WorldWideScience

Sample records for bare silicate grain

  1. Probing the Surfaces of Interstellar Dust Grains: The Adsorption of CO at Bare Grain Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, H J; Pontoppidan, K M; Van Dishoeck, A G; Fraser, Helen J.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Dishoeck, Alexander G.G.M. Tielens & Ewine F. van

    2004-01-01

    A solid-state feature was detected at around 2175 cm-1 towards 30 embedded young stellar objects in spectra obtained using the ESO VLT-ISAAC. We present results from laboratory studies of CO adsorbed at the surface of Zeolite wafers, where absorption bands were detected at 2177 and 2168 cm-1 (corresponding to CO chemisorbed at the Zeolite surface), and 2130 cm-1 (corresponding to CO physisorbed at the Zeolite surface), providing an excellent match to the observational data. We propose that the main carrier of the 2175-band is CO chemisorbed at bare surfaces of dust grains in the interstellar medium. This result provides the first direct evidence that gas-surface interactions do not have to result in the formation of ice mantles on interstellar dust. The strength of the 2175-band is estimated to be ~ 4 x 10-19 cm molecule-1. The abundance of CO adsorbed at bare grain surfaces ranges from 0.06 to 0.16 relative to H2O ice, which is, at most, half of the abundance (relative to H2O ice) of CO residing in H2O-domin...

  2. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    CERN Document Server

    Min, M; De Koter, A; Hovenier, J W; Keller, L P; Markwick-Kemper, F

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effect of the amount of magnesium in the silicate lattice is studied. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu extinction feature as observed towards the galactic center. We use very irregularly shaped coated and non-coated porous Gaussian Random Field particles as well as a statistical approach to model shape effects. For the dust materials we use amorphous and crystalline silicates with various composition and SiC. The results of our analysis of the 10 mu feature are used to compute the shape of the 20 mu silicate feature and to compare this with observations. By using realistic particle shapes we are, for the first time, able to derive the magnesium fraction in interstellar silicates. We find that the interstellar silicates are highly magnesium rich (Mg/(Fe+Mg)>0.9) and that the stoichiometry lies between pyroxene and olivine type silicates. This composition is not consistent with that o...

  3. Laboratory Analysis of Silicate Stardust Grains of Diverse Stellar Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Silicate dust is ubiquitous in a multitude of environments across the cosmos, including evolved oxygen-rich stars, interstellar space, protoplanetary disks, comets, and asteroids. The identification of bona fide silicate stardust grains in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, and dust returned from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft has revolutionized the study of stars, interstellar space, and the history of dust in the Galaxy. These stardust grains have exotic isotopic compositions that are records of nucleosynthetic processes that occurred in the depths of their now extinct parent stars. Moreover, the chemical compositions and mineralogies of silicate stardust are consequences of the physical and chemical nature of the stellar condensation environment, as well as secondary alteration processes that can occur in interstellar space, the solar nebula, and on the asteroid or comet parent body in which they were incorporated. In this talk I will discuss our use of advanced nano-scale instrumentation in the laboratory to conduct coordinated isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of silicate stardust grains from AGB stars, supernovae, and novae. By analyzing the isotopic compositions of multiple elements in individual grains, we have been able to constrain their stellar sources, explore stellar nucleosynthetic and mixing processes, and Galactic chemical evolution. Through our mineralogical studies, we have found these presolar silicate grains to have wide-ranging chemical and mineral characteristics. This diversity is the result of primary condensation characteristics and in some cases secondary features imparted by alteration in space and in our Solar System. The laboratory analysis of actual samples of stars directly complements astronomical observations and astrophysical models and offers an unprecedented level of detail into the lifecycles of dust in the Galaxy.

  4. Oxygen diffusion and reactivity at low temperature on bare amorphous olivine-type silicate

    CERN Document Server

    Minissale, M; Dulieu, F

    2014-01-01

    The mobility of O atoms at very low temperatures is not generally taken into account, despite O diffusion would add to a series of processes leading to the observed rich molecular diversity in space. We present a study of the mobility and reactivity of O atoms on an amorphous silicate surface. Our results are in the form of RAIRS and temperature-programmed desorption spectra of O2 and O3 produced via two pathways: O + O and O2 + O, investigated in a submonolayer regime and in the range of temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. All the experiments show that ozone is formed efficiently on silicate at any surface temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. The derived upper limit for the activation barriers of O + O and O2 + O reactions is 150 K/kb. Ozone formation at low temperatures indicates that fast diffusion of O atoms is at play even at 6.5 K. Through a series of rate equations included in our model, we also address the reaction mechanisms and show that neither the Eley Rideal nor the Hot atom mechanisms alone can expla...

  5. Annealing of Pre-Cometary Silicate Grains in Solar Nebula Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, D. E.; Desch, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Comets contain crystalline silicate grains which could only have formed at high temperatures, not generally experienced by comets. We test the hypothesis that amorphous silicates were annealed by shock waves in the solar nebula. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Laboratory Annealing Experiments Of Refractory Silicate Grain Analogs Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Tsukamota, Katsuo; Kaito, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    Exothermic reactions during the annealing of laboratory synthesized amorphous magnesium-bearing silicate particles used as grain analogs of cosmic dust were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in air. With infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we show that cosmic dust could possibly undergo fusion to larger particles, with oxidation of magnesium silicide and crystallization of forsterite as exothermic reactions in the early solar system. The reactions begin at approximately 425, approximately 625, and approximately 1000 K, respectively, and the reaction energies (enthalpies) are at least 727, 4151, and 160.22 J per gram, respectively. During the crystallization of forsterite particles, the spectral evolution of the 10 micrometer feature from amorphous to crystalline was observed to begin at lower temperature than the crystallization temperature of 1003 K. During spectral evolution at lower temperature, nucleation and/or the formation of nanocrystallites of forsterite at the surface of the grain analogs was observed.

  7. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  8. Soft X-ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications on Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaravella, A; Chen, Y -J; Caro, G M Muñoz; Huang, C -H; Jiménez-Escobar, A; Venezia, A M

    2016-01-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate ?lms submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted solgel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  9. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications for Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Huang, C.-H.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Venezia, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate films submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted sol-gel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray-irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  10. Special Feature: Constraints on nebular dynamics and chemistry based on observations of annealed magnesium silicate grains in comets and in disks surrounding Herbig Ae/Be stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Hugh G. M.; Grady, Carol A.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Hallenbeck, Susan L.; Sitko, Michael L.

    2001-02-01

    Understanding dynamic conditions in the Solar Nebula is the key to prediction of the material to be found in comets. We suggest that a dynamic, large-scale circulation pattern brings processed dust and gas from the inner nebula back out into the region of cometesimal formationextending possibly hundreds of astronomical units (AU) from the sunand that the composition of comets is determined by a chemical reaction network closely coupled to the dynamic transport of dust and gas in the system. This scenario is supported by laboratory studies of Mg silicates and the astronomical data for comets and for protoplanetary disks associated with young stars, which demonstrate that annealing of nebular silicates must occur in conjunction with a large-scale circulation. Mass recycling of dust should have a significant effect on the chemical kinetics of the outer nebula by introducing reduced, gas-phase species produced in the higher temperature and pressure environment of the inner nebula, along with freshly processed grains with "clean" catalytic surfaces to the region of cometesimal formation. Because comets probably form throughout the lifetime of the Solar Nebula and processed (crystalline) grains are not immediately available for incorporation into the first generation of comets, an increasing fraction of dust incorporated into a growing comet should be crystalline olivine and this fraction can serve as a crude chronometer of the relative ages of comets. The formation and evolution of key organic and biogenic molecules in comets are potentially of great consequence to astrobiology.

  11. Constraints on nebular dynamics and chemistry based on observations of annealed magnesium silicate grains in comets and in disks surrounding Herbig Ae/Be stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, H G; Grady, C A; Nuth, J A; Hallenbeck, S L; Sitko, M L

    2001-02-27

    Understanding dynamic conditions in the Solar Nebula is the key to prediction of the material to be found in comets. We suggest that a dynamic, large-scale circulation pattern brings processed dust and gas from the inner nebula back out into the region of cometesimal formation-extending possibly hundreds of astronomical units (AU) from the sun-and that the composition of comets is determined by a chemical reaction network closely coupled to the dynamic transport of dust and gas in the system. This scenario is supported by laboratory studies of Mg silicates and the astronomical data for comets and for protoplanetary disks associated with young stars, which demonstrate that annealing of nebular silicates must occur in conjunction with a large-scale circulation. Mass recycling of dust should have a significant effect on the chemical kinetics of the outer nebula by introducing reduced, gas-phase species produced in the higher temperature and pressure environment of the inner nebula, along with freshly processed grains with "clean" catalytic surfaces to the region of cometesimal formation. Because comets probably form throughout the lifetime of the Solar Nebula and processed (crystalline) grains are not immediately available for incorporation into the first generation of comets, an increasing fraction of dust incorporated into a growing comet should be crystalline olivine and this fraction can serve as a crude chronometer of the relative ages of comets. The formation and evolution of key organic and biogenic molecules in comets are potentially of great consequence to astrobiology. PMID:11226213

  12. Identification of silicate and carbonaceous presolar grains by SIMS in the type-3 enstatite chondrite ALHA81189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isotope ratio imaging technique using the HokuDai isotope microscope system has been applied to in situ survey for presolar grains in the type-3 enstatite chondrite ALHA81189. Rastered and static ion beam were used for primary beam. Lateral resolution of the isotope image was achieved to be 0.4 μm for static ion beam mode and to be 0.6 μm for rastered ion beam mode. As a result, the abundances of presolar grains are 150-200% larger under the static ion beam mode than under the rastered ion beam mode. Development of image processing introducing isotopography of 32S-, 24Mg16O- and 56Fe- succeeded to increase efficiency of presolar grain characterization. Using the static ion beam and introducing appropriate isotopography were very useful methods of in situ characterization of presolar grains in meteorites

  13. Interstellar Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Draine, B. T.

    2000-01-01

    Our current understanding of interstellar dust is summarized at an introductory level. Submicron-sized interstellar dust grains absorb and scatter light, and reradiate the absorbed energy in the infrared. The grain population spans a range of sizes, from molecules containing only tens of atoms, to particles containing 10^{10} atoms. Most of the grain mass appears to be due to two types of solid, in approximately equal amounts: amorphous silicate mineral, and carbonaceous material. Approximate...

  14. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  15. The Globe laid bare

    CERN Multimedia

    Fortunati, Lucien

    2015-01-01

    If you’re at CERN at the moment, you will certainly have noticed the work under way on the Globe. The structure, which has been in pride of place opposite the Laboratory for over ten years, has never been so completely laid bare. But, as we explained in a previous article (see here), it is all for a good cause. The Globe is built entirely from wood and certain parts of it need to be replaced.

  16. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  17. The Globe laid bare

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    If you’re at CERN at the moment, you will certainly have noticed the work under way on the Globe. The structure, which has been in pride of place opposite the Laboratory for over ten years, has never been so completely laid bare. But, as we explained in a previous article (see here), it is all for a good cause. The Globe is built entirely from wood and certain parts of it need to be replaced.   The Globe after the removal of all the sun baffles. Image: Lucien Fortunati. Picture the general structure of the Globe. In simple terms, the building consists of two spheres, one inside the other. The inner sphere houses the Universe of Particles exhibition and the conference room and is connected to the outer sphere by two access ramps. “Each of these two spheres is made up of eighteen large supporting arcs,” explains Amaya Martínez García of the GS department, who is supervising the Globe renovation project. “These eighteen arcs are ...

  18. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Jäger, C.; Simionovici, A.; Lemaire, J. L.; Sabri, T.; Foy, E.; Yagoubi, S.; Henning, T.; Salomon, D.; Martinez-Criado, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei contain X-ray-dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Aims: Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. Methods: We prepared enstatite (MgSiO3) nanograins, which are analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared in X-ray transparent substrates and were irradiated with hard X-rays nanobeams (29.4 keV) provided by beamline ID16B of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble). X-ray diffraction images were recorded in transmission mode, and the ensuing diffractograms were analyzed as a function of the total X-ray exposure time. Results: We detected the amorphization of polycrystalline silicates embedded in an organic matrix after an accumulated X-ray exposure of 6.4 × 1027 eV cm-2. Pure crystalline silicate grains (without resin) do not exhibit amorphization. None of the amorphous silicate samples (pure and embedded in resin) underwent crystallization. We analyze the evolution of the polycrystalline sample embedded in an organic matrix as a function of X-ray exposure. Conclusions: Loss of diffraction peak intensity, peak broadening, and the disappearance of discrete spots and arcs reveal the amorphization

  19. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Gavilan, L; Simionovici, A; Lemaire, J L; Sabri, T; Foy, E; Yagoubi, S; Henning, T; Salomon, D; Martinez-Criado, G

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei, contain X-ray dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in-situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments, and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. We prepared enstatite nanograins, analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared i...

  20. Annealing of Silicate Dust by Nebular Shocks at 10 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, David E.; Desch, Steven J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium are known to be mostly amorphous, yet crystalline silicate grains have been observed in many long-period comets and in protoplanetary disks. Annealing of amorphous silicate grains into crystalline grains requires temperatures greater than or approximately equal to 1000 K, but exposure of dust grains in comets to such high temperatures is apparently incompatible with the generally low temperatures experienced by comets. This has led to the proposal of models in which dust grains were thermally processed near the protoSun, then underwent considerable radial transport until they reached the gas giant planet region where the long-period comets originated. We hypothesize instead that silicate dust grains were annealed in situ, by shock waves triggered by gravitational instabilities. We assume a shock speed of 5 km/s, a plausible value for shocks driven by gravitational instabilities. We calculate the peak temperatures of pyroxene grains under conditions typical in protoplanetary disks at 5-10 AU. We show that in situ annealing of micron-sized dust grains can occur, obviating the need for large-scale radial transport.

  1. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when those small grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing the dipole moment per atom ($\\beta$) and can reach $P\\sim 20\\%$ for $\\beta\\sim 0.1$D at grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space $(\\beta,Y_{Si})$ for silicate nanoparticles in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the ob...

  2. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  3. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  4. Discovery of ancient silicate stardust in a meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ann N; Zinner, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    We have discovered nine presolar silicate grains from the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Their anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions indicate formation in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Two grains are identified as pyroxene, two as olivine, one as a glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS), and one as an Al-rich silicate. One grain is enriched in 26Mg, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of 26Al and provides information about mixing processes in the parent star. This discovery opens new means for studying stellar processes and conditions in various solar system environments.

  5. Matrix methods for bare resonator eigenvalue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, W P; Dente, G C

    1980-05-15

    Bare resonator eigenvalues have traditionally been calculated using Fox and Li iterative techniques or the Prony method presented by Siegman and Miller. A theoretical framework for bare resonator eigenvalue analysis is presented. Several new methods are given and compared with the Prony method.

  6. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    OpenAIRE

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior; Lucia Helena Garófala Chaves; Fernando Antônio Melo da Costa; Hans Raj Gheyi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to...

  7. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles...

  8. Very Late Bare Metal Stent Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Soto Herrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Very late stent thrombosis is a rare and not-well-understood complication after bare metal stent implantation. It usually presents as an ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and it is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not well defined; nevertheless, recent studies have proposed a neoatherosclerotic process as the triggering mechanism. We present the case of a patient with bare metal very late stent thrombosis 12 years after implantation.

  9. Very Late Bare Metal Stent Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Herrera, Mariana; Restrepo, José A.; Felipe Buitrago, Andrés; Gómez Mejía, Mabel; Díaz, Jesús H.

    2013-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis is a rare and not-well-understood complication after bare metal stent implantation. It usually presents as an ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and it is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not well defined; nevertheless, recent studies have proposed a neoatherosclerotic process as the triggering mechanism. We present the case of a patient with bare metal very late stent thrombosis 12 years after implantation. PMID:24829831

  10. Leaf application of silicic acid to upland rice and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Si (stabilized silicic acid, Silamol® leaf application on mineral nutrition and yield in upland rice and corn crops. The treatments were the control (without Si and Si foliar split spraying using 2 L ha-1 of the Silamol® commercial product, with 0.8% soluble Si as concentrated stabilized silicic acid. Silicon leaf application increased the concentrations of K, Ca and Si in rice and corn leaves, the number of panicles per m2 of rice and the number of grains per ear of corn; accordingly, the Si leaf application provided a higher grain yield in both crops.

  11. Silicic Large Igneous Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott Bryan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are the end-product of huge additions of magma to the continental crust both at the surface and at depth. Since the first categorisation of LIPs by Coffin & Eldholm (1994), it has been recognised that LIPs are more varied inform, age and character, and this includes the recognition of Silicic LIPs. Silicic LIPs are the largest accumulations of primary volcaniclastic rocks at the Earth's surface with areal extents >0.1 Mkm2 and extrusive and subvolcanic intrusive volumes >0.25 Mkm3. The Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic Silicic LIP events are the best recognised and are similar in terms of their dimension, crustal setting, volcanic architecture and geochemistry.

  12. A New Determination of the Binding Energy of Atomic Oxygen on Dust Grain Surfaces: Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Hopkins, Tyler; Vidali, Gianfranco; Kaufman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The energy to desorb atomic oxygen from an interstellar dust grain surface, $E_{\\rm des}$, is an important controlling parameter in gas-grain models; its value impacts the temperature range over which oxygen resides on a dust grain. However, no prior measurement has been done of the desorption energy. We report the first direct measurement of $E_{\\rm des}$ for atomic oxygen from dust grain analogs. The values of $E_{\\rm des}$ are $1660\\pm 60$~K and $1850\\pm 90$~K for porous amorphous water ice and for a bare amorphous silicate film, respectively, or about twice the value previously adopted in simulations of the chemical evolution of a cloud. We use the new values to study oxygen chemistry as a function of depth in a molecular cloud. For $n=10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ and $G_0$=10$^2$ ($G_0$=1 is the average local interstellar radiation field), the main result of the adoption of the higher oxygen binding energy is that H$_2$O can form on grains at lower visual extinction $A_{\\rm V}$, closer to the cloud surface. A higher ...

  13. Silicate Dust in Evolved Protoplanetary Disks: Growth, Sedimentation, and Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Watson, Dan; Bohac, Chris; Henning, Thomas; Bouwman, Jeroen; 10.1086/512121

    2009-01-01

    We present the Spitzer IRS spectra for 33 young stars in Tr 37 and NGC 7160. The sample includes the high- and intermediate-mass stars with MIPS 24 microns excess, the only known active accretor in the 12 Myr-old cluster NGC 7160, and 19 low-mass stars with disks in the 4 Myr-old cluster Tr 37. We examine the 10 microns silicate feature, present in the whole sample of low-mass star and in 3 of the high- and intermediate-mass targets, and we find that PAH emission is detectable only in the Herbig Be star. We analyze the composition and size of the warm photospheric silicate grains by fitting the 10 microns silicate feature, and study the possible correlations between the silicate characteristics and the stellar and disk properties (age, SED slope, accretion rate, spectral type). We find indications of dust settling with age and of the effect of turbulent enrichment of the disk atmosphere with large grains. Crystalline grains are only small contributors to the total silicate mass in all disks, and do not seem t...

  14. Bare nominals and reference to capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Henriëtte de; Winter, Y.; Zwarts, J.

    2007-01-01

    Prefinal version. This paper concentrates on the syntax and semantics of bare nominals in Germanic and Romance languages. These languages do not normally allow nominals to occur without an article. However, some syntactic configurations, including predicative constructions, supplementives and some p

  15. Formation of Magnesium Silicates is Limited around Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, J. A., III

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) grains could be produced in the hydrogen dominant gas outflow from evolved stars in addition to amorphous oxide minerals. Astronomical observations have shown the existence of abundant silicate grains around evolved stars and we have long realized that most of the silicate grains are amorphous, based on the observed infrared features. Only high mass loss stars show the feature attributed to magnesium-rich crystalline silicate about 10-20 % respect to total silicates, so far. The lower degree of crystallinity observed in silicates formed in outflows of lower mass-loss-rate stars might be caused by the formation of magnesium silicide in this relatively hydrogen-rich environment. As a result of predominant distribution of magnesium into the silicide, the composition of interstellar amorphous silicates could be magnesium poor compared with silicon. Indeed, the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition (Floss et al. 2006; Keller & Messenger 2007). Infrared observations suggest that there is little or no crystalline forsterite in interstellar environments while there is an abundance of crystalline forsterite in our Solar System. If the forsterite is a result of the oxidation of interstellar magnesium silicide, then it is clear both why crystalline forsterite is stoichiometric olivine and why the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition. In addition, it may also explain why the chemical composition of olivine is iron poor. Unfortunately, magnesium silicide has never been detected via astronomical observation or in the analysis of primitive meteorites. I would suggest that future analysis of meteorites and theoretical calculations could confirm the possibility of the formation of magnesium silicide grains around evolved stars.

  16. The Search for Interstellar Sulfide Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The lifecycle of sulfur in the galaxy is poorly understood. Fe-sulfide grains are abundant in early solar system materials (e.g. meteorites and comets) and S is highly depleted from the gas phase in cold, dense molecular cloud environments. In stark contrast, sulfur is essentially undepleted from the gas phase in the diffuse interstellar medium, indicating that little sulfur is incorporated into solid grains in this environment. It is widely believed that sulfur is not a component of interstellar dust grains. This is a rather puzzling observation unless Fe-sulfides are not produced in significant quantities in stellar outflows, or their lifetime in the ISM is very short due to rapid destruction. Fe sulfide grains are ubiquitous in cometary samples where they are the dominant host of sulfur. The Fe-sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite; Fe(1-x)S) are common, both as discrete 0.5-10 micron-sized grains and as fine (5-10 nm) nanophase inclusions within amorphous silicate grains. Cometary dust particles contain high abundances of well-preserved presolar silicates and organic matter and we have suggested that they should contain presolar sulfides as well. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of abundant Fe-sulfides grains in dust around pre- and post-main sequence stars inferred from astronomical spectra showing a broad 23 micron IR feature due to FeS. Fe-sulfide grains also occur as inclusions in bona fide circumstellar amorphous silicate grains and as inclusions within deuterium-rich organic matter in cometary dust samples. Our irradiation experiments show that FeS is far more resistant to radiation damage than silicates. Consequently, we expect that Fe sulfide stardust should be as abundant as silicate stardust in solar system materials.

  17. Thermal Photons From Magnetized Bare Strange Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez, Enrique Moreno; Patiño, Leonardo; Ortega, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    A plasma made out of strange-quark matter (SQM) and electrons, has a rather high plasma frequency (>20 MeV). Thus, a compact star made of such material all the way up to its surface, i.e., a bare strange star, would be unable to radiate away its thermal emission. We use the MIT-bag model and assume that SQM is the ground state of nuclear matter at high density. We investigate whether the presence of a magnetic field will allow propagation of radiation at frequencies below the SQM plasma frequencies. Hence, we study the presence of gyrofrequencies in a SQM plasma permeated by a strong magnetic field (B > 10^{12} G). We find that small regions in the frequency spectrum allow radiation propagation due to the presence of the magnetic fields. It is likely that narrow bands of radiation would likely be observable from magnetized bare strange stars .

  18. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  19. Silicates in D-type symbiotic stars: an ISO overview

    CERN Document Server

    Angeloni, R; Ciroi, S; Rafanelli, P

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the IR spectral features of a sample of D-type symbiotic stars. Analyzing unexploited ISO-SWS data, deriving the basic observational parameters of dust bands and comparing them with respect to those observed in other astronomical sources, we try to highlight the effect of environment on grain chemistry and physic. We find strong amorphous silicate emission bands at 10 micron and 18 micron in a large fraction of the sample. The analysis of the 10 micron band, along with a direct comparison with several astronomical sources, reveals that silicate dust in symbiotic stars shows features between the characteristic circumstellar environments and the interstellar medium. This indicates an increasing reprocessing of grains in relation to specific symbiotic behavior of the objects. A correlation between the central wavelength of the 10 and 18 micron dust bands is found. By the modeling of IR spectral lines we investigate also dust grains conditions within the shocked nebulae. Both the unusual depletion ...

  20. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to water replacement of 50, 75, 100 and 125% of the crop evapotranspiration, with fertilizer levels of 0, 82, 164 and 246 g of calcium-magnesium silicate, with three replications. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with the irrigation depths distributed in bands while the silicon levels constituted the subplots. Corn yield was influenced by calcium-magnesium silicate and by irrigation depth, obtaining the greatest grain yield with the dose of 164 g pot-1 irrigated at the highest water level. The water-use efficiency of in corn production tended to decrease when the irrigation depth was increased. The best water-use efficiency was observed when the irrigation level was between 87 and 174 mm, and the dose of silicate was 164 g pot-1.

  1. Water Accommodation on Bare and Coated Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangrui

    2015-04-01

    A good understanding of water accommodation on ice surfaces is essential for quantitatively predicting the evolution of clouds, and therefore influences the effectiveness of climate models. However, the accommodation coefficient is poorly constrained within the literature where reported values vary by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, the complexity of the chemical composition of the atmosphere plays an important role in ice phase behavior and dynamics. We employ an environmental molecular beam (EMB) technique to investigate molecular water interactions with bare and impurity coated ice at temperatures from 170 K to 200 K. In this work, we summarize results of water accommodation experiments on bare ice (Kong et al., 2014) and on ice coated by methanol (Thomson et al., 2013), butanol (Thomson et al., 2013) and acetic acid (Papagiannakopoulos et al., 2014), and compare those results with analogous experiments using hexanol and nitric acid coatings. Hexanol is chosen as a complementary chain alcohol to methanol and butanol, while nitric acid is a common inorganic compound in the atmosphere. The results show a strong negative temperature dependence of water accommodation on bare ice, which can be quantitatively described by a precursor model. Acidic adlayers tend to enhance water uptake indicating that the system kinetics are thoroughly changed compared to bare ice. Adsorbed alcohols influence the temperature dependence of the accommodation coefficient and water molecules generally spend less time on the surfaces before desorbing, although the measured accommodation coefficients remain high and comparable to bare ice for the investigated systems. We conclude that impurities can either enhance or restrict water uptake in ways that are influenced by several factors including temperature and type of adsorbant, with potential implications for the description of ice particle growth in the atmosphere. This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council and

  2. The silicate absorption profile in the ISM towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    CERN Document Server

    Roche, P F; Gonzalez-Martin, O

    2015-01-01

    The 9.7-micron silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse interstellar medium is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile towards the very heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418, the galaxy with the deepest known silicate absorption feature, and compare it to the profiles seen in the Milky Way. Comparison between the 8-13 micron spectrum obtained with TReCS on Gemini and the larger aperture spectrum obtained from the Spitzer archive indicates that the former isolates the nuclear emission, while Spitzer detects low surface brightness circumnuclear diffuse emission in addition. The silicate absorption profile towards the nucleus is very similar to...

  3. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Robert J. Flatt; D'Espinose De Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measuremen...

  4. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  5. Ikke bare porno på mobilen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tem Frank

    2013-01-01

    Den britiske børne- og ungdomsforsker professor Sonia Livingstone ved London School of Economics viser gennem en række interviews, at billeder af eksplicitte sexhandlinger er en velkendt del af den ungdommelige cirkulation af ’hverdagspornografisk’ materiale (Ringrose et al. 2012). ’Sexting’ er...... altså ikke bare porno på en mobilplatform. Det er handlinger og værgestrategier, som unge piger er nødt til at forholde sig til i hverdagen, mens drengene umiddelbart ser ud til at slippe relativt let udenom den chikane, der kan ligge i ’sexting’....

  6. Chirality in Bare and Passivated Gold Nanoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Garzon, I L; Rodrigues-Hernandez, J I; Sigal, I; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Chiral structures have been found as the lowest-energy isomers of bare (Au$_{28}$ and Au$_{55}) and thiol-passivated (Au$_{28}(SCH$_{3})$_{16}$ and Au$_{38}$(SCH$_{3}$)$_{24}) gold nanoclusters. The degree of chirality existing in the chiral clusters was calculated using the Hausdorff chirality measure. We found that the index of chirality is higher in the passivated clusters and decreases with the cluster size. These results are consistent with the observed chiroptical activity recently reported for glutahione-passivated gold nanoclusters, and provide theoretical support for the existence of chirality in these novel compounds.

  7. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  8. Phloem Transport of Arsenic Species from Flag Leaf to Grain During Grain Filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Carey; G Norton; C Deacon; K Scheckel; E Lombi; T Punshon; M Guerinot; A Lanzirotti; M Newville; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Strategies to reduce arsenic (As) in rice grain, below concentrations that represent a serious human health concern, require that the mechanisms of As accumulation within grain be established. Therefore, retranslocation of As species from flag leaves into filling rice grain was investigated. Arsenic species were delivered through cut flag leaves during grain fill. Spatial unloading within grains was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography. Additionally, the effect of germanic acid (a silicic acid analog) on grain As accumulation in arsenite-treated panicles was examined. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were extremely efficiently retranslocated from flag leaves to rice grain; arsenate was poorly retranslocated, and was rapidly reduced to arsenite within flag leaves; arsenite displayed no retranslocation. Within grains, DMA rapidly dispersed while MMA and inorganic As remained close to the entry point. Germanic acid addition did not affect grain As in arsenite-treated panicles. Three-dimensional SXRF microtomography gave further information on arsenite localization in the ovular vascular trace (OVT) of rice grains. These results demonstrate that inorganic As is poorly remobilized, while organic species are readily remobilized, from leaves to grain. Stem translocation of inorganic As may not rely solely on silicic acid transporters.

  9. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years On

    CERN Document Server

    Wickramasinghe, N Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance - a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  10. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  11. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  12. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Rige, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  13. Pair emission from bare magnetized strange stars

    CERN Document Server

    Melrose, D B; Peres-Menezes, D

    2006-01-01

    The dominant emission from bare strange stars is thought to be electron-positron pairs, produced through spontaneous pair creation (SPC) in a surface layer of electrons tied to the star by a superstrong electric field. The positrons escape freely, but the electrons are directed towards the star and quickly fill all available states, such that their degeneracy suppresses further SPC. An electron must be reflected and gain energy in order to escape, along with the positron. Each escaping electron leaves a hole that is immediately filled by another electron through SPC. We discuss the collisional processes that produce escaping electrons. When the Landau quantization of the motion perpendicular to the magnetic field is taken into account, electron-electron collisions can lead to an escaping electron only through a multi-stage process involving higher Landau levels. Although the available estimates of the collision rate are deficient in several ways, it appears that the rate is too low for electron-electron colli...

  14. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  16. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  17. A Syntactic Study on Bare Infinitive and Infinitival to

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing

    2014-01-01

    Infinitives which consist of bare infinitive and infinitival to are imperative in linguistic studies. And both of the two kinds of infinitives do not indicate person, tense and number. This research aims to analyze the properties, similarities and differ-ences between bare infinitive and infinitival to from the perspective of syntax. Thus, it enables us to attain a uniform characteriza-tion of the infinitival to and bare infinitive on the syntactic level and help us to understand these two kinds of infinitives better.

  18. EAARL Bare Earth Topography-Fire Island National Seashore

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of Fire Island National Seashore was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  19. EAARL Coastal Topography--Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi was produced from remotely...

  20. EAARL Coastal Topography--Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth digital elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, was produced from remotely...

  1. EAARL Coastal Topography--Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey was produced from...

  2. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the northern Gulf of Mexico barrier islands and Naval Live Oaks was produced from...

  3. EAARL Topography-Vicksburg National Millitary Park 2008: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi was produced from remotely...

  4. Bare and effective fluid description in brane world cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Universidad de Santiago, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile); Lepe, Samuel; Saavedra, Joel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco [Universidad de La Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile)

    2010-03-15

    An effective fluid description, for a brane world model in five dimensions, is discussed for both signs of the brane tension. We found several cosmological scenarios where the effective equation differs widely from the bare equation of state. For universes with negative brane tension, with a bare fluid satisfying the strong energy condition, the effective fluid can cross the barrier {omega} {sub eff}=-1. (orig.)

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Silicate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng; NING Congqin; ZHOU Yue; CHEN Lei; LIN Kaili; CHANG Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Four kinds of pure silicate ceramic particles, CaSiO3, Ca3SiO5, bredigite and akermanite were prepared and their bactericidal effects were systematically investigated. The phase compositions of these silicate ceramics were characterized by XRD. The ionic concentration meas urement revealed that the Calcium (Ca) ion concentration were relatively higher in Ca3SiO5 and bredigite, and much lower in CaSiO3 and akermanite. Accordingly, the pH values of the four silicate ceramics extracts showed a positive correlation with the particle concentrations. Meanwhile, by decreasing the particle size, higher Ca ion concentrations can be achieved, leading to the increase of aqueous pH value as well. In summary, all of the four silicate ceramics tested in our study showed antibacterial effect in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, the order of their antibacterial activity against E.coli from strong to weak is Ca3SiO5, bredigite, CaSiO3 and akermanite.

  6. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  7. Killing, letting die and the bare difference argument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrett, Roy W

    1996-04-01

    I believe that there is no intrinsic moral difference between killing and letting die. That is, there is no difference that depends solely on the distinction between an act and an omission. I also believe that we can reasonably establish this thesis by appeal to the Bare Difference Argument. The form of this argument involves considering two imaginary cases in which there are no morally relevant differences present, save the bare difference that one is a case of killing and one a case of letting die. But in the pair of cases under consideration this bare difference makes no moral difference. Hence it cannot be that the bare difference between killing and letting die is in itself a morally important difference. Winston Nesbitt has recently argued that the Bare Difference Argument fails because "the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were designed to undermine". I argue that Nesbitt misunderstands the logic of the Bare Difference Argument and that accordingly his objections are mistaken.

  8. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  9. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  10. Cohesion of Amorphous Silica Spheres: Toward a Better Understanding of the Coagulation Growth of Silicate Dust Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Senshu, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion forces between submicrometer-sized silicate grains play a crucial role in the formation of silicate dust agglomerates, rocky planetesimals, and terrestrial planets. The surface energy of silicate dust particles is the key to their adhesion and rolling forces in a theoretical model based on the contact mechanics. Here we revisit the cohesion of amorphous silica spheres by compiling available data on the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in various circumstances. It turned out that the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in a vacuum is a factor of 10 higher than previously assumed. Therefore, the previous theoretical models underestimated the critical velocity for the sticking of amorphous silica spheres, as well as the rolling friction forces between them. With the most plausible value of the surface energy for amorphous silica spheres, theoretical models based on the contact mechanics are in harmony with laboratory experiments. Consequently, we conclude that silicate grains ...

  11. High Silicate Crystalline-to-Amorphous Ratios in Comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and Hale-Bopp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.; Harker, D. E.; Woodward, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Crystalline silicates, by their apparent absence in the ISM, are dust grains that experienced high temperatures in the solar nebula. Mg-rich crystalline silicates formed either by condensation from hot nebular gases (1450 K) or by the annealing of Mg-rich amorphous silicates (approx. 1000 K) in shocks in the 5-10 AU region or by radial transport into and out of the hot inner zones, e.g., T(sub d) > 1000 K at r(sub h) Hale-Bopp) demonstrate that both these comets have similar, high silicate crystalline-to-amorphous ratios of 2.4 and 2.1, respectively, indicating that these icy planetesimals aggregated from similar reservoirs of material or that crystalline silicates were widely distributed within the comet-forming zone. This argues for efficient annealing mechanisms and radial mixing.

  12. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  13. LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF PRESOLAR SILICATE STARDUST FROM A NOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the major element as well as the oxygen, magnesium, and silicon isotope composition of a unique presolar silicate grain found in the fine-grained fraction of the Antarctic CR2 chondrite Graves Nunataks 95229. The grain is characterized by an extremely high 17O/16O ratio (6.3 ± 0.2 × 10–3) relative to solar values, whereas its 18O/16O ratio is solar within measurement uncertainty. It also shows enrichments in 25,26Mg and a significant excess in 30Si relative to solar system compositions, with δ25Mg = 79 ± 21 per mille , δ26Mg = 70 ± 20 per mille , and δ30Si = 379 ± 92 per mille . This isotopic composition is consistent with an origin in the ejecta of a ∼1.3-1.4 M☉ ONe nova with large contributions of material from a main-sequence companion star of roughly solar metallicity. However, many details of the stellar source remain undetermined, owing to the uncertainties of current nova nucleosynthesis models. Auger electron spectroscopic analyses identify O, Mg, Si, and Fe as the grain's major constituents. Its (Mg+Fe)/Si atomic ratios are lower than that of olivine and correspond on average to Fe-Mg-pyroxene. A complex texture and heterogeneous major element distribution within the grain attest to condensation under non-equilibrium conditions, which is consistent with the proposed nova origin.

  14. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    with a spectacular improvement up to 300 % in impact strength were obtained. In the second part of this study, layered silicate bio-nanomaterials were obtained starting from natural compounds and taking into consideration their biocompatibility properties. These new materials may be used for drug delivery systems......Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...... toughness-stiffness requirements. The new compatibilizer system used to obtain nanocomposites, presented an improvement of 8-20 % in tensile strength, 15-34 % in Young’s modulus, 23-34 % in fatigue tests and 20-58% in degree of crystalline phase. By introducing a rubbery phase as modifier, nanocomposites...

  15. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  16. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  17. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  18. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF Al-RICH SILICATE STARDUST FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christian [Institute for Mineralogy, University of Muenster, Correnssstr. 24, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Hoppe, Peter [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Brenker, Frank E., E-mail: christian.vollmer@wwu.de [Institute of Geoscience/Mineralogy, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-05-20

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content < 0.5 at%), structurally undisturbed orthopyroxene (MgSiO{sub 3}) with an unusually high Al content (1.8 {+-} 0.5 at%). This is the first TEM documentation of a single crystal pyroxene within the complete stardust silicate data set. We interpret the microstructure and chemistry of this grain as being a direct condensate from a gas of locally non-solar composition (i.e., with a higher-than-solar Al content and most likely also a lower-than-solar Mg/Si ratio) at (near)-equilibrium conditions. From the overabundance of crystalline olivine (six reported grains to date) compared to crystalline pyroxene (only documented as a single crystal in this work) we infer that formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  19. Cohesion of Amorphous Silica Spheres: Toward a Better Understanding of The Coagulation Growth of Silicate Dust Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Wada, Koji; Senshu, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Adhesion forces between submicrometer-sized silicate grains play a crucial role in the formation of silicate dust agglomerates, rocky planetesimals, and terrestrial planets. The surface energy of silicate dust particles is the key to their adhesion and rolling forces in a theoretical model based on contact mechanics. Here we revisit the cohesion of amorphous silica spheres by compiling available data on the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in various circumstances. It turned out that the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in a vacuum is a factor of 10 higher than previously assumed. Therefore, the previous theoretical models underestimated the critical velocity for the sticking of amorphous silica spheres, as well as the rolling friction forces between them. With the most plausible value of the surface energy for amorphous silica spheres, theoretical models based on the contact mechanics are in harmony with laboratory experiments. Consequently, we conclude that silicate grains with a radius of 0.1 μm could grow to planetesimals via coagulation in a protoplanetary disk. We argue that the coagulation growth of silicate grains in a molecular cloud is advanced either by organic mantles rather than icy mantles or, if there are no mantles, by nanometer-sized grain radius.

