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Sample records for barbiturate coma therapy

  1. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

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    Christopher R. Newey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted.

  2. Music therapy for coma patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Chen, W

    2015-04-01

    The application of quantitative EEG (δ+θ/α+β value) and GCS value to evaluate the role of music therapy for traumatic brain injury coma patients. Forty patients of traumatic brain injury coma were selected to meet the inclusion criteria. Twenty cases were selected for the rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery ward, whose families could actively cooperate with, and the patients could receive a long-term fixed nursing staff with formal music therapy (music group). Twenty cases were in the intensive care unit of the rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery ward. Their families members cooperated poorly, had often changing nursing staff, and without a formal music therapy (control group). After a one monthe follow up, the GCS value and quantitative EEG (δ+θ/α+β value) were compared between the two groups. Between the two groups, except for the presence or absence of formal music therapy, the rest of treatment had no significant difference and was matched by age, gender, and injury types. In 40 cases of traumatic brain injury patients, the GCS value increased in the music group after treatment when compared to the control group. The difference between the two groups was significant (p music therapy in patients with craniocerebral trauma coma has obviously an effect on promoting to regain consciousness. The quantitative EEG (δ+θ/α+β value) can be used as an objective index to evaluate the state of brain function.

  3. Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state of unconsciousness. Persistent vegetative state is not brain-death. An individual in a state of coma is alive but unable to move or respond to his or her environment. Coma may occur as a ...

  4. COMA

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    P.F. Litvitsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture reviews modern ideas of comatose conditions: their types, etiology, common key pathogenesis elements, stages, key manifestations, treatment principles; it characterizes the specifics of certain coma varieties and key impairments of consciousness. Key words: coma, stupor, sopor, hypoxia, impairments of energy supply for neurons.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:48-54

  5. Extracorporeal treatment for barbiturate poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mactier, Robert; Laliberté, Martin; Mardini, Joelle

    2014-01-01

    The EXTRIP (Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning) Workgroup conducted a systematic review of barbiturate poisoning using a standardized evidence-based process to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in patients with barbiturate poisoning. The authors reviewed all...... articles, extracted data, summarized key findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A 2-round modified Delphi method was used to reach a consensus on voting statements, and the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement. 617 articles met......-acting barbiturates are dialyzable and short-acting barbiturates are moderately dialyzable. Four key recommendations were made. (1) The use of ECTR should be restricted to cases of severe long-acting barbiturate poisoning. (2) The indications for ECTR in this setting are the presence of prolonged coma, respiratory...

  6. Coma mixedematoso Myxedema coma

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    Lisette Leal Curí

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El coma mixedematoso es la forma más severa y profunda del hipotiroidismo. Se presenta con mayor frecuencia en mujeres y ancianos. Entre los factores precipitantes se encuentran: la sepsis, la exposición al frío, los eventos agudos graves, el uso de anestésicos, sedantes o narcóticos, así como la descontinuación del tratamiento sustitutivo con hormonas tiroideas, entre otros. El diagnóstico clínico se realiza por la presencia de síntomas y signos característicos de un hipotiroidismo severo, con hipotermia y alteraciones de la conciencia. Apoyan este diagnóstico los hallazgos de laboratorio: hiponatremia, hipoxemia, hipercapnia, alteraciones hemoquímicas y el aumento de la tirotropina por la disminución de las hormonas tiroideas en el caso de la enfermedad primaria. El tratamiento se debe realizar en una unidad de cuidados intensivos, con monitorización, medidas de soporte respiratorio y cardiovascular, calentamiento corporal interno, hidratación, corrección de la hipotensión y de los trastornos electrolíticos. Se administrarán, además, glucocorticoides, antibióticos de amplio espectro y hormonas tiroideas. La evolución depende de la demora en el inicio del tratamiento, la edad, las comorbilidades, la hipotermia persistente y las complicaciones asociadas.Myxedema coma is the most severe and deepest form of hypothyroidism. It occurs more often in the women and the elderly. Among the unleashing factors found are sepsis, exposure to cold, acute severe events, use of anesthetic drugs, sedatives or narcotics as well as the interruption of the replacement treatment with thyroid hormones, among others. The clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of symptoms and signs that are characteristic of severe hypothyroidism, with hypothermia and altered consciousness. This diagnosis is also supported by the lab findings: hyponatremia, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, hemochemical alterations and the rise of thyrotropin due to the decrease of

  7. Severe cutaneous reactions caused by barbiturates in seven Iranian children.

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    Mamishi, Setareh; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Pourpak, Zahra; Aghaee, Farzaneh Mirza; Moinfar, Zeinab; Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Ashrafi, Mahmoud; Moin, Mostafa

    2009-11-01

    The severe adverse cutaneous reactions of erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare mucocutaneous diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause is antiepileptic drugs, particularly carbamazepine and lamotrigine, as well as the barbiturates group (phenobarbital and phenytoin). In this article, we present seven children with severe adverse cutaneous reactions caused by barbiturates. The age of the affected children was between 2 and 11 years and they all had a history of taking barbiturates. Their symptoms started 1-3 weeks after the initiation of barbiturates, including a prodrome characterized by 2-3 days of malaise, fever, cough and anorexia, after which the skin and mucosal lesions appeared and worsened. The skin lesions varied from rash to large bullae, plus different forms of mucous membrane involvement. The offending drugs (barbiturates) were stopped immediately and care was largely supportive. As a result of the morbidity and/or mortality associated with EM, SJS and TEN, physicians should keep in mind their differential diagnosis when cutaneous reactions are observed in patients undergoing barbiturate therapy. Furthermore, although TEN and SJS are life-threatening diseases, early detection and appropriate care can lead to a decrease in the incidence of death. The strategies described here seem to be successful and safe because, despite the serious conditions, our patients responded well. All survived.

  8. An Interesting Case of Barbiturate Automatism and Review of Literature

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    Sankalp Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48 year old man with a diagnosis of HIV infection since 1993, on highly active anti-retro viral therapy (HAART with stable CD4 count and undetectable viral load for years and seizure disorder presented with recurrent drowsiness. His seizures were well controlled on phenobarbitone for years. Repeated laboratory evaluation demonstrated toxic levels of phenobarbitone in his blood. A thorough clinical, psychiatric, laboratory and imaging evaluation did not reveal any obvious etiology for the recurrent barbiturate intoxication in this man. Our findings suggest the possible diagnosis of barbiturate drug automatism in this patient. Though drug automatism is a controversial entity, it merits continued attention. There are recent reports of similar phenomenon with newer sedative agents such as Zolpidem. It is important to be aware of this phenomenon as a possible explanation for recurrent intoxication with barbiturates without a clear etiology for drug overdose.

  9. Diabetic Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lead to: Permanent brain damage Death Prevention Good day-to-day control of your diabetes can help you prevent a diabetic coma. Keep these tips in mind: Follow your meal plan. Consistent snacks and meals can help you control your blood ...

  10. Prophylactic barbiturate use for the prevention of morbidity and mortality following perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leslie; Berg, Marie; Soll, Roger

    2016-05-05

    Seizures are common following perinatal asphyxia and may exacerbate secondary neuronal injury. Barbiturate therapy has been used for infants with perinatal asphyxia in order to prevent seizures. However, barbiturate therapy may adversely affect neurodevelopment leading to concern regarding aggressive use in neonates. To determine the effect of administering prophylactic barbiturate therapy on death or neurodevelopmental disability in term and late preterm infants following perinatal asphyxia. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2015, Issue 11), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 30 November 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 30 November 2015), and CINAHL (1982 to 30 November 2015). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and quasi-RCTs. We included all RCTs or quasi-RCTs of prophylactic barbiturate therapy in term and late preterm infants without clinical or electroencephalographic evidence of seizures compared to controls following perinatal asphyxia. Three review authors independently selected, assessed the quality of, and extracted data from the included studies. We assessed methodologic quality and validity of studies without consideration of the results. The review authors independently extracted data and performed meta-analyses using risk ratios (RR) and risk differences (RD) for dichotomous data and mean difference for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For significant results, we calculated the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) or for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH). In this updated review, we identified nine RCTs of any barbiturate therapy in term and late preterm infants aged less than three days old with perinatal asphyxia without evidence of seizures. Eight of these studies compared prophylactic

  11. Primary study on median nerve stimulation therapy in improving the level of consciousness of patients in coma caused by head traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ping; Wang Zhong; Cui Gang; Wu Yiwei; Zhang Bin; He Huai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of median nerve stimulation in improving the level of consciousness of patients in coma caused by severe head traumas and the possible mechanism of its hastening awakening from coma. Methods: 30 unconscious patients with severe brain traumas were randomly assigned to the treated group (n=15) and the control group (n=15). The patients in the control group were treated routinely. Besides routine therapy the patients in the treated group were treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. As the treated group were treated with initial stimulation, SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after 30 minutes' median nerve electrical stimulation under the same condition. The changes of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of lesion spot of brain were compared and analysed with visual method and semi-quantitative method in BFCK% mathematical model. A week after stimulation authors assess the therapeutic effect in the two groups with GCS scores. Results: The patients in the treated group's rCBF of the lesion spot increased significantly after stimulation. A week later the patients in the treated group had improved by average of 4.8 on the GCS in contrast to 2.0 on the GCS in the control group which showed that the GCS scores of the two groups had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion: The median nerve electrical stimulation can improve the level of consciousness of patients in coma caused by severe head traumas. The increase of rCBF of lesion spot of brain can be one of mechanisms of its hastening awakening from coma

  12. Hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma induced by methylprednisolone pulse therapy for acute rejection after liver transplantation: a case report and review of the literature

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    Zhou J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jian Zhou,* Weiqiang Ju,* Xiaopeng Yuan, Xiaofeng Zhu, Dongping Wang, Xiaoshun HeOrgan Transplant Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma (HNKHC is a serious, rare complication induced by methylprednisolone (MP pulse therapy for acute rejection after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. Herein, we report an unusual case of a 58-year-old woman who experienced acute rejection at 30 months after OLT, only one case in which HNKHC resulted in MP pulse therapy for acute rejection in all 913 recipients in our center. The general morbidity of HNKHC was 1.09‰ in this study. HNKHC is characterized by rapid onset, rapid progression, and a lack of specific clinical manifestations. High-dose MP management was a clear risk factor. The principle of treatment included rapid rehydration, low-dose insulin infusion, and correcting disorders of electrolytes and acidosis. In conclusion, clinicians considering MP pulse therapy after OLT should be alert to the occurrence of HNKHC. Keywords: liver transplantation, complications, hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma, methylprednisolone pulse therapy, principle of treatment

  13. Barbiturate-refractory epilepsy: safe schedule for therapeutic substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Gorz, Ana Maria; Silvado, Carlos E. S.; Bittencourt, Paulo Rogério M.

    1986-01-01

    Barbiturates are considered first line antiepileptic drugs in third world countries due to traditional and economic reasons. This prospective uncontrolled study of 52 patients aged 15 to 64 years (mean 24) demonstrates that patients who become refractory to barbiturates are mainly those with partial seizures with or without generalization or with a focal EEG abnormality (71%). Seizures tend to become refractory approximately 6 years after barbiturates were started. Progressive barbiturate wit...

  14. Formation of a hydrogen-bonded barbiturate [2]-rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Arnaud; Thornton, Peter J; Rocher, Mathias; Jacquot de Rouville, Henri-Pierre; Desvergne, Jean-Pierre; Kauffmann, Brice; Buffeteau, Thierry; Cavagnat, Dominique; Tucker, James H R; McClenaghan, Nathan D

    2014-03-07

    Interlocked structures containing the classic Hamilton barbiturate binding motif comprising two 2,6-diamidopyridine units are reported for the first time. Stable [2]-rotaxanes can be accessed either through hydrogen-bonded preorganization by a barbiturate thread followed by a Cu(+)-catalyzed "click" stoppering reaction or by a Cu(2+)-mediated Glaser homocoupling reaction.

  15. new spiro (thio) barbiturates based on cyclohexanone and bicyclo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    condensation can be operated with the aid of strong acids or bases [2, 13]. Several catalytic methods have been achieved for crossed-aldol condensation [4, 14-31]. Several spiro-(thio)barbituric acid derivatives in which the active methylene carbon of. (thio)barbituric acid is substituted by an unsubstituted cyclobutane or ...

  16. Intensive Care for Eclampic Coma

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    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of treatment of puerperas with eclampic coma, by substantiating, developing, and introducing new algorithms for correction of systemic hemodynamic, metabolic disturbances, and perfusion-metabolic changes in brain tissues. Subjects and methods. Studies were conducted in 18 puerperas with eclampic coma (Group 2 in whom the authors used a new treatment algorithm aimed at maintaining baseline cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP, restoring volemic levels at the expense of interstitial fluid. A control group (Group 1 included 30 patients who received conventional standard therapy. Regional cerebral circulation was measured by a non-invasive (inhalation radioisotopic method, by applying the tracer 131Xe, as described by V. D. Obrist et al., on a modified КПРДИ-1 apparatus (USSR. The rate of brain oxygen uptake was determined from the oxygen content between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Central hemodynamic parameters were studied by the direct method of right heart catheterization using a flow-directed Swan-Ganz catheter. The volumes of total and extracellular fluids were estimated using 20% urea and mannitol solutions, respectively, at 0.2 g/kg weight by the procedure of V. M. Mogen. Circulating blood volume (CBV was determined by a radioisotopic method using 131iodine albumin on an УPI-7 apparatus (USSR. Cerebral spinal fluid pressure was measured by an ИиНД apparatus. Studies were made in four steps: 1 on admission; 2 on days 2—3; 3 during emergence from coma; 4 before transition. Results. The use of the new algorithm for intensive care for eclampic coma, which is aimed at improving the perfusion metabolic provision of brain structures, with a reduction in mean blood pressure by 10—15% of the baseline level, by administering magnesium sulfate and nimodipine, and at compensating for CBV by high-molecular-weight hydroxyethylated starch (stabizol, ensured early emergence from a comatose state

  17. 3d-METAL COMPLEXES WITH BARBITURIC ACID DERIVATIVES

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    T. V. Koksharova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The various aspects of the 3d-metal complexes with barbiturates and uric acid chemistry such as composition, structure, physicochemical properties, possible fields of application – have been illustrated in this review

  18. Unusual cause of Coma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    woman with normal hydration status who was in deep coma. The general examination was normal, and there ... Ethanol induced. Drugs - e.g. salicylates. Acute infections - malaria, septicaemia. Severe liver disease. Sarcoma, hepatoma, other malignant tumours. Addison's disease, hypopituitarism. Insulinoma. In the patient ...

  19. Synthesis of carboranyl amino acids, hydantoins, and barbiturates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyzlic, I.M.; Tjarks, W.; Soloway, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    The syntheses of three novel boronated hydantoins, 5-(o-carboran-1-ylmethyl)hydantoin, 14, the tetraphenylphosphonium salt of 7-(hydantoin-5-ylmethyl)dodecahydro-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate, 15, 5-(o-carboran-1-ylmethyl)-2-thiohydantoin, 16, and two new barbiturates, 5,5-bis(but-2-ynyl)barbiturate, 18, and 5,5-bis[(2-methyl-0-carboran-1-yl)methyl]barbiturate, 20, are described. Hydantoins 14-16 were synthesized from o-carboranylalanine (Car, 13). The detailed synthesis of Car and two other carborane-containing amino acids, O-(o-carboran-1-ylmethyl)tyrosine (CBT, 5a) and p-(o-carboran-1-yl)phenylalanine (CBPA, 5b), presented earlier as a communication, 16 are also described. Hydantoin 14 and barbiturates 18 and 20 were tested for their potential anticonvulsant activity. Initial qualitative screening showed moderate activities for hydantoin 14 and barbiturate 18. Barbiturate 20 had no activity. Compound 14 appeared to be nontoxic at doses of 300 mg/kg (mice, ip) and 50 mg/kg (rats, oral). However, 18 was very toxic under similar conditions

  20. Comparative Actions of Barbiturates Studied by Pollen Grain Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordan, Herbert A.; Mumford, Pauline M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple experimental system whereby the comparative actions of long, medium, and short-acting barbiturates can be demonstrated in a relatively short period of time under optical microscopy using pollen grains as the biological test or assay system. (Author/HM)

  1. Abnormal temperature control after intoxication with short-acting barbiturates.

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    de Villota, E D; Mosquera, J M; Shubin, H; Weil, M H

    1981-09-01

    Changes in rectal and toe temperatures were measured in 16 patients who had been intoxicated with short-acting barbiturates. The lowest temperatures observed in the group of 16 patients averaged 35.5 +/- 2.0 degrees C. In 11 patients, the interval between intoxication and admission was documented. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.83) between the time of estimated intoxication and hypothermia. Patients who were admitted soon after the ingestion of the barbiturates had the lowest rectal temperatures. These observations indicate that hypothermia is a usual clinical sign in the initial period after intoxication with a short-acting barbiturate. Except for 2 patients, rectal temperature exceeded 38 degrees C during the interval of recovery with the maximum rectal temperature averaging 39.0 +/- 0.8 degrees C. Hyperthermia was not related to infection of the airways, lungs, urinary tract, or bloodstream. In 11 patients, pathogenic organisms were recovered from the airway and/or urine, but there was no difference in the highest rectal temperature in these patients (39.0 +/- 0.9 degrees C) when compared with 5 patients from whom no pathogenic organisms were recovered (39.2 +/- 0.7 degrees C). Accordingly, there was no evidence that hyperthermia was due to infection. The skin temperatures of the ventrum of the first toe were not typically decreased during hypothermia. To the contrary, increases in skin temperatures were often observed during hypothermia. These observations provide evidence of altered thermoregulation with increased surface heat loss accounting for the hypothermia in the early course and heat conservation with hyperthermia during the later course of intoxication by short-acting barbiturates.

