavior. With the bond coating, both Y and Hf were segregated to the grain boundaries as expected. However, there was evidence of Ti-rich oxide particles near the gas interface suggesting that Ti diffused from the superalloy through the coating. To further understand these segregation observations with multiple dopants, other alumina-forming systems were examined. Alumina scale grain boundary co-segregation of Ti with Y is common for FeCrAl alloys. Co-segregation of Hf and Ti was observed in the scale formed on co-doped NiAl. No La segregation was detected in the scale formed on NiCrAl with only a 19 ppma La addition, however, the scale was adherent.

  6. Nitridosilicates - a significant extension of silicate chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnick, W.; Huppertz, H. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Lab. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    1997-05-01

    A new dimension in silicate chemistry becomes accessible through substitution of oxygen by nitrogen. Multinary nitridosilicates, such as Ln{sub 3}Si{sub 6}N{sub 11} (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) shown on the right, are built up from SiN{sub 4} tetrahedra into network structures. Owing to the stability of the covalent Si-N bonds and the high degree of condensation, the nitridosilicates show remarkable chemical and thermal stabilities, similar to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. (orig.) 22 refs.

  7. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartzman, D. [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  8. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  9. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  10. Diagnostics of circumstellar grains in geometric models I: structure and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, J. H. P.; Greaves, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of circumstellar dust has been extensively used to diagnose the sizes and compositions of dust grains. We show that variations of SED slope in the long wavelength (submillimetre to radio) regime can be used to diagnose the gross physical nature (and hence origins) of the dust, using simple geometric models that complement the use of detailed simulations. We consider two dust grain types: (i) clustered aggregates of smaller particles (monomers), and (ii) composite grains comprising ferrous inclusions within a silicate matrix. These types are intended to be analogous to fluffy cometary particles and fragments of compacted asteroids, respectively. Our results indicate that clusters of silicate grains produce a smooth SED, while composite grains with FeS inclusions produce an SED that has a pronounced drop at a wavelength an order of magnitude larger than the grain size, and is flatter at long wavelengths. As a test case, we compare the model predictions to flux measurements of the TW Hydrae disc. This SED shows a drop that only occurs in our models of compacted grains with inclusions. Since the TW Hya discs spans approximately 10-40 AU in radius, fluffy particles from comets were perhaps expected, as in the Sun's Kuiper belt.

  11. Modeling IR Spectral Energy Distributions: A Pilot Study of Starburst Parameters and Silicate Absorption Curves for Some GOALS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Kewley, Lisa J; Rich, Jeff A; Sanders, Dave; Appleton, Phillip N; Chan, Ben H P; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Evans, Aaron S; Frayer, David T; Howell, Justin H; Inami, Hanae; Mazzarella, Joseph A; Petric, Andreea; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study into the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting and the derivation of physical parameters for 19 galaxies observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) survey as observed with the \\emph{Spitzer Space Telescope}. For this we have used the pan-spectral fitting tools developed in a series of papers by Dopita and his co-workers. We show that the standard Lee and Draine `astronomical silicate' model cannot provide a good fit to the silicate absorption features as observed in the heavily dust-extinguished ($A_{\\rm V} \\sim 50$mag.) starbursts. We have derived an empirical fit to the `starburst silicate' absorption in these objects. This absorption curve is consistent with the silicate grains being systematically larger in starburst environments than in the local Galactic interstellar medium. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the SED fitting to each of the fitted parameters, and derive these parameters for those galaxies which do not have an embedded AG...

  12. Mineralogy and trace element chemistry of the Siliceous Earth of Barmer basin, Rajasthan: Evidence for a volcanic origin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Sisodia; U K Singh; G Lashkari; P N Shukla; A D Shukla; N Bhandari

    2005-04-01

    We report the presence of a 3-5 cm thick loose fragmental layer in the Siliceous Earth at Matti ka Gol in the Barmer basin of Rajasthan. Petrographic, chemical and mineralogical study reveals the presence of abundant volcanic debris such as glass shards, agglutinates, hollow spheroids, kinked biotites, feldspars showing oscillatory zoning, olivines, ilmenite and native iron. The presence of similar particles in the whole section suggests that the Siliceous Earth is a volcanic ash. Stratigraphic correlation, palynological and microvertebrate data suggest that the Siliceous Earth may have deposited over a short span of time during the Upper Cretaceous to Lower Palaeocene. In view of the possibility that this section may contain K/T impact debris, we looked for grains having impact signatures. Some patches of the Siliceous Earth of Bariyara show the presence of Ni-rich (< 0.5%) vesicular glasses, sanidine spherules, magnesioferrite crystals, soot, etc., but because of their low abundance, it is not possible to establish if they are volcanic, micrometeorite ablation products or a part of the K/T impact ejecta.

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography--Western Florida, Post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: Seamless (Bare Earth and Submerged)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless (bare-earth and submerged) elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, was...

  14. 2010 USGS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana (Bare-Earth)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A bare-earth digital elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, was produced from remotely...

  15. Galvanic effects on electrochemical behaviors of bare surface of 304 stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The bare surface of 304 stainless steel is produced by the fast fracture method. The influence of the surfacegalvanic cell on the electrochemical behaviors of bare surface of 304 stainless steel has been investigated in H2SO4 solutionswith different concentrations. The results show that the solution corrosivity level and the area ratio influence the surfacegalvanic effects caused by the inhomogeneity between the free-film surface of alloy and the passive surface. The surfacegalvanic effects can speed up the dissolution rate of the bare surface of the alloy and will change the electrochemical behav-ior of bare surface. With the increase of the area ratio between passive surface and fractured surface, the galvanic potentialbecomes more positive and, in the range of passive potential, both galvanic current and the peak fracture current increase

  16. EAARL Coastal Topography--Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Virginia and Maryland was produced from...

  17. Assessing the adequacy of the bare optical potential in near-barrier fusion calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, L.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, CP 68528, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto de Fisica, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil); Hussein, M.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Estudos Avancados, C. P. 72012, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C. P. 66318, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lotti, P. [INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    We critically examine the differences among the different bare nuclear interactions used in near-barrier heavy-ion fusion analysis and coupled-channels calculations, and discuss the possibility of extracting the barrier parameters of the bare potential from above-barrier data. We show that the choice of the bare potential may be critical for the analysis of the fusion cross sections. Although this may seem trivial, several recent papers use different bare potentials and reach different conclusions, especially when weakly bound systems are considered and possible relatively small fusion cross section enhancements or suppressions are found. We show also that the barrier parameters taken from above-barrier data may be very wrong. (orig.)

  18. LiDAR Derived Bare Earth Digital Elevation Model: Camas National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset represents the Camas National Wildlife Refuge survey area in Jefferson and Clark County, ID. This bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) represent the...

  19. LiDAR Derived Bare Earth Digital Elevation Model: Camas National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset represents the Camas National Wildlife Refuge survey area in Jefferson and Clark County, ID. This bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) represent...

  20. EAARL Coastal Topography--Eastern Florida, Post-Hurricane Frances, 2004: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth digital elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the eastern Florida coastline was produced from remotely sensed,...

  1. Biolimus-eluting stents with biodegradable polymer versus bare-metal stents in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räber, Lorenz; Kelbæk, Henning; Taniwaki, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study sought to determine whether the 1-year differences in major adverse cardiac event between a stent eluting biolimus from a biodegradable polymer and bare-metal stents (BMSs) in the COMFORTABLE trial (Comparison of Biolimus Eluted From an Erodible Stent Coating With Bare Meta...... to improve cardiovascular events compared with BMS beyond 1 year. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NTC00962416....

  2. Stability of foams in silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Kutolin, Vladislav A.

    1993-12-01

    Bubble coalescence and the spontaneous disruption of high-porosity foams in silicate melts are the result of physical expulsion of interpore melt (syneresis) leading to bubble coalescence, and diffusive gas exchange between bubbles. Melt expulsion can be achieved either along films between pairs of bubbles, or along Plateau borders which represent the contacts between 3 or more bubbles. Theoretical evaluation of these mechanisms is confirmed by experimental results, enabling us to quantify the relevant parameters and determine stable bubble size and critical film thickness in a foam as a function of melt viscosity, surface tension, and time. Foam stability is controlled primarily by melt viscosity and time. Melt transport leading to coalescence of bubbles proceeds along inter-bubble films for smaller bubbles, and along Plateau borders for larger bubbles. Thus the average bubble size accelerates with time. In silicate melts, the diffusive gas expulsion out of a region of foam is effective only for water (and even then, only at small length scales), as the diffusion of CO 2 is negligible. The results of our analyses are applicable to studies of vesicularity of lavas, melt degassing, and eruption mechanisms.

  3. Silicate mineralogy at the surface of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed geochemical diversity across Mercury's volcanic crust. Near-infrared to ultraviolet spectra and images have provided evidence for the Fe2+-poor nature of silicate minerals, magnesium sulfide minerals in hollows and a darkening component attributed to graphite, but existing spectral data is insufficient to build a mineralogical map for the planet. Here we investigate the mineralogical variability of silicates in Mercury's crust using crystallization experiments on magmas with compositions and under reducing conditions expected for Mercury. We find a common crystallization sequence consisting of olivine, plagioclase, pyroxenes and tridymite for all magmas tested. Depending on the cooling rate, we suggest that lavas on Mercury are either fully crystallized or made of a glassy matrix with phenocrysts. Combining the experimental results with geochemical mapping, we can identify several mineralogical provinces: the Northern Volcanic Plains and Smooth Plains, dominated by plagioclase, the High-Mg province, strongly dominated by forsterite, and the Intermediate Plains, comprised of forsterite, plagioclase and enstatite. This implies a temporal evolution of the mineralogy from the oldest lavas, dominated by mafic minerals, to the youngest lavas, dominated by plagioclase, consistent with progressive shallowing and decreasing degree of mantle melting over time.

  4. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...... required days-weeks, both reactions probably being diffusion controlled. Applying the values for specific surface area and site densities for ferrihydrite used by Dzombak & Morel (1990) (600 m2 g-1, 3.4 mumole m-2) the constants pK(al)intr 6.93 +/- 0.12, pK(a2)intr = 8.72 +/- 0.17 and log K(Si) = 3.62 were...

  5. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Grain Boundary Complexions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    theories of grain boundary adsorption were based on the McLean model, which assumes that segregation is constrained to a monolayer of atomic sites at the...New York: McGraw- Hill ; 1956. [58] de Boer JH. The dynamical character of adsorption . London: Oxford University Press; 1953. [59] McLean D. Grain...Overview No. 152 Grain boundary complexions Patrick R. Cantwell a, Ming Tang b,1, Shen J. Dillon c, Jian Luo d, Gregory S . Rohrer e, Martin P. Harmer

  7. Folding of Pollen Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katifori, Eleni; Alben, Silas; Cerda, Enrique; Nelson, David; Dumais, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    At dehiscence, which occurs when the anther reaches maturity and opens, pollen grains dehydrate and their volume is reduced. The pollen wall deforms to accommodate the volume loss, and the deformation pathway depends on the initial turgid pollen grain geometry and the mechanical properties of the pollen wall. We demonstrate, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, that the design of the apertures (areas on the pollen wall where the stretching and the bending modulus are reduced) is critical for controlling the folding pattern, and ensures the pollen grain viability. An excellent fit to the experiments is obtained using a discretized version of the theory of thin elastic shells.

  8. Manipulating plant geometry to improve microclimate, grain yield, and harvest index in grain sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob A.; Xue, Qingwu; Chen, Yuanquan

    2017-01-01

    Cultivar selection, planting geometry, and plant population are the key factors determining grain sorghum yields in water deficit areas. The objective of this study was to investigate whether clump geometry (three plants clustered) improves microclimate within crop canopy when plants are grown under varying water levels. In a 2-yr sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) greenhouse study, plants were grown at two geometries (clump and conventional evenly spaced planting, ESP), two water levels (high and low, representing well-watered and water-limited condition, respectively), and three soil surface treatments (lid covered, straw-mulched, and bare). Air temperature and relative humidity (RH) within the plant canopy were measured every five minutes at different growth stages. Mean vapor pressure deficits (VPDs) within the clumps were consistently lower than those for ESPs, indicating that clumps improved the microclimate. Clumps had significantly higher harvest index (HI) compared to ESPs (0.48 vs. 0.43), which was largely due to clumps having an average of 0.4 tillers per plant compared to 1.2 tillers per plant for ESPs. Grain yield in the current study was similar between clumps and ESPs. However, our results suggest that improved microclimate was likely a reason for clumps producing significantly higher grain yields compared to ESPs in previous studies. PMID:28264051

  9. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DEBRIS DISK CATALOG. II. SILICATE FEATURE ANALYSIS OF UNRESOLVED TARGETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Tushar [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States); Chen, Christine H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jang-Condell, Hannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Sargent, Benjamin A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, Dan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Lisse, Carey M., E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, astronomers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates that have been compiled in the Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog. We have discovered 10 and/or 20 μm silicate emission features toward 120 targets in the catalog and modeled the IRS spectra of these sources, consistent with MIPS 70 μm observations, assuming that the grains are composed of silicates (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) and are located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. For systems better fit by the continuous disk model, we find that (1) the dust size distribution power-law index is consistent with that expected from a collisional cascade, q = 3.5-4.0, with a large number of values outside this range, and (2) the minimum grain size, a {sub min}, increases with stellar luminosity, L {sub *}, but the dependence of a {sub min} on L {sub *} is weaker than expected from radiation pressure alone. In addition, we also find that (3) the crystalline fraction of dust in debris disks evolves as a function of time with a large dispersion in crystalline fractions for stars of any particular stellar age or mass, (4) the disk inner edge is correlated with host star mass, and (5) there exists substantial variation in the properties of coeval disks in Sco-Cen, indicating that the observed variation is probably due to stochasticity and diversity in planet formation.

  10. Micro-zoning in minerals of a Landes silicate inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhour, D. D.; Buseck, P. R.; Palme, H.; Zipfel, J.

    1993-01-01

    There is an increasing number of meteorites with chondritic bulk composition but completely different textures than the conventional chondrite groups. Winonaites, Acapulcoites and silicate inclusions in IAB-iron meteorites have in common coarse grain size, highly equilibrated mineralogy with frequent 120 deg triple junctions and they record a significantly lower degree of oxidation than ordinary chondrites. They all have equilibration temperatures, based on Ca-exchange among pyroxenes, of around 900 to 1100 deg C. However, on cooling disequilibrium features may develop: (1) Olivine in IAB-inclusions has lower Fa-content than equilibrium Fs-content of pyroxenes requires; (2) CaO-zoning in olivine was established at temperatures of around 500 deg C, several hundred degrees below pyroxene equilibration temperatures. Obviously, olivine responded faster to changes in fO2 (Fa in olivine) and temperature (Ca-zoning) than pyroxenes. Differences in diffusion coefficients can readily explain the observed trends. Here we report on much more subtle zoning features in pyroxenes. TEM-observations reveal large compositional gradients in Ca, Na, Cr, Ti and Fe within the first micrometer of cpx and opx crystals. In summary, the data reflect the complicated subsolidus history of a chondritic mineral assemblage that was in thermodynamic equilibrium at about 900 deg C and cooled slowly from this temperature whereby oxidation reactions and different closure temperatures for various minerals and elements played an important role. The oxidation of P dissolved in metal and formation of phosphate, which is thermodynamically stable at low temperatures, is suggested to be responsible for most of the observed zoning.

  11. Extraction of two kinds of bare lands around cities and its significance to city development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.; Yue, Y. M.; Liu, Bo; Zhang, X.; Tian, X.

    2014-05-01

    In china, especially in the North and Northwest, many cities suffer sand-dust or sand-storm attacks in winter and spring. There are two sand sources forming the bad weather, local sand source and other source out of local area. The second kind source needs state level activities to control sand movement and recover local ecological environment. For the local government, it should pay much attention to decreasing its inner sand & dust source, because the sand-stormy or sand-dusty weather causing by the local sand source usually comes abruptly and brings much damage frequently, and it is also hard to forecast it. However, people always emphasize all-year bare land controlling and pay less attention to seasonal bare land (especially in winter and spring seasons) which caused by unreasonable agricultural pattern. In this paper, taking Beijing as the test area, using MODIS vegetation index time-series data, all-year and seasonal bare land had been classified. The data set used was 16-day composited EVI time-series with a 250m spatial resolution. After filtered and reconstructed, this paper applied the parallelepiped classification algorithm to the data set, and emphasized the all-year bare land with lower EVI value and seasonal bare land with lower EVI value just in spring and winter. Taking accord of local terrain, infield was the main part of seasonal bare land. The experiment result showed that all-year bare land mainly distributes in northwest Beijing, the joint area of Beijing, Shanxi and Inner Mongolia, especially in Inner Mongolia. Seasonal bare land mainly distributes in northwest and west Beijing, gathering in northwest Hebei, east Shanxi; there are also some ones in Daxing, fangshan, changpin, yanqing, miyun, shunyi, and tongzhou areas of Beijing. These two kind bare lands were all possible contributor to sand storm or sand dust weather in Beijing. Considering wind direction and terrain information of Beijing area, some possible sand source could be found

  12. Silicate Adsorption in Paddy Soils of Guangdong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Li-Yuan; LI Hua-Xing; ZHANG Xin-Ming; LU Wei-Sheng; LIU Yuan-Jin

    2006-01-01

    Silicate adsorption in eight paddy soils developed from four different parent materials in Guangdong Province, China was examined to obtain fundamental knowledge of silicate adsorption to improve the efficacy of silicate fertilizer use in these areas. A correlation analysis showed that silicate adsorption did not obey the Langmuir equation (r = -0.664-0.301) but did obey the Freundlich and Temkin equations (P ≤ 0.01, r = 0.885-0.990). When the equilibrium silicate concentration (Ci) was less than 45 mg SiO2 kg-1, the adsorption capacity was in the following decreasing order of paddy soils: basalt-derived > Pearl River Delta sediment-derived > granite-derived > sand-shale-derived. Stepwise regression and path analysis showed that for the investigated paddy soils amorphous MnO and Al2O3 were the two most important materials that affected silicate adsorption. Moreover, as Ci increased, amorphous Al2O3 tended to play a more important role in silicate adsorption, while the effects of amorphous MnO on silicate adsorption tended to decrease.

  13. Crystalline silicates in AGB and post-AGB stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, LBFM; Molster, FJ; LeBertre, T; Lebre, A; Waelkens, C

    1999-01-01

    We discuss ISO spectroscopy of oxygen-rich dust shells surrounding evolved stars. The dust that condenses in the outflows of stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch consists mainly of amorphous silicates and simple oxides. For high mass loss rates, crystalline silicates begin to appear at modest abunda

  14. Subglacial Silicic Eruptions: Wet Cavities and Moist Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J. A.; McGarvie, D. W.; Gilbert, J. S.; Smellie, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    Comparing the deposits of subglacial eruptions with those of subaerial and subaqueous eruptions enables the influence of magma-water-ice interactions to be explored. In this presentation, the Icelandic subglacial rhyolite tuyas of Kerlingarfjöll and Prestahnúkur are compared with subaerial and subaqueous rhyolite formations at Sierra La Primavera, México. Prestahnúkur formed by the subglacial lava effusion and thick lava flows with steep termini are products of confinement by ice walls. Basal deposits of perlitised obsidian lobes suggest a water-saturated environment, and the extremely abundant microvesicular lava blocks surrounding these lobes and throughout the edifice are broadly similar to the carapaces of silicic lava domes at La Primavera known to have a subaqueous origin. Although bedded and sorted deposits are present at Prestahnúkur, they are trivial compared to the thick and extensive caldera-lake deposits of La Primavera, which even contain a "giant pumice" marker bed formed by the lake-wide deposition of once-bouyant blocks. The Kerlingarfjöll rhyolite tuyas formed during explosive subglacial eruptions. The first-erupted material forms structureless beds of phreatomagmatically-fragmented ash; ash from subaqueous eruptions at La Primavera is similarly fine grained, but in contrast is well-bedded (due to lacustrine deposition). Later-erupted material at Kerlingarfjöll typically consists of massive unconsolidated lapilli-tuffs. The lapilli themselves are similar to those within the well-sorted subaerially-formed pumice cones La Primavera, however Kerlingarfjöll's lapilli- tuffs have grain-size characteristics of proximal pyroclastic flows. These observations suggest that although similar fragmentation mechanisms operated in both locations, transport and consequent sorting was limited at Kerlingarfjöll. The different products of the two Icelandic subglacial tuyas are related to their different eruption rates and magma volatile contents. Melting of

  15. Optical Properties of Iron Silicates in the Infrared to Millimeter as a Function of Wavelength and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C. R.; Kinzer, R. E.; Cataldo, G.; Wollack, E. J.; Nuth, J. A.; Benford, D. J.; Silverberg, R. F.; Rinhart, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques program utilizes multiple instruments to provide spectral data over a wide range of temperatures and wavelengths. Experimental methods include Vector Network Analyzer and Fourier transform spectroscopy transmission, and reflection/scattering measurements. From this data, we can determine the optical parameters for the index of refraction, n, and the absorption coefficient, k. The analysis of the laboratory transmittance data for each sample type is based upon different mathematical models, which are applied to each data set according to their degree of coherence. Presented here are results from iron silicate dust grain analogs, in several sample preparations and at temperatures ranging from 5 to 300 K, across the infrared and millimeter portion of the spectrum (from 2.5 to 10,000/micron or 4000 to 1/cm).

  16. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  17. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  18. Organic modification of layered silicates. Structural and thermal characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, L.A.S. de A.; Schulte, K. [Polymer Composites, Denickstrasse 15, TU Hamburg-Harburg, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany); Karthikeyan, C.S.; Nunes, S.P. [Institute of Chemistry, GKSS Research Centre, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); De Torriani, Iris L. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitaria Zeferino Vaz, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2005-05-01

    Organic modification of natural and synthetic layered silicates namely montmorillonite and laponite is reported in this work. The modified silicates are being subsequently used in the preparation of nano-composite membranes based on ionomers for fuel cells application. Laponite, an entirely synthetic silicate, was modified using organosiloxanes containing imidazole groups. Two different strategies were adopted for modification: (a) swelling of the silicate in 2-butanone followed by functionalization using the siloxane at room temperature, (b) direct reaction between laponite and the organosiloxane in xylene at 120{sup o}C. Montmorillonite, a natural silicate, was supplied in the alkyl-ammonium form containing -OH groups. The modification of this silicate was conducted following the procedure (b). The structures of both plain and modified silicates were investigated by XRD showing that the interlayer distance (around 17A) was not affected during the functionalization of laponite. However, a noticeable increase in the interlayer distance from 18.0A to 24.5A was observed for the modified montmorillonite. This clearly shows the presence of polysiloxane chains in between the silicate layers. Further characterization showed that the modification of these silicates was in the range between 16% and 23% (molar percentage). TGA was done between 25 and 300{sup o}C in order to study the thermal degradation pattern of the silicates. The amount of adsorbed water could be determined from the results. The functionalization reduced the adsorption of water from 13.5% to 6.8% for laponite and from 8.5% to 4% for montmorillonite.

  19. Disordered Silicates in Space: a Study of Laboratory Spectra of "Amorphous" Silicates

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, Angela K; Hofmeister, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory study of silicate glasses of astrophysically relevant compositions including olivines, pyroxenes and melilites. With emphasis on the classic Si-O stretching feature near 10 microns, we compare infrared spectra of our new samples with laboratory spectra on ostensibly similar compositions, and also with synthetic silicate spectral data commonly used in dust modeling. Several different factors affect spectral features including sample chemistry (e.g., polymerization, Mg/Fe ratio, oxidation state and Al-content) and different sample preparation techniques lead to variations in porosity, density and water content. The convolution of chemical and physical effects makes it difficult to attribute changes in spectral parameters to any given variable. It is important that detailed chemical and structural characterization be provided along with laboratory spectra. In addition to composition and density, we measured the glass transition temperatures for the samples which place upper limits on the ...

  20. Étude des modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouzri, A.; Dorbez-Sridi, R.; Oumezzine, M.

    2004-11-01

    Les modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice en poudre en fonction du taux d'hydratation sont étudiées par calorimétrie différentielle à balayage et par diffusion des rayons X. L'analyse thermique par DSC a permis de montrer que pour les faibles taux d'hydratation (≤ 50%) l'eau est complètement confinée dans les pores alors que pour les forts taux d'hydratation (>50%) l'eau se trouve aussi bien dans les pores qu'autour des grains de la silice. L'apparition de la glace cubique lors du refroidissement de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice prouve que l'interaction eau-silice ne peut être négligée lors de la détermination du signal de l'eau. L'extraction du signal, diffusé uniquement par l'eau confinée, à partir des intensités diffusées par le gel de silice à deux taux d'hydratation distincts, révèle dans les fonctions de corrélation de paire un pic à 3.7Å qui ne peut être attribué qu'à une corrélation oxygène-oxygène inexistante dans l'eau massique et résultant de la déformation du réseau tétraédrique des molécules d'eau sous l'effet du confinement et de la proximité d'une surface.

  1. Widespread oxidized and hydrated amorphous silicates in CR chondrites matrices: Implications for alteration conditions and H2 degassing of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Changela, Hitesh G.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2015-06-01

    The CR chondrites carry one of the most pristine records of the solar nebula materials that accreted to form planetesimals. They have experienced very variable degrees of aqueous alteration, ranging from incipient alteration in their matrices to the complete hydration of all of their components. In order to constrain their chemical alteration pathways and the conditions of alteration, we have investigated the mineralogy and Fe oxidation state of silicates in the matrices of 8 CR chondrites, from type 3 to type 1. Fe-L edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was performed on matrix FIB sections using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio of submicron silicate particles was obtained and coordinated with TEM observations. In all the least altered CR chondrites (QUE 99177, EET 87770, EET 92042, LAP 02342, GRA 95229 and Renazzo), we find that the matrices consist of abundant submicron Fe-rich hydrated amorphous silicate grains, mixed with nanometer-sized phyllosilicates. The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratios of both amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are very high with values ranging from 68 to 78%. In the most altered samples (Al Rais and GRO 95577), fine-grained phyllosilicates also have a high Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio (around 70%), whereas the coarse, micrometer-sized phyllosilicates are less oxidized (down to 55%) and have a lower iron content. These observations suggest the following sequence: submicron Fe2+-amorphous silicate particles were the building blocks of CR matrices; after accretion they were quickly hydrated and oxidized, leading to a metastable, amorphous gel-like phase. Nucleation and growth of crystalline phyllosilicates was kinetically-limited in most type 3 and 2 CRs, but increased as alteration became more extensive in Al Rais and GRO 95577. The decreasing Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio is interpreted as a result of the transfer of Fe3+ from silicates to oxides during growth, while aqueous alteration progressed

  2. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z=0.89 Absorber Towards PKS 1830-211: Crystalline Silicates at High Redshift?

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Vladilo, Giovanni; Welty, Daniel E; Som, Debopam

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence of a >10-sigma detection of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of tau_10=0.27+/-0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources wit...