  20. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Spadotti Amaral Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The experimental design was a complete randomized block with sixteen replicates. Plots were treated with one of two materials for acidity correction (dolomitic lime and calcium/magnesium silicate or with no soil correction, as a control. Silicate corrected soil acidity and increased exchangeable base levels in soil at greater depths faster than does liming. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased N, Ca and Mg leaf concentrations, and all yield components and grain yield in soybean; but in maize, just silicate also increased N and Si when compared with lime, whereas both acidity-correcting increased just two yield components: grains per ear and mass of 100 grains, resulting in highest grain yield. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased dry matter production of green manures, but for pigeon pea the silicate provided the best result in this dry-winter region.

  1. Spinning Dust Emission from Ultra-small Silicates: Emissivity and Polarization Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen-Anh; Quynh Lan, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of cosmic microwave background radiation. It is believed that AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we suppose that a new population of ultra-small silicate grains perhaps exists in the ISM, and quantify the rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We find that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when the tiny grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing dipole moment per atom (β) and can reach P∼ 20 % for β ∼ 0.1 {{D}} at a grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space (β ,{Y}{{Si}}), with {Y}{{Si}} being the fraction of Si abundance in nanoparticles, in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the observational constraints of ultraviolet extinction and polarization of starlight. Our results reveal that rotational emission from spinning silicate may be an important source of AME.

  2. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system.

  3. A proposed bare tether experiment on board a sounding rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; OYAMA, Kohichiro; Sasaki, Susumu; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Cho, Mengu; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón; Charro, Mario; Heide, Erik J. van der; Kruijff, Michiel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Hilgers, Alain

    2005-01-01

    A sounding rocket experiment is proposed to carry out two experiments by the conductive bare-tether; 1) the test of the OML (Orbital-Motion-Limited) theory to collect electron, and II) the test of techniques to determine (neutral) density profile in critical E-layer. The main driver of the mission is provide a space tether technology experiment in low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) deploying a long tape tether in space and verify the performance of the bare electrodynamic tape tether. The sounding rocket ...

  4. Semantic coherence in English accusative-with-bare-infinitive constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on usage-based cognitively oriented construction grammar, this paper investigates the patterns of coattraction of items that appear in the two VP positions (the VP in the matrix clause, and the VP in the infinitive subordinate clause) in the English accusative-with-bare-infinitive constru......Drawing on usage-based cognitively oriented construction grammar, this paper investigates the patterns of coattraction of items that appear in the two VP positions (the VP in the matrix clause, and the VP in the infinitive subordinate clause) in the English accusative...... relations of English accusatives-with-bare-infinitives through the relations of semantic coherence between the two VPs....

  5. Lightning and Mass Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning has long been postulated as the agent of Chondru|e formation in the solar nebula, but it may have an additional role to play as well. Lightning bolts of almost any scale will both vaporize dust and liberate oxygen atoms that will then interact with both nebular gases as well as the refractory silicate vapor as it re-condenses. Such processes should result in the addition of the heavy oxygen isotopes to the growing silicate grains while the light oxygen-16 becomes part of the gas phase water. This process will proceed to some extent throughout the history of any turbulent nebula and will result in the gradual increase of O-16 in the gas phase and in a much larger relative increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of the nebular dust. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the production of such "heavy oxygen enriched", non-mass-dependently-fractionated dust grains in a high voltage discharge in a hydrogen rich gas containing small quantities of silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen.

  6. Analysis of organic grain coatings in primitive interplanetary dust particles: Implications for the origin of Solar System organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George

    are consistent with this primitive organic matter being produced by the alternative process of condensation of C-bearing ices onto the grain surfaces and production of refractory organic matter by UV or other ionizing radiation bombardment of the ices [4]. The processes by which primitive grains aggregate to form the first dust of our Solar System are not well understood. Collision experiments indicate that bare rocky grains bounce apart at collision speeds ¡30 to 50 m/s and shatter at larger speeds [5]. However, experiments indicate grains coated with organic matter stick quite easily, even at speeds up to 5 m/s -an order of magnitude higher than the speed at which silicate grains accrete [6]. Thus the organic grain coatings we identified likely played a critical role in dust aggregation in the early Solar System. References: [1] Ishii, H. et al. Science 2009. [2] Flynn, G. J. et al. (2003) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 67, 4791-4806. [3] Keller L. P. et al. GCA (2004) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 68, 2577-2589. [4] Bernstein, M. P. et al. (1995) Astrophys. J., 454, 327-344. [5] Hartmann, W. K. (1978) Icarus, 33, 50-61. [6] Kudo, T. et al. (2002) Meteoritics Planet. Sci., 37, 1975-1983.

  7. A MODEL FOR THE DUST ENVELOPE OF THE SILICATE CARBON STAR IRAS 09425-6040

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung-Won, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City, 28644 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 09425-6040 (I09425) is a silicate carbon star with conspicuous crystalline silicate and water-ice features and emission excesses in the far-infrared and millimeter (mm) wavelength ranges. To understand properties of the dust envelope of I09425, we propose a physical model based on the observations and known properties of asymptotic giant branch stars and dust. We perform radiative transfer model calculations using multiple dust shells and disks with various dust species. We compare the model results with the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) acquired with different telescopes. We find that the physical model for I09425 using multiple shells of carbon and silicate dust and multiple disks of amorphous and crystalline silicates reproduces the observed SED fairly well. This object looks to have detached cold O-rich (silicate and water-ice) dust shells, which could be remnants of the recent chemical transition from O to C and an inner C-rich dust shell. A long-lived thin disk of very large silicate grains can reproduce the emission excess in the mm wavelength band and a recently formed thick disk of crystalline silicates can reproduce the prominent emission features in the spectral range 8–45 μm. The highly crystallized silicates could be recently formed by high temperature annealing due to the last O-rich superwind just before the chemical transition of the central star. I09425 could be a rare object that has the remnants of past O-rich stellar winds in the outer shells as well as in the circumbinary disks.

  8. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  9. BARE retrotransposons are translated and replicated via distinct RNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    Full Text Available The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon.

  10. Basic science of nuclear medicine the bare bone essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kai H

    2015-01-01

    Through concise, straightforward explanations and supporting graphics that bring abstract concepts to life, the new Basic Science of Nuclear Medicine—the Bare Bone Essentials is an ideal tool for nuclear medicine technologist students and nuclear cardiology fellows looking for an introduction to the fundamentals of the physics and technologies of modern day nuclear medicine.

  11. Evaluation of Bare Ground on Rangelands using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins

    2011-01-01

    Attention is currently being given to methods that assess the ecological condition of rangelands throughout the United States. There are a number of different indicators that assess ecological condition of rangelands. Bare Ground is being considered by a number of agencies and resource specialists as a lead indicator that can be evaluated over a broad area. Traditional methods of measuring bare ground rely on field technicians collecting data along a line transect or from a plot. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an alternative to collecting field data, can monitor a large area in a relative short period of time, and in many cases can enhance safety and time required to collect data. In this study, both fixed wing and helicopter UAVs were used to measure bare ground in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. The data were collected with digital imagery and read using the image analysis software SamplePoint. The approach was tested over seven different plots and compared against traditional field methods to evaluate accuracy for assessing bare ground. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho in locations where there is very little disturbance by humans and the area is grazed only by wildlife. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  12. Identification of Presolar Spinel Grains from a Murray Residue by Multi-Detection Raster Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A.; Zinner, E.; Lewis, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    Grain size separate CG from the Murray CM2 carbonaceous chondrite contains mostly spinel grains of average diameter 0.5 m. Zinner et al. found that approximately 1% of these spinel grains are of presolar origin as determined by their large O isotopic anomalies. These O isotopic measurements were made with the NanoSIMS on individual grains that were well separated from one another on a gold foil. The grains were selected for analysis from secondary electron and secondary O-16(-) images. The primary beam was then successively deflected onto these single grains for O isotopic analysis. While single grain analysis on dispersed samples is effective for finding relatively abundant anomalous grains, ion imaging in a raster mode on tightly packed grains might be more efficient for locating few anomalous grains among predominantly isotopically normal grains. In fact, this was the analysis mode used by Messenger et al. to discover presolar silicates in interplanetary dust particles. In an exploratory effort that is also geared toward establishing the optimum isotopic imaging technique in the search for presolar silicate grains in primitive meteorites, we measured O isotopic ratios in spinel grains from the Murray CG separate by raster imaging of areas with more or less tightly packed grains.

  13. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  14. Comparative petrology of silicates in the Udei Station (IAB) and Miles (IIE) iron meteorites: Implications for the origin of silicate-bearing irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Hutson, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    The textures and mineral chemistries of silicate inclusions in the Udei Station (IAB) and Miles (fractionated IIE) iron meteorites were studied using optical and electron microscopy, SEM, EMPA, and LA-ICP-MS techniques to better understand the origin of silicate-bearing irons. Inclusions in Udei Station include near-chondritic, basaltic/gabbroic, feldspathic orthopyroxenitic, and harzburgitic lithologies. In Miles, most inclusions can be described as feldspathic pyroxenite or pyroxene-enriched basalt/gabbro. The trace-element compositions of both orthopyroxene and plagioclase grains are similar in different lithologies from Udei Station; whereas in different inclusions from Miles, the compositions of orthopyroxene grains are similar, while those of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and especially Cl-apatite are variable. Orthopyroxene in Miles tends to be enriched in REE compared to that in Udei Station, but the reverse is true for plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The data can be explained by models involving partial melting of chondritic protoliths, silicate melt migration, and redox reactions between silicate and metal components to form phosphate. The extent of heating, melt migration, and phosphate formation were all greater in Miles. Silicates in Miles were formed from liquids produced by ˜30% partial melting of a chondritic precursor brought to a peak temperature of ˜1250 °C. This silicate melt crystallized in two stages. During Stage 1, crystallizing minerals (orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, chromite, and olivine) were largely in equilibrium with an intercumulus melt that was evolving by igneous fractionation during slow cooling, with a residence time of ˜20 ka at ˜1150 °C. During Stage 2, following probable re-melting of feldspathic materials, and after the silicate "mush" was mixed with molten metal, plagioclase and phosphate fractionally crystallized together during more rapid cooling down to the solidus. In Udei Station, despite a lower peak temperature (IIE

  15. Grain Boundary Effects in Solid Oxide Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mai

    Ion conducting ceramics are essential in applications such as solid oxide fuel cells and oxygen sensors. Traditional 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) solid oxide electrolytes operate at high temperatures (850°C-1000°C) to achieve high ionic conductivity (> 0.1 Scm-1 at 1000°C) by oxygen ion diffusion via vacancies. Operation at such temperatures requires high temperature electrode materials and shortens device lifetime due to interdiffusion and reactions at electrode/electrolyte interfaces. These concerns drive research in current systems and alternative materials to improve ionic conductivity at reduced operating temperatures. This research considers how grain size and grain boundary phases affect three electrolyte materials with different ion diffusion mechanisms. First, the conductivity of ultra-fine grained two-step sintered and large grained conventional sintered 8YSZ are compared to determine if enhanced ionic conductivity occurs supporting the theory that ion blocking impurities in grain boundaries are diluted with decreasing grain size. Second, apatite-type lanthanide silicates (Ln9.33(SiO4)6O2) which exhibit anisotropic interstitial oxygen diffusion at intermediate temperatures (400°C-800°C) are studied to determine whether grain boundaries detrimentally affect conductivity. Lastly, proton conducting La-monazite (LaPO4) is evaluated to determine the role of Sr-doping (up to 10% substitution of La with Sr) on grain size and conductivity as well as the effect of sintering in air or water vapor on the formation of intergranular phases rich in Sr and P. This research investigates grain boundary effects in three solid oxide electrolyte materials with the goal of understanding how grain boundaries affect ionic conductivity and the atomistic behavior governing these different diffusion mechanisms.

  16. The origin of GEMS in IDPs as deduced from microstructural evolution of amorphous silicates with annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Davoisne, C; Leroux, H; D'Hendecourt, L B; Jones, A; Deboffle, D

    2006-01-01

    We present laboratory studies of the micro-structural evolution of an amorphous ferro-magnesian silicate, of olivine composition, following thermal annealing under vacuum. Annealing under vacuum was performed at temperatures ranging from 870 to 1020 K. After annealing spheroidal metallic nano-particles (2-50 nm) are found within the silicate films. We interpret this microstructure in terms of a reduction of the initial amorphous silicate FeO component, because of the carbon-rich partial pressure in the furnace due to pumping mechanism. Annealing in a controlled oxygen-rich atmosphere confirms this interpretation. The observed microstructures closely resemble those of the GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulphides) found in chondritic IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles). Since IDPs contain abundant carbonaceous matter, a solid-state reduction reaction may have occurred during heating in the hot inner regions of the proto-solar disc. Related to this, the presence of forsterite grains grown from the amorphou...

  17. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  18. Radar reflectivity of bare and vegetation-covered soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Bradley, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Radar sensitivity to soil moisture content has been investigated experimentally for bare and vegetation-covered soil using detailed spectral measurements obtained by a truck-mounted radar spectrometer in the 1-8 GHz band and by airborne scatterometer observations at 1.6, 4.75, and 13.3 GHz. It is shown that radar can provide quantitative information on the soil moisture content of both bare and vegetation-covered soil. The observed soil moisture is in the form of the soil matric potential or a related quantity such as the percent of field capacity. The depth of the monitored layer varies from 1 cm for very wet soil to about 15 cm for very dry soil.

  19. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  20. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the chargedinterfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits shortrange in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  1. Ion Probe Study of Silicate Inclusions from Colomera (IIE) Iron Meteorite:the Rare Earth Element Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU Weibiao

    2004-01-01

    Coupled with a petrographical study, I carried out an ion probe study of rare earth element microdistributions in mineral phases of silicate inclusions from the Colomera IIE iron meteorite. Most mineral grains have homogeneous REEs, but show considerable inter-grain variations by a factor of 2 to 100. The whole rock REE abundances for Colomera,estimated by combining REE data with modal abundances, are relatively LREE-enriched with REEs of ~10'CI, which suggest that Colomera silicates were highly differentiated and might represent a low degree partial melt (~10%) of a chondritic source. REE geochemistry of Colomera silicate inclusions points to an origin that involves differentiation,dynamic mixing, remelting, reduction, recrystallization, and subsequent rapid cooling near the surface of a planetary body.

  2. The Political Animal: Species-Being and Bare Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hudson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Marxism has been justifiably skeptical of animal rights. Indeed, deep ecology and animal-rights discourse are, in their native habitats, deeply problematic and self-contradictory. But recent theories of “bare life,” when brought into dialogue with Marx’s concept of species-being, offer a perspective from which animal rights discourse and Marxism share a common political horizon.

  3. Nuda vida y goce. // Bare life and jouissance.

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Arias.

    2010-01-01

    From the point of view that connects politics and psychoanalysis, the aim of this essay is to investigate the causes of the annihilation of the subject in the totalitarian regimes, making him a victim of power, reduced to a bare life. This question leads us to analyze the jouissance within the frame of a regime that proposes the unification of a universal jouissance. These questions are considered to be relevant in the field that makes possible the intersection between politics and subjectivi...

  4. Photon emissivity of the electrosphere of bare strange stars

    OpenAIRE

    Harko, T.; Cheng, KS

    2005-01-01

    We consider the spectrum, emissivity, and flux of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the thin electron layer (the electrosphere) at the surface of a bare strange star. In particular, we carefully consider the effect of the multiple and uncorrelated scattering on the radiation spectrum (the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect), together with the effect of the strong electric field at the surface of the star. The presence of the electric field strongly influences the radiation spectrum emitt...

  5. Dynamic Vision Sensor Camera Based Bare Hand Gesture Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    kashmera ashish khedkkar safaya; Rekha Lathi

    2012-01-01

    This Paper proposes a method to recognize bare hand gestures using dynamic vision sensor (DVS) camera. DVS camera only responds asynchronously to pixels that have temporal changes in intensity which different from conventional camera. This paper attempts to recognize three different hand gestures rock, paper and scissors and using those hand gestures design mouse free interface.   Keywords: Dynamic vision sensor camera, Hand gesture recognition

  6. Dynamic Vision Sensor Camera Based Bare Hand Gesture Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kashmera ashish khedkkar safaya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This Paper proposes a method to recognize bare hand gestures using dynamic vision sensor (DVS camera. DVS camera only responds asynchronously to pixels that have temporal changes in intensity which different from conventional camera. This paper attempts to recognize three different hand gestures rock, paper and scissors and using those hand gestures design mouse free interface.   Keywords: Dynamic vision sensor camera, Hand gesture recognition

  7. The Political Animal: Species-Being and Bare Life

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Hudson

    2008-01-01

    Marxism has been justifiably skeptical of animal rights. Indeed, deep ecology and animal-rights discourse are, in their native habitats, deeply problematic and self-contradictory. But recent theories of “bare life,” when brought into dialogue with Marx’s concept of species-being, offer a perspective from which animal rights discourse and Marxism share a common political horizon.

  8. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  9. LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF PRESOLAR SILICATE STARDUST FROM A NOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, J.; Kodolanyi, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Floss, C., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    We report the major element as well as the oxygen, magnesium, and silicon isotope composition of a unique presolar silicate grain found in the fine-grained fraction of the Antarctic CR2 chondrite Graves Nunataks 95229. The grain is characterized by an extremely high {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O ratio (6.3 {+-} 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}) relative to solar values, whereas its {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratio is solar within measurement uncertainty. It also shows enrichments in {sup 25,26}Mg and a significant excess in {sup 30}Si relative to solar system compositions, with {delta}{sup 25}Mg = 79 {+-} 21 per mille , {delta}{sup 26}Mg = 70 {+-} 20 per mille , and {delta}{sup 30}Si = 379 {+-} 92 per mille . This isotopic composition is consistent with an origin in the ejecta of a {approx}1.3-1.4 M{sub Sun} ONe nova with large contributions of material from a main-sequence companion star of roughly solar metallicity. However, many details of the stellar source remain undetermined, owing to the uncertainties of current nova nucleosynthesis models. Auger electron spectroscopic analyses identify O, Mg, Si, and Fe as the grain's major constituents. Its (Mg+Fe)/Si atomic ratios are lower than that of olivine and correspond on average to Fe-Mg-pyroxene. A complex texture and heterogeneous major element distribution within the grain attest to condensation under non-equilibrium conditions, which is consistent with the proposed nova origin.

  10. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  11. SILICATES ON IAPETUS FROM CASSINI’S COMPOSITE INFRARED SPECTROMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J. [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Clark, Roger N. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Spencer, John R. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Jennings, Donald E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Poston, Michael J. [Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/N and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ∼855 cm{sup −1} and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm{sup −1} that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm{sup −1} feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn’s icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure have features near 855 and 660 cm{sup −1}. However, peaks can shift depending on temperature and pressure, so measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive feature identifications. As a first investigation, we measured muscovite at 125 K in a vacuum and found that this spectrum does match the emissivity feature near 855 cm{sup −1} and the location of the doublet. Further measurements are needed to robustly identify a specific silicate, which would provide clues regarding the origin and implications of the dark material.

  12. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2010-11-23

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO(2) sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1-5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique.

  13. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The exper...

  14. Silicates on Iapetus from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Cindy L; Clark, Roger N; Spencer, John R; Jennings, Donald E; Hand, Kevin P; Poston, Michael J; Carlson, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal to noise ratios (S/Rs) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/R and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure hav...

  15. Photoluminescence in amorphous MgSiO_3 silicate

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, S P; Day, S J; Connor, L D; Evans, A

    2013-01-01

    Samples of amorphous MgSiO_3 annealed at temperature steps leading up to their crystallisation temperature show a rise in photoluminescence activity, peaking at ~450C. The photoluminescence band has a main peak at 595nm and a weaker peak at 624nm. We present laboratory data to show that the maximum in photoluminescence activity is related to substantial structural reordering that occurs within a relatively narrow temperature range. We attribute the origin of the photoluminescence to non-bridging oxygen hole centre defects, which form around ordered nano-sized domain structures as a result of the breakup of tetrahedral connectivity in the disordered inter-domain network, aided by the loss of bonded OH. These defects are removed as crystallisation progresses, resulting in the decrease and eventual loss of photoluminescence. Thermally processed hydrogenated amorphous silicate grains could therefore represent a potential carrier of extended red emission.

  16. Magnetic properties of sheet silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susceptibility, magnetisation and Moessbauer measurements are reported for a representative selection of 2:1 layer phyllosilicates. Eight samples from the mica, vermiculite and smectite groups include examples diluted in iron which are paramagnetic at all temperatures, as well as iron-rich silicates which order magnetically below 10 K. Anisotropic susceptibility of crystals of muscovite, biotite and vermiculite is quantitatively explained with a model where the Fe2+ ions lie in sites of effective trigonal symmetry, the trigonal axis lying normal to the sheets. The ferrous ground state is an orbital singlet. Ferric iron gives an isotropic contribution to the susceptibility. Fe2+-Fe2+ exchange interactions are ferromagnetic with Gapprox. equal to2 K, whereas Fe3+-Fe3+ coupling is antiferromagnetic in the purely ferric minerals. A positive paramagnetic Curie temperature for glauconite may be attributable to Fe2+ → Fe3+ charge transfer. Magnetic order was found to set in inhomogeneously for glauconite at 1-7 K. One biotite sample showed an antiferromagnetic transition at Tsub(N) = 7 K marked by a well-defined susceptibility maximum. Its magnetic structure, consisting of ferromagnetic sheets with moments in their planes coupled antiferromagnetically by other, weak interactions, resembles that found earlier for the 1:1 mineral greenalite. (orig.)

  17. Phospholipid bilayer formation at a bare Si surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutberlet, T.; Steitz, R.; Fragneto, G.;

    2004-01-01

    Neutron reflectivity was applied to monitor in situ the adsorption of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles on a solid bare hydrophilic Si interface. The obtained reflectivity curves are consistent with the rupture and fusion model for the adsorption of phosphatidylcholine vesicles to solid...... interfaces. The results show details of the adsorbed bilayer system at ångström resolution and indicate the presence of a thin ∼6 Å thick water leaflet that separates the bilayer from the Si surface. The resolved structural details provide the basis for further investigation of processes such as adsorption...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  19. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  20. Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and therm...

  1. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  2. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  3. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  4. Interstellar Extinction and Polarization by Graphite-Silicate Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. T.; Draine, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    The geometry of interstellar dust continues to be uncertain. In some models, intertellar grains are assumed to homogeneous spheres, with a suitable mixture of sizes and compositions in order to reproduce observations of of absorption and scattering (e.g., Weingartner & Draine 2001, or Zubko et al. 2004). However, it is often thought that the larger interstellar grains may be formed by agglomeration of smaller particles, with the resulting ``cluster'' being of nonuniform composition and having a ``fluffy'' geometry. The optical properties of such ``fluffy'' grains have sometimes been estimated using ``effective medium theory'' or other approximations, but it is now possible to directly calculate scattering and absorption using the discrete dipole approximation (Draine & Flatau 1994). We construct candidate clusters by random ballistic agglomeration of small graphite and silicate spheres, and calculate their scattering and absorption cross sections using the discrete dipole approximation code DDSCAT 6.x (Draine & Flatau 2004). We consider a model for interstellar dust consisting of very small grains plus clusters built by ballistic agglomeration with a suitable size distribution, and we test the model by trying to reproduce the observed wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and polarization. This research was supported in part by NSF grants AST-0216105 and AST-0406883. References: Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 1994, JOSA, A11, 1491l Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 2004, http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409262l Weingartner, J.C., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 548, 296l Zubko, V., Dwek, E., & Arendt, R.G. 2004, ApJS, 152, 211l

  5. Are All Active Galactic Nuclei Born Equal? The Silicate Dust Mineralogy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aigen

    Dust is the cornerstone of the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This theory proposes that all AGNs are essentially the same object or "born equal" but viewed from different lines of sight; much of the observed diversity arises from different viewing angles toward the central engine and a dusty toroidal structure around it. When the dusty torus is viewed face-on, both the central engine and the broad-line regions can be seen directly causing objects to appear as type 1 AGNs; when the dusty torus is viewed edge- on, the anisotropic obscuration created by the torus causes objects to appear as type 2 AGNs. It is this crucial role played by dust in the unified model of AGNs that makes understanding dust properties very important in understanding AGNs. Little is known about the dust in the circumnuclear torus of AGNs. There is evidence suggesting that the size and composition of the dust in AGNs may differ substantially from that of the Galactic interstellar dust, as reflected by the flat or "gray" extinction, and the anomalous silicate emission or absorption features observed respectively in type 1 and type 2 AGNs. The silicate feature profiles of AGNs are rather diverse in peak wavelengths, widths, strengths, and band ratios of the 18 micrometer O--Si--O feature to the 9.7 micrometer Si--O feature, suggesting that the AGN silicate grains are diverse in composition and size (or probably not "born equal"). We propose a two-year project to study the size and composition of the dust in AGNs, with special attention paid to the silicate mineralogy. We will obtain constraints on the silicate composition and size by modeling the Spitzer IRS spectra of >100 AGNs of various types. We will examine whether (and how) the silicate composition and size properties vary with the properties of an AGN (e.g. type, luminosity). This research will improve our understanding of the physical properties of the dust torus and the origin of the observed silicate emission

  6. Bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms. PMID:25013844

  7. Bare-Bones Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms.

  8. Iron line profiles in Suzaku spectra of bare Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Patrick, A R; Porquet, D; Markowitz, A G; Lobban, A P; Terashima, Y

    2010-01-01

    We methodically model the broad-band Suzaku spectra of a small sample of six 'bare' Seyfert galaxies: Ark 120, Fairall 9, MCG-02-14-009, Mrk 335, NGC 7469 and SWIFT J2127.4+5654. The analysis of bare Seyferts allows a consistent and physical modelling of AGN due to a weak amount of any intrinsic warm absorption, removing the degeneracy between the spectral curvature due to warm absorption and the red-wing of the Fe K region. Through effective modelling of the broad-band spectrum and investigating the presence of narrow neutral or ionized emission lines and reflection from distant material, we obtain an accurate and detailed description of the Fe K line region using models such as laor, kerrdisk and kerrconv. Results suggest that ionized emission lines at 6.7 keV and 6.97 keV (particularly Fe XXVI) are relatively common and the inclusion of these lines can greatly affect the parameters obtained with relativistic models i.e. spin, emissivity, inner radius of emission and inclination. Moderately broad components...

  9. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq(-1) and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm(-2) reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters. PMID:27678197

  10. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@med.uni-marburg.de [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps University of Marburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M., E-mail: anneke.damberg@rwth-aachen.de [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  11. Radiation pressure on fluffy submicron-sized grains

    CERN Document Server

    Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the claim that the ratio {\\beta} of radiation pressure force to gravitational force on a dust grain in our solar system can substantially exceed unity for some grain sizes, provided that grain porosity is high enough. For model grains consisting of random aggregates of silicate spherules, we find that the maximum value of {\\beta} is almost independent of grain porosity, but for small (<0.3 {\\mu}m) grains, {\\beta} actually decreases with increasing porosity. These results affect the interpretation of the grain trajectories estimated from the Stardust mission, which were modeled assuming {\\beta} values exceeding one. We find that radiation pressure effects are not large enough for particles Orion and Hylabrook captured by Stardust to be of interstellar origin given their reported impact velocities. We also investigate the effect of metallic iron inclusions in the dust grains, and find that metallic iron will increase {\\beta}, but at least half the grain (by mass) must be iron in order to raise...

  12. Influence of silicate anions structure on desilication in silicate-bearing sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 张闻; 齐天贵; 彭志宏; 周秋生; 李小斌

    2016-01-01

    The structural changes of silicate anions in the desilication process with the addition of calcium hydrate alumino-carbonate were studied by measuring Raman spectra, infrared spectra and corresponding second derivative spectra. The results show that the desilication ratio in the solution prepared by the addition of sodium silicate (solution-SS) is much greater than that in the solution by the addition of green liquor (solution-GL), and low alumina concentration in the sodium aluminate solutions facilitates the desilication process. It is also shown that alumino-silicate anions in the solution-GL, and Q3 polymeric silicate anions in solution-SS are predominant, respectively. In addition, increasing the concentration of silica favors respectively the formation of the alumino-silicate or the Q3 silicate anions in the solution-GL or the solution-SS. Therefore, it can be inferred that the low desilication ratio in the silicate-bearing aluminate solution is mainly attributed to the existence of alumino-silicate anions.

  13. Low temperature FIR and submm mass absorption coefficient of interstellar silicate dust analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Coupeaud, A; Meny, C; Nayral, C; Delpech, F; Leroux, H; Depecker, C; Creff, G; Brubach, J B; Roy, P

    2011-01-01

    Cold dust grains emission in the FIR/submm is usually expressed as a modified black body law in which the dust mass absorption coefficient (MAC), is described with a temperature- and wavelength-independent emissivity spectral index, beta. However, numerous data from space and balloon-born missions and recently from Herschel and Planck show that dust emission is not well understood, as revealed by the observed anti-correlation of beta with the grain temperature. In order to give astronomers the necessary data to interpret FIR/submm observations, we synthesised analogues of interstellar amorphous and crystalline silicate grains, rich in Mg and Ca, and having stiochiometry of olivine and pyroxene and measured their MAC, in the 100-1000/1500 \\mum range for grain temperatures varying from 300 to 10 K. We find that the grain MAC decreases when the grain temperature decreases and that the local spectral index, beta, defined as the slope of the MAC curve, is anti-correlated with the grain temperature. These variation...

  14. Interaction of Hg Atom with Bare Si(111) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-Jun; LIU Ying

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between Hg atom and bare Si(111) surface, three types of silicon cluster models of Si4H7, Si7H10 and Si16H20 together with their Hg complexes were studied by using hybrid (U)B3LYP density functional theory method. Optimized geometries and energies for Hg atom on different adsorption sites indicate that: 1) the binding energies at different adsorption sites are small (ranging from ~3 to 8 kJ/mol dependent on the adsorption sites), suggesting a weak interaction between Hg atom and silicon surface; 2) the most favorable adsorption site is the on top (T) site. By analyzing their natural bonding orbitals, the possible reason of this difference is suggested.

  15. Corrosion of bare and galvanized steel in gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez, Mercedes

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum is a relatively low-cost building material much abounding in our country. When it is put in contact with steel, it may produce high corrosion rates due to its pH value (close to 7. This work reports the results obtained in studying the corrosion rates of bare and galvanized steel in contact with gypsum and plaster, as well as the influence curing thermal treatment applied to gypsum, enviromental relative humidity and addition of compounds with different natures and purposes may have in such process. In-situ observations, as well as the measurement of the Polarization Resistance and the weight loss have been used as measurement technics. From the results obtained it has been possible to deduce that galvanized steel has better behaviour in dry enviroments than bare steel in the same conditions and moist atmosphere induces proportionally more corrosion in galvanized steel than in bare one. Additions to gypsum do not modified these conclusions, though it may be pointed out that addition of nitrites or lime improves the behaviour of bare steel, while galvanized behaviour is not modified. The addition of lime is not recommended because phenomena of dilated along time expansion may take place.

    El yeso es un material de construcción de relativo bajo coste y que, además, es muy abundante en nuestro país. Debido a su pH cercano a la neutralidad, cuando entra en contacto con el acero, este puede corroerse a elevadas velocidades. En esta comunicación se presentan los resultados de un estudio sobre la velocidad de corrosión del acero desnudo y galvanizado en contacto con yeso y escayola y la influencia que tienen: el tratamiento térmico del curado del yeso, la humedad relativa ambiental y la adición de aditivos de diversa naturaleza y finalidad. Como técnicas de medida se han utilizado la medida de la Resistencia de Polarización y de la pérdida de peso, así como observaciones visuales. De los resultados se puede deducir que en

  16. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  17. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales. PMID:25437760

  18. Dust in the wind: Crystalline silicates, corundum and periclase in PG 2112+059

    CERN Document Server

    Markwick-Kemper, F; Hines, D C; Bouwman, J

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the mineralogical composition of dust in the Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasar PG 2112+059 using mid-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. From spectral fitting of the solid state features, we find evidence for Mg-rich amorphous silicates with olivine stoichiometry, as well as the first detection of corundum (Al_2O_3) and periclase (MgO) in quasars. This mixed composition provides the first direct evidence for a clumpy density structure of the grain forming region. The silicates in total encompass 56.5% of the identified dust mass, while corundum takes up 38 wt.%. Depending on the choice of continuum, a range of mass fractions is observed for periclase ranging from 2.7% in the most conservative case to 9% in a less constrained continuum. In addition, we identify a feature at 11.2 micron as the crystalline silicate forsterite, with only a minor contribution from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The 5% crystalline silicate fraction requires high temperatures such ...

  19. Abundant crystalline silicates in the disk of a very low mass star

    CERN Document Server

    Merin, B; Van Dishoeck, E F; Kessler-Silacci, J; Dullemond, C P; Blake, G A; Lahuis, F; Brown, J M; Geers, V C; Pontoppidan, K M; Comeron, F; Frasca, A; Guieu, S; Alcalá, J M; Boogert, A C A; II, N J E; D'Alessio, P; Mundy, L G; Chapman, N

    2007-01-01

    We announce the discovery of SST-Lup3-1, a very low mass star close to the brown dwarf boundary in Lupus III with a circum(sub)stellar disk, discovered by the `Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Program from mid-, near-infrared and optical data, with very conspicuous crystalline silicate features in its spectrum. It is the first of such objects with a full 5 to 35 micron spectrum taken with the IRS and it shows strong 10 and 20 micron silicate features with high feature to continuum ratios and clear crystalline features out to 33 micron. The dust in the disk upper layer has a crystalline silicate grain fraction between 15% and 33%, depending on the assumed dust continuum. The availability of the full Spitzer infrared spectrum allows an analysis of the dust composition as a function of temperature and position in the disk. The hot (~ 300 K) dust responsible for the 10 micron feature consists of a roughly equal mix of small (~ 0.1 micron) and large (~ 1.5 micron) grains, whereas the cold (~ 70 K) dust responsible f...

  20. Sticking coefficient of hydrogen and deuterium on silicates under interstellar conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaabouni, H; Baouche, S; Dulieu, F; Matar, E; Congiu, E; Gavilan, L; Lemaire, J L

    2012-01-01

    Sticking of H and D atoms on interstellar dust grains is the first step in molecular hydrogen formation, which is a key reaction in the InterStellar Medium (ISM). After studying the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on amorphous silicate surfaces experimentally and theoretically, we extrapolate the results to the sticking coefficient of atoms and propose a formulae that gives the sticking coefficients of H and D on both silicates and icy dust grains. In our experiments, we used the King and Wells method for measuring the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on a silicate surface held at 10 K. It consists of measuring with a QMS (quadrupole mass spectrometer) the signals of H2 and D2 molecules reflected by the surface during the exposure of the sample to the molecular beam at a temperature ranging from 20 K to 340 K. We tested the efficiency of a physical model, developed previously for sticking on water-ice surfaces. We applied this model to our experimental results for the sticking coeffic...

  1. Microbiota of kefir grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Pogačić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kefir grains represent the unique microbial community consisting of bacteria, yeasts, and sometimes filamentous moulds creating complex symbiotic community. The complexity of their physical and microbial structures is the reason that the kefir grains are still not unequivocally elucidated. Microbiota of kefir grains has been studied by many microbiological and molecular approaches. The development of metagenomics, based on the identification without cultivation, is opening new possibilities for identification of previously nonisolated and non-identified microbial species from the kefir grains. Considering recent studies, there are over 50 microbial species associated with kefir grains. The aim of this review is to summarise the microbiota composition of kefir grains. Moreover, because of technological and microbiological significance of the kefir grains, the paper provides an insight into the microbiological and molecular methods applied to study microbial biodiversity of kefir grains.

  2. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  3. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  4. Marketing Farm Grain Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenour, Harlan E.

    This vocational agriculture curriculum on grain marketing contains three parts: teacher guide, student manual, and student workbook. All three are coordinated and cross-referenced. The course is designed to give students of grain marketing a thorough background in the subject and provide practical help in developing grain marketing strategies for…

  5. EAARL Topography - Vicksburg National Military Park 2008: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi, acquired on March 6, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the

  7. EAARL Coastal Topography-Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nagle, David B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and submerged topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, acquired March 3, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  8. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of select barrier islands and peninsular regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, acquired on June 27-30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using

  9. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey, acquired April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  10. Interstellar grains in elliptical galaxies grain evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, J C; Tsai, John C; Mathews, William G

    1995-01-01

    We consider the lifecycle of dust introduced into the hot interstellar medium in isolated elliptical galaxies. Dust grains are ejected into galactic-scale cooling flows in large ellipticals by normal mass loss from evolving red giants. Newly introduced dust rapidly enters the hot gas environment and is sputtered away by thermal collisions with ions. Before the grains are completely sputtered away, they emit prodigious amounts of infrared radiation which may contribute to the large far infrared luminosities observed in ellipticals. In order to study the global properties of grains in ellipticals we construct a new series of King-type galactic models which are consistent with the fundamental plane, galactic mass to light ratios and other relevant observational correlations. We describe a new ``continuity'' procedure to construct simple time-dependent gas dynamic models for cooling flows. In all galaxy models, although grains can flow a considerable distance from their radius of origin before being sputtered awa...

  11. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-03-01

    II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  12. Stability of calcium silicate in basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Mixture of CaO and SiO2 was sintered at 1 200 or 1 400 ℃ according to the mole ratio of CaO/SiO2 of 1 or 2, and then calcium silicate was leached in pure caustic or soda solution. The results indicated that calcium silicate exists much more stably in caustic solution than that in soda solution, and CaO*SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO*SiO2 whether in caustic solution or in soda solution. The increase of sintering temperature favored the stability of calcium silicate in the leaching process. When β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in soda solution, the increase of leaching temperature and time resulted in decomposing of more calcium silicate. And when β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in caustic solution at high temperature, much 2CaO*SiO2*H2O but little CaO*SiO2*H2O appeared in slag.

  13. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  14. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    OpenAIRE

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ; TEREZA BĚLOUBKOVÁ; ZUZANA MIZEROVÁ; LUDVÍK ŠANDA; ZUZANA CÍLOVÁ; MARKÉTA ČASTORÁLOVÁ; ALEŠ HELEBRANT

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings cont...

  15. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Katarina Simon; Davorin Matanović

    2004-01-01

    The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact ...

  16. Interstellar silicate dust in the z = 0.685 absorber toward TXS 0218+357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Liger, Nicholas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vladilo, Giovanni, E-mail: ALLERM@mailbox.sc.edu [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-10

    We report the detection of interstellar silicate dust in the z {sub abs} = 0.685 absorber along the sightline toward the gravitationally lensed blazar TXS 0218+357. Using Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph data, we detect the 10 μm silicate absorption feature with a detection significance of 10.7σ. We fit laboratory-derived silicate dust profile templates obtained from the literature to the observed 10 μm absorption feature and find that the best single-mineral fit is obtained using an amorphous olivine template with a measured peak optical depth of τ{sub 10} = 0.49 ± 0.02, which rises to τ{sub 10} ∼ 0.67 ± 0.04 if the covering factor is taken into account. We also detected the 18 μm silicate absorption feature in our data with a >3σ significance. Due to the proximity of the 18 μm absorption feature to the edge of our covered spectral range, and associated uncertainty about the shape of the quasar continuum normalization near 18 μm, we do not independently fit this feature. We find, however, that the shape and depth of the 18 μm silicate absorption are well matched to the amorphous olivine template prediction, given the optical depth inferred for the 10 μm feature. The measured 10 μm peak optical depth in this absorber is significantly higher than those found in previously studied quasar absorption systems. However, the reddening, 21 cm absorption, and velocity spread of Mg II are not outliers relative to other studied absorption systems. This high optical depth may be evidence for variations in dust grain properties in the interstellar medium between this and the previously studied high redshift galaxies.