  2. Application of thermoresponsive HPLC to forensic toxicology: determination of barbiturates in human urine

    OpenAIRE

    Kanno, Sanae; Watanabe, Kanako; Hirano, Seishiro; Yamagishi, Itaru; Gonmori, Kunio; Minakata, Kayoko; Suzuki, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the assays of five barbiturates in human urine using a new thermoresponsive polymer separation column, which is composed of N-isopropylacrylamide polymer. According to elevating the column temperature from 10 ℃ to 50 ℃, five barbiturates, such as metharbital, primidone, phenobarbital, mephobarbital and pentobarbital, became well separated by this method. Five barbiturates showed good linearity in the range of 0.2-10...

  3. Direct radioimmunoassay for the detection of barbiturates in blood and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, P.A.; Law, B.; Pocock, K.; Moffat, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the detection of barbiturates in blood and urine without any pre-treatment of the sample. It is based on a radioiodinated derivative of 4-hydroxyphenobarbitone which allows use of relatively simple gamma-counting procedures. The assay can detect therapeutic levels of barbiturates in very small amounts (50 μl) of blood and urine samples. It is cheap, rapid, simple to perform and is broadly specific for the barbiturate class of drugs to the exclusion of related drugs. The assay is, therefore, very well suited to the task of screening large numbers of samples for the presence of barbiturates. (author)

  4. [The identification of barbituric acid derivatives in the old blood stains on textiles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, A V; Shabalina, A E; Rassinskaya, L A

    Thus article was designed to report a few cases of the identification of barbituric acid derivatives in the old blood stains on the clothes and other textiles. The data presented give evidence that barbiturates are capable of persisting in dry blood stains during rather a long period. The authors emphasize the necessity of mandatory control investigations to avoid obtaining the false positive results.

  5. Intermediates of Krebs cycle correct the depression of the whole body oxygen consumption and lethal cooling in barbiturate poisoning in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivnitsky, Jury Ju; Schäfer, Timur V; Malakhovsky, Vladimir N; Rejniuk, Vladimir L

    2004-10-01

    Rats poisoned with one LD50 of thiopental or amytal are shown to increase oxygen consumption when intraperitoneally given sucinate, malate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, dimethylsuccinate or glutamate (the Krebs cycle intermediates or their precursors) but not when given glucose, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate or nicotinate (energy substrates of other metabolic stages etc). Survival was increased with succinate or malate from control groups, which ranged from 30-83% to 87-100%. These effects were unrelated to respiratory depression or hypoxia as judged by little or no effect of succinate on ventilation indices and by the lack of effect of oxygen administration. Body cooling of comatose rats at ambient temperature approximately 19 degrees C became slower with succinate, the rate of cooling correlated well with oxygen consumption decrease. Succinate had no potency to modify oxygen consumption and body temperature in intact rats. A condition for antidote effect of the Krebs intermediate was sufficiently high dosage (5 mmol/kg), further dose increase made no odds. Repeated dosing of succinate had more marked protective effect, than a single one, to oxygen consumption and tended to promote the attenuation of lethal effect of barbiturates. These data suggest that suppression of whole body oxygen consumption with barbiturate overdose could be an important contributor to both body cooling and mortality. Intermediates of Krebs cycle, not only succinate, may have a pronounced therapeutic effect under the proper treatment regimen. Availability of Krebs cycle intermediates may be a limiting factor for the whole body oxygen consumption in barbiturate coma, its role in brain needs further elucidation.

  6. The Physicochemical and Pharmacokinetic Relationships of Barbiturates - From the Past to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Britton J; Clark, Gerald F; Grundmann, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of different barbiturates have been studied extensively and the relationship of their duration of action to their clinical use has been known for decades. While these particular compounds have largely been displaced by agents with better therapeutic indices, barbiturate use remains relatively common and important in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Their mechanism of action is to bind to inhibitory GABAA receptors in the CNS causing and potentiating the opening of neuronal chloride ion channels thus having a sedative and CNS depressant effect. All psychotropic barbiturates feature di-substitution at the C5 position of the barbituric acid prototype. This is also the primary factor by which physiologically active barbiturates differ from one another and a major mediator of lipophilicity and duration of action. However, in this review, inconsistencies in certain commonly held notions about the structure-activity relationship of barbiturates were found. Commonly accepted chemistry for the structure-activity relationship of barbiturates holds that substitution of larger alkyl groups, alicyclic, and aromatic groups, as well as branching and unsaturation, lead in general to more lipophilic compounds with a shorter biological half-life. This rationale may have limitations in the case of barbiturates as proposed in this review. There is poor correlation between nine clinically used barbiturates' octanol:water partition coefficients (log(P) values) and their respective half-lives. However, a strong correlation between pKa values and half-life was found. The current clinical relevance of these findings is discussed as well as their pertinence to future design and use of barbiturates.

  7. The Blue Coma: The Role of Methylene Blue in Unexplained Coma After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Enrico Antonio; Winterton, Dario; Nardelli, Pasquale; Pasin, Laura; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Bove, Tiziana; Fanelli, Giovanna; Zangrillo, Alberto; Landoni, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Methylene blue commonly is used as a dye or an antidote, but also can be used off label as a vasopressor. Serotonin toxicity is a potentially lethal and often misdiagnosed condition that can result from drug interaction. Mild serotonin toxicity previously was reported in settings in which methylene blue was used as a dye. The authors report 3 cases of life-threatening serotonin toxicity in patients undergoing chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy who also underwent cardiac surgery and received methylene blue to treat vasoplegic syndrome. An observational study. A cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) in a teaching hospital. Three patients who received methylene blue after cardiac surgery, later discovered to be undergoing chronic SSRI therapy. None. All 3 patients received high doses of fentanyl during general anesthesia. They all developed vasoplegic syndrome and consequently were given methylene blue in the ICU. All 3 patients developed serotonin toxicity, including coma, after this administration and diagnostic tests were negative for acute intracranial pathology. Coma lasted between 1 and 5 days. Two patients were discharged from the ICU shortly after awakening, whereas the third patient experienced a complicated postoperative course for concomitant refractory low-cardiac-output syndrome. Patients undergoing chronic SSRI therapy should not be administered methylene blue to treat vasoplegic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comet coma sample return instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  9. Survey of Opioid and Barbiturate Prescriptions in Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Headache Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minen, Mia T; Lindberg, Kate; Wells, Rebecca E; Suzuki, Joji; Grudzen, Corita; Balcer, Laura; Loder, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    To educate physicians about appropriate acute migraine treatment guidelines by determining (1) where headache patients were first prescribed opioids and barbiturates, and (2) the characteristics of the patient population who had been prescribed opioids and barbiturates. Several specialty societies issued recommendations that caution against the indiscriminate use of opioids or barbiturate containing medications for the treatment of migraine. These medications are still being prescribed in various medical settings and could put headache specialists in a difficult position when patients request these agents. Patients presenting to a headache center comprised of eight physicians were asked to complete a survey that assessed headache types, comorbid conditions, and whether they had ever been prescribed opioids or barbiturates. If they responded affirmatively to the latter question, they were asked about the prescribing doctor, medication effectiveness, and whether they were currently on the medication. Data collection took place over a one month period. Two hundred forty-four patients were given the survey and 218 of these patients completed it. The predominant diagnosis was migraine (83.9%). More than half of the patients reported having been prescribed an opioid (54.8%) or a barbiturate (56.7%). About one fifth were on opioids (19.4%) or barbiturates (20.7%) at the time of completing the survey. Most patients reported being on opioids for more than 2 years (24.6%) or less than one week (32.1%). The reasons most frequently cited for stopping opioids were that the medications did not help (30.9%) or that they saw a new doctor who would not prescribe them (29.4%). Among patients who had previously been on barbiturates, 32.2% had been on these for over 2 years. Most patients (61.8%) stopped barbiturates because they did not find the medication helpful, while 17.6% said they saw a new doctor who would not prescribe them. The physician specialty most frequently cited as

  10. Synthesis and Antiangiogenic Properties of Tetrafluorophthalimido and Tetrafluorobenzamido Barbituric Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrożak, Agnieszka; Steinebach, Christian; Gardner, Erin R; Beedie, Shaunna L; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Figg, William D; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-12-06

    The development of novel thalidomide derivatives as immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic agents has revived over the last two decades. Herein we report the design and synthesis of three chemotypes of barbituric acids derived from the thalidomide structure: phthalimido-, tetrafluorophthalimido-, and tetrafluorobenzamidobarbituric acids. The latter were obtained by a new tandem reaction, including a ring opening and a decarboxylation of the fluorine-activated phthalamic acid intermediates. Thirty compounds of the three chemotypes were evaluated for their anti-angiogenic properties in an ex vivo assay by measuring the decrease in microvessel outgrowth in rat aortic ring explants. Tetrafluorination of the phthalimide moiety in tetrafluorophthalimidobarbituric acids was essential, as all of the nonfluorinated counterparts lost anti-angiogenic activity. An opening of the five-membered ring and the accompanying increased conformational freedom, in case of the corresponding tetrafluorobenzamidobarbituric acids, was well tolerated. Their activity was retained, although their molecular structures differ in torsional flexibility and possible hydrogen-bond networking, as revealed by comparative X-ray crystallographic analyses. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Reversible photocapture of a [2]rotaxane harnessing a barbiturate template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Arnaud; Thornton, Peter J; Lincheneau, Christophe; Desvergne, Jean-Pierre; Spencer, Neil; Tucker, James H R; McClenaghan, Nathan D

    2015-01-16

    Photoirradiation of a hydrogen-bonded molecular complex comprising acyclic components, namely, a stoppered thread (1) with a central barbiturate motif and an optimized doubly anthracene-terminated acyclic Hamilton-like receptor (2b), leads to an interlocked architecture, which was isolated and fully characterized. The sole isolated interlocked photoproduct (Φ = 0.06) is a [2]rotaxane, with the dimerized anthracenes assuming a head-to-tail geometry, as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and consistent with molecular modeling (PM6). A different behavior was observed on irradiating homologous molecular complexes 1⊂2a, 1⊂2b, and 1⊂2c, where the spacers of 2a, 2b, and 2c incorporated 3, 6, and 9 methylene units, respectively. While no evidence of interlocked structure formation was observed following irradiation of 1⊂2a, a kinetically labile rotaxane was obtained on irradiating the complex 1⊂2c, and ring slippage was revealed. A more stable [2]rotaxane was formed on irradiating 1⊂2b, whose capture is found to be fully reversible upon heating, thereby resetting the system, with some fatigue (38%) after four irradiation–thermal reversion cycles.

  12. Postanoxic coma: prognosis after therapeutic hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, A.

    2012-01-01

    Postanoxic coma, also known as anoxic-ischemic coma, is a state of unconsciousness caused by global anoxia of the brain. The most common cause is primary cardiac arrest followed by successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Other causes include primary respiratory arrest, near-drowning,

  13. Coma associated with microscopy-diagnosed Plasmodium vivax: a prospective study in Papua, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Lampah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Coma complicates Plasmodium falciparum infection but is uncommonly associated with P. vivax. Most series of vivax coma have been retrospective and have not utilized molecular methods to exclude mixed infections with P. falciparum.We prospectively enrolled patients hospitalized in Timika, Indonesia, with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS ≤10 and P. vivax monoinfection on initial microscopy over a four year period. Hematological, biochemical, serological, radiological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examinations were performed to identify other causes of coma. Repeat microscopy, antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were performed to exclude infections with other Plasmodium species.Of 24 patients fulfilling enrolment criteria, 5 had clear evidence for other non-malarial etiologies. PCR demonstrated 10 mixed infections and 3 P. falciparum monoinfections. 6 (25% patients had vivax monoinfection and no apparent alternative cause, with a median GCS of 9 (range 8-10 and a median coma duration of 42 (range 36-48 hours. CSF leukocyte counts were <10/ul (n=3; 2 of the 3 patients without CSF examination recovered with antimalarial therapy alone. One patient had a tremor on discharge consistent with a post-malarial neurological syndrome. No patient had other organ dysfunction. The only death was associated with pure P. falciparum infection by PCR. Vivax monoinfection-associated risk of coma was estimated at 1 in 29,486 clinical vivax infections with no deaths. In comparison, the risk of falciparum-associated coma was estimated at 1 in 1,276 clinical infections with an 18.5% mortality rate.P. vivax-associated coma is rare, occurring 23 times less frequently than that seen with falciparum malaria, and is associated with a high proportion of non-malarial causes and mixed infections using PCR. The pathogenesis of coma associated with vivax malaria, particularly the role of comorbidities, is uncertain and requires further investigation.

  14. Capacities of Follow-up of the Severity of Acute Barbiturate Intoxications and their Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vorobyeva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy-eight patients with moderate, severe, and fatal (n = 12 acute intoxication with barbiturates, as evidenced by the measurements of their blood concentrations were examined. Cardiointervalography was made during follow-up ECG in all the patients in order to determine the tension index (TI, a cumulative measure of the tone of the autonomic nervous system. Comparison of clinical, laboratory, and cardiointervalographic data showed that sympathicotonia (TI, 90—160 conventional units was predominant in moderate intoxication with barbiturates (their concentration was 16.14±3.2 ^g/ml, there was hypersympathicotonia (TI, more than 160 conventional units in severe intoxication (the concentration of barbiturates, 30.56±7.6 ^g/ml; the increased tone of the parasympathetic portion of the autonomic nervous system — vagotonia (TI, less than 30 conventional units in fatal intoxication (the concentration of barbiturates, 37.3±6.6 ^g/ml. Moreover, TI decreased with the age of patients and increased with combined intoxication with barbiturates and alcohol (its blood concentration was more than 1 g/l.

  15. Acute Kidney Injury as a Risk Factor for Delirium and Coma during Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Fissell, William H; Tripp, Christina M; Blume, Jeffrey D; Wilson, Matthew D; Clark, Amanda J; Vincz, Andrew J; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Girard, Timothy D

    2017-06-15

    Acute kidney injury may contribute to distant organ dysfunction. Few studies have examined kidney injury as a risk factor for delirium and coma. To examine whether acute kidney injury is associated with delirium and coma in critically ill adults. In a prospective cohort study of intensive care unit patients with respiratory failure and/or shock, we examined the association between acute kidney injury and daily mental status using multinomial transition models adjusting for demographics, nonrenal organ failure, sepsis, prior mental status, and sedative exposure. Acute kidney injury was characterized daily using the difference between baseline and peak serum creatinine and staged according to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Mental status (normal vs. delirium vs. coma) was assessed daily with the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale. Among 466 patients, stage 2 acute kidney injury was a risk factor for delirium (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-2.26) and coma (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.25-3.34) as was stage 3 injury (OR for delirium, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.57-4.16) (OR for coma, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.85-6.03). Daily peak serum creatinine (adjusted for baseline) values were also associated with delirium (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.18-1.55) and coma (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.20-1.74). Renal replacement therapy modified the association between stage 3 acute kidney injury and daily peak serum creatinine and both delirium and coma. Acute kidney injury is a risk factor for delirium and coma during critical illness.

  16. Structure-activity relationships of convulsant and anticonvulsant barbiturates: a computer-graphic-based pattern-recognition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, P R; Mark, L C; Winkler, D A; Jones, G P

    1983-09-01

    A computer-graphic-based pattern-recognition study of two series of 5-ethyl-5-substituted barbiturates has been undertaken in an attempt to find a correlation between molecular conformation and convulsant and anticonvulsant activity. Studies of a first (trial) set of barbiturates related to pentobarbital revealed a region of space in which at least one low-energy conformation of the hydrocarbon side chain of each of the anticonvulsant barbiturates resides. Another region was occupied by a low-energy conformation of each of the convulsant barbiturates. These regions of space are, thus, possible pharmacophores for convulsant and anticonvulsant activity. Analysis of a second (test) set of barbiturates related to phenobarbital has shown that the activities and structures of these molecules are consistent with the above model. These pharmacophores thus provide a basis for the design of rigid, new analogues with potent convulsant or anticonvulsant activities.

  17. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  18. Synthesis and steriostructure of 5-(5-R-2- furfur lidene)- barbituric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, A.