  3. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  4. Karst bare slope soil erosion and soil quality: a simulation case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Dai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence on soil erosion by different bedrock bareness ratios, different rainfall intensities, different underground pore fissure degrees and rainfall duration are researched through manual simulation of microrelief characteristics of karst bare slopes and underground karst crack construction in combination with artificial simulation of rainfall experiment. The results show that firstly, when the rainfall intensity is small (30 and 50 mm h−1, no bottom load loss is produced on the surface, and surface and underground runoff and sediment production is increased with the increasing of rainfall intensity; secondly, surface runoff and sediment production reduced with increased underground pore fissure degree, while underground runoff and sediment production increased; thirdly, raindrops hit the surface, forming a crust with rainfall duration. The formation of crusts increases surface runoff erosion and reduces soil infiltration rate. Increasing of surface runoff erosion damaged crust and increased soil seepage rate. Raindrops continued to hit the surface, leading the formation of crust. Soil permeability showed volatility which were from reduction to increases and reduction, and so on. Surface and subsurface runoff were volatility with rainfall duration; fourthly, when rock bareness ratio is 50% and rainfall intensities are 30 and 50 mm h−1, runoff is not produced on the surface, and the slope runoff and sediment production presents a fluctuating change with increased rock bareness ratio; fifthly, the correlation degree between the slope runoff and sediment production and all factors are as follows: rainfall intensity > rainfall duration > underground pore fissure degree > bed rock bareness ratio.

  5. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vladilo, Giovanni, E-mail: ALLERM@mailbox.sc.edu [Osservatorio Astonomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, 34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  6. A new model of composite interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Voshchinnikov, N V; Henning, T; Dubkova, D N; Henning, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The approach to model composite interstellar dust grains, using the exact solution to the light scattering problem for multi-layered spheres as suggested by Voshchinnikov & Mathis (1999), is further developed. Heterogeneous scatteres are represented by particles with very large number of shells, each including a homogeneous layer per material considered (amorphous carbon, astronomical silicate and vacuum). The applicability of the effective medium theory (EMT) mostly utilized earlier to approximate inhomogeneous interstellar grains is examined on the basis of the new model. It is shown that the EMT rules generally have an accuracy of several percent in the whole range of particle sizes provided the porosity does not exceed about 50%. For larger porosity, the EMT rules give wrong results. Using the model, we reanalyze various basic features of cosmic dust -- interstellar extinction, scattered radiation, infrared radiation, radiation pressure, etc. As an example of the potential of the model, it is applied ...

  7. Behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; ZHAO Zhuo; LIU Gui-hua; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; PENG Zhi-hong

    2005-01-01

    Using calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate as starting materials, two kinds of calcium silicate hydrates, CaO · SiO2 · H2O and 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2O, were hydro-thermally synthesized at 120 ℃. The reaction rule of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution was investigated. The result shows that CaO · SiO2 · H2O is more stable than 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2 O in aluminate solution and its stability increases with the increase of reaction temperature but decreases with the increase of caustic concentration. The reaction between calcium silicate hydrate and aluminate solution is mainly through two routes. In the first case, Al replaces partial Si in calcium silicate hydrate, meanwhile 3CaO · Al2 O3 · xSiO2 · (6-2x) H2 O (hydro-garnet) is formed and some SiO2 enters the solution. In the second case, calcium silicate hydrate can react directly with aluminate solution, forming hydro-garnet and Na2O · Al2O3 · 2SiO2 · nH2O (DSP). The desilication reaction of aluminate solution containing silicate could contribute partially to forming DSP.

  8. Deep ocean biogeochemistry of silicic acid and nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Simeon, J.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gruber, N.; Key, R. M.; Schlitzer, R.

    2007-03-01

    Observations of silicic acid and nitrate along the lower branch of the global conveyor belt circulation show that silicic acid accumulation by diatom opal dissolution occurs at 6.4 times the rate of nitrate addition by organic matter remineralization. The export of opal and organic matter from the surface ocean occurs at a Si:N mole ratio that is much smaller than this almost everywhere (cf. Sarmiento et al., 2004). The preferential increase of silicic acid over nitrate as the deep circulation progresses from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific is generally interpreted as requiring deep dissolution of opal together with shallow remineralization of organic matter (Broecker, 1991). However, Sarmiento et al. (2004) showed that the primary reason for the low silicic acid concentration of the upper ocean is that the waters feeding the main thermocline from the surface Southern Ocean are depleted in silicic acid relative to nitrate. By implication, the same Southern Ocean processes that deplete the silicic acid in the surface Southern Ocean must also be responsible for the enhanced silicic acid concentration of the deep ocean. We use observations and results from an updated version of the adjoint model of Schlitzer (2000) to confirm that this indeed the case.

  9. The Comparison of Bare Sclera and Rotational Flap Methods in Primary Pterygium Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bazazi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the comparison of Bare Sclera and Rotational Flap methods in primary pterygium surgery. This study was retrospective Cohort and studied population were 80 patients (40 patients in each group with primary pterygium in stage II and III operated in Hamadan Emam Khomeini hospital , during 2001-2003. All of the patients followed up 48 hours , 1 week , 1,3 and 6 months after operative surgery. In this study , complications and recurrences of both methods (Bare Sclera and Rotational Flap were compared and the results were as follows : Recurrence rate in Bare Sclera method was 22.5% and in rotational flap method 11.1% , that obtained no significant relationship between two groups. Also there was not significant difference in complications.

  10. Patches of bare ground as a staple commodity for declining ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael; Martinez, Nicolas; Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Maurer, Melanie L; Reichlin, Thomas S; Abadi, Fitsum; Zbinden, Niklaus; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2010-10-06

    Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart) inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30-70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds.

  11. X-ray photoelectron studies of the mechanism of iron silicate dissolution during weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Jacques; Berner, Robert A.

    1983-12-01

    Iron silicate minerals (bronzite, fayalite), exposed to aqueous dissolution in the laboratory for up to 60 days at room temperature and pH 1, 1.5, and 6, have been studied for evidence of changes in surface composition, using XPS, and these results compared with those obtained from solution chemical analysis. In the absence of dissolved O 2 or at low pH (1-1.5) dissolution proceeds congruently after the initial formation of a thin (occupation by Fe +2 of more weakly bonded M 2 sites. The behavior of the layer is similar to that found earlier on iron-free pyroxene ( SCHOTTet al., 1981); in other words, because of its thinness and instability it is not diffusion-inhibiting or protective toward dissolution. In the presence of dissolved O 2, as would be the case in most weathering solutions, dissolution of bronzite and fayalite results in the formation of two surface layers whose compositions were deduced by measurements of XPS binding energies. The outer layer, consisting of hydrous ferric oxide, is readily removed by ultrasonic cleaning and, most likely, is not protective toward dissolution. The inner layer consists of Fe +3 in a protonated or hydroxylated silicate (Mg-silicate in the case of bronzite) matrix. This layer appears to impede dissolution over the time scale of the experiment as attested to by parabolic dissolution rates. However, the layer does not continue to grow on the time scale of weathering because ultrasonically cleaned soil grains ( BERNER and SCHOTT, 1982) exhibit surface compositions similar to those found in the present month-long laboratory experiments. In other words, a thick, highly altered, diffusion-inhibiting, protective surface layer does not form at the acidic pH of most soils.

  12. Estimating Vegetation Height and Bare-Earth Topography from SRTM Data using Fourier Spectral Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Liu, D.; Alsdorf, D.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, LiDAR vegetation topography (bare-earth + vegetation height), LiDAR bare-earth topography, the National Elevation Data (NED) set, and Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission (SRTM) measurements are used to develop a statistical model to explore the possibility of extracting vegetation height measurements and accurate high resolution bare-earth topography from SRTM data. The key innovation is to obtain the statistical signature of the vegetation height measurements in the Fourier domain by taking advantage of the well-known linearity in additive properties of the Fourier transform. We demonstrate that the power-law relationship, P(k) α k^(-β), as shown by the bare-earth topography, breaks down approximately at a cross-over wavenumber, k=k_c, due to the vegetation height effect using four different topographic and vegetation study locations in the United States. We document that the vegetation effect mainly dominates the high-frequency contents of the vegetation topography from 2-180 m, 1-60 m, and 1-70 m for the South Fork Eel River, California; Flathead Lake, Montana; and Tenderfoot Creek, Montana, LiDAR data, respectively, and from 1-240 m for 30 m SRTM data for the Jesup, Georgia site. Finally, we demonstrate our ability to obtain a high resolution bare-earth topography with RMSE of 9.6 m, 2.2 m, and 2.9 m and vegetation height with RMSE of 11.0 m (11% error), 4.5 m (12% error), and 1.6 m (8% error) for LiDAR data study sites, whereas for the SRTM data, bare-earth topography and vegetation height are obtained with RMSE values of 5.4 m and 3.1 m, respectively, for the Jesup site. Model Vegetation height

  13. DDA Modeling for the Mid-IR Absorption of Irregularly Shaped Crystalline Forsterite Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sean; Wooden, D. H.; Kelley, M. S.; Harker, D. E.; Woodward, C. E.; Murphy, J.

    2010-10-01

    An analysis of the Spitzer IRS spectra of the Deep Impact ejecta of comet 9P/Tempel 1 (Wooden et al. 2010, 42nd DPS Meeting) in conjunction with the dynamics of the ejecta grains (Kelley et al. 2010, 42nd DPS Meeting) strongly suggests that ecliptic comets have comae dominated by large (> 10 - 20 micron in radii) porous grains with Mg-rich crystal inclusions. In fact, Kelley et al. (2010) conclude that many ecliptic comets may be dominated by such grains with a high crystalline fraction, approximately 40% by mass, despite their generally weak silicate emission feature. To date, no model for the optical properties in the mid-IR of multi-mineralic large porous grains with silicate crystal inclusions, has been performed. We have initiated a program to compute the absorption and scattering efficiencies for these grains. Presented here are the 3 - 40 micron absorption efficiencies for models of sub-micron sized crystalline forsterite grains of irregular shape. We use the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) to create discrete targets of forsterite that can be included in large porous aggregates. Computations are performed on the NAS Pleiades supercomputer. Our calculated absorption efficiencies for individual grains of forsterite are in agreement with laboratory measurements (Tamanai et al. 2006; Koike et al. 2003) and the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) method by Harker et al. (2007). We find for discrete grains that grain shape has a strong effect on the peak location of a crystalline resonance and that mimicking the physical properties of forsterite is important. Also presented are the absorption efficiencies for simple multi-component aggregates and for collections of forsterite crystals of different size and shape to replicate laboratory samples. This research is supported by the NASA GSRP Program.

  14. Presolar Grains and Their Isotopic Anomalies in Meteorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杨挺; 王世杰

    2001-01-01

    Study on presolar grains including diamond, silicon carbide, graphite, silicon nitrite (Si3N4), corundum and spinel isolated from meteorites is summarized in this paper. Except for nanometer-sized diamond, the other grains are micrometers to submicrometers in size. The presolar grains survived mainly in the fine -grained matrix of primitive chondrites and were isolated by chemical treatments. Diamond contains Xe isotopes (Xe-HL), typically produced in p- and r-processes, probably formed in supernovae. Mainstream silicon carbides are enriched in 29, 30Si and 13C, but depleted in 15N. They also contain various s-process products, consistent with calculations of AGB stars. Other silicon carbides exhibit much larger isotopic anomalies and are classified as groups X, Y, Z and AB. Among them, group X of SiC is characterized by enrichment of 28Si and daughter isotopes of various short-lived nuclides, suggesting an origin from supernovae. Graphite can be divided into four density fractions with distinct isotopic compositions. They may form in AGB stars, novae and supernovae, respectively. Si3N4 is similar to X-SiC in isotopic composition. Corundum is classified as four groups based on their oxygen isotopic compositions. AGB and red giant stars are possible sources for the oxide. More comprehensive study of presolar grains, especially discovery of the other types of oxides and silicates, isotopic analyses of individual submicrometer-sized grains and distribution of presolar grains among various chemical groups and petrographic types of chondrites will provide new information on nucleosynthesis, stellar evolution and formation of the solar nebula.

  15. Presolar Grains and Their Isotopic Anomalies in Meteorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杨挺; 王世杰

    2001-01-01

    Study on presolar grains including diamond,silicon carbide,graphite,silicon nitrite(Si3N4),coundum and spinel isolated from meteorites is summarized in this paper.Except for nanometer-sized diamond,the other grains are micrometers to submicrometers in size.The presolar grains survived mainly in the fine-grained matrix of primitive chondrites and were isolated by chemical treatments.Diamond contains Xe isotopes(Xe-HL),typically produced in p-and r-processes,probably formed in supernovae.Mainstream silicon carbides are enriched in 29,30Si and 13C,but depleted in 15N.They also contain various s-process products,consistent with calculations of AGB stars.Other silicon carbides exhibit much larger isotopic anomalies and are classified as groups X,Y,Z and AB.Among them,group X of SiC is characterized by enrichment of 28Si and daughter isotopes of various short-lived nuclides,suggesting an origin from supernovae.Graphite can be divided into four density fractions with distince isotopic compositions.They may form in AGB stars,novae and supernovae,respctively,Si3N4 is similar to X-SiC in isotopic composition.Corundum is classified as four groups based on theid oxygen isotopic compositions.AGB and red giang stare are possible sources for the oxide.More comprehensive study of presolar grains,especially discovery of the other types of oxides and silicates,isotopic analyses of individual submicrometer-sized grains and distribution of presolar grains among various chemical groups and petropaphic types of chondrites will provide new information on nucleosynthesis,stellar evolution and formation of the solar nebula.

  16. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  17. Fire Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Soluble Alkaline Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Giudice

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the fire performance of wood panels (Araucaria angustifolia impregnated with soluble alkaline silicates. Commercial silicates based on sodium and potassium with 2.5/1.0 and 3.0/1.0 silica/alkali molar ratios were selected; solutions and glasses were previously characterized. Experimental panels were tested in a limiting oxygen chamber and in a two-foot tunnel. Results displayed a high fire-retardant efficiency using some soluble silicates.

  18. Journal of the Chinese Silicate Society (Selected Articles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    A-A157 497 JOURNAL OF THE CHINESE SILICATE SOCIETY (SELECTED i/i ARTICLES)(U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV IWRIGHT-PRT RSON U CLSS..AFE OH 11 JUN 85...7 V- V 17 -, 7Z I T7. k. V.-.’.~. W ~ . FTD-ID(RS)T-0160-85 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION JOURNAL OF THE CHINESE SILICATE SOCIETY... JOURNAL OF THE CHINESE SILICATE SOCIETY D- At"Ibutilonf (Selected Articles) Availability Cadm English pages: 28 Dist ’Avail ald/zr Source: Guisuanyan

  19. Bare PCB inspection system with SV-GMR sensor eddy-current testing probe

    OpenAIRE

    Chomsuwan, K.; Yamada, Sotoshi; Iwahara, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes bare printed circuit board (PCB) inspection based on eddy-current testing (ECT) technique with high scanning speed. A high-frequency ECT probe composed of a meander coil as an exciting coil and the spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) sensor was fabricated and is proposed. The ECT probe was designed based on crack inspection over flat surface, especially suitable for microdefect detection on high-density bare PCB. The ECT signal detected by the SV-GMR sensor was ac...

  20. Bare Fiber Bragg Gratings embedded into concrete buffer Supercontainer concept for nuclear waste storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinet, Damien; Chah, Karima; Megret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe [Electromagnetism and Telecommunications Department of the University of Mons, 31 Boulevard Dolez, 7000 Mons, (Belgium); Gusarov, Andrei [Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, (Belgium); Faustov, Alexey [Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, (Belgium); Electromagnetisme and Telecommunication Department of the University of Mons, 31 Boulevard Dolez, 7000 Mons, (Belgium); Areias, Lou [Mechanics of Materials and Constructions Department of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, (Belgium); European Underground Research Infrastructure for Disposal of nuclear waste In Clay Environment, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    We present the preliminary results obtained with bare fiber Bragg grating-based sensors embedded into half-scale Belgian Supercontainer concept. Being temperature and strain sensitive, some sensors were placed into aluminum tubes to monitor only temperature and results were compared with thermocouples data. The utility of using bare fiber Bragg gratings, knowing that these ones are very fragile, is to have a direct contact between the high alkaline environment of the concrete and silica fibers and to determine its impact over a very long time. (authors)

  1. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex Plant - part I: Bare pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knief, R.A. [Ogden Environmental & Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    This paper briefly describes criticality investigations for weapon assembly and dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. Results are summarized for calculations performed for safety analyses, radiological hazards assessments, and a study to justify the criticality alarm exemption. Pits and pits in containers were modeled in their most reactive configuration. Criticality calculations were performed with the KENO and MCNP code packages. Configurations involving bare pits were subcritical by a substantial amount even with very conservative model assumptions. Thus, it is concluded that a critical configuration involving the bare pits is not credible.

  2. Mechanical and physical properties of calcium silicate/alumina composite for biomedical engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F S; Mehrali, M; Oshkour, A A; Metselaar, H S C; Kadri, N A; Abu Osman, N A

    2014-02-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of Al2O3 on α-calcium silicate (α-CaSiO3) ceramic. α-CaSiO3 was synthesized from CaO and SiO2 using mechanochemical method followed by calcinations at 1000°C. α-CaSiO3 and alumina were grinded using ball mill to create mixtures, containing 0-50w% of Al2O3 loadings. The powders were uniaxially pressed and followed by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) in order to achieve greater uniformity of compaction and to increase the shape capability. Afterward, the compaction was sintered in a resistive element furnace at both 1150°C and 1250°C with a 5h holding time. It was found that alumina reacted with α-CaSiO3 and formed alumina-rich calcium aluminates after sintering. An addition of 15wt% of Al2O3 powder at 1250°C were found to improve the hardness and fracture toughness of the calcium silicate. It was also observed that the average grain sizes of α-CaSiO3 /Al2O3 composite were maintained 500-700nm after sintering process.

  3. Crystalline silicates and dust processing in the protoplanetary disks of the Taurus young cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Dan M; Furlan, Elise; Bohac, J; Sargent, B; Forrest, W J; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Nordhaus, Jason T; Green, Joel D; Kim, K H; Sloan, G C; Chen, C H; Keller, L D; dAlessio, Paola; Najita, J; Uchida, Keven I; Houck, J R

    2007-01-01

    We characterize the crystalline silicate content and spatial distribution of small dust grains in a large sample of protoplanetary disks in the Taurus-Auriga young cluster, using Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectra. In turn we use the results to analyze the evolution of structure and composition of these 1-2 Myr-old disks around Solar- and later-type young stars, and test the standard models of dust processing which result in the conversion of originally amorphous dust into minerals. We find strong evidence of evolution of the dust crystalline mass fraction in parallel with that of the structure of the disks, in the sense that increasing crystalline mass fraction is strongly linked to dust settling to the disk midplane. We also confirm that the crystalline silicates are confined to small radii, r < 10 AU. However, we see no significant correlation of crystalline mass fraction with stellar mass or luminosity, stellar accretion rate, disk mass, or disk/star mass ratio, as would be expected in the st...

  4. THE COMPOSITION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS TOWARD ζ OPHIUCHI: CONSTRAINING THE ELEMENTAL BUDGET NEAR THE DIFFUSE-DENSE CLOUD TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteet, Charles A.; Whittet, Douglas C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Draine, Bruce T., E-mail: charles.poteet@gmail.com [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward ζ Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H{sub 2}O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H{sub 2}O ice mantles on large (a ≈ 2.8 μm) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of the Mg and Si atoms along the line of sight reside in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of the elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of elemental O is largely inconsistent with the adopted reference abundances, indicating that as much as ∼156 ppm of interstellar O is missing along the line of sight. After taking into account additional limits on the abundance of elemental O in other O-bearing solids, we conclude that any missing reservoir of elemental O must reside on large grains that are nearly opaque to infrared radiation.

  5. Whole Grains and Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whole grains. Does not contain partially hydrogenated oils. Dietary Fiber Dietary fiber is the term for several materials that make ... water. When eaten regularly as part of a diet low in saturated fat and trans fat soluble fiber has been associated with increased diet quality and ...

  6. Formation on grain surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazaux, S; Tielens, AGGM

    2004-01-01

    The most abundant interstellar molecule, H-2, is generally thought to form by recombination of H atoms on grain surfaces. On surfaces, hydrogen atoms can be physisorbed and chemisorbed and their mobility can be governed by quantum mechanical tunneling or thermal hopping. We have developed a model fo

  7. Nanostructure of Er3+ doped silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nan; Hou, Kirk; Haines, Christopher D; Etessami, Nathan; Ranganathan, Varadh; Halpern, Susan B; Kear, Bernard H; Klein, Lisa C; Sigel, George H

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate nanostructural evolution resulting in highly increased photoluminescence in silicates doped with Er3+ ions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging, nano-energy dispersed X-ray (NEDX) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence analysis confirm the local composition and structure changes of the Er3+ ions upon thermal annealing. We studied two types of amorphous nanopowder: the first is of the composition SiO2/18Al2O3/2Er2O3 (SAE), synthesized by combustion flame-chemical vapor condensation, and the second is with a composition of SiO2/8Y2O3/2Er2O3 (SYE), synthesized by sol-gel synthesis (composition in mol%). Electron diffraction and HRTEM imaging clearly show the formation of nanocrystallites with an average diameter of approximately 8 nm in SAE samples annealed at 1000 degrees C and SYE samples annealed at 1200 degrees C. The volume fraction of the nanocrystalline phase increased with each heat treatment, eventually leading to complete devitrification at 1400 degrees C. Further XRD and NEDX analysis indicates that the nanocrystalline phase has the pyrochlore structure with the formula Er(x)Al(2-x)Si2O7 or Er(x)Y(2-x)Si2O7 and a surrounding silica matrix.

  8. Silicate mineral impacts on the uptake and storage of arsenic and plant nutrients in rice ( Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-12-18

    Arsenic-contaminated rice grain may threaten human health globally. Since H₃AsO₃⁰ is the predominant As species found in paddy pore-waters, and H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ share an uptake pathway, silica amendments have been proposed to decrease As uptake and consequent As concentrations in grains. Here, we evaluated the impact of two silicate mineral additions differing in solubility (+Si(L), diatomaceous earth, 0.29 mM Si; +Si(H), Si-gel, 1.1 mM Si) to soils differing in mineralogy on arsenic concentration in rice. The +Si(L) addition either did not change or decreased As concentration in pore-water but did not change or increased grain-As levels relative to the (+As--Si) control. The +Si(H) addition increased As in pore-water, but it significantly decreased grain-As relative to the (+As--Si) control. Only the +Si(H) addition resulted in significant increases in straw- and husk-Si. Total grain- and straw-As was negatively correlated with pore-water Si, and the relationship differed between two soils exhibiting different mineralogy. These differing results are a consequence of competition between H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ for adsorption sites on soil solids and subsequent plant-uptake, and illustrate the importance of Si mineralogy on arsenic uptake.

  9. The crystalline fraction of interstellar silicates in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, F; Woods, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    We present a model using the evolution of the stellar population in a starburst galaxy to predict the crystallinity of the silicates in the interstellar medium of this galaxy. We take into account dust production in stellar ejecta, and amorphisation and destruction in the interstellar medium and find that a detectable amount of crystalline silicates may be formed, particularly at high star formation rates, and in case supernovae are efficient dust producers. We discuss the effect of dust destruction and amorphisation by supernovae, and the effect of a low dust-production efficiency by supernovae, and find that when taking this into account, crystallinity in the interstellar medium becomes hard to detect. Levels of 6.5-13% crystallinity in the interstellar medium of starburst galaxies have been observed and thus we conclude that not all these crystalline silicates can be of stellar origin, and an additional source of crystalline silicates associated with the Active Galactic Nucleus must be present.

  10. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  11. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  12. Properties of sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jina; Fan Zitian; Zan Xiaolei; Pan Di

    2009-01-01

    The sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating has many advantages,such as low sodium silicate adding quantity,fast hardening speed,high room temperature strength,good collapsibility and certain surface stability. However,it has big moisture absorbability in the air,which would lead to the compression strength and the surface stability of the sand molds being sharply reduced. In this study,the moisture absorbability of the sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating in different humidity conditions and the effect factors were investigated. Meanwhile,the reasons for the big moisture absorbability of the sand were analyzed.Some measures to overcome the problems of high moisture absorbability,bad surface stability and sharply reducing strength in the air were discussed. The results of this study establish the foundation of green and clean foundry technology based on the microwave heating hardening sodium silicate sand process.

  13. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  14. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus; Leonardo Theodoro Büll; Juliano Corulli Corrêa; Roberto Lyra Villas Boas

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR) and neutralization power (NP), indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC). Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER) for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicat...

  15. Why Is It Important to Eat Grains, Especially Whole Grains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrients and health benefits Print Share Why is it important to eat grains, especially whole grains? Eating ... diabetes. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods ...

  16. Properties of Dust Grains Probed with Extinction Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya

    2013-01-01

    Modern data of the extinction curve from ultraviolet to near infrared are revisited to study the property of dust grains in the Milky Way (MW) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We confirmed that the graphite-silicate mixture of grains yields the observed extinction curve with the simple power-law distribution of the grain size but with a cutoff at some maximal size: the parameters are tightly constrained to be $q = 3.5 \\pm 0.2$ for the size distribution $a^{-q}$ and the maximum radius $a_{max} = 0.24 \\pm 0.05$ um, for both MW and SMC. The abundance of grains, and hence the elemental abundance, is constrained from the reddening versus hydrogen column density, E(B-V)/N_H. If we take the solar elemental abundance as a standard for the MW, >56 % of carbon should be in graphite dust, while it is <40 % in the SMC. This disparity and the relative abundance explain the difference of the two curves. We find that 50-60 % of carbon may not necessarily be in graphite but in the amorphous or the glassy phase, or up...

  17. Introducing the Notion of Bare and Effective Mass via Newton's Second Law of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here I discuss how these concepts may be introduced together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion. The…

  18. Graph segmentation and support vector machines for bare earth classification from lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Nicholas S.; Smith, O'Neil; Smith, Philip; Rahmes, Mark

    2014-06-01

    A novel approach using a support vector machine (SVM) is proposed to classify bare earth points in LiDAR point clouds. Using graph based segmentation, the LiDAR point cloud is segmented into a set of topological components. Several features establishing relationships from those components to their neighboring components are formulated. The SVM is then trained on the segment features to establish a model for the classification of bare earth and non bare earth points. Quantitative results are presented for training and testing the proposed SVM classifier on the ISPRS data set. Using the ISPRS data set as a training set, qualitative results are presented by testing the proposed SVM classifier on data downloaded from Open Topography; which covers a variety of different landscapes and building structures in Frazier Park, California. Despite the data being captured from different sensors, and collected from scenes with different terrain types and building structures, the results shown were processed with no parameter changes. Furthermore, a confidence value is returned indicating how well the unforeseen data fits the SVM's trained model for bare earth recognition.

  19. A new notion of soundness in bare public-key model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yunlei; ZHU Hong

    2003-01-01

    A new notion of soundness in bare public-key (BPK) model is presented. This new notion just lies in between one-time soundness and sequential soundness and its reasonableness is justified in the context of resettable zero-knowledge when resettable zero-knowledge prover is implemented by smart card.

  20. Long-Term Safety of Drug-Eluting and Bare-Metal Stents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Benedetto, Umberto; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous meta-analyses have investigated the relative safety and efficacy profiles of different types of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS); however, most prior trials in these meta-analyses reported follow-up to only 1 year, and as such, the relative long-term safe...