  17. A Density Functional Study of Bare and Hydrogenated Platinum Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sebetci, A

    2006-01-01

    We perform density functional theory calculations using Gaussian atomic-orbital methods within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation to study the interactions in the bare and hydrogenated platinum clusters. The minimum-energy structures, binding energies, relative stabilities, vibrational frequencies and the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular-orbital gaps of Pt_nH_m (n=1-5, m=0-2) clusters are calculated and compared with previously studied pure platinum and hydrogenated platinum clusters. We investigate any magic behavior in hydrogenated platinum clusters and find that Pt_4H_2 is more stable than its neighboring sizes. Our results do not agree with a previous conclusion that 3D geometries of Pt tetramer and pentamer are unfavored. On the contrary, the lowest energy structure of Pt_4 is found to be a distorted tetrahedron and that of Pt_5 is found to be a bridge site capped tetrahedron which is a new global minimum for Pt_5 cluster. The successive addition of H ...

  18. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  19. Nd-YAG laser welding of bare and galvanised steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, one of the problems that has held back the introduction of lasers into car body fabrication has been the difficulty of integrating the lasers with robots. Nd-YAG laser beams can be transmitted through fibre optics which, as well as being considerably easier to manipulate than a mirror system, can be mounted on more lightweight accurate robots. Although previously only available at low powers, recent developments in Nd-YAG laser technology mean that lasers of up to 1kW average power will soon be available, coupled to a fibre optic beam delivery system. The increasing usage of zinc coated steels in vehicle bodies has led to welding problems using conventional resistance welding as well as CO2 laser welding. The use of Nd-YAG lasers may be able to overcome these problems. This paper outlines work carried out at The Welding Institute on a prototype Lumonics 800W pulsed Nd-YAG laser to investigate its welding characteristics on bare and zinc coated car body steels

  20. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  1. AMQ Protocol Based Performance Analysis of Bare Metal Hypervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Deepak Arora

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is one of the most exciting technology because of its cost-reducing approach, flexibility, and scalability. Hypervisor is the essential part of cloud technology; it is a component of software that provides a virtualized hardware environment to support running multiple operating systems concurrently using one physical server. In this paper we took KVM, XEN, Hyper-V and ESXi as hypervisors. We have compared the performance of Virtual Machines (VMs by RabbitMQ message broker server that uses Advanced Message Queuing Protocol(AMQP for breaking messages. We establish the setup on bare metal hypervisor that is installed directly on the hardware of the system. We took SAN (Shared Storage Network server for maintaining the storage of all VMs. By the evaluation of these hyperviosrs we got a brief idea about their performance on different parameters. These results will be beneficial to small enterprise, social group or any private IT firm which is choosing to build small cloud infrastructure with optimal benefits. Experiment results of checking the performance of VMs for all the hypervisors shows that there is performance variation on different applications and workloads of the hypervisors. None of the hypervisors outperform another at every aspect of our comparison.

  2. Rare earth element geochemistry and petrogenesis of miles (IIE) silicate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Weibiao

    2003-12-01

    An ion probe study of rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of silicate inclusions in the Miles IIE iron meteorite was carried out. Individual mineral phases among inclusions have distinct REE patterns and abundances. Most silicate grains have homogeneous REE abundances but show considerable intergrain variations between inclusions. A few pyroxene grains display normal igneous REE zoning. Phosphates (whitlockite and apatite) are highly enriched in REEs (50 to 2000 × CI) with a relatively light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched REE pattern. They usually occurred near the interfaces between inclusions and Fe host. In Miles, albitic glasses exhibit two distinctive REE patterns: a highly fractionated LREE-enriched (CI normalized La/Sm ˜15) pattern with a large positive Eu anomaly and a relatively heavy rare earth element (HREE)-enriched pattern (CI-normalized Lu/Gd ˜4) with a positive Eu anomaly and a negative Yb anomaly. The glass is generally depleted in REEs relative to CI chondrites. The bulk REE abundances for each inclusion, calculated from modal abundances, vary widely, from relatively depleted in REEs (0.1 to 3 × CI) with a fractionated HREE-enriched pattern to highly enriched in REEs (10 to 100 × CI) with a relatively LREE-enriched pattern. The estimated whole rock REE abundances for Miles are at ˜ 10 × CI with a relatively LREE-enriched pattern. This implies that Miles silicates could represent the product of a low degree (˜10%) partial melting of a chondritic source. Phenocrysts of pyroxene in pyroxene-glassy inclusions were not in equilibrium with coexisting albitic glass and they could have crystallized from a parental melt with REEs of ˜ 10 × CI. Albitic glass appears to have formed by remelting of preexisting feldspar + pyroxene + tridymite assemblage. Yb anomaly played an important role in differentiation processes of Miles silicate inclusions; however, its origin remains unsolved. The REE data from this study suggest that Miles, like

  3. The role of water in silicate oligomerization reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. Trinh; A.P.J. Jansen; R.A. Santen; E.J. Meijer

    2009-01-01

    The silicate oligomerization reaction is key to sol-gel chemistry and zeolite synthesis. Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have been devoted to investigating the physical chemistry of silicate oligomers in the prenucleation stage of siliceous zeolite formation. Most of the previous quant

  4. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  5. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  6. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. FMR Study of the Porous Silicate Glasses with Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zapotoczny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on new magnetic materials for biomedical applications are discussed. These materials are porous silicate glasses with magnetic fillers. To ensure the smallest number of components for subsequent removal from the body, the magnetic fillers are bare magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4. The magnetic properties of these materials have been investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance method (FMR. The FMR analysis has been complemented by scanning electron microscope (SEM measurements. In order to examine the effect of time degradation on filling the porous glass with bare magnetite nanoparticles the FMR measurement was repeated five months later. For the samples with high degree of pore filling, in contrast to the samples with low degree of pore filling, the FMR signal was still strong. The influence of different pH values of magnetite nanoparticles aqueous suspension on the degree of filling the pores of glasses is also discussed. The experimental results are supported by computer simulations of FMR experiment for a cluster of N magnetic nanoparticles locked in a porous medium based on a stochastic version of the Landau-Lifshitz equation for nanoparticle magnetization.

  8. Electrodeposition of porous hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate composite coating on titanium for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method of electrolytic porous hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate (HA/CaSiO3) composite coating was conducted on pure titanium in a mixed solution of nano-SiO2, Ca(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4. SEM observation showed that the composite layer was porous, thereby providing abundant sites for the osteoblast adhesion. XRD results showed that the composite coating was mainly composed of HA and CaSiO3. Bond strength testing exhibited that HA-CaSiO3/Ti had higher bond strength than HA/Ti. The HA/CaSiO3 coating was more corrosion resistant than the HA coating based on the polarization tests. In vitro cell experiments demonstrated that both the HA and HA/CaSiO3 coatings showed better cell response than the bared titanium. In addition, the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells grown on the HA/CaSiO3 coating were remarkably higher than those on the bared Ti and pure HA coating.

  9. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic bare heavy ions: Nuclear and electronic contributions in amorphous and crystalline materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Vissing; Sørensen, Allan Hvidkjær

    2013-01-01

    A charged particle emits bremsstrahlung while traversing matter. We calculate the radiation cross section for bare heavy ions penetrating amorphous materials and single crystals at highly relativistic energies. The main component originates in scattering of the virtual photons of screened target...... in a pronounced directional dependence of the energy loss of bare heavy ions at extreme relativistic energies....

  10. Hydrodynamic behavior of a bare rod bundle. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzis, J.G.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-06-01

    The temperature distribution within the rod bundle of a nuclear reactor is of major importance in nuclear reactor design. However temperature information presupposes knowledge of the hydrodynamic behavior of the coolant which is the most difficult part of the problem due to complexity of the turbulence phenomena. In the present work a 2-equation turbulence model--a strong candidate for analyzing actual three dimensional turbulent flows--has been used to predict fully developed flow of infinite bare rod bundle of various aspect ratios (P/D). The model has been modified to take into account anisotropic effects of eddy viscosity. Secondary flow calculations have been also performed although the model seems to be too rough to predict the secondary flow correctly. Heat transfer calculations have been performed to confirm the importance of anisotropic viscosity in temperature predictions. All numerical calculations for flow and heat have been performed by two computer codes based on the TEACH code. Experimental measurements of the distribution of axial velocity, turbulent axial velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and radial Reynolds stresses were performed in the developing and fully developed regions. A 2-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer working on the Reference mode with forward scattering was used to perform the measurements in a simulated interior subchannel of a triangular rod array with P/D = 1.124. Comparisons between the analytical results and the results of this experiment as well as other experimental data in rod bundle array available in literature are presented. The predictions are in good agreement with the results for the high Reynolds numbers.

  11. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  12. Aqueous deposition of calcium phosphates and silicate substituted calcium phosphates on magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attempts were made to deposit homogeneous films of calcium phosphates (CaPs) on two magnesium alloy systems, AZ31 and Mg–4Y, through an aqueous phosphating bath method. The deposition of silicate substituted CaPs by this aqueous method was also explored as silicate substitution is believed to increase the bioactivity of CaPs. The effect of doped and undoped coatings on the in vitro degradation and bioactivity of both alloy systems was studied. FTIR and EDX confirmed the deposition of Ca, P, and Si on both alloys and the coatings appeared to consist primarily biphasic mixtures of hydroxyapatite and β-TCP. These largely inhomogeneous coatings, as observed by SEM, were not shown to have any significant effect on maintaining the physiological pH of the culture medium in comparison to the uncoated samples, as the pH remained approximately in the 8.4–8.7 range. Interestingly, despite similar pH profiles between the coated and uncoated samples, CaP coatings affected the degradation of both alloys. These doped and undoped calcium phosphate coatings were observed to decrease the degradation of AZ31 whereas they increased the degradation of Mg–4Y. In vitro studies on cell attachment using MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblasts showed that between the uncoated alloys, Mg–4Y appeared to be the more biocompatible of the two. Silicate substituted CaP coatings were observed to increase the cell attachment on AZ31 compared to bare and undoped CaPs coated samples, but did not have as great of an effect on increasing cell attachment on Mg–4Y.

  13. Scattering by Interstellar Dust Grains. II. X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2003-01-01

    Scattering and absorption of X-rays by interstellar dust is calculated for a model consisting of carbonaceous grains and amorphous silicate grains. The calculations employ realistic dielectric functions with structure near X-ray absorption edges, with resulting features in absorption, scattering, and extinction. Differential scattering cross sections are calculated for energies between 0.3 and 10 keV. The median scattering angle is given as a function of energy, and simple but accurate approximations are found for the X-ray scattering properties of the dust mixture, as well as for the angular distribution of the scattered X-ray halo for dust with simple spatial distributions. Observational estimates of the X-ray scattering optical depth are compared to model predictions. Observations of X-ray halos to test interstellar dust grain models are best carried out using extragalactic point sources.

  14. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  15. Tracking bubble evolution inside a silicic dike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Okumura, Satoshi; Arzilli, Fabio; Borrajo, Javier; Recio, Clemente; Ban, Masao; Gonzalo, Juan C.; Benítez, José M.; Douglas, Madison; Sasaki, Osamu; Franco, Piedad; Gómez-Barreiro, Juan; Carnicero, Asunción

    2016-10-01

    Pressure estimates from rapidly erupted crustal xenoliths constrain the depth of intrusion of the silicic lavas hosting them. This represents an opportunity for tracking magmatic bubble's evolution and quantifying the variation in bubble volume during rapid magma ascent through a volcanic dike just prior to eruption. The petrology, stable-isotope geochemistry and X-ray micro-tomography of dacites containing crustal xenoliths, erupted from a Neogene volcano in SE Spain, showed an increase in porosity from ~ 1.7 to 6.4% from ~ 19 to 13 km depth, at nearly constant groundmass and crystal volumes. This result provides additional constraints for experimental and numerical simulations of subvolcanic magma-crust degassing processes in silicic systems, and may allow the characterization of volcanic eruptive styles based on volatile content.

  16. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  17. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  18. Recycle of silicate waste into mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2011-04-15

    Template synthesis of porous carbon materials usually requires selective removal of template silica from the carbon/silica composites. It not only involves waste of valuable chemicals, but also poses significant environmental concerns including high waste treatment cost. Recycling of silicates released from such nanocasting methods is successfully performed for the first time to regenerate valuable mesoporous MCM and SBA type silica materials, which will not only help in saving valuable chemicals, but also in decreasing chemical waste, contributing in improvement of our environmental standards. This approach can thus improve cost effectiveness for the mass production of nanostructured carbon and others utilizing silica directed nanocasting method by recycling otherwise silicate waste into highly desirable valuable mesoporous silica.

  19. Submarine silicic volcanism: Processes and products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kalangutkar, N.G.; Iyer, S.D.

    and these are supported by several experimental studies (Annen et al., 2006). A silicic calc-alkalic magma can form by differentiation from a more mafic parent magma and by crustal anatexis. Several evidences show the origin of some rhyolitic and andesitic magma... to be related due to similar tectonic settings. Fractional crystallisation: This process produces a series of residual liquids of variable compositions as compared to their parental magmas and is best explained by the Bowen’s reaction principle (Bowen, 1922...

  20. Polymorphism in silicate-postperovskite reviewed (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschauner, O. D.

    2010-12-01

    Early on in the examination of postperovskite(ppv)-type magnesium metasilicate it had been debated if this potential deep mantle mineral can be subject to further structural transformation as function of composition, pressure, and temperature within the range of conditions in the lower mantle. MgSiO3-perovskite accommodates minor elements through local lattice distortions by tilt of the corner-sharing octahedral framework. The CaIrO3-type ppv structure does not seem to possess a similar mechanism of local relaxation of lattice strain. Instead minor elements may rather be accommodated by periodic kinks in this layered structure (1). This kinking-mechanism allows for generating a plethora of polymorphs similar in structure and free energy (1,2). However, the elastic properties of ppv may be strongly affected by this type of structural modification. While structural analogues of silicate-ppv exhibit this type of polymorphism (3,4) previous attempts to examine polymorphism in silicate-ppv remained suggestive (2,5). This is mostly owed to the severe constraints imposed on powder diffraction studies conducted under the extreme conditions of stability of MgSiO3-ppv. Here I present new results on silicate-ppv based on different experimental strategies which shed more light on this complex yet important issue of structural modifications in minor-element bearing silicate-ppv. (1) Oganov et al. Nature 438, 1142 (2005);(2) Tschauner et al. Am. Min. 93, 533 (2008); (3) Shirako et al. Phys. Chem. Min. 36, 455 (2009); Yakovlev et al. J. Sol. Stat. Chem. 182, 1545 (2009) Work supported through NNSA Cooperative Agreement DOE-FC88-01NV14049

  1. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and am...

  2. Process for acidizing hot siliceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuerman, R. F.; Silverman, S. A.

    1985-10-22

    The dissolving of siliceous material in an environment containing corrodable metal and having a temperature exceeding about 300/sup 0/ F. is improved by using an aqueous solution containing an amount of ammonium fluoride equivalent to that in a 2-3 molar solution of hydrogen fluoride and enough weak acid and weak acid salt to provide a pH of near to but less than 7.

  3. Near-field photocurrent nanoscopy on bare and encapsulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, Achim; Alonso-González, Pablo; Lundeberg, Mark B.; Gao, Yuanda; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Navickaite, Gabriele; Ma, Qiong; Janner, Davide; Watanabe, Kenji; Cummings, Aron W.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Pruneri, Valerio; Roche, Stephan; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Hone, James; Hillenbrand, Rainer; Koppens, Frank H. L.

    2016-02-01

    Optoelectronic devices utilizing graphene have demonstrated unique capabilities and performances beyond state-of-the-art technologies. However, requirements in terms of device quality and uniformity are demanding. A major roadblock towards high-performance devices are nanoscale variations of the graphene device properties, impacting their macroscopic behaviour. Here we present and apply non-invasive optoelectronic nanoscopy to measure the optical and electronic properties of graphene devices locally. This is achieved by combining scanning near-field infrared nanoscopy with electrical read-out, allowing infrared photocurrent mapping at length scales of tens of nanometres. Using this technique, we study the impact of edges and grain boundaries on the spatial carrier density profiles and local thermoelectric properties. Moreover, we show that the technique can readily be applied to encapsulated graphene devices. We observe charge build-up near the edges and demonstrate a solution to this issue.

  4. Field Investigations of Evaporation from a Bare Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evett, Steven Roy

    Selected components of the water and energy balances at the surface of a bare clay loam were measured at 57 locations in a 1 ha field. Spatial and temporal variability of these components were also studied. Components included evaporation, irrigation, moisture storage, sensible heat flux and long wave radiation. Sub-studies were conducted on irrigation uniformity under low pressure sprinklers; and, on steel versus plastic microlysimeters (ML) of various lengths. An energy balance model of evaporation, requiring minimal inputs, was developed and validated giving an r ^2 value of 0.78. Model improvements included an easy method of accurately estimating soil surface temperature at many points in a field, and an empirically fitted transfer coefficient function for the sensible heat flux from the reference dry soil. The omission of soil heat flux and reflected shortwave radiation terms was shown to reduce model accuracy. Steel ML underestimated cumulative evaporation compared to plastic ML at 20 and 30 cm lengths. Cumulative evaporation increased with ML length. The 10 and 20 cm ML were too short for use over multiple days but 30 cm ML may not be long enough for extended periods. Daily net soil heat flux for steel ML averaged 44% higher than that for both plastic ML and undisturbed field soil. Christiansen's uniformity coefficient (UCC) was close to 0.83 for each of 3 irrigations when measured by both catch cans and by profile water contents. But UCC for the change in storage due to irrigation averaged only 0.43 indicating than the high uniformity of profile water contents was more due to surface and subsurface redistribution than to the uniformity of application. Profile water contents and catch can depths were time invariant across at least 3 irrigations. Midday soil surface temperatures and daily evaporation were somewhat less time invariant. Variogram plots for evaporation and surface temperature showed mostly random behavior. Relative variograms represented well

  5. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  6. Volume of ionic sites in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molar volume data of alkali and alkaline earth silicate glasses have been used to calculate the free volume associated with the bridging and nonbridging oxygen and modifier ions. The free volume associated with the bridging oxygen is constant (15.39 x 10-24 cm3) for all modifier ions up to 33.3 mol% modifier oxide. It decreases (in alkali or alkaline earth silicate glasses) with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The nonbridging oxygen ion is associated with a constant free volume (6.50 x 10-24 cm3) in all cases. Modifier ions are associated with free volume that increases with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The used model explores the change in the free volume due to changing the concentration of alkali oxides in mixed alkali silicate glasses. The results show that, in such glasses, the free volume related to a certain type of alkali oxide increases with increasing content

  7. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Nicolas, Rackel [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bernal, Susan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin St, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Materials Engineering, Composite Materials Group, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby [School of Materials Engineering, Composite Materials Group, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Deventer, Jannie S.J. van [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin St, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturation–nucleation–depletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  8. GrainSpotter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for indexing multigrain diffraction data is presented. It is based on the use of a monochromatic beam simultaneously illuminating all grains. By operating in sub-volumes of Rodrigues space, a powerful vertex-finding algorithm can be applied, with a running time that is compatible...... with online analysis. The resulting program, GrainSpotter, is sufficiently fast to enable online analysis during synchrotron sessions. The program applies outlier rejection schemes, leading to more robust and accurate data. By simulations it is shown that several thousand grains can be retrieved. A new...... method to derive partial symmetries, called pseudo-twins, is introduced. Uniquely, GrainSpotter includes an analysis of pseudo-twins, which is shown to be critical to avoid erroneous grains resulting from the indexing....

  9. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  10. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  11. Temperature spectra of interstellar dust grains heated by cosmic-rays I: translucent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-01-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas-grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating $f_T$, s$^{-1}$, determines how often a certain temperature $T_{\\rm CR}$, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with comprehensive and updated dataset on the CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of $f_T$ and $T_{\\rm CR}$ spectra for bare olivine grains with radius $a$ of 0.05; 0.1; 0.2 $\\mu$m, and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1$a$ and 0.3$a$. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with $A_V=2$ mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the SRIM program. We report full $T_{\\rm CR}$ spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain te...

  12. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fernanda Cruz; Fabrício Ávila Rodrigues; Ana Paula Cardoso Diniz; Maurilio Alves Moreira; Everaldo Gonçalves de Barros

    2013-01-01

    The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS) and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS) on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection ...

  13. Characterizing silicic rocks in the Parana Magmatic Province: an update in their origin and emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, A. F.; Nardy, A. R.; Machado, F. B.; Gravley, D. M.; Gualda, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP), a large igneous province in southern Brazil (with correlative rocks in western Africa), includes 800,000 km3 of flood basalts generated during the rifting that ultimately led to the opening of the South Atlantic and covers nearly 75% of the surface of the Paraná Basin. Towards the top of the volcanic pile, silicic rocks are observed in many areas. They comprise a small proportion of the total erupted volume (2.5%), yet correspond to a significant flare-up of silicic volcanism over a period of only a few million years. In Brazil, the silicic rocks are divided into two groups, the Chapecó Member, which appears more northerly and includes porphyritic, crystal-rich, high-Ti dacites and trachydacites; and the Palmas Member, which includes fine-grained, crystal-poor, low-Ti dacites and rhyolites. The mode of emplacement (lavas vs. pyroclastic flows) of the volcanic units has been the subject of much controversy. The aim of this project is to better understand the origin and evolution of the PMP silicic rocks. We are combining information from the regional to the thin section scale to better characterize eruption dynamics and magma distribution prior to eruption. In both Palmas and Chapecó units, we observe features consistent with emplacement in the form of pyroclastic density currents, e.g. fiamme, variable weathering patterns consistent with local variations in welding at the outcrop scale, vertical gas-escape structures, sedimentary dykes, and lythophysae. Some ignimbrite units can be traced for 10's of kilometers and with more research on their spatial distribution could reveal the location of eruptive centers. In the Palmas, ignimbrites can be observed juxtaposed against or overlying discrete eruptive centers in the form of discordant structures that resemble domes and coulees typical of lava extrusion and flow. However, many of the silicic rocks are ambiguous and difficult to characterize, with features that could be related

  14. Petrogenesis of silicate inclusions in the Weekeroo Station IIE iron meteorite: Differentiation, remelting, and dynamic mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Fowler, Grant W.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Prinz, Martin; Papike, James J.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1999-07-01

    The Weekeroo Station IIE iron meteorite contains a variety of felsic and mafic inclusions enclosed in an FeNi-metal host. Petrographic, EMP, and SIMS data suggest that the petrogenesis of the silicates was complex, and included differentiation, remelting, FeO-reduction, and dynamic mixing of phases. Differentiation produced a variety of olivine-free inclusion assemblages, ranging from pyroxene + plagioclase + tridymite with peritectic compositions, to coarse orthopyroxene, to plagioclase + tridymite and its glassy equivalent. Individual phases have similar trace-element abundances and patterns, despite large variations in inclusion textures, modes, and bulk compositions, probably as a result of mechanical separation of pre-existing phases in an impact event that dynamically mixed silicates with the metallic host. Trace-element data imply that augite and plagioclase grains in different inclusions crystallized from the same precursor melt, characterized by relatively unfractionated REE abundances of ˜20-30 × CI-chondrites except for a negative Eu anomaly. Such a precursor melt could have been produced by ˜2-5% equilibrium partial melting of an H-chondrite silicate protolith, or by higher degrees of partial melting involving subsequent fractional crystallization. Glass appears to have formed by the remelting of pre-existing plagioclase and orthopyroxene, in a process that involved either disequilibrium or substantial melting of these phases. During remelting, silicate melt reacted with the FeNi-metal host, and FeO was reduced to Fe-metal. Following remelting and metal-silicate mixing, inclusions apparently cooled at different rates in a near-surface setting on the parent body; glass- or pigeonite-bearing inclusions cooled more rapidly (≥2.5°C/hr between 1000-850°C) than pigeonite-free, largely crystalline inclusions. The results of this study point to two likely models for forming IIE iron meteorites, both involving collision between an FeNi-metal impactor and

  15. Folding of Pollen Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katifori, Eleni; Alben, Silas; Cerda, Enrique; Nelson, David; Dumais, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    At dehiscence, which occurs when the anther reaches maturity and opens, pollen grains dehydrate and their volume is reduced. The pollen wall deforms to accommodate the volume loss, and the deformation pathway depends on the initial turgid pollen grain geometry and the mechanical properties of the pollen wall. We demonstrate, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, that the design of the apertures (areas on the pollen wall where the stretching and the bending modulus are reduced) is critical for controlling the folding pattern, and ensures the pollen grain viability. An excellent fit to the experiments is obtained using a discretized version of the theory of thin elastic shells.

  16. EAARL Coastal Topography--Western Florida, Post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: Seamless (Bare Earth and Submerged)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless (bare-earth and submerged) elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, was...

  17. EAARL Coastal Topography--Eastern Florida, Post-Hurricane Frances, 2004: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth digital elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of a portion of the eastern Florida coastline was produced from remotely...

  18. LiDAR Derived Bare Earth Digital Elevation Model: Camas National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset represents the Camas National Wildlife Refuge survey area in Jefferson and Clark County, ID. This bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) represent...

  19. EAARL Coastal Topography--Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Virginia and Maryland was produced from...

  20. Galvanic effects on electrochemical behaviors of bare surface of 304 stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The bare surface of 304 stainless steel is produced by the fast fracture method. The influence of the surfacegalvanic cell on the electrochemical behaviors of bare surface of 304 stainless steel has been investigated in H2SO4 solutionswith different concentrations. The results show that the solution corrosivity level and the area ratio influence the surfacegalvanic effects caused by the inhomogeneity between the free-film surface of alloy and the passive surface. The surfacegalvanic effects can speed up the dissolution rate of the bare surface of the alloy and will change the electrochemical behav-ior of bare surface. With the increase of the area ratio between passive surface and fractured surface, the galvanic potentialbecomes more positive and, in the range of passive potential, both galvanic current and the peak fracture current increase

  1. Redox control of sulfur degassing in silicic magmas

    OpenAIRE

    Scaillet, Bruno; Clémente, Béatrice; Evans, Bernard W.; Pichavant, Michel

    1998-01-01

    International audience Explosive eruptions involve mainly silicic magmas in which sulfur solubility and diffusivity are low. This inhibits sulfur exsolution during magma uprise as compared to more mafic magmas such as basalts. Silicic magmas can nevertheless liberate large quantities of sulfur as shown by the monitoring of SO2 in recent explosive silicic eruptions in arc settings, which invariably have displayed an excess of sulfur relative to that calculated from melt degassing. If this e...

  2. Biolimus-eluting stents with biodegradable polymer versus bare-metal stents in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räber, Lorenz; Kelbæk, Henning; Taniwaki, Masanori;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study sought to determine whether the 1-year differences in major adverse cardiac event between a stent eluting biolimus from a biodegradable polymer and bare-metal stents (BMSs) in the COMFORTABLE trial (Comparison of Biolimus Eluted From an Erodible Stent Coating With Bare Meta......, BES continued to improve cardiovascular events compared with BMS beyond 1 year. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NTC00962416....

  3. A TFD model for the Electrospheres of Bare Strange Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hai-Chuan; Zhang, Cheng-Min

    2007-01-01

    We study the layer of electrons on bare strange star surfaces, taking the Dirac exchange-energy into account. Because electrons are fermions, the electron wave function must be of exchange-antisymmetry. The Dirac exchange-energy originates, consequently, from the exchange-antisymmetry of electron wave functions. This consideration may result in changing the electron distribution and the electric field on the surface of bare strange star. The strong magnetic field effect on the structures of the electrospheres is also discussed.

  4. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.)

  5. EXAFS studies of silicate glasses containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing hexavalent uranium ions have been studied using the EXAFS technique. The U6+ ions appear in the uranyl configuration with two oxygen atoms at 1.85 A and four to five at 2.2-2.3 A. In the glasses (0.25Na2O.0.75SiO2)sub(1-x)(UO3)sub(x) with x = 0.02 to x = 0.1, planar (or nearly planar) uranium containing clusters, with U-U distances of 3.3 A, are observed. A layered model is proposed to describe these glasses. (Auth.)

  6. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  7. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  8. Mechanical loss associated with silicate bonding of fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on mechanical loss associated with hydroxy-catalysis (or 'silicate') bonding between fused silica substrates in the presence of potassium hydroxide or sodium silicate. We measured the mechanical quality factor of three fused silica samples, each composed of two half-rods bonded together on their flat surfaces and compared them to that of an unbonded half-rod. The measurements show a significant reduction of quality factor due to mechanical loss associated with the silicate bonds. We calculate the loss factor of the bonded region φbond and estimate that the effect of silicate bonding on thermal noise in the Advanced LIGO interferometers will be small

  9. Modeling IR Spectral Energy Distributions: A Pilot Study of Starburst Parameters and Silicate Absorption Curves for Some GOALS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Kewley, Lisa J; Rich, Jeff A; Sanders, Dave; Appleton, Phillip N; Chan, Ben H P; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Evans, Aaron S; Frayer, David T; Howell, Justin H; Inami, Hanae; Mazzarella, Joseph A; Petric, Andreea; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study into the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting and the derivation of physical parameters for 19 galaxies observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) survey as observed with the \\emph{Spitzer Space Telescope}. For this we have used the pan-spectral fitting tools developed in a series of papers by Dopita and his co-workers. We show that the standard Lee and Draine `astronomical silicate' model cannot provide a good fit to the silicate absorption features as observed in the heavily dust-extinguished ($A_{\\rm V} \\sim 50$mag.) starbursts. We have derived an empirical fit to the `starburst silicate' absorption in these objects. This absorption curve is consistent with the silicate grains being systematically larger in starburst environments than in the local Galactic interstellar medium. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the SED fitting to each of the fitted parameters, and derive these parameters for those galaxies which do not have an embedded AG...

  10. Mineralogy and trace element chemistry of the Siliceous Earth of Barmer basin, Rajasthan: Evidence for a volcanic origin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Sisodia; U K Singh; G Lashkari; P N Shukla; A D Shukla; N Bhandari

    2005-04-01

    We report the presence of a 3-5 cm thick loose fragmental layer in the Siliceous Earth at Matti ka Gol in the Barmer basin of Rajasthan. Petrographic, chemical and mineralogical study reveals the presence of abundant volcanic debris such as glass shards, agglutinates, hollow spheroids, kinked biotites, feldspars showing oscillatory zoning, olivines, ilmenite and native iron. The presence of similar particles in the whole section suggests that the Siliceous Earth is a volcanic ash. Stratigraphic correlation, palynological and microvertebrate data suggest that the Siliceous Earth may have deposited over a short span of time during the Upper Cretaceous to Lower Palaeocene. In view of the possibility that this section may contain K/T impact debris, we looked for grains having impact signatures. Some patches of the Siliceous Earth of Bariyara show the presence of Ni-rich (< 0.5%) vesicular glasses, sanidine spherules, magnesioferrite crystals, soot, etc., but because of their low abundance, it is not possible to establish if they are volcanic, micrometeorite ablation products or a part of the K/T impact ejecta.

  11. Light emission from thulium silicates and oxides for optical amplifiers on silicon in the extended optical communications band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroo Omi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Films composed of Tm2Si2O7 and Tm2O3 grains formed on SiO2/Si substrates by radio magnetic sputtering and subsequent thermal annealing up to 1250 °C were characterized by synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, cross-sectional transmission microscopy, and micro photoluminescence (PL measurements. The films composed of triclinic (type-B and monoclinic (type-C Tm2Si2O7 grains on SiO2/Si and Tm2O3 grains on Si exhibit photoluminescence at the wavelength of about 1620 nm for the silicates and 1630 nm for the oxide, which indicates that they have good potential as light amplifiers on Si in the L and U bands at telecommunications wavelengths.

  12. Artabas of grain or artabas of grains?

    OpenAIRE

    Clarysse, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Survey of the use of the singular and plural with Greek words for grain. The original plural gives way to the singular in the course of the Hellenistic period, but the plural reappears in the later Roman period for barley, whereas wheat, for which σῖτος is then used rather than πυρός, occurs in the singular. There are, however, a number of exceptions to the general picture, often depending on the case in which the words occur.

  13. Stability of foams in silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Kutolin, Vladislav A.

    1993-12-01

    Bubble coalescence and the spontaneous disruption of high-porosity foams in silicate melts are the result of physical expulsion of interpore melt (syneresis) leading to bubble coalescence, and diffusive gas exchange between bubbles. Melt expulsion can be achieved either along films between pairs of bubbles, or along Plateau borders which represent the contacts between 3 or more bubbles. Theoretical evaluation of these mechanisms is confirmed by experimental results, enabling us to quantify the relevant parameters and determine stable bubble size and critical film thickness in a foam as a function of melt viscosity, surface tension, and time. Foam stability is controlled primarily by melt viscosity and time. Melt transport leading to coalescence of bubbles proceeds along inter-bubble films for smaller bubbles, and along Plateau borders for larger bubbles. Thus the average bubble size accelerates with time. In silicate melts, the diffusive gas expulsion out of a region of foam is effective only for water (and even then, only at small length scales), as the diffusion of CO 2 is negligible. The results of our analyses are applicable to studies of vesicularity of lavas, melt degassing, and eruption mechanisms.

  14. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    1994-01-01

    required days-weeks, both reactions probably being diffusion controlled. Applying the values for specific surface area and site densities for ferrihydrite used by Dzombak & Morel (1990) (600 m2 g-1, 3.4 mumole m-2) the constants pK(al)intr 6.93 +/- 0.12, pK(a2)intr = 8.72 +/- 0.17 and log K(Si) = 3.62 were...... calculated by using the FITEQL optimization routine. Use of the specific surface area actually measured (269 m2 g-1) gave a poorer fit of the experimental data. Due to the slow adsorption of silicate and hence long shaking times, changes in the surface characteristics of the ferrihydrite seem to take place......Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...

  15. SPM nanolithography of hydroxy-silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is becoming a crucial technique with applications ranging from molecular and cell biology to medicine. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is one of the most useful tools for nanopatterning of flat surfaces. However, these patterns are usually built on homogeneous surfaces and require chemical functionalization to ensure specific affinity. Layered magnesium–aluminum hydroxide–silicates have already shown unique self-assembly properties on DNA molecules, due to their peculiar crystal chemistry based on alternating positive and negative crystal layers. However, patterns on these surfaces tend to be randomly organized. Here we show etching and oxidation at the nanometer scale of magnesium–aluminum hydroxide–silicates using the same SPM probe for the creation of organized nanopatterns. In particular, it is possible to produce three-dimensional structures in a reproducible way, with a depth resolution of 0.4 nm, lateral resolution of tens of nm, and a speed of about 10 μm s−1. We report, as an example, the construction of an atomically flat charged pattern, designed to guide DNA deposition along predetermined directions without the need of any chemical functionalization of the surface. (paper)

  16. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  17. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  18. Optical Properties of Iron Silicates in the Infrared to Millimeter as a Function of Wavelength and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C. R.; Kinzer, R. E.; Cataldo, G.; Wollack, E. J.; Nuth, J. A.; Benford, D. J.; Silverberg, R. F.; Rinhart, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques program utilizes multiple instruments to provide spectral data over a wide range of temperatures and wavelengths. Experimental methods include Vector Network Analyzer and Fourier transform spectroscopy transmission, and reflection/scattering measurements. From this data, we can determine the optical parameters for the index of refraction, n, and the absorption coefficient, k. The analysis of the laboratory transmittance data for each sample type is based upon different mathematical models, which are applied to each data set according to their degree of coherence. Presented here are results from iron silicate dust grain analogs, in several sample preparations and at temperatures ranging from 5 to 300 K, across the infrared and millimeter portion of the spectrum (from 2.5 to 10,000/micron or 4000 to 1/cm).

  19. Silicate Adsorption in Paddy Soils of Guangdong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Li-Yuan; LI Hua-Xing; ZHANG Xin-Ming; LU Wei-Sheng; LIU Yuan-Jin

    2006-01-01

    Silicate adsorption in eight paddy soils developed from four different parent materials in Guangdong Province, China was examined to obtain fundamental knowledge of silicate adsorption to improve the efficacy of silicate fertilizer use in these areas. A correlation analysis showed that silicate adsorption did not obey the Langmuir equation (r = -0.664-0.301) but did obey the Freundlich and Temkin equations (P ≤ 0.01, r = 0.885-0.990). When the equilibrium silicate concentration (Ci) was less than 45 mg SiO2 kg-1, the adsorption capacity was in the following decreasing order of paddy soils: basalt-derived > Pearl River Delta sediment-derived > granite-derived > sand-shale-derived. Stepwise regression and path analysis showed that for the investigated paddy soils amorphous MnO and Al2O3 were the two most important materials that affected silicate adsorption. Moreover, as Ci increased, amorphous Al2O3 tended to play a more important role in silicate adsorption, while the effects of amorphous MnO on silicate adsorption tended to decrease.

  20. Spectral properties of porphyrins in the systems with layered silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is focused on investigation of hybrid materials based on layered silicates, representing host inorganic component, and porphyrin dyes as organic guest. Aqueous colloidal dispersions, as well as thin solid films of layered silicate/porphyrin systems were studied. Modification of photophysical properties, such as absorption and fluorescence of molecules, adsorbed or incorporated in layered silicate hosts, were studied mainly to spread the knowledge about the environments suitable for incorporating aromatic compounds, providing photoactive properties of potential technological interest. TMPyP cations interact with the surfaces of layered silicates via electrostatic interactions. The extent of dye adsorption on colloidal particles of the silicates is influenced by the CEC values and swelling ability of silicates. Interaction of porphyrins with layered silicate hosts leads to significant changes of dye spectral properties. One of the key parameters that has a crucial impact on this interaction is the layer charge of silicate template. Other factors influence the resulting spectral properties of hybrid systems, such as the method of hybrid material preparation, the material's type (colloid, film), and the modification of the silicate host. Molecular orientation studies using linearly-polarized spectroscopies in VIS and IR regions revealed that TMPyP molecules were oriented in almost parallel fashion with respect to the silicate surface plane. Slightly higher values of the orientation angle of TMPyP transition moment were observed for the TMPyP/FHT system. Thus, flattening of the guest TMPyP molecules is the next important factor (mainly in the systems with lower layer charge), influencing its spectral properties upon the interaction with layered silicates. Fluorescence was effectively quenched in the systems based on solid films prepared from the high concentration of the dye (10-3 mol.dm-3). The quenching is most probably related to the structure of the

  1. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous Ooze Sediments, Ormen Lange Field, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    is the main gas reservoir (NDP). In this study, we are interested in the siliceous ooze intervals only. A possible hydrocarbon prospect of siliceous ooze is proposed, but siliceous ooze is significantly different in structure from most commonly known hydrocarbon reservoir rocks. For instance, the pore...... and to a lesser extent upon other elements. It is normally assumed that the contribution to the neutron porosity measurement comes entirely from the hydrogen in fluids fully occupying the pore space. But, elements other than hydrogen that exist in the rock matrix do contribute to the signal; and hydrogen is also...... to analyse and interpret logging data acquired through siliceous ooze sediments. Our main objectives were to characterize and evaluate the petrophysics of siliceous ooze and to find the true porosity and water saturation to test its hydrocarbon reservoir potential. We used and integrated core analysis data...