    2012-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds 5-(5-R-2-furfur lidene)- barbituric acid were obtained and their physical and chemical properties were studied. Their structures were identified by spectroscopic methods. This study proved by 1 H-NMR Spectroscopy data that these compounds exist in S-cis form. (author)

  19. Complementary hydrogen bonding of a carboxylato-barbiturate with urea and acetamide: Experimental and theoretical approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasan, Md. A.; Seshaditya, A.; Záliš, Stanislav; Mishra, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2011), s. 532-539 ISSN 1386-1425 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : barbiturate derivative * binding study * 1H-NMR titration Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.098, year: 2011

  20. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and concomitant fatal botulism of one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J H; Bester, L; Venter, L; Pretorius, D; Greyling, F

    2011-12-01

    Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay neutralisation test, confirming

  1. Right median nerve electrical stimulation for acute traumatic coma (the Asia Coma Electrical Stimulation trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Junfeng; Mao, Qing; Gao, Guoyi; Jiang, Jiyao

    2017-07-10

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become the most common cause of death and disability in persons between 15 and 30 years of age, and about 10-15% of patients affected by TBI will end up in a coma. Coma caused by TBI presents a significant challenge to neuroscientists. Right median nerve electrical stimulation has been reported as a simple, inexpensive, non-invasive technique to speed recovery and improve outcomes for traumatic comatose patients. This multicentre, prospective, randomised (1:1) controlled trial aims to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of electrical right median nerve stimulation (RMNS) in both accelerating emergence from coma and promoting long-term outcomes. This trial aims to enrol 380 TBI comatose patients to partake in either an electrical stimulation group or a non-stimulation group. Patients assigned to the stimulation group will receive RMNS in addition to standard treatment at an amplitude of 15-20 mA with a pulse width of 300 μs at 40 Hz ON for 20 s and OFF for 40 s. The electrical treatment will last for 8 h per day for 2 weeks. The primary endpoint will be the percentage of patients regaining consciousness 6 months after injury. The secondary endpoints will be Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale, Coma Recovery Scale-Revised and Disability Rating Scale scores at 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after injury; Glasgow Coma Scale, Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Part and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness scale scores on day 1 and day 7 after enrolment and 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after injury; duration of unconsciousness and mechanical ventilation; length of intensive care unit and hospital stays; and incidence of adverse events. Right median nerve electrical stimulation has been used as a safe, inexpensive, non-invasive therapy for neuroresuscitation of coma patients for more than two decades, yet no trial has robustly proven the efficacy and safety of this treatment. The Asia Coma Electrical Stimulation (ACES) trial has the

  2. New red jewels in Coma Berenices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cargile, Phillip A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Cottaar, Michiel [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fleming, Scott W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21211 (United States); Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Jackson, Kelly M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Weaver, Benjamin A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2014-02-20

    We have used Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) radial velocity observations in the near-infrared H-band to explore the membership of the nearby (86.7 ± 0.9 pc) open cluster Coma Berenices (Melotte 111), concentrating on the poorly populated low-mass end of the main sequence. Using SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity measurements, we confirm the membership of eight K/M dwarf members, providing the first confirmed low-mass members of the Coma Berenices cluster. Using R ∼ 2000 spectra from IRTF-SpeX, we confirm the independently luminosity classes of these targets, and find their metallicities to be consistent with the known solar mean metallicity of Coma Berenices and of M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. In addition, the APOGEE spectra have enabled measurement of vsin i for each target and detection for the first time of the low-mass secondary components of the known binary systems Melotte 111 102 and Melotte 111 120, as well as identification of the previously unknown binary system 2MASS J12214070+2707510. Finally, we use Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope photometry to measure photometric variability and rotation periods for a subset of the Coma Berenices members.

  3. [Coma, dream and thinking: a semiotic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balat, M

    1990-01-01

    The notion of "frontier-dream", with a high perceptive direct content, is defined from accounts of dream experienced during coma. Then, from discussions with nursing-team working in units for comatose patients in a wakeful state, a protocol is proposed based on semiotic and psychoanalytical factors which aims at ensuring the global care of the comatose patient considered as a person.

  4. Myxedema coma in a 74 year old man: case report and narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idania Teresa Mora López

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The follicular cells of the thyroid gland produce thyroxine and triiodothyronine hormones, as regulated by the thyrotropic hormone of the anterior pituitary, also called thyroid stimulating hormone. Myxedema coma is defined as profound hypothyroidism characterized by impairment of consciousness ranging from lethargy to stupor and coma, associated with hypothermia, hypoglycemia, seizures, hypotension, and manifestations of uncompensated hypothyroidism. The condition can be prevented if diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism is established and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is instituted. It is considered a medical emergency with high mortality rates, where environmental factors such as cold, severe infections and drug poisoning are important triggering factors. We report the case of a 74 year old male adult with no history of thyroid disease who was admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward of the “Enrique Cabrera” Hospital, Havana, Cuba, in December 2011, with clinical and laboratory signs of thyroid hypofunction. Myxedema coma was confirmed and patient course was untoward.

  5. Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital: An Unusually Potent Enantioselective and Photoreactive Barbiturate General Anesthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Zhang, Xi; Chiara, David C.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Ge, Rile; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Raines, Douglas E.; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Forman, Stuart A.; Miller, Keith W.; Bruzik, Karol S. (Harvard-Med); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.); (UIC)

    2012-12-10

    We synthesized 5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (14), a trifluoromethyldiazirine-containing derivative of general anesthetic mephobarbital, separated the racemic mixture into enantiomers by chiral chromatography, and determined the configuration of the (+)-enantiomer as S by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, we obtained the {sup 3}H-labeled ligand with high specific radioactivity. R-(-)-14 is an order of magnitude more potent than the most potent clinically used barbiturate, thiopental, and its general anesthetic EC{sub 50} approaches those for propofol and etomidate, whereas S-(+)-14 is 10-fold less potent. Furthermore, at concentrations close to its anesthetic potency, R-(-)-14 both potentiated GABA-induced currents and increased the affinity for the agonist muscimol in human {alpha}1{beta}2/3{gamma}2L GABA{sub A} receptors. Finally, R-(-)-14 was found to be an exceptionally efficient photolabeling reagent, incorporating into both {alpha}1 and {beta}3 subunits of human {alpha}1{beta}3 GABAA receptors. These results indicate R-(-)-14 is a functional general anesthetic that is well-suited for identifying barbiturate binding sites on Cys-loop receptors.

  6. Analysis of 'Coma strip' galaxy redshift catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klypin, A.A.; Karachentsev, I.D.; Lebedev, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    We present results of the analysis of a galaxy redshift catalog made at the 6-m telescope by Karachentsev and Kopylov (1990. Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 243, 390). The catalog covers a long narrow strip on the sky (10 arcmin by 63 0 ) and lists 283 galaxies up to limiting blue magnitude m B = 17.6. The strip goes through the core of Coma cluster and this is called the 'Coma strip' catalog. The catalog is almost two times deeper than the CfA redshift survey and creates the possibility of studying the galaxy distribution on scales of 100-250 Mpc. Due to the small number of galaxies in the catalog, we were able to estimate only very general and stable parameters of the distribution. (author)

  7. Irreversible Coma clinicopathologic correlations in 79 observations

    OpenAIRE

    Jerí, F. Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and developmental data of 79 patients suffering from deep coma associated with isoelectric electroencephalogram for at least 24 consecutive hours are presented. The neuropathological study showed that the vast majority had ischemic lesions in the cerebral cortex hiccups field , cerebellum , striatum , thalamus and to a lesser extent , in the brain - stem . Failed to check precise relationship between the clinical manifestations of the specific nerve dysfunction and destruction of neu...

  8. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OUTSKIRTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Walker, S. A.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot (∼8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to ∼2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r 500 reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r 500 , the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters

  9. Modified Newtonian dynamics and the Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The, L.S.; White, S.D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The consistency of Milgrom's theory of modified Newtonian dynamics is checked against optical and X-ray data for the Coma cluster of galaxies. It is found that viable models for the cluster containing no dark matter can be constructed. They require an extensive gaseous atmosphere through which galaxies move on near-radial orbits. The gas temperature is predicted to have a shallow minimum near the cluster center; this structure may conflict with the best X-ray spectra of the cluster. 18 references

  10. [Mother and son between omnipotence and coma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyckendorf, J; Brede, S; Guo, X; Haberl, B; Sayk, F

    2017-09-01

    An academic and his mother, both with Chinese roots, present to the emergency department due to acute confusion. After short latency nausea, complex-focal seizures and finally coma with preserved protective reflexes occur. The cardiorespiratory stable patients are observed in an intensive care unit. The extended emergency diagnostic work-up revealed no cause for the underlying symptoms. Following medical request, the apartment of the patient is inspected by the police, where a meal with self-picked mushrooms is found. Special laboratory exams lead to the diagnosis of pantherina syndrome.

  11. A Greener, Efficient Approach to Michael Addition of Barbituric Acid to Nitroalkene in Aqueous Diethylamine Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany J. Al-Najjar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for the synthesis of a variety of pyrimidine derivatives 3a–t by reaction of barbituric acids 1a,b as Michael donor with nitroalkenes 2a–k as Michael acceptor using an aqueous medium and diethylamine is described. This 1,4-addition strategy offers several advantages, such as using an economic and environmentally benign reaction media, high yields, versatility, and shorter reaction times. The synthesized compounds were identified by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, CHN, IR, and MS. The structure of compound 3a was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray structure determination.

  12. ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Tully, R. Brent; Marzke, R. O.; Phillipps, S.; Price, J.; Peng, Eric W.; Trentham, Neil; Carter, David; Hammer, Derek

    2011-01-01

    We have undertaken a spectroscopic search for ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in the dense core of the dynamically evolved, massive Coma cluster as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) Coma Cluster Treasury Survey. UCD candidates were initially chosen based on color, magnitude, degree of resolution within the ACS images, and the known properties of Fornax and Virgo UCDs. Follow-up spectroscopy with Keck/Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer confirmed 27 candidates as members of the Coma cluster, a success rate >60% for targeted objects brighter than M R = -12. Another 14 candidates may also prove to be Coma members, but low signal-to-noise spectra prevent definitive conclusions. An investigation of the properties and distribution of the Coma UCDs finds these objects to be very similar to UCDs discovered in other environments. The Coma UCDs tend to be clustered around giant galaxies in the cluster core and have colors/metallicity that correlate with the host galaxy. With properties and a distribution similar to that of the Coma cluster globular cluster population, we find strong support for a star cluster origin for the majority of the Coma UCDs. However, a few UCDs appear to have stellar population or structural properties which differentiate them from the old star cluster populations found in the Coma cluster, perhaps indicating that UCDs may form through multiple formation channels.

  13. Determination of the rate constants of the reactions CO/sub 2/+OH/sup -/ -> HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and barbituric acid -> barbiturate anion -> H/sup -/ using the pulse radiolyse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchmann, M.N.; von Sonntag, C.

    1982-09-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of CO/sub 2/ + OH /sup -/-> HCO/sub 3//sup -/ (i) and barbituric acid -> barbiturate anion + H/sup +/ (ii) have been remeasured using as a new approach the pulse radiolysis technique with optical and conductivity detection. The rate constants obtained in the present study, ksub(j) (21/sup 0/C) = 6900 +- 700 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and ksub(II) (19/sup 0/C) = 22 +- 2 s/sup -1/ agree within experimental errors with values obtained earlier by other methods.

  14. The Spinning Corona of FK Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Vinay

    2010-09-01

    FK Comae is an ultra-fast rotating, single yellow giant, product of a recent W UMa merger. Extraordinary levels of FUV and X-ray emission rate FK Comae a coronal powerhouse on par with the most extreme of the better known activity heavyweights: short-period RS CVn binaries. As a single star, FK Comae has clear advantages as a laboratory for exploring the outer limits of magnetospheric activity among the coronal cool stars. FK Comae has a long history of attention at optical and X-ray wavelengths, thanks to its generously spotted surface, and proclivity to flare regularly at high energies. FUSE discovered ultra-broad, redshifted profiles of OVI and CIII, but unfortunately the singular observation could not be repeated, thanks to the satellite's flaky attitude system. The remarkable FUV spectrum was taken just a few months before STIS failed in 2004, so there was no opportunity to turn the more powerful gaze of Hubble to the task. Now, finally, the amazing sensitivity of Cosmic Origins Spectrograph can be brought to bear: a single orbit can capture an FUV spectrum of FK Comae with S/N at instrumental limits for bright lines, and digging down to faint FeXXI 1354 {bridge to the coordinated Chandra HETGS pointing we are carrying out}.We will trace how the bright FUV regions relate spatially to the photospheric dark spots, to inform ideas of coronal structure and heating in these advanced objects. We will probe whether a global magnetosphere exists, and whether the field lines are loaded with hot coronal gas {>10 MK}, as well as the cooler 0.3 MK material already suggested by highly broadened FUSE OVI. Further, we will test whether the striking 100 km/s redshifts of the FUV lines, and similar shifts seen in NeX by Chandra HETGS, are caused by persistent coronal flows {outflows, perhaps implicated in magnetic braking; or inflows, like "coronal rain" on the Sun}. Our method is to exploit, on the one hand, emission-line "Doppler imaging," whereby bright surface regions are

  15. Hyperalgesic effect induced by barbiturates, midazolam and ethanol: pharmacological evidence for GABA-A receptor involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.K.F. Tatsuo

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of GABA-A receptors in the control of nociception was studied using the tail-flick test in rats. Non-hypnotic doses of the barbiturates phenobarbital (5-50 mg/kg, pentobarbital (17-33 mg/kg, and thiopental (7.5-30 mg/kg, of the benzodiazepine midazolam (10 mg/kg or of ethanol (0.4-1.6 g/kg administered by the systemic route reduced the latency for the tail-flick response, thus inducing a 'hyperalgesic' state in the animals. In contrast, non-convulsant doses of the GABA-A antagonist picrotoxin (0.12-1.0 mg/kg administered systemically induced an increase in the latency for the tail-flick response, therefore characterizing an 'antinociceptive' state. Previous picrotoxin (0.12 mg/kg treatment abolished the hyperalgesic state induced by effective doses of the barbiturates, midazolam or ethanol. Since phenobarbital, midazolam and ethanol reproduced the described hyperalgesic effect of GABA-A-specific agonists (muscimol, THIP, which is specifically antagonized by the GABA-A antagonist picrotoxin, our results suggest that GABA-A receptors are tonically involved in the modulation of nociception in the rat central nervous system

  16. Extragalactic Gamma Ray Excess from Coma Supercluster Direction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... galactic diffuse gamma ray intensity or to consider the contribution of other extragalactic structures while surveying a specific portion of the sky. More precise analysis of EGRET data however, makes it possible to estimate the diffuse gamma ray in Coma supercluster (i.e., Coma\\A1367 supercluster) direction with a value of ...

  17. Flip-flops of FK Comae Berenices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackman, T.; Pelt, J.; Mantere, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Context.FK Comae Berenices is a rapidly rotating magnetically active star, the light curve of which is modulated by cool spots on its surface. It was the first star where the "flip-flop" phenomenon was discovered. Since then, flip-flops in the spot activity have been reported in many other stars...... of photometric observations with two different time series analysis methods, with a special emphasis on detecting flip-flop type events from the data. Methods. We apply the continuous period search and carrier fit methods on long-term standard Johnson-Cousins V-observations from the years 1995......-2010. The observations were carried out with two automated photometric telescopes, Phoenix-10 and Amadeus T7 located in Arizona. Results. We identify complex phase behaviour in 6 of the 15 analysed data segments. We identify five flip-flop events and two cases of phase jumps, where the phase shift is ¿f

  18. Pediatric Glasgow coma scale modified for dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, M.B.; Cole, E.F.; Evêncio Neto, J.; Silva, A.C.J.; Aleixo, G.A.S.; Cunha, A.L.T.

    2010-01-01

    Com o objetivo de modificar a escala de coma de Glasgow pediátrica para utilização na medicina veterinária, foram utilizados 30 cães adultos com alterações neurológicas passíveis de avaliação da consciência. A escala modificada para cães foi aplicada em três momentos com intervalos de 48 horas entre eles, resultando em 90 eventos diversos. A escala foi aplicada para avaliação da abertura ocular (AO), da melhor resposta associada à vocalização (MRV) e da melhor resposta motora (MRM). Com a aná...

  19. FK Comae Berenices, King of Spin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Kashyap, V.; Saar, S.

    2016-01-01

    COCOA-PUFS is an energy-diverse, time-domain study of the ultra-fast spinning, heavily spotted, yellow giant FK Comae Berenices (FK Com: HD117555; G4 III). This single star is thought to be a recent binary merger, and is exceptionally active by measure of its intense ultraviolet (UV) and X......-ray emissions, and proclivity to flare. COCOA-PUFS was carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope in the UV (1200-3000 Å), using mainly its high-performance Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, but also high precision Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; Chandra X-ray Observatory in the soft X-rays (0.5-10 ke...