  1. Bare Quark Stars or Naked Neutron Stars: The Case of RX J1856.5-3754

    CERN Document Server

    Turolla, R; Drake, J J; Turolla, Roberto; Zane, Silvia; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2004-01-01

    In a cool neutron star (T 10^13 G), a phase transition may occur in the outermost layers. As a consequence the neutron star becomes `bare', i.e. no gaseous atmosphere sits on the top of the crust. The surface of cooling, bare neutron stars not necessary gives off blackbody radiation because of the strong suppression in the emissivity at energies below the electron plasma frequency \\omega_p. Since \\omega_p~1 keV under the conditions typical of the dense electron gas in the condensate, the emission from a T~100 eV bare neutron star will be substantially depressed with respect to that of a perfect Planckian radiator at most energies. Here we present a detailed analysis of the emission properties of a bare neutron star. In particular, we derive the surface emissivity for a Fe composition in a range of magnetic fields and temperatures representative of cooling isolated neutron stars, like RX J1856.5-3754. We find that the emitted spectrum is strongly dependent on the electron conductivity in the solid surface lay...

  2. Drug-eluting versus bare-metal stents in large coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Christoph; Galatius, Soeren; Erne, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent data have suggested that patients with coronary disease in large arteries are at increased risk for late cardiac events after percutaneous intervention with first-generation drug-eluting stents, as compared with bare-metal stents. We sought to confirm this observation and to assess whether...

  3. Comparative measurements with seven rainfall simulators on uniform bare fallow land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iserloh, T.; Ries, J.B.; Cerda, A.; Echeverria, M.T.; Fister, W.; Geissler, C.; Kuhn, N.J.; Leon, F.J.; Peters, P.; Schindewolf, M.; Schmidt, J.; Scholten, T.; Seeger, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the influence of rainfall simulator type and plot dimensions on runoff and erosion, seven small portable rainfall simulators from Freiberg, Tubingen, Trier (all Germany), Valencia, Zaragoza (both Spain), Basel (Switzerland) and Wageningen (the Netherlands) were compared on a prepared bare

  4. Analyses of protein corona on bare and silica-coated gold nanorods against four mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Minakshi; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxic effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs). Here, a comprehensive study was performed by examining the effects of bare (uncoated) AuNRs and AuNRs functionalized with silica (SiO2-AuNRs) against various mammalian cell lines, including cervical cancer cells, fibroblast cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and neuroblastoma cells. The interactions between AuNRs and mammalian cells were investigated with cell viability and mortality assays. Dihydrorhodamine-123 assay was carried out for evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, along with mass spectroscopy analysis for determining the composition of the protein corona. Our results suggest that even the lowest concentrations of AuNRs (0.7 μg/mL) induced ROS production leading to cell mortality. On the other hand, cellular viability and ROS production were maintained even at a higher concentration of SiO2-coated AuNRs (12 μg/mL). The increased production of ROS by AuNRs seemed to cause the toxicity observed in all four mammalian cell types. The protein corona on the bare AuNRs did not appear to reduce ROS generation; however, different compositions of the protein corona on bare and SiO2-coated AuNRs may affect cellular behavior differently. Therefore, it was determined that SiO2-coated AuNRs would be more advantageous than bare AuNRs for cellular applications.

  5. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  6. Friction and Wear Behaviors of Nano-Silicates in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Boshui; Lou Fang; Fang Jianhua; Wang Jiu; Li Jia

    2009-01-01

    Nano-metric magnesium silicate and zinc silicate with particle size of about 50--70nm were prepared in water by the method of chemical deposition. The antiwear and friction reducing abilities of the nano-silicates, as well as their compos-ites with oleie acid tri-ethanolamine (OATEA), were evaluated on a four-ball friction tester. The topographies and tribochemical features of the worn surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS). Results show that nano-silicates alone provide poor antiwear and friction reducing abilities in water, but exhibits excellent synergism with OATEA in reducing friction and wear. The synergism in reducing friction and wear between naao-silicates and OATEA does exist almost regardless of particle sizes and species, and may be attributed, on one hand, to the formation of an adsorption film of OATEA, and, on the other hand, to the formation oftdbochemical species of silicon dioxide and iron oxides on the friction surfaces. Tribo-reactions and tribo-adsorptions of nano-silicates and OATEA would produce hereby an effective composite boondary lubrication film, which could efficiently enhance the anti-wear and friction-reducing abilities of water.

  7. Validity of arthroscopic measurement of glenoid bone loss using the bare spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake K

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Katsutoshi Miyatake, Yoshitsugu Takeda, Koji Fujii, Tomoya Takasago, Toshiyuki Iwame Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokushima Red Cross Hospital, Komatsushima, Tokushima, Japan Purpose: Our aim was to test the validity of using the bare spot method to quantify glenoid bone loss arthroscopically in patients with shoulder instability. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with no evidence of instability (18 males, nine females; mean age 59.1 years were evaluated arthroscopically to assess whether the bare spot is consistently located at the center of the inferior glenoid. Another 40 patients with glenohumeral anterior instability who underwent shoulder arthroscopy (30 males, ten females; mean age 25.9 years were evaluated for glenoid bone loss with preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT and arthroscopic examination. In patients without instability, the distances from the bare spot of the inferior glenoid to the anterior (Da and posterior (Dp glenoid rim were measured arthroscopically. In patients with instability, we compared the percentage glenoid bone loss calculated using CT versus arthroscopic measurements. Results: Among patients without instability, the bare spot could not be identified in three of 27 patients. Da (9.5±1.2 mm was smaller than Dp (10.1±1.5 mm, but it was not significantly different. However, only 55% of glenoids showed less than 1 mm of difference between Da and Dp, and 18% showed more than 2 mm difference in length. The bare spot could not be identified in five of 40 patients with instability. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed significant (P<0.001 and strong (R2=0.63 correlation in percentage glenoid bone loss between the 3D-CT and arthroscopy method measurements. However, in ten shoulders (29%, the difference in percentage glenoid bone loss between 3D-CT and arthroscopic measurements was greater than 5%. Conclusion: The bare spot was not consistently located at the center of the inferior glenoid

  8. 演化晚期恒星中的结晶硅酸盐尘埃%Crystalline Silicates in Evolved Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳明; 姜碧沩

    2014-01-01

    stars indicate that the crystalline silicates are magnesium-rich, rather than iron-rich in the case of amorphous silicates. It means that forsterite and enstatite are the main components of the crystalline silicates in evolved stars. The modelling of the spectral energy distribution reveals that the crystalline silicates may have bigger average size than the amorphous ones. In general, the degree of crystallinity is not high, usually around 10%—15%, although very high degrees up to > 80% are also reported. What determines the degree of crystallinity is not clear yet, while mass loss rate has long been suggested as an important factor and metallicity could be another factor. The degree of crystallinity may be related to the mechanism of the formation of the crystalline silicate. A direct condensation of gas particles can form crystalline silicates as demonstrated by the grain formation theory. This mechanism has the problem to explain some of the observed high abundance of crystalline silicate. The other proposed mechanism is the so-called annealing, i.e. the amorphous silicate dust is heated to a high enough temperature and re-condense to form crystalline silicate. This model has the problem to explain the transformation from iron-rich amorphous form to magnesium-rich crystalline form so that additional replacement reaction needs to be induced. With the abundant detection of crystalline silicate dust in the evolved stars, astronomers have learned much about the properties of the dust. There are still some important questions to be answered: (1) what determines the degree of crystallinity?(2) how are the crystalline silicate grains formed? (3) why is there little crystalline silicate dust in the interstellar medium? We look forward to the answers with further investigations.%硅酸盐是宇宙尘埃的主要成分之一。20世纪60年代,在演化晚期恒星中就曾发现硅酸盐尘埃的辐射特征,并且与实验室无定形硅酸盐的

  9. Grain rotation mediated by grain boundary dislocations in nanocrystalline platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Teng, Jiao; Liu, Pan; Hirata, Akihiko; Ma, En; Zhang, Ze; Chen, Mingwei; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Grain rotation is a well-known phenomenon during high (homologous) temperature deformation and recrystallization of polycrystalline materials. In recent years, grain rotation has also been proposed as a plasticity mechanism at low temperatures (for example, room temperature for metals), especially for nanocrystalline grains with diameter d less than ~15 nm. Here, in tensile-loaded Pt thin films under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, we show that the plasticity mechanism transitions from cross-grain dislocation glide in larger grains (d>6 nm) to a mode of coordinated rotation of multiple grains for grains with d<6 nm. The mechanism underlying the grain rotation is dislocation climb at the grain boundary, rather than grain boundary sliding or diffusional creep. Our atomic-scale images demonstrate directly that the evolution of the misorientation angle between neighbouring grains can be quantitatively accounted for by the change of the Frank–Bilby dislocation content in the grain boundary. PMID:25030380

  10. The contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance in an arid ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C. M.; Smith, A.; Campanella, A.; Rango, A.

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneity of vegetation and soils in arid and semi-arid environments complicates the analysis of medium spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery. A single pixel may contain several different types of vegetation, as well as a sizeable proportion of bare soil. We have used linear mixture modeling to explore the contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance. In October, 2006, aerial imagery (0.25 m spatial resolution) was acquired for our study sites in the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. Imagery was also acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for June and November, 2006. These data corresponded with pre- and post monsoon conditions. Object-based feature extraction was used to classify the aerial imagery to shrub, grass and bare ground cover classes. Percent cover was then calculated for each cover class. Visible-near-infrared and shortwave infrared ASTER reflectance data from both dates were combined into a single 18-band dataset (30 m spatial resolution). A vector overlay from the classification results of the aerial imagery was used to define pure endmember pixels in the ASTER imagery. Estimates of the proportions of shrub, grass and bare ground cover from the linear mixture modeling approach were compared with cover calculated using feature extraction from the aerial imagery. The results indicate that reflectance in ASTER pixels is likely to be a linear combination of the cover proportions of the three main cover types (shrubs, grass, bare ground). However, noticeable outliers in the relationship between cover calculated from each method, indicate there may be other variables that affect the accuracy with which we can estimate cover using linear mixture modeling.

  11. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  12. Production of Organic Grain Coatings by Surface-Mediated Reactions and the Consequences of This Process for Meteoritic Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO are exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these reactions. The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic material. Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  13. Predictive coarse-graining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöberl, Markus; Zabaras, Nicholas; Koutsourelakis, Phaedon-Stelios

    2017-03-01

    We propose a data-driven, coarse-graining formulation in the context of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast to existing techniques which are based on a fine-to-coarse map, we adopt the opposite strategy by prescribing a probabilistic coarse-to-fine map. This corresponds to a directed probabilistic model where the coarse variables play the role of latent generators of the fine scale (all-atom) data. From an information-theoretic perspective, the framework proposed provides an improvement upon the relative entropy method [1] and is capable of quantifying the uncertainty due to the information loss that unavoidably takes place during the coarse-graining process. Furthermore, it can be readily extended to a fully Bayesian model where various sources of uncertainties are reflected in the posterior of the model parameters. The latter can be used to produce not only point estimates of fine-scale reconstructions or macroscopic observables, but more importantly, predictive posterior distributions on these quantities. Predictive posterior distributions reflect the confidence of the model as a function of the amount of data and the level of coarse-graining. The issues of model complexity and model selection are seamlessly addressed by employing a hierarchical prior that favors the discovery of sparse solutions, revealing the most prominent features in the coarse-grained model. A flexible and parallelizable Monte Carlo - Expectation-Maximization (MC-EM) scheme is proposed for carrying out inference and learning tasks. A comparative assessment of the proposed methodology is presented for a lattice spin system and the SPC/E water model.

  14. Grain alcohol study: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The study has concentrated upon a detailed examination of all considerations involved in the production, use, and marketing of ethyl alcohol (Ethanol) as produced from the fermentation of agricultural grains. Each parameter was examined in the light of current energy markets and trends; new sources and technological, and processes for fermentation, the capability of the agricultural industry to support fermentaton demand; the optimization of value of agricultureal crops; and the efficiencies of combining related industries. Anhydrous (200 proof) ethanol makes an excellent blending component for all present automotive fuels and an excellent octane additive for unleaded fuels in proportions up to 35% without requiring modifications to current engines. There is no difference between ethanol produced by fermentation and ethanol produced synthetically from petroleum. The decision to produce ethanol one way or the other is purely economic. The agricultural industry can support a major expansion in the fermentation industry. The residue (distillers grains) from the fermentation of corn for ethanol is an excellent and economical feed for livestock and poultry. A reliable supply of distillers grains can assist in making the large beef feedlot operations more economically viable. The source materials, fuels, products and by-products of an ethanol plant, beef feedlot, gas biodigester plant, municipal waste recovery plant and a steam generated electrical plant are interrelated and mutually beneficial for energy efficiencies and economic gains when co-located. The study concludes that the establishment of such agricultural-environment industrial energy complexes, would provide a broad range of significant benefits to Indiana.

  15. Grain alcohol study: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The study has concentrated upon a detailed examination of all considerations involved in the production, use, and marketing of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) as produced from the fermentation of agricultural grains. Each parameter was examined in the light of current energy markets and trends; new sources and technological, and processes for fermentation, the capability of the agricultural industry to support fermentation demand; the optimizaton of value of agricultural crops; and the efficiencies of combining related industries. Ahydrous (200 proof) ethanol makes an excellent blending component for all present automotive fuels and an excellent octane additive for unleaded fuels in proportions up to 35% without requiring modifications to current engines. There is no difference between ethanol produced by fermentation and ethanol produced synthetically from petroleum. The decision to produce ethanol one way or the other is purely economic. The agricultural industry can support a major expansion in the fermentation industry. The residue (distillers grains) from the fermentation of corn for ethanol is an excellent and economical feed for livestock and poultry. A reliable supply of distillers grain can assist in making the large beef feedlot operations more economically viable. The source materials, fuels, products and by-products of an ethanol plant, beef feedlot, gas biodigester plant, municipal waste recovery plant and a steam generated electrical plant are interrelated and mutually beneficial for energy efficiencies and economic gains when co-located. The study concludes that the establishment of such agricultural- environment industrial energy complexes, would provide a broad range of significant benefits to Indiana.

  16. FeO-rich silicates and Ca,Al-rich inclusions in Qingzhen andYamato 691 (EH3) meteo-rites: Evidence for migration of mass in the solar nebula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Qingzhen and Yamato 691 (EH3) enstatite chondrites, which formed under extremely reducing conditions, are studied using the scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer. Both meteorites contain FeO-rich silicates and minor Ca, Al-rich inclusions. Most FeO-rich silicates are Ca-poor pyroxenes and occur as fragments in matrix. A few grains of FeO-rich silicates were found in chondrules, and FeO-rich olivine is rare. In Qingzhen, FeO-rich silicates commonly contain abundant dust-like Ni-poor metals, which probably formed through reduction of FeO. In contrast, only a few fragments of FeO-rich silicates in Yamato 691 enclose dust-like metals.This difference is consistent with a more reducing condition of Qingzhen than Yamato 691. Ca, Al-rich inclusions have similar modal compositions and mineral chemistry as their counterparts in carbonaceous chondrites. We suggest that (1)the FeO-rich silicates probably formed in oxidized regions of the solar nebula, and then moved into the enstatite chondrite locations; and (2) Ca, Al-rich inclusions in both enstatite chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites may have similar origins and reservoirs.``

  17. The abundance of presolar grains in comet 81P/WILD 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Ong, W. J. [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kearsley, Anton T. [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, Mark J., E-mail: floss@wustl.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    We carried out hypervelocity impact experiments in order to test the possibility that presolar grains are preferentially destroyed during impact of the comet 81P/Wild 2 samples into the Stardust Al foil collectors. Powdered samples of the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 were shot at 6 km s{sup -1} into Stardust flight spare Al foil. Craters from the Acfer 094 test shots, as well as ones from the actual Stardust cometary foils, were analyzed by NanoSIMS ion imaging to search for presolar grains. We found two O-rich presolar grains and two presolar SiC grains in the Acfer 94 test shots, with measured abundances in the foils of 4 and 5 ppm, respectively, significantly lower than the amount of presolar grains actually present in this meteorite. Based on known abundances of these phases in Acfer 094, we estimate a loss of over 90% of the O-rich presolar grains; the fraction of SiC lost is lower, reflecting its higher resistance to destruction. In the Stardust cometary foils, we identified four O-rich presolar grains in 5000 {mu}m{sup 2} of crater residue. Including a presolar silicate grain found by Leitner et al., the overall measured abundance of O-rich presolar grains in Wild 2 is {approx}35 ppm. No presolar SiC has been found in the foil searches, although one was identified in the aerogel samples. Based on the known abundances of presolar silicates and oxides in Acfer 094, we can calculate the pre-impact abundances of these grains in the Stardust samples. Our calculations indicate initial abundances of 600-830 ppm for O-rich presolar grains. Assuming a typical diameter of {approx}300 nm for SiC suggests a presolar SiC abundance of {approx}45 ppm. Analyses of the Stardust samples indicated early on that recognizable presolar components were not particularly abundant, an observation that was contrary to expectations that the cometary material would, like interplanetary dust particles, be dominated by primitive materials from the early solar system

  18. Comparison of the Mineralogy of Comet Wild 2 Coma Grains to Other Astromaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David; Zolensky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We propose that Kuiper Belt samples (in this case comet coma grains from the Jupiter family comet Wild 2) are recognizably different from the bulk of materials in outer belt asteroids, because of their different formation positions and times in the early solar system. We believe this despite similarities found between some Wild 2 grains and components of carbonaceous chondrites (i.e. some CAI and chondrules). Kuiper Belt samples must preserve measurable mineralogical and compositional evidence of formation at unique positions and times in the early solar nebula, and these formational differences must have imparted recognizable special characteristics. We hypothesize that these characteristics include: (1) Unique major element compositional ranges of common astromaterial minerals, especially olivine and pyroxene; (2) Unique minor element compositions of major silicate phases, especially olivine and low-Ca pyroxene; (3) Degree and effects of radiation processing -- including amorphous rims, metal coatings, and Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides (GEMS); (4) Presence of abundant presolar silicate grains as recognized by anomalous oxygen in silicates; (5) Oxidation state of the mineral assemblage. We are working our way through all available Wild 2 samples, selecting 1-2 non-consecutive viable TEM grids from each possible extracted Wild 2 grain. We especially prefer TEM grids from grains for which complete mineralogical details have not been published (which is to say the majority of the extracted grains). We are performing a basic mineralogic survey by E-beam techniques, to establish the essential features of the extracted Wild 2 grains. We are making a particular effort to carefully and accurately measure minor elements of olivine and pyroxene, as these minerals are widespread in astromaterials, and comparisons of their compositions will serve to place the Wild 2 silicates in contact with asteroids, meteorites and chondritic interplanetary dust particles

  19. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  20. Silicic Arc Magmas And Silicic Slab Melts: The Melt-Rock Reaction Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, S. M.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Bolge, L. L.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Bindeman, I. N.; Stuart, F. M.; Zellmer, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    While a genetic link between silicic arc magmas and silicic melts from the subducted slab has long been proposed, this hypothesis is commonly refuted because most arc magmas lack a 'garnet-signature' which such slab melts must have. A comprehensive geochemical study of high-Mg# arc magmas from the Quaternary central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), however, shows that this conflict can be reconciled if melt-rock reaction processes in the mantle wedge were essential to arc magma formation. In the central MVB, monogenetic and composite volcanoes erupt high-Mg# basalts to andesites with highly variable trace element patterns. These magmas contain high-Ni olivines (olivine Ni higher than permissible for olivines in partial peridotite melts) with high 3He/4He = 7-8 Ra that provide strong evidence for silicic slab components that infiltrate the subarc mantle to produce olivine-free segregations of 'reaction pyroxenite' in the sources of individual volcanoes. Melting of silica-excess and silica-deficient reaction pyroxenites can then produce high-Mg# basaltic and dacitic primary melts that mix during ascent through mantle and crust to form high-Mg# andesites. Mass balance requires that reaction pyroxenites contain at least >15-18 wt%, and likely more, of slab component. However, because the HREE of the slab component are efficiently retained in the eclogitic slab, elements Ho to Lu in partial melts from reaction pyroxenites remain controlled by the mantle and maintain MORB-normalized Ho/Lun ˜1.15 close to unity. In contrast, the MREE to LREE and fluid mobile LILE of the arc magmas are either controlled, or strongly influenced, by slab-contributions. The origin from hybrid sources also shows in the major elements that are blends of mantle-derived elements (Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ti) and elements augmented by slab contributions (Si, Na, K, P, and possibly Al). Moreover, strong correlations between bulk rock SiO2, 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O (olivines) can be interpreted as mixtures of subarc

  1. Implications of climate change for evaporation from bare soils in a Mediterranean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mehmet; Yano, Tomohisa; Evrendilek, Fatih; Uygur, Veli

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict quantitative changes in evaporation from bare soils in the Mediterranean climate region of Turkey in response to the projections of a regional climate model developed in Japan (hereafter RCM). Daily RCM data for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ETr) and soil evaporation were obtained for the periods of 1994--2003 and 2070--2079. Potential evaporation (Ep) from bare soils was calculated using the Penman-Monteith equation with a surface resistance of zero. Simulation of actual soil evaporation (Ea) was carried out using Aydin model (Aydin et al., Ecological Modelling 182:91-105, 2005) combined with Aydin and Uygur (2006, A model for estimating soil water potential of bare fields. In Proceedings of the 18th International Soil Meeting (ISM) on Soils Sustaining Life on Earth, Managing Soil and Technology, Sanliurfa, 477-480pp.) model of predicting soil water potential at the top surface layer of a bare soil, after performances of Aydin model (R2 = 94.0%) and Aydin and Uygur model (R2 = 97.6) were tested. The latter model is based on the relations among potential soil evaporation, hydraulic diffusivity, and soil wetness, with some simplified assumptions. Input parameters of the model are simple and easily obtainable such as climatic parameters used to compute the potential soil evaporation, average diffusivity for the drying soil, and volumetric water content at field capacity. The combination of Aydin and Aydin and Uygur models appeared to be useful in estimating water potential of soils and Ea from bare soils, with only a few parameters. Unlike ETr and Ep projected to increase by 92 and 69 mm (equivalent to 8.0 and 7.3% increases) due to the elevated evaporative demand of the atmosphere, respectively, Ea from bare soils is projected to reduce by 50 mm (equivalent to a 16.5% decrease) in response to a decrease in rainfall by 46% in the Mediterranean region of Turkey by the 2070s predicted by RCM, and consequently

  2. Dust properties and disk structure of evolved protoplanetary disks in Cep OB2: Grain growth, settling, gas and dust mass, and inside-out evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Patel, Nimesh; Juhász, Attila; Bouwman, Jeroen; Sturm, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer/IRS spectra of 31 TTS and IRAM/1.3mm observations for 34 low- and intermediate-mass stars in the Cep OB2 region. Including our previously published data, we analyze 56 TTS and the 3 intermediate-mass stars with silicate features in Tr 37 (~4 Myr) and NGC 7160 (~12 Myr). The silicate emission features are well reproduced with a mixture of amorphous (with olivine, forsterite, and silica stoichiometry) and crystalline grains (forsterite, enstatite). We explore grain size and disk structure using radiative transfer disk models, finding that most objects have suffered substantial evolution (grain growth, settling). About half of the disks show inside-out evolution, with either dust-cleared inner holes or a radially-dependent dust distribution, typically with larger grains and more settling in the innermost disk. The typical strong silicate features require nevertheless the presence of small dust grains, and could be explained by differential settling according to grain size, anomalous dust distr...

  3. The Composition of Interstellar Grains Toward Zeta Ophiuchi: Constraining the Elemental Budget Near the Diffuse-Dense Cloud Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Poteet, Charles A; Draine, Bruce T

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward Zeta Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H2O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H2O ice mantles on large (a ~ 2.8 microns) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of elemental Mg and Si along the line of sight are present in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of eleme...

  4. Whole grains and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Joanne

    2004-06-01

    Epidemiological studies find that whole-grain intake is protective against cancer, CVD, diabetes, and obesity. Despite recommendations to consume three servings of whole grains daily, usual intake in Western countries is only about one serving/d. Whole grains are rich in nutrients and phytochemicals with known health benefits. Whole grains have high concentrations of dietary fibre, resistant starch, and oligosaccharides. Whole grains are rich in antioxidants including trace minerals and phenolic compounds and these compounds have been linked to disease prevention. Other protective compounds in whole grains include phytate, phyto-oestrogens such as lignan, plant stanols and sterols, and vitamins and minerals. Published whole-grain feeding studies report improvements in biomarkers with whole-grain consumption, such as weight loss, blood-lipid improvement, and antioxidant protection. Although it is difficult to separate the protective properties of whole grains from dietary fibre and other components, the disease protection seen from whole grains in prospective epidemiological studies far exceeds the protection from isolated nutrients and phytochemicals in whole grains.

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  6. Alternative grains in nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevcsák Sz.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many people suffer from gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance. They have to avoid or limit their gluten intake. Sorghum and millet are gluten-free cereals, wherefore persons with gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance could consume them. Moreover, they have a lot of positive effects due to their phenolic compounds as phenol acid or flavonoid. Antioxidant activity in sorghum is especially high in comparison with other cereals. Our aim was to compare literature data about the chemical compositions of sorghum and millet with other grains.

  7. The lithification of ultramafic dominated till with magnesium silicate hydrate: a new green concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Lisa; Olav Austrheim, Håkon; Hu, Depan; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Ulven, Ole Ivar

    2016-04-01

    The Feragen Ultramafic Body located near the town of Røros in Eastern Norway gives rise to a unique phenomenon: A lithification process involving natural cement of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H). The ultramafic body is covered with moraine deposits that form tills throughout the area. The tills consist mainly of variably serpentinized ultramafic rock fragments, with additional quartz and feldspar grains transported to the area with the glaciers that formed the till. This provides the exceptional combination of ultramafic and Si-rich rocks. Throughout the area, multiple spots can be found where natural cement has resulted in the lithification of the till, forming tillite. This mainly occurs close to mine tailings of ancient chromium mines, as the mine tunnels provide air flow that increases the evaporation and thus the precipitation of the cement. The Weichselian glaciation constrains the age of the moraines to less than 10 ka and the formation of the concrete related to mine tailings suggests that the lithification took place after the termination of the mining activity in 1927. Thus, the cement is formed in-situ at its current location, indicating that it forms in a subarctic climate. EMP and SEM analysis indicate that the cement is a hydrated magnesium silicate phase, cementing together quartz, feldspar and serpentine grains to form a natural concrete. The cement consist of 31 wt% of MgO and 49 wt% of SiO2. Quartz and feldspar grains are partly dissolved in the concrete while the resulting pore space is filled with cement, indicating that the Si in the cement originated from the quartz and feldspar phases. Weathering of the ultramafic body involves the dissolution of brucite to create a high pH, Mg-rich fluid, which subsequently can dissolve the quartz and be the source for the M-S-H cement. A dissolution-precipitation process involving the dissolution of both brucite and quartz thus results in the formation of the cement. Future TEM analysis should give

  8. Effects of lidar point density on bare earth extraction and DEM creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Angela M.; Olsen, R. Chris; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    Data density has a crucial impact on the accuracy of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In this study, DEMs were created from a high point-density LIDAR dataset using the bare earth extraction module in Quick Terrain Modeler. Lower point-density LIDAR collects were simulated by randomly selecting points from the original dataset at a series of decreasing percentages. The DEMs created from the lower resolution datasets are compared to the original DEM. Results show a decrease in DEM accuracy as the resolution of the LIDAR dataset is reduced. Some analysis is made of the types of errors encountered in the lower resolution DEMs. It is also noted that the percentage of points classified as bare earth decreases as the resolution of the LIDAR dataset is reduced.