  2. The Non-Linear Relationship between Silicate Absorption Depth and IR Extinction in Dense Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiar, Jean E.; Pendleton, Y.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-12-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between visual extinction (Av) and the depth of the 9.7 mu silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well mixed. In the diffuse ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233, 321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. To eliminate any uncertainties associated with adopting a specific extinction law, we investigated the relationship between tau(9.7) and E(J-K). Our data set spans E(J-K) between 0.3 and 8 mag (Av=between 2-35 mag.). All lines of sight show the 9.7 mu silicate feature. For E(J-K) greater than about 2 mag, tau(9.7) levels off, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. There are two exceptions: one line of sight in Serpens, with E(J-K) 4 mag lies on the diffuse ISM line. Another line of sight with E(J-K) 8 mag, also in Serpens, lies well below the diffuse ISM line, but well above the “flat” trend of the other dense cloud sources. This particular line of sight also has a high ice column relative to the amount of visual/infrared extinction. The cause of the “flat” trend exhibited by most of the dense cloud points is undetermined. However, in general, it is unlikely that ice mantles would have any effect on the measured silicate feature since ices are transparent in the 10 mu region.

  3. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  4. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg Kα irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  5. Étude des modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouzri, A.; Dorbez-Sridi, R.; Oumezzine, M.

    2004-11-01

    Les modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice en poudre en fonction du taux d'hydratation sont étudiées par calorimétrie différentielle à balayage et par diffusion des rayons X. L'analyse thermique par DSC a permis de montrer que pour les faibles taux d'hydratation (≤ 50%) l'eau est complètement confinée dans les pores alors que pour les forts taux d'hydratation (>50%) l'eau se trouve aussi bien dans les pores qu'autour des grains de la silice. L'apparition de la glace cubique lors du refroidissement de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice prouve que l'interaction eau-silice ne peut être négligée lors de la détermination du signal de l'eau. L'extraction du signal, diffusé uniquement par l'eau confinée, à partir des intensités diffusées par le gel de silice à deux taux d'hydratation distincts, révèle dans les fonctions de corrélation de paire un pic à 3.7Å qui ne peut être attribué qu'à une corrélation oxygène-oxygène inexistante dans l'eau massique et résultant de la déformation du réseau tétraédrique des molécules d'eau sous l'effet du confinement et de la proximité d'une surface.

  6. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na2O-B2O3-SiO2-FeO and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe3+/ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO4 species in the glass network whereas the BO3 and BO4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO3 and BO4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  7. Widespread oxidized and hydrated amorphous silicates in CR chondrites matrices: Implications for alteration conditions and H2 degassing of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Changela, Hitesh G.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2015-06-01

    The CR chondrites carry one of the most pristine records of the solar nebula materials that accreted to form planetesimals. They have experienced very variable degrees of aqueous alteration, ranging from incipient alteration in their matrices to the complete hydration of all of their components. In order to constrain their chemical alteration pathways and the conditions of alteration, we have investigated the mineralogy and Fe oxidation state of silicates in the matrices of 8 CR chondrites, from type 3 to type 1. Fe-L edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was performed on matrix FIB sections using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio of submicron silicate particles was obtained and coordinated with TEM observations. In all the least altered CR chondrites (QUE 99177, EET 87770, EET 92042, LAP 02342, GRA 95229 and Renazzo), we find that the matrices consist of abundant submicron Fe-rich hydrated amorphous silicate grains, mixed with nanometer-sized phyllosilicates. The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratios of both amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are very high with values ranging from 68 to 78%. In the most altered samples (Al Rais and GRO 95577), fine-grained phyllosilicates also have a high Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio (around 70%), whereas the coarse, micrometer-sized phyllosilicates are less oxidized (down to 55%) and have a lower iron content. These observations suggest the following sequence: submicron Fe2+-amorphous silicate particles were the building blocks of CR matrices; after accretion they were quickly hydrated and oxidized, leading to a metastable, amorphous gel-like phase. Nucleation and growth of crystalline phyllosilicates was kinetically-limited in most type 3 and 2 CRs, but increased as alteration became more extensive in Al Rais and GRO 95577. The decreasing Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio is interpreted as a result of the transfer of Fe3+ from silicates to oxides during growth, while aqueous alteration progressed

  8. Presolar Grains and Their Isotopic Anomalies in Meteorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杨挺; 王世杰

    2001-01-01

    Study on presolar grains including diamond, silicon carbide, graphite, silicon nitrite (Si3N4), corundum and spinel isolated from meteorites is summarized in this paper. Except for nanometer-sized diamond, the other grains are micrometers to submicrometers in size. The presolar grains survived mainly in the fine -grained matrix of primitive chondrites and were isolated by chemical treatments. Diamond contains Xe isotopes (Xe-HL), typically produced in p- and r-processes, probably formed in supernovae. Mainstream silicon carbides are enriched in 29, 30Si and 13C, but depleted in 15N. They also contain various s-process products, consistent with calculations of AGB stars. Other silicon carbides exhibit much larger isotopic anomalies and are classified as groups X, Y, Z and AB. Among them, group X of SiC is characterized by enrichment of 28Si and daughter isotopes of various short-lived nuclides, suggesting an origin from supernovae. Graphite can be divided into four density fractions with distinct isotopic compositions. They may form in AGB stars, novae and supernovae, respectively. Si3N4 is similar to X-SiC in isotopic composition. Corundum is classified as four groups based on their oxygen isotopic compositions. AGB and red giant stars are possible sources for the oxide. More comprehensive study of presolar grains, especially discovery of the other types of oxides and silicates, isotopic analyses of individual submicrometer-sized grains and distribution of presolar grains among various chemical groups and petrographic types of chondrites will provide new information on nucleosynthesis, stellar evolution and formation of the solar nebula.

  9. Presolar Grains and Their Isotopic Anomalies in Meteorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杨挺; 王世杰

    2001-01-01

    Study on presolar grains including diamond,silicon carbide,graphite,silicon nitrite(Si3N4),coundum and spinel isolated from meteorites is summarized in this paper.Except for nanometer-sized diamond,the other grains are micrometers to submicrometers in size.The presolar grains survived mainly in the fine-grained matrix of primitive chondrites and were isolated by chemical treatments.Diamond contains Xe isotopes(Xe-HL),typically produced in p-and r-processes,probably formed in supernovae.Mainstream silicon carbides are enriched in 29,30Si and 13C,but depleted in 15N.They also contain various s-process products,consistent with calculations of AGB stars.Other silicon carbides exhibit much larger isotopic anomalies and are classified as groups X,Y,Z and AB.Among them,group X of SiC is characterized by enrichment of 28Si and daughter isotopes of various short-lived nuclides,suggesting an origin from supernovae.Graphite can be divided into four density fractions with distince isotopic compositions.They may form in AGB stars,novae and supernovae,respctively,Si3N4 is similar to X-SiC in isotopic composition.Corundum is classified as four groups based on theid oxygen isotopic compositions.AGB and red giang stare are possible sources for the oxide.More comprehensive study of presolar grains,especially discovery of the other types of oxides and silicates,isotopic analyses of individual submicrometer-sized grains and distribution of presolar grains among various chemical groups and petropaphic types of chondrites will provide new information on nucleosynthesis,stellar evolution and formation of the solar nebula.

  10. Direct Observation of a Semi-Bare Electron Coulomb Field Recover

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, G; Shevelev, M

    2011-01-01

    The problem of "semi-bare electron" was first considered in frame of quantum electrodynamics by E.L. Feinberg in 1980. In theory in frame of classical electrodynamics this problem was touched on in articles of N.F. Shul'ga and X. Artru. In 2008 the experimental investigations of this phenomenon in millimeter wavelength region were started by the group of scientists, including authors of this article. Used technique allowed us to study this effect in macroscopic mode. In this paper we present the results of direct observation of a semi-bare electron coulomb field recovery. The semi-bare state was obtained by passing of electron beam through the hole in a conductive screen. Measured spatial distribution of electromagnetic field shows the process of recover of the electron coulomb field, which is followed by a forward radiation. The experiments were performed on the relativistic electron beam of the microtron of Tomsk Polytechnic University.

  11. Quantifying and isolating stable soil organic carbon using long-term bare fallow experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barré, P; Eglin, T; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup;

    2010-01-01

    , and gaining insights into the mechanisms that lead to soil C stability. Long-term experiments with continuous bare fallow (vegetation-free) treatments in which the decay of soil C is monitored for decades after all inputs of C have stopped, provide a unique opportunity to assess the quantity of stable soil C...... into a labile pool (turnover time of a several years), an intermediate pool (turnover time of a several decades) and a stable pool (turnover time of a several centuries or more) fits well with the long term C decline observed in the bare fallow soils. The estimate of stable C ranged from 2.7 g C kg−1....... We analyzed data from six bare fallow experiments of long-duration (>30 yrs), covering a range of soil types and climate conditions, and sited at Askov (Denmark), Grignon and Versailles (France), Kursk (Russia), Rothamsted (UK), and Ultuna (Sweden). A conceptual three pool model dividing soil C...

  12. A proposed bare-tether experiment on board a sounding rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori A.; OYAMA, Koichiro; Sasaki, Susumu; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; 藤井 裕矩; 小山 孝一郎; 佐々木 進; 山極 芳樹; Cho, Mengu; Sanmartin, Juan R.; Charro, Mario; VanderHeide, Erick J.; Kruijff, Michiel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    A sounding rocket experiment is proposed to carry out two experiments by the conductive bare-tether; (1) the test of the OML (Orbital-Motion-Limited) theory to collect electron, and (2) the test of techniques to determine (neutral) density profile in critical E-layer. The main driver of the mission is provide a space tether technology experiment in Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) deploying a long tape tether in space and verify the performance of the bare electrodynamic tape tether. The sounding rocket...

  13. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex Plant - part I: Bare pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knief, R.A. [Ogden Environmental & Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    This paper briefly describes criticality investigations for weapon assembly and dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. Results are summarized for calculations performed for safety analyses, radiological hazards assessments, and a study to justify the criticality alarm exemption. Pits and pits in containers were modeled in their most reactive configuration. Criticality calculations were performed with the KENO and MCNP code packages. Configurations involving bare pits were subcritical by a substantial amount even with very conservative model assumptions. Thus, it is concluded that a critical configuration involving the bare pits is not credible.

  14. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex Plant - part I: Bare pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly describes criticality investigations for weapon assembly and dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. Results are summarized for calculations performed for safety analyses, radiological hazards assessments, and a study to justify the criticality alarm exemption. Pits and pits in containers were modeled in their most reactive configuration. Criticality calculations were performed with the KENO and MCNP code packages. Configurations involving bare pits were subcritical by a substantial amount even with very conservative model assumptions. Thus, it is concluded that a critical configuration involving the bare pits is not credible

  15. Behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; ZHAO Zhuo; LIU Gui-hua; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; PENG Zhi-hong

    2005-01-01

    Using calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate as starting materials, two kinds of calcium silicate hydrates, CaO · SiO2 · H2O and 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2O, were hydro-thermally synthesized at 120 ℃. The reaction rule of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution was investigated. The result shows that CaO · SiO2 · H2O is more stable than 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2 O in aluminate solution and its stability increases with the increase of reaction temperature but decreases with the increase of caustic concentration. The reaction between calcium silicate hydrate and aluminate solution is mainly through two routes. In the first case, Al replaces partial Si in calcium silicate hydrate, meanwhile 3CaO · Al2 O3 · xSiO2 · (6-2x) H2 O (hydro-garnet) is formed and some SiO2 enters the solution. In the second case, calcium silicate hydrate can react directly with aluminate solution, forming hydro-garnet and Na2O · Al2O3 · 2SiO2 · nH2O (DSP). The desilication reaction of aluminate solution containing silicate could contribute partially to forming DSP.

  16. Deep ocean biogeochemistry of silicic acid and nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Simeon, J.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gruber, N.; Key, R. M.; Schlitzer, R.

    2007-03-01

    Observations of silicic acid and nitrate along the lower branch of the global conveyor belt circulation show that silicic acid accumulation by diatom opal dissolution occurs at 6.4 times the rate of nitrate addition by organic matter remineralization. The export of opal and organic matter from the surface ocean occurs at a Si:N mole ratio that is much smaller than this almost everywhere (cf. Sarmiento et al., 2004). The preferential increase of silicic acid over nitrate as the deep circulation progresses from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific is generally interpreted as requiring deep dissolution of opal together with shallow remineralization of organic matter (Broecker, 1991). However, Sarmiento et al. (2004) showed that the primary reason for the low silicic acid concentration of the upper ocean is that the waters feeding the main thermocline from the surface Southern Ocean are depleted in silicic acid relative to nitrate. By implication, the same Southern Ocean processes that deplete the silicic acid in the surface Southern Ocean must also be responsible for the enhanced silicic acid concentration of the deep ocean. We use observations and results from an updated version of the adjoint model of Schlitzer (2000) to confirm that this indeed the case.

  17. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  18. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  19. Fire Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Soluble Alkaline Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Giudice

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the fire performance of wood panels (Araucaria angustifolia impregnated with soluble alkaline silicates. Commercial silicates based on sodium and potassium with 2.5/1.0 and 3.0/1.0 silica/alkali molar ratios were selected; solutions and glasses were previously characterized. Experimental panels were tested in a limiting oxygen chamber and in a two-foot tunnel. Results displayed a high fire-retardant efficiency using some soluble silicates.

  20. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  1. Grain Marketing Tools: A Survey of Illinois Grain Elevators

    OpenAIRE

    Whitacre, Rick C.; Spaulding, Aslihan D.

    2007-01-01

    As with most sectors of the agriculture economy, the U. S. country grain elevator industry has experienced considerable consolidation and concentration. By the same token, the country elevator's customer base (grain producers and landlords) has also changed rather dramatically as grain production takes place on larger and fewer farms. The profitability of operating a country elevator is directly related to the volume of grain the country elevator purchases over the course of a marketing year....

  2. Presolar grains in the Solar System: Connections to stellar and interstellar organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2008-10-01

    A small fraction of primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) consists of grains of presolar stardust. These grains have extremely unusual isotopic compositions, relative to all other planetary materials, indicating that they condensed in the outflows and explosions of prior generations of stars (Clayton & Nittler 2004). Identified presolar grain types include silicate, oxide and carbonaceous phases. The latter include graphitic carbon, diamond and SiC. Although many of these phases do not have a direct connection to organic chemistry, this is not true of the graphitic spherules. Many of these, with isotopic compositions indicating an origin in C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star outflows, have a structure consisting of naonocrystalline cores surrounded by well-graphitized C (Bernatowicz et al. 1996). The cores include isotopically anomalous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Messenger et al. 1998) and represent a link between molecular chemistry and dust condensation in stellar outflows. Meteorites and IDPs also contain abundant isotopically anomalous organic matter, including distinct organic grains, some of which probably formed in stellar outflows and/or the interstellar medium (ISM) (Busemann et al. 2006, Floss et al. 2004). In some IDPs, deuterium- and 15N-enriched organic matter is closely associated with presolar silicate grains (Messenger et al. 2005, Nguyen et al. 2007), suggesting an association in the ISM prior to Solar System formation.

  3. Properties of Dust Grains Probed with Extinction Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya

    2013-01-01

    Modern data of the extinction curve from ultraviolet to near infrared are revisited to study the property of dust grains in the Milky Way (MW) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We confirmed that the graphite-silicate mixture of grains yields the observed extinction curve with the simple power-law distribution of the grain size but with a cutoff at some maximal size: the parameters are tightly constrained to be $q = 3.5 \\pm 0.2$ for the size distribution $a^{-q}$ and the maximum radius $a_{max} = 0.24 \\pm 0.05$ um, for both MW and SMC. The abundance of grains, and hence the elemental abundance, is constrained from the reddening versus hydrogen column density, E(B-V)/N_H. If we take the solar elemental abundance as a standard for the MW, >56 % of carbon should be in graphite dust, while it is <40 % in the SMC. This disparity and the relative abundance explain the difference of the two curves. We find that 50-60 % of carbon may not necessarily be in graphite but in the amorphous or the glassy phase, or up...

  4. Mechanical and physical properties of calcium silicate/alumina composite for biomedical engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F S; Mehrali, M; Oshkour, A A; Metselaar, H S C; Kadri, N A; Abu Osman, N A

    2014-02-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of Al2O3 on α-calcium silicate (α-CaSiO3) ceramic. α-CaSiO3 was synthesized from CaO and SiO2 using mechanochemical method followed by calcinations at 1000°C. α-CaSiO3 and alumina were grinded using ball mill to create mixtures, containing 0-50w% of Al2O3 loadings. The powders were uniaxially pressed and followed by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) in order to achieve greater uniformity of compaction and to increase the shape capability. Afterward, the compaction was sintered in a resistive element furnace at both 1150°C and 1250°C with a 5h holding time. It was found that alumina reacted with α-CaSiO3 and formed alumina-rich calcium aluminates after sintering. An addition of 15wt% of Al2O3 powder at 1250°C were found to improve the hardness and fracture toughness of the calcium silicate. It was also observed that the average grain sizes of α-CaSiO3 /Al2O3 composite were maintained 500-700nm after sintering process.

  5. Silicate mineral impacts on the uptake and storage of arsenic and plant nutrients in rice ( Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-12-18

    Arsenic-contaminated rice grain may threaten human health globally. Since H₃AsO₃⁰ is the predominant As species found in paddy pore-waters, and H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ share an uptake pathway, silica amendments have been proposed to decrease As uptake and consequent As concentrations in grains. Here, we evaluated the impact of two silicate mineral additions differing in solubility (+Si(L), diatomaceous earth, 0.29 mM Si; +Si(H), Si-gel, 1.1 mM Si) to soils differing in mineralogy on arsenic concentration in rice. The +Si(L) addition either did not change or decreased As concentration in pore-water but did not change or increased grain-As levels relative to the (+As--Si) control. The +Si(H) addition increased As in pore-water, but it significantly decreased grain-As relative to the (+As--Si) control. Only the +Si(H) addition resulted in significant increases in straw- and husk-Si. Total grain- and straw-As was negatively correlated with pore-water Si, and the relationship differed between two soils exhibiting different mineralogy. These differing results are a consequence of competition between H₄SiO₄⁰ and H₃AsO₃⁰ for adsorption sites on soil solids and subsequent plant-uptake, and illustrate the importance of Si mineralogy on arsenic uptake.

  6. Grain alcohol study: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The study has concentrated upon a detailed examination of all considerations involved in the production, use, and marketing of ethyl alcohol (Ethanol) as produced from the fermentation of agricultural grains. Each parameter was examined in the light of current energy markets and trends; new sources and technological, and processes for fermentation, the capability of the agricultural industry to support fermentaton demand; the optimization of value of agricultureal crops; and the efficiencies of combining related industries. Anhydrous (200 proof) ethanol makes an excellent blending component for all present automotive fuels and an excellent octane additive for unleaded fuels in proportions up to 35% without requiring modifications to current engines. There is no difference between ethanol produced by fermentation and ethanol produced synthetically from petroleum. The decision to produce ethanol one way or the other is purely economic. The agricultural industry can support a major expansion in the fermentation industry. The residue (distillers grains) from the fermentation of corn for ethanol is an excellent and economical feed for livestock and poultry. A reliable supply of distillers grains can assist in making the large beef feedlot operations more economically viable. The source materials, fuels, products and by-products of an ethanol plant, beef feedlot, gas biodigester plant, municipal waste recovery plant and a steam generated electrical plant are interrelated and mutually beneficial for energy efficiencies and economic gains when co-located. The study concludes that the establishment of such agricultural-environment industrial energy complexes, would provide a broad range of significant benefits to Indiana.

  7. Grain alcohol study: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The study has concentrated upon a detailed examination of all considerations involved in the production, use, and marketing of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) as produced from the fermentation of agricultural grains. Each parameter was examined in the light of current energy markets and trends; new sources and technological, and processes for fermentation, the capability of the agricultural industry to support fermentation demand; the optimizaton of value of agricultural crops; and the efficiencies of combining related industries. Ahydrous (200 proof) ethanol makes an excellent blending component for all present automotive fuels and an excellent octane additive for unleaded fuels in proportions up to 35% without requiring modifications to current engines. There is no difference between ethanol produced by fermentation and ethanol produced synthetically from petroleum. The decision to produce ethanol one way or the other is purely economic. The agricultural industry can support a major expansion in the fermentation industry. The residue (distillers grains) from the fermentation of corn for ethanol is an excellent and economical feed for livestock and poultry. A reliable supply of distillers grain can assist in making the large beef feedlot operations more economically viable. The source materials, fuels, products and by-products of an ethanol plant, beef feedlot, gas biodigester plant, municipal waste recovery plant and a steam generated electrical plant are interrelated and mutually beneficial for energy efficiencies and economic gains when co-located. The study concludes that the establishment of such agricultural- environment industrial energy complexes, would provide a broad range of significant benefits to Indiana.

  8. Comparative measurements with seven rainfall simulators on uniform bare fallow land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iserloh, T.; Ries, J.B.; Cerda, A.; Echeverria, M.T.; Fister, W.; Geissler, C.; Kuhn, N.J.; Leon, F.J.; Peters, P.; Schindewolf, M.; Schmidt, J.; Scholten, T.; Seeger, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the influence of rainfall simulator type and plot dimensions on runoff and erosion, seven small portable rainfall simulators from Freiberg, Tubingen, Trier (all Germany), Valencia, Zaragoza (both Spain), Basel (Switzerland) and Wageningen (the Netherlands) were compared on a prepared bare

  9. Heat and water transfer in bare topsoil and the lower atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, H.F.M.

    1996-01-01

    This book describes an analysis of processes and factors that affect the energy balance of bare soil, and the associated exchange of heat and moisture at the surface. After a brief treatment of basic transport theory, the processes of soil-atmosphere interaction are expressed in a simulation algorit

  10. Introducing the Notion of Bare and Effective Mass via Newton's Second Law of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here I discuss how these concepts may be introduced together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion. The…

  11. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a young child with cytomegalovirus pneumonia and the bare lymphocyte syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is reported in a 3-year-old Turkish girl. She had combined immunodeficiency, later shown to be the Bare Lymphocyte syndrome, and chronic pneumonia. Lung biopsy showed cytomegalovirus. The child developed painful elbow and knee joints and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy was demonstrated radiologically. (orig.)

  12. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation preceded by routine prestenting with a bare metal stent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demkow, Marcin; Biernacka, Elzbieta Katarzyna; Spiewak, Mateusz;

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) with routine prestenting with a bare metal stent (BMS). Background: PPVI is a relatively new method of treating patients with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). Results of PPVI performed...

  13. Bare Pedagogy and the Scourge of Neoliberalism: Rethinking Higher Education as a Democratic Public Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2010-01-01

    A new form of bare pedagogy is emerging in higher education focused on market-driven competitiveness and even militaristic goal-setting, while critical pedagogy, with its emphasis on the hard work of critical analysis, moral judgments, and social responsibility (critical pedagogy that goes to the very heart of what it means to address real…

  14. Drug-eluting versus bare-metal stents in large coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Christoph; Galatius, Soeren; Erne, Paul;

    2010-01-01

    Recent data have suggested that patients with coronary disease in large arteries are at increased risk for late cardiac events after percutaneous intervention with first-generation drug-eluting stents, as compared with bare-metal stents. We sought to confirm this observation and to assess whether...

  15. Drug-eluting stents and bare metal stents in patients with NSTE-ACS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Haahr; Pfisterer, Matthias; Kaiser, Christoph;

    2014-01-01

    the randomised BASKET-PROVE trial (sirolimus-eluting stent vs. everolimus-eluting stent vs. bare metal stent in large-vessel stenting). The primary endpoint was the combined two-year rate of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). Secondary endpoints were each component of the primary...

  16. Long-Term Safety of Drug-Eluting and Bare-Metal Stents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Benedetto, Umberto; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous meta-analyses have investigated the relative safety and efficacy profiles of different types of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS); however, most prior trials in these meta-analyses reported follow-up to only 1 year, and as such, the relative long-term safe...

  17. A new notion of soundness in bare public-key model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yunlei; ZHU Hong

    2003-01-01

    A new notion of soundness in bare public-key (BPK) model is presented. This new notion just lies in between one-time soundness and sequential soundness and its reasonableness is justified in the context of resettable zero-knowledge when resettable zero-knowledge prover is implemented by smart card.

  18. Bare Quark Stars or Naked Neutron Stars: The Case of RX J1856.5-3754

    CERN Document Server

    Turolla, R; Drake, J J; Turolla, Roberto; Zane, Silvia; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2004-01-01

    In a cool neutron star (T 10^13 G), a phase transition may occur in the outermost layers. As a consequence the neutron star becomes `bare', i.e. no gaseous atmosphere sits on the top of the crust. The surface of cooling, bare neutron stars not necessary gives off blackbody radiation because of the strong suppression in the emissivity at energies below the electron plasma frequency \\omega_p. Since \\omega_p~1 keV under the conditions typical of the dense electron gas in the condensate, the emission from a T~100 eV bare neutron star will be substantially depressed with respect to that of a perfect Planckian radiator at most energies. Here we present a detailed analysis of the emission properties of a bare neutron star. In particular, we derive the surface emissivity for a Fe composition in a range of magnetic fields and temperatures representative of cooling isolated neutron stars, like RX J1856.5-3754. We find that the emitted spectrum is strongly dependent on the electron conductivity in the solid surface lay...

  19. Production of Organic Grain Coatings by Surface-Mediated Reactions and the Consequences of This Process for Meteoritic Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO are exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these reactions. The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic material. Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  20. The di- and tricalcium silicate dissolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a specially designed reactor connected to an ICP spectrometer enabled the careful determination of the dissolution rates of C3S, C2S and CaO, respectively, over a broad range of concentration of calcium and silicates under conditions devoid of C–S–H. The kinetic laws, bridging the dissolution rates and the undersaturations, were obtained after extrapolation of rate zero allowing the estimation of the true experimental solubility products of C3S (Ksp = 9.6 · 10−23), C2S (Ksp = 4.3 · 10−18) and CaO (Ksp = 9.17 · 10−6). The latter are then compared to the solubilities calculated from the enthalpies of formation. We propose that the observed deviations result from the protonation of the unsaturated oxygen atoms present at the surface of these minerals. Hydration rates measured in cement pastes or in C3S pastes are in excellent agreement with the kinetic law found in this study for C3S under conditions undersaturated with respect to C–S–H

  1. Nanostructure of Er3+ doped silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nan; Hou, Kirk; Haines, Christopher D; Etessami, Nathan; Ranganathan, Varadh; Halpern, Susan B; Kear, Bernard H; Klein, Lisa C; Sigel, George H

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate nanostructural evolution resulting in highly increased photoluminescence in silicates doped with Er3+ ions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging, nano-energy dispersed X-ray (NEDX) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence analysis confirm the local composition and structure changes of the Er3+ ions upon thermal annealing. We studied two types of amorphous nanopowder: the first is of the composition SiO2/18Al2O3/2Er2O3 (SAE), synthesized by combustion flame-chemical vapor condensation, and the second is with a composition of SiO2/8Y2O3/2Er2O3 (SYE), synthesized by sol-gel synthesis (composition in mol%). Electron diffraction and HRTEM imaging clearly show the formation of nanocrystallites with an average diameter of approximately 8 nm in SAE samples annealed at 1000 degrees C and SYE samples annealed at 1200 degrees C. The volume fraction of the nanocrystalline phase increased with each heat treatment, eventually leading to complete devitrification at 1400 degrees C. Further XRD and NEDX analysis indicates that the nanocrystalline phase has the pyrochlore structure with the formula Er(x)Al(2-x)Si2O7 or Er(x)Y(2-x)Si2O7 and a surrounding silica matrix.

  2. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  3. Properties of sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jina; Fan Zitian; Zan Xiaolei; Pan Di

    2009-01-01

    The sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating has many advantages,such as low sodium silicate adding quantity,fast hardening speed,high room temperature strength,good collapsibility and certain surface stability. However,it has big moisture absorbability in the air,which would lead to the compression strength and the surface stability of the sand molds being sharply reduced. In this study,the moisture absorbability of the sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating in different humidity conditions and the effect factors were investigated. Meanwhile,the reasons for the big moisture absorbability of the sand were analyzed.Some measures to overcome the problems of high moisture absorbability,bad surface stability and sharply reducing strength in the air were discussed. The results of this study establish the foundation of green and clean foundry technology based on the microwave heating hardening sodium silicate sand process.

  4. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  5. The contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance in an arid ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C. M.; Smith, A.; Campanella, A.; Rango, A.

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneity of vegetation and soils in arid and semi-arid environments complicates the analysis of medium spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery. A single pixel may contain several different types of vegetation, as well as a sizeable proportion of bare soil. We have used linear mixture modeling to explore the contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance. In October, 2006, aerial imagery (0.25 m spatial resolution) was acquired for our study sites in the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. Imagery was also acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for June and November, 2006. These data corresponded with pre- and post monsoon conditions. Object-based feature extraction was used to classify the aerial imagery to shrub, grass and bare ground cover classes. Percent cover was then calculated for each cover class. Visible-near-infrared and shortwave infrared ASTER reflectance data from both dates were combined into a single 18-band dataset (30 m spatial resolution). A vector overlay from the classification results of the aerial imagery was used to define pure endmember pixels in the ASTER imagery. Estimates of the proportions of shrub, grass and bare ground cover from the linear mixture modeling approach were compared with cover calculated using feature extraction from the aerial imagery. The results indicate that reflectance in ASTER pixels is likely to be a linear combination of the cover proportions of the three main cover types (shrubs, grass, bare ground). However, noticeable outliers in the relationship between cover calculated from each method, indicate there may be other variables that affect the accuracy with which we can estimate cover using linear mixture modeling.

  6. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    OpenAIRE

    Quirk, J; D. J. Beerling; S. A. Banwart; Kakonyi, G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increase...

  7. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    OpenAIRE

    Yukio Homma; Akira Ishikawa; Kanami Takaya; Teruaki Kobayashi; Yorito Nose; Toshikazu Sato; Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilep...

  8. Influence of PC superplasticizers on tricalcium silicate hydration.

    OpenAIRE

    Pourchet, S.; Comparet, C.; Nicoleau, L.; Nonat, A.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of polycarboxylate superplasticizers with variations of content of anionic groups was studied on pure tricalcium silicate hydration. The hydration in diluted suspension has been investigated by conductimetry, calorimetry, and ionic and total organic carbon analysis of the liquid phase. The tricalcium silicate hydration is always delayed in presence of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. Moreover, the delay can be correlated with the number of carboxylate groups which are on the ad...

  9. Effects of silicate application on soil fertility and wheat yield

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Vinícius Mansano Sarto; Maria do Carmo Lana; Leandro Rampim; Jean Sérgio Rosset; Jaqueline Rocha Wobeto

    2015-01-01

    An improvement in soil chemical properties and crop development with silicate application has been confirmed in several plant species. The effects of silicate application on soil chemical properties and wheat growth were investigated in the present study. The experiment was carried out in 8-L plastic pots in a greenhouse. Treatments were arranged in a randomized block design in a 3 × 5 factorial: three soils [Rhodic Acrudox (Ox1), Rhodic Hapludox (Ox2) and Arenic Hapludult (Ult)] and five sil...

  10. Mineralogy and chemical compositions of Colomera (IIE) silicate inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, W.; H. Takeda; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Irons of groups lAB and IIE contain silicate inclusions. In IAB irons, these inclusions are basically chondritic, but in IIE they vary from chondritic to highly differentiated [1,2]. In this work, we present detailed studies of mineralogy and trace-element geochemistry of eight silicate inclusions from Colomera with the goal of better understanding early planetary differentiation and possible genetic relationships between iron and stony meteorites.

  11. Experimental calibration of a new oxybarometer for silicic magmas based on the partitioning of vanadium between magnetite and silicate melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arató, Róbert; Audétat, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen fugacity is an important parameter in magmatic systems that affects the stability of mineral phases and fluid species. However, there is no well-established method to reconstruct the oxygen fugacity of slowly cooled magmas such as granite, for example, because existing oxybarometers (e.g., magnetite-ilmenite method) are susceptible to re-equilibration processes during slow cooling and thus lead to erroneous results when applied for granitic rocks. In this study, we aim at developing an oxybarometer that is based on the partitioning of vanadium (a redox-sensitive element) between magnetite inclusions and silicate melt inclusions preserved in quartz phenocrysts, where they were protected from subsolidus alteration and can be measured as entities by LA-ICP-MS. In the first - experimental - part of this study we investigated the effects of temperature (800-950 ° C), pressure (1-2 kbar), oxygen fugacity (from ΔFMQ+0.7 to ΔFMQ+4.0), magnetite composition, and melt composition on the partition coefficient of vanadium between magnetite and melt (DVmgt-melt). The experiments were carried out in cold-seal pressure vessels and the starting material was a mixture of V-doped haplogranite glasses or natural obsidian powder with variable aluminum saturation index (ASI), and synthetic, V-free magnetite of 10-20 μm grain size. The vanadium partition coefficient was found to depend strongly on oxygen fugacity, and to lesser (but still considerable) degrees on melt composition and temperature. A more than 1.5 log unit decrease in DVmgt-melt values with increasing oxygen fugacity can be explained by a change of the dominant valence state of V in the silicate melt. For a given oxygen fugacity buffer DVmgt-melt decreases with increasing temperature, but this reflects mostly the change in absolute fO2 values while the net temperature effect is in fact positive. DVmgt-melt depends significantly on melt composition, resulting in higher D-values with increasing aluminum

  12. The abundance of presolar grains in comet 81P/WILD 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Ong, W. J. [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kearsley, Anton T. [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, Mark J., E-mail: floss@wustl.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    We carried out hypervelocity impact experiments in order to test the possibility that presolar grains are preferentially destroyed during impact of the comet 81P/Wild 2 samples into the Stardust Al foil collectors. Powdered samples of the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 were shot at 6 km s{sup -1} into Stardust flight spare Al foil. Craters from the Acfer 094 test shots, as well as ones from the actual Stardust cometary foils, were analyzed by NanoSIMS ion imaging to search for presolar grains. We found two O-rich presolar grains and two presolar SiC grains in the Acfer 94 test shots, with measured abundances in the foils of 4 and 5 ppm, respectively, significantly lower than the amount of presolar grains actually present in this meteorite. Based on known abundances of these phases in Acfer 094, we estimate a loss of over 90% of the O-rich presolar grains; the fraction of SiC lost is lower, reflecting its higher resistance to destruction. In the Stardust cometary foils, we identified four O-rich presolar grains in 5000 {mu}m{sup 2} of crater residue. Including a presolar silicate grain found by Leitner et al., the overall measured abundance of O-rich presolar grains in Wild 2 is {approx}35 ppm. No presolar SiC has been found in the foil searches, although one was identified in the aerogel samples. Based on the known abundances of presolar silicates and oxides in Acfer 094, we can calculate the pre-impact abundances of these grains in the Stardust samples. Our calculations indicate initial abundances of 600-830 ppm for O-rich presolar grains. Assuming a typical diameter of {approx}300 nm for SiC suggests a presolar SiC abundance of {approx}45 ppm. Analyses of the Stardust samples indicated early on that recognizable presolar components were not particularly abundant, an observation that was contrary to expectations that the cometary material would, like interplanetary dust particles, be dominated by primitive materials from the early solar system

  13. 演化晚期恒星中的结晶硅酸盐尘埃%Crystalline Silicates in Evolved Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳明; 姜碧沩

    2014-01-01

    stars indicate that the crystalline silicates are magnesium-rich, rather than iron-rich in the case of amorphous silicates. It means that forsterite and enstatite are the main components of the crystalline silicates in evolved stars. The modelling of the spectral energy distribution reveals that the crystalline silicates may have bigger average size than the amorphous ones. In general, the degree of crystallinity is not high, usually around 10%—15%, although very high degrees up to > 80% are also reported. What determines the degree of crystallinity is not clear yet, while mass loss rate has long been suggested as an important factor and metallicity could be another factor. The degree of crystallinity may be related to the mechanism of the formation of the crystalline silicate. A direct condensation of gas particles can form crystalline silicates as demonstrated by the grain formation theory. This mechanism has the problem to explain some of the observed high abundance of crystalline silicate. The other proposed mechanism is the so-called annealing, i.e. the amorphous silicate dust is heated to a high enough temperature and re-condense to form crystalline silicate. This model has the problem to explain the transformation from iron-rich amorphous form to magnesium-rich crystalline form so that additional replacement reaction needs to be induced. With the abundant detection of crystalline silicate dust in the evolved stars, astronomers have learned much about the properties of the dust. There are still some important questions to be answered: (1) what determines the degree of crystallinity?(2) how are the crystalline silicate grains formed? (3) why is there little crystalline silicate dust in the interstellar medium? We look forward to the answers with further investigations.%硅酸盐是宇宙尘埃的主要成分之一。20世纪60年代,在演化晚期恒星中就曾发现硅酸盐尘埃的辐射特征,并且与实验室无定形硅酸盐的

  14. Friction and Wear Behaviors of Nano-Silicates in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Boshui; Lou Fang; Fang Jianhua; Wang Jiu; Li Jia

    2009-01-01

    Nano-metric magnesium silicate and zinc silicate with particle size of about 50--70nm were prepared in water by the method of chemical deposition. The antiwear and friction reducing abilities of the nano-silicates, as well as their compos-ites with oleie acid tri-ethanolamine (OATEA), were evaluated on a four-ball friction tester. The topographies and tribochemical features of the worn surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS). Results show that nano-silicates alone provide poor antiwear and friction reducing abilities in water, but exhibits excellent synergism with OATEA in reducing friction and wear. The synergism in reducing friction and wear between naao-silicates and OATEA does exist almost regardless of particle sizes and species, and may be attributed, on one hand, to the formation of an adsorption film of OATEA, and, on the other hand, to the formation oftdbochemical species of silicon dioxide and iron oxides on the friction surfaces. Tribo-reactions and tribo-adsorptions of nano-silicates and OATEA would produce hereby an effective composite boondary lubrication film, which could efficiently enhance the anti-wear and friction-reducing abilities of water.