  20. Brain connectivity in pathological and pharmacological coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Noirhomme

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC tend to support the view that awareness is not related to activity in a single brain region but to thalamo-cortical connectivity in the frontoparietal network. Functional neuroimaging studies have shown preserved albeit disconnected low level cortical activation in response to external stimulation in patients in a vegetative state or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. While activation of these primary sensory cortices does not necessarily reflect conscious awareness, activation in higher order associative cortices in minimally conscious state patients seems to herald some residual perceptual awareness. PET studies have identified a metabolic dysfunction in a widespread fronto-parietal global neuronal workspace in DOC patients including the midline default mode network, ‘intrinsic’ system, and the lateral frontoparietal cortices or ‘extrinsic system’. Recent studies have investigated the relation of awareness to the functional connectivity within intrinsic and extrinsic networks, and with the thalami in both pathological and pharmacological coma. In brain damaged patients, connectivity in all default network areas was found to be non-linearly correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative, coma and brain dead patients. Anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness was also shown to correlate with a global decrease in cortico-cortical and thalamo-cortical connectivity in both intrinsic and extrinsic networks, but not in auditory or visual networks. In anesthesia, unconsciousness was also associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between networks. These results suggest that conscious awareness critically depends on the functional integrity of thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical frontoparietal connectivity within and between intrinsic and extrinsic brain networks.

  1. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. VIII. Barred Disk Galaxies in the Core of the Coma Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Hammer, Derek; den Brok, Mark; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzmán, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Peletier, Reynier F.; Peng, Eric W.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    We use high-resolution (~0farcs1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z ~ 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest

  2. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : VIII. Barred Disk Galaxies in the Core of the Coma Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Hammer, Derek; den Brok, Mark; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Peletier, Reynier F.; Peng, Eric W.; Kleijn, Gijs V.

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution (similar to 0.'' 1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z similar to 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the

  3. Barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells: tuning acceptor energetics to suppress geminate recombination losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ching-Hong; Gorman, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, Andrew; Holliday, Sarah; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Jenekhe, Samson A; Baran, Derya; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R

    2018-01-26

    We report the synthesis of two barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors and demonstrate their efficient function in high voltage output organic solar cells. The acceptor with the lower LUMO level is shown to exhibit suppressed geminate recombination losses, resulting in enhanced photocurrent generation and higher overall device efficiency.

  4. Simultaneous effect of organic modifier and physicochemical parameters of barbiturates on their retention on a narrow-bore PGC column

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forgács, E.; Cserháti, T.; Mikšík, Ivan; Eckhardt, Adam; Deyl, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 800, č. 1-2 (2004), s. 259-262 ISSN 1570-0232 Grant - others:CZ - HU(CZ) Cooperation programme Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : barbiturates * porous graphitized carbon Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2004

  5. Barbiturate End-Capped Non-Fullerene Acceptors for Organic Solar Cells: Tuning Acceptor Energetics to Suppress Geminate Recombination Losses

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Ching-Hong

    2018-01-10

    We report the synthesis of two barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors and demonstrate their efficient function in high voltage output organic solar cells. The acceptor with the lower LUMO level is shown to exhibit suppressed geminate recombination losses, resulting in enhanced photocurrent generation and higher overall device efficiency.

  6. Hydrogen bond donor–acceptor–donor organocatalysis for conjugate addition of benzylidene barbiturates via complementary DAD– ADA hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, King-Chi; Cui, Jian-Fang; Hui, Tsz-Wai; Zhou, Zhong-Yuan; Wong, Man-Kin

    2014-01-01

    A new class of hydrogen bond donor-acceptor-donor (HB-DAD) organocatalysts has been developed for conjugate addition of benzylidene barbiturates. HB-DAD organocatalyst 1a (featuring para-chloro-pyrimidine as the hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), N-H as the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and a trifluoroacetyl

  7. Endozepine-4 levels are increased in hepatic coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Vacante, Marco; Drago, Filippo; Bertino, Gaetano; Motta, Massimo; Giordano, Maria; Malaguarnera, Michele

    2015-08-14

    To evaluate the serum levels of endozepine-4, their relation with ammonia serum levels, the grading of coma and the severity of cirrhosis, in patients with hepatic coma. In this study we included 20 subjects with Hepatic coma, 20 subjects with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) and 20 subjects control. All subjects underwent blood analysis, Child Pugh and Model for End - stage liver disease (MELD) assessment, endozepine-4 analysis. Subjects with hepatic coma showed significant difference in endozepine-4 (P blood ammonia concentration was noted to be raised in patients with hepatic coma, with the highest ammonia levels being found in those who were comatose. We also found a high correlation between endozepine-4 and ammonia (P < 0.001). In patients with grade IV hepatic coma, endozepine levels were significantly higher compared to other groups. This study suggests that an increased level of endozepine in subjects with higher levels of MELD was observed. In conclusion, data concerning involvement of the GABA-ergic system in HE coma could be explained by stage-specific alterations.

  8. Estimation of very low concentrations of Ruthenium by spectrophotometric method using barbituric acid as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna Reddy, S.; Srinivasan, R.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrophotometric method employing numerous chromogenic reagents like thiourea, 1,10-phenanthroline, thiocyanate and tropolone is reported in the literature for the estimation of very low concentrations of Ru. A sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of ruthenium in the concentration range 1.5 to 6.5 ppm in the present work. This method is based on the reaction of ruthenium with barbituric acid to produce ruthenium(ll)tris-violurate, (Ru(H 2 Va) 3 ) -1 complex which gives a stable deep-red coloured solution. The maximum absorption of the complex is at 491 nm due to the inverted t 2g → Π(L-L ligand) electron - transfer transition. The molar absorptivity of the coloured species is 9,851 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1

  9. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris and concomitant fatal botulism of one : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay

  10. Temperature- and moisture-dependent phase changes in crystal forms of barbituric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zencirci, Neslihan; Gstrein, Elisabeth; Langes, Christoph [Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Griesser, Ulrich J. [Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: ulrich.griesser@uibk.ac.at

    2009-03-10

    The dihydrate of barbituric acid (BAc) and its dehydration product, form II were investigated by means of moisture sorption analysis, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, solution calorimetry, IR- and Raman-spectroscopy as well as powder X-ray diffraction. The dihydrate desolvates already at and below 50% relative humidity (RH) at 25 deg. C whereas form II is stable up to 80% RH, where it transforms back to the dihydrate. The thermal dehydration of barbituric acid dihydrate (BAc-H2) is a single step, nucleation controlled process. The peritectic reaction of the hydrate was measured at 77 deg. C and a transformation enthalpy of {delta}{sub trs}H{sub H2-II} = 17.3 kJ mol{sup -1} was calculated for the interconversion between the hydrate and form II. An almost identical value of 17.0 kJ mol{sup -1} was obtained from solution calorimetry in water as solvent ({delta}{sub sol}H{sub H2} = 41.5, {delta}{sub sol}H{sub II} = 24.5 kJ mol{sup -1}). Additionally a high-temperature form (HT-form) of BAc, which is enantiotropically related to form II and unstable at ambient conditions has been characterized. Furthermore, we observed that grinding of BAc with potassium bromide (KBr) induces a tautomeric change. Therefore, IR-spectra recorded with KBr-discs usually display a mixture of tautomers, whereas the IR-spectra of the pure trioxo-form of BAc are obtained if alternative preparation techniques are used.

  11. The atomic carbon distribution in the coma of Comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T. N.; Feldman, P. D.; Dymond, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The radial distribution of CO, OI, Ci, and CII emissions in the coma of comet Halley were measured by a long-slit far ultraviolet spectrograph aboard a sounding rocket on 26 Feb. and 13 Mar. 1986. While the CO profiles strongly suggest that CO is vaporized directly from the nucleus, the observed carbon distribution is not consistent with a radial outflow model of CO, suggesting an additional source of atomic carbon in the inner coma. Based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Vega and Giotto spacecraft, it is possible that this additional source of carbon could be the recombination of ionized CO in the inner coma.

  12. Thyroid gland disorder emergencies: thyroid storm and myxedema coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid dysfunction will develop in more than 12% of the US population during their lifetimes, true thyroid emergencies are rare. Thyroid storm and myxedema coma are endocrine emergencies resulting from thyroid hormone dysregulation, usually coupled with an acute illness as a precipitant. Careful assessment of risk and rapid action, once danger is identified, are essential for limiting morbidity and mortality related to thyroid storm and myxedema coma. This article reviews which patients are at risk, explains thyroid storm and myxedema coma, and describes pharmacological treatment and supportive cares.

  13. Coma mixedematoso y midazolam: Reporte de caso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pinto Valdivia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta el caso de un paciente varón sin antecedente previo de patología tiroidea que ingresó por coma mixedematoso y desarrolló insuficiencia respiratoria después de la administración endovenosa de midazolam. Tenía 55 años de edad, y una enfermedad de dos semanas caracterizado por letargia, debilidad, hiporexia y cefalea. Los análisis de laboratorio mostraron anemia, hiponatremia severa y niveles elevados de transaminasas y creatinquinasa. TSH elevada y T4 y T3 en niveles muy bajos. Se inició tratamiento con levotiroxina, corticoides endovenosos y solución hipertónica de cloruro de sodio. La evolución fue mala, se colocó un catéter venoso central bajo sedación con midazolam endovenoso para monitoreo hemodinámico, luego del cual, el paciente desarrolló insuficiencia respiratoria, mayor compromiso del sensorio y falleció. En pacientes con hipotiroidismo, el metabolismo del midazolam esta alterado y puede causar insuficiencia respiratoria. (Rev Med Hered 2008; 19:171-174.

  14. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Chinese calligraphy handwriting (CCH: a case of rehabilitative awakening of a coma patient after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao HSR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Henry SR Kao,1 Stewart PW Lam,2 Tin Tin Kao3,4 1Calligraphy Therapy Laboratory, Shenzhen Institute of Neuroscience, Shenzhen, China; 2Research and Development Division, Calli-Health Society, 3Department of Geography, 4Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Introduction: This study investigated the efficacy of Chinese calligraphy handwriting (CCH for the awakening of patients under a vegetative state after stroke. The theories, the instrument, and the treatment protocols were reported. A single case of a severe stroke patient who was in a coma state for 2 years is presented in this study. The objectives were to apply finger writing as a new method to awaken a stroke patient in a coma state and to test the effect of this method in improving the patient’s vegetative states over time. Case presentation: A 55-year-old man suffered a severe stroke in 2004 which left him in a coma for 2 years without any systematic rehabilitation. A culture-based finger-writing method of visual-spatial intervention was then applied to improve his condition. The writing tasks involved aided viewing and finger tracing of sets of innovative characters with enriched visual-spatial and movement characteristics. Following regular treatment protocols involving diverse movement and sensory feedback, the patient was awakened after 12 months. As a consequence, the patient showed significant behavioral changes favoring enhanced focusing, alertness, visual scan, visual span, and quickened visual and motor responses. The treatment continued for another 12 months. As the treatment progressed, we gradually observed improvements in his attention span and mental concentration. His eye ball movements – the left eye in particular – were quickened and showed wider visual angularity in his focal vision. Currently, the patient can now watch television, engage in improved visual sighting, and focus on visual-spatial and cognitive-linguistic materials. Conclusion

  16. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f R0 | < 6 × 10 −5 , which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales

  17. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, 739-8526 (Japan); Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C., E-mail: telkina@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk, E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup −5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  18. Nucleobase-Based Barbiturates: Their Protective Effect against DNA Damage Induced by Bleomycin-Iron, Antioxidant, and Lymphocyte Transformation Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaveshkumar D. Dhorajiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of nucleobase-based barbiturates have been synthesized by combination of nucleic acid bases and heterocyclic amines and barbituric acid derivatives through green and efficient multicomponent route and one pot reaction. This approach was accomplished efficiently using aqueous medium to give the corresponding products in high yield. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral analysis (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HMBC, and UV spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Representative of all synthesized compounds was tested and evaluated for antioxidant, bleomycin-dependent DNA damage, and Lymphocyte Transformation studies. Compounds TBC > TBA > TBG showed highest lymphocyte transformation assay, TBC > TBA > BG showed inhibitory antioxidant activity using ABTS methods, and TBC > BPA > BAMT > TBA > 1, 3-TBA manifested the best protective effect against DNA damage induced by bleomycin.

  19. Behaviour of Some Activated Nitriles Toward Barbituric Acid, Thiobarbituric Acid and 3-Methyl-1-Phenylpyrazol-5-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Habashy

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of some active methylene containing heterocyclic compounds, namely barbituric acid, thiobarbituric acid and 3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazol-5-one on a-cyano-3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamonitrile and ethyl a-cyano-3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamate (1a,b was investigated. The structure of the new products was substantiated by their IR,1H-NMR and mass spectra.

  20. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    OpenAIRE

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide...

  1. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9 by a barbiturate-nitrate hybrid ameliorates dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis: effect on inflammation-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Wang, Jun; Pigott, Maria T; Docherty, Neil; Boyle, Noreen; Lis, Samuel Kana; Gilmer, John F; Medina, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is up-regulated in ulcerative colitis and implicated in the pathology of the disease. In this study, we have examined the effects of a barbiturate-based MMP inhibitor incorporating a nitric oxide donor/mimetic group (dinitrate-barbiturate) on the intestinal injury induced by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). In vivo experiments were carried out using male Wistar rats given 5% DSS ad libitum in drinking water. The dinitrate-barbiturate, non-nitrate equivalent, nitrate side chains alone or vehicle were administered rectally, twice daily. MMP-9 release was measured by gelatin zymography, and analysis of gene expression was carried out using RT-qPCR. TaqMan low density arrays were used to evaluate the expression of 91 inflammatory genes in the rat colon. The dinitrate-barbiturate inhibited the induction and activity of MMP-9 during DSS colitis in the rat. This occurred in association with significant reductions in the colitic response to DSS as assessed by an established clinical disease activity index and a pathological colitis grade score. The compound modified expression rates of numerous inflammation-related genes in the colon. This study demonstrated the efficacy of the dinitrate-barbiturate in DSS-induced colitis. Therefore, barbiturate-nitrate hybrids may be developed as a promising anti-inflammatory approach to the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. On the Action of General Anesthetics on Cellular Function: Barbiturate Alters the Exocytosis of Catecholamines in a Model Cell System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Daixin; Ewing, Andrew

    2018-01-22

    General anesthetics are essential in many areas, however, the cellular mechanisms of anesthetic-induced amnesia and unconsciousness are incompletely understood. Exocytosis is the main mechanism of signal transduction and neuronal communication through the release of chemical transmitters from vesicles to the extracellular environment. Here, we use disk electrodes placed on top of PC12 cells to show that treatment with barbiturate induces fewer molecules released during exocytosis and changes the event dynamics perhaps by inducing a less stable fusion pore that is prone to close faster during partial exocytosis. Larger events are essentially abolished. However, use of intracellular vesicle impact electrochemical cytometry using a nano-tip electrode inserted into a cell shows that the distribution of vesicle transmitter content does not change after barbiturate treatment. This indicates that barbiturate selectively alters the pore size of larger events or perhaps differentially between types of vesicles. Alteration of exocytosis in this manner could be linked to the effects of general anesthetics on memory loss. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Coma hiperosmolar associado ao transplante de fígado Hyperosmolar coma associated with liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olival Cirilo Lucena da Fonseca-Neto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O diagnóstico diferencial dos pacientes inconscientes sempre inclui o coma hiperosmolar hiperglicêmico não-cetótico. RELATO DE CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino, 22 anos, tipo sangüíneo O+, branca, natural e procedente do Recife - PE com queixa de icterícia e astenia há um mês. Ao exame físico, havia icterícia 3+/4+, desnutrição leve (IMC 17,5 e asterixis. Os exames laboratoriais sugeriram hepatite fulminante. Após 12 horas da inclusão na lista de espera pelo transplante, recebeu enxerto de fígado de doador cadáver, mediante o uso de técnica de piggback sem intercorrências. No 10º dia pós-operatório evoluiu com trombose de artéria hepática (TAH, diagnosticada por ultra-som com doppler de artéria hepática. Após 48 horas foi retransplantada sem intercorrências. A partir do 13º dia de pós-operatório, evoluiu com hiperglicemia grave (> 600 mg/dl e alteração do nível de consciência (9 pontos na escala de coma de Glasgow. Osmolaridade sérica nesse momento igual a 309 mOsm/kgH2O. O nível sérico de tacrolimus nesse dia foi de 11 ng/dl. Coma hiperosmolar hiperglicêmico não-cetótico foi tratado clinicamente por 48 horas. Recebeu alta no 30º dia de pós-operatório do retransplante, sem diabete mellitus. CONCLUSÃO: O coma hiperosmolar é um evento raro no pós-operatório de transplante de fígado e pode modificar a evolução do paciente.BACKGROUND: The literature described an increased incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. These tumors typically occur in the small intestine, and frequently are multiple. Often the behavior of the tumor in this association is more favorable than in sporadic cases. CASE REPORT: Incidental diagnosis of GIST was done in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 during treatment for acute abdomen. Trans-operatively was identified a retrocecal perforated appendicitis and a neoplastic mass in the proximal jejunum. The

  4. Distribution of gas in the inner comae of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Michael

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand the physical and chemical processes which produce the observed spatial morphology of the cometary coma, it is necessary to analyze observational data with physically meaningful models. Thus, a coupled program of theoretical modeling and complementary observational data analysis was undertaken regarding the spatial distributions of neutral gases in the coma. More, specifically, the particular topics of interest are: (1) the theoretical modeling of the nonequilibrium dynamics of the inner coma with emphasis on the region of the coma from the transition from collisional fluid flow out to the free-flow region and on observable conditions in the coma (i.e., density, outflow speed, and temperature); and (2) the model analysis of an important set of long-slit CCD spectra of comets. The side-by-side development of models along with the observation and analysis of data is an important and integral part of this project. The scientific community has in hand valuable observational and in situ data regarding one comet, Halley. It is important to use Halley as the benchmark by which other remotely observed comet data can be understood. Therefore, the self-consistant analysis of data with appropriate models is of the utmost importance. The data analysis work includes the analysis of the spatial profiles of (OI), NH2, CN, and C2.