  9. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasscer, D.S.; Ernst, R.; Morgan, T.O.; Rivera, C.; Scott, A.C.; Summerson, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a cooperative research effort between The Puerto Rico Center of Energy and Environment Research, Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation and The Trane Company, a six month study was made of the seawater corrosion performance of various aluminum materials to test their suitability for use in seawater heat exchangers. The materials tested included bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger extrusions from a brazed aluminium, plate-fin heat exchanger developed by The Trane Company. The test materials were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr).

  10. Sub-pixel estimation of tree cover and bare surface densities using regression tree analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Zangrando Toneli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sub-pixel analysis is capable of generating continuous fields, which represent the spatial variability of certain thematic classes. The aim of this work was to develop numerical models to represent the variability of tree cover and bare surfaces within the study area. This research was conducted in the riparian buffer within a watershed of the São Francisco River in the North of Minas Gerais, Brazil. IKONOS and Landsat TM imagery were used with the GUIDE algorithm to construct the models. The results were two index images derived with regression trees for the entire study area, one representing tree cover and the other representing bare surface. The use of non-parametric and non-linear regression tree models presented satisfactory results to characterize wetland, deciduous and savanna patterns of forest formation.

  11. Quantifying and isolating stable soil organic carbon using long-term bare fallow experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barré, P; Eglin, T; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup;

    2010-01-01

    The stability of soil organic matter (SOM) is a major source of uncertainty in predicting atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. Isolating the stable soil carbon (C) from other, more labile, C fractions in soil is of prime importance for calibrating soil C simulation models......, and gaining insights into the mechanisms that lead to soil C stability. Long-term experiments with continuous bare fallow (vegetation-free) treatments in which the decay of soil C is monitored for decades after all inputs of C have stopped, provide a unique opportunity to assess the quantity of stable soil C....... We analyzed data from six bare fallow experiments of long-duration (>30 yrs), covering a range of soil types and climate conditions, and sited at Askov (Denmark), Grignon and Versailles (France), Kursk (Russia), Rothamsted (UK), and Ultuna (Sweden). A conceptual three pool model dividing soil C...

  12. Assessment of alteration processes on circumstellar and interstellar grains in Queen Alexandra Range 97416

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Maitrayee; Zega, Thomas J.; Williams, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Insight into the presolar and interstellar grain inventory of the CO3 chondrite Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 97416 is gained through correlated secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Only one presolar silicate grain [O17/O16=(9.96±0.75)×10-4; O18/O16=(19.49±0.96)×10-4] that may have formed in a low-mass Red Giant or Asymptotic Giant Branch star occurs in the coarse-grained matrix of QUE 97416. No other presolar grains were identified. Although presolar grains are rare in QUE 97416, numerous (898±259 ppm) 15N-rich domains (δN15∼+1447‰ to +3069‰) occur in the thin section. Based on TEM of an extracted section, two 15N-rich domains are amorphous, C-bearing, and texturally uniform, and they are embedded in a ferromagnesian silicate matrix with varied grain sizes. The individual 15N-rich organic regions with high δN15 (+2942±107‰ and +2341±140‰) exhibit diverse carbon functional groups, such as aromatic, vinyl-keto, amidyl, and carboxylic functionality, while the nitrogen XANES reveals traces of nitrile functionality. QUE 97416 appears to have escaped aqueous alteration based on the absence of hydrated minerals but is thermally altered, which could have resulted in the destruction of presolar grains. However, this process at >400 °C metamorphic temperatures was inefficient in destroying the carriers of N isotope anomalies, which may indicate the resistant nature of the organic carriers and/or the limited extent of thermal metamorphism on the QUE 97416 parent body.

  13. Transportable Waste-to-Energy System (TWES) Energy Recovery From Bare Base Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    removed and/or partially burned. Instead the furnace, coupled with a shredder , will completely burn the waste and provide heat for water or other...Photos from Ali Al Salem, AF bare base Nov 1998, FOUO-for official use only 8 8 TWES Fuel Processing Bulk Trash Shredder Shredded Fuel TWES Furnace...Program (FEMP) to initiate the conversion. • Will install and test electricity production at Tyndall AFB 15 15 TWES Process Diagram Shredders Useful

  14. Bare-State Time-Evolving Operator Solution to Raman Model in A Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUYing; NIEYi-Zhen; YANGXiao-Xue

    2003-01-01

    We derive exact analytical expressions of time-evolving bare-state operators of level occupation numbers and the photon numbers for a composite system consisting of a three-level atom interacting with two modes ofa quantized electromagnetic field in A configuration. These results demonstrate the oscillations with three-family frequencies for a nonzero detuning, which dramatically differ from the previous results showing only single-family Rabi oscillations.

  15. Bare-State Time-Evolving Operator Solution to Raman Model in A Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; NIE Yi-Zhen; YANG Xiao-Xue

    2003-01-01

    We derive exact analytical expressions of time-evolving bare-state operators of level occupation numbers and the photon numbers for a composite system consisting of a three-level atom interacting with two modes of a quantized electromagnetic field in A configuration. These results demonstrate the oscillations with three-family frequencies for a nonzero detuning, which dramatically differ from the previous results showing only single-family Rabi oscillations.

  16. Optical coupling of bare optoelectronic components and flexographically printed polymer waveguides in planar optronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixiao; Wolfer, Tim; Lange, Alex; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-05-01

    Large scale, planar optronic systems allowing spatially distributed functionalities can be well used in diverse sensor networks, such as for monitoring the environment by measuring various physical quantities in medicine or aeronautics. In these systems, mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric foils, e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), are employed as carrier materials. A benefit of using these materials is their low cost. The optical interconnections from light sources to light transmission structures in planar optronic systems occupy a pivotal position for the sensing functions. As light sources, we employ the optoelectronic components, such as edgeemitting laser diodes, in form of bare chips, since their extremely small structures facilitate a high integration compactness and ensure sufficient system flexibility. Flexographically printed polymer optical waveguides are deployed as light guiding structures for short-distance communication in planar optronic systems. Printing processes are utilized for this generation of waveguides to achieve a cost-efficient large scale and high-throughput production. In order to attain a high-functional optronic system for sensing applications, one of the most essential prerequisites is the high coupling efficiency between the light sources and the waveguides. Therefore, in this work, we focus on the multimode polymer waveguide with a parabolic cross-section and investigate its optical coupling with the bare laser diode. We establish the geometrical model of the alignment based on the previous works on the optodic bonding of bare laser diodes and the fabrication process of polymer waveguides with consideration of various parameters, such as the beam profile of the laser diode, the employed polymer properties of the waveguides as well as the carrier substrates etc. Accordingly, the optical coupling of the bare laser diodes and the polymer waveguides was simulated

  17. Towards new methodology for improvement of topographic and anisotropic correction of desert bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomran, Ali

    Desert bare soil has been found in literature to exhibit anisotropic reflectance behaviour. Anisotropy is described by Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution function (BRDF). Literature studies have limited their investigations to the behaviour of the topographic corrections of Minnaert and C models (simple forms of the empirical type of BRDF) with terrain variables (slope and orientation). Yet, none of these studies, especially for desert bare soil, has investigated the behaviour of the coefficient values of Minnaert and C with terrain variables. The investigation in this study has revealed that the relation between terrain slope (derived from both DEM level-1 and level-2) of desert bare soil in Saudi Arabia and K and C values follow closely a 2nd order polynomial trend. K curves have taken convex shapes, whereas C curves were concave. The Minnaert (K) and C coefficients trends have shown that surface Lambertian behaviour is more pronounced on slopes facing away from the sun than on sun facing slopes. Unlike the Minnaert K and C coefficients derived from four spectral classes, this author's newly developed terrain slope, aspect and phase angle dependant's C and Minnaert coefficients produced promising results compared to the global K and C. Induced BRDF effects in the desert bare soil is found the more probable dominating cause for the scatter/jitter in the radiance/cos(i) regression plots that remained after radiometric correction. Though its high topographic correction efficiency and unlike Minnaert model, C model tends to maintain the uncorrected radiance values unchanged after correction (i.e. not amplified to compensate for low sun angle).

  18. Dynamic atmospheres and winds of cool luminous giants, I. Al$_2$O$_3$ and silicate dust in the close vicinity of M-type AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Höfner, Susanne; Aringer, Bernhard; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    High spatial resolution techniques have given valuable insights into the mass loss mechanism of AGB stars, which presumably involves a combination of atmospheric levitation by pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. Observations indicate that Al$_2$O$_3$ condenses at distances of about 2 stellar radii or less, prior to the formation of silicates. Al$_2$O$_3$ grains are therefore prime candidates for producing the scattered light observed in the close vicinity of several M-type AGB stars, and they may be seed particles for the condensation of silicates at lower temperatures. We have constructed a new generation of Dynamic Atmosphere & Radiation-driven Wind models based on Implicit Numerics (DARWIN), including a time-dependent treatment of grain growth & evaporation for both Al$_2$O$_3$ and Fe-free silicates (Mg$_2$SiO$_4$). The equations describing these dust species are solved in the framework of a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamical model for the atmosphere & wind s...

  19. Models for calculating phreatic water evaporation on bare and Tamarix-vegetated lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shunjun; TIAN Changyan; SONG Yudong; CHEN Xiaobing; LI Yuetan

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water consumption of natural vegetation in arid regions.It is an effective approach to study ecological water demand of natural vegetation by phreatic evaporation.In order to study the ecological water demand of Tarim river basin, based on the observation data of phreatic evaporation on bare lands at the Aksu Water Balance Experimental station from 1989 to 1996, by analyzing the relationship of phreatic evaporation,depth of phreatic surface and evaporation of water,taking the limit rate of phreatic evaporation as the control condition, and based on the objective law that the relation between phreatic evaporation and evaporation of water is nonlinear, we establish models for calculating phreatic evaporation on bare land,which can fully reflect the law of phreatic evaporation in the Tarim river basin. According to the data of depth of phreatic surface and soil moisture when pheratic level decline is caused just by evapotranspiration on Tamarix-vegetated land from 2003 to 2004, we calculate the amount of phreatic evaporation and set up models for calculating phreatic evaporation on Tamarix- vegetated land. Phreatic evaporation on bare land and Tamarix-vegetated land could be transformed each other by a Tamarix vegetation conversion coefficient. The test results show that the calculation accuracy of the models is high and the models are suitable for Tarim river basin.

  20. Percutaneous Creation of Bare Intervascular Tunnels for Salvage of Thrombosed Hemodialysis Fistulas Without Recanalizable Outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu, E-mail: jjychen@gmail.com [Yuan’s General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Wang, Yen-Chi [E-Da Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Weng, Mei-Jui [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology (China)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThis study aimed to retrospectively assess the efficacy of a bare intervascular tunnel for salvage of a thrombosed hemodialysis fistula. We examined the clinical outcomes and provided follow-up images of the bare intervascular tunnel.Materials and MethodsEight thrombosed fistulas lacked available recanalizable outflow veins were included in this study. These fistulas were salvaged by re-directing access site flow to a new outflow vein through a percutaneously created intervascular tunnel without stent graft placement. The post-intervention primary and secondary access patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method.ResultsThe procedural and clinical success rates were 100 %. Post-intervention primary and secondary access patency at 300 days were 18.7 ± 15.8 and 87.5 ± 11.7 %, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 218.7 days (range 10–368 days). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction 10 days after the procedure. No other major complications were observed. Minor complications, such as swelling, ecchymosis, and pain around the tunnel, occurred in all of the patients.ConclusionsPercutaneous creation of a bare intervascular tunnel is a treatment option for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas without recanalizable outflow in selected patients.

  1. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia Jorge,1 Christophe Dubois1,2 1Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, 2Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract: Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. Keywords: bare metal stent, coronary stent alloys, coronary artery disease

  2. Patches of bare ground as a staple commodity for declining ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schaub

    Full Text Available Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30-70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds.

  3. Charge-exchange cross sections and beam lifetimes for stored and decelerated bare uranium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Ludziejewski, T.; Reich, H.; Bosch, F.; Franzke, B.; Kozhuharov, C.; Menzel, G.; Mokler, P.H.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Dunford, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.; Eichler, J. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany). Bereich Theoretische Physik]|[Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Rymuza, P. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Stachura, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Swiat, P.; Warczak, A. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland). Inst. Fizyki; Winkler, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    Charge-exchange cross sections and beam lifetimes are studied for decelerated bare uranium ions at the ESR storage ring. By deceleration from the initial energy of 358 MeV/u down to various energies as low as 49 MeV/u, i.e. far below the production energy of bare ionic species, the electron pick-up cross sections were obtained for collisions with N{sub 2}, Ar, CH{sub 4} and Kr gaseous targets. The measured cross sections and beam lifetimes are compared with the theoretical results for radiative and non-radiative electron capture. The present data along with the theoretical approximations discussed, provide a solid basis for the estimation of beam lifetimes for decelerated bare high-Z ions. Moreover, a normalization procedure is proposed, in which absolute total charge-exchange cross sections are derived by normalizing the simultaneously measured yield of K-REC photons to rigorously calculated relativistic cross sections. This method along with the unprecedented beam conditions at the ESR storage ring, allows a significant improvement in the accuracy of cross section data. (orig.)

  4. Bare Shear Viscosity and Anomalous Fall Rate of Oil Droplets in Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Rodney

    2011-11-01

    Experimental evidence of Kim and Fedele (1982) indicates a breakdown of the Millikan Law for the fall rate of oil droplets in Nitrogen gas over a pressure range of 1-15 atm. The discrepancy is most pronounced for smallest, 0.1 micron radius droplets for which the fall rate increases with pressure. The opposite behavior was observed by Millikan with larger drops in air of pressure at most one atm. We explain these results by arguing that the particle's motion, in particular Stokes' drag formula, is determined by the so-called bare shear viscosity which applies to micro fluid flows. This is in contrast with the usual theory which uses a renormalized shear viscosity and which is well approximated by the Enskog value. A mode coupling formula for the bare shear viscosity is discussed and a graphical comparison is made with the experimental results. Basically an increase in gas pressure produces a decrease in the bare shear viscosity and thus the fall rate increases. The idea that the shear viscosity is smaller for micro flows is consistent with the intuitive belief that on small enough spatial and time scales, fluid flows are conservative without dissipation.

  5. From interstellar abundances to grain composition: the major dust constituents Mg, Si and Fe

    CERN Document Server

    Voshchinnikov, N V

    2010-01-01

    We analyse observational correlations for three elements entering into the composition of interstellar silicate and oxide grains. Using current solar abundances (Asplund et al. 2009), we convert the gas-phase abundances into dust-phase abundances for 196 sightlines. We deduce a sharp difference in abundances for sightlines located at low ($|b|30\\degr$) galactic latitudes. For high-latitude stars the ratios Mg/Si and Fe/Si in dust are close to 1.5. For disk stars they are reduced to ${\\rm Mg/Si} \\sim 1.2$ and ${\\rm Fe/Si} \\sim 1.05$. The derived numbers indicate that 1) the dust grains cannot be the mixture of silicates with olivine and pyroxene composition only and some amount of magnesium or iron (or both) should be in another population and 2) the destruction of Mg-rich grains in the warm medium is more effective than of Fe-rich grains. We reveal a decrease of dust-phase abundances and correspondingly an increase of gas-phase abundances with distance $D$ for stars with $D\\ga 400$\\,pc. We attribute this fact...

  6. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-O and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures.Therefore,those silicates may be named titano- and zircono-silicates.Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra,the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet,respectively.As a new concept,the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  7. Calcined sodium silicate as solid base catalyst for biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng; Peng, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Jian-Ying; Xiu, Zhi-Long [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, School of Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-03-15

    This paper examined the use of calcined sodium silicate as a novel solid base catalyst in the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol. The calcined sodium silicate was characterized by DTA-TG, Hammett indicator method, XRD, SEM, BET, IR and FT-IR. It catalyzed the transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel with a yield of almost 100% under the following conditions: sodium silicate of 3.0 wt.%, a molar ratio of methanol/oil of 7.5:1, reaction time of 60 min, reaction temperature of 60 C, and stirring rate of 250 rpm. The oil containing 4.0 wt.% water or 2.5 wt.% FFA could also be transesterified by using this catalyst. The catalyst can be reused for at least 5 cycles without loss of activity. (author)

  8. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  9. Effect of Minor Elements on Silicate Cement Clinker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Congyun; ZHANG Mingfei; ZHANG Meixiang; LONG Shizong; CHEN Yuankui; MA Baoguo

    2005-01-01

    The effect of rare-earth and HX addition agent on the burn-ability of silicate cement clinker was investigated by orthogonal experiment. The result shows, compared with blank sample, f- CaO of the samples added with rare-earth and HX agent drops by 84.95% , its 3d and 28d compressive strength enhances by 24.40%and 16.90%, respectively. It was discovered by means of X-ray diffraction and high temperature microscope analysis that sintering temperature of the sample added with rare-earth and HX addition agent is about 1320℃. At the same time, the burning temperature of tricalcium silicate desends and its crystal growth forming-rate increases.Tricalcium silicate content in burning clinker is higher and its crystal is larger.

  10. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  11. Structural chemistry of anhydrous sodium silicates - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Sodium silicates are of considerable importance for many fields of inorganic chemistry and applied mineralogy, being either raw materials for synthesis or already finished products. In addition to their industrial relevance they have also been studied intensively because of their interesting physico-chemical properties including high ion-exchange capacity and selectivity or two-dimensional sodium diffusion and conductivity. Furthermore, the structural chemistry of crystalline sodium silicates offers the crystallographer challenging tasks such as polytypism, polymorphism, temperature and/or pressure-dependent phase transitions, pseudo-symmetry, complex twinning phenomena as well as incommensurately modulated structures. Many of these structural problems have been solved only recently, although in some cases they have been known for several decades. This article will provide an overview on the structurally characterized sodium silicates and their fascinating crystallochemical characteristics.

  12. Behaviour of Silicate Melts in Respect of Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金民; 叶大年

    1989-01-01

    The volumes per oxygen of some silicate melts have been calculated and then compared with those of silicate glasses.It is suggested that the volume of a silicate melt can be divided into two parts.One is contri buted by the silicon-oxygen network and the other by the “oxides”.Variation patterns of VPOs suggest that the volume of the Si-O network generally remains unchanged and the expansion of the melt is caused mainly by the locat expansion of the “oxides”.It is further proposed that the radius of O2- shows little variation,in striking contrast to the radius of cations.The mechanism governing the expansion is discussed in detail.

  13. Good Grains Gone Bad: How Grain to Grain Interactions Complicate the Onset of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, E.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Predictions of the onset of sediment motion are integral components of bed stability and bedload flux estimates. Mechanistic equations for initial motion employ a balance between driving and resisting forces. Driving forces are modeled as functions of the magnitude and duration of turbulence events whereas resisting forces are simply approximated by the grain weight and a static friction angle. Such resistance approximations do not include the effects of grain packing and dynamic interactions with surrounding sediment. To better understand and quantify grain resistance, we used a Discrete Element Method (DEM) model for a single test grain surrounded by a bed of smaller grains. We applied a constant external force on the test grain in each run and progressively increased the force between runs until the test grain moved out of its resting pocket. The DEM model calculated the test grain velocity, position and net force (sum of applied external force and forces from other grains) at time steps of 1×10-7 s. Despite applying a constant external force, the net force on the test grain fluctuated by three to six orders of magnitude, depending on the run. These fluctuations were driven by the creation and destruction of force chains, and the rearrangement of the positions of surrounding bed sediment. Stick-slip behavior, which has been observed in shear tests of granular material, occurred during test-grain motion. The frequency of stick-slip behavior generally declined with higher applied external forces. Therefore, the onset of grain motion was not continuous, as is often assumed even in the presence of fluctuating applied fluid forces. The duration and magnitude of turbulence fluctuations have received considerable attention but our results suggest that grain resistance oscillations are also important. Whether turbulence and resistance fluctuations are synchronous will likely dictate if grain movement occurs, and we are currently conducting model runs to better

  14. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  15. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  16. Germinated grains: a superior whole grain functional food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kristina; Stojanovska, Lily; Vasiljevic, Todor; Mathai, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Grains are global dietary staples that when consumed in whole grain form, offer considerable health benefits compared with milled grain foods, including reduced body weight gain and reduced cardiovascular and diabetes risks. Dietary patterns, functional foods, and other lifestyle factors play a fundamental role in the development and management of epidemic lifestyle diseases that share risks of developing adverse metabolic outcomes, including hyperglycaemia, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Whole grains provide energy, nutrients, fibres, and bioactive compounds that may synergistically contribute to their protective effects. Despite their benefits, the intake of grains appears to be lower than recommended in many countries. Of emerging interest is the application of germination processes, which may significantly enhance the nutritional and bioactive content of grains, as well as improve palatability. Enhancing grain foods in a natural way using germination techniques may therefore offer a practical, natural, dietary intervention to increase the health benefits and acceptability of whole grains, with potentially widespread effects across populations in attenuating adverse lifestyle disease outcomes. Continuing to build on the growing body of in-vitro studies requires substantiation with extended in-vivo trials so that we may further develop our understanding of the potential of germinated grains as a functional food.

  17. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  18. Mathematical Viscosity Models for Ternary Metallic and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yuan-kun; MENG Xian-min; GUO Han-jie

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical viscosity models for metallic melts were discussed. The experimental data of Ag-Au-Cu systems were used to verify the models based on Chou's general geometric thermodynamic model and the calculated results are consistent with the reported experimental data. A new model predicting the viscosity of multi-component silicate melts was established. The CaO-MnO-SiO2, CaO-FeO-SiO2 and FeO-MnO-SiO2 silicate slag systems were used to verify the model.

  19. Mbosi: An anomalous iron with unique silicate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Wasson, John T.

    1996-09-01

    The Mbosi iron meteorite contains millimeter size silicate inclusions. Mbosi is an ungrouped iron meteorite with a Ge/Ga ratio >10, which is an anomalous property shared with the five-member IIF iron group, the Eagle Station pallasites and four other ungrouped irons. Neither the IIF group nor the four other ungrouped irons are known to have silicate inclusions. Chips from three Mbosi inclusions were studied, but most of the work concentrated on a whole 3.1 mm circular inclusion. This inclusion consists of a mantle and a central core of different mineralogies. The mantle is partially devitrified quartz-normative glass, consisting of microscopic crystallites of two pyroxenes and plagioclase, which are crystalline enough to give an x-ray powder diffraction pattern but not coarse enough to permit analyses of individual minerals. The core consists of silica. The bulk composition does not match any known meteorite type, although there is a similarity in mode of occurrence to quartz-normative silicate inclusions in some HE irons. Mbosi silicate appears to be unique. The bulk rare earth element (REE) pattern of the mantle is flat at ≅ 7×C1; the core is depleted in REE but shows a small positive Eu anomaly. The O-isotope composition of bulk silicate lies on a unit slope mixing line (parallel and close to the C3 mixing line) that includes the Eagle Station pallasites and the iron Bocaiuva (related to the IIF irons); all of these share the property of having Ge/Ga ratios >10. It is concluded that Mbosi silicate represents a silica-bearing source rock that was melted and injected into metal. Melting occurred early in the history of the parent body because the metal now shows a normal Widmanstätten structure with only minor distortion that was caused when the parent body broke up and released meteorites into interplanetary space. The cause of Ge/Ga ratios being >10 in these irons is unknown. The fact that silicates in Mbosi, Bocaiuva (related to IIF irons) and the Eagle

  20. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  1. Coordinated Isotopic and Mineral Characterization of Highly Fractionated 18O-Rich Silicates in the Queen Alexandra Range 99177 CR3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain a mixture of solar system condensates, pre-solar grains, and primitive organic matter. Each of these materials record conditions and processes in different regions of the solar nebula, on the meteorite parent body, and beyond the solar system. Oxygen isotopic studies of meteorite components can trace interactions of distinct oxygen isotopic reservoirs in the early solar system and secondary alteration processes. The O isotopic compositions of the earliest solar system condensates fall along a carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mineral (CCAM) line of slope approximately 1 in a plot of delta 17O against delta 18O. This trend is attributed to mixing of material from 16O-poor and 16O-rich reservoirs. Secondary processing can induce mass-dependent fractionation of the O isotopes, shifting these compositions along a line of slope approximately 0.52. Substantial mass-dependent fractionation of O isotopes has been observed in secondary minerals in CAIs, calcite, and FUN inclusions. These fractionations were caused by significant thermal or aqueous alteration. We recently reported the identification of four silicate grains with extremely fractionated O isotopic ratios (delta 18O equals 37 - 55 per mille) in the minimally altered CR3 chondrite QUE 99177. TEM analysis of one grain indicates it is a nebular condensate that did not experience substantial alteration. The history of these grains is thus distinct from those of the aforementioned fractionated materials. To constrain the origin of the silicate grains, we conducted further Mg and Fe isotopic studies and TEM analyses of two grains.

  2. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension D_f = 2. Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the ...

  3. Solar wind helium, neon and argon released by oxidation of metal grains from the Weston chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R. H.; Rajan, R. S.; Rambaldi, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A set of experiments were carried out to test the feasibility of determining unfractionated elemental and isotopic ratios for the noble gases in the presumably ancient solar wind present in the gas rich meteorites. The problems of diffusive loss was avoided by analyzing metal rather than the usual silicates. In order to avoid chemical, and even harsh physical, treatment of the sample, which might have affected the surfaces of metal grains, a means of analyzing the metal in the presence of residual silicate not removed by gentle crushing and magnetic separation was devised. Preliminary results given were obtained by taking advantage of the differing properties of metal and silicates with regard to diffusion. The results suggests that, with some modifications in the choice of pyrolysis and combustion temperatures and in the amount of O2 used, it should be possible, by oxidizing the surfaces of metal grains from gas rich meteorites, to obtain data on solar wind that has not been fractionated by diffusive loss.

  4. Grain Handling and Storage Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Jill, Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Agricultural Health and Safety Fact Sheet AHS-02 Grain Handling and Storage Safety Jill Webster Ph.D., S. Christian Mariger, Graduate Assistant Agricultural Systems Technology and Education There are several hazards that should be considered when working with grain. Storage structures, handling equipment, and the grain itself have all caused serious injuries and deaths. Storage structures (bins, silos, and granaries), like all confined spaces, have significant hazards associated with them. Be...

  5. Core Formation Timescale, Silicate-Metal Equilibration, and W Diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Q.; Jacobsen, B.; Tinker, D.; Lesher, C.

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which material accreted to the proto-Earth and segregated to form the core was chemically and isotopically equilibrated with the silicate mantle is an outstanding problem in planetary science. This is particularly important when attempting to assign a meaningful age for planetary accretion and core formation based on Hf-W isotope systematics. The Earth and other terrestrial planets likely formed by accretion of previously differentiated planetesimals. For the planetesimals themselves the most important energy source for metal-silicate differentiation is the combined radioactive heating due to decay of 26Al (half-life 0.7 Ma) and 60Fe (half-life 1.5 Ma). It is expected that the fractionation of Hf and W during planetesimal core formation will lead to a divergence in the W isotopic compositions of the core and silicate portions of these bodies. This expectation is supported by the enormously radiogenic 182W signatures reported for basaltic eucrites. The observation that the W isotopic compositions of the silicate portions of Earth, Moon and Mars are similar and markedly less radiogenic than eucrites suggests that during planet accretion the pre-differentiated metallic core material containing low 182W must have equilibrated extensively with the more radiogenic (high 182W) silicate material to subdue the ingrowth of 182W in the silicate mantle of the planets. The standard theory of planet formation predicts that after runaway and oligarchic growth, the late stage of planet formation is characterized by impact and merging of Mars-sized objects. This is a tremendously energetic process estimated to raise the temperature of the proto-Earth to about 7000K (a temperature equivalent to a mass spectrometer's plasma source, which indiscriminately ionizes all incoming elements). After the giant impacts, the proto-Earth had a luminosity and surface temperature close to a low mass star for a brief period of time. Stevenson (1990) argued that emulsification caused

  6. Clear Evidence for Fe-60 in Silicate from a Semarkona Chondrule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, G. R.; Tachibana, S.