  15. H-Bond interactions between silicates and water during zeolite pre-nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Fonz, Miguel J; Catlow, C Richard A; Lewis, Dewi W

    2008-11-21

    The relative strength of water-water, water-silicate and silicate-silicate interactions are studied, in order to explain the low solubility of the monomer (Si(OH)(4)), and determine the degree of dispersion of silicate clusters in solution during the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites. We will show how the hydrogen bond interactions between water and monomeric silicate species are similar to that in pure water, whilst monomer-monomer interactions are stronger. However, when larger silicate species are also considered we find the relative hydrogen-bonding strength to follow: water-water silicate-water silicate-silicate. The effects of pH are also considered. The implications of the relative strength of these interactions on the formation of larger silicate species, leading to zeolite pre-nucleation, are discussed. PMID:18979042

  16. Comparison of the Mineralogy of Comet Wild 2 Coma Grains to Other Astromaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David; Zolensky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We propose that Kuiper Belt samples (in this case comet coma grains from the Jupiter family comet Wild 2) are recognizably different from the bulk of materials in outer belt asteroids, because of their different formation positions and times in the early solar system. We believe this despite similarities found between some Wild 2 grains and components of carbonaceous chondrites (i.e. some CAI and chondrules). Kuiper Belt samples must preserve measurable mineralogical and compositional evidence of formation at unique positions and times in the early solar nebula, and these formational differences must have imparted recognizable special characteristics. We hypothesize that these characteristics include: (1) Unique major element compositional ranges of common astromaterial minerals, especially olivine and pyroxene; (2) Unique minor element compositions of major silicate phases, especially olivine and low-Ca pyroxene; (3) Degree and effects of radiation processing -- including amorphous rims, metal coatings, and Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides (GEMS); (4) Presence of abundant presolar silicate grains as recognized by anomalous oxygen in silicates; (5) Oxidation state of the mineral assemblage. We are working our way through all available Wild 2 samples, selecting 1-2 non-consecutive viable TEM grids from each possible extracted Wild 2 grain. We especially prefer TEM grids from grains for which complete mineralogical details have not been published (which is to say the majority of the extracted grains). We are performing a basic mineralogic survey by E-beam techniques, to establish the essential features of the extracted Wild 2 grains. We are making a particular effort to carefully and accurately measure minor elements of olivine and pyroxene, as these minerals are widespread in astromaterials, and comparisons of their compositions will serve to place the Wild 2 silicates in contact with asteroids, meteorites and chondritic interplanetary dust particles

  17. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  18. Carbon on Quartz Grain Boundaries: Continuous Films versus Isolated Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. D.; Watson, E. B.; Wark, D. A.

    2003-12-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments on quartzites containing a small amount of carbon were conducted at 1.0-1.4 GPa and 850-1500° C in order to assess the microstructure of graphite along grain boundaries in deep crustal materials. In one series of experiments, polished 3mm diameter single-crystal quartz discs were coated with ˜50 to 150 nm of evaporated carbon or 500 to 1000 nm of alcohol-based carbon paint. Stacks of these were subjected to high P-T conditions for durations ranging from 5 minutes to 10 days. Observations from our earlier experiments suggested that the coatings become discontinuous with time at high temperature. However, more recent observations show that coated disc boundaries contain a dark, interconnected material: those subjected to lower temperatures and shorter durations exhibited continuous films; those run at higher temperatures for longer durations contained thicker, yet still interconnected dendrite and plate structures. In contrast, relatively fine-grained synthetic quartzites produced at similar conditions typically do not contain continuous films. Quartz powder with an initial grain size between 75-150 μ m, coated with 30-50 nm of evaporated carbon, was subjected to 850-1300° C for durations ranging from 1 hour to 6 days. Only very short runs at low temperatures contained irregular boundaries still darkened by a connected film; longer duration and higher temperature quartzites exhibited texturally-equilibrated quartz grains accompanied by isolated small opaque carbon plates located along grain corners, edges, and grain boundaries. Identical features are seen in additional quartzite materials constructed in graphite cylinders using uncoated powdered silica glass or smaller quartz crystals (<22 μ m) taken to 1000° C and 1.4 GPa for 14 days. The results suggest that carbon may remain as a connected surface, at least metastably, on silicate mineral boundaries in the absence of grain boundary movement. With grain growth, carbon diffuses

  19. FeO-rich silicates and Ca,Al-rich inclusions in Qingzhen andYamato 691 (EH3) meteo-rites: Evidence for migration of mass in the solar nebula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Qingzhen and Yamato 691 (EH3) enstatite chondrites, which formed under extremely reducing conditions, are studied using the scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer. Both meteorites contain FeO-rich silicates and minor Ca, Al-rich inclusions. Most FeO-rich silicates are Ca-poor pyroxenes and occur as fragments in matrix. A few grains of FeO-rich silicates were found in chondrules, and FeO-rich olivine is rare. In Qingzhen, FeO-rich silicates commonly contain abundant dust-like Ni-poor metals, which probably formed through reduction of FeO. In contrast, only a few fragments of FeO-rich silicates in Yamato 691 enclose dust-like metals.This difference is consistent with a more reducing condition of Qingzhen than Yamato 691. Ca, Al-rich inclusions have similar modal compositions and mineral chemistry as their counterparts in carbonaceous chondrites. We suggest that (1)the FeO-rich silicates probably formed in oxidized regions of the solar nebula, and then moved into the enstatite chondrite locations; and (2) Ca, Al-rich inclusions in both enstatite chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites may have similar origins and reservoirs.``

  20. Implications of climate change for evaporation from bare soils in a Mediterranean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mehmet; Yano, Tomohisa; Evrendilek, Fatih; Uygur, Veli

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict quantitative changes in evaporation from bare soils in the Mediterranean climate region of Turkey in response to the projections of a regional climate model developed in Japan (hereafter RCM). Daily RCM data for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ETr) and soil evaporation were obtained for the periods of 1994--2003 and 2070--2079. Potential evaporation (Ep) from bare soils was calculated using the Penman-Monteith equation with a surface resistance of zero. Simulation of actual soil evaporation (Ea) was carried out using Aydin model (Aydin et al., Ecological Modelling 182:91-105, 2005) combined with Aydin and Uygur (2006, A model for estimating soil water potential of bare fields. In Proceedings of the 18th International Soil Meeting (ISM) on Soils Sustaining Life on Earth, Managing Soil and Technology, Sanliurfa, 477-480pp.) model of predicting soil water potential at the top surface layer of a bare soil, after performances of Aydin model (R2 = 94.0%) and Aydin and Uygur model (R2 = 97.6) were tested. The latter model is based on the relations among potential soil evaporation, hydraulic diffusivity, and soil wetness, with some simplified assumptions. Input parameters of the model are simple and easily obtainable such as climatic parameters used to compute the potential soil evaporation, average diffusivity for the drying soil, and volumetric water content at field capacity. The combination of Aydin and Aydin and Uygur models appeared to be useful in estimating water potential of soils and Ea from bare soils, with only a few parameters. Unlike ETr and Ep projected to increase by 92 and 69 mm (equivalent to 8.0 and 7.3% increases) due to the elevated evaporative demand of the atmosphere, respectively, Ea from bare soils is projected to reduce by 50 mm (equivalent to a 16.5% decrease) in response to a decrease in rainfall by 46% in the Mediterranean region of Turkey by the 2070s predicted by RCM, and consequently

  1. Dust properties and disk structure of evolved protoplanetary disks in Cep OB2: Grain growth, settling, gas and dust mass, and inside-out evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Patel, Nimesh; Juhász, Attila; Bouwman, Jeroen; Sturm, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer/IRS spectra of 31 TTS and IRAM/1.3mm observations for 34 low- and intermediate-mass stars in the Cep OB2 region. Including our previously published data, we analyze 56 TTS and the 3 intermediate-mass stars with silicate features in Tr 37 (~4 Myr) and NGC 7160 (~12 Myr). The silicate emission features are well reproduced with a mixture of amorphous (with olivine, forsterite, and silica stoichiometry) and crystalline grains (forsterite, enstatite). We explore grain size and disk structure using radiative transfer disk models, finding that most objects have suffered substantial evolution (grain growth, settling). About half of the disks show inside-out evolution, with either dust-cleared inner holes or a radially-dependent dust distribution, typically with larger grains and more settling in the innermost disk. The typical strong silicate features require nevertheless the presence of small dust grains, and could be explained by differential settling according to grain size, anomalous dust distr...

  2. The Composition of Interstellar Grains Toward Zeta Ophiuchi: Constraining the Elemental Budget Near the Diffuse-Dense Cloud Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Poteet, Charles A; Draine, Bruce T

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward Zeta Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H2O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H2O ice mantles on large (a ~ 2.8 microns) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of elemental Mg and Si along the line of sight are present in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of eleme...

  3. Economics of Grain Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After three years, in which preliminary designs were prepared, a grain irradiation plant has been designed and is being built into an existing silo installation. From this experience actual costs of plant construction are available for a plant using cobalt-60 and this experience is incorporated in estimates for machine installations for high grain throughput. Costs are compared for plants of comparable complexity and they indicate those areas in which each type of plant is pre-eminently suitable and those areas where either type may be best, dependent upon local site conditions, the standard of local technology and methods of operation. The two plants compared are described in sufficient detail to enable the precise extent of the equipment supply covered by the costs to be appreciated. The accounting methods employed have been discussed with industrial accountants to ensure that they are acceptable to the potential users. The methods employed are explained so that they can be applied to problems of a similar nature. (author)

  4. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  5. COOPERATIVE MARKETING IN SPECIALTY GRAINS AND IDENTITY PRESERVED GRAIN MARKETS

    OpenAIRE

    Janzen, Edward L.; Wilson, William W.

    2002-01-01

    Marketing of specialty and identity preserved grains has become an important strategy in the grain marketing industry and is being driven, in part, by consumer and processor demand and an interest in non-GM products. This study provides background and practices of numerous organizations involved in marketing of specialty/identity preserved grains. Supporting marketing activities are reviewed. Key factors in the success (or failure) of their efforts are identified. Major challenges facing the ...

  6. Silicic Arc Magmas And Silicic Slab Melts: The Melt-Rock Reaction Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, S. M.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Bolge, L. L.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Bindeman, I. N.; Stuart, F. M.; Zellmer, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    While a genetic link between silicic arc magmas and silicic melts from the subducted slab has long been proposed, this hypothesis is commonly refuted because most arc magmas lack a 'garnet-signature' which such slab melts must have. A comprehensive geochemical study of high-Mg# arc magmas from the Quaternary central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), however, shows that this conflict can be reconciled if melt-rock reaction processes in the mantle wedge were essential to arc magma formation. In the central MVB, monogenetic and composite volcanoes erupt high-Mg# basalts to andesites with highly variable trace element patterns. These magmas contain high-Ni olivines (olivine Ni higher than permissible for olivines in partial peridotite melts) with high 3He/4He = 7-8 Ra that provide strong evidence for silicic slab components that infiltrate the subarc mantle to produce olivine-free segregations of 'reaction pyroxenite' in the sources of individual volcanoes. Melting of silica-excess and silica-deficient reaction pyroxenites can then produce high-Mg# basaltic and dacitic primary melts that mix during ascent through mantle and crust to form high-Mg# andesites. Mass balance requires that reaction pyroxenites contain at least >15-18 wt%, and likely more, of slab component. However, because the HREE of the slab component are efficiently retained in the eclogitic slab, elements Ho to Lu in partial melts from reaction pyroxenites remain controlled by the mantle and maintain MORB-normalized Ho/Lun ˜1.15 close to unity. In contrast, the MREE to LREE and fluid mobile LILE of the arc magmas are either controlled, or strongly influenced, by slab-contributions. The origin from hybrid sources also shows in the major elements that are blends of mantle-derived elements (Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ti) and elements augmented by slab contributions (Si, Na, K, P, and possibly Al). Moreover, strong correlations between bulk rock SiO2, 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O (olivines) can be interpreted as mixtures of subarc

  7. Differential effects of grammatical gender and gender inflection in bare noun production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolieri, Daniela; Lotto, Lorella; Leoncini, Debora; Cubelli, Roberto; Job, Remo

    2011-02-01

    In a new series of experiments with the picture-word interference paradigm, we replicated the grammatical gender interference effect in bare noun production in Italian: naming times are slower to picture-word noun pairs sharing the same gender. This effect is independent from the morphological transparency for gender, but responses are significantly slower when the distracters are transparent for gender. Overall, the pattern of results supports the assumption that in bare noun production grammatical gender is always selected, at least in languages like Italian. We assume that the differential effects of the nominal endings are due to the mechanisms involved in the recognition of grammatical gender of the distracter nouns which are sensitive to the morphological transparency for gender: lexical representation of transparent written words leads to a higher level of activation, thus resulting in stronger gender interference. PMID:21241283

  8. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on soil moisture remote sensing was conducted during July to September 1981 on bare, grass, and alfalfa fields at frequencies of 0.6, 1.4, 5.0, and 10.6 GHz with radiometers mounted on mobile towers. The results confirm the frequency dependence of sensitivity reduction due to the presence of vegetation cover. For the type of vegetated fields reported here, the vegetation effect is appreciable even at 0.6 GHz. Measurements over bare soil show that when the soil is wet, the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest at 0.6 GHz, a result contrary to the expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil-water mixtures and the current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  9. An OPAL measurement of the τ- → e-/-bareντ Branching Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The branching ratio for the decay τ- → e-/-bareντ has been measured using data collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP. In total 33073 τ- → e-/-bareντ candidates were identified from a sample of 186197 selected τ decays, giving a branching ratio of Be (17.81 ± 0.09 (stat) ± 0.06 (syst))%. This result is combined with other electroweak measurements to test e - μ and μ - τ universality in charged-current weak interactions at the level of 0.5%. Additionally, a value of the strong coupling constant αs (m2τ) has been extracted from Be and evolved to the Zo mass scale to give αs (m2Z) = 0.1204 ± 0.0011 (exp)+0.0021-0.0019 (theory)

  10. Sub-pixel estimation of tree cover and bare surface densities using regression tree analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Zangrando Toneli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sub-pixel analysis is capable of generating continuous fields, which represent the spatial variability of certain thematic classes. The aim of this work was to develop numerical models to represent the variability of tree cover and bare surfaces within the study area. This research was conducted in the riparian buffer within a watershed of the São Francisco River in the North of Minas Gerais, Brazil. IKONOS and Landsat TM imagery were used with the GUIDE algorithm to construct the models. The results were two index images derived with regression trees for the entire study area, one representing tree cover and the other representing bare surface. The use of non-parametric and non-linear regression tree models presented satisfactory results to characterize wetland, deciduous and savanna patterns of forest formation.

  11. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasscer, D.S.; Ernst, R.; Morgan, T.O.; Rivera, C.; Scott, A.C.; Summerson, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a cooperative research effort between The Puerto Rico Center of Energy and Environment Research, Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation and The Trane Company, a six month study was made of the seawater corrosion performance of various aluminum materials to test their suitability for use in seawater heat exchangers. The materials tested included bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger extrusions from a brazed aluminium, plate-fin heat exchanger developed by The Trane Company. The test materials were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr).

  12. EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

  13. Optical coupling of bare optoelectronic components and flexographically printed polymer waveguides in planar optronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixiao; Wolfer, Tim; Lange, Alex; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-05-01

    Large scale, planar optronic systems allowing spatially distributed functionalities can be well used in diverse sensor networks, such as for monitoring the environment by measuring various physical quantities in medicine or aeronautics. In these systems, mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric foils, e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), are employed as carrier materials. A benefit of using these materials is their low cost. The optical interconnections from light sources to light transmission structures in planar optronic systems occupy a pivotal position for the sensing functions. As light sources, we employ the optoelectronic components, such as edgeemitting laser diodes, in form of bare chips, since their extremely small structures facilitate a high integration compactness and ensure sufficient system flexibility. Flexographically printed polymer optical waveguides are deployed as light guiding structures for short-distance communication in planar optronic systems. Printing processes are utilized for this generation of waveguides to achieve a cost-efficient large scale and high-throughput production. In order to attain a high-functional optronic system for sensing applications, one of the most essential prerequisites is the high coupling efficiency between the light sources and the waveguides. Therefore, in this work, we focus on the multimode polymer waveguide with a parabolic cross-section and investigate its optical coupling with the bare laser diode. We establish the geometrical model of the alignment based on the previous works on the optodic bonding of bare laser diodes and the fabrication process of polymer waveguides with consideration of various parameters, such as the beam profile of the laser diode, the employed polymer properties of the waveguides as well as the carrier substrates etc. Accordingly, the optical coupling of the bare laser diodes and the polymer waveguides was simulated

  14. Bonding bare die LEDs on PET foils for lighting applications: thermal design modeling and bonding experiments

    OpenAIRE

    van den Ende, Daan; Kusters, Roel; Cauwe, Maarten; A de Waal; van den Brand, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Integration of LEDs on flexible foil substrates is of interest for flexible lighting applications and flexible photonic devices. A matrix of LEDs on a foil combined with a diffuser can be a potential alternative for flexible OLED lighting devices. Preferably, these LEDs are integrated in an unpackaged, bare die form as it reduces cost, footprint and thickness. As a substrate, preferably low cost materials like polyesters (PET) are being used, especially for large area devices. However, the us...

  15. Heat and water transfer in bare topsoil and the lower atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    ten Berge, H.F.M.

    1996-01-01

    This book describes an analysis of processes and factors that affect the energy balance of bare soil, and the associated exchange of heat and moisture at the surface. After a brief treatment of basic transport theory, the processes of soil-atmosphere interaction are expressed in a simulation algorithm. This algorithm provides an instrument to study the 'conditioning' effect of soil on the lower atmosphere, and vice versa. Examples of sensitivity analysis are presented, with emphasis on the be...

  16. Bare-State Time-Evolving Operator Solution to Raman Model in A Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUYing; NIEYi-Zhen; YANGXiao-Xue

    2003-01-01

    We derive exact analytical expressions of time-evolving bare-state operators of level occupation numbers and the photon numbers for a composite system consisting of a three-level atom interacting with two modes ofa quantized electromagnetic field in A configuration. These results demonstrate the oscillations with three-family frequencies for a nonzero detuning, which dramatically differ from the previous results showing only single-family Rabi oscillations.

  17. Occupation of bare habitats, an evolutionary precursor to soil specialization in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, N Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2014-10-21

    Plant soil specialists contribute greatly to global diversity; however, the ecoevolutionary forces responsible for generating this diversity are poorly understood. We integrate molecular phylogenies with descriptive and experimental ecological data, creating a powerful framework with which to elucidate forces driving soil specialization. Hypotheses explaining edaphic specialization have historically focused on costs of adaptation to elements (e.g., nickel, calcium/magnesium) and accompanying tradeoffs in competitive ability in benign soils. We combine in situ microhabitat data for 37 streptanthoid species (Brassicaceae), soil analyses, and competition experiments with their phylogeny to reconstruct selective forces generating serpentine soil endemism, which has four to five independent origins in this group. Coupling ancestral state reconstruction with phylogenetic independent contrasts, we examine the magnitude and timing of changes in soil and habitat attributes relative to inferred shifts to serpentine. We find large changes in soil chemistry at nodes associated with soil shifts, suggesting that elemental changes occurred concomitantly with soil transitions. In contrast, the amount of bare ground surrounding plants in the field ("bareness"), which is greater in serpentine environments, is conserved across soil-type shifts. Thus, occupation of bare environments preceded shifts to serpentine, and may serve as an evolutionary precursor to harsh elemental soils and environments. In greenhouse experiments, taxa from barer environments are poorer competitors, a tradeoff that may contribute to soil endemism. The hypothesis of occupation of bare habitats as a precursor of soil specialization can be tested in other systems with a similar integrative ecophylogenetic approach, thereby providing deeper insights into this rich source of biodiversity. PMID:25267640

  18. Introducing the notion of bare and effective mass via Newton's second law of motion

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2005-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here, I discuss how these concepts may be introduced, at a very early stage, together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion for a sliding block. The setting up of a simple equation for the effective mass will allow instructors to discuss how external paramet...

  19. Low work-function coating for an entirely propellantless bare electrodynamic tether

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, John D.; Sanmartin, Juan R.; Rand, Lauren P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the possibility of a low work-function material, calcium aluminate electride, being used for a coating on a bare electrodynamic tether system. Analyses suggest that the coating would eliminate the need for an active cathodic device like a hollow cathode and, consequently, eliminate the need for an expellant to the hollow cathode, thus resulting in an electrodynamic tether system that requires no consumables. Applications include on-orbit power generation and deorbiting debris fr...

  20. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene dikes in Bare Mountain, southwest Nevada: Implications for regional tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Gillett, S.L.; Karlin, R.E.; Schweickert, R.A. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of N-striking Miocene quartz latite dikes (13.9 Ma), within Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of Bare Mountain, have been conducted in an effort to determine the sense of post-middle Miocene tectonic tilting and rotation in the Bare Mountain region. A total of 56 oriented samples of dikes and wallrocks were collected from Tarantula Canyon (TC) and south of Joshua Hollow (JH), where the dikes intruded N-dipping Mississippian-Devonian limestone beds. Progressive thermal demagnetization and principal component analyses reveal a stable high temperature component of remanent magnetization that is carried by magnetite or hematite in different samples. Petrographic investigations, combined with thermal demagnetization analysis, indicate that magnetite is a primary phase and that hematite is secondary. Hematitic alteration in both wallrocks and dikes is probably hydrothermal following intrusion as the mean direction of both minerals overlap. The in situ mean magnetization directions from all dikes exhibit negative inclinations that correspond to a Tertiary reversed field. The data indicate that magnetization acquisition in the wallrocks and dikes postdates tilting of the beds and the no major remagnetization event has occurred since the intrusion. The results from TC imply that there has been no significant rotation of the northeast part of Bare Mountain since [minus]14 Ma. The authors further suggest that the E-W structural trends of Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks at Bare Mountain are older than the middle Miocene dikes. Paleomagnetic data from dikes of JH show steeper inclinations and westerly declinations compared to the dike of TC. There are two interpretations to explain the differences: The dikes may have formed at different times in the same magmatic event and the directional differences are due to secular variation. Alternatively, the dikes at JH were tilted slightly to the north around a sub-horizontal axis.

  1. Experimental electro-mechanical static characterization of IGBT bare die under controlled temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Belmehdi, Yassine; Azzopardi, Stephane; Delétage, Jean-Yves; Woirgard, Eric

    2010-01-01

    International audience Silicon dice soldered in power assemblies have to withstand simultaneously electrical, thermal and mechanical stress. Mechanical stress is an important issue because it will directly impact on both the device behaviour and power modules reliability. This paper focuses on the electro-mechanical static characterization of a planar gate IGBT by the help of experiments at controlled temperatures. A specific test bench is proposed to make the experiments on silicone bare ...

  2. Survival of icy grains in debris discs. The role of photosputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Anna; Artymowicz, P; Brandeker, A

    2007-01-01

    We put theoretical constraints on the presence and survival of icy grains in debris discs. Particular attention is paid to UV sputtering of water ice, which has so far not been studied in detail in this context. We present a photosputtering model based on available experimental and theoretical studies. We quantitatively estimate the erosion rate of icy and ice-silicate grains, under the influence of both sublimation and photosputtering, as a function of grain size, composition and distance from the star. The effect of erosion on the grain's location is investigated through numerical simulations coupling the grain size to its dynamical evolution. Our model predicts that photodesorption efficiently destroy ice in optically thin discs, even far beyond the sublimation snow line. For the reference case of beta Pictoris, we find that only > 5mm grains can keep their icy component for the age of the system in the 50-150AU region. When taking into account the collisional reprocessing of grains, we show that the water...

  3. Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of coated and bare nickel-based superalloy single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chataigner, E.; Remy, L.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of chromium-aluminum coated [001] single crystals of AM1, a nickel-base superalloy for turbine blades, is studied using a diamond shape cycle from 600 to 1,100 C. Comparison with bare specimens does not show any significant difference in thermal-mechanical fatigue nor in isothermal low cycle fatigue at high temperature. Metallographic observations on fracture surfaces and longitudinal sections of specimens tested to fatigue life or to a definite fraction of expected life have shown that the major crack tends to initiate from casting micropores in the sub-surface area very early in bare and coated specimens, under low cycle fatigue or thermal-mechanical fatigue. But the interaction between oxidation and fatigue cracking seems to play a major role. A simple model proposed by Reuchet and Remy has been identified for this single crystal superalloy. Its application to the life prediction under low cycle fatigue and thermal-mechanical fatigue for bare and coated single crystals with different orientations is shown.

  4. Models for calculating phreatic water evaporation on bare and Tamarix-vegetated lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shunjun; TIAN Changyan; SONG Yudong; CHEN Xiaobing; LI Yuetan

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water consumption of natural vegetation in arid regions.It is an effective approach to study ecological water demand of natural vegetation by phreatic evaporation.In order to study the ecological water demand of Tarim river basin, based on the observation data of phreatic evaporation on bare lands at the Aksu Water Balance Experimental station from 1989 to 1996, by analyzing the relationship of phreatic evaporation,depth of phreatic surface and evaporation of water,taking the limit rate of phreatic evaporation as the control condition, and based on the objective law that the relation between phreatic evaporation and evaporation of water is nonlinear, we establish models for calculating phreatic evaporation on bare land,which can fully reflect the law of phreatic evaporation in the Tarim river basin. According to the data of depth of phreatic surface and soil moisture when pheratic level decline is caused just by evapotranspiration on Tamarix-vegetated land from 2003 to 2004, we calculate the amount of phreatic evaporation and set up models for calculating phreatic evaporation on Tamarix- vegetated land. Phreatic evaporation on bare land and Tamarix-vegetated land could be transformed each other by a Tamarix vegetation conversion coefficient. The test results show that the calculation accuracy of the models is high and the models are suitable for Tarim river basin.

  5. Study of THz surface waves (TSW) on bare and coated metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mufei

    Scope and Method of Study. The focus of the research was to investigate the propagation characteristics (such as field distribution, attenuation and group velocity) of terahertz surface waves on bare and dielectric coated metal surface. The experiment was carried out on a modified standard terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system. Surface waves were coupled into the metal surface using the parallel plate waveguide coupling mechanism. The picosecond terahertz pulses were generated and detected using the Grischkowsky photo-conductive transmitter and antenna driven by a femtosecond laser. Findings and Conclusions. Surface waves at microwave and terahertz frequencies are weakly guided on bare metal surface due to the high metal conductivity. Detailed wave coupling analysis and experiment has shown that on a bare metal surface, the majority of energy remains to be uncoupled freely propagating waves. The spatial extent of the terahertz surface wave collapses two orders of magnitude upon the addition of the sub-wavelength dielectric layer on the metal surface. Simple theory in terahertz range gives an accurate explanation to this effect. Direct experimental measurements of the terahertz surface wave on an aluminum surface covered with a 12.5 mum thick dielectric layer have completely characterized the wave. The measurements of the frequency-dependent exponential fall-off of the evanescent wave from the surface agree well with theory.

  6. Percutaneous Creation of Bare Intervascular Tunnels for Salvage of Thrombosed Hemodialysis Fistulas Without Recanalizable Outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu, E-mail: jjychen@gmail.com [Yuan’s General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Wang, Yen-Chi [E-Da Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Weng, Mei-Jui [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology (China)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThis study aimed to retrospectively assess the efficacy of a bare intervascular tunnel for salvage of a thrombosed hemodialysis fistula. We examined the clinical outcomes and provided follow-up images of the bare intervascular tunnel.Materials and MethodsEight thrombosed fistulas lacked available recanalizable outflow veins were included in this study. These fistulas were salvaged by re-directing access site flow to a new outflow vein through a percutaneously created intervascular tunnel without stent graft placement. The post-intervention primary and secondary access patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method.ResultsThe procedural and clinical success rates were 100 %. Post-intervention primary and secondary access patency at 300 days were 18.7 ± 15.8 and 87.5 ± 11.7 %, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 218.7 days (range 10–368 days). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction 10 days after the procedure. No other major complications were observed. Minor complications, such as swelling, ecchymosis, and pain around the tunnel, occurred in all of the patients.ConclusionsPercutaneous creation of a bare intervascular tunnel is a treatment option for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas without recanalizable outflow in selected patients.

  7. Relating variation of dust on snow to bare soil dynamics in the western United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of desert dust to mountain snow directly impacts the hydrologic cycle and water resource management through the depression of snow albedo and acceleration of snowmelt. However, the key processes that control the variation of dust deposition to snow are poorly understood. Here we relate the bare soil exposure from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data for the period of 2002–2011, with dust loading in snow at downwind mountain sites in southern Colorado, the United States. We found that, for many pixels, remotely sensed fraction of bare soil in the dust-emitting area is significantly correlated with end-of-season dust concentrations in snow, and that the highest number of significantly correlated pixels in the dust-source area corresponds well with the period of peak dust deposition in the mountain snow (April–May). This analysis indicates that surface conditions in the dust-source area may provide first-order controls on emission of dust and deposition of that dust to the mountain snowcover. A preliminary analysis of precipitation records indicates that bare ground cover is strongly affected by prior rainfall in the months preceding the dust-emission season. (letter)

  8. An evaluation of the simulated bare soil evaporation of an atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jan-Peter; Vogel, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Land surface processes have a significant impact on near-surface atmospheric phenomena. They determine, among others, near-surface sensible and latent heat fluxes and the radiation budget, and thus influence atmosphere and land characteristics, such as temperature and humidity, the structure of the planetary boundary layer, and even cloud formation processes. It is therefore important to simulate the land surface processes in atmospheric models as realistically as possible. Verifications have shown that the bare soil evaporation computed by the land surface scheme TERRA of the COSMO atmospheric model is systematically overestimated. Since this flux is part of the surface water and energy balance it affects, for instance, the other components of the turbulent heat fluxes as well as the soil water content and the surface temperature. Data from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Meteorological Service were used to analyse this model behaviour. In the standard model configuration of TERRA, the formulation of bare soil evaporation is based on the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), following the work by R. E. Dickinson. In order to reduce the excessive evaporation simulated by BATS, other formulations for the bare soil evaporation were tested in TERRA. In turned out that a scheme based on a resistance formulation efficiently reduces the simulated vapour flux, leading to a better agreement with the measurements.

  9. The lithification of ultramafic dominated till with magnesium silicate hydrate: a new green concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Lisa; Olav Austrheim, Håkon; Hu, Depan; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Ulven, Ole Ivar

    2016-04-01

    The Feragen Ultramafic Body located near the town of Røros in Eastern Norway gives rise to a unique phenomenon: A lithification process involving natural cement of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H). The ultramafic body is covered with moraine deposits that form tills throughout the area. The tills consist mainly of variably serpentinized ultramafic rock fragments, with additional quartz and feldspar grains transported to the area with the glaciers that formed the till. This provides the exceptional combination of ultramafic and Si-rich rocks. Throughout the area, multiple spots can be found where natural cement has resulted in the lithification of the till, forming tillite. This mainly occurs close to mine tailings of ancient chromium mines, as the mine tunnels provide air flow that increases the evaporation and thus the precipitation of the cement. The Weichselian glaciation constrains the age of the moraines to less than 10 ka and the formation of the concrete related to mine tailings suggests that the lithification took place after the termination of the mining activity in 1927. Thus, the cement is formed in-situ at its current location, indicating that it forms in a subarctic climate. EMP and SEM analysis indicate that the cement is a hydrated magnesium silicate phase, cementing together quartz, feldspar and serpentine grains to form a natural concrete. The cement consist of 31 wt% of MgO and 49 wt% of SiO2. Quartz and feldspar grains are partly dissolved in the concrete while the resulting pore space is filled with cement, indicating that the Si in the cement originated from the quartz and feldspar phases. Weathering of the ultramafic body involves the dissolution of brucite to create a high pH, Mg-rich fluid, which subsequently can dissolve the quartz and be the source for the M-S-H cement. A dissolution-precipitation process involving the dissolution of both brucite and quartz thus results in the formation of the cement. Future TEM analysis should give

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  11. Experimental high strain-rate deformation products of carbonate-silicate rocks: Comparison with terrestrial impact materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bogert, C. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Spray, J. G.

    2008-09-01

    as an individual mineral species, no pure lime was observed to be present. In the quartzite sample, CaO is present only as a component of the Ca- and Ca,Mg-silicates. In the fine-grained shear zone materials, however, elemental mapping and EMP analyses reveal an overall segregation of MgO and CaO [6], suggesting that CaO is mostly present in Casilicates and Ca,Mg-silicates with low MgO contents. Dolomitic marble sample. The dolomitic marble section exhibited thinner, shorter fractures than the quartzite sample. Mechanical twinning was induced by the deformation. The adhered friction products were very fine-grained material with larger, untwinned calcite (Fig. 2), and dendritic carbonates with a composition similar to huntite. Most of the secondary calcite had rounded margins, which suggested that they were molten during the experiment. The dendritic huntite-like carbonate, with a CO2 content higher than of these secondary carbonate grains (Fig. 3). However, calcite was the dominant secondary mineral. The finegrained portion of the shear zone material contained pervasive vesicles. The vesicles immediately adjacent to the secondary calcite grains were smaller than those adjacent to the dolomitic marble. This suggests that incorporation of CO2 near the calcite grains facilitated their growth. Discussion. The textures and compositions of the experimental products indicate that the dolomitic marble decarbonated in response to the high temperatures generated during experimental deformation. Simultaneously, the liberated CaO recombined with CO2 to form molten calcite in the shear zone. This effect, in part, is due to the lower decarbonation temperature for dolomite versus calcite [c.f., 7], which allows calcite to survive at higher temperatures than dolomite. In addition, the confining pressure during the experiment was high enough to allow calcite to be present as a liquid [c.f., 8]. Both the calcite and dendritic carbonate are likely products of back-reaction of CaO and

  12. The Relationship between the Optical Depth of the 9.7 micron Silicate Absorption Feature and Infrared Differential Extinction in Dense Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Chiar, J E; Pendleton, Y J; Boogert, A C A; Greene, T; Knez, C; Lada, C; Roellig, T; Tielens, A G G M; Werner, M; Whittet, D C B

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the relationship between the optical depth of the 9.7 micron silicate absorption feature (tau_9.7) and the near-infrared color excess, E(J-Ks) in the Serpens, Taurus, IC 5146, Chameleon I, Barnard 59, and Barnard 68 dense clouds/cores. Our data set, based largely on Spitzer IRS spectra, spans E(J-Ks)=0.3 to 10 mag (corresponding to visual extinction between about 2 and 60 mag.). All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. Unlike in the diffuse ISM where a tight linear correlation between the 9.7 micron silicate feature optical depth and the extinction (Av) is observed, we find that the silicate feature in dense clouds does not show a monotonic increase with extinction. Thus, in dense clouds, tau_9.7 is not a good measure of total dust column density. With few exceptions, the measured tau_9.7 values fall well below the diffuse ISM correlation line for E(J-Ks) > 2 mag (Av >12 mag). Grain growth via coagulation is a likely cause of this effect.

  13. The Relationship between the Optical Depth of the 9.7 μm Silicate Absorption Feature and Infrared Differential Extinction in Dense Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D. C. B.

    2007-09-01

    We have examined the relationship between the optical depth of the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature (τ9.7) and the near-infrared color excess, E(J-Ks), in the Serpens, Taurus, IC 5146, Chameleon I, Barnard 59, and Barnard 68 dense clouds/cores. Our data set, based largely on Spitzer IRS spectra, spans E(J-Ks)=0.3-10 mag (corresponding to visual extinction between about 2 and 60 mag). All lines of sight show the 9.7 μm silicate feature. Unlike in the diffuse ISM where a tight linear correlation between the 9.7 μm silicate feature optical depth and the extinction (AV) is observed, we find that the silicate feature in dense clouds does not show a monotonic increase with extinction. Thus, in dense clouds, τ9.7 is not a good measure of total dust column density. With few exceptions, the measured τ9.7 values fall well below the diffuse ISM correlation line for E(J-Ks)>2 mag (AV>12 mag). Grain growth via coagulation is a likely cause of this effect.

  14. Quality of rolled barley flakes as affected by batch of grain and processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, B; Abrahamsson, L; Aman, P

    1994-02-01

    Rolled barely flakes were prepared from three different batches of grain by pearling, steaming and rolling. Autoclaved and malted barleys from the three batches were also processed in the same way. Analysis of the nine products showed that both batch of barley and process had significant effects on chemical composition and viscosity. Puddings were prepared from the products and mechanical consistency, juiciness and grain consistency were graded on both newly prepared and heated puddings by a sensory taste panel. Batch of barley had no effect on mechanical consistency but significant effects on juiciness and grain consistency. Type of processing had significant effect on all three parameters for both newly prepared and heated puddings. PMID:8153065

  15. Botanicals as Grain Protectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallappa Rajashekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of food losses during postharvest storage is of paramount economic importance. Integrated pest management is now a widely accepted strategy in pest control including postharvest infestation control which involves the use of chemical (contact/residual insecticides along with fumigants. The use of synthetic chemical insecticides is either not permitted or used restrictively because of the residue problem and health risks to consumers. In view of the above, there is a need for plants that may provide potential alternatives to the currently used insect control agents as they constitute a rich source of bioactive molecules. Available literature indicates that plant could be source for new insecticides. Therefore, there is a great potential for a plant-derived insecticidal compounds. This paper focuses on the current state of the botanical insecticides as grain protectants and its mode of action.

  16. Dynamic atmospheres and winds of cool luminous giants, I. Al$_2$O$_3$ and silicate dust in the close vicinity of M-type AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Höfner, Susanne; Aringer, Bernhard; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    High spatial resolution techniques have given valuable insights into the mass loss mechanism of AGB stars, which presumably involves a combination of atmospheric levitation by pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. Observations indicate that Al$_2$O$_3$ condenses at distances of about 2 stellar radii or less, prior to the formation of silicates. Al$_2$O$_3$ grains are therefore prime candidates for producing the scattered light observed in the close vicinity of several M-type AGB stars, and they may be seed particles for the condensation of silicates at lower temperatures. We have constructed a new generation of Dynamic Atmosphere & Radiation-driven Wind models based on Implicit Numerics (DARWIN), including a time-dependent treatment of grain growth & evaporation for both Al$_2$O$_3$ and Fe-free silicates (Mg$_2$SiO$_4$). The equations describing these dust species are solved in the framework of a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamical model for the atmosphere & wind s...

  17. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    OpenAIRE

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains a...

  18. Grain Flow at High Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSaveney, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The transport mechanism of rapid long-runout rock avalanches was a hotly debated topic when I came on the scene in 1967. So how come it is still debated today? My explanation is that it is the expected outcome of peer review, poor comprehension, and technological advances outpacing intellectual advances. Why think about the problem when we can model it! So let us think about the problem. Shreve thought that rock avalanches fell upon and trapped a layer of air. What physics was he thinking about? It is how feathers and tissue papers fall. When my rock avalanches fly, they fly like unlubricated bricks using the physics of projectiles and ballistics. But the main transport mechanism is not flight. The dominant impression from watching a rock avalanche in motion is of fluid flow, as Heim described it in 1882. A rock avalanche is a very large grain flow. Bagnold studied dispersive grain flows, but why should one assume that rock avalanches are dispersive grain flows as many do. The more common grain flow type is a dense grain flow and rock avalanches are dense grain flows in which the weight can and does generate very high stresses at grain contacts. Brittle rock deforms elastically up to its compressive strength, whereupon it breaks, releasing elastic strain as transient elastic strain (seismic energy to a seismologist, acoustic energy to a physicist). Melosh and others have shown that acoustic energy can fluidize a grain mass. There is no exotic physics behind grain flow at high stress. When grains break, the released elastic strain has to go somewhere, and it goes somewhere principally by transmission though grain contacts. Depending on the state of stress at the grain contact, the contact will pass the stress or will slip at conventional values of Coulomb friction. Enough thinking! A physical model of the entire process is too big for any laboratory. So whose numerical model will do it?

  19. Solar wind helium, neon and argon released by oxidation of metal grains from the Weston chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R. H.; Rajan, R. S.; Rambaldi, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A set of experiments were carried out to test the feasibility of determining unfractionated elemental and isotopic ratios for the noble gases in the presumably ancient solar wind present in the gas rich meteorites. The problems of diffusive loss was avoided by analyzing metal rather than the usual silicates. In order to avoid chemical, and even harsh physical, treatment of the sample, which might have affected the surfaces of metal grains, a means of analyzing the metal in the presence of residual silicate not removed by gentle crushing and magnetic separation was devised. Preliminary results given were obtained by taking advantage of the differing properties of metal and silicates with regard to diffusion. The results suggests that, with some modifications in the choice of pyrolysis and combustion temperatures and in the amount of O2 used, it should be possible, by oxidizing the surfaces of metal grains from gas rich meteorites, to obtain data on solar wind that has not been fractionated by diffusive loss.