  5. NON-TRAUMATIC COMA- INCIDENCE, AETIOLOGY AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun R. Patil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute non-traumatic coma is one of the most common paediatric emergencies, which arouses much anxiety and apprehension in both parents and physicians. Due to heterogeneity of causes in these patients, prediction of outcome is difficult and unfortunately no single clinical, laboratory or electrophysiological parameters singly predict their outcome. Aetiology of nontraumatic coma varies depending on different geographical area. We have attempted to find the incidence, aetiology and outcome and delineate neurological signs to predict the prognosis in this study. The aim of this study is to study the incidence, aetiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 consecutive cases of non-traumatic coma between 5months and 15 years of age were selected for the study. Clinical signs and findings were recorded at admission (‘0’ Hr and after ‘48’ Hrs. of hospital stay. Aetiology of coma is determined on the basis of clinical history, examination and relevant laboratory investigations by the treating physician. These children were followed up till the death in the hospital or discharged from the hospital. Discharged patients were asked for followup after 4 weeks. During this period, all of them were evaluated by formal neurological examination and for special sensory involvement. The neurological outcomes were categorised into 6 groups (I-VI based on the severity of neurological involvement. Chisquare test was applied to determine the predictors of outcome. RESULTS 1. The incidence of non-traumatic coma in our hospital based study was 8.02% of all paediatric admissions and 21.64% of all PICU admissions. 2. CNS infections contributed the majority (58% of cases. (Dengue encephalitis-28%, viral encephalitis-12%, TB meningitis-8%, pyogenic meningitis- 6%, Shigella encephalopathy-3% and cerebral malaria-1%. 3. Other non-infectious aetiologies were toxic and metabolic group- 21%, post status epilepticus- 9

  6. Bullous lesions, sweat gland necrosis and rhabdomyolysis in alcoholic coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelakandhan Asokan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old male developed hemorrhagic bullae and erosions while in alcohol induced coma. The lesions were limited to areas of the body in prolonged contact with the ground in the comatose state. He developed rhabdomyolysis, progressing to acute renal failure (ARF. Histopathological examination of the skin showed spongiosis, intraepidermal vesicles, and necrosis of eccrine sweat glands with denudation of secretory epithelial lining cells. With supportive treatment and hemodialysis, the patient recovered in 3 weeks time. This is the first reported case of bullous lesions and sweat gland necrosis occurring in alcohol-induced coma complicated by rhabdomyolysis and ARF.

  7. Challenges in the Management of a Patient with Myxoedema Coma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ism.1 The incidence in western countries is reported to be 0.22 million per year, however, there is a paucity of data from countries adjacent to the equator.2 Myxoede- ma coma is a medical emergency associated with high mortality rates ranging from 25–60% even with the best possible treatment and settings.1,3 Patients ...

  8. Assessment of physicians' knowledge of glasgow coma score

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Background: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most commonly used tool in assessing comatose patients. It is simple, easily communicable, and useful in prognostication and determination of the treatment modality in head injury. Unfortunately, a high percentage of clinicians who are not in the emergency ...

  9. PCA/HEXTE Observations of Coma and A2319

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rephaeli, Yoel

    1998-01-01

    The Coma cluster was observed in 1996 for 90 ks by the PCA and HEXTE instruments aboard the RXTE satellite, the first simultaneous, pointing measurement of Coma in the broad, 2-250 keV, energy band. The high sensitivity achieved during this long observation allows precise determination of the spectrum. Our analysis of the measurements clearly indicates that in addition to the main thermal emission from hot intracluster gas at kT=7.5 keV, a second spectral component is required to best-fit the data. If thermal, it can be described with a temperature of 4.7 keV contributing about 20% of the total flux. The additional spectral component can also be described by a power-law, possibly due to Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the CMB. This interpretation is based on the diffuse radio synchrotron emission, which has a spectral index of 2.34, within the range allowed by fits to the RXTE spectral data. A Compton origin of the measured nonthermal component would imply that the volume-averaged magnetic field in the central region of Coma is B =0.2 micro-Gauss, a value deduced directly from the radio and X-ray measurements (and thus free of the usual assumption of energy equipartition). Barring the presence of unknown systematic errors in the RXTE source or background measurements, our spectral analysis yields considerable evidence for Compton X-ray emission in the Coma cluster.

  10. Challenges in the Management of a Patient with Myxoedema Coma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myxoedema coma is a rare life-threatening disease, and it is essential that it is managed appropriately to reduce the associated high mortality. However, in the setting where efficient healthcare delivery is hampered by inadequacies, the management of such cases may pose a significant challenge. We present the case of a ...

  11. Coma chemical composition at the Abydos landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, A.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G.; Andrews, D.; Barber, S.; Wright, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Ptolemy instrument, onboard the Rosetta Philae Lander, made measurements of the chemical composition of the coma mid-bounce, just after the non-nominal landing on the surface, and subsequently at the Abydos landing site. This presentation will discuss Ptolemy's operations throughout this 45 hour period and the results obtained.

  12. Fulminant hyperammonaemia induced by thiopental coma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivnitsky, Jury Ju; Rejniuk, Vladimir L; Schäfer, Timur V; Malakhovsky, Vladimir N

    2006-07-25

    Fulminant hyperammonaemia as a threshold effect of coma-inducing dose of sodium thiopental has been revealed in rats. Blood ammonia content increased progressively after the introduction of 1.0 LD(50) (but not 0.8 LD(50)) of sodium thiopental three times in 3h and five times in 18h. The urinary ammonia excretion was not impaired while the volatilization of ammoniac from the body of ST-treated rats was higher, giving evidence of the augmentation of ammonia production. Blood urea increased by one third despite of insignificant alterations of haematocrit and blood creatinine. Ammonia hyperproduction in the digestive tract could result from gastrointestinal stasis, which has been verified by roentgenography and confirmed by correlation of hyperammonaemia with the stool retardation. In thiopental coma rats the slope of a dose-dependent increase of the blood ammonia and the blood urea after the intraperitoneal injection of ammonium acetate did not exceed that in intact animals. So the ammonia hyperproduction in the digestive tract could be the main contributing cause of fulminant hyperammonaemia in rats with thiopental coma and thus be involved into pathogenesis of the coma.

  13. Trisubstituted barbiturates and thiobarbiturates: Synthesis and biological evaluation as xanthine oxidase inhibitors, antioxidants, antibacterial and anti-proliferative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Joana; Serrano, João L; Cavalheiro, Eunice; Keurulainen, Leena; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Moreira, Vânia M; Ferreira, Susana; Domingues, Fernanda C; Silvestre, Samuel; Almeida, Paulo

    2018-01-01

    Barbituric and thiobarbituric acid derivatives have become progressively attractive to medicinal chemists due to their wide range of biological activities. Herein, different series of 1,3,5-trisubstituted barbiturates and thiobarbiturates were prepared in moderate to excellent yields and their activity as xanthine oxidase inhibitors, antioxidants, antibacterial agents and as anti-proliferative compounds was evaluated in vitro. Interesting bioactive barbiturates were found namely, 1,3-dimethyl-5-[1-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)ethylidene]pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (6c) and 1,3-dimethyl-5-[1-[2-(4-nitrophenyl)hydrazinyl]ethylidene]pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (6e), which showed concomitant xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect (IC 50 values of 24.3 and 27.9 μM, respectively), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (IC 50 values of 18.8 and 23.8 μM, respectively). In addition, 5-[1-(2-phenylhydrazinyl)ethylidene]pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (6d) also revealed DPPH radical scavenger effect, with an IC 50 value of 20.4 μM. Moreover, relevant cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells (IC 50  = 13.3 μM) was observed with 5-[[(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)amino]methylene]-2-thioxodihydropyrimidine-4,6(1H,5H)-dione (7d). Finally, different 5-hydrazinylethylidenepyrimidines revealed antibacterial activity against Acinetobacter baumannii (MIC values between 12.5 and 25.0 μM) which paves the way for developing new treatments for infections caused by this Gram-negative coccobacillus bacterium, known to be an opportunistic pathogen in humans with high relevance in multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections. The most promising bioactive barbiturates were studied in silico with emphasis on compliance with the Lipinski's rule of five as well as several pharmacokinetics and toxicity parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting outcome from coma : man-in-the-barrel syndrome as potential pitfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; Haaxma, R; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    The Glasgow coma scale motor score is often used in predicting outcome after hypoxic ischemic coma. Judicious care should be exerted when using this variable in predicting outcome in patients with coma following hypotension since borderzone infarction can obscure the clinical picture. We describe a

  15. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  16. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-05

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of Changes Induced by Solvent and Substituent in Electronic Absorption Spectra of New Azo Disperse Dyes Containig Barbiturate Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Hamidian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Six azo disperse dyes were prepared by diazotizing 4-amino hippuric acid and coupled with barbituric acid and 2-thiobarbituric acid. Then, the products were reacted with aromatic aldehyde, sodium acetate, and acetic anhydride, and oxazolone derivatives were formed. Characterization of the dyes was carried out by using UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR, and mass spectroscopic techniques. The solvatochromic behavior of azo disperse dyes was evaluated in various solvents. The effects of substituents of aromatic aldehyde, barbiturate, and thiobarbiturate ring on the color of dyes were investigated.

  18. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  19. Spontaneous intraparenchymal otogenic pneumocephalus presenting with abrupt onset of coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuotto, A.; Cappabianca, S.; Capasso, R.; Natale, M.; D'Oria, S.; Rotondo, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous otogenic pneumocephalus, manifesting with a rapid deterioration of consciousness level. A 37-year-old man presented a 3-days history of headache and fluctuant confusion. On admission the patient was neurologically intact except for temporo-spatial disorientation. Brain Computed Tomography (CT) scan showed a large air collection in the left temporal lobe, causing mass effect. Hyperpneumatisation of mastoid air cells was also noticed. Because of the abrupt onset of coma (Glasgow Coma Scale = 10), emergency surgical evacuation of tensive pneumocephalus was carried out. Postoperatively, the patient quickly regained a good level of consciousness and was headache-free. - Highlights: • Spontaneous otogenic pneumocephalus generally presents with subtle symptoms. • Sudden consciousness involvement is a rare onset condition. • Hyperpneumatisation of the petrous bone is a predisposing factor.

  20. The Nature and Origin of UCDs in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Tully, R. Brent; Madrid, Juan; Phillipps, Steven; Carter, David; Peng, Eric

    2018-01-01

    UCDs are super massive star clusters found largely in dense regions but have also been found around individual galaxies and in smaller groups. Their origin is still under debate but currently favored scenarios include formation as giant star clusters, either as the brightest globular clusters or through mergers of super star clusters, themselves formed during major galaxy mergers, or as remnant nuclei from tidal stripping of nucleated dwarf ellipticals. Establishing the nature of these enigmatic objects has important implications for our understanding of star formation, star cluster formation, the missing satellite problem, and galaxy evolution. We are attempting to disentangle these competing formation scenarios with a large survey of UCDs in the Coma cluster. Using ACS two-passband imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we are using colors and sizes to identify the UCD cluster members. With a large size limited sample of the UCD population within the core region of the Coma cluster, we are investigating the population size, properties, and spatial distribution, and comparing that with the Coma globular cluster and nuclear star cluster populations to discriminate between the threshing and globular cluster scenarios. In previous work, we had found a possible correlation of UCD colors with host galaxy and a possible excess of UCDs around a non-central giant galaxy with an unusually large globular cluster population, both suggestive of a globular cluster origin. With a larger sample size and additional imaging fields that encompass the regions around these giant galaxies, we have found that the color correlation with host persists and the giant galaxy with unusually large globular cluster population does appear to host a large UCD population as well. We present the current status of the survey.

  1. Truncation of the krebs cycle during hypoglycemic coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Garnette R; Tyson, Randy L; Auer, Roland N

    2008-07-01

    There is a misconception that hypoglycemic nerve cell death occurs easily, and can happen in the absence of coma. In fact, coma is the prerequisite for neuronal death, which occurs via metabolic excitatory amino acid release. The focus on nerve cell death does not explain how most brain neurons and all glia survive. Brain metabolism was interrogated in rats during and following recovery from 40 min of profound hypoglycemia using ex vivo (1)H MR spectroscopy to determine alterations accounting for survival of brain tissue. As previously shown, a time-dependent increase in aspartate was equaled by a reciprocal decrease in glutamate/glutamine. We here show that the kinetics of aspartate formation during the first 30 min (0.36 +/- 0.03 micromol g(-1) min(-1)) are altered such that glutamate, via aspartate aminotransferase, becomes the primary source of carbon when glucose-derived pyruvate is unavailable. Oxaloacetate is produced directly from alpha-ketoglutarate, so that reactions involving the six-carbon intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are bypassed. These fundamental observations in basic metabolic pathways in effect redraw the tricarboxylic acid cycle from a tricarboxylic to a dicarboxylic acid cycle during hypoglycemia. The basic neurochemical alterations according to the chemical equilibrium of mass action augments flux through a truncated Krebs cycle that continues to turn during hypoglycemic coma. This explains the partial preservation of energy charge and brain cell survival during periods of glucose deficiency.

  2. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  3. EXTINCTION IN THE COMA OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Pedro [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Jewitt, David, E-mail: lacerda.pedro@gmail.com [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), 595 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    On 2007 October 29, the outbursting comet 17P/Holmes passed within 0.''79 of a background star. We recorded the event using optical, narrowband photometry and detect a 3%-4% dip in stellar brightness bracketing the time of closest approach to the comet nucleus. The detected dimming implies an optical depth {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.04 at 1.''5 from the nucleus and an optical depth toward the nucleus center {tau}{sub n} < 13.3. At the time of our observations, the coma was optically thick only within {rho} {approx}< 0.''01 from the nucleus. By combining the measured extinction and the scattered light from the coma, we estimate a dust red albedo p{sub d} = 0.006 {+-} 0.002 at {alpha} = 16 Degree-Sign phase angle. Our measurements place the most stringent constraints on the extinction optical depth of any cometary coma.

  4. Reliability of self-reported use of amphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, methadone, and opiates among acutely hospitalized elderly medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, B.; Olsen, L.; Poulsen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Undisclosed use of illicit drugs and prescription controlled substances is frequent in some settings. The aim of the present study was to estimate the reliability of self-reported use of amphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, methadone, and opiates among acutely...

  5. The determination of pentobarbital and other barbiturates in blood plasma by gas—liquid chromatography with on-column and pre-column butylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff, A.; Houwen, O.A.G.J. van der; Barends, D.M.; Kostenbauder, H.B.

    1979-01-01

    Two g.l.c. methods for the determination of pentobarbital and other barbiturates are reported. In the first method the plasma samples are extracted with toluene; the toluene layer is back-extracted with a small volume of a tetrabutylammonium hydroxide solution of which an aliquot is injected into

  6. Synthesis, X-Ray Crystal Structures, Biological Evaluation, and Molecular Docking Studies of a Series of Barbiturate Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assem Barakat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of barbiturates derivatives synthesized and screened for different set of bioassays are described. The molecular structures of compounds 5a, 5d, and 5f were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The results of bioassay show that compounds 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f, and 4g are potent antioxidants in comparison to the tested standards, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, and N-acetylcysteine. Compounds 4a–4e (IC50=101.8±0.8–124.4±4.4 μM and 4g (IC50=104.1±1.9 μM were more potent antioxidants than the standard (BHT, IC50=128.8±2.1 μM. The enzyme inhibition potential of these compounds was also evaluated, in vitro, against thymidine phosphorylase, α-glucosidase, and β-glucuronidase enzymes. Compounds 4c, 4h, 4o, 4p, 4q, 5f, and 5m were found to be potent α-glucosidase inhibitors and showed more activity than the standard drug acarbose, whereas compounds 4v, and 5h were found to be potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors, more active than the standard drug, 7-deazaxanthine. All barbiturates derivatives (4a–4x, 4z, and 5a–5m were found to be noncytotoxic against human prostate (PC-3, Henrietta Lacks cervical (HeLa and Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 breast (MCF-7 cancer cell lines, and 3T3 normal fibroblast cell line, except 4y which was cytotoxic against all the cell lines.