    2004-01-01

    Fe-60 (t(sub 1/2) = 1.5 Ma) is key to understanding the sources of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system because it is the only one among those known from meteoritic material that is produced only in stars [1]. Within the last year, it has become clear that Fe-60 was present in sulfides from primitive ordinary and enstatite chondrites in amounts sufficient to require a recent stellar input [2-5]. The sulfide data indicate an initial Fe-60/Fe-56 ratio for the early solar system of between approx. 3 10(exp -7) and approx. 1.6 10(exp -6) [2-4]. However, iron (and nickel?) in sulfides is easily mobilized by very mild heating [e.g., 6], so there is considerable uncertainty over the true initial ratio. To resolve this uncertainty, we have begun a search for evidence of Fe-60 in silicates from primitive chondrites. In olivine from type 3.0-3.1 ordinary chondrites, diffusive exchange of iron and magnesium has not occurred to any significant degree, and diffusive exchange in pyroxene is slower [7]. However, the relatively small elemental fractionation of iron from nickel in silicates, coupled with the fact that the daughter nuclide, Ni-60, makes up approx. 26 % of normal nickel, make detection of excesses of radiogenic Ni-60 very difficult. Fortunately, we have found a fine-grained radiating-pyroxene chondrule in Semarkona (LL3.0) with a very high Fe/Ni ratio that gives clear evidence of Fe-60.

  7. The formation and evolution of planetary systems: Grain growth and chemical processing of dust in T Tauri systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwman, J; Hillenbrand, L A; Meyer, M R; Pascucci, I; Carpenter, J; Hines, D; Kim, J S; Silverstone, M D; Hollenbach, D; Wolf, S

    2008-01-01

    This paper is one in a series presenting results obtained within the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Legacy Science Program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Here we present a study of dust processing and growth in seven protoplanetary disks. Our spectra indicate that the circumstellar silicate dust grains have grown to sizes at least 10 times larger than observed in the interstellar medium, and show evidence for a non-negligible (~5 % in mass fractions) contribution from crystalline species. These results are similar to those of other studies of protoplanetary disks. In addition, we find a correlation between the strength of the amorphous silicate feature and the shape of the spectral energy distribution. This latter result is consistent with the growth and subsequent gravitational settling of dust grains towards the disk mid-plane. Further, we find a change in the relative abundance of the different crystalline species: more enstatite relative to forsterite is observed in the inner warm du...

  8. Non-conservative controls on distribution of dissolved silicate in Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    Cochin backwater system was studied with regard to dissolved silicate (DSi) to understand its seasonal distribution and behaviour during estuarine mixing. Silicate had a linear relationship with salinity during the high river discharge period...

  9. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  10. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  11. On the Dissolution Behavior of Sulfur in Ternary Silicate Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Park, Joo Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Sulfur dissolution behavior, in terms of sulfide capacity ( C S), in ternary silicate slags (molten oxide slags composed of MO - NO - SiO2, where M and N are Ca, Mn, Fe, and Mg), is discussed based on available experimental data. Composition dependence of the sulfur dissolution, at least in the dilute region of sulfur, may be explained by taking into account the cation-anion first-nearest-neighbor (FNN) interaction (stability of sulfide) and the cation-cation second-nearest-neighbor (SNN) interaction over O anion (oxygen proportions in silicate slags). When the Gibbs energy of a reciprocal reaction MO + NS = MS + NO is positive, the sulfide capacity of slags with virtually no SiO2 or low SiO2 concentration decreases as the concentration of MO increases. However, in some slags, as SiO2 concentration increases, replacing NO by MO at a constant SiO2 concentration may increase sulfide capacity when the basicity of NO is less than that of MO. This phenomenon is observed as rotation of iso- C S lines in ternary silicate slags, and it is explained by simultaneous consideration of the stability of sulfide and oxygen proportions in the silicate slags. It is suggested that a solution model for the prediction of sulfide capacity should be based on the actual dissolution mechanism of sulfur rather than on the simple empirical correlation.

  12. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  13. Nd3+ Doped Silicate Glass Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lu-Yun; CHEN Dan-Ping; XIA Jin-An; WANG Chen; JIANG Xiong-Wei; ZHU Cong-Shan; QIU Jian-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ We report on the fabrication of two kinds of large core area Nd3+ doped silicate glass photonic crystal fibres, and demonstration of the fibre waveguiding properties. The measured minimum loss of one kind ofibres is 2.5 db/m at 660nm. The fibres sustain only a single mode at least over the wavelength range from 660nm to 980nm.

  14. Calorimetric signature of structural heterogeneity in a ternary silicate glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Yang, G.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural heterogeneity in a silicate glass by hyperquenching–annealing–calorimetry approach. The results show a striking phenomenon: two separated sub-Tg relaxation peaks appear on the calorimetric curve of the hyperquenched CaO–MgO–SiO2 glass, implying the existence of two d...

  15. Phase Diagrams of Silicate Systems: Handbook; Third Issue; Ternary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the third issue of the handbook Phase Diagrams of Silicate Systems, information is included on the phase relationships in systems containing...radioelectronics, nuclear engineering, etc. Not only are equilibrium phase diagrams presented in the handbook, but the phases existing in the

  16. Electron stimulated hydroxylation of a metal supported silicate film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Emmez, Emre; Pan, Qiushi; Yang, Bing; Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E; Sterrer, Martin; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Goikoetxea, Itziar; Wlodarczyk, Radoslaw; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Water adsorption on a double-layer silicate film was studied by using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Under vacuum conditions, small amounts of silanols (Si-OH) could only be formed upon deposition of an ice-like (amorphous solid water, ASW) film and subsequent heating to room temperature. Silanol coverage is considerably enhanced by low-energy electron irradiation of an ASW pre-covered silicate film. The degree of hydroxylation can be tuned by the irradiation parameters (beam energy, exposure) and the ASW film thickness. The results are consistent with a generally accepted picture that hydroxylation occurs through hydrolysis of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds in the silica network. Calculations using density functional theory show that this may happen on Si-O-Si bonds, which are either parallel (i.e., in the topmost silicate layer) or vertical to the film surface (i.e., connecting two silicate layers). In the latter case, the mechanism may additionally involve the reaction with a metal support underneath. The observed vibrational spectra are dominated by terminal silanol groups (ν(OD) band at 2763 cm(-1)) formed by hydrolysis of vertical Si-O-Si linkages. Film dehydroxylation fully occurs only upon heating to very high temperatures (∼ 1200 K) and is accompanied by substantial film restructuring, and even film dewetting upon cycling hydroxylation/dehydroxylation treatment.

  17. Silicate Dispersion and Mechanical Reinforcement in Polysiloxane/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, Daniel F.

    2010-01-12

    We report the first in-depth comparison of the mechanical properties and equilibrium solvent uptake of a range of polysiloxane nanocomposites based on treated and untreated montmorillonite and fumed silica nanofillers. We demonstrate the ability of equilibrium solvent uptake data (and, thus, overall physical and chemical cross-link density) to serve as a proxy for modulus (combining rubber elasticity and Flory-Rehner theory), hardness (via the theory of Boussinesq), and elongation at break, despite the nonideal nature of these networks. In contrast, we find that tensile and tear strength are not well-correlated with solvent uptake. Interfacial strength seems to dominate equilibrium solvent uptake and the mechanical properties it predicts. In the montmorillonite systems in particular, this results in the surprising consequence that equilibrium solvent uptake and mechanical properties are independent of dispersion state. We conclude that edge interactions play a more significant role than degree of exfoliation, a result unique in the field of polymer nanocomposites. This demonstrates that even a combination of polymer/nanofiller compatibility and thermodynamically stable nanofiller dispersion levels may not give rise to reinforcement. These findings provide an important caveat when attempting to connect structure and properties in polymer nanocomposites, and useful guidance in the design of optimized polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites in particular. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  18. Comparison of different methods of image analysis for quantifying bare soil in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Fernández, M.; Lavado Contador, J. F.; Schnabel, S.; Gómez Gutiérrez, Á.

    2009-04-01

    Many authors emphasize the importance of vegetation in maintaining low levels of soil loss by means of its positive influence in reducing erosion. In some low-vegetated Mediterranean rangelands, especially those with high livestock densities, water erosion can ultimately lead to a partial or total loss of soils, particularly at the beginning of the rainy season, when the surface cover is reduced after the dry summer period. In relation with this, it is essential to develop accurate methods allowing the quantification of bare soil which, in turn, can inform about the influence of different livestock management alternatives over the land system. The main goal of this work is the comparison of the ability of various pixel-based as well as object-oriented methods of image classification for the quantification of bare soil at a fine spatial resolution. The study area is a farm located in a woody rangeland (dehesa) in SW Spain covering a surface area of 1,024 hectare. A three bands (RGB) orthophoto image with a pixel size of 0,4 metres was used, together with its brightness component, to compare the classification of bare soil vs covered soil by means of the following methods: unsupervised classification (k-means algorithm), supervised classification (maximum likelihood classification, minimum distance or nearest neighbour and Mahalanobis distance) and object oriented classification through a multiresolution segmentation. The results of classification were tested using 700 to 1000 points of field validation. Different combinations of image layers as well as validation algorithms were applied to assess for the better classification results. The best unsupervised classification was obtained from a combination of the RGB layers with the brightness component of the image. A total of 93.1 % of the field data were correctly classified and the Area Under the Curve (AUC) obtained with the ROC (Receiving Operating Characteristic) validation technique amounted to 0.91. With this

  19. Clinical outcomes with drug-eluting and bare-metal stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Della Riva, Diego;

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the relative safety and efficacy of different drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) using a network meta-analysis....

  20. EAARL-B coastal topography: Fire Island, New York, pre-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: seamless (bare earth and submerged)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Wayne; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Klipp, Emily S.; Troche, Rodolfo J.; Fredericks, Alexandra M.; Masessa, Melanie L.; Nagle, David B.

    2014-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography datasets were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, Florida.

  1. Benthic metabolism and denitrification in a river reach: a comparison between vegetated and bare sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi VIAROLI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at comparing biogeochemical processes in a Vallisneria spiralis meadow and in unvegetated sediments in the upper reach of the Mincio River (Northern Italy. The main hypothesis of this work is that meadows of rooted macrophytes affect benthic metabolism, enhancing capacity to retain nutrients (assimilation and dissipate (denitrification nitrogen loadings. In order to highlight how plants affect benthic processes in the riverbed, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP and inorganic nitrogen fluxes, together with denitrification rates, were measured from February to November 2007 in intact cores collected from stands of V. spiralis and bare sediments. V. spiralis biomass, elemental composition and growth rates were concurrently measured. Macrophyte biomass ranged from 60 to 120 g m-2 (as dry matter; growth rates followed a seasonal pattern from 0.001 in winter up to 0.080 d-1 in summer. On an annual basis, the macrophyte meadow was autotrophic with net O2 production and dissolved inorganic carbon uptake, while the bare sediment was net heterotrophic. The concurrent N assimilation by macrophytes and losses through denitrification led to similar N uptake/dissipation rates, up to 2500 mmol m-2 y-1. Under the very high NO3 - concentrations of the Mincio River, the competition between primary production and denitrification processes was also avoided. A significant ammonium regeneration from sediments to the water column occurred in the V. spiralis meadow, where plant debris and particulate matter accumulated. Here, SRP was also released into the water column, whilst in the bare sediment SRP fluxes were close to zero. Overall, V. spiralis affected the benthic metabolism enhancing the ecosystem capacity to control nitrogen contamination. However, the actual N removal rates were not sufficient to mitigate the pollution discharge.

  2. Survival of Ancylostoma caninum on bare ground, pea gravel, and concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D L

    1975-12-01

    Studies were done to determine the survival of infective Ancylostoma caninum 3rd-stage larvae on 3 ground covers commonly used in dog run construction: bare ground, pea gravel, and concrete. Changes in numbers of recovered larvae were compared to meterologic data and the most significant weather variables were determined. Larvae were recovered 1 to 7 days on bare ground. Larvae survived longer in the fecal mass (mean of 3 days) than on the bare ground (mean of 2 days). Rain was the most significant variable, in that it was positive in its effects (higher larval count) early in the experiment (causing fecal mass breakdown and release of larvae) and negative (lower larval count) later in the experiment (spreading larvae away from test site). Larvae were also recovered 1 to 7 days on pea gravel. They were recovered for a mean 2.6 days from the fecal sample, a mean of 1.5 days from the rocks directly below the fecal mass, and a mean of 1.3 days from the remaining rocks. Here also, rain was the most significant weather factor. It was negatively significant (lower larval count) for the fecal mass (spreading of the larvae) and positive for those in the pebbles (increasing the moisture in the pebbles). Survival time of larvae on concrete was shorter than that on the other 2 substrates: from 0 to 2 days. Larvae were recovered a mean of 1.3 days from the fecal mass and a mean of 0., days from the surrounding concrete. Rain was positively significant early in the experiments in that it released trapped larvae from the fecal mass. Sunlight consistently was negatively significant (lower larval count) due to its lethality to the unprotected larvae.

  3. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous-Ooze Sediments, More Basin, Norwegian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic siliceous-ooze sediments occur above the hydrocarbon reservoir of the Ormen Lange gas field in More Basin, Norwegian Sea. A possible hydrocarbon prospect of siliceous ooze was proposed, but siliceous ooze is significantly different in texture from most commonly known reservoir rocks...

  4. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  5. Space demostration of bare electrodynamic tape-tether technology on the sounding rocket S520-25

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; Watanabe, Takeo; Sahara, Hironori; Kojima, Hirohisa; Takehara, Shoichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Susumu; Abe, Takumi; Tanaka, Koji; Oyama, Khoichiro; Jhonson, Les; Khazanov, V.; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón; Charro, Mario; Kruijff, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    A spaceflight validation of bare electro dynamic tape tether technology was conducted. A S520-25 sounding rocket was launched successfully at 05:00am on 31 August 2010 and successfully deployed 132.6m of tape tether over 120 seconds in a ballistic flight. The electrodynamic performance of the bare tape tether employed as an atmospheric probe was measured. Flight results are introduced through the present progressive report of the demonstration and the results of flight experiment are ex...

  6. T-REX: Bare electro-dynamic tape-tether technology experimetn on sounding rocket S520

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takeo; Fujii, Hironori; Kusagaya, Tairo; Sahara, Hironori; Kojima, Hirohisa; Takehara, Shoichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Susumu; Abe, Takumi; Tanaka, Koji; Oyama, Khoichiro; Ebinuma, Takuji; Johson, Les; Khazanov, George; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2012-01-01

    The project to verify the performance of space tether technology was successfully demonstrated by the launch of the sounding rocket S520 the 25tu. The project is the space demonstration of science and engineering technologies of a bare tape electrodynamic tether (EDT) in the international campaign between Japan, USA, Europe and Australia. Method of "Inverse ORIGAMI (Tape tether folding)" was employed in order to deploy the bare tape EDT in a short period time of the suborbital flight. The ...

  7. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Charles Y., E-mail: charles.kim@duke.edu; Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  8. A Simulating Experiment in the Process of Soil Erosion on Bare Land in Mt. Tanakami

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; HU Ke; WANG Xikui; Akitsu KIMOTO; Takahisa MIZUYAMA

    2001-01-01

    In order to understand the process of surface erosion and acquire basic data of conditions on hillslope without vege tation, a sprinkling experiment is conducted on a bare slope in Mt. Tanakami in the central part of Japan. Based on the mea surements of runoff, mean soil erosion depth, and sediment yield, etc. , the results suggest the following characteristics in the process of surface erosion in the experimental area. (1) The occurrence of sediment discharge is interrupted; (2) Surface runoff is a saturated overland flow; (3) The mean soil erosion depth is thick compared with other areas in Mt. Tanakami;(4) Sediment discharge process is detachment- limited.

  9. Numerical solution of uncertain neutron diffusion equation for imprecisely defined homogeneous triangular bare reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nayak; S Chakraverty

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, neutron diffusion equation of a triangular homogeneous bare reactor with uncertain parameters has been investigated. Here the involved parameters viz. geometry of the reactor, diffusion coefficient and absorption coefficient, etc. are uncertain and these are considered as fuzzy. Fuzzy values are handled through limit method which was defined for interval computations. The concept of fuzziness is hybridised with traditional finite element method to propose fuzzy finite element method. The proposed fuzzy finite element method has been used to obtain the uncertain eigenvalues of the said problem. Further these uncertain eigenvalues are compared with the traditional finite element method in special cases.

  10. Inversion of dielectric constant and moisture of bare soil surface from backscattering coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗谦; 冯孔豫

    1997-01-01

    An inverse method of dielectric constant and moisture of bare wet soil surface from backscattering coefficients is presented, which is based upon the small perturbation model of electromagnetic wave scattering from rough surfaces and the empirical and dielectric mixing models of wet soil. Some sets of curves which describe the relation between the moisture of soil and the ratio of like polarization backscattering coefficients σvv and σhh are obtained, and some principles on how to choose the incident frequencies and the incident angles of the electromagnetic wave are given Analysis and calculation show that the mam advantage of this inverse method is its efficiency and simplicity.

  11. Cultura de calidad en centros nocturnos y bares en México. Caso puerto de Veracruz

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Carlos; Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla; Vargas-Hernández, José G.; Universidad de Guadalajara

    2016-01-01

    El sector turismo ha tenido un auge creciente en fechas recientes y en este ámbito la competitividad ha sido un asunto ampliamente analizado. La calidad es un elemento importante para incrementar la competitividad en bares y centros nocturnos y en ella el personal de la empresa es una pieza clave. Su participación en el diseño de elementos de ambiente, servicio y mercadotecnia induce un incremento en la competitividad de las empresas del sector industrial al influir directamente en la experie...

  12. Safety and efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents for bare-metal in-stent restenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Hideaki [Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Mahmoudi, Michael [University of Surrey, Guildford Road, Surrey, GU2-7XH (United Kingdom); Torguson, Rebecca; Satler, Lowell F.; Suddath, William O.; Pichard, Augusto D. [Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Waksman, Ron, E-mail: ron.waksman@medstar.net [Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of the everolimus-eluting stents (EES) with the paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) and sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) for the treatment of bare-metal in-stent restenosis. Background: The optimal treatment for bare-metal in-stent restenosis remains controversial. Methods: The study cohort comprised 322 consecutive patients (543 lesions) who presented with bare-metal in-stent restenosis to our institution and underwent coronary artery stent implantation with EES (114 patients; 181 lesions), PES (65 patients; 116 lesions) and SES (143 patients; 246 lesions). The analyzed clinical parameters were the 1-year rates of death, Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI), target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR), definite stent thrombosis (ST) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as the composite of death, MI, or TLR at 1-year. Results: The three groups were well matched for the conventional risk factors except for age and chronic kidney disease. The 1-year analyzed clinical parameters were similar in the three groups: death (EES = 3.5%, PES = 4.6%, SES = 4.2%; p = 0.94), MI (EES = 3.5%, PES = 6.3%, SES = 2.1%; p = 0.31), TLR (EES = 9.8%, PES = 9.5%, SES = 5.7%; p = 0.42), TVR (EES = 14.3%, PES = 11.1%, SES = 11.3%; p = 0.74), definite ST (EES = 0.9%, PES = 3.1%, SES = 3.5%; p = 0.38) and MACE (EES = 14.0%, PES = 15.4%, SES = 10.5%; p = 0.54). Male gender (hazard ratio = 0.47; 95% confidence interval = 0.25–0.88) and number of treated lesions (hazard ratio = 1.47; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–2.05) were found to be independent predictors of MACE. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that EES may provide similar safety and efficacy as first generation DES for the treatment of patients presenting with bare-metal in-stent restenosis.

  13. Low-Energy Rate Enhancement in Recombination Processes of Electrons into Bare Uranium Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yong; ZENG Si-Liang; DUAN Bin; YAN Jun; WANG Jian-Guo; DONG Chen-Zhong; MA Xin-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Dirac-Fork-Slater method combined with the multichannel quantum defect theory, the recombination processes of electrons into bare uranium ions (U92+) are investigated in the relative energy range close to zero, and the x-ray spectrum emitted in the direct radiative recombination and cascades processes are simulated. Compared with the recent measurement, it is found that the rate enhancement comes from the additional populations on high Rydberg states. These additional populations may be produced by other recombination mechanisms, such as the external electric-magnetic effects and the many-body correlation effects, which still remains an open problem.

  14. Introducing the notion of bare and effective mass via Newton's second law of motion

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, M B

    2005-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here, I discuss how these concepts may be introduced, at a very early stage, together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion for a sliding block. The setting up of a simple equation for the effective mass will allow instructors to discuss how external parameters, such as the temperature, influence this quantity. By developing the same equation as a power series one may also discuss perturbation theory and introduce Feynman diagrams.

  15. Low-frequency noise in bare SOI wafers: Experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-11-01

    Low-frequency noise (LFN) measurements are largely used for interface quality characterization in MOSFETs. In this work, a detailed investigation of LFN technique applied to pseudo-MOSFETs in bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates is provided. A physical model capable to describe the experimental results is proposed and validated using different die areas and inter-probe distances. The effective silicon area contributing to the noise signal, the impact of defects induced by probes and the possibility to extract interface trap density are addressed.

  16. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    , and pK+ are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy–Chapman–Stern triple-layer model......We present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the solid–liquid interface of fused-silica nanofabricated channels with and without a hydrophilic 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (cyanosilane) coating. We develop a model that relaxes the assumption that the surface parameters C1, C2...

  17. Bare metal or drug-eluting stent implantation in last remaining vessel PCI? A serious dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jianhua; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of an old male diabetic patient with last remaining vessel coronary artery disease and poor left ventricular function. In presence of an old occlusion of the left main coronary artery, a subtotal stenosis of a dominant right coronary artery required angioplasty. After ample consideration it was decided to implant a bare metal stent (BMS) instead of a drug-eluting stent (DES). The major reason was the fear for early discontinuation of clopidogrel in case a drug-eluting stent was placed. The procedure and follow-up are described followed by an overview of current literature concerning similar pathology.

  18. Urbanization and Grain Production Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyang; LI; Dongge; LIU

    2015-01-01

    Based on DEA-Malmquist method,this paper calculated the integrated technology efficiency of grain production and total factor productivity and analyzed factors influencing the grain production technology efficiency using working documents of panel structure. Research results indicate that grain production integrated technology efficiency of China is relatively low,technology utilization level is low,and it remains at the stage of decreasing returns to scale,and the pure technology efficiency still has space to increase. Total factor productivity is declining and the total factor productivity of many provinces is relatively low. Since the total factor productivity of eastern areas is higher than central and western areas,it is required to strengthen technological support for grain production. The implementation of urbanization is helpful for promoting increase of grain production technology efficiency in central and eastern areas,but it will exert negative influence on western areas.

  19. Autonomous grain combine control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

    2013-06-25

    A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

  20. Coarse Grained Quantum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Agon, Cesar; Kasko, Skyler; Lawrence, Albion

    2014-01-01

    We consider coarse graining a quantum system divided between short distance and long distance degrees of freedom, which are coupled by the Hamiltonian. Observations using purely long distance observables can be described by the reduced density matrix that arises from tracing out the short-distance observables. The dynamics of this density matrix is that of an open quantum system, and is nonlocal in time, on the order of some short time scale. We describe these dynamics in a model system with a simple hierarchy of energy gaps $\\Delta E_{UV} > \\Delta E_{IR}$, in which the coupling between high-and low-energy degrees of freedom is treated to second order in perturbation theory. We then describe the equations of motion under suitable time averaging, reflecting the limited time resolution of actual experiments, and find an expansion of the master equation in powers of $\\Delta E_{IR}/\\Delta E_{UV}$, in which the failure of the system to be Hamiltonian or even Markovian appears at higher orders in this ratio. We com...

  1. Exploring the Role of Sub-micron Sized Dust Grains in the Atmospheres of Red L0 - L6 Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Hiranaka, Kay; Douglas, Stephanie T; Marley, Mark S; Baldassare, Vivienne F

    2016-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis that the red near-infrared colors of some L dwarfs could be explained by a "dust haze" of small particles in their upper atmospheres. This dust haze would exist in conjunction with the clouds found in dwarfs with more typical colors. We developed a model which uses Mie theory and the Hansen particle size distributions to reproduce the extinction due to the proposed dust haze. We apply our method to 23 young L dwarfs and 23 red field L dwarfs. We constrain the properties of the dust haze including particle size distribution and column density using Markov-Chain Monte Carlo methods. We find that sub-micron range silicate grains reproduce the observed reddening. Current brown dwarf atmosphere models include large grain (1--100~$\\mu m$) dust clouds but not submicron dust grains. Our results provide a strong proof of concept and motivate a combination of large and small dust grains in brown dwarf atmosphere models.

  2. What does the fine-scale petrography of IDPs reveal about grain formation and evolution in the early solar system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John

    1994-01-01

    The 'pyroxene' interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) may be the best samples for investigation of primordial grain-forming reactions because they appear to have experienced negligible post-accretional alteration. They are likely to continue to yield information about gas-to-solid condensation and other grain-forming reactions that may have occurred either in the solar nebular or presolar interstellar environments. An immediate challenge lies in understanding the nanometer-scale petrography of the ultrafine-grained aggregates in 'pyroxene' IDP's. Whether these aggregates contain components from diverse grain-forming environments may ultimately be answered by systematic petrographic studies using electron microscopes capable of high spatial resolution microanalysis. It may be more difficult to decipher evidence of grain formation and evolution in 'olivine' and 'layer silicate' IDP's because they appear to have experienced post-accretional alteration. Most of the studied 'olivine' IDPs have been subjected to heating and equilibration, perhaps during atmospheric entry, while the 'layer silicate' IDP's have experienced aqueous alteration.

  3. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  4. Ice Formation via Deposition Mode Nucleation on Bare and Alcohol-covered Graphite Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of water on aerosol particles contributes to ice cloud formation in the atmosphere with implications for the water cycle and climate on Earth. The heterogeneous ice nucleation process is influenced by physico-chemical properties of the substrate, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we report on ice formation on bare and alcohol-covered graphite at temperatures from 175 to 213 K, probed by elastic helium and light scattering. Water has a low wettability on bare and butanol-covered graphite resulting in the growth of rough ice surfaces. In contrast, pre-adsorbed methanol provides hydrophilic surface sites and results in the formation of smooth crystalline ice; an effect that is pronounced also for sub-monolayer methanol coverages. The alcohols primarily reside at the ice surface and at the ice-graphite interface with a minor fraction being incorporated into the growing ice structures. Methanol has no observable effect on gas/solid water vapor exchange whereas butanol acts as a tr...