  20. Behaviour of Silicate Melts in Respect of Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金民; 叶大年

    1989-01-01

    The volumes per oxygen of some silicate melts have been calculated and then compared with those of silicate glasses.It is suggested that the volume of a silicate melt can be divided into two parts.One is contri buted by the silicon-oxygen network and the other by the “oxides”.Variation patterns of VPOs suggest that the volume of the Si-O network generally remains unchanged and the expansion of the melt is caused mainly by the locat expansion of the “oxides”.It is further proposed that the radius of O2- shows little variation,in striking contrast to the radius of cations.The mechanism governing the expansion is discussed in detail.

  1. Effect of Minor Elements on Silicate Cement Clinker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Congyun; ZHANG Mingfei; ZHANG Meixiang; LONG Shizong; CHEN Yuankui; MA Baoguo

    2005-01-01

    The effect of rare-earth and HX addition agent on the burn-ability of silicate cement clinker was investigated by orthogonal experiment. The result shows, compared with blank sample, f- CaO of the samples added with rare-earth and HX agent drops by 84.95% , its 3d and 28d compressive strength enhances by 24.40%and 16.90%, respectively. It was discovered by means of X-ray diffraction and high temperature microscope analysis that sintering temperature of the sample added with rare-earth and HX addition agent is about 1320℃. At the same time, the burning temperature of tricalcium silicate desends and its crystal growth forming-rate increases.Tricalcium silicate content in burning clinker is higher and its crystal is larger.

  2. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  3. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-O and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures.Therefore,those silicates may be named titano- and zircono-silicates.Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra,the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet,respectively.As a new concept,the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  4. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  5. Calcined sodium silicate as solid base catalyst for biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng; Peng, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Jian-Ying; Xiu, Zhi-Long [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, School of Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-03-15

    This paper examined the use of calcined sodium silicate as a novel solid base catalyst in the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol. The calcined sodium silicate was characterized by DTA-TG, Hammett indicator method, XRD, SEM, BET, IR and FT-IR. It catalyzed the transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel with a yield of almost 100% under the following conditions: sodium silicate of 3.0 wt.%, a molar ratio of methanol/oil of 7.5:1, reaction time of 60 min, reaction temperature of 60 C, and stirring rate of 250 rpm. The oil containing 4.0 wt.% water or 2.5 wt.% FFA could also be transesterified by using this catalyst. The catalyst can be reused for at least 5 cycles without loss of activity. (author)

  6. Charging of small grains in a space plasma: Application to Jovian stream particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhanoev, A. R.; Schmidt, J.; Liu, X.; Spahn, F.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Most theoretical investigations of dust charging processes in space have treated the current balance condition as independent of grain size. However, for small grains, since they are often observed in space environments, a dependence on grain size is expected owing to secondary electron emission (SEE). Here, by the term "small" we mean a particle size comparable to the typical penetration depth for given primary electron energy. The results are relevant for the dynamics of small, charged dust particles emitted by the volcanic moon Io, which forms the Jovian dust streams. Aims: We revise the theory of charging of small (submicron sized) micrometeoroids to take into account a high production of secondary electrons for small grains immersed in an isotropic flux of electrons. We apply our model to obtain an improved estimate for the charge of the dust streams leaving the Jovian system, detected by several spacecraft. Methods: We apply a continuum model to describe the penetration of primary electrons in a grain and the emission of secondary electrons along the path. Averaging over an isotropic flux of primaries, we derive a new expression for the secondary electron yield, which can be used to express the secondary electron current on a grain. Results: For the Jupiter plasma environment we derive the surface potential of grains composed of NaCl (believed to be the major constituent of Jovian dust stream particles) or silicates. For small particles, the potential depends on grain size and the secondary electron current induces a sensitivity to material properties. As a result of the small particle effect, the estimates for the charging times and for the fractional charge fluctuations of NaCl grains obtained using our general approach to SEE give results qualitatively different from the analogous estimates derived from the traditional approach to SEE. We find that for the charging environment considered in this paper field emission does not limit the charging of

  7. Ionizing radiation for insect control in grain and grain products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical review summarizes and discusses information on various aspects of the use of ionizing radiation for the control of insect infestation in grains and grain products. Topics include: the effects of ionizing radiation on insects infesting stored-grain products; the 2 main types of irradiators (electron accelerators; radioisotopes (e.g.: Co-60; Cs-137); dosimetry systems and methodology; variations in radiation resistance by stored-product pests; the proper selection of radiation dose; the effects of combining various treatments (temperature, infrared/microwave radiation, hypoxia, chemicals) with ionizing radiation; sublethal radiation for controlling bulk grain insects; the feeding capacity of irradiated insects; the susceptibility of insecticide-resistant insects to ionizing radiation; and the possible resistance of insects to ionizing radiation. Practical aspects of removing insects from irradiated grain also are discussed

  8. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  9. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  10. Coordinated Isotopic and Mineral Characterization of Highly Fractionated 18O-Rich Silicates in the Queen Alexandra Range 99177 CR3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain a mixture of solar system condensates, pre-solar grains, and primitive organic matter. Each of these materials record conditions and processes in different regions of the solar nebula, on the meteorite parent body, and beyond the solar system. Oxygen isotopic studies of meteorite components can trace interactions of distinct oxygen isotopic reservoirs in the early solar system and secondary alteration processes. The O isotopic compositions of the earliest solar system condensates fall along a carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mineral (CCAM) line of slope approximately 1 in a plot of delta 17O against delta 18O. This trend is attributed to mixing of material from 16O-poor and 16O-rich reservoirs. Secondary processing can induce mass-dependent fractionation of the O isotopes, shifting these compositions along a line of slope approximately 0.52. Substantial mass-dependent fractionation of O isotopes has been observed in secondary minerals in CAIs, calcite, and FUN inclusions. These fractionations were caused by significant thermal or aqueous alteration. We recently reported the identification of four silicate grains with extremely fractionated O isotopic ratios (delta 18O equals 37 - 55 per mille) in the minimally altered CR3 chondrite QUE 99177. TEM analysis of one grain indicates it is a nebular condensate that did not experience substantial alteration. The history of these grains is thus distinct from those of the aforementioned fractionated materials. To constrain the origin of the silicate grains, we conducted further Mg and Fe isotopic studies and TEM analyses of two grains.

  11. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  12. Mathematical Viscosity Models for Ternary Metallic and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yuan-kun; MENG Xian-min; GUO Han-jie

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical viscosity models for metallic melts were discussed. The experimental data of Ag-Au-Cu systems were used to verify the models based on Chou's general geometric thermodynamic model and the calculated results are consistent with the reported experimental data. A new model predicting the viscosity of multi-component silicate melts was established. The CaO-MnO-SiO2, CaO-FeO-SiO2 and FeO-MnO-SiO2 silicate slag systems were used to verify the model.

  13. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  14. Aluminum-silicates flotation with quaternary ammonium salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王毓华; 胡岳华; 陈湘清

    2003-01-01

    The zeta potential measurements show that the flotation separation of diaspore from kaolinite, illite and pyrophyllite could be achieved in the range of pH 46.5 with cationic collectors. A special quaternary ammonium salts(DTAL) shows better selectivity than that the dodecyl amine(DDA) does for the flotation of three silicates. The closed-circuit flotation results show that the reverse flotation de-silicate can be achieved with DTAL as collector, a new inorganic reagent(SFL) as depressant and MIBC as frother to obtain a bauxite concentrate m(Al2O3)/m(SiO2)>10, Al2O3 recovery>86%).

  15. High-Q bismuth silicate nonlinear glass microsphere resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Ganapathy; Lee, Timothy; Ding, Ming; Brambilla, Gilberto; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Koizumi,Fumihito; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a bismuth-silicate glass microsphere resonator has been demonstrated. At wavelengths near 1550 nm, high-modes can be efficiently excited in a 179-μm diameter bismuth-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of circa 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as were observed. The dependence of the spectral response on variations in the input power level was studied in detail to gain an insight in...

  16. Lead Silicate Glass Microsphere Resonators With Absorption-Limited Q

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Genapathy; Lee, Timothy; Feng, Xian; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Loh, Wei; Brambilla, Gilberto; Wilkinson, James; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a lead-silicate glass microsphere resonator. We show that at the wavelengths near 1555 nm high Q modes can be efficiently excited from a 109 μm diameter lead-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as 0.9×107 were observed. This is very close to the theoretical material-limited Q-factor and is the highest Q-factor reported so far from a non...

  17. The Antinutritional Components of Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Krogh; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Grains provide humans and farmed animals with a very large proportion of the energy and macro- and micronutrients they need. Unfortunately, grains also contain compounds that interfere with the utilization of the nutrients by animals. These so-called antinutritionals may result in poor resource...

  18. Core Formation Timescale, Silicate-Metal Equilibration, and W Diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Q.; Jacobsen, B.; Tinker, D.; Lesher, C.

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which material accreted to the proto-Earth and segregated to form the core was chemically and isotopically equilibrated with the silicate mantle is an outstanding problem in planetary science. This is particularly important when attempting to assign a meaningful age for planetary accretion and core formation based on Hf-W isotope systematics. The Earth and other terrestrial planets likely formed by accretion of previously differentiated planetesimals. For the planetesimals themselves the most important energy source for metal-silicate differentiation is the combined radioactive heating due to decay of 26Al (half-life 0.7 Ma) and 60Fe (half-life 1.5 Ma). It is expected that the fractionation of Hf and W during planetesimal core formation will lead to a divergence in the W isotopic compositions of the core and silicate portions of these bodies. This expectation is supported by the enormously radiogenic 182W signatures reported for basaltic eucrites. The observation that the W isotopic compositions of the silicate portions of Earth, Moon and Mars are similar and markedly less radiogenic than eucrites suggests that during planet accretion the pre-differentiated metallic core material containing low 182W must have equilibrated extensively with the more radiogenic (high 182W) silicate material to subdue the ingrowth of 182W in the silicate mantle of the planets. The standard theory of planet formation predicts that after runaway and oligarchic growth, the late stage of planet formation is characterized by impact and merging of Mars-sized objects. This is a tremendously energetic process estimated to raise the temperature of the proto-Earth to about 7000K (a temperature equivalent to a mass spectrometer's plasma source, which indiscriminately ionizes all incoming elements). After the giant impacts, the proto-Earth had a luminosity and surface temperature close to a low mass star for a brief period of time. Stevenson (1990) argued that emulsification caused

  19. Seed particle formation for silicate dust condensation by SiO nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail, H.-P.; Wetzel, S.; Pucci, A.; Tamanai, A.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Dust formation in stellar outflows is initiated by the formation of some seed particles that form the growth centres for macroscopic dust grains. The nature of the seed particles for silicate dust in stellar outflows with an oxygen-rich element mixture is still an open question. Clustering of the abundant SiO molecules has been discussed several times as a possible mechanism and investigated both theoretically and by laboratory experiments. The initial results seemed to indicate, however, that condensation temperatures obtained by model calculations based on this mechanism are significant lower than what is really observed, which renders SiO nucleation unlikely. Aims: This negative result strongly rests on experimental data on the vapour pressure of SiO. The case for SiO nucleation may be not as bad as it previously seemed and needs to be discussed again because new determinations of the vapour pressure of SiO molecules over solid SiO have shown the older data on SiO vapour pressure to be seriously in error. Here we aim to check again the possibility that SiO nucleation triggers the cosmic silicate dust formation in light of improved new data. Methods: First we present results of our measurements of vapour pressure of solid SiO. Second, we use the improved vapour pressure data to recalibrate existing experimental data on SiO nucleation from the literature. Third, we use the recalibrated data on SiO nucleation in a simple model program for dust-driven winds to determine the condensation temperature of silicate in stellar outflows from AGB stars. Results: Our measurements extend the temperature range of measurements for the vapour pressure to lower temperatures and pressures than ever before. This improves the reliability of the required extrapolation from the temperature range where laboratory data can be obtained to the temperature range where circumstellar dust condensation is observed. We determine an analytical fit for the nucleation rate of SiO from

  20. Coarse Grained Quantum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Agon, Cesar; Kasko, Skyler; Lawrence, Albion

    2014-01-01

    We consider coarse graining a quantum system divided between short distance and long distance degrees of freedom, which are coupled by the Hamiltonian. Observations using purely long distance observables can be described by the reduced density matrix that arises from tracing out the short-distance observables. The dynamics of this density matrix is that of an open quantum system, and is nonlocal in time, on the order of some short time scale. We describe these dynamics in a model system with a simple hierarchy of energy gaps $\\Delta E_{UV} > \\Delta E_{IR}$, in which the coupling between high-and low-energy degrees of freedom is treated to second order in perturbation theory. We then describe the equations of motion under suitable time averaging, reflecting the limited time resolution of actual experiments, and find an expansion of the master equation in powers of $\\Delta E_{IR}/\\Delta E_{UV}$, in which the failure of the system to be Hamiltonian or even Markovian appears at higher orders in this ratio. We com...

  1. Urbanization and Grain Production Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyang; LI; Dongge; LIU

    2015-01-01

    Based on DEA-Malmquist method,this paper calculated the integrated technology efficiency of grain production and total factor productivity and analyzed factors influencing the grain production technology efficiency using working documents of panel structure. Research results indicate that grain production integrated technology efficiency of China is relatively low,technology utilization level is low,and it remains at the stage of decreasing returns to scale,and the pure technology efficiency still has space to increase. Total factor productivity is declining and the total factor productivity of many provinces is relatively low. Since the total factor productivity of eastern areas is higher than central and western areas,it is required to strengthen technological support for grain production. The implementation of urbanization is helpful for promoting increase of grain production technology efficiency in central and eastern areas,but it will exert negative influence on western areas.

  2. Autonomous grain combine control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

    2013-06-25

    A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

  3. EAARL-B coastal topography: Fire Island, New York, pre-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: seamless (bare earth and submerged)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Wayne; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Klipp, Emily S.; Troche, Rodolfo J.; Fredericks, Alexandra M.; Masessa, Melanie L.; Nagle, David B.

    2014-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography datasets were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, Florida.

  4. Effect of Laser Power on Atom Probe Tomography of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Diercks, D.

    2011-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is an emerging analytical method that has the potential to produce nm-scale spatial resolution of atom positions with ppm-level detection limits. Until recently, APT has been limited to analysis of conducting samples due to the high pulsed electrical fields previously required. The recent development of laser-assisted APT now allows much lower laser powers to be used, opening the door to analysis of geologic minerals. The potential applications are many, ranging from diffusion profiles to the distribution of nano-phases to grain boundary chemical properties. We reported the first analysis of natural olivine using APT last year (Parman et al, 2010). While the spatial resolution was good (nm-scale), the accuracy of the compositional analysis was not. Two of the primary barriers to accurate ion identification in APT are: 1) Specimen overheating - This is caused by the interaction of the laser with the low thermal conductivity insulating specimens. Ions are assumed to have left the surface of the sample at the time the laser is pulsed during the analysis (laser pulse width = 12 ps). If the laser power is too high, the surface remains heated for an appreciable time (greater than 5 ns in some cases) after the laser pulse, causing atoms to field evaporate from the surface well after the laser pulse. Since they hit the detector later than the atoms that were released during the pulse, they are interpreted to be higher mass. Thus overheating appears in the analysis as a smearing of mass/charge peaks to higher mass/charge ratios (thermal tails). For well separated peaks, this is not a substantial problem, but for closely spaced peaks, overheating causes artificial mass interferences. 2) Molecular evaporation or clustering - This is also caused by overheating by the laser. Ideally, atoms are field evaporated individually from the surface of the cylindrical specimen. However, if the absorbed energy is high enough, clusters of atoms will be formed

  5. Non-conservative controls on distribution of dissolved silicate in Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    Cochin backwater system was studied with regard to dissolved silicate (DSi) to understand its seasonal distribution and behaviour during estuarine mixing. Silicate had a linear relationship with salinity during the high river discharge period...

  6. Benthic metabolism and denitrification in a river reach: a comparison between vegetated and bare sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi VIAROLI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at comparing biogeochemical processes in a Vallisneria spiralis meadow and in unvegetated sediments in the upper reach of the Mincio River (Northern Italy. The main hypothesis of this work is that meadows of rooted macrophytes affect benthic metabolism, enhancing capacity to retain nutrients (assimilation and dissipate (denitrification nitrogen loadings. In order to highlight how plants affect benthic processes in the riverbed, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP and inorganic nitrogen fluxes, together with denitrification rates, were measured from February to November 2007 in intact cores collected from stands of V. spiralis and bare sediments. V. spiralis biomass, elemental composition and growth rates were concurrently measured. Macrophyte biomass ranged from 60 to 120 g m-2 (as dry matter; growth rates followed a seasonal pattern from 0.001 in winter up to 0.080 d-1 in summer. On an annual basis, the macrophyte meadow was autotrophic with net O2 production and dissolved inorganic carbon uptake, while the bare sediment was net heterotrophic. The concurrent N assimilation by macrophytes and losses through denitrification led to similar N uptake/dissipation rates, up to 2500 mmol m-2 y-1. Under the very high NO3 - concentrations of the Mincio River, the competition between primary production and denitrification processes was also avoided. A significant ammonium regeneration from sediments to the water column occurred in the V. spiralis meadow, where plant debris and particulate matter accumulated. Here, SRP was also released into the water column, whilst in the bare sediment SRP fluxes were close to zero. Overall, V. spiralis affected the benthic metabolism enhancing the ecosystem capacity to control nitrogen contamination. However, the actual N removal rates were not sufficient to mitigate the pollution discharge.

  7. Survival of Ancylostoma caninum on bare ground, pea gravel, and concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D L

    1975-12-01

    Studies were done to determine the survival of infective Ancylostoma caninum 3rd-stage larvae on 3 ground covers commonly used in dog run construction: bare ground, pea gravel, and concrete. Changes in numbers of recovered larvae were compared to meterologic data and the most significant weather variables were determined. Larvae were recovered 1 to 7 days on bare ground. Larvae survived longer in the fecal mass (mean of 3 days) than on the bare ground (mean of 2 days). Rain was the most significant variable, in that it was positive in its effects (higher larval count) early in the experiment (causing fecal mass breakdown and release of larvae) and negative (lower larval count) later in the experiment (spreading larvae away from test site). Larvae were also recovered 1 to 7 days on pea gravel. They were recovered for a mean 2.6 days from the fecal sample, a mean of 1.5 days from the rocks directly below the fecal mass, and a mean of 1.3 days from the remaining rocks. Here also, rain was the most significant weather factor. It was negatively significant (lower larval count) for the fecal mass (spreading of the larvae) and positive for those in the pebbles (increasing the moisture in the pebbles). Survival time of larvae on concrete was shorter than that on the other 2 substrates: from 0 to 2 days. Larvae were recovered a mean of 1.3 days from the fecal mass and a mean of 0., days from the surrounding concrete. Rain was positively significant early in the experiments in that it released trapped larvae from the fecal mass. Sunlight consistently was negatively significant (lower larval count) due to its lethality to the unprotected larvae.

  8. Methods of assessing grain-size distribution during grain growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweed, Cherry J.; Hansen, Niels; Ralph, Brian

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers methods of obtaining grain-size distributions and ways of describing them. In order to collect statistically useful amounts of data, an automatic image analyzer is used, and the resulting data are subjected to a series of tests that evaluate the differences between two related...... distributions (before and after grain growth). The distributions are measured from two-dimensional sections, and both the data and the corresponding true three-dimensional grain-size distributions (obtained by stereological analysis) are collected. The techniques described here are illustrated by reference to...

  9. Exploring the Role of Sub-micron Sized Dust Grains in the Atmospheres of Red L0 - L6 Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Hiranaka, Kay; Douglas, Stephanie T; Marley, Mark S; Baldassare, Vivienne F

    2016-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis that the red near-infrared colors of some L dwarfs could be explained by a "dust haze" of small particles in their upper atmospheres. This dust haze would exist in conjunction with the clouds found in dwarfs with more typical colors. We developed a model which uses Mie theory and the Hansen particle size distributions to reproduce the extinction due to the proposed dust haze. We apply our method to 23 young L dwarfs and 23 red field L dwarfs. We constrain the properties of the dust haze including particle size distribution and column density using Markov-Chain Monte Carlo methods. We find that sub-micron range silicate grains reproduce the observed reddening. Current brown dwarf atmosphere models include large grain (1--100~$\\mu m$) dust clouds but not submicron dust grains. Our results provide a strong proof of concept and motivate a combination of large and small dust grains in brown dwarf atmosphere models.

  10. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Charles Y., E-mail: charles.kim@duke.edu; Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  11. Clinical outcomes with drug-eluting and bare-metal stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Della Riva, Diego;

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the relative safety and efficacy of different drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) using a network meta-analysis.......The authors investigated the relative safety and efficacy of different drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) using a network meta-analysis....

  12. Space demostration of bare electrodynamic tape-tether technology on the sounding rocket S520-25

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; Watanabe, Takeo; Sahara, Hironori; Kojima, Hirohisa; Takehara, Shoichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Susumu; Abe, Takumi; Tanaka, Koji; Oyama, Khoichiro; Jhonson, Les; Khazanov, V.; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón; Charro, Mario; Kruijff, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    A spaceflight validation of bare electro dynamic tape tether technology was conducted. A S520-25 sounding rocket was launched successfully at 05:00am on 31 August 2010 and successfully deployed 132.6m of tape tether over 120 seconds in a ballistic flight. The electrodynamic performance of the bare tape tether employed as an atmospheric probe was measured. Flight results are introduced through the present progressive report of the demonstration and the results of flight experiment are ex...

  13. T-REX: Bare electro-dynamic tape-tether technology experimetn on sounding rocket S520

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takeo; Fujii, Hironori; Kusagaya, Tairo; Sahara, Hironori; Kojima, Hirohisa; Takehara, Shoichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Susumu; Abe, Takumi; Tanaka, Koji; Oyama, Khoichiro; Ebinuma, Takuji; Johson, Les; Khazanov, George; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2012-01-01

    The project to verify the performance of space tether technology was successfully demonstrated by the launch of the sounding rocket S520 the 25tu. The project is the space demonstration of science and engineering technologies of a bare tape electrodynamic tether (EDT) in the international campaign between Japan, USA, Europe and Australia. Method of "Inverse ORIGAMI (Tape tether folding)" was employed in order to deploy the bare tape EDT in a short period time of the suborbital flight. The ...

  14. Collision of Bare Ion Si14+ with the Same Z Slow-atom Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We present the collision of bare ion Si14+ with the same Z slow-atom Si. It is shown that the cold-atom collisions are sensitive to the potential. In this paper, we present the cross sectiond for the most important transition from the 3p13d1 and 3p14d1 excited states. It is seen that there are large cross sections when the angle is larger than 80 degrees. With increasing energy, the cross section becomes decresasingly flat.PACS numbers:34.70.+e, 32.80. Fb

  15. Universal, geometry-driven hydrophobic behaviour of bare metal nanowire clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A parallel array of isolated metal nanowires is expected to be hydrophilic. We show, however, that a clustering of such nanowires brought about by vacuum drying produces a 'dual-scale roughness' and confers a strongly hydrophobic property to the surface. The mean size of the nanowire clusters as well as the contact angle are both found to be related to the wire length, and the critical wire length above which the surface becomes hydrophobic is ∼10 μm. Surface roughness is generally known to enhance water-repellent properties, but this is the first report of roughness-induced hydrophobicity on a bare (uncoated) metallic surface

  16. Use of TerraSAR-X data to retrieve soil moisture over bare soil agricultural fields

    OpenAIRE

    Baghdadi, N.; Aubert, M.; Zribi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The retrieval of the bare soil moisture content from TerraSAR-X data is discussed using empirical approaches. Two cases were evaluated: 1) one image at low or high incidence angle and 2) two images, one at low incidence and one at high incidence. This study shows by using three databases collected between 2008 and 2010 over two study sites in France (Orgeval and Villamblain) that TerraSAR-X is a good remote sensing tool for the retrieving of surface soilmoisture with accuracy of about 3% (rms...

  17. Low-frequency noise in bare SOI wafers: Experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-11-01

    Low-frequency noise (LFN) measurements are largely used for interface quality characterization in MOSFETs. In this work, a detailed investigation of LFN technique applied to pseudo-MOSFETs in bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates is provided. A physical model capable to describe the experimental results is proposed and validated using different die areas and inter-probe distances. The effective silicon area contributing to the noise signal, the impact of defects induced by probes and the possibility to extract interface trap density are addressed.

  18. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita;

    2011-01-01

    , and pK+ are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy–Chapman–Stern triple-layer model...... of the electrochemical double layer coupling these two equilibrium models. To validate our model, we used both pH-sensitive dye-based capillary filling experiments as well as electro-osmotic current-monitoring measurements. Using our model we predict the dependence of ζ potential, surface charge density, and capillary...

  19. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  20. Safety and efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents for bare-metal in-stent restenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Hideaki [Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Mahmoudi, Michael [University of Surrey, Guildford Road, Surrey, GU2-7XH (United Kingdom); Torguson, Rebecca; Satler, Lowell F.; Suddath, William O.; Pichard, Augusto D. [Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Waksman, Ron, E-mail: ron.waksman@medstar.net [Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of the everolimus-eluting stents (EES) with the paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) and sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) for the treatment of bare-metal in-stent restenosis. Background: The optimal treatment for bare-metal in-stent restenosis remains controversial. Methods: The study cohort comprised 322 consecutive patients (543 lesions) who presented with bare-metal in-stent restenosis to our institution and underwent coronary artery stent implantation with EES (114 patients; 181 lesions), PES (65 patients; 116 lesions) and SES (143 patients; 246 lesions). The analyzed clinical parameters were the 1-year rates of death, Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI), target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR), definite stent thrombosis (ST) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as the composite of death, MI, or TLR at 1-year. Results: The three groups were well matched for the conventional risk factors except for age and chronic kidney disease. The 1-year analyzed clinical parameters were similar in the three groups: death (EES = 3.5%, PES = 4.6%, SES = 4.2%; p = 0.94), MI (EES = 3.5%, PES = 6.3%, SES = 2.1%; p = 0.31), TLR (EES = 9.8%, PES = 9.5%, SES = 5.7%; p = 0.42), TVR (EES = 14.3%, PES = 11.1%, SES = 11.3%; p = 0.74), definite ST (EES = 0.9%, PES = 3.1%, SES = 3.5%; p = 0.38) and MACE (EES = 14.0%, PES = 15.4%, SES = 10.5%; p = 0.54). Male gender (hazard ratio = 0.47; 95% confidence interval = 0.25–0.88) and number of treated lesions (hazard ratio = 1.47; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–2.05) were found to be independent predictors of MACE. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that EES may provide similar safety and efficacy as first generation DES for the treatment of patients presenting with bare-metal in-stent restenosis.

  1. Inversion of dielectric constant and moisture of bare soil surface from backscattering coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗谦; 冯孔豫

    1997-01-01

    An inverse method of dielectric constant and moisture of bare wet soil surface from backscattering coefficients is presented, which is based upon the small perturbation model of electromagnetic wave scattering from rough surfaces and the empirical and dielectric mixing models of wet soil. Some sets of curves which describe the relation between the moisture of soil and the ratio of like polarization backscattering coefficients σvv and σhh are obtained, and some principles on how to choose the incident frequencies and the incident angles of the electromagnetic wave are given Analysis and calculation show that the mam advantage of this inverse method is its efficiency and simplicity.

  2. Numerical solution of uncertain neutron diffusion equation for imprecisely defined homogeneous triangular bare reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nayak; S Chakraverty

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, neutron diffusion equation of a triangular homogeneous bare reactor with uncertain parameters has been investigated. Here the involved parameters viz. geometry of the reactor, diffusion coefficient and absorption coefficient, etc. are uncertain and these are considered as fuzzy. Fuzzy values are handled through limit method which was defined for interval computations. The concept of fuzziness is hybridised with traditional finite element method to propose fuzzy finite element method. The proposed fuzzy finite element method has been used to obtain the uncertain eigenvalues of the said problem. Further these uncertain eigenvalues are compared with the traditional finite element method in special cases.

  3. Moss cushions facilitate water and nutrient supply for plant species on bare limestone pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand; Hammer, Kathrine

    2012-01-01

    Dense moss cushions of different size are distributed across the bare limestone pavements on Øland, SE Sweden. Increasing cushion size is predicted to physically protect and improve performance and colonization by vascular plants. Therefore, we tested water balance, phosphorus supply, and species...... desiccation. Phosphorus concentrations increased stepwise and four-fold from detritus to surface mosses and to vascular plants, and all three pools increased with cushion size. We conclude that cushion mosses and cushion size play a critical role in this resource-limited limestone environment by offering...

  4. A Simulating Experiment in the Process of Soil Erosion on Bare Land in Mt. Tanakami

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; HU Ke; WANG Xikui; Akitsu KIMOTO; Takahisa MIZUYAMA

    2001-01-01

    In order to understand the process of surface erosion and acquire basic data of conditions on hillslope without vege tation, a sprinkling experiment is conducted on a bare slope in Mt. Tanakami in the central part of Japan. Based on the mea surements of runoff, mean soil erosion depth, and sediment yield, etc. , the results suggest the following characteristics in the process of surface erosion in the experimental area. (1) The occurrence of sediment discharge is interrupted; (2) Surface runoff is a saturated overland flow; (3) The mean soil erosion depth is thick compared with other areas in Mt. Tanakami;(4) Sediment discharge process is detachment- limited.

  5. A case report of very late stent thrombosis after bare-metal stent implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Adem Tatlısu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stent thrombosis is undesirable complication after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI, despite contemporary concepts of stents and antiplatelet therapy. Stent thrombosis (ST is defined by the Academic Research Concortium as: early (1 year. Risk of very late stent thrombosis is considerably higher in patients with drug-eluting stents (DES, owing to delayed endothelialization. There are several cases very late ST after bare-metal stent (BMS implantation. Our patient presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction on account of BMS thrombosis 14 years after the implantation.

  6. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  7. Calorimetric signature of structural heterogeneity in a ternary silicate glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Yang, G.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural heterogeneity in a silicate glass by hyperquenching–annealing–calorimetry approach. The results show a striking phenomenon: two separated sub-Tg relaxation peaks appear on the calorimetric curve of the hyperquenched CaO–MgO–SiO2 glass, implying the existence of two...

  8. On the Dissolution Behavior of Sulfur in Ternary Silicate Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Park, Joo Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Sulfur dissolution behavior, in terms of sulfide capacity ( C S), in ternary silicate slags (molten oxide slags composed of MO - NO - SiO2, where M and N are Ca, Mn, Fe, and Mg), is discussed based on available experimental data. Composition dependence of the sulfur dissolution, at least in the dilute region of sulfur, may be explained by taking into account the cation-anion first-nearest-neighbor (FNN) interaction (stability of sulfide) and the cation-cation second-nearest-neighbor (SNN) interaction over O anion (oxygen proportions in silicate slags). When the Gibbs energy of a reciprocal reaction MO + NS = MS + NO is positive, the sulfide capacity of slags with virtually no SiO2 or low SiO2 concentration decreases as the concentration of MO increases. However, in some slags, as SiO2 concentration increases, replacing NO by MO at a constant SiO2 concentration may increase sulfide capacity when the basicity of NO is less than that of MO. This phenomenon is observed as rotation of iso- C S lines in ternary silicate slags, and it is explained by simultaneous consideration of the stability of sulfide and oxygen proportions in the silicate slags. It is suggested that a solution model for the prediction of sulfide capacity should be based on the actual dissolution mechanism of sulfur rather than on the simple empirical correlation.

  9. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author)

  10. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  11. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    OpenAIRE

    Skaug, V; Davies, R.; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells.

  12. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  13. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  14. Silicate karst associated with lateritic formations (examples from eastern Niger)

    OpenAIRE

    Sponholz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Silicate and iron crust karst pits and sinkholes in eastern Niger are filled with reworked lateritic sediments or with unconsolidated palaeosoils and aeolian deposits. The fillings facies depend on the environmental conditions during deposition. Geomorphological and sedimentological studies on the karst fillings and the interpretation of various karst/filling associations allow an approach to the chronology of landscape development in eastern Niger plateaus.

  15. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  16. Thermodynamic consistencies and anomalies among end-member silicate garnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    Materials with the garnet crystal structure include silicate minerals of importance both in geology, on account of their use in geothermobarometry, and industrially as abrasives. As a consequence of the former, there is considerable published thermodynamic information concerning them. We here examine this thermodynamic information for end-member silicate garnets (some of which are synthetic since not all occur in nature) for consistencies and anomalies, using thermodynamic relations between thermodynamic properties that we have established over recent years. The principal properties of interest are formula volume, heat capacity, entropy, formation enthalpy (from which the Gibbs energy may be obtained), and isothermal compressibility. A significant observation is that the ambient-temperature heat capacities of the silicate garnets are rather similar, whereas their ambient-temperature entropies are roughly proportional to their formula volumes. Evaluation of their Debye temperatures implies that their vibrational contributions to heat capacity are fully excited at ambient temperatures. The relatively small isothermal compressibilities of these garnets is related to the rigidity of their constituent silicate tetrahedra. We here establish additive single-ion values for each of the thermodynamic properties, which may be applied in estimating corresponding values for related materials.

  17. Nd3+ Doped Silicate Glass Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lu-Yun; CHEN Dan-Ping; XIA Jin-An; WANG Chen; JIANG Xiong-Wei; ZHU Cong-Shan; QIU Jian-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ We report on the fabrication of two kinds of large core area Nd3+ doped silicate glass photonic crystal fibres, and demonstration of the fibre waveguiding properties. The measured minimum loss of one kind ofibres is 2.5 db/m at 660nm. The fibres sustain only a single mode at least over the wavelength range from 660nm to 980nm.

  18. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. PMID:22035594

  19. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  20. Electron stimulated hydroxylation of a metal supported silicate film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Emmez, Emre; Pan, Qiushi; Yang, Bing; Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E; Sterrer, Martin; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Goikoetxea, Itziar; Wlodarczyk, Radoslaw; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Water adsorption on a double-layer silicate film was studied by using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Under vacuum conditions, small amounts of silanols (Si-OH) could only be formed upon deposition of an ice-like (amorphous solid water, ASW) film and subsequent heating to room temperature. Silanol coverage is considerably enhanced by low-energy electron irradiation of an ASW pre-covered silicate film. The degree of hydroxylation can be tuned by the irradiation parameters (beam energy, exposure) and the ASW film thickness. The results are consistent with a generally accepted picture that hydroxylation occurs through hydrolysis of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds in the silica network. Calculations using density functional theory show that this may happen on Si-O-Si bonds, which are either parallel (i.e., in the topmost silicate layer) or vertical to the film surface (i.e., connecting two silicate layers). In the latter case, the mechanism may additionally involve the reaction with a metal support underneath. The observed vibrational spectra are dominated by terminal silanol groups (ν(OD) band at 2763 cm(-1)) formed by hydrolysis of vertical Si-O-Si linkages. Film dehydroxylation fully occurs only upon heating to very high temperatures (∼ 1200 K) and is accompanied by substantial film restructuring, and even film dewetting upon cycling hydroxylation/dehydroxylation treatment.

  1. Silicate Dispersion and Mechanical Reinforcement in Polysiloxane/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, Daniel F.

    2010-01-12

    We report the first in-depth comparison of the mechanical properties and equilibrium solvent uptake of a range of polysiloxane nanocomposites based on treated and untreated montmorillonite and fumed silica nanofillers. We demonstrate the ability of equilibrium solvent uptake data (and, thus, overall physical and chemical cross-link density) to serve as a proxy for modulus (combining rubber elasticity and Flory-Rehner theory), hardness (via the theory of Boussinesq), and elongation at break, despite the nonideal nature of these networks. In contrast, we find that tensile and tear strength are not well-correlated with solvent uptake. Interfacial strength seems to dominate equilibrium solvent uptake and the mechanical properties it predicts. In the montmorillonite systems in particular, this results in the surprising consequence that equilibrium solvent uptake and mechanical properties are independent of dispersion state. We conclude that edge interactions play a more significant role than degree of exfoliation, a result unique in the field of polymer nanocomposites. This demonstrates that even a combination of polymer/nanofiller compatibility and thermodynamically stable nanofiller dispersion levels may not give rise to reinforcement. These findings provide an important caveat when attempting to connect structure and properties in polymer nanocomposites, and useful guidance in the design of optimized polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites in particular. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  2. Silicate anion structural change in calcium silicate hydrate gel on dissolution of hydrated cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pH conditions of aqueous solutions in a radioactive waste repository can be brought about by dissolution of cementitious materials. In order to clarify the mechanisms involved in maintaining this high pH for long time, we investigated the dissolution phenomena of OPC hydrate. In the present research, leaching tests on powdered cement hydrates were conducted by changing the ratio of mass of leaching water to mass of OPC hydrate (liquid/solid ratio) from 10 - 2,000 (wt/wt). Ordinary Portland Cement hydrate was contacted with deionized water and placed in a sealed bottle. After a predetermined period, the solid was separated from the solution. From the results of XRD analysis on the solid phase and the Ca concentration in the aqueous phase, it was confirmed that Ca(OH)2 was preferentially dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 10 or 100 (wt/wt), and that C-S-H gel as well as Ca(OH)2 were dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or larger. 29Si-NMR results showed that the silicate anion chain of the C-S-H gel became longer when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or greater. This indicates that leaching of OPC hydrate results in a structural change of C-S-H gel. (author)

  3. Prevalence of IgE antibodies to grain and grain dust in grain elevator workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IgE-mediated allergic reactions have been postulated to contribute to respiratory reactions seen in workers exposed to grain dusts. In an attempt better to define the prevalence of IgE antibodies in workers exposed to grain dusts, we performed the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) on worker sera using both commercial allergens prepared from grain and worksite allergens prepared from grain dust samples collected at the worksite. We found that the two types of reagents identified different populations with respect to the specificity of IgE antibodies present. The RAST assay performed using worksite allergens correlated well with skin test procedures. These results may allow us to gain better understanding of allergy associated with grain dust exposure, and document the utility of the RAST assay in assessment of occupational allergies

  4. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  5. Quantitative characterisation of sedimentary grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunwal, Mohit; Mulchrone, Kieran F.; Meere, Patrick A.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of sedimentary texture helps in determining the formation, transportation and deposition processes of sedimentary rocks. Grain size analysis is traditionally quantitative, whereas grain shape analysis is largely qualitative. A semi-automated approach to quantitatively analyse shape and size of sand sized sedimentary grains is presented. Grain boundaries are manually traced from thin section microphotographs in the case of lithified samples and are automatically identified in the case of loose sediments. Shape and size paramters can then be estimated using a software package written on the Mathematica platform. While automated methodology already exists for loose sediment analysis, the available techniques for the case of lithified samples are limited to cases of high definition thin section microphotographs showing clear contrast between framework grains and matrix. Along with the size of grain, shape parameters such as roundness, angularity, circularity, irregularity and fractal dimension are measured. A new grain shape parameter developed using Fourier descriptors has also been developed. To test this new approach theoretical examples were analysed and produce high quality results supporting the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore sandstone samples from known aeolian and fluvial environments from the Dingle Basin, County Kerry, Ireland were collected and analysed. Modern loose sediments from glacial till from County Cork, Ireland and aeolian sediments from Rajasthan, India have also been collected and analysed. A graphical summary of the data is presented and allows for quantitative distinction between samples extracted from different sedimentary environments.