  7. The kinetics and dynamics of the coma of Halley's comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    This grant to the University of Michigan supported the efforts of Michael R. Combi to serve as a co-investigator in collaboration with a larger effort by the principal investigator, William Smyth of Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. The overall objective of this project was to analyze in a self-consistent manner unique optical O((sup 1)D) and NH2 ultra-high resolution line profile data of excellent quality and other supporting lower-resolution spectral data for the coma of comet P/Halley by using highly developed and physically-based cometary coma models in order to determine and explain in terms of physical processes the actual dynamics and photochemical kinetics that occur in the coma. The justification for this work is that it provides a valuable and underlying physical base from which to interpret significantly different types of coma observations in a self-consistent manner and hence bring into agreement (or avoid) apparent inconsistencies that arise from non-physically based interpretations. The level of effort for the Michigan component amounted to less than three person-months over a planned period of three years. The period had been extended at no extra cost to four years because the Michigan grant and the AER contract did not have coincident time periods. An effort of somewhat larger scope was undertaken by the PI. The importance of the O((sup 1)D) profiles is that they provide a direct trace of the water distribution in comets. The line profile shape is produced by the convolution of the outflow velocity and thermal dispersion of the parent water molecules with the photokinetic ejection of the oxygen atoms upon photodissociation of the parent water molecules. Our understanding of the NH2 and its precursor ammonia are important for comet-to-comet composition variations as they relate to the cosmo-chemistry of the early solar nebula. Modeling of the distribution of NH2 is necessary in order to infer the ammonia production rates from NH2

  8. Isothermality of the gas in the Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.P.; Yamashita, K.; Okumura, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The high-quality X-ray spectrum of the Coma cluster observed by the Japanese satelite Tenma in conjunction with imaging data from the Einstein Observatory was used to explore the temperature distribution of the cluster gas. It is found that pure polytropic models are inadequate to describe this temperature distribution. Instead, a hybrid model is proposed consisting of a central isothermal region surrounded by a polytropic distribution. It is shown that as much as 75 percent of the global emission may come from the isothermal component. 30 references

  9. X-ray archaeology in the Coma cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon D. M.; Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We present images of X-ray emission from hot gas within the Coma cluster of galaxies. These maps, made with the ROSAT satellite, have much higher SNR than any previous X-ray image of a galaxy cluster, and allow cluster structure to be analyzed in unprecedented detail. They show greater structural irregularity than might have been anticipated from earlier observations of Coma. Emission is detected from a number of bright cluster galaxies in addition to the two known previously. In four cases, there is evidence that these galaxies lie at the center of an extended subconcentration within the cluster, possibly the remnant of their associated groups. For at least two galaxies, the images show direct evidence for ongoing disruption of their gaseous atmosphere. The luminosity associated with these galaxies is comparable to that detected around similar ellipticals in much poorer environments. Emission is easily detected to the limit of our field, about 1 deg from the cluster center, and appears to become more regular at large radii. The data show clearly that this archetype of a rich and regular galaxy cluster was, in fact, formed by the merging of several distinct subunits which are not yet fully destroyed.

  10. Distribucion de Hidrogeno Neutro EN Galaxias Espirales de Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Alfaro, H.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.

    1998-11-01

    We have carried out a study of environmental effects on the properties and evolution of galaxies in clusters. We have studied the HI content of spiral galaxies in two nearby clusters, Abell~262 and Abell~1656 (Coma), from 21cm observations obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and with the Very Large Array. These observations have provided us the HI images of a sample of 11 galaxies in Abell~262, and 19 in Coma. We have computed the HI content and analyzed the HI distribution of detected galaxies, what enabled us to study the environmental effects on cluster galaxies, as well as the possible involved physical mechanisms. We confirm the tendency of HI deficient galaxies to be closer to the cluster core. We also estimate in a quantitative fashion the role that ram pressure stripping can play in the central cluster region, where the intra--cluster medium shows its most hostile density and temperature conditions. Most of galaxies showing a perturbed neutral hydrogen distribution are likely affected by ram pressure. Five star--bursting galaxies and one post--starburst were detected among the 19 HI detected objects in Coma. We conclude, from the analysis of their HI distribution and from the correlations of their positions in the cluster and U--V colors with the HI deficiency, that some cluster galaxies may follow an evolutionary sequence: galaxies would first become blue because of the interaction with the ICM, what trigger a burst of star--formation. Galaxies appear at this stage as HI deficient. The next step in this sequence would be the PSB stage, where galaxies arrive once they quench most of their HI reservoir and the star--formation stops in a short time-scale. The deep neutral gas stripping explain why these galaxies are hardly detected in HI. None of the closest galaxies to NGC~4839 have been detected in our observations around the Southwest group, what hints a previous passage across the cluster core with the consequence of a stripping process

  11. Antibacterial Barbituric Acid Analogues Inspired from Natural 3-Acyltetramic Acids; Synthesis, Tautomerism and Structure and Physicochemical Property-Antibacterial Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chul Jeong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis, tautomerism and antibacterial activity of novel barbiturates is reported. In particular, 3-acyl and 3-carboxamidobarbiturates exhibited antibacterial activity, against susceptible and some resistant Gram-positive strains of particular interest is that these systems possess amenable molecular weight, rotatable bonds and number of proton-donors/acceptors for drug design as well as less lipophilic character, with physicochemical properties and ionic states that are similar to current antibiotic agents for oral and injectable use. Unfortunately, the reduction of plasma protein affinity by the barbituric core is not sufficient to achieve activity in vivo. Further optimization to reduce plasma protein affinity and/or elevate antibiotic potency is therefore required, but we believe that these systems offer unusual opportunities for antibiotic drug discovery.

  12. The Hubble Space Telescope advanced camera for surveys coma cluster survey. I. Survey objectives and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, David; Goudfrooij, Paul; Mobasher, Bahram; Ferguson, Henry C.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Balcells, Marc; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Davies, Jonathan I.; Erwin, Peter; Graham, Alister W.; Guzmán, Rafael; Hammer, Derek; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoyos, Carlos; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jogee, Shardha; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Peletier, Reynier F.; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sharples, Ray M.; Smith, Russell J.; Trentham, Neil; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2008-01-01

    We describe the HST ACS Coma Cluster Treasury survey, a deep two-passband imaging survey of one of the nearest rich clusters of galaxies, the Coma Cluster (Abell 1656). The survey was designed to cover an area of 740 arcmin2 in regions of different density of both galaxies and intergalactic medium

  13. Influence of coma aberration on aperture averaged scintillations in oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yujuan; Ji, Xiaoling; Yu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    The influence of coma aberration on aperture averaged scintillations in oceanic turbulence is studied in detail by using the numerical simulation method. In general, in weak oceanic turbulence, the aperture averaged scintillation can be effectively suppressed by means of the coma aberration, and the aperture averaged scintillation decreases as the coma aberration coefficient increases. However, in moderate and strong oceanic turbulence the influence of coma aberration on aperture averaged scintillations can be ignored. In addition, the aperture averaged scintillation dominated by salinity-induced turbulence is larger than that dominated by temperature-induced turbulence. In particular, it is shown that for coma-aberrated Gaussian beams, the behavior of aperture averaged scintillation index is quite different from the behavior of point scintillation index, and the aperture averaged scintillation index is more suitable for characterizing scintillations in practice.

  14. [Pediatric hyperglycemic hyperosmolar coma diabeticum: diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetter, J; Gohlke, B C; Stutte, S; Woelfle, J F

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar coma diabeticum (HHS) is a rare phenomenon in pediatric patients. It causes major morbidity and significant mortality. It is characterized by the trias of hyperglycemia, hyperosmolality and absent or mild metabolic acidosis. Major complications include cerebral edema and rhabdomyolysis. Evidence based guidelines for HHS in children are lacking. Based on a literature review we discuss treatment options in pediatric HHS und suggest a therapeutic concept. Appropriate treatment consists of adequate fluid administration and a cautious lowering of the serum glucose level. Patients should be treated on an intensive care unit and monitored closely to avoid complications. Low-dose and late insulin administration seems to be favourable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Absorption of folic acid and its rate of disappearance from the blood of patients receiving barbiturates in excess in combination with alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyftaki, H.; Kesse-Elias, M.; Alevizou-Terzaki, V.; Rapidis, P.; Sdougou-Christakopoulou, J.

    1975-01-01

    It is known that megaloblastic anaemia may occur from the intake of phenobarbital, which apparently responds to folic acid and vitamin B 12 . Its site of action is not known but there is evidence that it may act as a pyrimidine antagonist. It is also known that alcoholics with or without cirrhosis have folate deficiency. Furthermore, although potentiating effects of alcohol and barbiturates exist it is not known how the combination of barbiturates and alcohol acts on folic acid metabolism. In thirty patients receiving barbiturates in excess in combination with alcohol, absorption of folic acid and its rate of disappearance were studied in the blood. Two series of studies were performed. In the first, folic acid (15μg/kg of body weight) was administered orally and the maximum concentration in the blood as well as its disappearance rate were determined. In the second, folinic acid (15 μg/kg of body weight) was administered intramuscularly and the disappearance rate of folic acid was again determined. Blood samples were taken at certain intervals after administration of folic or folinic acid. Estimation of serum folic acid level was obtained by a competitive protein-binding technique developed in our laboratory. The results are discussed and compared with those in normal subjects. (author)

  16. Phase synchronization in electroencephalographic recordings prognosticates outcome in paediatric coma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Nenadovic

    Full Text Available Brain injury from trauma, cardiac arrest or stroke is the most important cause of death and acquired disability in the paediatric population. Due to the lifetime impact of brain injury, there is a need for methods to stratify patient risk and ultimately predict outcome. Early prognosis is fundamental to the implementation of interventions to improve recovery, but no clinical model as yet exists. Healthy physiology is associated with a relative high variability of physiologic signals in organ systems. This was first evaluated in heart rate variability research. Brain variability can be quantified through electroencephalographic (EEG phase synchrony. We hypothesised that variability in brain signals from EEG recordings would correlate with patient outcome after brain injury. Lower variability in EEG phase synchronization, would be associated with poor patient prognosis. A retrospective study, spanning 10 years (2000-2010 analysed the scalp EEGs of children aged 1 month to 17 years in coma (Glasgow Coma Scale, GCS, <8 admitted to the paediatric critical care unit (PCCU following brain injury from TBI, cardiac arrest or stroke. Phase synchrony of the EEGs was evaluated using the Hilbert transform and the variability of the phase synchrony calculated. Outcome was evaluated using the 6 point Paediatric Performance Category Score (PCPC based on chart review at the time of hospital discharge. Outcome was dichotomized to good outcome (PCPC score 1 to 3 and poor outcome (PCPC score 4 to 6. Children who had a poor outcome following brain injury secondary to cardiac arrest, TBI or stroke, had a higher magnitude of synchrony (R index, a lower spatial complexity of the synchrony patterns and a lower temporal variability of the synchrony index values at 15 Hz when compared to those patients with a good outcome.

  17. Optical characterization and blu-ray recording properties of metal(II) azo barbituric acid complex films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.Y. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: xyli@siom.ac.cn; Wu, Y.Q. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Lab of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Haerbin 150080 (China)], E-mail: yqwu@siom.ac.cn; Gu, D.D.; Gan, F.X. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2009-02-25

    Smooth thin films of nickel(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II) complexes with azo barbituric acid were prepared by the spin-coating method. Absorption spectra of the thin films on K9 glass substrates in 300-700 nm wavelength region were measured. Optical constants (complex refractive index N = n + ik) of the thin films prepared on single-crystal silicon substrates in 275-695 nm wavelength region were investigated on rotating analyzer-polarizer type of scanning ellipsometer, and dielectric constant {epsilon} ({epsilon} = {epsilon}{sub 1} + i{epsilon}{sub 2}) as well as absorption coefficient {alpha} of thin films were calculated at 405 nm. In addition, static optical recording properties of the cobalt(II) complex thin film with an Ag reflective layer was carried out using a 406.7 nm blue-violet laser and a high numerical aperture (NA) of 0.90. Clear recording marks with high reflectivity contrast (>60%) at proper laser power and pulse width were obtained, and the size of recording mark was as small as 250 nm. The results indicate that these metal(II) complexes are promising organic recording medium for the blu-ray optical storage system.

  18. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-06-01

    1 Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. 2 The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (Paniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. 4 There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. 5 Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis.

  19. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (PPiracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  20. A new barbiturate-based centrosymmetric compound: Joint experimental/DFT investigation of the structural, spectroscopic and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Fatih; Çapan, İrfan; Dincer, Muharrem; Cukurovali, Alaaddin

    2018-03-01

    A combined experimental and DFT studies on molecular structure along with spectral investigation on the title compound which is a barbiturate derivative with the formula [C34H40N2O5], 5,5-diethyl-1,3-Bis(2-(3-methyl-3-phenylcyclobutyl)-2-oxoethyl)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione, has been reported. The crystal and molecular structures of compound were uncovered by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) technique. The starting geometry was obtained from the X-ray structure determination was optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-31G(d) and 6-31G(d, p) basis sets in ground state. From the optimized geometry of the molecule, geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational assignments and chemical shifts of the title compound have been calculated theoretically and compared with the experimental data(SCXRD, FT-IR and NMR). Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) map and Hirshfeld surfaces of the compound are obtained by using the optimized structures and Crystal Explorer software, respectively.

  1. Effectiveness of Sensory Stimulation to Improve Arousal and Alertness of People in a Coma or Persistent Vegetative State After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, René; Domina, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of sensory stimulation to improve arousal and alertness of people in a coma or persistent vegetative state after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Databases searched included Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, OTseeker, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The search was limited to outcomes studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals between 2008 and 2013. Included studies provide strong evidence that multimodal sensory stimulation improves arousal and enhances clinical outcomes for people in a coma or persistent vegetative state after TBI. Moderate evidence was also provided for auditory stimulation, limited evidence was provided for complex stimuli, and insufficient evidence was provided for median nerve stimulation. Interventions should be tailored to client tolerance and premorbid preferences. Bimodal or multimodal stimulation should begin early, be frequent, and be sustained until more complex activity is possible. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  2. Coma Etiologies And Its One-Month Outcome Sina Hospital (Year 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togha M

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Defining the patient outcome and decision making about allocation of our limited fund and technology for comatose patients depends on our knowledge about frequency and outcome of various coma etiologies. We determined the various coma causes frequency and one-month outcome of non traumatic coma. . In addition the co existence of the primary neurologic signs with the one-month outcome of non traumatic coma was defined."nMethods and Materials: Our study is based on 130 comatose patients in a one-year study in Sina Hospital that consisted of 80 non traumatic and 50 traumatic patients."nResults: 74% of the cases were men and 26% were women. The most common etiology of coma was trauma (38.5%. The other common etiologies were cerebro¬vascular diseases (25.4%, cancer (10% and hypoxia-ischemia (8.5%. The most common cause of coma in men was trauma (46.9% while the vascular diseases were the most common etiology of coma in women (41.2%.In under 40 year patients trauma was the cause of coma in 57.5% of cases in respect to 28% in above 40 cases. On the other hand, vascular diseases and malignancies were the etiology of coma in 15% of under 40 year patients and 46.5% of above 40 year patients. Among traumatic etiologies of coma, subdural hematoma was the most frequent (40%. In our research none of patients who did not have one of pupillary, oculocephalic or motor reflexes in the 3rd and 7th day of the onset of coma had acceptable outcome after one month. With consideration of pupillary, corneal, oculocephalic and motor reflexes in combination, loss of at least two of them in the 3rd and 7th day accompanied with no acceptable outcome. On the other hand the presence of three or more reflexes in the 3rd and 7th day of coma was a good prognostic factor, with 80% and 88.9% chance of acceptable recovery respectively."nConclusion: According of the study, the best time for prediction of outcome in a comatose patient, is the third or seventh the day after the onset

  3. Post-cardiorespiratory arrest beta-alpha coma: an unusual electroencephalographic phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, G R K; Kumar, A; Roy, A K; Pinheiro, L

    2003-06-01

    The presence of frontally-dominant alpha pattern in the EEG is common in patients with coma due to trauma, toxic-metabolic causes and following cardiorespiratory arrest. Diffuse beta activity following resuscitation after a cardiac arrest is not well recognized. We report a case of coma in a 3-year-old girl who had a cardiac arrest from which she was revived. Initial EEG showed diffuse beta activity, which later evolved to predominantly alpha activity. The possible mechanisms involved in the generation of such rhythms are discussed. Transition of EEG activity from faster to slower frequencies is suggested as an adverse prognostic factor in post-cardiorespiratory arrest coma.

  4. Auditory Brain-Stem and Middle-and Long-Latency Evoked Potentials in Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, C; Wogensen, K; Starr, A

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-five patients in coma, each with a Glascow Coma Scale measure less than or equal to five, were studied within the first three days of hospitalization with auditory brain-stem and middle- and long-latency evoked potentials. Survival was related to the simultaneous preservation of long- and middle-latency and brain-stem evoked potentials. The preservation of just middle-latency and/or brain-stem components did not correlate with survival. However, if the group of patients in coma due to ...