  5. Genetic relationships between dagginess, breech bareness, and wool traits in New Zealand dual-purpose sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, N K; Blair, H T; Hickson, R E; Dodds, K G; Johnson, P L; McEwan, J C

    2013-10-01

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters were estimated for dagginess, breech, wool, and fiber traits from approximately 29,500 progeny born in 2009 and 2010 in New Zealand dual-purpose ram breeding sheep flocks. Dagginess is adherence of fecal matter to the wool, and this study investigates the genetic and phenotypic correlations between dagginess and breech and wool traits. Estimates for heritability were moderate (0.21 to 0.44) for the following traits: dag score at 3 and 8 mo (DAG3, DAG8), breech bareness, wool length, wool bulk (BULK), mean fiber diameter, mean fiber diameter SD, mean fiber diameter CV, curvature (CURV), weaning weight at 3 mo, and autumn BW. Heritability estimates for fleece weight at 12 mo and proportion of medullated fibers were high (0.49 and 0.53, respectively). Dag score at 3 mo and DAG8 had low genetic and phenotypic correlations with all traits. Breech bareness had positive genetic and phenotypic correlations with CURV and BULK and mostly negative genetic correlations with all other wool traits. In summary the quantity and attributes of wool were not primary causative factors in fecal accumulation, leaving fecal consistency and composition as the major factors.

  6. Performance of bare high-purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heider, Marik Barnabé; Chkvorets, Oleg; Di Vacri, Assunta; Gusev, Konstantin; Schönert, Stefan; Shirchenko, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge at the National Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN. Bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in liquid argon serving simultaneously as a shield against external radioactivity and as a cooling medium. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, will be redeployed. Before operating the enriched detectors, tests are performed with non-enriched bare HPGe detectors in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory to test the Phase-I detector assembly, the detector handling protocols, the refurbishment technology and to study the long-term stability in liquid argon. The leakage currents in liquid argon and liquid nitrogen have been extensively studied under varying gamma irradiation conditions. In total three non-enriched high-purity p-type prototype germanium detectors have been operated successfully. The dete...

  7. Characterization of stainless steel assisted bare gold nanoparticles and their analytical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lorente, A I; Simonet, B M; Valcárcel, M; Eppler, S; Schindl, R; Kranz, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2014-01-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly, one-pot method to synthesize highly stable bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been developed. AuNPs have been synthesized from tetrachloroauric acid solution using steel or stainless steel as solid reducing agent, which can be reused. The proposed method yields bare gold nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure and room temperature for potentially producing large quantities. The obtained AuNPs have been characterized by SEM, TEM and AFM finding an average diameter of around 20 nm, polygonal yet nearly spherical shape and a narrow size distribution. The mechanism of reaction has been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX analysis. The obtained dispersed gold nanoparticles proved to be stable if stored a 4 °C for over four months without the addition of a stabilizing agent. Their analytical potential as SERS substrate has been demonstrated and their performance compared with that showed by citrate-coated gold nanoparticles. Thanks to their unique properties, their use as analytical tools provides analytical processes with enhanced selectivity and precision.

  8. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  9. Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumin, Md Abdul; Akhter, Kazi Farida; Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC).

  10. Discovery Of Transient Iron Fluorescence In The Bare Seyfert Ark 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Emanuele; Porquet, D.; Reeves, J.; Braito, V.; Lobban, A.; Matt, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results from an X-ray observational campaign on the bare Seyfert galaxy Ark 120 jointly carried out with XMM- Newton, Chandra, and NuSTAR. The favourable line of sight to this source, devoid of any significant absorbing material, provides an incomparably clean view to the nuclear regions of an AGN, down to the the immediate surroundings of the radiatively efficient, accreting supermassive black hole. Here we focus on the nature, properties, and variability of the emission-line complex due to iron fluorescence detected in the 6-7 keV band. The narrow K-alpha feature from neutral iron at 6.4 keV is resolved by Chandra/HETG to a width of 5000 km/s, consistent with origin from the optical broad-line region. However, excess components are seen on both sides of this core. The excess emission map computed over the 7.5 days of XMM-Newton monitoring and the following, time-resolved spectral analysis show that both the red and blue features are highly variable on timescales of 10-15 hours. Any explanation (orbiting hotspots, coronal clumps, disc instabilities) requires a highly dynamic, inhomogeneous disc/coronal system. These observations thus prove the unique potential of a bare source like Ark 120 to better understand the physics of the accretion disc/X-ray corona system in AGN.

  11. Oralloy (93.2 235U) Bare Metal Annuli And Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, Andrew John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A multitude of critical experiments with highly enriched uranium metal were conducted in the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments served to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant while also providing data for verification of different calculation methods and associated cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included both solid cylinders and annuli of various diameters, interacting cylinders of various diameters, parallelepipeds, and reflected cylinders and annuli. The experiments described here involve a series of delayed critical stacks of bare oralloy HEU annuli and disks. Three of these experiments consist of stacking bare HEU annuli of varying diameters to obtain critical configurations. These annuli have nominal inner and outer diameters (ID/OD) including: 7 inches (") ID – 9" OD, 9" ID – 11" OD, 11" ID – 13" OD, and 13? ID – 15" OD. The nominal heights range from 0.125" to 1.5". The three experiments themselves range from 7" – 13", 7" – 15", and 9" – 15" in diameter, respectively. The fourth experiment ranges from 7" – 11", and along with different annuli, it also includes an 11" disk and several 7" diameter disks. All four delayed critical experiments were configured and evaluated by J. T. Mihalczo, J. J. Lynn, and D. E. McCarty from December of 1962 to February 1963 with additional information in their corresponding logbook.

  12. Quantitative characterisation of sedimentary grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunwal, Mohit; Mulchrone, Kieran F.; Meere, Patrick A.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of sedimentary texture helps in determining the formation, transportation and deposition processes of sedimentary rocks. Grain size analysis is traditionally quantitative, whereas grain shape analysis is largely qualitative. A semi-automated approach to quantitatively analyse shape and size of sand sized sedimentary grains is presented. Grain boundaries are manually traced from thin section microphotographs in the case of lithified samples and are automatically identified in the case of loose sediments. Shape and size paramters can then be estimated using a software package written on the Mathematica platform. While automated methodology already exists for loose sediment analysis, the available techniques for the case of lithified samples are limited to cases of high definition thin section microphotographs showing clear contrast between framework grains and matrix. Along with the size of grain, shape parameters such as roundness, angularity, circularity, irregularity and fractal dimension are measured. A new grain shape parameter developed using Fourier descriptors has also been developed. To test this new approach theoretical examples were analysed and produce high quality results supporting the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore sandstone samples from known aeolian and fluvial environments from the Dingle Basin, County Kerry, Ireland were collected and analysed. Modern loose sediments from glacial till from County Cork, Ireland and aeolian sediments from Rajasthan, India have also been collected and analysed. A graphical summary of the data is presented and allows for quantitative distinction between samples extracted from different sedimentary environments.

  13. An Improved Implementation of Grain

    CERN Document Server

    Mansouri, Shohreh Sharif

    2009-01-01

    A common approach to protect confidential information is to use a stream cipher which combines plain text bits with a pseudo-random bit sequence. Among the existing stream ciphers, Non-Linear Feedback Shift Register (NLFSR)-based ones provide the best trade-off between cryptographic security and hardware efficiency. In this paper, we show how to further improve the hardware efficiency of Grain stream cipher. By transforming the NLFSR of Grain from its original Fibonacci configuration to the Galois configuration and by introducing a clock division block, we double the throughput of the 80 and 128-bit key 1bit/cycle architectures of Grain with no area penalty.

  14. Removal of Cadmium Ions from Aqueous Solution by Silicate-incorporated Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hebin; ZHONG Hong; LIU Yu; DENG Jinyang

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a preliminary research on silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite as a new environmental mineral used to remove cadmium ions from aqueous solutions. The silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was prepared by coprecipitation and calcining, and silicate was incorporated into the crystal lattice of hydroxyapatite by partial substitution of phosphate. The amount of cadmium ions removed by silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was significantly elevated, which was 76% higher than that of pure hydroxyapatite. But the sorption behavior of cadmium ions on silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was similar to that of pure hydroxyapatite. Morphological study revealed that silicate incorporation confined the crystal growth and increased the specific surface area of hydroxyapatite,which were in favor of enhancing the cadmium ion sorpfion capacity of the samples. Incorporation of silicate into hydroxyapatite seems to be an effective approach to improve the environmental property of hydroxyapatite on removal of aqueous cadmium ions.

  15. IN SITU INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF FREE-FLYING SILICATE DURING CONDENSATION IN THE LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Sakon, Itsuki [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-04-20

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  16. BET surface area distributions in polar stream sediments: Implications for silicate weathering in a cold-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    BET surface area values are critical for quantifying the amount of potentially reactive sediments available for chemical weathering and ultimately, prediction of silicate weathering fluxes. BET surface area values of fine-grained (glacier surfaces, where dust is trapped and subsequently liberated during summer melting. Additionally, variations in stream discharge rate, which mobilizes sediment in pulses and influences water:rock ratios, the origin and nature of the underlying drift material, and the contribution of organic acids may play significant roles in the production and mobilization of high-surface area sediment. This study highlights the presence of sediments with high surface area in cold-based glacier systems, which influences models of chemical denudation rates and the impact of glacial systems on the global carbon cycle.

  17. A Facile Strategy for In Situ Core-Template-Functionalizing Siliceous Hollow Nanospheres for Guest Species Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Wenjian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The shell wall-functionalized siliceous hollow nanospheres (SHNs with functional molecules represent an important class of nanocarriers for a rich range of potential applications. Herein, a self-templated approach has been developed for the synthesis of in situ functionalized SHNs, in which the biocompatible long-chain polycarboxylates (i.e., polyacrylate, polyaspartate, gelatin provide the framework for silica precursor deposition by simply controlling chain conformation with divalent metal ions (i.e., Ca2+, Sr2+, without the intervention of any external templates. Metal ions play crucial roles in the formation of organic vesicle templates by modulating the long chains of polymers and preventing them from separation by washing process. We also show that, by in situ functionalizing the shell wall of SHNs, it is capable of entrapping nearly an eightfold quantity of vitamin Bc in comparison to the bare bulk silica nanospheres. These results confirm the feasibility of guest species entrapment in the functionalized shell wall, and SHNs are effective carriers of guest (bio-molecules potentially for a variety of biomedical applications. By rationally choosing the functional (self-templating molecules, this concept may represent a general strategy for the production of functionalized silica hollow structures.

  18. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  19. Effective elastic moduli of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Polymer-layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites exhibit some mechanical properties that are much better than conventional polymer filled composites. A relatively low content of layered silicate yields a significant enhancement of material performance. After the volume fraction of clay reaches a relatively low "critical value"; however, further increasing does not show a greater stiffening effect. This phenomenon is contrary to previous micromechanical pre-dictions and is not understood well. Based on the analysis on the microstructures of PLS nanocomposites, the present note provides an insight into the physical micromechanisms of the above unexpected phenomenon. The Mori-Tanaka scheme and a numerical method are employed to estimate the effec-tive elastic moduli of such a composite.

  20. The viscosity window of the silicate glass foam production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    The production of silicate glass foam allows diverse resources and waste materials to be used in the production. Testing of such large palette of materials complicates and prolongs the optimisation process. Therefore, it is crucial to find a universal criterion for foaming silicate glass melts...... which can offer a practical starting point for the optimisation procedure. The melt viscosity might be the most important parameter for controlling the foaming process and the glass foam density. In this work, we attempt to define a viscosity range in which foaming of different glasses results...... in a maximum of foam expansion. The expansion maximum is obtained for different glasses (labware, E-glass, CRT panel, soda-lime-silica) by foaming with CaCO3 at isokom temperature and from literature data. In general, the viscosity window was found to be within 104–106 Pa s when foaming with MnO2 or metal...

  1. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  2. Xe and Kr analyses of silicate inclusions from iron meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Huneke, J. C.; Burnett, D. S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the amounts and isotopic composition of Xe and Kr in silicate inclusions of several iron meteorites. It is shown that the Xe and Kr contents are comparable to chondritic values. The isotopic compositions show trapped gas of both chondritic and atmospheric composition. Large spallation effects occur in some of the meteorites; the spallation spectra in some instances differ from those reported for stone meteorites. In several meteorites, very large neutron capture effects on Br and I occur. All samples have pronounced Xe129 excesses which apparently indicate differences in the formation times from chondrites of less than about 100 million years; however, the presence of trapped Xe132 in silicates which were enclosed in molten Fe-Ni and cooled slowly proves that they were not entirely outgassed, so that some of the Xe129 excess may also be trapped.

  3. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  4. Calc-silicate mineralization in active geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed study of calc-silicate mineral zones and coexisting phase relations in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system were used as examples for thermodynamic evaluation of phase relations among minerals of variable composition and to calculate the chemical characteristics of hydrothermal solutions compatible with the observed calc-silicate assemblages. In general there is a close correlation between calculated and observed fluid compositions. Calculated fugacities of O{sub 2} at about 320{degrees}C in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system are about five orders of magnitude less than that at the nearby Salton Sea geothermal system. This observation is consistent with the occurrence of Fe{sup 3+} rich epidotes in the latter system and the presence of prehnite at Cerro Prieto.

  5. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  6. Authigenic layer silicate minerals in borehole Elmore 1, Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, S. Douglas; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1980-10-01

    A combined petrographic/X-ray/electron microprobe and energy dispersive system investigation of sandstone cuttings from borehole Elmore # 1 near the center of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field has revealed numerous regular variations in the composition, texture, mineralogy and proportions of the authigenic layer silicate minerals in the temperature interval 185° C (411.5 m depth) to 361° C (2,169 m). At temperatures near 190° C, dolomite/ankerite+calcite-bearing sandstones contain an illite/mixed layer phase with 10% expandable layers (dolomite/ankerite zone). In shale, the percentage of expandable layers in the mixed layer phase changes from 10 15% at 185° C to 5% at 210° C (494 m). In the interval 250° C (620 m) to 325° C (1,135 m), the calcite+pyrite+epidote-bearing sandstones contain a layer silicate assemblage of chlorite and illite (chlorite-calcite zone). In the shallower portions of this metamorphic zone, the illite contains 0 5% expandable layers, while at depths greater than 725 m (275° C) it is completely free of expandable layers. On increasing temperature, the white mica shows regular decreases in SiIV, Mg and Fe, and increase in AlIV, AlVI, and interlayer occupancy, as it changes gradually from fine-grained illite (=textural sericite) to coarse-grained recrystallized phengitic white mica. In the same interval, chlorite shows decreases in AlVI and octahedral vacancies and an increase in total Mg+Fe. The sandstones range from relatively unmodified detrital-textured rocks with porosities up to 20% and high contents of illite near 250° C to relatively dense hornfelsic-textured rocks with trace amounts of chlorite and phengite and porosities near 5% at 325° C. Numerous complex reactions among detrital (allogenic) biotite, chlorite, and muscovite, and authigenic illite and chlorite, occur in the chlorite-calcite zone. Biotite appears, and calcite disappears, at a temperature near 325° C and a depth of 1,135m. The biotite zone so produced persists

  7. Nanoindentation investigation of creep properties of calcium silicate hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Vandamme, Matthieu; ULM, Franz Josef

    2013-01-01

    The creep properties of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) are assessed by means of nanoindentation creep experiments on a wide range of substoichiometric cement pastes. We observe that, after a few seconds, the measured creep compliance of C-S-H is very well captured by a logarithmic time function. The rate of the logarithmic creep is found to scale in a unique manner with indentation modulus, indentation hardness, and packing density, independent of processing, mix proportions, indenter geom...

  8. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  9. Diapiric ascent of silicic magma beneath the Bolivian Altiplano

    OpenAIRE

    Del Potro, R.; M. Díez; Blundy, J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Gottsmann, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The vertical transport of large volumes of silicic magma, which drives volcanic eruptions and the long-term compositional evolution of the continental crust, is a highly debated problem. In recent years, dyking has been favored as the main ascent mechanism, but the structural connection between a distributed configuration of melt-filled pores in the source region and shallow magma reservoirs remains unsolved. In the Central Andes, inversion of a new high-resolution Bouguer anomaly data over t...

  10. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  11. Sulfur Solubility In Silicate Melts: A Thermochemical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, R.; Ottonello, G.

    A termochemical model for calculating sulfur solubility of simple and complex silicate melts has been developed in the framework of the Toop-Samis polymeric approach combined with a Flood - Grjotheim theoretical treatment of silicate slags [1,2]. The model allows one to compute sulfide and sulfate content of silicate melts whenever fugacity of gaseous sulphur is provided. "Electrically equivalent ion fractions" are needed to weigh the contribution of the various disproportion reactions of the type: MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas MSmelt+1/2O2 ,gas (1) MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas + 3/2O2 ,gas MSO4 ,melt (2) Eqs. 1 and 2 account for the oxide-sulfide and the oxide-sulfate disproportiona- tion in silicate melt. Electrically equivalent ion fractions are computed, in a fused salt Temkin notation, over the appropriate matrixes (anionic and cationic). The extension of such matrixes is calculated in the framework of a polymeric model previously developed [1,2,3] and based on a parameterization of acid-base properties of melts. No adjustable parameters are used and model activities follow the raoultian behavior implicit in the ion matrix solution of the Temkin notation. The model is based on a huge amount of data available in literature and displays a high heuristic capability with virtually no compositional limits, as long as the structural role assigned to each oxide holds. REFERENCES: [1] Ottonello G., Moretti R., Marini L. and Vetuschi Zuccolini M. (2001), Chem. Geol., 174, 157-179. [2] Moretti R. (2002) PhD Thesis, University of Pisa. [3] Ottonello G. (2001) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 282, 72-85.

  12. INORGANIC PHOSPHORS IN GLASS BASED ON LEAD SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aseev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We created and synthesized luminescent composite of the "phosphor in glass" type, based on the lead-silicate matrix and fine-dispersed powder of cerium-activated yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal. Lead-silicate system (40SiO2- 20PbO-(40-x PbF2-xAlF3, x = 0-25 was chosen as the glassy matrix. Initial glass was reduced to powder (frit for "phosphor in glass" composite with a particle size about 50 µm. Glass frit and powder of commercial YAG:Ce3+ phosphor were mixed in a ratio of 30 to 70 (wt %. Then this composite was pressed in a tablet and sintered on a quartz substrate at 823 К for 30 minutes. Thus, the plane parallel sheet for composite of the "phosphor in glass" was obtained with a diameter equal to 10 mm. For the purpose to reduce the loss of light in the presence of dispersion at a glass-phosphor boundary, optimization of glass mixture was done by adjusting the refractive index. X-ray phase and spectral-luminescent analysis of the derived composite were done. The results of these studies showed that there was no degradation of YAG: Ce powder during sintering. Dependence of luminescence intensity from temperature in the range from room temperature to 473 К was studied. It was shown, that with the phosphor in glass usage thermal quenching of luminescence was reduced in comparison with the silicone. The model of white LED was created with the "phosphor in glass" composite based on lead-silicate glasses with low temperature of vitrifying. The derived LED emits white light with a color temperature of 4370 K, and the luminous efficiency is equal to 58 lm/W. The developed luminescent composite based on the lead-silicate matrix can be used for the production of high-power white light LED.

  13. Export Rebates on Grain Finished

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ According to the State Statistics Bureau, China's consumer price index (CPI) jumped by 6.9 percent year-on-year last November, approaching the high levels seen at the end of 1996, one of the largest areas of increase was the price of grain,which rose by 6.6 percent. There is no doubt the growth in CPI can be mainly attributed to soaring food prices and the diffusion effect of oil price adjustments. Large orders for grain exports have put Chinese grain suppliers under tremendous pressure. In order to solve this problem, the Finance Ministry and State Administration of Taxation together announced that 84 categories of export tax rebates on major types of grain will be eliminated.

  14. Export Rebates on Grain Finished

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Xinwen

    2008-01-01

      According to the State Statistics Bureau, China's consumer price index (CPI) jumped by 6.9 percent year-on-year last November, approaching the high levels seen at the end of 1996, one of the largest areas of increase was the price of grain,which rose by 6.6 percent. There is no doubt the growth in CPI can be mainly attributed to soaring food prices and the diffusion effect of oil price adjustments. Large orders for grain exports have put Chinese grain suppliers under tremendous pressure. In order to solve this problem, the Finance Ministry and State Administration of Taxation together announced that 84 categories of export tax rebates on major types of grain will be eliminated.……

  15. PARASITE MYCOPOPULATION OF SOYBEAN GRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasenka Ćosić

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease appearance on soybean can influence quality and quantity of yield. Different spieces of saprophyte and parasite fungi can be isolated from stems, pods and grain of soybean. The aim of the research was to evaluate the incidence of important disease on natural soybean grain over the period of 4 years (2004-2007 of experiment held on the location Sopot-Vinkovci and included 9 cultivars of soybean. The following plant pathogenic fungi were identified: Peronospora, Sclerotinia, Cercospora, Fusarium and Diaporthe/Phomopsis. The most frequent fungi on soybean grains were: Cladosporium, Alternaria, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Epicoccum. The health condition of the natural soybean grains over the four years period on all cultivars was good.

  16. Hydrogen Implantation in Silicates: The role of solar wind in OH bond formation on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Micah J; Baragiola, Raul

    2014-06-01

    Airless bodies in space such as the Moon, asteroids and interplanetary dust particles are subject to bombardment from energetic electrons and ions, ultraviolet photons, micrometeorites and cosmic rays. These bombarding particles modify optical, chemical and physical characteristics of the ices and minerals that make up these bodies in a process known as space weathering. In particular, solar wind protons implanted in silicate materials can participate in hydroxylation reactions with the oxygen to form OH. This mechanism has been suggested to explain a reported 3-14% absorption signal identified as OH on the surface of lunar soil grains and present in decreasing magnitude from polar to equatorial latitudes. With the goal of determining a precise OH formation rate due to H+ implantation in silicates, a series of experiments were carried out on terrestrial minerals as analogs to lunar and interstellar material.Experiments were carried out under UHV pressures (OH in thermally grown silicon oxide and San Carlos olivine, before and after irradiated with 1 - 5 keV H+ ions. The increase in Si-OH content due to irradiation was determined by subtracting the unirradiated spectra from the irradiated spectra. The implanted protons induced OH stretch absorptions in the mid-infrared peaked at 3673 cm-1 for SiO2 and 3570 cm-1 for olivine. The initial yield (OH formed per incident ion) was ~90% and the OH absorption band was found to saturate at implantation fluences of ~2x1017 H/cm2. Irradiation also modified the Si-O stretch band at ~1090 cm-1 (9.2 μm) causing an exponential decrease in the peak height with increasing fluence and the appearance of a silanol structure peaking at ~1030 cm-1. These measurements allow constraints to be placed on stellar wind contribution to observational and theoretical models of water on the lunar surface and on interstellar dust grains.

  17. Analysis on Interaction between Genotype of Four Main Flavonoids of Barley Grain and Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao YANG; Chengli DUAN; Yawen ZENG; Juan DU; Shuming YANG; Xiaoying PU; Shengchao YANG

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to analyze the interaction between genotype of flavonoids of barley grain and environment, to increase the flavonoid content of barley grain in cultivation and breeding. [Method] In this study, the content of cate- chin, myricetin, quercetin and kaempferol of barley grain planted in Kunming, Qujing and Baoshan were determined by HPLC, and the genotype, environment, genotype- environment interaction of the flavonoid content of barley grain were analyzed. [Result] According to the experimental results, the genotype variance, environmental variance and G x E interaction variance of catechin and kaempferol contents show the same trend: genotype variation 〉 environmental variation 〉 G × E interaction variation, which all reach a extremely significant level; the genotype variance, envi- ronmental variance and G × E interaction variance of quercetin and total flavonoid contents show the same trend: genetype variation 〉 G × E interaction variation 〉 environmental variation, which all reach a extremely significant level; the genotype variance and environmental variance of myricetin content both reach a extremely sig- nificant level, while the G × E interaction variance reaches a significant level, showing an order of genotype variation 〉 environmental variation 〉 G × E interaction variation; the genotype variance, environmental variance and G x E interaction vari- ance of total flavonoid content show an order of genotype variation 〉 environmental variation 〉 G × E interaction variation. Among different barley varieties, Ziguang- mangluoerling and Kuanyingdamai in Qujing, Kunming and Baoshan have relatively high content of quercetin, while other barley varieties barely contain any quercetin. The grains of Ziguangmangluoerling and Kuanyingdamai are purple, while the grains of other barley varieties are yellow. [Conclusion] Four main flavonoids and the total flavonoids of barley grain are mainly under genetic control and

  18. Soft Landing of Bare PtRu Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Moon, DaeWon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu alloy nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 x 104 ions µm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (STEM-HAADF) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu alloy nanoparticles are uniform in size and have a Ru core decorated with small regions of Pt on the surface. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in relative atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt4f and Ru3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 x 104 ions µm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the alloy nanoparticles supported on glassy

  19. In vitro studies of calcium phosphate silicate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuxin; Ma, Jingzhi; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Ruse, N Dorin; Yang, Quanzu; Troczynski, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A novel calcium phosphate silicate bone cement (CPSC) was synthesized in a process, in which nanocomposite forms in situ between calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel and hydroxyapatite (HAP). The cement powder consists of tricalcium silicate (C(3)S) and calcium phosphate monobasic (CPM). During cement setting, C(3)S hydrates to produce C-S-H and calcium hydroxide (CH); CPM reacts with the CH to precipitate HAP in situ within C-S-H. This process, largely removing CH from the set cement, enhances its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The testing results of cell culture confirmed that the biocompatibility of CPSC was improved as compared to pure C(3)S. The results of XRD and SEM characterizations showed that CPSC paste induced formation of HAP layer after immersion in simulated body fluid for 7 days, suggesting that CPSC was bioactive in vitro. CPSC cement, which has good biocompatibility and low/no cytotoxicity, could be a promising candidate as biomedical cement.

  20. Structure and dynamics of iron doped and undoped silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristiane N.; Meneses, Domingos D. S.; Echegut, Patrick; Lecomte, Emmanuel

    2010-03-01

    The optical properties of common silicate glass compositions are well known at room temperature. However, their radiative properties and structural evolution of these glasses with temperature are still largely unexplored. In this work we have measured the emissivity of a set of iron doped and undoped silicate and borosilicate glasses over an unprecedented temperature (up to 1700 K) and spectral range (40 -- 20000 cm-1). This was achieved by means of a home-made apparatus composed of a CO2 laser as the heat source, a black-body reference and two spectrometers. The optical functions were assessed using a dielectric function model [1], and the structure and dynamics of the glassy network, as well the absorption of iron species in different redox states were evidenced. We believe that these new data will help to understand the heat transfer in molten silicates. [4pt] [1] D. D. S. Meneses, G. Gruener, M. Malki, and P. Echegut, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 351, 124 (2005)

  1. The Partitioning of Tungsten bwtween Aqueous Fluids and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许永胜; 张本仁; 等

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to determine the partition coefficients of tungsten between aqueous fluids and granitic melts at 800℃ and 1.5kb with natural granite as the starting material,The effects of the solution on the partition coefficients of tungsten show a wequence of P>co32->B>H2O.The effects are limited(generally KD<0.3)and the tungsten shows a preferential trend toward the melt over the aqueous fiuid.The value of KD increases with increasing concentration of phosphorus;the KD increases first and then reduces with the concentration of CO32-;when temperature decreases,the KD between the solution of CO32- and the silicate melt increases,and that between the solution of B4O72- and the silicate melt decreases.The partition coefficients of phosphorus and sodium between fluids and silicate melts have been calculated from the concentrations of the elements in the melts.The KD value for phosphorus is 0.38 and that for sodium is 0.56.Evidence shows that the elements tend to become richer and richer in the melts.