  6. Why Is It Important to Eat Grains, Especially Whole Grains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drink Matters Variety Amount Nutrition Other Ingredients Choosing Foods and Beverages Saturated, Unsaturated, and Trans Fats Sodium Added Sugars ... may reduce the risk of heart disease. Consuming foods containing fiber, ... weight management. Eating grain products fortified with folate before and ...

  7. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous-Ooze Sediments, More Basin, Norwegian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic siliceous-ooze sediments occur above the hydrocarbon reservoir of the Ormen Lange gas field in More Basin, Norwegian Sea. A possible hydrocarbon prospect of siliceous ooze was proposed, but siliceous ooze is significantly different in texture from most commonly known reservoir rocks...

  8. Chernozem aggregate waterstability loss investigation in a long-term bare fallow experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, N. A.; Milanovskiy, E. Y.

    2009-04-01

    The research is focused on mechanisms of aggregate waterstability controlled by soil organic matter (SOM). The objects of the research are two contrast variants of typical chernozem - under native grassland and under a 60-year bare fallow experimental plot (100 m2) on the territory of Central Chernozem Biosphere Reserve, Russia. Seasonal plowing and deficiency of fresh plant residues (due to weeding out) resulted in a rapid mineralization of SOM. The Corg content in the 0-20 cm topsoil under native grassland is 6-4.5 %. For the last two decades Corg content under bare fallow has stabilized on the 2.6% level and is therefore assumed to represent stable SOM pool. However excellent aggregate waterstability of chernozem is completely lost under bare fallow. Therefore the aim of our study is to reveal the role of different SOM pools spatial and functional organization in aggregate waterstability formation. Bulk soil samples were collected from 2 m grassland profile and 1.5 m bare fallow profile with 10 cm interval and simultaneous measurements of soil field density and moisture. Following samples were analysed: bulk samples, dry and wet-sieving aggregates, undisturbed and pulverized aggregates, granule-densimetric fractions obtained by sedimentation of bulk samples (clay 5 mkm) with following densimetric fractionation in bromoform (light ? 2.4 g/cm3), and above mentioned samples after removal of SOM by hydrogen peroxide. Isolation of aggregates and granule-densimetric fractionation were carried out for bulk soils at 0-20, 40-50 and 80-90 cm depth. We use elemental analysis (C, H, N), size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction chromatography of humic substances (HS), laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area (SSA) measurements by nitrogen adsorption and micromorphological examination of thin sections. Detailed characteristics obtained for aggregates and granule-densimetric fractions from a typical chernozem soil under native grassland and under 60

  9. Performance of bare high-purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heider, Marik Barnabé; Chkvorets, Oleg; Di Vacri, Assunta; Gusev, Konstantin; Schönert, Stefan; Shirchenko, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge at the National Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN. Bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in liquid argon serving simultaneously as a shield against external radioactivity and as a cooling medium. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, will be redeployed. Before operating the enriched detectors, tests are performed with non-enriched bare HPGe detectors in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory to test the Phase-I detector assembly, the detector handling protocols, the refurbishment technology and to study the long-term stability in liquid argon. The leakage currents in liquid argon and liquid nitrogen have been extensively studied under varying gamma irradiation conditions. In total three non-enriched high-purity p-type prototype germanium detectors have been operated successfully. The dete...

  10. Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumin, Md Abdul, E-mail: pcharpentier@eng.uwo.ca; Akhter, Kazi Farida, E-mail: pcharpentier@eng.uwo.ca; Charpentier, Paul A., E-mail: pcharpentier@eng.uwo.ca [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Western University, London Ontario (Canada)

    2014-03-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC)

  11. Oralloy (93.2 235U) Bare Metal Annuli And Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, Andrew John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A multitude of critical experiments with highly enriched uranium metal were conducted in the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments served to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant while also providing data for verification of different calculation methods and associated cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included both solid cylinders and annuli of various diameters, interacting cylinders of various diameters, parallelepipeds, and reflected cylinders and annuli. The experiments described here involve a series of delayed critical stacks of bare oralloy HEU annuli and disks. Three of these experiments consist of stacking bare HEU annuli of varying diameters to obtain critical configurations. These annuli have nominal inner and outer diameters (ID/OD) including: 7 inches (") ID – 9" OD, 9" ID – 11" OD, 11" ID – 13" OD, and 13? ID – 15" OD. The nominal heights range from 0.125" to 1.5". The three experiments themselves range from 7" – 13", 7" – 15", and 9" – 15" in diameter, respectively. The fourth experiment ranges from 7" – 11", and along with different annuli, it also includes an 11" disk and several 7" diameter disks. All four delayed critical experiments were configured and evaluated by J. T. Mihalczo, J. J. Lynn, and D. E. McCarty from December of 1962 to February 1963 with additional information in their corresponding logbook.

  12. Laser damage of HR, AR-coatings, monolayers and bare surfaces at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnov, S. V.; Klimentov, S. M.; Said, A. A.; Soileau, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced damage thresholds and morphologies were investigated in a variety of uncoated and coated surfaces, including monolayers and multi-layers of different chemical compositions. Both antireflective (AR) and highly reflective (HR) were tested. Testing was done at 1064 nm with 25 picosecond and 8 nanosecond YAG/Nd laser single pulses. Spot diameter in the experiments varied from 0.09 to 0.22 mm. The laser damage measurement procedure consisted of 1-on-1 (single laser pulse in the selected site) and N-on-1 experiments including repeated irradiation by pulses of the same fluence and subsequently raised from pulse to pulse fluence until damage occurred. The highest picosecond damage thresholds of commercially available coatings averaged 12 - 14 J/sq cm, 50 percent less than thresholds obtained in bare fused silica. Some coatings and bare surfaces revealed a palpable preconditioning effect (an increase in threshold of 1.2 to 1.8 times). Picosecond and nanosecond data were compared to draw conclusions about pulse width dependence. An attempt was made to classify damage morphologies according to the type of coating, class of irradiating, and damage level.

  13. Matching the BtA line to the bare-AGS (Part 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas,N.; Glenn, J. W.; Huan, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Raparia, D.; Zeno, K.

    2008-11-01

    The Booster to AGS (BtA) transfer line [Ref for BtA line] transports the beam bunches from the AGS-Booster to the AGS synchrotron, and also matches the beam parameters ({beta}{sub x,y}, {alpha}{sub x,y}) and dispersion functions ({eta}{sub x,y}, {eta}{prime}{sub x,y}) of the transported beam to the corresponding quantities of the circulating beam in AGS, at the AGS injection point. In this technical note we describe in details, the calculations of the matching procedure of the BtA line to the bare-AGS, and provide magnet settings for the MAD-model of the BtA transfer line which is 'matched' to the bare-AGS. In a separate but more concise technical note (Part II) we will present results on the beam optics of the BtA beam line which is 'matched' to the AGS with two helical snakes.

  14. Ice Formation via Deposition Mode Nucleation on Bare and Alcohol-covered Graphite Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of water on aerosol particles contributes to ice cloud formation in the atmosphere with implications for the water cycle and climate on Earth. The heterogeneous ice nucleation process is influenced by physico-chemical properties of the substrate, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we report on ice formation on bare and alcohol-covered graphite at temperatures from 175 to 213 K, probed by elastic helium and light scattering. Water has a low wettability on bare and butanol-covered graphite resulting in the growth of rough ice surfaces. In contrast, pre-adsorbed methanol provides hydrophilic surface sites and results in the formation of smooth crystalline ice; an effect that is pronounced also for sub-monolayer methanol coverages. The alcohols primarily reside at the ice surface and at the ice-graphite interface with a minor fraction being incorporated into the growing ice structures. Methanol has no observable effect on gas/solid water vapor exchange whereas butanol acts as a tr...

  15. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J. C.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1980-01-01

    Remote measurements of soil moisture contents over bare fields and fields covered with orchard grass, corn, and soybean were made during October 1979 with 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz microwave radiometers mounted on a truck. Ground truth of soil moisture content, ambient air, and soil temperatures was acquired concurrently with the radiometric measurements. The biomass of the vegetation was sampled about once a week. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields were compared with those of radiative transfer model calculations using as inputs the acquired soil moisture and temperature data with appropriate values of dielectric constants for soil-water mixtures. Good agreement was found between the calculated and the measured results over 10-70 deg incident angles. The presence of vegetation was found to reduce the sensitivity of soil moisture sensing. At 1.4 GHz the sensitivity reduction ranged from approximately 20% for 10-cm tall grassland to over 60% for the dense soybean field. At 5 GHz the corresponding reduction in sensitivity ranged from approximately 70 to approximately 90%.

  16. Estimation of evaporation and drainage losses from two bare soils in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, evaporation, drainage rates and water storage of two bare soils in the east (Batticaloa and west (Puttalam regions of Sri Lanka, were simulated using the E-DiGOR model. Daily simulations were carried out for each of the years during the periods of 1978 to 1987 in Batticaloa and 1998 to 2007 in Puttalam using standard climate data. The soils in the locations were predominantly sandy loam and/or sandy clay loam. Grass reference evapotranspiration and potential soil evaporation were higher, whereas actual soil evaporation was lower during the dry seasons. The 10-year average annual reference evapotranspiration and potential soil evaporation were 2069.3 mm and 1814.1 mm in Batticaloa, and 1908.8 mm and 1714.5 mm in Puttalam, respectively. Aridity index (precipitation/reference evapotranspiration was 0.685 for Batticaloa and 0.606 for Puttalam. The actual evaporation from bare soil varied between 463.1—725.0 mm in Batticaloa and 543.6—646.3 mm in Puttalam. Annual drainage rates below 150 cm soil depth ranged from 321.7 to 1581.2 mm in Batticaloa and from 346.7 to 957.0 mm in Puttalam. Soil water storage changed daily depending on the intensity and frequency of rainfall events and on evaporation rates.

  17. Trajectories of water table recovery following the re-vegetation of bare peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim; Maskill, Rachael; Pilkington, Michael; Walker, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological status of blanket peat influences a wide range of peatland functions, such as runoff generation, water quality, vegetation distribution, and rates of carbon sequestration. The UK supports 15% of the world's blanket peat cover, but much of this vital resource is significantly degraded, impacted by industrial pollution, overgrazing, wildfire, and climatic shifts. These pressures have produced a unique landscape characterised by severe gully erosion and extensive areas of bare peat. This in turn has led water tables to become substantially drawn down, impacting peatland function and limiting the resilience of these landscapes to future changes in climate. The restoration of eroding UK peatlands is a major conservation concern, and landscape-scale interventions through the re-vegetation of bare peat is becoming increasingly extensive in areas of upland Britain. Water table is the primary physical parameter considered in the monitoring of many peatland restoration projects, and there is a wealth of data on individual monitoring programmes which indicates that re-vegetation significantly raises water tables. This paper draws on data from multiple restoration projects carried out by the Moors for the Future Partnership in the Southern Pennines, UK, covering a range of stages in the erosion-restoration continuum, to assess the trajectories of water table recovery following re-vegetation. This will allow us to generate projections of future water table recovery, which will be of benefit to land managers and conservation organisations to inform future restoration initiatives.

  18. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  19. SERS detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a bare gold nanoparticles coupled film system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hai-Xin; Hu, Kai; Li, Da-Wei; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-07-21

    A facile approach based on a bare gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coupled film system as the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was developed for the effective detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A smooth gold film (Au film) was self-assembled with a hydrophobic layer of an alkyl chain in order to capture the PAHs molecules from bulk solution to its surface. Next, the bare gold nanoparticles, about 60 nm in diameter without functional modification, were paved onto the PAHs-molecule-coated Au film. This was aimed at generating a plasmon coupling effect to illuminate a stronger electromagnetic field within the gaps between particles and film, exactly where the absorbed molecules were located. The effects of the Au film, alkyl chain, and Au NPs on the SERS response to PAHs were respectively investigated. Through utilizing this simple system, a reproducible and interference-free SERS detection was demonstrated. Furthermore, the excellent detection ability to sense a series of PAHs was achieved with low concentrations of 1.2 × 10(-8) M, 2.0 × 10(-8) M, 5.5 × 10(-8) M, and 6.3 × 10(-8) M for benzo[b]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, and pyrene, respectively. This method, capable of sample preparation and SERS measurement on a portable carrier, would be an ideal candidate for practical applications under field conditions.

  20. Functional RG flow equation: regularization and coarse-graining in phase space

    CERN Document Server

    Vacca, G P

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the basic path integral in phase space we reconsider the functional approach to the RG flow of the one particle irreducible effective average action. On employing a balanced coarse-graining procedure for the canonical variables we obtain a functional integral with a non trivial measure which leads to a modified flow equation. We first address quantum mechanics for boson and fermion degrees of freedom and we then extend the construction to quantum field theories. For this modified flow equation we discuss the reconstruction of the bare action and the implications on the computation of the vacuum energy density.

  1. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  2. Export Rebates on Grain Finished

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Xinwen

    2008-01-01

      According to the State Statistics Bureau, China's consumer price index (CPI) jumped by 6.9 percent year-on-year last November, approaching the high levels seen at the end of 1996, one of the largest areas of increase was the price of grain,which rose by 6.6 percent. There is no doubt the growth in CPI can be mainly attributed to soaring food prices and the diffusion effect of oil price adjustments. Large orders for grain exports have put Chinese grain suppliers under tremendous pressure. In order to solve this problem, the Finance Ministry and State Administration of Taxation together announced that 84 categories of export tax rebates on major types of grain will be eliminated.……

  3. Export Rebates on Grain Finished

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ According to the State Statistics Bureau, China's consumer price index (CPI) jumped by 6.9 percent year-on-year last November, approaching the high levels seen at the end of 1996, one of the largest areas of increase was the price of grain,which rose by 6.6 percent. There is no doubt the growth in CPI can be mainly attributed to soaring food prices and the diffusion effect of oil price adjustments. Large orders for grain exports have put Chinese grain suppliers under tremendous pressure. In order to solve this problem, the Finance Ministry and State Administration of Taxation together announced that 84 categories of export tax rebates on major types of grain will be eliminated.

  4. MYCOTOXIN CONTROL DURING GRAIN PROCESSING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlling mycotoxin formation by fungi growing in and on cereal grains involves a multifactorial approach for defining multiple variables. The scope includes varietial (maturity, date, GMO) selection, tillage (time, depth), planting (density, spacing), fertilizion (type, amount, timing), irrigati...

  5. When Layered Nickel-Cobalt Silicate Hydroxide Nanosheets Meet Carbon Nanotubes: A Synergetic Coaxial Nanocable Structure for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ce; Jiang, Jing; Ai, Lunhong

    2016-01-13

    Developing robust earth-abundant electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is an ongoing scientific challenge, which is coupled with a number of important electrochemical processes and many key renewable energy systems, such as water splitting, rechargeable metal-air batteries, and regenerative fuel cells. Here, we proposed a rational design and fabrication of the synergetic coaxial nanocable structures by intimate growth of the layered nickel-cobalt silicate hydroxide nanosheets on the outer surfaces of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs@NCS) and demonstrated their high efficiency in electrocatalytic OER from water splitting. The electrocatalytic activities of the MWCNTs@NCS were found to be significantly higher than that of bare NCS and pristine MWCNTs, synergetically determining by such the constituted individual components. Among them, the MWCNTs@NCS-2 exhibited best electrocatalytic OER performance, showing a small OER onset potential, large anodic current and long-term durability, which was favorably comparable to the previously reported NiCo-based OER electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolytes. To the best of our knowledge, this was a first example on the earth-abundant metal silicate hydroxides utilized in electrochemical water splitting. PMID:26671308

  6. Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Lejček; Lei Zheng; Siegfried Hofmann; Mojmír Šob

    2014-01-01

    Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary se...

  7. GRAIN BOUNDARIES IN POLYPHASE CERAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, D

    1985-01-01

    The majority of polyphase ceramics contain a residual glass phase at their grain boundaries. The stability of these phases, particularly at the two-grain boundaries, is of significance since they affect the properties of the material as a whole. Drawing analogies with soap films, the stability of a continuous intergranular phase is considered in terms of the balance between the capillarity and disjoining pressures. The individual components to the disjoining pressures are discussed. It is arg...

  8. Enhanced ionic conductivity of apatite-type lanthanum silicate electrolyte for IT-SOFCs through copper doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xifeng; Hua, Guixiang; Ding, Dong; Zhu, Wenliang; Wang, Hongjin

    2016-02-01

    Apatite-type Lanthanum silicate (LSO) is among the most promising electrolyte for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) owing to the high conductivity and low activation energy at lower temperature than traditional doped-zirconia electrolyte. The ionic conductivity as well as the sintering density of lanthanum silicate oxy-apatite, La10Si6-xCuxO27-δ (LSCO, 0 ≤ x ≤ 2), was effectively enhanced through a small amount of doped copper. The phase composition, relative density, ionic conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of La10Si6-xCuxO27-δ was systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Archimedes' drainage method, scanning electron microscope (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and thermal dilatometer techniques. With increasing copper doping content, the ionic conductivity of La10Si6-xCuxO27-δincreased, reaching a maximum of 4.8 × 10-2 S cm-1 at 800 °C for x = 1.5. The improved ionic conductivity could be primarily associated with the enhanced grain conductivity. The power output performance of NiO-LSCO/LSCO/LSCF single cell was superior to that obtained on NiO-LSO/LSO/LSCF at different temperatures using hydrogen as fuel and oxygen as oxidant, which could be attributed to the enhanced oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the sintering density for the copped doped lanthanum silicate. In conclusion, the apatite La10Si4.5Cu1.5O25.5 is a promising candidate electrolyte for IT-SOFCs.

  9. Superconductivity of small metal grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Renrong; CHEN; Zhiqian; ZHU; Shunquan

    2005-01-01

    The formulas of the energy gap and superconducting critical temperature appropriate for systems with both odd and even number of electrons are derived; the bases of the derivations are BCS theory and energy level statistics. Numerical results qualitatively agree with the experimental phenomena. i.e., the superconductivity of small metallic grains will first enhance then decrease to zero when the grain are getting smaller and smaller. The calculations indicate that the above phenomena happen in the metallic grains belonging to Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) and Gaussian Unitary ensemble (GUE) with zero spin; The superconductivity of small metallic grains in Gaussian Symplectic Ensemble (GSE) will monotonically decrease to zero with the decreasing of the grain size. The analyses suggest that the superconductivity enhancements come from pairing and the balance of the strengths between spin-orbital coupling and external magnetic field. In order to take the latter into account, it is necessary to include the level statistics given by Random Matrix Theory (RMT) in describing small metallic grains.

  10. Analysis on Interaction between Genotype of Four Main Flavonoids of Barley Grain and Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao YANG; Chengli DUAN; Yawen ZENG; Juan DU; Shuming YANG; Xiaoying PU; Shengchao YANG

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to analyze the interaction between genotype of flavonoids of barley grain and environment, to increase the flavonoid content of barley grain in cultivation and breeding. [Method] In this study, the content of cate- chin, myricetin, quercetin and kaempferol of barley grain planted in Kunming, Qujing and Baoshan were determined by HPLC, and the genotype, environment, genotype- environment interaction of the flavonoid content of barley grain were analyzed. [Result] According to the experimental results, the genotype variance, environmental variance and G x E interaction variance of catechin and kaempferol contents show the same trend: genotype variation 〉 environmental variation 〉 G × E interaction variation, which all reach a extremely significant level; the genotype variance, envi- ronmental variance and G × E interaction variance of quercetin and total flavonoid contents show the same trend: genetype variation 〉 G × E interaction variation 〉 environmental variation, which all reach a extremely significant level; the genotype variance and environmental variance of myricetin content both reach a extremely sig- nificant level, while the G × E interaction variance reaches a significant level, showing an order of genotype variation 〉 environmental variation 〉 G × E interaction variation; the genotype variance, environmental variance and G x E interaction vari- ance of total flavonoid content show an order of genotype variation 〉 environmental variation 〉 G × E interaction variation. Among different barley varieties, Ziguang- mangluoerling and Kuanyingdamai in Qujing, Kunming and Baoshan have relatively high content of quercetin, while other barley varieties barely contain any quercetin. The grains of Ziguangmangluoerling and Kuanyingdamai are purple, while the grains of other barley varieties are yellow. [Conclusion] Four main flavonoids and the total flavonoids of barley grain are mainly under genetic control and

  11. X-ray scattering on layered silicates in polymeric matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocomposites based on polymeric matrices have been studied via small angle X-ray scattering with respect to the dispersion and the orientation of filler particles. Both natural and synthetic layered silicates were used as filler particles. For this purpose, a software was developed which allows to determine the size and the size distribution of nanoparticles with various geometries by analyzing small angle X-ray scattering data. In contrast to conventional software, the one developed and used here is based on free distribution functions, e.g. no particular size distribution is pre-supposed. By example of three different reference systems it could be shown that the software works reliably and accurately. Using the computer-based evaluation of scattering data, significantly more information can be obtained about the samples compared to classical analytical and numerical evaluation schemes. By means of this software, the inner structure of the microgel PVCUAAEM (Poly(N-Vinylcaprolactam- co-acetoacetoxyethylmethacrylat)) filled with a synthetic layered silicate was investigated as a function of temperature. For this temperature-sensitive microgelnanocomposite, the dispersion of the silicate layers was determined and a structural model was developed. It could be shown that with increasing temperature, the layers move closer together and, depending on the amount of filler content, the filler particles drift to the surface of the nanocomposites. Additionally, for higher filler contents the charged layered silicate prevents the typical reduction of the particle radius, which is otherwise observed with increasing temperature. For polyethylene filled with natural layered silicate, it could be shown that small angle X-ray scattering allows the quantitative evaluation of the orientation of platelet-shaped nanoparticles in a polymeric matrix. Based on spatially resolved measurements of injection-molded tensile bars, the degree of orientation could be determined quantitatively

  12. Soft Landing of Bare PtRu Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Moon, DaeWon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu alloy nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 x 104 ions µm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (STEM-HAADF) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu alloy nanoparticles are uniform in size and have a Ru core decorated with small regions of Pt on the surface. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in relative atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt4f and Ru3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 x 104 ions µm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the alloy nanoparticles supported on glassy

  13. Co-polarization channel imbalance determination by the use of bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Pingxiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a novel technique which determines the co-polarization channel imbalance by the use of natural bare soil, instead of a trihedral corner reflector (CR). In polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) remote sensing, the polarimetric calibration (PolCAL) is the key technique in quantitative earth parameter measurement. In general, the current PolCAL process can be separated into two parts. The first part tries to estimate the crosstalk and the cross-polarization (x-pol) channel imbalance components by the reflection symmetry and the reciprocity properties, without a CR. Then, at least one trihedral CR is required to determine the co-polarization (co-pol) channel imbalance; however, it is not always possible to deploy a CR in difficult terrain such as desert. In this paper, we utilize bare soil as a stable reference target, and four common natural constraints of bare soil are evaluated to determine the co-pol channel imbalance, without the use of a CR. It should be mentioned that we do not propose to replace the CR by a natural target, but we utilize the natural target to enhance the PolCAL accuracy when a CR is missing. The four constraints are: (1) the consistency of the polarimetric orientation angle (CPOA) between the PolSAR POA and the digital elevation model (DEM) derived POA; (2) the unitary zero POA (UZPOA) of a flat ground surface; (3) the zero helix (ZHEX) component of the ground surface; and (4) the unitary version of the previous zero helix (UZHEX). In the theoretical part of this paper, we demonstrate that the forth constraint is the most suitable in different scenes. We then propose a multi-scale algorithm to further improve the robustness of the co-pol channel imbalance determination. In the experimental part, we apply our new methods to simulated airborne SAR (AIRSAR) and real uninhabited aerial vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data. Without the use of any CR, the recovered results show that the estimated amplitude and phase error of the co

  14. Soft landing of bare PtRu nanoparticles for electrochemical reduction of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert; Engelhard, Mark; Moon, Daewon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 × 104 ions μm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4.5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (HAADF-STEM) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu nanoparticles are uniform in size. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt 4f and Ru 3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 × 104 ions μm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon. The reproducibility of the nanoparticle synthesis and deposition was evaluated by

  15. Degradability Characteristics of Treated and Untreated Barley Grain Using In situ Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Taghizadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine of degradability characteristics of untreated barely grain (UBG and treated barley grain with autoclaving at 120°C, 5´ (TBG1 and 20' (TBG2, treated barley grain at 100°C, 5´ (TBG3 and 20' (TBG4, using in situ technique in Ghizel sheep’s. The sheep fed diet content 40% alfalfa: 60% concentrate containing 2.9 Mcal kg-1 DM and 14% CP. The incubation times were 0, 4, 8, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h and rumen degradation of cp and DM was measured. The equation of p = a+b (1-e-ct was used for fitting of dry matter and crude protein disappearance data. The dry matter disappearance of TBG1 and TBG2 at 24 and 48 h were lower than the other treatments (p<0.05. The crude protein disappearance of 24 and 48 h of UBG was more than the other treatment (p<0.05. Treating of barley grain of 120°C (5' and 20' can be decreased ruminal crude protein degradability of barley grain resulting high escaped crude protein into lower digestive tract.

  16. Removal of Cadmium Ions from Aqueous Solution by Silicate-incorporated Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hebin; ZHONG Hong; LIU Yu; DENG Jinyang

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a preliminary research on silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite as a new environmental mineral used to remove cadmium ions from aqueous solutions. The silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was prepared by coprecipitation and calcining, and silicate was incorporated into the crystal lattice of hydroxyapatite by partial substitution of phosphate. The amount of cadmium ions removed by silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was significantly elevated, which was 76% higher than that of pure hydroxyapatite. But the sorption behavior of cadmium ions on silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was similar to that of pure hydroxyapatite. Morphological study revealed that silicate incorporation confined the crystal growth and increased the specific surface area of hydroxyapatite,which were in favor of enhancing the cadmium ion sorpfion capacity of the samples. Incorporation of silicate into hydroxyapatite seems to be an effective approach to improve the environmental property of hydroxyapatite on removal of aqueous cadmium ions.

  17. Complex Chemistry on Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Kelley, Matthew J.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    Early interstellar chemical models considered complex molecule formation on grains [Allen & Robinson (1977)], but current models assume that simple molecules form on grains and subsequent gas phase ion-molecule reactions produce the more complex species [Ruffle & Herbst (2001), Charnley (2001)]. It has been shown, however, that gas phase ion-molecule reactions are insufficient for the production of such complex organic species as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) [Horn et al. (2004)]. Organics such as acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), ethanol, methyl formate, acetic acid (CH3COOH), and glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) have also been detected in high abundance in regions of grain mantle disruption or evaporation, indicating that these species are formed on grain surfaces [see Chengalur & Kanekar (2003), Bottinelli et al. (2004), Hollis et al. (2001)]. The mechanisms for complex molecule production on grains are clearly much more important, and much more complex, than has been recognized. Recent observational studies of these types of species have offered insight into the mechanisms for their possible grain surface synthesis. The relative hot core abundances of the 2C structural isomers methyl formate, acetic acid, and glycolaldehyde (52:2:1, respectively [Hollis et al. (2001)]) indicate that if they form on grains it is not from kinetically-controlled single-atom addition reactions. Likewise, the 3C aldose sugar, glyceraldehyde (CH2OHCHOHCHO), was not detected in Sgr B2(N-LMH) [Hollis et al. (2004)] while the 3C ketose sugar, dihydroxyacetone (CO(CH2OH)2) was detected in this source [Widicus Weaver & Blake (2005)]. Chemical pathways favoring the more stable carbonates over acids and aldehydes are required to explain these results. Interestingly, all of these species can be formed from reactions involving the abundant grain mantle constituents CO, HCOOH, and CH3OH and their radical precursors. A model has been developed to investigate this type of chemical network, and

  18. Dissociative adsorption of molecular deuterium and thermal stability onto hydrogenated, bare and ion beam damaged poly- and single crystalline diamond surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson, Sh.; Chandran, M.; Zalkind, S.; Shamir, N.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report on dissociative adsorption of deuterium (D2) on bare, hydrogenated and ion beam bombarded polycrystalline and single crystalline diamond surfaces. Polycrystalline diamond films with an average grain size of ~ 300 nm were deposited on silicon substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique from methane/hydrogen gas mixture. Deposited films were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to estimate the phase composition and microstructure. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and direct recoil spectrometry were used to study hydrogen (deuterium) bonding configuration of the upper surface region. Near surface amorphization was achieved by 1 keV Ar+ implantation at ~ 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature (RT). As deposited and Ar+ bombarded films are annealed to 500-1000 °C in ultra-high vacuum conditions and also under D2 partial pressure of 5 × 10- 6 Torr. For comparison, key experiments were repeated on the single crystal (100) diamond. Our results clearly show the preferential dissociative adsorption of D2 on low hybridized carbon (sp/sp2) states with activation temperature as low as RT, but with a lower thermal stability compared to pure diamond Csbnd D bonds.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Si/Ga Eni Carbon Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Bellussi; Angela Carati; Stefania Guidetti; Caterina Rizzo; Roberto Millini; Stefano Zanardi; Erica Montanari; Wallace O’Neil Parker Jr.; Michela Bellettato

    2015-01-01

    Phenylene-gallosilicates were prepared with the same crystalline structure as their aluminum ana-logues. The new Ga-Eni Carbon Silicates (Ga-ECS) phases were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and thermogravimetric analysis, which demonstrated that gallium isomorphously replaced aluminum in the framework of the organ-ic-inorganic hybrids similar to the case of classical zeolites. Hybrid ECS materials were obtained with different types of bridged silsesquioxane precursors that maintained the aluminum-silicate nature of the inorganic moiety. This work confirms a new level of crystal chemistry versatility for this class of materials, and demonstrates the possibility to tailor also the inorganic part of the framework by changing the nature of the trivalent heteroatom.

  20. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  1. In vitro bioactivity of a tricalcium silicate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement and the responsible for their mechanical strength at early stages. In order to be used as and additive of conventional calcium phosphate cement (CPC), in vitro bioactivity of a calcium silicate cement (CSC) after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days was study. The cement was obtained by mixing Ca3SiO5, obtained by sol-gel process, and a Na2HPO4 solution. The morphological and structural changes of the material before and after soaking were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the formation of a layer of a Hydroxyapatite (HA) onto the CSC cement after soaking for 1h in SBF that became denser with the increase of soaking time. The study suggests that Ca3SiO5 would be an effective additive to improve the bioactivity and long term strength of conventional CPC. (author)

  2. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  3. Xe and Kr analyses of silicate inclusions from iron meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Huneke, J. C.; Burnett, D. S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the amounts and isotopic composition of Xe and Kr in silicate inclusions of several iron meteorites. It is shown that the Xe and Kr contents are comparable to chondritic values. The isotopic compositions show trapped gas of both chondritic and atmospheric composition. Large spallation effects occur in some of the meteorites; the spallation spectra in some instances differ from those reported for stone meteorites. In several meteorites, very large neutron capture effects on Br and I occur. All samples have pronounced Xe129 excesses which apparently indicate differences in the formation times from chondrites of less than about 100 million years; however, the presence of trapped Xe132 in silicates which were enclosed in molten Fe-Ni and cooled slowly proves that they were not entirely outgassed, so that some of the Xe129 excess may also be trapped.

  4. EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th4+, U4+, Np4+, and Pu4+ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U6+ and Np5+ ions have complex local symmetries. The U6+ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np5+ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U6+ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U6+ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U6+ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4+ ions. 4 references, 2 figures

  5. Effective elastic moduli of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Polymer-layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites exhibit some mechanical properties that are much better than conventional polymer filled composites. A relatively low content of layered silicate yields a significant enhancement of material performance. After the volume fraction of clay reaches a relatively low "critical value"; however, further increasing does not show a greater stiffening effect. This phenomenon is contrary to previous micromechanical pre-dictions and is not understood well. Based on the analysis on the microstructures of PLS nanocomposites, the present note provides an insight into the physical micromechanisms of the above unexpected phenomenon. The Mori-Tanaka scheme and a numerical method are employed to estimate the effec-tive elastic moduli of such a composite.

  6. Morphology and Optical Properties of Bare and Silica Coated Hybrid Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Sushant; Lebek, Werner; Godehardt, Reinhold; Lee, Wan In; Adhikari, Rameshwar

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their wide applications in the field of optoelectronics, photonics, catalysis, and medicine; plasmonic metal nanoparticles are attaining considerable interest nowadays. The optical properties of these metal nanoparticles depend upon their size, shape, and surrounding medium. The present work studies the morphology and optical properties of bare silver nanoparticles and silica coated hybrid silver nanoparticles. Aqueous phase mediated synthesis and water-in-oil microemulsion mediated synthesis are two different wet chemical routes employed for nanosynthesis. Direct coating of silica is performed in water-in-oil microemulsion on pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles using tetraethyl orthosilicate as silica precursor. This study shows that using different wet chemical routes the size of the synthesized nanoparticles could be tuned. In addition, using reverse micelles as nanoreactors, the thickness of the silica shell around the core silver nanoparticles could be significantly controlled. Further, the optical properties of silver nanoparticles could be adjusted through the size and the surface coating. PMID:27483900

  7. Distorted wave calculations for electron loss process induced by bare ion impact on biological targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distorted wave models are employed to investigate the electron loss process induced by bare ions on biological targets. The two main reactions which contribute to this process, namely, the single electron ionization as well as the single electron capture are here studied. In order to further assess the validity of the theoretical descriptions used, the influence of particular mechanisms are studied, like dynamic screening for the case of electron ionization and energy deposition on the target by the impacting projectile for the electron capture one. Results are compared with existing experimental data. - Highlights: ► Distorted wave models are used to investigate ion-molecule collisions. ► Differential and total cross-sections for capture and ionization are evaluated. ► The influence of dynamic screening is determined. ► Capture reaction dominates the mean energy deposited by the projectile on the target

  8. Intravascular ultrasound assessment of very late bare-metal stent thrombosis: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Hyun Lee; Kyung Min Kim; Jun Won Lee; Sung Gyun Ahn; Young Jin Youn

    2012-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis (VLST) is increasingly being regarded as a complication of drug-eluting stents (DES),and delayed endothelization,local hypersensitivity reactions,and late stent malapposition due to excessive positive remodeling have been postulated as mechanisms.Considering that stent endothelialization seems to be completed within 4 weeks following bare-metal stent (BMS) placement and that BMS do not possess antiproliferative coating,the mechanism of VLST may differ between patients with DES and those with BMS.We report a case of VLST 9 years after BMS implantation,in which thrombus from the ruptured neointima was confirmed by intravascular ultrasound.This finding suggests that de novo plaque rupture at the neointimal layer within the stent may be one of the explanations for VLST.

  9. Remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare field at 1.4 GHz frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. R.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for estimating moisture content of a bare soil from the observed brightness temperature at 1.4 GHz is discussed and applied to a limited data base. The method is based on a radiative transfer model calculation, which has been successfully used in the past to account for many observational results, with some modifications to take into account the effect of surface roughness. Besides the measured brightness temperatures, the three additional inputs required by the method are the effective soil thermodynamic temperature, the precise relation between moisture content and the smooth field brightness temperatures and a pair of parameters related to surface roughness. The procedures of estimating surface roughness parameters and of obtaining moisture content from observed brightness temperature are discussed. The algorithm is applied to observations from truck mounted and airborne radiometers. The estimated moisture contents compare favorably with the observations in the top 2 cm layer.

  10. The Integrity bare-metal stent made by continuous sinusoid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    The Integrity Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular, CA, USA) is a low-profile, open-cell, cobalt-chromium-alloy advanced bare-metal iteration of the well-known Driver/Micro-Driver Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular). The Integrity stent is made with a process called continuous sinusoid technology. This process allows stent construction via wrapping a single thin strand of wire around a mandrel in a sinusoid configuration, with laser fusion of adjacent crowns. The wire-forming process and fusion pattern provide the stent with a continuous preferential bending plane, intended to allow easier access to, and smoother tracking within, distal and tortuous vessels while radial strength is maintained. Continuous sinusoid technology represents innovation in the design of stent platforms and will provide a future stent platform for newer technology, including drug-eluting stent platforms, drug-filled stents and core wire stents. PMID:21542702

  11. Heat transfer profiles of a vertical, bare, 7-element bundle cooled with supercritical Freon-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data on SuperCritical-Water (SCW) cooled bundles are very limited. However, SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactor (SCWRs) designs cannot be optimized without such data. A set of experimental data obtained in Freon-12 (modeling fluid) cooled vertical bare bundle at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk, Russia) was analyzed. The existence of three distinct regimes for forced convention with supercritical fluids was experienced. (1) Normal heat transfer; (2) Deteriorated heat transfer, characterized by higher than expected temperatures; and (3) Enhanced heat transfer, characterized by lower than expected temperatures. This work compares the heat transfer coefficient of the experiments to predictions based upon current correlations for heat transfer in super critical fluids where the 1-D correlations are based upon tube data under supercritical water conditions. (author)

  12. Strongly confining bare core CdTe quantum dots in polymeric microdisk resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assegid Flatae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a simple route to the efficient coupling of optical emission from strongly confining bare core CdTe quantum dots (QDs to the eigenmodes of a micro-resonator. The quantum emitters are embedded into QD/polymer sandwich microdisk cavities. This prevents photo-oxidation and yields the high dot concentration necessary to overcome Auger enhanced surface trapping of carriers. In combination with the very high cavity Q-factors, interaction of the QDs with the cavity modes in the weak coupling regime is readily observed. Under nanosecond pulsed excitation the CdTe QDs in the microdisks show lasing with a threshold energy as low as 0.33 μJ.

  13. Non-destructive testing of barely visible impact damage in polymer matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Z Y; M. O. W. Richardson

    2004-01-01

    Barely visible impact damage (BVID) is developed when polymer matrix composites are subjected to impact loading. The damage has an adverse effect on structural integrity, and potentially leads to catastrophic failure.Thus it is important to employ a variety of advanced non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques in parallel to unambiguously determine the integrity of composite systems. This study deals with damage evaluation using visual inspection, ultrasonic C-scan, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), electronic shearography (ES) and optical deformation and strain measurement system (ODSMS). Internal damage was introduced using an instrumented falling weight impact test (IFWIT) machine by controlling the combination of striker mass and releasing height. It was found that different NDT techniques were successfully employed to identify and visualise the impact induced internal damage. Experimental results generated from these techniques show a good agreement in damage identification and determination. The features, capabilities and limitations associated with these techniques were briefly discussed.

  14. Paradoxical switching to a barely-mastered second language by an aphasic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemann, B; Laganaro, M; Schwitter, V; Schnider, A

    2007-06-01

    Polyglot speakers who become aphasics are not necessarily affected to the same extent in each language. In some cases there is a mixing of the different languages or a switching between languages and in very rare cases the switch is to the language seldom if ever used in everyday live. We report a French-speaking aphasic, who switched paradoxically from his mother tongue (French) to a second language (German) which he had learned at school but barely mastered and hardly ever spoke, and kept using German most of the time. We tried to understand the mechanism responsible for that phenomenon by reviewing the actual hypothesis of multi-language organization. We concluded, in line with previous reports, that our case used his metalinguistic knowledge to compensate for his inability to access his linguistic skills. PMID:17786781

  15. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  16. Radiative recombination of twisted electrons with bare nuclei: going beyond the Born approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zaytsev, V A; Shabaev, V M

    2016-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic investigation of the radiative recombination of a twisted electron with a bare heavy nucleus. The twisted electron is described by the wave function which accounts for the interaction with the nucleus in all orders in $\\alpha Z$. We use this wave function to derive the probability of the radiative recombination with a single ion being shifted from the twisted electron propagation direction. We also consider more realistic experimental scenarios where the target is either localized (mesoscopic) or infinitely wide (macroscopic). The situation when the incident electron is a coherent superposition of two vortex states is considered as well. For the nonrelativistic case we present analytical expressions which support our numerical calculations. We study in details the influence of the electron twistedness on the polarization and angular distribution of the emitted photon. It is found that these properties of the outgoing photon might be very sensitive to the total angular momentum ...