  5. Does the doctrine of double effect apply to the prescription of barbiturates?Syme vs the Medical Board of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Xavier

    2018-04-01

    The doctrine of double effect (DDE) is a principle of crucial importance in law and medicine. In medicine, the principle is generally accepted to apply in cases where the treatment necessary to relieve pain and physical suffering runs the risk of hastening the patient's death. More controversially, it has also been used as a justification for withdrawal of treatment from living individuals and physician-assisted suicide. In this paper, I will critique the findings of the controversial Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) hearing Syme vs the Medical Board of Australia In that hearing, Dr Rodney Syme, a urologist and euthanasia advocate, was defending his practice of prescribing barbiturates to terminally ill patients. Syme claimed that he prescribed the drugs with the intention of relieving their existential suffering and not to assist in suicide; he argued that the DDE could be applied. Pace VCAT, I argue that this is an illegitimate application of DDE. I argue that a close scrutiny of Syme's actions reveals that, at the very least, he intended to give patients the option of suicide. He furthermore used what on a traditional definition of DDE would be considered a 'bad' means-the prescription of Nembutal-to achieve a 'good' end-the relief of suffering. The case demonstrates the crucial importance of analysing an agent's 'intention' and the 'effects' of their actions when applying DDE. Ethicists and, indeed, the judiciary need to attend to the ethical complexities of DDE when they assess the applicability of DDE to end of life care. If they fail to do this, the doctrine risks losing its legitimacy as an ethical principle. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Hypertriglyceridemia as a possible cause of coma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi Ryota

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Many studies suggest that elevated triglyceride levels are associated with increased long-term risk of stroke, including transient ischemic attacks. In addition, elevated triglyceride levels independently contribute to plasma viscosity and decreased blood flow. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the significance of hypertriglyceridemia as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a patient admitted to our hospital for sudden onset of coma. Laboratory test results revealed he had high blood glucose (28.2mmol/L, high glycated hemoglobin (11.4 percent, considerably high serum triglyceride levels (171.5mmol/L; type V hyperlipoproteinemia, and high plasma viscosity (1.90mPa/s with normal β-hydroxybutyric acid levels. His triglyceride levels decreased after administering intravenous fluids. Our patient’s consciousness level improved gradually over three days. All serum lipid levels decreased seven days after admission. Conclusions The findings in our patient’s case are likely explained by triglyceride-mediated hyperviscosity causing a transient ischemic attack. In the present report we suggest that when several tests do not reveal the cause of stroke-like symptoms, measurement of plasma viscosity may be informative.

  7. Seizure and coma following Kratom (Mitragynina speciosa Korth) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jamie L; Lapoint, Jeff; Hodgman, Michael J; Aldous, Kenneth M

    2010-12-01

    Reports of toxicity secondary to Kratom are rare and lack of diagnostic testing in human specimens has prevented confirmatory explanation of observed clinical effects. We present a novel case of serious human toxicity following Kratom use confirmed via quantitative analysis of urine by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. A 64 year-old male was witnessed to have a seizure at home following kratom consumption. Upon arrival to the emergency department (ED), the patient was unresponsive. While in the ED, the patient sustained a second seizure. He was intubated to protect his airway. The remainder of his hospital course was uneventful. A urine specimen was collected shortly after admission and sent for analysis. The mitragynine concentration in the urine was 167 ± 15 ng/ml. We report a rare case of Kratom toxicity characterized by a seizure and coma confirmed by urinary analysis of mitragynine by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed mechanism for this reaction is unclear but suggested mechanisms include adenosine binding or stimulation of adrenergic and/or serotonergic receptors similar to tramadol.

  8. Streaming Clumps Ejection Model and the Heterogeneous Inner Coma of Comet Wild 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. C.; Economou, T. E.; Green, S. F.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    The conventional concept of cometary comae is that they are dominated by fine particulates released individually by sublimation of surface volatiles and subsequent entrainment in the near-surface gas. It has long been recognized that such particulates could be relatively large, with early estimates that objects perhaps up to one meter in size may be levitated from the surface of the typical cometary nucleus. However, the general uniformity and small average particulate size of observed comae and the relatively smooth, monotonic increases and decreases in particle density during the Giotto flythrough of comet Halley s coma in 1986 reinforced the view that the bulk of the particles are released at the surface, are fine-sized and inert. Jets have been interpreted as geometrically constrained release of these particulates. With major heterogeneities observed during the recent flythrough of the inner coma of comet Wild 2, these views deserve reconsideration.

  9. Reestablishment of ion homeostasis during chill-coma recovery in the cricket Gryllus pennsylvanicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Williams, Caroline M.; Staples, James F.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    The time required to recover from cold-induced paralysis (chill-coma) is a common measure of insect cold tolerance used to test central questions in thermal biology and predict the effects of climate change on insect populations. The onset of chill-coma in the fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus, Orthoptera: Gryllidae) is accompanied by a progressive drift of Na+ and water from the hemolymph to the gut, but the physiological mechanisms underlying recovery from chill-coma are not understood for any insect. Using a combination of gravimetric methods and atomic absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that recovery from chill-coma involves a reestablishment of hemolymph ion content and volume driven by removal of Na+ and water from the gut. Recovery is associated with a transient elevation of metabolic rate, the time span of which increases with increasing cold exposure duration and closely matches the duration of complete osmotic recovery. Thus, complete recovery from chill-coma is metabolically costly and encompasses a longer period than is required for the recovery of muscle potentials and movement. These findings provide evidence that physiological mechanisms of hemolymph ion content and volume regulation, such as ion-motive ATPase activity, are instrumental in chill-coma recovery and may underlie natural variation in insect cold tolerance. PMID:23184963

  10. Jet Morphology and Coma Analysis of Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Charles M.; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2017-12-01

    Spectral data for the coma of Hartley 2 were acquired across four nights in late 2010 using an integral field spectrometer at McDonald Observatory. For the 30 observations during these four nights, we detected five radical species in the coma: C2, C3, CH, CN, and NH2. Using division by azimuthal mean and division by radial profile, we enhanced 150 images of the coma to reveal subtle coma structure. These images revealed noticeable temporal evolution and spatial variations between species. To quantify the observed variation between species, we partitioned the coma and used analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques to provide a statistical basis for heterogeneity. Nearly every ANOVA test indicated a spatially diverse distribution in the coma when considering all species collectively. To examine the temporal behavior, we used the works by Belton et al., Thomas et al., and Bruck Syal et al. to predict nucleus orientation and active jet directions at our observation times. Several of these reported jet sites correlated to high radical concentrations, and the sites on the smaller lobe are more closely associated with high radical concentrations. Lastly, we provide constraints for the suspect parent molecules of the detected radicals, and we propose that photolysis reactions occurring at or near extended icy grains are a source for the more enigmatic radicals, such as C3.

  11. Ultraviolet and X-ray Properties of Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Derek; Hornschemeier, A.; Mobasher, B.; Bauer, F.; Kuntz, K.; Bautz, M.

    2006-09-01

    We present an archival study of galaxies in the nearest rich cluster, Coma, using ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray data from instruments onboard the XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observatories. We report results on 27 Coma-member galaxies detected in the XMM Optical Monitor (OM) UVW2 band (λ 2100 Å), and find that UVW2-R color may serve as a proxy for star formation history in Coma, supporting similar results found in field galaxy studies using a combination of the GALEX and SDSS. We also include results from 20 Coma-member galaxies detected in the GALEX FUV and NUV filters at the cluster outskirts. There are 54 X-ray detected Coma members, 13 (25) of these galaxies have UVW2 (UVW1) counterparts. The X-ray/optical flux ratios are typically low, indicating they are mostly normal galaxies; we find that star-forming galaxies have higher X-ray/optical flux ratios than evolved galaxies. The small number of X-ray/UV detections does not permit strong constraints on e.g., X-ray - SFR correlations, though such techniques show great promise for future deeper and wider-field GALEX and X-ray studies of the Coma cluster. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through Chandra X-ray grant G05-5089X.

  12. Interaction between metals and nucleic acids. Part 3. Synthesis and structural studies of copper(II) complexes with Schiff base ligands derived from barbituric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, I.; Gaudemer, A.; Chiaroni, A.; Riche, C.

    1986-02-17

    Schiff bases have been prepared from 5-formylbarbituric acid and 5-formyl-1,3-dimethyl-barbituric acid and various di- or tri-amines. The structure of the corresponding copper(II) complexes have been established by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of one of the complexes, Cu(DiMeBardpt), was determined by X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical study shows that these complexes are reduced at slightly more negative potentials than the corresponding complexes obtained from uracil, which suggests that these new ligands are better electron-donors.

  13. Assessment of physicians' knowledge of Glasgow coma score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emejulu, Jkc; Nkwerem, Spu; Ekweogwu, O C

    2014-01-01

    Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most commonly used tool in assessing comatose patients. It is simple, easily communicable, and useful in prognostication and determination of the treatment modality in head injury. Unfortunately, a high percentage of clinicians who are not in the emergency or neurological services are not conversant with this life-saving tool. The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge of GCS among physicians practicing in a tertiary institution in South-East Nigeria, and to evaluate the call for a new and simpler scoring system. This study was carried out using the instrument of a structured-questionnaire in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, a federal government tertiary health institution in South-East Zone of Nigeria, which is a 350-bed facility employing about 550 medical doctors of different cadres. A total of 139 questionnaires were distributed to the doctors practicing in the institution who consented to participating in the study. The questionnaires were completed at the point of their administration and completed questionnaires were retrieved on the spot, and data were collated, and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, SPSS version 17.0. Statistical significance was calculated with the chi square, P ≤ 0.5. The modal age group was 20-30 years 66 (48%), and most were resident doctors 99 (66.2%). One week prior to the questionnaire distribution, 56 (42.1%) had been actively involved in emergency care of patients, and 41 (30%) could not recall what GCS stood for. Medical and house officers showed a better knowledge of GCS. There was a poor knowledge of GCS among a good number of physicians practicing in our setting and hence, continuing medical education on GCS is strongly advocated.

  14. Coma cluster ultradiffuse galaxies are not standard radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struble, Mitchell F.

    2018-02-01

    Matching members in the Coma cluster catalogue of ultradiffuse galaxies (UDGs) from SUBARU imaging with a very deep radio continuum survey source catalogue of the cluster using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) within a rectangular region of ∼1.19 deg2 centred on the cluster core reveals matches consistent with random. An overlapping set of 470 UDGs and 696 VLA radio sources in this rectangular area finds 33 matches within a separation of 25 arcsec; dividing the sample into bins with separations bounded by 5, 10, 20 and 25 arcsec finds 1, 4, 17 and 11 matches. An analytical model estimate, based on the Poisson probability distribution, of the number of randomly expected matches within these same separation bounds is 1.7, 4.9, 19.4 and 14.2, each, respectively, consistent with the 95 per cent Poisson confidence intervals of the observed values. Dividing the data into five clustercentric annuli of 0.1° and into the four separation bins, finds the same result. This random match of UDGs with VLA sources implies that UDGs are not radio galaxies by the standard definition. Those VLA sources having integrated flux >1 mJy at 1.4 GHz in Miller, Hornschemeier and Mobasher without SDSS galaxy matches are consistent with the known surface density of background radio sources. We briefly explore the possibility that some unresolved VLA sources near UDGs could be young, compact, bright, supernova remnants of Type Ia events, possibly in the intracluster volume.

  15. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. IV. Intergalactic Globular Clusters and the Massive Globular Cluster System at the Core of the Coma Galaxy Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzmán, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matković, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Phillipps, Steven; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Russell J.; Tully, Brent; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is

  16. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : IV. Intergalactic Globular Clusters and the Massive Globular Cluster System at the Core of the Coma Galaxy Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzman, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Phillipps, Steven; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Russell J.; Tully, Brent; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes

    2011-01-01

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is

  17. 3D-QSAR Studies on Barbituric Acid Derivatives as Urease Inhibitors and the Effect of Charges on the Quality of a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ul-Haq

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Urease enzyme (EC 3.5.1.5 has been determined as a virulence factor in pathogenic microorganisms that are accountable for the development of different diseases in humans and animals. In continuance of our earlier study on the helicobacter pylori urease inhibition by barbituric acid derivatives, 3D-QSAR (three dimensional quantitative structural activity relationship advance studies were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA methods. Different partial charges were calculated to examine their consequences on the predictive ability of the developed models. The finest developed model for CoMFA and CoMSIA were achieved by using MMFF94 charges. The developed CoMFA model gives significant results with cross-validation (q2 value of 0.597 and correlation coefficients (r2 of 0.897. Moreover, five different fields i.e., steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic, H-bond acceptor and H-bond donors were used to produce a CoMSIA model, with q2 and r2 of 0.602 and 0.98, respectively. The generated models were further validated by using an external test set. Both models display good predictive power with r2pred ≥ 0.8. The analysis of obtained CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided detailed insight for the promising modification of the barbituric acid derivatives with an enhanced biological activity.

  18. Daily isoflurane exposure increases barbiturate insensitivity in medullary respiratory and cortical neurons via expression of ε-subunit containing GABA ARs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hengen

    Full Text Available The parameters governing GABAA receptor subtype expression patterns are not well understood, although significant shifts in subunit expression may support key physiological events. For example, the respiratory control network in pregnant rats becomes relatively insensitive to barbiturates due to increased expression of ε-subunit-containing GABAARs in the ventral respiratory column. We hypothesized that this plasticity may be a compensatory response to a chronic increase in inhibitory tone caused by increased central neurosteroid levels. Thus, we tested whether increased inhibitory tone was sufficient to induce ε-subunit upregulation on respiratory and cortical neurons in adult rats. Chronic intermittent increases in inhibitory tone in male and female rats was induced via daily 5-min exposures to 3% isoflurane. After 7d of treatment, phrenic burst frequency was less sensitive to barbiturate in isoflurane-treated male and female rats in vivo. Neurons in the ventral respiratory group and cortex were less sensitive to pentobarbital in vitro following 7d and 30d of intermittent isoflurane-exposure in both male and female rats. The pentobarbital insensitivity in 7d isoflurane-treated rats was reversible after another 7d. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory tone in the respiratory control network and cortex causes a compensatory increase in ε-subunit-containing GABAARs.

  19. Intranasal post-cardiac arrest treatment with orexin-A facilitates arousal from coma and ameliorates neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hiren R; Wang, Qihong; Gd, Sahithi; Sherman, David; Greenwald, Elliot; Savonenko, Alena V; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) entails significant risks of coma resulting in poor neurological and behavioral outcomes after resuscitation. Significant subsequent morbidity and mortality in post-CA patients are largely due to the cerebral and cardiac dysfunction that accompanies prolonged whole-body ischemia post-CA syndrome (PCAS). PCAS results in strong inflammatory responses including neuroinflammation response leading to poor outcome. Currently, there are no proven neuroprotective therapies to improve post-CA outcomes apart from therapeutic hypothermia. Furthermore, there are no acceptable approaches to promote cortical or cognitive arousal following successful return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Hypothalamic orexinergic pathway is responsible for arousal and it is negatively affected by neuroinflammation. However, whether activation of the orexinergic pathway can curtail neuroinflammation is unknown. We hypothesize that targeting the orexinergic pathway via intranasal orexin-A (ORXA) treatment will enhance arousal from coma and decrease the production of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in improved functional outcome after resuscitation. We used a highly validated CA rat model to determine the effects of intranasal ORXA treatment 30-minute post resuscitation. At 4hrs post-CA, the mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers (IL1β, iNOS, TNF-α, GFAP, CD11b) and orexin receptors (ORX1R and ORX2R) were examined in different brain regions. CA dramatically increased proinflammatory markers in all brain regions particularly in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Post-CA intranasal ORXA treatment significantly ameliorated the CA-induced neuroinflammatory markers in the hypothalamus. ORXA administration increased production of orexin receptors (ORX1R and ORX2R) particularly in hypothalamus. In addition, ORXA also resulted in early arousal as measured by quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) markers, and recovery of the associated behavioral neurologic

  20. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OH AND CN RADICALS IN THE COMA OF COMET ENCKE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.; Pierce, Donna M.; Dorman, Garrett R.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple potential parent species have been proposed to explain CN abundances in comet comae, but the parent has not been definitively identified for all comets. This study examines the spatial distribution of CN radicals in the coma of comet Encke and determines the likelihood that CN is a photodissociative daughter of HCN in the coma. Comet Encke is the shortest orbital period (3.3 years) comet known and also has a low dust-to-gas ratio based on optical observations. Observations of CN were obtained from 2003 October 22 to 24, using the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. To determine the parent of CN, the classical vectorial model was modified by using a cone shape in order to reproduce Encke's highly aspherical and asymmetric coma. To test the robustness of the modified model, the spatial distribution of OH was also modeled. This also allowed us to obtain CN/OH ratios in the coma. Overall, we find the CN/OH ratio to be 0.009 ± 0.004. The results are consistent with HCN being the photodissociative parent of CN, but we cannot completely rule out other possible parents such as CH 3 CN and HC 3 N. We also found that the fan-like feature spans ∼90°, consistent with the results of Woodney et al..