  2. Electrical properties of iron doped apatite-type lanthanum silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qingle; ZHANG Hua

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Fe doping on the electrical properties of lanthanum silicates was investigated.The apatite-type lanthanum silicates La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 (x=0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0) were synthesized via sol-gel process.The unit cell volume increased with Fe doping because the ionic radius of Fe3+ ion is larger than that of Si4+ ion.The conductivities of La10Si6-xFexO27 x/2 first increased and then decreased with the increasing of Fe content.The increase of the conductivity might be attributed to the distortion of the cell lattice,which assisted the migration of the interstitial oxygen ions.The decrease of the conductivity might be caused by the lower concentration of interstitial oxygen ions.The optimum Fe doping content in lanthanum silicates was 0.6.La10Si5.4Fe0.6O26.7 exhibited the highest ionic conductivity of 2.712× 10-2 S/cm at 800 ℃.The dependence of conductivity on oxygen partial pressure p(O2) suggested that the conductivity of La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 was mainly contributed by ionic conductivity.

  3. A Clinopyroxene-Plagioclase Geobarometer for A-type Silicic Volcanic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, J.; Iveson, A. A.; Davis, K.; Johnson, T. A.; Gahagan, S.; Ellis, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the crustal storage depths of magmas is important in understanding volcanism. The reaction: anorthite (pl) = Ca-Tschermak's (cpx) + silica (Q or liq) has a large volume change and hence offers potential as a geobarometer, but has not been extensively exploited as such. One of the chief barriers to its wide application is consistent estimation of melt silica activity for assemblages that lack quartz. We have skirted this problem by confining attention to metaluminous silicic compositions (SiO2 > 60% by weight), for which silica activity during crystallization is presumed to be close to 1, and calibrated the barometer for the range 0 - 2 GPa using the LEPR database and additional experiments from the literature. Additional improvement is obtained by excluding hydrous phase-bearing assemblages. Despite the analytical uncertainties present in older experimental investigations, with knowledge of temperature, and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and host melt compositions, pressures for amphibole- and biotite-free dacites and rhyolites can be estimated to ±0.17 GPa (1 sigma). The limitations of the barometer render it most applicable to intraplate, A-type rhyolites. Application to one such system, the Snake River Plain rhyolites, indicate that both melt-hosted phenocrysts and clinopyroxene-plagioclase aggregate grains found in these rhyolites formed at low pressures, <0.5 GPa. This is consistent with isotopic evidence for a shallow crustal origin for Snake River Plain rhyolites.

  4. The transition from carbon dust to silicates production in low-metallicity AGB and SAGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, P; Schneider, R; Carini, R; Valiante, R; D'Antona, F; Gallerani, S; Maiolino, R; Tornambé, A

    2011-01-01

    We compute the mass and composition of dust produced by stars with masses in the range 1Msungrains under the hypothesis of a time-independent, spherically symmetric stellar wind. We find that the total mass of dust injected by AGB stars in the interstellar medium does not increase monotonically with stellar mass and ranges between a minimum of 10^{-6}Msun for the 1.5Msun stellar model, up to 2x10^{-4} Msun, for the 6Msun case. Dust composition depends on the stellar mass: low-mass stars (M < 3Msun) produce carbon-rich dust, whereas more massive stars, experiencing Hot Bottom Burning, never reach the carbon-star stage, and produce silicates and iron. This is in partial disagreement with previ...

  5. PARASITE MYCOPOPULATION OF SOYBEAN GRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Jasenka Ćosić; Karolina Vrandečić; Draženka Jurković; Ivan Ereš; Jelena Poštić

    2008-01-01

    Disease appearance on soybean can influence quality and quantity of yield. Different spieces of saprophyte and parasite fungi can be isolated from stems, pods and grain of soybean. The aim of the research was to evaluate the incidence of important disease on natural soybean grain over the period of 4 years (2004-2007) of experiment held on the location Sopot-Vinkovci and included 9 cultivars of soybean. The following plant pathogenic fungi were identified: Peronospora, Sclerotinia, Cercospora...

  6. Method 366.0 Determination of Dissolved Silicate in Estuarine and Coastal Watersby Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method provides a procedure for the determination of dissolved silicate concentration in estuarine and coastal waters. The dissolved silicate is mainly in the form of silicic acid, H SiO , in estuarine and 4 4 coastal waters. All soluble silicate, including colloidal silici...

  7. Superconductivity of small metal grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Renrong; CHEN; Zhiqian; ZHU; Shunquan

    2005-01-01

    The formulas of the energy gap and superconducting critical temperature appropriate for systems with both odd and even number of electrons are derived; the bases of the derivations are BCS theory and energy level statistics. Numerical results qualitatively agree with the experimental phenomena. i.e., the superconductivity of small metallic grains will first enhance then decrease to zero when the grain are getting smaller and smaller. The calculations indicate that the above phenomena happen in the metallic grains belonging to Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) and Gaussian Unitary ensemble (GUE) with zero spin; The superconductivity of small metallic grains in Gaussian Symplectic Ensemble (GSE) will monotonically decrease to zero with the decreasing of the grain size. The analyses suggest that the superconductivity enhancements come from pairing and the balance of the strengths between spin-orbital coupling and external magnetic field. In order to take the latter into account, it is necessary to include the level statistics given by Random Matrix Theory (RMT) in describing small metallic grains.

  8. Degradability Characteristics of Treated and Untreated Barley Grain Using In situ Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Taghizadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine of degradability characteristics of untreated barely grain (UBG and treated barley grain with autoclaving at 120°C, 5´ (TBG1 and 20' (TBG2, treated barley grain at 100°C, 5´ (TBG3 and 20' (TBG4, using in situ technique in Ghizel sheep’s. The sheep fed diet content 40% alfalfa: 60% concentrate containing 2.9 Mcal kg-1 DM and 14% CP. The incubation times were 0, 4, 8, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h and rumen degradation of cp and DM was measured. The equation of p = a+b (1-e-ct was used for fitting of dry matter and crude protein disappearance data. The dry matter disappearance of TBG1 and TBG2 at 24 and 48 h were lower than the other treatments (p<0.05. The crude protein disappearance of 24 and 48 h of UBG was more than the other treatment (p<0.05. Treating of barley grain of 120°C (5' and 20' can be decreased ruminal crude protein degradability of barley grain resulting high escaped crude protein into lower digestive tract.

  9. Radiative recombination of twisted electrons with bare nuclei: going beyond the Born approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zaytsev, V A; Shabaev, V M

    2016-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic investigation of the radiative recombination of a twisted electron with a bare heavy nucleus. The twisted electron is described by the wave function which accounts for the interaction with the nucleus in all orders in $\\alpha Z$. We use this wave function to derive the probability of the radiative recombination with a single ion being shifted from the twisted electron propagation direction. We also consider more realistic experimental scenarios where the target is either localized (mesoscopic) or infinitely wide (macroscopic). The situation when the incident electron is a coherent superposition of two vortex states is considered as well. For the nonrelativistic case we present analytical expressions which support our numerical calculations. We study in details the influence of the electron twistedness on the polarization and angular distribution of the emitted photon. It is found that these properties of the outgoing photon might be very sensitive to the total angular momentum ...

  10. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF ESTIMATING SOIL MOISTURE OVER BARE SOIL USING FULL-POLARIMETRIC ALOS-2 DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekertekin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR imaging system is one of the most effective way for Earth observation. The aim of this study is to present the preliminary results about estimating soil moisture using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data. Full-polarimetric (HH, HV, VV, VH ALOS-2 data, acquired on 22.04.2016 with the incidence angle of 30.4o, were used in the study. Simultaneously with the SAR acquisition, in-situ soil moisture samples over bare agricultural lands were collected and evaluated using gravimetric method. Backscattering coefficients for all polarizations were obtained and linear regression analysis was carried out with in situ moisture measurements. The best correlation coefficient was observed with VV polarization. Cross-polarized backscattering coefficients were not so sensitive to soil moisture content. In the study, it was observed that soil moisture maps can be retrieved with the accuracy about 14% (RMSE.

  11. Non-destructive testing of barely visible impact damage in polymer matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Z Y; M. O. W. Richardson

    2004-01-01

    Barely visible impact damage (BVID) is developed when polymer matrix composites are subjected to impact loading. The damage has an adverse effect on structural integrity, and potentially leads to catastrophic failure.Thus it is important to employ a variety of advanced non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques in parallel to unambiguously determine the integrity of composite systems. This study deals with damage evaluation using visual inspection, ultrasonic C-scan, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), electronic shearography (ES) and optical deformation and strain measurement system (ODSMS). Internal damage was introduced using an instrumented falling weight impact test (IFWIT) machine by controlling the combination of striker mass and releasing height. It was found that different NDT techniques were successfully employed to identify and visualise the impact induced internal damage. Experimental results generated from these techniques show a good agreement in damage identification and determination. The features, capabilities and limitations associated with these techniques were briefly discussed.

  12. Electron-positron pair creation in low-energy collisions of heavy bare nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, I A; Tupitsyn, I I; Bondarev, A I; Kozhedub, Y S; Plunien, G; Stoehlker, Th

    2014-01-01

    A new method for calculations of electron-positron pair-creation probabilities in low-energy heavy-ion collisions is developed. The approach is based on the propagation of all one-electron states via the numerical solving of the time-dependent Dirac equation in the monopole approximation. The electron wave functions are represented as finite sums of basis functions constructed from B-splines using the dual-kinetic-balance technique. The calculations of the created particle numbers and the positron energy spectra are performed for the collisions of bare nuclei at the energies near the Coulomb barrier with the Rutherford trajectory and for different values of the nuclear charge and the impact parameter. To examine the role of the spontaneous pair creation the collisions with a modified velocity and with a time delay are also considered. The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations and the possibility of observation of the spontaneous pair creation is discussed.

  13. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1earth permanent magnets, and to model the capture of charge-state-selected ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). An experimental apparatus adapted to the NIST EBIT will also be discussed. Reference: [1] U.D. Jentschura, P.J. Mohr, J.N. Tan, and B.J. Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  14. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  15. Intravascular ultrasound assessment of very late bare-metal stent thrombosis: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Hyun Lee; Kyung Min Kim; Jun Won Lee; Sung Gyun Ahn; Young Jin Youn

    2012-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis (VLST) is increasingly being regarded as a complication of drug-eluting stents (DES),and delayed endothelization,local hypersensitivity reactions,and late stent malapposition due to excessive positive remodeling have been postulated as mechanisms.Considering that stent endothelialization seems to be completed within 4 weeks following bare-metal stent (BMS) placement and that BMS do not possess antiproliferative coating,the mechanism of VLST may differ between patients with DES and those with BMS.We report a case of VLST 9 years after BMS implantation,in which thrombus from the ruptured neointima was confirmed by intravascular ultrasound.This finding suggests that de novo plaque rupture at the neointimal layer within the stent may be one of the explanations for VLST.

  16. Comparison of Bare metal Vs Drug eluting stents for in-stent Restenosis among Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhaber Etsadashvili

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of restenosis, stent thrombosis, and death afterpercutaneous coronary interventions. Little is known about the late outcome of patients with diabetes mellitus whoreceive drug-eluting stents (DES or bare metal stents (BMS.Methods: From January 2008 to January 2010, six patients with DES and 20 with BMS, ISR were identified at ourinstitution.Results: The median age of our diabetic cohort was 63 years, and 87 of the patients were male. For two years, ratesof repeat target-vessel revascularization were significantly lower among diabetic patients treated with DEScompared with those treated with BMS (5.8% vs. 17.0%, p=0.003.Conclusions: DES is effective among diabetic patients in substantially reducing the need for repeat TVR.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of bare Ge-Sb-Se chalcogenide glass fiber taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Baohua; Wang, Yingying; Sun, Ya'nan; Dai, Shixun; Yang, Peilong; Zhang, Peiqing; Wang, Xunsi; Chen, Feifei; Wang, Rongping

    2017-01-01

    In this work, Ge15Sb20Se65 bare glass fiber with a diameter of 500 μm was fabricated, and then tapered with different tapering parameters. The analysis of Raman and energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) indicated that, a slight change in the chemical composition of the glass, fiber and tapering fiber has negligible effect on the glass structure. It was found that, the waist diameter decreases exponentially with increasing tapering length and speed, and high quality taper fiber with the cone diameter of 2.65 μm can be achieved under the optimal tapering conditions. Finally, the simulated and experimental results of the output transmission under different waist length and taper ratio show that the transmission decreases with increasing waist length and taper ratio.

  18. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic bare heavy ions: Nuclear and electronic contributions in amorphous and crystalline materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Vissing; Sørensen, Allan Hvidkjær

    2013-01-01

    A charged particle emits bremsstrahlung while traversing matter. We calculate the radiation cross section for bare heavy ions penetrating amorphous materials and single crystals at highly relativistic energies. The main component originates in scattering of the virtual photons of screened target...... at a very low value. Incoherent interaction with single target electrons gives rise to two additional bremsstrahlung components, a modest component due to scattering of virtual photons of the electrons on the projectile and a strong low-energy component due to scattering of the virtual photons...... of the projectile on the electrons. The difference in radiation levels can be traced to the mass of the scatterer. Since target electrons are more widely distributed than nuclei in a crystal channel the variation of the electron component of the bremsstrahlung with incidence angle to a major crystallographic...

  19. Highly nonlinear optical regime in graphene-assisted cavities: lasing threshold bares graphene nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Ciattoni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Strong nonlinear optical mechanisms operating in a miniaturized environment have a key role in photonics since they allow complex and versatile light manipulation within subwavelength devices. On the other hand, due to its two-dimensional planar geometry, graphene can easily be embedded within miniaturized structures and has fascinating linear and nonlinear optical properties arising from its relativistic electron dynamics. However, very few light steering graphene-based setups with a strong nonlinear behavior have been proposed since, due to its intrinsic planar localization, graphene nonlinearity has to be exploited through novel schemes not available in standard bulk nonlinear optics. Here we show that an active cavity hosting a graphene sheet, when tuned near its lasing threshold, is able to isolate the spatially localized graphene nonlinearity thus producing a very strong nonlinear device response with multi-valued features. The proposed strategy for exploiting graphene nonlinearity through its baring co...

  20. Self-Assembly of Graphene Nanoblisters Sealed to a Bare Metal Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Colonna, Stefano; Ronci, Fabio; Flammini, Roberto; Lacovig, Paolo; Apostol, Nicoleta; Politano, Antonio; Feulner, Peter; Menzel, Dietrich; Lizzit, Silvano

    2016-03-09

    The possibility to intercalate noble gas atoms below epitaxial graphene monolayers coupled with the instability at high temperature of graphene on the surface of certain metals has been exploited to produce Ar-filled graphene nanosized blisters evenly distributed on the bare Ni(111) surface. We have followed in real time the self-assembling of the nanoblisters during the thermal annealing of the Gr/Ni(111) interface loaded with Ar and characterized their morphology and structure at the atomic scale. The nanoblisters contain Ar aggregates compressed at high pressure arranged below the graphene monolayer skin that is decoupled from the Ni substrate and sealed only at the periphery through stable C-Ni bonds. Their in-plane truncated triangular shapes are driven by the crystallographic directions of the Ni surface. The nonuniform strain revealed along the blister profile is explained by the inhomogeneous expansion of the flexible graphene lattice that adjusts to envelop the Ar atom stacks.

  1. The Integrity bare-metal stent made by continuous sinusoid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    The Integrity Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular, CA, USA) is a low-profile, open-cell, cobalt-chromium-alloy advanced bare-metal iteration of the well-known Driver/Micro-Driver Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular). The Integrity stent is made with a process called continuous sinusoid technology. This process allows stent construction via wrapping a single thin strand of wire around a mandrel in a sinusoid configuration, with laser fusion of adjacent crowns. The wire-forming process and fusion pattern provide the stent with a continuous preferential bending plane, intended to allow easier access to, and smoother tracking within, distal and tortuous vessels while radial strength is maintained. Continuous sinusoid technology represents innovation in the design of stent platforms and will provide a future stent platform for newer technology, including drug-eluting stent platforms, drug-filled stents and core wire stents.

  2. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  3. Reliability Optimization of Radial Distribution Systems Employing Differential Evolution and Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kela, K. B.; Arya, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a methodology for determination of optimum failure rate and repair time for each section of a radial distribution system. An objective function in terms of reliability indices and their target values is selected. These indices depend mainly on failure rate and repair time of a section present in a distribution network. A cost is associated with the modification of failure rate and repair time. Hence the objective function is optimized subject to failure rate and repair time of each section of the distribution network considering the total budget allocated to achieve the task. The problem has been solved using differential evolution and bare bones particle swarm optimization. The algorithm has been implemented on a sample radial distribution system.

  4. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation preceded by routine prestenting with a bare metal stent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demkow, Marcin; Biernacka, Elzbieta Katarzyna; Spiewak, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) with routine prestenting with a bare metal stent (BMS). Background: PPVI is a relatively new method of treating patients with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). Results of PPVI performed...... with routine prestenting have never been reported. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent PPVI for homograft dysfunction with prestenting with BMS were studied. The schedule of follow-up assessment comprised clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, transthoracic echocardiography, and chest...... X-ray to screen for device integrity. Results: PPVI was performed with no serious complications in all patients (n = 10, mean age 26.8 ± 4.0 years, 60% males). In nine patients with significant pulmonary stenosis, peak right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) gradient was reduced from a mean of 80...

  5. Nanosecond electrical explosion of bare and dielectric coated tungsten wire in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun

    2017-02-01

    Experiments of the electrical explosion of tungsten wire with and without insulating coatings demonstrate that the insulating coatings exert a significant influence on the exploding characteristics. The shadowgraphy and interferometry diagnostics are applied to present the morphology of the exploding products. In the experiments, energy of ˜3.2 eV/atom is deposited into the bare tungsten wire at the instant of voltage breakdown, giving a velocity of 0.38 km/s for the high density core. The value and structure of the energy deposition for the tungsten wire explosions are substantially improved by employing the thin dielectric coatings. Energy of ˜15.2 eV/atom is deposited into the coated tungsten wire transforming the wire into gaseous state and the expanding velocity of the high density core is 5.64 km/s. The interference phase shift and atomic density are reconstructed from the interferogram for the exploding coated tungsten wire.

  6. Moss cushions facilitate water and nutrient supply for plant species on bare limestone pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand; Hammer, Kathrine

    2012-01-01

    Dense moss cushions of different size are distributed across the bare limestone pavements on Øland, SE Sweden. Increasing cushion size is predicted to physically protect and improve performance and colonization by vascular plants. Therefore, we tested water balance, phosphorus supply, and species...... richness, and evaluated duration of plant activity during desiccation as a function of ground area, for a large collection of moss cushions. We found that lower evaporation and higher water storage contributed equally to extending the desiccation period with increasing cushion size. Evaporation rates...... under stagnant conditions. One moss species was added to the species pool for every nine-fold increase in cushion area. Vascular plants were absent from the smallest cushions, whereas one or two species, on average, appeared in 375- and 8,500-cm(2) cushions with water available for 6 and 10 days during...

  7. Investigation of synthesized Be-bearing silicate glass as laboratory reference sample at X-ray electron probe microanalysis of silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozerova, Olga Yu.; Mikhailov, Mikhail A.; Demina, Tamara V.

    2017-01-01

    The article discusses estimates of the stability and homogeneity in Be-Mg-Al-silicate glass produced by the authors and its applicability as a laboratory reference sample for X-ray electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of Be-bearing silicate matters: crystals and quenching melt (glasses), silicates and oxides. The results were obtained using Superprobe-733 and Superprobe JXA-8200 (JEOL Ltd, Japan) devices. The sample homogeneity was studied on macro (10-100 μm) and micro (1-10 μm) levels and was evaluated by the scheme of dispersion analysis. The applicability of Be-bearing silicate glass as a reference sample for Mg, Al, Si determinations was tested on the international certified reference glasses and laboratory reference samples of minerals with a known composition. The obtained experimental metrological characteristics correspond to the "applied geochemistry" type of analysis (second category) and suggest that Be-bearing silicate glass is appropriate as a laboratory reference sample for EPMA of Be-bearing silicate matters, silicates and oxides. Using Be-Mg-Al-silicate glass as a reference sample we obtained satisfactory data on the composition of both some minerals including cordierite and beryllium cordierite, beryllium indialite, beryl and metastable phases (chrysoberyl, compounds with structure of β-quartz and petalite).

  8. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da, E-mail: roselisboa@cardiol.br [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Silva, Carlos Augusto Bueno [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Belo Horizonte, Hospital São João de Deus, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Greco, Otaviano José [Belo Horizonte, Hospital São João de Deus, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men) with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform), measuring the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively), with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00). The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents.

  9. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. Objective: To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. Methods: This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform, measuring the low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Results: Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively, with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00. The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Conclusions: Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents.

  10. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  11. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  12. Si-rich Fe-Ni grains in highly unequilibrated chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaldi, E. R.; Sears, D. W.; Wasson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the Si contents of Fe-Ni grains in highly unequilibrated chondrites, which have undergone little metamorphosis and thus best preserve the record of processes in the solar nebula. Electron microprobe determinations of silicon content in grains of the Bishunpur chondrite are presented for the six Si-bearing Fe-Ni grains for which data could be obtained, five of which were found to be embedded in olivine chondrules. In addition, all grains are found to be Cr-rich, with Cr increased in concentration towards the grain edge, and to be encased in FeS shells which evidently preserved the Si that entered the FeNi at higher temperatures. A mechanism for the production of Si-bearing metal during the condensation of the cooling solar nebula is proposed which considers the metal to have condensed heterogeneously while the mafic silicates condensed homogeneously with amounts of required undercooling in the low-pressure regions where ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites formed, resulting in Si mole fractions of 0.003 at nebular pressures less than 0.000001 atm.

  13. Very Large Interstellar Grains as Evidenced by the Mid-Infrared Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, B W

    2015-01-01

    The sizes of interstellar grains are widely distributed, ranging from a few angstroms to a few micrometers. The ultraviolet (UV) and optical extinction constrains the dust in the size range of a couple hundredth micrometers to several submicrometers. The near and mid infrared (IR) emission constrains the nanometer-sized grains and angstrom-sized very large molecules. However, the quantity and size distribution of micrometer-sized grains remain unknown as they are gray in the UV/optical extinction and they are too cold and emit too little in the IR to be detected by IRAS, Spitzer, or Herschel. In this work, we employ the ~3-8 micron mid-IR extinction which is flat in both diffuse and dense regions to constrain the quantity, size, and composition of the micron-sized grain component. We find that, together with nano- and submicron-sized silicate and graphite (as well as PAHs), micron-sized graphite grains with C/H=137 ppm and a mean size of ~1.2 micron closely fit the observed interstellar extinction of the Gala...

  14. Infrared Emission from the Composite Grains: Effects of Inclusions and Porosities on the 10 and 18 $\\mu m$ Features

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, D B

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of inclusions and porosities on the emission properties of silicate grains and compare the model curves with the observed infrared emission from circumstellar dust. We calculate the absorption efficiency of the composite grain, made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and inclusions of ice/graphite/or voids, in the spectral region 5.0-25.0$\\mu m$. The absorption efficiencies of the composite spheroidal oblate grains for three axial ratios are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). We study the absorption as a function of the volume fraction of the inclusions and porosity. In particular, we study the variation in the $10\\mu m$ and $18\\mu m$ emission features with the volume fraction of the inclusions and porosities. We then calculate the infrared fluxes for these composite grains at several dust temperatures (T=200-350K) and compare the model curves with the average observed IRAS-LRS curve, obtained for circumstellar dust shells around oxygen rich M-type st...

  15. Grain dynamics in zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B. T.; Haff, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of granular materials has proved difficult to model, primarily because of the complications arising from inelastic losses, friction, packing, and the effect of many grains being in contact simultaneously. One interesting limit for which it was recently possible to construct a theory is that where the grain-grain interactions are dominated by binary collisions. The kinetic model of granular systems if similar to the kinetic theory of gases, except that collisional energy losses are always present in the former and must be treated explicitly. Few granular materials on Earth are describable by this limiting model, since gravity tends to collapse the grains into a high-density state where Coulombic friction effects are dominant. The planned Space Station offers an unusual opportunity to test the kinetic grain model and to explore its predictions. Without gravity, the regime of low interparticle velocities, where an elastic description of the collision is still valid, is investigated. This will allow direct interpretation by dynamical computer simulations as well as by kinetic theory.

  16. Deformation strain inhomogeneity in columnar grain nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.L.; Godfrey, A.; Juul Jensen, D.

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for determination of the local deformation strain of individual grains in the bulk of a columnar grain sample. The method, based on measurement of the change in grain area of each grain, is applied to 12% cold rolled nickel. Large variations are observed in the local strain...

  17. Ore petrography of low-grade siliceous manganese ores from the Bonai-Keonjhar belt, Orissa, India: The influence of mineral-fabric on their beneficiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mishra Subrat; Mohapatra Birendra Kumar; Dash Nilima; Rao Danda Srinivas

    2011-01-01

    Low grade siliceous manganese ores from the iron ore group of the Bonai-Keonjhar belt,Orissa,India are found mostly in shear zones.The ore characteristics of siliceous manganese ore samples from three different mines,viz.the Shankar (Barbil OMC lease hold area),the Sone-Patuli (Patmunda,OMM lease hold area),and the Musaghar (Roida,OMDC lease hold area),were studied.These siliceous manganese ores are of three types,respectively:(i) spongy-granular; (ii) massive-mosaic; and (iii) hard-mylonitized.The spongy-granular type contains granular,saccharoidal quartz and the major manganese mineral present is pyrolusite.The second type contains well crystallized quartz and cryptomelane,while the third has cherty,fine grained quartz (mylonite) along with romanechite.All three ores were subjected to physical beneflciation under similar conditions.Both gravity and magnetic separation techniques were employed.The mineral-fabric of the ores has been correlated to the extent of their beneflciation using these physical techniques.Of these three ores only the spongy-granular type responded well to upgrading.The feed with 22% Mn content could be upgraded to 44% with a 28% yield and a 49% recovery.The good response to beneficiation of the spongygranular sample could be due to the large euhedral crystals of pyrolusite and the friable nature of the saccharoidal quartz.This study reveals the influence of mineral-fabric on beneficiation of low grade ore,siliceous Mn ore in particular.

  18. BARE-EARTH EXTRACTION AND DTM GENERATION FROM PHOTOGRAMMETRIC POINT CLOUDS WITH A PARTIAL USE OF AN EXISTING LOWER RESOLUTION DTM

    OpenAIRE

    M. Debella-Gilo

    2016-01-01

    A method of extracting bare-earth points from photogrammetric point clouds by partially using an existing lower resolution digital terrain model (DTM) is presented. The bare-earth points are extracted based on a threshold defined by local slope. The local slope is estimated from the lower resolution DTM. A gridded DTM is then interpolated from the extracted bare-earth points. Five different interpolation algorithms are implemented and evaluated to identify the most suitable interpola...

  19. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  20. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  1. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R. S.; Murugavel, S.; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2-(60-x)Bi2O3-40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623-703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  2. Grain centre mapping - 3DXRD measurements of average grain characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Lyckegaard, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    Three-Dimensional X-ray Diraction (3DXRD) Microscopy is a generic term covering a variety of dierent techniques for characterising the mi- crostructure within the bulk of polycrystalline materials. One strategy | namely grain centre mapping | enables fast measurements of the av- erage characteris...