  17. Electron-positron pair creation in low-energy collisions of heavy bare nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, I A; Tupitsyn, I I; Bondarev, A I; Kozhedub, Y S; Plunien, G; Stoehlker, Th

    2014-01-01

    A new method for calculations of electron-positron pair-creation probabilities in low-energy heavy-ion collisions is developed. The approach is based on the propagation of all one-electron states via the numerical solving of the time-dependent Dirac equation in the monopole approximation. The electron wave functions are represented as finite sums of basis functions constructed from B-splines using the dual-kinetic-balance technique. The calculations of the created particle numbers and the positron energy spectra are performed for the collisions of bare nuclei at the energies near the Coulomb barrier with the Rutherford trajectory and for different values of the nuclear charge and the impact parameter. To examine the role of the spontaneous pair creation the collisions with a modified velocity and with a time delay are also considered. The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations and the possibility of observation of the spontaneous pair creation is discussed.

  18. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications. PMID:26555179

  19. Analysis of silicate rocks by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at developing an all-purpose method for the determination of various elements in silicate rocks, by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The sample is prepared by borax fusion, in the presence of cobalt oxide acting as an inner standard meant for eliminating certain errors. Contents are computed in comparison with outer standards having a chemical composition akin to that of the rock sample under analysis. (authors)

  20. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  1. Sulfur Solubility In Silicate Melts: A Thermochemical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, R.; Ottonello, G.

    A termochemical model for calculating sulfur solubility of simple and complex silicate melts has been developed in the framework of the Toop-Samis polymeric approach combined with a Flood - Grjotheim theoretical treatment of silicate slags [1,2]. The model allows one to compute sulfide and sulfate content of silicate melts whenever fugacity of gaseous sulphur is provided. "Electrically equivalent ion fractions" are needed to weigh the contribution of the various disproportion reactions of the type: MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas MSmelt+1/2O2 ,gas (1) MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas + 3/2O2 ,gas MSO4 ,melt (2) Eqs. 1 and 2 account for the oxide-sulfide and the oxide-sulfate disproportiona- tion in silicate melt. Electrically equivalent ion fractions are computed, in a fused salt Temkin notation, over the appropriate matrixes (anionic and cationic). The extension of such matrixes is calculated in the framework of a polymeric model previously developed [1,2,3] and based on a parameterization of acid-base properties of melts. No adjustable parameters are used and model activities follow the raoultian behavior implicit in the ion matrix solution of the Temkin notation. The model is based on a huge amount of data available in literature and displays a high heuristic capability with virtually no compositional limits, as long as the structural role assigned to each oxide holds. REFERENCES: [1] Ottonello G., Moretti R., Marini L. and Vetuschi Zuccolini M. (2001), Chem. Geol., 174, 157-179. [2] Moretti R. (2002) PhD Thesis, University of Pisa. [3] Ottonello G. (2001) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 282, 72-85.

  2. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E. Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  3. Forming the Moon from terrestrial silicate-rich material

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, R.J.; Anisichkin, V. F.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent high-precision measurements of the isotopic composition of lunar rocks demonstrate that the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon show an unexpectedly high degree of similarity. This is inconsistent with one of the primary results of classic dynamical simulations of the widely accepted giant impact model for the formation of the Moon, namely that most of the mass of the Moon originates from the impactor, not Earth. Resolution of this discrepancy without changing the main premises of the gia...

  4. Strength and impermeability recovery of siliceous mudstone from complete failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide migration can be undesirably increased by weakening the mechanical properties of a rock mass in the excavated disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnels of a geological disposal facility for high level radioactive waste. Laboratory testing of loading stress and loading time on failed siliceous mudstone specimens has identified the potential for the long-term recovery of the strength and impermeability of the rock mass in the EDZ. (author)

  5. Coloration processes in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mechanical stretching upon room temperature γ coloration of soda-lime silicate (SLS) glasses has been investigated. Optical absorption measurements were performed to follow the formation and thermal bleaching of the induced color centers. It has been shown that the mechanical deformation reduces the coloration effectivity and thermal stability of the created centers. It has been proposed that increase of the concentration of the non-bridging oxygens accelerate the bleaching processes

  6. Very Large Interstellar Grains as Evidenced by the Mid-Infrared Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, B W

    2015-01-01

    The sizes of interstellar grains are widely distributed, ranging from a few angstroms to a few micrometers. The ultraviolet (UV) and optical extinction constrains the dust in the size range of a couple hundredth micrometers to several submicrometers. The near and mid infrared (IR) emission constrains the nanometer-sized grains and angstrom-sized very large molecules. However, the quantity and size distribution of micrometer-sized grains remain unknown as they are gray in the UV/optical extinction and they are too cold and emit too little in the IR to be detected by IRAS, Spitzer, or Herschel. In this work, we employ the ~3-8 micron mid-IR extinction which is flat in both diffuse and dense regions to constrain the quantity, size, and composition of the micron-sized grain component. We find that, together with nano- and submicron-sized silicate and graphite (as well as PAHs), micron-sized graphite grains with C/H=137 ppm and a mean size of ~1.2 micron closely fit the observed interstellar extinction of the Gala...

  7. The transition from carbon dust to silicates production in low-metallicity AGB and SAGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, P; Schneider, R; Carini, R; Valiante, R; D'Antona, F; Gallerani, S; Maiolino, R; Tornambé, A

    2011-01-01

    We compute the mass and composition of dust produced by stars with masses in the range 1Msungrains under the hypothesis of a time-independent, spherically symmetric stellar wind. We find that the total mass of dust injected by AGB stars in the interstellar medium does not increase monotonically with stellar mass and ranges between a minimum of 10^{-6}Msun for the 1.5Msun stellar model, up to 2x10^{-4} Msun, for the 6Msun case. Dust composition depends on the stellar mass: low-mass stars (M < 3Msun) produce carbon-rich dust, whereas more massive stars, experiencing Hot Bottom Burning, never reach the carbon-star stage, and produce silicates and iron. This is in partial disagreement with previ...

  8. Low-to-Medium-Frequency AC Impedance Spectroscopy Investigations of Nanocrystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate Dried Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-to-medium-frequency range impedance spectroscopy was used to investigate two series of dried calcium silicate hydrates with or without aluminum atoms, C-S-H and C-A-S-H. Over four decades in frequency, sample Nyquist plots were fitted by adopting an equivalent circuit using constant phase elements (CPE). Conductivity values of the order of 10-9-10-10 S/cm were obtained at 316 K. The presence of CPE characteristic of the depleted semicircle at high frequency was related to a fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 up to 2.7. Above 316 K, the impedance spectra behaved unpredictably due to the dehydration process, while below 316 K the behavior was followed by adopting the modulus loss factor. The associated peak maximum variation is of the Arrhenius-type. The entire behavior may be interpreted by ionic motion and charge accumulation in addition to dielectric polarization at the grain boundaries associated to low fractal surface. (authors)

  9. Investigation of crystallization processes from hafnium silicate powders prepared from an oxychloride sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGilvery, Catriona M. [Imperial College, London; De Gendt, S [Imperial College, London; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Craven, A J [Imperial College, London; MacKenzie, M [Imperial College, London; McComb, D W [Imperial College, London

    2012-01-01

    Hafnium oxide and silicate materials are now incorporated into working CMOS devices, however the crystallisation mechanism is still poorly understood. In particular, addition of SiO2 to HfO2 has been shown to increase the crystallisation temperature of HfO2 hence allowing it to remain amorphous under current processing conditions. Building on earlier work we here investigate bulk HfxSi1-xO2 samples to determine the effect of SiO2 on the crystallisation pathway. Techniques such as XRD, HTXRD, thermal analysis techniques and TEM are used. It is found that the addition of SiO2 has very little affect on the crystallisation path at temperatures below 900 C but at higher temperatures a second t-HfO2 phase nucleates and is stabilised due to the strain of the surrounding amorphous SiO2 material. With an increase in SiO2 content the temperature at which this nucleation and stabilisation occurs is increased. The effect of strain has implications for inhibiting the crystallisation of the high-k layer, reduction of grain boundaries and hence diffusion, reduction of formation of interface layers and the possibility of stabilising t-HfO2 rather than m-HfO2 hence increasing the dielectric of the layer.

  10. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da, E-mail: roselisboa@cardiol.br [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Silva, Carlos Augusto Bueno [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Belo Horizonte, Hospital São João de Deus, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Greco, Otaviano José [Belo Horizonte, Hospital São João de Deus, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men) with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform), measuring the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively), with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00). The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents.

  11. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men) with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform), measuring the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively), with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00). The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents

  12. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. Objective: To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. Methods: This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform, measuring the low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Results: Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively, with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00. The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Conclusions: Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents.

  13. The Partitioning of Tungsten bwtween Aqueous Fluids and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许永胜; 张本仁; 等

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to determine the partition coefficients of tungsten between aqueous fluids and granitic melts at 800℃ and 1.5kb with natural granite as the starting material,The effects of the solution on the partition coefficients of tungsten show a wequence of P>co32->B>H2O.The effects are limited(generally KD<0.3)and the tungsten shows a preferential trend toward the melt over the aqueous fiuid.The value of KD increases with increasing concentration of phosphorus;the KD increases first and then reduces with the concentration of CO32-;when temperature decreases,the KD between the solution of CO32- and the silicate melt increases,and that between the solution of B4O72- and the silicate melt decreases.The partition coefficients of phosphorus and sodium between fluids and silicate melts have been calculated from the concentrations of the elements in the melts.The KD value for phosphorus is 0.38 and that for sodium is 0.56.Evidence shows that the elements tend to become richer and richer in the melts.

  14. Electrochemical Studies on Silicate and Bicarbonate Ions for Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohorich, Michael E.; Lamb, Joshua; Chandra, Dhanesh; Daemen, Jaak; Rebak, Raul B.

    2010-10-01

    Several types of carbon and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are being considered for use in the underground reinforcement of the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. In this study, potentiodynamic polarization under reducing conditions was used to determine the corrosion rates (CRs) and passivity behavior of AISI 4340 steel using different combinations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), in both pure water (PW) and simulated seawater (SW, 3.5 pct NaCl). These experiments were carried out to examine the potential inhibiting properties of the silicate or bicarbonate ions on the surface of the steel. The addition of sodium silicate to solution reduced the observed CR at room temperature to 19 μm/y at 0.005 M concentration and 7 μm/y at 0.025 M concentration in PW. The addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the CR from 84 μm/y (C = 0.1 M) to 455 μm/y (C = 1 M). These same behaviors were also observed at higher temperatures.

  15. Electrical properties of iron doped apatite-type lanthanum silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qingle; ZHANG Hua

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Fe doping on the electrical properties of lanthanum silicates was investigated.The apatite-type lanthanum silicates La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 (x=0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0) were synthesized via sol-gel process.The unit cell volume increased with Fe doping because the ionic radius of Fe3+ ion is larger than that of Si4+ ion.The conductivities of La10Si6-xFexO27 x/2 first increased and then decreased with the increasing of Fe content.The increase of the conductivity might be attributed to the distortion of the cell lattice,which assisted the migration of the interstitial oxygen ions.The decrease of the conductivity might be caused by the lower concentration of interstitial oxygen ions.The optimum Fe doping content in lanthanum silicates was 0.6.La10Si5.4Fe0.6O26.7 exhibited the highest ionic conductivity of 2.712× 10-2 S/cm at 800 ℃.The dependence of conductivity on oxygen partial pressure p(O2) suggested that the conductivity of La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 was mainly contributed by ionic conductivity.

  16. A Review: Fundamental Aspects of Silicate Mesoporous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid A. ALOthman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicate mesoporous materials have received widespread interest because of their potential applications as supports for catalysis, separation, selective adsorption, novel functional materials, and use as hosts to confine guest molecules, due to their extremely high surface areas combined with large and uniform pore sizes. Over time a constant demand has developed for larger pores with well-defined pore structures. Silicate materials, with well-defined pore sizes of about 2.0–10.0 nm, surpass the pore-size constraint (<2.0 nm of microporous zeolites. They also possess extremely high surface areas (>700 m2 g−1 and narrow pore size distributions. Instead of using small organic molecules as templating compounds, as in the case of zeolites, long chain surfactant molecules were employed as the structure-directing agent during the synthesis of these highly ordered materials. The structure, composition, and pore size of these materials can be tailored during synthesis by variation of the reactant stoichiometry, the nature of the surfactant molecule, the auxiliary chemicals, the reaction conditions, or by post-synthesis functionalization techniques. This review focuses mainly on a concise overview of silicate mesoporous materials together with their applications. Perusal of the review will enable researchers to obtain succinct information about microporous and mesoporous materials.

  17. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by Si29 NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process ( Dtilde 10-9m2/s at 300 K), and a much slower process ( Dtilde 10-11m2/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  18. Kinetics of structure formation in PP/layered silicate nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP/organophilized montmorillonite (OMMT and polypropylene/organophilized montmorillonite/maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP composites were prepared in an internal mixer under a wide range of processing conditions to study the kinetics of structure formation. Structure and properties were characterized by a variety of techniques. The gallery structure of the organophilic silicate changed in spite of the fact that no compatibilizer was added to PP/OMMT composites. Silicate reflection shifted towards smaller 2θangles, broadened and its intensity decreased indicating intercalation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM micrographs even showed individual platelets at long mixing times. However, the extent and direction of changes in the gallery structure of the silicate did not justify those observed in properties. The analysis of the results and additional experiments proved that the degradation of the polymer also takes place during processing leading to the formation of carbonyl and/or carboxyl groups, as well as to the decrease of molecular weight. The modification of the chain structure of the polymer influences interfacial interactions and the intercalation process. Some properties are directly determined by molecular weight (rheological properties, elongation. Both the clay and the MAPP seem to accelerate degradation. Thermooxidative degradation must have disadvantageous effect during the application of PP nanocomposites and needs further study.

  19. Deformation strain inhomogeneity in columnar grain nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.L.; Godfrey, A.; Juul Jensen, D.;

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for determination of the local deformation strain of individual grains in the bulk of a columnar grain sample. The method, based on measurement of the change in grain area of each grain, is applied to 12% cold rolled nickel. Large variations are observed in the local strain...

  20. Effects of cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents or bare metal stent on fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgimigli, Marco; Sabaté, Manel; Kaiser, Christoph;

    2014-01-01

    eluting stents with bare metal stents were selected. The principal investigators whose trials met the inclusion criteria provided data for individual patients. PRIMARY OUTCOMES: The primary outcome was cardiac mortality. Secondary endpoints were myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, definite......OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and effectiveness of cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents compared with bare metal stents. DESIGN: Individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Cox proportional regression models stratified by trial, containing random effects, were...... or probable stent thrombosis, target vessel revascularisation, and all cause death. RESULTS: The search yielded five randomised controlled trials, comprising 4896 participants. Compared with patients receiving bare metal stents, participants receiving cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents had...

  1. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  2. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  3. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng, R. D. [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Y. H. [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ye, M. F.; Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  4. Infrared imaging spectroscopy with micron resolution of Sutter's Mill meteorite grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Mehmet; Kebukawa, Yoko; Peale, Robert E.; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol J.; Jenniskens, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy are applied with submicrometer spatial resolution to multiple grains of Sutter's Mill meteorite, a regolith breccia with CM1 and CM2 lithologies. The Raman and infrared active functional groups reveal the nature and distribution of organic and mineral components and confirm that SM12 reached higher metamorphism temperatures than SM2. The spatial distributions of carbonates and organic matter are negatively correlated. The spatial distributions of aliphatic organic matter and OH relative to the distributions of silicates in SM2 differ from those in SM12, supporting a hypothesis that the parent body of Sutter's Mill is a combination of multiple bodies with different origins. The high aliphatic CH2/CH3 ratios determined from band intensities for SM2 and SM12 grains are similar to those of IDPs and less altered carbonaceous chondrites, and they are significantly higher than those in other CM chondrites and diffuse ISM objects.

  5. Silicate sulfidation and chemical differences between enstatite chondrites and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, S. W.; Petaev, M. I.; Buseck, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic similarity between the Earth-Moon system and enstatite chondrites (ECs) led to the idea that ECs were Earth's building blocks [1-3]. However, compared to Earth's mantle, ECs have low Fe0/Fe ratios, are enriched in volatile elements, and depleted in refractory lithophile elements and Mg [4]. Therefore, deriving Earth composition from ECs requires a loss of volatiles during or prior to accretion and sequestering a large fraction of Si in the deep Earth. Alternatively, the isotopic similarity between the Earth and ECs is explained by their formation from a common precursor that experienced different evolutionary paths resulting in the chemical difference [4]. The vestiges of such a precursor are still present in the unequilibrated ECs as FeO-rich silicates with O isotopic compositions identical to bulk ECs and Earth [5]. Conversion of such a precursor into the characteristic EC mineral assemblage requires high-temperature processing in an H-poor environment with high fS2 and fO2 close to that of the classic solar nebula [6], consistent with redox conditions inferred from Ti4+/Ti3+ ratios in EC pyroxene [7]. Under such conditions reaction of FeO-rich silicates with S-rich gas results in their replacement by the assemblage of FeO-poor silicates; Fe, Mg, Ca sulfides; free silica; and Si-bearing Fe,Ni metal alloy. The progressive sulfidation of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules results in loss of Mg and addition of Fe, Mn, S, Na, K and, perhaps, other volatiles [6]. At the advanced stages of silicate sulfidation recorded in the metal-sulfide nodules [8], a portion of Si is reduced and dissolved in the Fe,Ni metal. This process is known to fractionate Si isotopes [9,10] and would explain the differences between the ECs and Earth's mantle [11]. The sulfidation of silicates also produces porous S-rich silica, a peculiar phase observed so far only in the ECs. It consists of a sinewy SiO2-rich framework enclosing numerous vesicles filled with beam

  6. Grain centre mapping - 3DXRD measurements of average grain characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Lyckegaard, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    Three-Dimensional X-ray Diraction (3DXRD) Microscopy is a generic term covering a variety of dierent techniques for characterising the mi- crostructure within the bulk of polycrystalline materials. One strategy | namely grain centre mapping | enables fast measurements of the av- erage characteris...

  7. VENDA DE BEBIDA ALCOÓLICA E VIOLÊNCIA: O QUE PENSAM OS DONOS DE BARES

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Franchino; Maria do Perpétuo S S Nóbrega; Marcelo Eduardo Pfeiffer Castellanos

    2008-01-01

    En los últimos años, creció significativamente el fenómeno de la violencia. El consumo abusivo de alcohol representa un factor importante a ser considerado en la comprensión de ese fenómeno. Analizamos la percepción de los dueños de bares con respecto a venta de bebida alcohólica y la situación de violencia. En un estudio cualitativo, desarrollado en julio de 2005, fueron realizadas entrevistas en profundidad con 15 dueños de bares. Las transcripciones fueron clasificadas en seis categoría...

  8. The application of Guided Ion Beam Tandem Mass Spectrometer; Bond dissociation energies of bare and ligated copper group cluster anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Threshold energies, fragmentation patterns, and integral cross sections for the reactions of collision induced dissociations of bare and ligated copper group cluster anions are determined using a Guided Ion Beam Tandem Mass Spectrometer (GIB-MS). The bond breaking patterns for the copper cluster anions show dramatic even/odd tendencies, e.g., all copper group anions generate as the predominant reaction product, Carbon monoxide is weakly bound to copper group cluster anions. Cohesive energies of the bare copper and silver cluster anions are determined and exhibit a good correspondence with estimate cohesive energies by the model of Miedema.

  9. Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lejček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary segregation, their dependence on volume solid solubility, mutual solute–solute interaction and pressure effect in ferrous alloys is demonstrated.

  10. Irradiation Effects in Fosterrite and the Nature of Interstellar Grains: A Coordinated Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Christoffersen, R.

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline and amorphous silicates condense in the outflows of low mass evolved stars and massive red supergiant stars and are injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) where they are rendered almost completely amorphous by a multitude of destructive processes (e.g. shock, grain-grain collisions, and irradiation). Irradiation effects in particular may have played an important role in the genesis and modification of primitive grains in cometary dust, but unraveling those effects requires controlled experiments under appropriate conditions and with an emphasis on materials relevant to the ISM. Here we report our infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and trans-mission electron microscope (TEM) measurements on forsterite that was amorphized through irradiation by high energy heavy ions.

  11. Ore petrography of low-grade siliceous manganese ores from the Bonai-Keonjhar belt, Orissa, India: The influence of mineral-fabric on their beneficiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mishra Subrat; Mohapatra Birendra Kumar; Dash Nilima; Rao Danda Srinivas

    2011-01-01

    Low grade siliceous manganese ores from the iron ore group of the Bonai-Keonjhar belt,Orissa,India are found mostly in shear zones.The ore characteristics of siliceous manganese ore samples from three different mines,viz.the Shankar (Barbil OMC lease hold area),the Sone-Patuli (Patmunda,OMM lease hold area),and the Musaghar (Roida,OMDC lease hold area),were studied.These siliceous manganese ores are of three types,respectively:(i) spongy-granular; (ii) massive-mosaic; and (iii) hard-mylonitized.The spongy-granular type contains granular,saccharoidal quartz and the major manganese mineral present is pyrolusite.The second type contains well crystallized quartz and cryptomelane,while the third has cherty,fine grained quartz (mylonite) along with romanechite.All three ores were subjected to physical beneflciation under similar conditions.Both gravity and magnetic separation techniques were employed.The mineral-fabric of the ores has been correlated to the extent of their beneflciation using these physical techniques.Of these three ores only the spongy-granular type responded well to upgrading.The feed with 22% Mn content could be upgraded to 44% with a 28% yield and a 49% recovery.The good response to beneficiation of the spongygranular sample could be due to the large euhedral crystals of pyrolusite and the friable nature of the saccharoidal quartz.This study reveals the influence of mineral-fabric on beneficiation of low grade ore,siliceous Mn ore in particular.

  12. AGB stars and presolar grains

    CERN Document Server

    Busso, M; Maiorca, E; Palmerini, S

    2013-01-01

    Among presolar materials recovered in meteorites, abundant SiC and Al$_{2}$O$_{3}$ grains of AGB origins were found. They showed records of C, N, O, $^{26}$Al and s-element isotopic ratios that proved invaluable in constraining the nucleosynthesis models for AGB stars \\cite{zin,gal}. In particular, when these ratios are measured in SiC grains, they clearly reveal their prevalent origin in cool AGB circumstellar envelopes and provide information on both the local physics and the conditions at the nucleosynthesis site (the H- and He-burning layers deep inside the structure). Among the properties ascertained for the main part of the SiC data (the so-called {\\it mainstream} ones), we mention a large range of $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratios, extending below the solar value \\cite{mar}, and $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratios $\\gtrsim$ 30. Other classes of grains, instead, display low carbon isotopic ratios ($\\gtrsim 10$) and a huge dispersion for N isotopes, with cases of large $^{15}$N excess. In the same grains, isotopes currently...

  13. Microstructure characterization of porous microalloyed aluminium-silicate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purenović Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaolinite and bentonite clay powders mixed with active additives, based on Mg(NO32 and Al(NO32, sintered at high temperatures produce very porous ceramics with microcrystalline and amorphous regions and highly developed metalized surfaces (mainly with magnesium surplus. Microstructure investigations have revealed non-uniform and highly porous structure with broad distribution of grain size, specifically shaped grains and high degree of agglomeration. The ceramics samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD and IR spectroscopy analysis, prior and after treatment in “synthetic water”, i.e. in aqueous solution of arsenic-salt. Grain size distribution for untreated and treated samples was done with software SemAfore 4. It has shown great variety in size distribution of grains from clay powders to sintered samples.

  14. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  15. Preparation and fluorescence property of red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the energy efficient synthesis of a red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor produced by heating a Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor. Concentration quenching of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was not observed and the emission intensity did not decrease up to a Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio of 0.46. Heating of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio = 0.32) phosphor produced an amorphous Eu3+-activated calcium silicate phosphor, which had a maximum emission intensity at 870 oC and emitted in the red under near-ultraviolet irradiation (395 nm). The emission intensity of the Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was about half that of a commercial BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphor, and shows great potential for application in white light-emitting diodes.

  16. Use of silicate shells to prevent sintering during thermally induced chemical ordering of iron platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Dwayne Fitzgerald

    Its very high value of magnetocrystalline anisotropy makes the L1 0 phase of FePt a leading candidate for future high density magnetic recording systems. FePt nanoparticles can be prepared by a number of chemical methods. However, these particles have a face-centered cubic structure, with low anisotropy and are superparamagnetic. They must be heated to temperatures above 500 °C to obtain the chemically ordered L10 phase. However, during heating the particles coalesce to give twinned grains with large sizes (10-30 nm). Here we provide a solution to the sintering problem by developing a sol-gel procedure for coating the FePt particles with an amorphous silica shell. The silica shell prevents the FePt particles from agglomerating when heated to 700 °C to effect chemical ordering. FePt nanoparticles were prepared by the super-hydride reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate and iron(II) chloride in hot diphenyl ether in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid capping ligands. The particles had an average diameter of 5-6 nm, a face-centered cubic structure and were superparamagnetic. The particles were coated using a microemulsion process producing a 6 nm silicon oxide shell with a single nanoparticle core-shell structure. The nanoparticles were heated to 700 °C for times of 30 min and 1hr to achieve L10 phase transformation. These samples were annealed in a tube furnace under 95% Ar/5% H2. Many procedures were found to be ineffective. They mostly consisted of biphasic reaction systems and several trials where reaction variables were altered in search of the appropriate conditions. This work has impacted the search for a higher density magnetic recording medium by allowing the study of FePt under a protected environment while achieving chemical ordering. If the L10 FePt nanoparticles will be used in magnetic recording, the particles will require a hard coating to prevent wear. In the course of the present work, it has been shown that the silicate shells

  17. Grain Refinement of Deoxidized Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balart, María José; Patel, Jayesh B.; Gao, Feng; Fan, Zhongyun

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the current status of grain refinement of copper accompanied in particular by a critical appraisal of grain refinement of phosphorus-deoxidized, high residual P (DHP) copper microalloyed with 150 ppm Ag. Some deviations exist in terms of the growth restriction factor ( Q) framework, on the basis of empirical evidence reported in the literature for grain size measurements of copper with individual additions of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 wt pct of Mo, In, Sn, Bi, Sb, Pb, and Se, cast under a protective atmosphere of pure Ar and water quenching. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) has been observed in copper, with an individual addition of 0.4B and with combined additions of 0.4Zr-0.04P and 0.4Zr-0.04P-0.015Ag and, in a previous study, with combined additions of 0.1Ag-0.069P (in wt pct). CETs in these B- and Zr-treated casts have been ascribed to changes in the morphology and chemistry of particles, concurrently in association with free solute type and availability. No further grain-refining action was observed due to microalloying additions of B, Mg, Ca, Zr, Ti, Mn, In, Fe, and Zn (~0.1 wt pct) with respect to DHP-Cu microalloyed with Ag, and therefore are no longer relevant for the casting conditions studied. The critical microalloying element for grain size control in deoxidized copper and in particular DHP-Cu is Ag.

  18. Grain Refinement of Deoxidized Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balart, María José; Patel, Jayesh B.; Gao, Feng; Fan, Zhongyun

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the current status of grain refinement of copper accompanied in particular by a critical appraisal of grain refinement of phosphorus-deoxidized, high residual P (DHP) copper microalloyed with 150 ppm Ag. Some deviations exist in terms of the growth restriction factor (Q) framework, on the basis of empirical evidence reported in the literature for grain size measurements of copper with individual additions of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 wt pct of Mo, In, Sn, Bi, Sb, Pb, and Se, cast under a protective atmosphere of pure Ar and water quenching. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) has been observed in copper, with an individual addition of 0.4B and with combined additions of 0.4Zr-0.04P and 0.4Zr-0.04P-0.015Ag and, in a previous study, with combined additions of 0.1Ag-0.069P (in wt pct). CETs in these B- and Zr-treated casts have been ascribed to changes in the morphology and chemistry of particles, concurrently in association with free solute type and availability. No further grain-refining action was observed due to microalloying additions of B, Mg, Ca, Zr, Ti, Mn, In, Fe, and Zn (~0.1 wt pct) with respect to DHP-Cu microalloyed with Ag, and therefore are no longer relevant for the casting conditions studied. The critical microalloying element for grain size control in deoxidized copper and in particular DHP-Cu is Ag.

  19. Concepts on Low Temperature Mechanical Grain Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, John Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.; Boyce, Brad Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.

    2013-11-01

    In metals, as grain size is reduced below 100nm, conventional dislocation plasticity is suppressed resulting in improvements in strength, hardness, and wears resistance. Existing and emerging components use fine grained metals for these beneficial attributes. However, these benefits can be lost in service if the grains undergo growth during the component’s lifespan. While grain growth is traditionally viewed as a purely thermal process that requires elevated temperature exposure, recent evidence shows that some metals, especially those with nanocrystalline grain structure, can undergo grain growth even at room temperature or below due to mechanical loading. This report has been assembled to survey the key concepts regarding how mechanical loads can drive grain coarsening at room temperature and below. Topics outlined include the atomic level mechanisms that facilitate grain growth, grain boundary mobility, and the impact of boundary structure, loading scheme, and temperature.

  20. Type D personality predicts death or myocardial infarction after bare metal stent or sirolimus-eluting stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Lemos, Pedro A; van Vooren, Priya R;

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Type D personality on the occurrence of adverse events at nine months in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs) or bare stents. Type D patients experience increased negative...

  1. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Yi; Xinming Wang

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China.Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS.The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively).Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils.Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime.COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29℃.While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature.COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios,and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  2. Productivity and nutritive value of bluestem grass fertilized with calcium and magnesium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    Cinthya Souza Santana; Laura Souza Santos; Greiciele de Morais; Luiz Arnaldo Fernandes; Luciana Castro Geraseev

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of application of calcium and magnesium silicate on the productivity, chemical composition and in situ ruminal degradation of bluestem grass (Andropogon gayanus Kunth, cv. Baeti; Embrapa 23) during the rainy and dry seasons. The design consisted of completely randomized blocks in a 6x2 factorial scheme (six silicate doses and two cutting seasons), arranged in plots subdivided over time. The plots were the calcium and magnesium silicate doses (0, 200, 400, 600, ...

  3. Cool Down!——The State Administration of Grain Lower Expectation of Grain Price

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Jun

    2010-01-01

    @@ The rising grain price in the first half of the year,coupled with the news that China's summer grain output fell for the first time in seven years,has enhanced market expectation for the grain price to rise.

  4. Three Dimension Monte Carlo Simulation of Austenite Grain Growth in CGHAZ of an Ultrafine Grain Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong CHEN; Yongping LEI; Xiaoyan LI; Yaowu SHI; Zhiling TIAN

    2003-01-01

    In the present research Monte Carlo technique was used to simulate the grain growth in heat-affected zone(HAZ) of an ultrafine grain steel. An experimental data based (EBD) model proposed by Gao was used to establish the relation between tMCS and real time temperature kinetics in our simulation. The simulations give out the evolution of grain structure and grain size distribution in HAZ of the ultrafine grain steel. A Microsoft Window based on computer program for the simulation of grain growth in the HAZ of weldment in three dimensions has been developed using Monte Carlo technique. For the system, inputting the temperature field data and material properties, the evolution of grain structure, both image of simulated grain structure and numerical datum reflecting grain size distribution can be produced by the program. The system was applied to the ultrafine grain steel welding, and the simulated results show that the ultrafine grain steel has large tendency of grain growth.

  5. Historical developments in marine geology and some aspects of fine-grained sediments along the continental margins of India and Bengal fan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 29 Historical developments in Marine Geology and some aspects of fine- grained sediments along the continental margins of India and Bengal Fan V. Purnachandra Rao National Institute of Oceanography...-surface Gas Hydrates deposits. These were dealt separately in a different lecture. The slope sediments are silty clays with an admixture of abundant carbonate and/or siliceous tests. There are two large Deep sea Fans in the deeper Arabian Sea and Bay...

  6. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R. S.; Murugavel, S.; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2-(60-x)Bi2O3-40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623-703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  7. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  8. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  9. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat Banerjee

    2001-04-01

    Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack length decreases and the crack deviates from its original path with increasing angle. The deviation of the crack was correlated with the component of the crack driving force and the theoretical strength of the aligned crystals at different angles.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  11. Microstructural study of an iron silicate catalyst by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the effects of various synthesis conditions on the structure of iron silicate analogs of zeolite ZSM-5 considered. Scanning electron microscopy and morphologies. Particle sizes vary from tenths of a micron to several microns, depending on degree of agitation during crystal growth, while morphology is additionally dependent on the concentration of iron in the gel during crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the size and spatial distributions of iron-rich (as compared to the FeZSM-5 matrix) second phase particles within the ZSM-5 framework as a function of SiO2/Fe2O3-ratio, thermal and hydrothermal treatments

  12. Concentration Quenching in Erbium Doped Bismuth Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shi-Xun; XU Tie-Feng; NIE Qiu-Hua; SHEN Xiang; WANG Xun-Si

    2006-01-01

    @@ Er2 O3-doped bismuth silicate glasses are prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method, and the Er3+ : 4 I13/2 → 4I15/2 fluorescence properties are studied for different Er3+ concentrations. Infrared spectra are measured to estimate the exact content of OH- groups in the samples. Based on the electric dipole-dipole interaction theory,the interaction parameter CEr,Er for the migration rate of Er3+ :4 I13/2 → 4 I13/2 in proposed glasses is calculated.

  13. In vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of tricalcium silicate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaoming Liao; Hongyang Zhu; Guangfu Yin; Zhongbing Huang; Yadong Yao; Xianchun Chen

    2011-08-01

    The in vitro bioactivity of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5) ceramics was investigated by the bone-like apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid (SBF), and the cytocompatibility was evaluated through osteoblast adhesion and proliferation assay. The results show that the Ca3SiO5 ceramics possess bone-like apatite formation ability in SBF. In vitro cytocompatible evaluation reveals that osteoblasts adhere and spread well on the Ca3SiO5 ceramics, indicating good bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  14. Competitive Adsorption of Arsenite and Silicic Acid on Goethite

    OpenAIRE

    Luxton, Todd Peter

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of silicic acid and arsenite alone and competitively on goethite over a broad pH range (3-11) at environmentally relevant concentrations was investigated utilizing pH adsorption data and zeta potential measurements. Both addition scenarios (Si before As(III) and As(III) before Si) were examined. The results of the adsorption experiments and zeta potential measurements were then used to model the single ion and competitive ion adsorption on goethite with the CD-MUSIC ...

  15. Tin in silicate glasses: structure, thermodynamics and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work Moessbauer spectroscopy is used to investigate the oxidation states and structures of tin in silicate glasses. Thermal treatment of the glasses in atmospheres with varying oxygen partial pressure leads to the simultaneous appearance of reduction and diffusion. Experiments with varying treatment time give the opportunity to study diffusion and reduction processes in detail. Comparison of the hyperfine parameters of reference materials with measured parameter provides information about the local surroundings of the tin atoms. An octahedral surrounding for Sn4+ is presumed, while Sn2+ and three oxygen atoms form a tetrahedral coordination.

  16. Kinetics of Cyclohexanone Ammoximation over Titanium Silicate Molecular Sieves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永祥; 吴巍; 闵恩泽

    2005-01-01

    An intrinsic kinetics of cyclohexanone ammoximation in the liquid phase over titanium silicate molecular sieves is investigated in an isothermal slurry reactor at different initial reactant concentrations, catalyst loading,and reaction temperature. The rate equations are developed by analyzing data of kinetic measurements. More than 10 side reactions were found. H202 decomposition reaction Inust be considered and other side reactions can be neglected in the kinetic modeling. The predicted values of reaction rates based on the kinetic models are almost consistent with experimental ones. The models have guidance to the selection of reactor types and they are useful to the design and operation of reactor used.

  17. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  18. Colorimetric and bare-eye determination of fluoride using gold nanoparticle agglomeration probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a sensitive detection scheme for fluoride that is based on a quinone-methide-type of rearrangement reaction to trigger a color change among cloaked gold nanoparticle agglomeration probes. Fluoride ions remove silyl moieties from phenol groups on the surface of the probes, and this causes a quinone-methide-type of rearrangement reaction to occur. This is accompanied by the release of a dithiol in a spontaneous and irreversible reaction at room temperature in aqueous medium. The released dithiol causes aggregation of the AuNPs which leads to a color change from pink-red to violet-blue that can easily be seen with bare eyes.. The generation of color by this cascade reactions is only caused by fluoride and not interfered by any other anions. The assay platform developed here offers a sensitive colorimetric assay for fluoride. The lower limit of detection is 120 μM, and the dynamic concentration range is from 120 μM to 1.5 mM. (author)

  19. Alpha decay in electron environments of increasing density: From the bare nucleus to compressed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Fabio [Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The influence of the electron environment on the α decay is elucidated. Within the frame of a simple model based on the generalized Thomas-Fermi theory of the atom, it is shown that the increase of the electron density around the parent nucleus drives a mechanism which shortens the lifetime. Numerical results are provided for {sup 144}Nd, {sup 154}Yb and {sup 210}Po. Depending on the nuclide, fractional lifetime reduction relative to the bare nucleus is of the order of 0.1-1% in free ions, neutral atoms and ordinary matter, but may reach up to 10% at matter densities as high as 10{sup 4}g/cm{sup 3}, in a high-Z matrix. The effect induced by means of state-of-the-art compression techniques, although much smaller than previously found, would however be measurable. The extent of the effect in ultra-high-density stellar environments might become significant and would deserve further investigation. (orig.)

  20. The Development of Coronary Artery Stents: From Bare-Metal to Bio-Resorbable Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yun Ho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Conventional balloon angioplasty is associated with high rates of complications such as coronary dissection and vessel recoil. The deployment of bare-metal stents (BMSs can overcome these problems and achieve a better patency rate than simple balloon angioplasty. It has been shown that the stent design including structure platform, size, length, and strut thickness has a major influence on the clinical results. Even though angioplasty with BMS implantation is widely used in coronary interventions, the restenosis rate due to neointimal hyperplasia remains high. Therefore, drug-eluting stents (DESs coated with anti-proliferative agents and polymers have been developed to reduce the restenosis rate and improve the clinical outcomes. Although the repeat revascularization rate of DESs is lower than that of BMSs, the long-term stent thrombosis rate is higher than for BMSs. Therefore, new and emerging generations of stents, in which, for example, thinner struts and bioresorbable polymers are used, are available for clinical use. However, there are only a limited number of clinical trials, in which these newer stents have been compared with BMSs and first- and second-generation DESs. The purpose of this review was to provide up-to-date information on the evolution of coronary artery stents from BMSs to DESs to bioresorbable stents (BRSs.