  3. In vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of tricalcium silicate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaoming Liao; Hongyang Zhu; Guangfu Yin; Zhongbing Huang; Yadong Yao; Xianchun Chen

    2011-08-01

    The in vitro bioactivity of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5) ceramics was investigated by the bone-like apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid (SBF), and the cytocompatibility was evaluated through osteoblast adhesion and proliferation assay. The results show that the Ca3SiO5 ceramics possess bone-like apatite formation ability in SBF. In vitro cytocompatible evaluation reveals that osteoblasts adhere and spread well on the Ca3SiO5 ceramics, indicating good bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  4. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat Banerjee

    2001-04-01

    Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack length decreases and the crack deviates from its original path with increasing angle. The deviation of the crack was correlated with the component of the crack driving force and the theoretical strength of the aligned crystals at different angles.

  5. Concentration Quenching in Erbium Doped Bismuth Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shi-Xun; XU Tie-Feng; NIE Qiu-Hua; SHEN Xiang; WANG Xun-Si

    2006-01-01

    @@ Er2 O3-doped bismuth silicate glasses are prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method, and the Er3+ : 4 I13/2 → 4I15/2 fluorescence properties are studied for different Er3+ concentrations. Infrared spectra are measured to estimate the exact content of OH- groups in the samples. Based on the electric dipole-dipole interaction theory,the interaction parameter CEr,Er for the migration rate of Er3+ :4 I13/2 → 4 I13/2 in proposed glasses is calculated.

  6. Kinetics of Cyclohexanone Ammoximation over Titanium Silicate Molecular Sieves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永祥; 吴巍; 闵恩泽

    2005-01-01

    An intrinsic kinetics of cyclohexanone ammoximation in the liquid phase over titanium silicate molecular sieves is investigated in an isothermal slurry reactor at different initial reactant concentrations, catalyst loading,and reaction temperature. The rate equations are developed by analyzing data of kinetic measurements. More than 10 side reactions were found. H202 decomposition reaction Inust be considered and other side reactions can be neglected in the kinetic modeling. The predicted values of reaction rates based on the kinetic models are almost consistent with experimental ones. The models have guidance to the selection of reactor types and they are useful to the design and operation of reactor used.

  7. Transparent silicate glass-ceramics embedding Ni-doped nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of transparent silicate glass-ceramics embedding Ni-doped nanocrystals as broadband gain media is reviewed. At first, optical properties such as the peak positions, wavelengths lifetimes and quantum efficiencies of the near-infrared emission of nickel-doped oxide crystals are overviewed. The quantum efficiencies of the near-infrared emission of nickel-doped LiGa5O8 and MgGa2O4 were as high as ~1 even at room temperature. Thus these materials are promising ca...

  8. U.S. Geological Survey silicate rock standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, F.J.

    1967-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has processed six silicate rocks to provide new reference samples to supplement G-1 and W-1. Complete conventional, rapid rock, and spectrochemical analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey are reported for a granite (replacement for G-1), a granodiorite, an andesite, a peridotite, a dunite, and a basalt. Analyses of variance for nickel, chromium, copper, and zirconium in each rock sample showed that for these elements, the rocks can be considered homogeneous. Spectrochemical estimates are given for the nickel, chromium, copper, and zirconium contents of the samples. The petrography of five of the six rocks is described and CIPW norms are presented. ?? 1967.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  10. Ultra flat supercontinuum generation in silicate dual core microstructured fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczynski, R.; Pysz, D.; Martynkien, T.; Lorenc, D.; Kujawa, I.; Nasilowski, T.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.; Stepien, R.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we report on ultra flat supercontinuum generation in dual core photonic crystal fiber pumped in the normal dispersion regime. The fiber cladding is fabricated from custom NC21 borosilicate glass while the fiber cores is made of commercially available F2 high index lead-silicate glass from Schott Corp. We investigated the supercontinuum characteristics for single and double core excitation by a Ti:Sapphire oscillator delivering 100 fs pulses centered at 800 nm with an energy of 4.2 nJ. Dual core pumping resulted in appreciable flattening of the supercontinuum spectra in the range 875 - 950 nm.

  11. High-temperature silicate volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A S; Keszthelyi, L; Spencer, J R; Schubert, G; Matson, D L; Lopes-Gautier, R; Klaasen, K P; Johnson, T V; Head, J W; Geissler, P; Fagents, S; Davies, A G; Carr, M H; Breneman, H H; Belton, M J

    1998-07-03

    Infrared wavelength observations of Io by the Galileo spacecraft show that at least 12 different vents are erupting lavas that are probably hotter than the highest temperature basaltic eruptions on Earth today. In at least one case, the eruption near Pillan Patera, two independent instruments on Galileo show that the lava temperature must have exceeded 1700 kelvin and may have reached 2000 kelvin. The most likely explanation is that these lavas are ultramafic (magnesium-rich) silicates, and this idea is supported by the tentative identification of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene in lava flows associated with these high-temperature hot spots.

  12. Irradiation Effects in Fosterrite and the Nature of Interstellar Grains: A Coordinated Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Christoffersen, R.

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline and amorphous silicates condense in the outflows of low mass evolved stars and massive red supergiant stars and are injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) where they are rendered almost completely amorphous by a multitude of destructive processes (e.g. shock, grain-grain collisions, and irradiation). Irradiation effects in particular may have played an important role in the genesis and modification of primitive grains in cometary dust, but unraveling those effects requires controlled experiments under appropriate conditions and with an emphasis on materials relevant to the ISM. Here we report our infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and trans-mission electron microscope (TEM) measurements on forsterite that was amorphized through irradiation by high energy heavy ions.

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  14. Ladinian radiolarian fauna, siliceous rock from the Xianshuihe Belt, West Sichuan and their tectonic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bin; FENG Qinglai; WANG Quanwei; GUO Jianqiu; ZHONG Changhong; LI Zhenjiang

    2005-01-01

    Ladinian radiolarian fauna, including Muelleritortis, Baumgartneria, Oertlispongus,Paroertlispongus, Pseudoertlispongus, etc., was discovered from the siliceous rock of the Runiange Formation in the Xianshuihe belt, West Sichuan Province. Geochemical test on five samples from the siliceous rock indicates that SiO2 content varies in 71.16%-90.06% and Si/Al ratio, in 49-71, which shows that the siliceous rock contains more terrigenous mud sediments.The siliceous rock is characterized by the large ratios of Al203/(Al203+Fe203) (0.63-0.81) and TiN (>26), the low ratio of V/Y (<2.8), and low vanadium content (<23 μg/g), which are similar to the geochemical characteristics of continental margin siliceous rock. The Ce/Ce* ratios of the four samples vary in 1.02-1.47 and the LaN/CeN ratio, in 0.75-1.07, which imply that the siliceous rock was deposited in the continental margin basin. But only one sample is similar to the oceanic siliceous rock in REE. Turbidite-siliceous rock bearing radiolarian-basalt assemblage and the geochemical characteristics of the siliceous rock indicate that the Xianshuihe belt is in the strong rift stage in the Ladinian age.

  15. Studying regimes of convective heat transfer in the production of high-temperature silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, O. G.; Sheremet, M. A.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Bondareva, N. S.; Kuzmin, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the production of high-temperature silicate melts using the energy of low-temperature plasma in a conceptually new setup. A mathematical model of unsteady regimes of convective heat and mass transfer is developed and numerically implemented under the assumption of non-Newtonian nature of flow in the melting furnace with plasma-chemical synthesis of high-temperature silicate melts. Experiments on melting silicate containing materials were carried out using the energy of low-temperature plasma. The dependence of dynamic viscosity of various silicate materials (basalt, ash, waste of oil shale) was found experimentally.

  16. Type D personality predicts death or myocardial infarction after bare metal stent or sirolimus-eluting stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Lemos, Pedro A; van Vooren, Priya R;

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Type D personality on the occurrence of adverse events at nine months in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs) or bare stents. Type D patients experience increased negative emoti...

  17. Stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and death after drug-eluting and bare-metal stent coronary interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Maeng, Michael; Kaltoft, Anne;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine outcomes subsequent to implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Use of DES might be associated with increased risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: From January 2002 ...

  18. Cross-satellite comparison of operational land surface temperature products derived from MODIS and ASTER data over bare soil surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang; Cheng, Jie; Leng, Pei

    2017-04-01

    The collection 6 (C6) MODIS land surface temperature (LST) product is publicly available for the user community. Compared to the collection 5 (C5) MODIS LST product, the C6 MODIS LST product has been refined over bare soil pixels. Assessing the accuracy of the C6 MODIS LST product will help to facilitate the use of the LST product in various applications. In this study, we present a cross-satellite comparison to evaluate the accuracy of the C6 MODIS LST product (MOD11_L2) over bare soil surfaces under various atmospheric and surface conditions using the ASTER LST product as a reference. For comparison, the C5 MODIS LST product was also used in the analysis. The absolute biases (0.2-1.5 K) of the differences between the C6 MODIS LST and ASTER LST over bare soil surfaces are approximately two times less than those (0.6-3.8 K) of the differences between the C5 MODIS LST and ASTER LST. Furthermore, the RMSEs (0.7-2.3 K) over bare soil surfaces for the C6 MODIS LST are significantly smaller than those (0.9-4.2 K) for the C5 MODIS LST. These results indicate that the accuracy of the C6 MODIS LST product is much better than that of the C5 MODIS LST product. We recommend that the user community employs the C6 MODIS LST product in their applications.

  19. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Wang, Xinming

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China. Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS. The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively). Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils. Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime. COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29 degrees C. While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature. COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios, and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  20. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Yi; Xinming Wang

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China.Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS.The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively).Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils.Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime.COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29℃.While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature.COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios,and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  1. AGB stars and presolar grains

    CERN Document Server

    Busso, M; Maiorca, E; Palmerini, S

    2013-01-01

    Among presolar materials recovered in meteorites, abundant SiC and Al$_{2}$O$_{3}$ grains of AGB origins were found. They showed records of C, N, O, $^{26}$Al and s-element isotopic ratios that proved invaluable in constraining the nucleosynthesis models for AGB stars \\cite{zin,gal}. In particular, when these ratios are measured in SiC grains, they clearly reveal their prevalent origin in cool AGB circumstellar envelopes and provide information on both the local physics and the conditions at the nucleosynthesis site (the H- and He-burning layers deep inside the structure). Among the properties ascertained for the main part of the SiC data (the so-called {\\it mainstream} ones), we mention a large range of $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratios, extending below the solar value \\cite{mar}, and $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratios $\\gtrsim$ 30. Other classes of grains, instead, display low carbon isotopic ratios ($\\gtrsim 10$) and a huge dispersion for N isotopes, with cases of large $^{15}$N excess. In the same grains, isotopes currently...

  2. Bare fiber Bragg grating immunosensor for real-time detection of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Rajesh; Umesh, Sharath; Murali, Swetha; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Siva Gorthi, Sai

    2017-02-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria have been identified to be the cause of variety of health outbreaks resulting from contamination of food and water. Timely and rapid detection of the bacteria is thus crucial to maintain desired quality of food products and water resources. A novel methodology proposed in this paper demonstrates for the first time, the feasibility of employing a bare fiber Bragg grating (bFBG) sensor for detection of E. coli bacteria. The sensor was fabricated in a photo-sensitive optical fiber (4.2 µm/80 µm). Anti-E. coli antibody was immobilized on the sensor surface to enable the capture of target cells/bacteria present in the sample solution. Strain induced on the sensor surface as a result of antibody immobilization and subsequent binding of E. coli bacteria resulted in unique wavelength shifts in the respective recording of the reflected Bragg wavelength, which can be exploited for the application of biosensing. Functionalization and antibody binding on to the fiber surface was cross validated by the color development resulting from the reaction of an appropriate substrate solution with the enzyme label conjugated to the anti-E. coli antibody. Scanning electron microscope image of the fiber, further verified the E. coli cells bound to the antibody immobilized sensor surface.

  3. Single-cycle surface plasmon polaritons on a bare metal wire excited by relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op `T Root, W. P. E. M.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Smorenburg, P. W.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-12-01

    Terahertz (THz) pulses are applied in areas as diverse as materials science, communication and biosensing. Techniques for subwavelength concentration of THz pulses give access to a rapidly growing range of spatial scales and field intensities. Here we experimentally demonstrate a method to generate intense THz pulses on a metal wire, thereby introducing the possibility of wave-guiding and focussing of the full THz pulse energy to subwavelength spotsizes. This enables endoscopic sensing, single-shot subwavelength THz imaging and study of strongly nonlinear THz phenomena. We generate THz surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by launching electron bunches onto the tip of a bare metal wire. Bunches with 160 pC charge and ~6 ps duration yield SPPs with 6-10 ps duration and 0.4+/-0.1 MV m-1 electric field strength on a 1.5 mm diameter aluminium wire. These are the most intense SPPs reported on a wire. The SPPs are shown to propagate around a 90° bend.

  4. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector

  5. Comparison of Juglans regia L. bare-root nursery stocks for plantations: morphological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tani A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Good results in plantations are strictly related to the fitness of the nursery stock. Plant fitness, or quality, depends on inherent genetic characters and on physiological and physical (dimensional, morphological and nutritional characteristics. In arboriculture for wood production the role of stock quality is essential for a prompt expression of plant growth potential. So the necessity to define stock quality standards is widely recognized, though is still discussed how to assess stock cultural value by characteristics easy to measure. First step in such activities is to individuate in the above-ground part of the plantlets some traits related to the root system development. The study was carried out in two public forest nurseries (property of Regione Piemonte on 163 Juglans regia seedlings and transplants produced for wood plantations. In order to evaluate Walnut nursery stock production, different kinds of bare-root seedlings and transplants have been compared. For each kind, shoot and root system dimensional and morphological traits have been investigated after assignment of plants in 3 dimensional (height categories. Relations between shoots and roots traits have been studied to allow a visual evaluation of nursery plants based on data easy to collect. This study is to be considered a preliminary survey in the evaluation of stock quality based on field performance.

  6. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  7. Automated bare earth extraction technique for complex topography in light detection and ranging surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Bradford, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital surface models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. Few existing algorithms can handle substantial terrain diversity without significant editing or user interaction. This effort presents a newly developed methodology that provides a flexible, adaptable tool capable of integrating multiple LiDAR data attributes for an accurate terrain assessment. The terrain extraction and segmentation (TEXAS) approach uses a third-order spatial derivative for each point in the digital surface model to determine the curvature of the terrain rather than rely solely on the slope. The utilization of the curvature has shown to successfully preserve ground points in areas of steep terrain as they typically exhibit low curvature. Within the framework of TEXAS, the contiguous sets of points with low curvatures are grouped into regions using an edge-based segmentation method. The process does not require any user inputs and is completely data driven. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LiDAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity.

  8. A LADAR bare earth extraction technique for diverse topography and complex scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.

    2012-06-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to LADAR data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. A successful approach provides a flexible methodology (adaptable for topography and/or environment) that is capable of integrating multiple ladar point cloud data attributes. A newly developed approach (TE-SiP) uses a 2nd and 3rd order spatial derivative for each point in the DEM to determine sets of contiguous regions of similar elevation. Specifically, the derivative of the central point represents the curvature of the terrain at that position. Contiguous sets of high (positive or negative) values define sharp edges such as building edges or cliffs. This method is independent of the slope, such that very steep, but continuous topography still have relatively low curvature values and are preserved in the terrain classification. Next, a recursive segmentation method identifies unique features of homogeneity on the surface separated by areas of high curvature. An iterative selection process is used to eliminate regions containing buildings or vegetation from the terrain surface. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LADAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity. The results shown here include developed and forested regions in the Dominican Republic.

  9. Visual detection of melamine based on the peroxidase-like activity enhancement of bare gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Pengjuan; Dai, Haichao; Wang, Yilin; Sun, Yujing; Shi, Yan; Hu, Jingting; Li, Zhuang

    2014-10-15

    In this study, a facile method to sensitively detect melamine and highly improve the peroxidase-like activity of bare gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) at the same time is proposed for the first time. It is interesting to find that the addition of melamine could improve the peroxidase-like activity of Au NPs. By coupling with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethlybenzidine (TMB)-H2O2 chormogenic reaction, a novel method for colorimetic detection of melamine is developed. The detection limit of this method is as low as 0.2 nM with the help of UV-vis spectroscopy and 0.5 µM by naked-eye observation, both which are far below the US food and Drug Administration estimated melamine safety limit of 20 µM. In addition, the present method is successfully applied for the detection of melamine in raw milk and milk powder. More importantly, the proposed method could also improve the peroxidase-like activity of Au NPs, which may not only provide a new approach to develop effective nanomaterials-based mimetic enzyme, but also irradiative to develop new applications for Au NPs in varieties of cost-effective and simple sensors in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  10. CORNEAL STROMAL THINNING: A RARE CORNEAL COMPLICATION AFTER BARE SCL ERA PTERYG I UM EXCISION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Abdul

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Bare sclera technique without using any anti - mitotic drugs are commonly employed in rural population. Corneal dellen formation and recurrence of pterygium are more common in these cases. But the corneal complication like stromal thinning, necrosis of corne a and sclera are not common. The corneal epithelium is a highly differentiated cell type that is self - renewing. Also corneal epithelium is important for the stromal replacement in the situations like chemical, thermal burns, ocular surgery like pterygium s urgery. Interference with status of stem cell replacement and as a consequent to it, stromal thinning is occurring in the pterygium surgery. P atient 1: A 68 yr s. old male patient underwent pterygium surgery ( B aresclera excision technique. After 30 days he developed corneal thinning with the punched out partial stromal loss without perforation or descmetocele or scleral thinning. Patient 2: A 60yr s. old male patient underwent pterygium surgery 2months back, he developed same type of corneal thinning. Both P atients were treated with tear drops and improved. CONCLUSION : The stromal thinning in these two cases is may be due to chemical factors like collagenase which might have been released from the traumatised conjunctival epithelial cells causing thinning wit hout replacement of stroma by limbal stem cells.

  11. Tensor-optimized shell model for the Li isotopes with a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Myo, Takayuki; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2012-01-01

    We study the Li isotopes systematically in terms of the tensor-optimized shell model (TOSM) by using a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction as the AV8' interaction. The short-range correlation is treated in the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). Using the TOSM+UCOM approach, we investigate the role of the tensor force on each spectrum of the Li isotopes. It is found that the tensor force produces quite a characteristic effect on various states in each spectrum and those spectra are affected considerably by the tensor force. The energy difference between the spin-orbit partner, the p1/2 and p3/2 orbits of the last neutron, in 5Li is caused by opposite roles of the tensor correlation. In 6Li, the spin-triplet state in the LS coupling configuration is favored energetically by the tensor force in comparison with jj coupling shell model states. In 7,8,9Li, the low-lying states containing extra neutrons in the p3/2 orbit are favored energetically due to the large tensor contribution to allow the excitation fro...

  12. Nanoscopic and redox characterization of engineered horse cytochrome C chemisorbed on a bare gold electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Caroppi, Paola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Piro, Maria Cristina; Sinibaldi, Federica; Ferri, Tommaso; Polticelli, Fabio; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Santucci, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we exploit the potential offered by site-directed mutagenesis to achieve direct adsorption of horse cyt c on a bare gold electrode surface. To this issue, the side chain T102 has been replaced by a cysteine. T102 is close to the surface exposed C-terminal residue (E104), therefore the T102C mutation is expected to generate an exposed cysteine side chain able to facilitate protein binding to the electrode via the sulphur atom (analogously to what observed for yeast iso-1-cyt c). Scanning Tunnelling and Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy measurements show that the T102C mutant stably adsorbs on an Au(111) surface and retains the morphological characteristics of the native form. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that the adsorbed variant is electroactive; however, the heterogeneous electron transfer with the electrode surface is slower than that observed for yeast iso-1-cyt c. We ascribe it to differences in the tertiary architecture of the two proteins, characterized by different flexibility and stability. In particular, the region where the N- and C-terminal helices get in contact (and where the mutation occurs) is analyzed in detail, since the interactions between these two helices are considered crucial for the stability of the overall protein fold.

  13. 'Half-bare' positron in the inner gap of a pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Kontorovich, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    The pulsed radiation from the Crab pulsar, which consists of the main pulse (MP) and inter pulse (IP), as well as of the extra pulse components appearing at certain frequencies, has been studied at many frequencies and contains unique information, which is not available for the majority of pulsars. One of the mysteries of these data is the shift of the IP at high radio frequencies compared to lower ones and return to its previous position in the more high-frequency optical and X-ray range. The explanation of mysterious changes with the frequency of the main pulse and inter pulse of the Crab pulsar (found by Moffett and Hankins twenty years ago) through reflection of radiation by relativistic positrons from the star surface is proposed. The positrons, which are accelerated towards the surface of the star by inner gap electric field, radiate as 'half-bare' particles. The spectral-angular properties of this radiation differ from those ones of the electron curvature radiation inside the gap. The magnetic field of...

  14. A New Empirical Model for Radar Scattering from Bare Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Baghdadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a new semi-empirical radar backscattering model for bare soil surfaces based on the Dubois model. A wide dataset of backscattering coefficients extracted from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images and in situ soil surface parameter measurements (moisture content and roughness is used. The retrieval of soil parameters from SAR images remains challenging because the available backscattering models have limited performances. Existing models, physical, semi-empirical, or empirical, do not allow for a reliable estimate of soil surface geophysical parameters for all surface conditions. The proposed model, developed in HH, HV, and VV polarizations, uses a formulation of radar signals based on physical principles that are validated in numerous studies. Never before has a backscattering model been built and validated on such an important dataset as the one proposed in this study. It contains a wide range of incidence angles (18°–57° and radar wavelengths (L, C, X, well distributed, geographically, for regions with different climate conditions (humid, semi-arid, and arid sites, and involving many SAR sensors. The results show that the new model shows a very good performance for different radar wavelengths (L, C, X, incidence angles, and polarizations (RMSE of about 2 dB. This model is easy to invert and could provide a way to improve the retrieval of soil parameters.

  15. Is HE 0436-4717 Anemic? A deep look at a bare Seyfert 1 galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Bonson, K; Vasudevan, R

    2015-01-01

    A multi-epoch, multi-instrument analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy HE 0436-4717 is conducted using optical to X-ray data from XMM-Newton and Swift (including the BAT). Fitting of the UV-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution shows little evidence of extinction and the X-ray spectral analysis does not confirm previous reports of deep absorption edges from OVIII. HE 0436-4717 is a "bare" Seyfert with negligible line-of-sight absorption making it ideal to study the central X-ray emitting region. Three scenarios were considered to describe the X-ray data: partial covering absorption, blurred reflection, and soft Comptonization. All three interpretations describe the 0.5-10.0 keV spectra well. Extrapolating the models to 100 keV results in poorer fits for the the partial covering model. When also considering the rapid variability during one of the XMM-Newton observations, the blurred reflection model appears to describe all the observations in the most self-consistent manner. If adopted, the blurred reflection model ...

  16. Docosanol: new drug. Herpes labialis: barely more effective than an excipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    (1) Herpes is a contagious, recurrent viral infection of the skin and mucous membranes. In immunocompetent patients the recurrences can be troublesome but they heal spontaneously. Management is mainly based on lifestyle measures. Local application of an antiviral drug such as aciclovir has modest effects. It reduces healing time by about 2 days provided treatment is started as soon as the first symptoms appear; (2) Docosanol, a fatty alcohol, was recently authorized in France for treatment of episodes of herpes labialis; (3) A trial in 474 patients showed no tangible difference between docosanol and 5% aciclovir in reducing healing time; (4) Clinical evaluation also includes two trials versus an excipient (polyethylene glycol) including 370 and 373 patients. The median healing time was reduced by less than a day; (5) In these trials, the adverse effects of docosanol were similar to those of the excipients. In particular, docosanol cream contains excipients that can provoke allergic reactions; (6) In practice, docosanol cream is barely or no more effective than an excipient in treating acute episodes of herpes labialis. Lifestyle measures are still the cornerstone of herpes management.

  17. Bare-tether cathodic contact through thermionic emission by low-work-function materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xin; Sanmartin, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Plaza Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-15

    A new material, C12A7:e{sup -} electride, which might present a work function as low as 0.6 eV and moderately high temperature stability, was recently proposed as coating for floating bare tethers. Arising from heating under space operation, current is emitted by thermionic emission along a thus coated cathodic segment. A preliminary study on the space-charge-limited (SCL) double layer in front of the cathodic segment is presented using Langmuir's SCL electron current between cylindrical electrodes and orbital-motion-limited ion-collection sheath. A detailed calculation of current and bias profiles along the entire tether length is carried out with ohmic effects and the transition from SCL to full Richardson-Dushman emission included. Analysis shows that in the simplest drag mode, under typical orbital and tether conditions, thermionic emission leads to a short cathodic section and may eliminate the need for an active cathodic device and its corresponding gas feed requirements and power subsystem, which results in a truly 'propellant-less' tether system for such basic applications as de-orbiting low earth orbit satellites.

  18. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector

  19. Effect of sheet and rill erosion on overland flow connectivity in bare agricultural plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuela Fernandez, Andres; Rocio Rodriguez Pleguezuelo, Carmen; Javaux, Mathieu; Bielders, Charles L.

    2014-05-01

    Rill erosion processes generate preferential flow paths that may increase the degree of connectivity of the soil surface and hence strongly modify its hydrological response. However, few studies have tried to quantify the effect of rill development on overland flow connectivity. For this purpose, changes in surface microtopography were monitored on three bare agricultural plots (3 m wide x 10 m long and 11% of slope) in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) under natural rainfall conditions. Digital elevation models of these plots were obtained on a monthly basis over a 1-year period by photogrammetry using the Micmac software. Runoff was collected at the plot outlets. To characterize the hydrological connectivity, a functional connectivity indicator was used, called the relative surface connection function (RSCf). This indicator, which relates the area connected to the outflow boundary to the degree of filling of maximum depression storage (MDS), is fast to compute and was previously shown to be able to capture runoff-relevant connectivity properties. The RSC function was calculated for each DEM and the evolution of overland flow connectivity was quantified and compared to the measured runoff. The results of this study showed that the changes in microtopography resulting from sheet and rill erosion have a strong impact on the hydrological connectivity as reflected in the RSCf. A higher volume of runoff was generated as a consequence of surface sealing and the decrease of the MDS. More rapid runoff initiation was observed as the RSCf evolved from a concave to a convex shape.

  20. An electrochemical study of hydrogen uptake and elimination by bare and gold-plated waspaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.; Lowery, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Two electrochemical methods for the determination of hydrogen concentrations in metals are discussed and evaluated. The take-up of hydrogen at a pressure of 5000 psi by Waspaloy metal was determined experimentally at 24 C. It was found that the metal becomes saturated with hydrogen after an exposure time of about 1 hr. For samples charged with hydrogen at high pressure, most of the hydrogen is contained in the interstitial solid solution of the metal. For electrolytically charged samples, most of the hydrogen is contained as surface and subsurface hydrides. Hydrogen elimination rates were determined for these two cases, with the rate for electrolytically charged samples being greater by over a factor of two. Theoretical effects of high temperature and pressure on hydrogen take-up and elimination by bare and gold plated Waspaloy metal was considered. The breakthrough point for hydrogen at 5000 psi, determined experimentally, lies between a gold thickness of 0.0127 mm (0.0005 in.) and 0.0254 mm (0.001 in.) at 24 C. Electropolishing was found to greatly reduce the uptake of hydrogen at high pressure by Waspaloy metal at 24 C. Possible implications of the results obtained, as they apply to the turbine disk of the space shuttle main engine, are discussed.