  1. The distribution of early- and late-type galaxies in the Coma cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Turner, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the morohology-density relation of Coma cluster galaxies are studied using a new homogeneous photmetric sample of 450 galaxies down to B = 16.0 mag with quantitative morphology classification. The sample covers a wide area (10 deg X 10 deg), extending well beyond the Coma cluster. Morphological classifications into early- (E+SO) and late-(S) type galaxies are made by an automated algorithm using simple photometric parameters, with which the misclassification rate is expected to be approximately 10% with respect to early and late types given in the Third Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The flattened distribution of Coma cluster galaxies, as noted in previous studies, is most conspicuously seen if the early-type galaxies are selected. Early-type galaxies are distributed in a thick filament extended from the NE to the WSW direction that delineates a part of large-scale structure. Spiral galaxies show a distribution with a modest density gradient toward the cluster center; at least bright spiral galaxies are present close to the center of the Coma cluster. We also examine the morphology-density relation for the Coma cluster including its surrounding regions.

  2. Chameleonic contribution to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich radial profile of the Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Schelpe, Camilla A. O.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the chameleonic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (CSZ) effect in the Coma cluster from measurements of the Coma radial profile presented in the WMAP 7-year results. The CSZ effect arises from the interaction of a scalar (or pseudoscalar) particle with the cosmic microwave background in the magnetic field of galaxy clusters. We combine this radial profile data with SZ measurements towards the center of the Coma cluster in different frequency bands, to find ΔT SZ,RJ (0)=-410±50 μK and ΔT CSZ 204 GHz (0) > or approx. -50 μK (at 95% confidence) for the thermal SZ and CSZ effects in the cluster, respectively. This leads to an estimated bound on the photon to scalar (or pseudoscalar) coupling strength of g eff -10 GeV -1 .

  3. Acidosis y coma en el Diabético

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jácome Roca

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Definición. La cetoacidosis diabética (CADy la alcohólica, la acidosis láctica y el síndrome hiperosmolar hiperglucémico (SHH a menudo se sobreponen en grado considerable, por lo que los revisaremos en conjunto. Definiremos la cetoacidosLs diabética como la descompensación grave de la diabetes, la emergencia endocrina más común caracterizada por un desequilibrio ácido-básico, de líquidos y electrolitos, asociado a una diuresis osmótica y catabolismo de las grasas por hiperglucemia insulino- deficiente.

    El síndrome hiperosmolar hiperglucémico es de comienzo lento y se caracteriza por trastorno del estado de conciencia, deshidratación profunda e hiperglucemia sin cetoacidosis. La cetoacidosLs alcohólica es un desequilibrio ácido-básico con deshidratación en alcohólicos, mujeres por lo común, no necesariamente diabéticas, aunque puede haber moderada hiperglucemia. La acidos Ls láctica puede ser complicación de un estado de shock y/o deshidratación severa, o de ingesta abundante de alcohol, lo que también puede llevar a hiperuricemia y gota.

    Signos y síntomas. Malestar general, astenia, anorexia, náusea, vómito, dolor abdominal con somnolencia, estupor y/o coma, pueden ser manifestaciones de cualquiera de las entidades arriba mencionadas.

    Sin embargo, aunque tanto en CADcomo en SHH hay signos de deshidratación (sequedad de mucosa con piel seca sin turgencia, ojos hundidos, en el primero hay náusea, vómito y respiración acidótica (rápida y profunda, lo que generalmente falta en el segundo. ElCADes de niños y adultos jóvenes o maduros, con función cardio-renal aceptable mientras que el SHHes más de ancianos, a menudo hipertensos con fallas renal o cardíaca, hemiparéticos, que pueden consultar por convulsiones focales. No siempre el paciente es reconocido como diabético, sobre todo en SHH.

    Lapoliuria y la polidipsia caracterizan a la acidosis diabética y al s

  4. DEEP ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT THE INFALL REGION OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Jenkins, L.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2012-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M UV = –10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (α ≈ –1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parameterization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of α ≈ –1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than α = –1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star-forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star-forming galaxies show a turnover at M UV ≈ –14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star-forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M * = 10 8 M ☉ . A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star-forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star-forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star-forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  5. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  6. SIRS score reflects clinical features of non-acetaminophen-related acute liver failure with hepatic coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yasuhiro; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Fusao; Takaki, Akinobu; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2012-01-01

    In acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF), the hepatic coma grade worsens and mortality rates increase, as the number of systemic inflammatory response syndrome components fulfilled (SIRS score) increases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of SIRS score on clinical features of non-acetaminophen-related ALF. Ninety-nine patients with non-acetaminophen-related ALF with hepatic coma who did not undergo liver transplantation were investigated. Each patient was given a SIRS score of 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 at the time of diagnosis. At the diagnosis of ALF with hepatic coma, with the increase of SIRS score, hepatic coma grade and prothrombin activity were deteriorated. After the diagnosis of ALF with hepatic coma, 25 patients (25%) developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 31 patients (31%) developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and 21 patients (22%) developed acute renal failure (ARF). Thirty-eight patients (38%) developed MOF. With the increase of SIRS score, frequencies of the development of ARDS, DIC and MOF increased. ARF was more frequently developed in patients with a SIRS score of 2 or higher. Overall, 36 patients (36%) survived. Overall survival rate was 66% in 29 patients with a score of 0, 43% in 21 patients with a score of 1, 17% in 29 patients with a score of 2 and 15% in 20 patients with a score of 3 or 4. SIRS score will be useful for predicting not only the overall survival but also the development of complications such as ARDS, DIC and MOF in non-acetaminophen-related ALF with hepatic coma.

  7. Outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis presenting with a minimal Glasgow Coma Scale score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In bacterial meningitis, a decreased level of consciousness is predictive for unfavorable outcome, but the clinical features and outcome in patients presenting with a minimal score on the Glasgow Coma Scale are unknown. Methods: We assessed the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of patients with bacterial meningitis presenting with a minimal score on the Glasgow Coma Scale from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Results: Thirty of 1,083 patients (3%) presented with a score of 3 on the Glasgow Coma Scale. In 22 of 30 patients (73%), the minimal Glasgow Coma Scale score could be explained by use of sedative medication or complications resulting from meningitis such as seizures, cerebral edema, and hydrocephalus. Systemic (86%) and neurologic (47%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (77%). However, 12 of 30 patients (40%) survived and 7 patients (23%) had a good functional outcome, defined as a score of 5 on the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Patients presenting with a minimal Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission and bilaterally absent pupillary light responses, bilaterally absent corneal reflexes, or signs of septic shock on admission all died. Conclusions: Patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis rarely present with a minimal score on the Glasgow Coma Scale, but this condition is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. However, 1 out of 5 of these severely ill patients will make a full recovery, stressing the continued need for aggressive supportive care in these patients. PMID:25340065

  8. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The inter-rater reliability and prognostic value of coma scales in Nepali children with acute encephalitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Stephen; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Bonnett, Laura J; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel; Griffiths, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Background Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a common cause of coma in Nepali children. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is used to assess the level of coma in these patients and predict outcome. Alternative coma scales may have better inter-rater reliability and prognostic value in encephalitis in Nepali children, but this has not been studied. The Adelaide coma scale (ACS), Blantyre coma scale (BCS) and the Alert, Verbal, Pain, Unresponsive scale (AVPU) are alternatives to the GCS which can be used. Methods Children aged 1-14 years who presented to Kanti Children's Hospital, Kathmandu with AES between September 2010 and November 2011 were recruited. All four coma scales (GCS, ACS, BCS and AVPU) were applied on admission, 48 h later and on discharge. Inter-rater reliability (unweighted kappa) was measured for each. Correlation and agreement between total coma score and outcome (Liverpool outcome score) was measured by Spearman's rank and Bland-Altman plot. The prognostic value of coma scales alone and in combination with physiological variables was investigated in a subgroup (n = 22). A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted by backward stepwise. Results Fifty children were recruited. Inter-rater reliability using the variables scales was fair to moderate. However, the scales poorly predicted clinical outcome. Combining the scales with physiological parameters such as systolic blood pressure improved outcome prediction. Conclusion This is the first study to compare four coma scales in Nepali children with AES. The scales exhibited fair to moderate inter-rater reliability. However, the study is inadequately powered to answer the question on the relationship between coma scales and outcome. Further larger studies are required.

  10. Coma mixedematoso e insuficiencia renal: Reporte de casos y revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Ticse

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El coma mixedematoso es una rara complicación del hipotiroidismo y está asociado a trastornos en la reabsorción de electrolitos, disminución del filtrado glomerular y flujo plasmático renal. Se sabe que estas alteraciones pueden ser reversibles con la terapia de reemplazo hormonal con levotiroxina. Se presentan tres pacientes con coma mixedematoso que presentaron insuficiencia renal, quienes fallecieron a pesar del tratamiento. Se realiza una revisión de la literatura. (Rev Med Hered 2011;22:82-85.

  11. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : VI. Colour gradients in giant and dwarf early-type galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Brok, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Valentijn, E. A.; Balcells, Marc; Carter, D.; Erwin, P.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Graham, A. W.; Hammer, D.; Lucey, J. R.; Trentham, N.; Guzman, R.; Hoyos, C.; Kleijn, G. Verdoes; Jogee, S.; Karick, A. M.; Marinova, I.; Mouhcine, M.; Weinzirl, T.

    Using deep, high-spatial-resolution imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we determine colour profiles of early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster. From 176 galaxies brighter than M-F814W(AB) = -15 mag that are either

  12. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : III. Structural parameters of galaxies using single Sersic fits star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Graham, Alister W.; Hammer, Derek; Karick, Arna M.; Lucey, John R.; Matković, Ana; Merritt, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Valentijn, Edwin

    We present a catalogue of structural parameters for 8814 galaxies in the 25 fields of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Coma Treasury Survey. Parameters from Sersic fits to the two-dimensional surface brightness distributions are given for all galaxies from our published Coma photometric catalogue with

  13. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  14. Morfología de la Coma del Cometa Hale - Bopp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Caballero, M.; Coldwell, G.; Cañada, M.; Godoy, G.; Trozzo, C.; Gómez, G.

    Para lograr comprender plenamente los procesos físicos que se desarrollan en los núcleos cometarios y obtener un modelo que explique, no sólo su actividad, sino también sus efectos sobre la coma, es necesario obtener información detallada para el mayor número de cometas posible, siendo las características más interesantes para estudiar la ubicación de las regiones activas, la presencia de jets, las tasas de producción de gas y polvo y la interacción de la coma con el viento solar. En la actualidad, con técnicas de procesamiento de imágenes y tecnología CCD se pueden obtener este tipo de datos para cometas que ingresan al sistema solar interior y estudiar, de esta manera, la morfología de sus comas, tratando de correlacionar la actividad detectada con algún modelo teórico. En este trabajo se presenta un estudio parcial de la actividad desarrollada por el cometa Hale-Bopp, y sus efectos sobre la morfología de su coma, desde agosto de 1995 hasta la fecha en base a imágenes adquiridas con el telescopio de 0.76 m. de la Estación Astronómica Dr. Carlos Ulrrico Cesco.

  15. FAST MOTIONS OF GALAXIES IN THE COMA I CLOUD: A CASE OF DARK ATTRACTOR?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Nasonova, Olga G.; Courtois, Helene M.

    2011-01-01

    We note that nearby galaxies having high negative peculiar velocities are distributed over the sky very inhomogeneously. A part of this anisotropy is caused by the 'Local Velocity Anomaly', i.e., by the bulk motion of nearby galaxies away from the Local Void. However, half of the fast-flying objects reside within a small region known as the Coma I cloud. According to Makarov and Karachentsev, this complex contains 8 groups, 5 triplets, 10 pairs, and 83 single galaxies with a total mass of 4.7 × 10 13 M ☉ . We use 122 galaxies in the Coma I region with known distances and radial velocities V LG –1 to draw the Hubble relation for them. The Hubble diagram shows a Z-shaped effect of infall with an amplitude of +200 km s –1 on the nearby side and –700 km s –1 on the back side. This phenomenon can be understood as the galaxy infall toward a dark attractor with a mass of ∼2 × 10 14 M ☉ situated at a distance of 15 Mpc from us. The existence of a large void between the Coma and Virgo clusters also probably affects the Hubble flow around the Coma I.

  16. Post-coma persons with multiple disabilities use assistive technology for their leisure engagement and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; D'Amico, Fiora; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Interventions for post-coma persons, who have emerged from a minimally conscious state but present with extensive neuro-motor impairment and lack of or minimal verbal skills, need to promote occupation and communication through the use of assistive technology. These two studies were aimed at assessing two technology-aided programs to promote leisure engagement and communication for three post-coma participants with multiple disabilities. Study I assessed a program to allow a woman and a man with extensive neuro-motor impairment and lack of speech to switch on music and videos, make requests to caregivers, and send messages to (communicate with) relevant partners and receive messages from those partners. Study II assessed a program to allow a post-coma woman with extensive motor impairment and reduced verbal behavior to activate music, videos and requests, send and receive messages, and make telephone calls. Data showed that both programs were successful. The participants of Study I managed leisure engagement, requests, as well as text messaging. The participant of Study II showed consistent leisure engagement, text messaging, and telephone calls. Assistive technology can be profitably used to provide post-coma persons with multiple disabilities relevant leisure and communication opportunities.

  17. On-chip COMA cache-coherence protocol for microgrids of microthreaded cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Jesshope, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an on-chip COMA cache coherency protocol to support the microthread model of concurrent program composition. The model gives a sound basis for building multi-core computers as it captures concurrency, abstracts communication and identifies resources, such as processor groups

  18. Accessibility assessment of MOOC platforms in Spanish: UNED COMA, COLMENIA and Miriada X

    OpenAIRE

    Iniesto, Francisco; Rodrigo, Covadonga

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a methodology for the assessment of MOOC courses, focusing on the degree of accessibility of three Spanish MOOC platforms: UNED COMA, COLMENIA and Miriada X. Four different criteria have been\\ud used in this context: automatic tools, disability simulators, testing tools and educational content

  19. Coma as a presenting sign of Datura stramonium seed tea poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diker, D; Markovitz, D; Rothman, M; Sendovski, U

    2007-07-01

    Datura stramonium is a hallucinogenic plant that causes serious poisoning. Consumption of any part of the plant may result in a severe anticholinergic reaction that may lead to toxicity and occasionally cause diagnostic difficulties. We report two patients with coma as a presenting sign of intoxication following intentional Datura seed tea ingestion and we review the leading clues for its diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Etiologies et pronostic des comas non-traumatiques de l'enfant a l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ischémique (66,67%), l'insuffisance rénale (50%) et le coma de l'enfant de moins d'un an (41 ... Redynamiser les programmes nationaux de vaccination et de lutte contre le paludisme et les infections respiratoires aiguës pour une lutte plus soutenue ...

  1. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  2. The etiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in critical care: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsting, Marlene Wb B; Franken, Mira D; Meulenbelt, Jan; van Klei, Wilton A; de Lange, Dylan W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-traumatic coma (NTC) is a serious condition requiring swift medical or surgical decision making upon arrival at the emergency department. Knowledge of the most frequent etiologies of NTC and associated mortality might improve the management of these patients. Here, we present the

  3. The etiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in critical care : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsting, Marlene WB|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413662705; Franken, Mira D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413648028; Meulenbelt, Jan; van Klei, Wilton A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239486706; de Lange, Dylan W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815497

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-traumatic coma (NTC) is a serious condition requiring swift medical or surgical decision making upon arrival at the emergency department. Knowledge of the most frequent etiologies of NTC and associated mortality might improve the management of these patients. Here, we present the

  4. Coma and death in unrecognized wernicke's encephalopathy an autopsy study: estudo necroscópico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Lana-peixoto

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Eleven out of 36 autopsied cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy had developed coma. None of these patients had the diagnosis during life. There were six men and five women with ages ranging from 36 to 50 years (mean 36.6. Seven of these patients were heavy drinkers, three exhibited signs of severe malnutrition, whereas one was being evaluated for a disseminated gastric cancer and one was in treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum. Two patients were brought to the hospital after found unconscious at home. Neuropatholo-gical examination disclosed gross changes in the mammillary bodies in eight cases and microscopic changes in all cases. In one case there was atrophy of the anterior superior part of the vermis. Petechial hemorrhages were observed particularly in the walls of the third ventricle. Microscopically there were in addition to hemorrhages, glial proliferation, endothelial hypertrophy and necrosis of nerve cells and myelin. Central pontine myelmolysis was observed in one case. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a clinically underdiagnosed condition. Coma may mask its classical clinical picture or even be the sole manifestation. Although coma points to a poor outlook it may be reversed by thiamine administration. Any patient with Coma of unknown etiology should be given parenteral thiamine.

  5. Role of noradrenaline in wake promotion effect of orexin-A on alcohol coma in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-hao WANG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study whether or not noradrenaline system participates in the process of orexin-A wake-promoting from alcohol coma. Methods  Twenty-four adult female SPF SD rats were divided into four groups, 6 each, and the model of alcohol coma was reproduced. Experimental rats were then divided randomly into rats receiving injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF, control group, orexin-A (orexin-A group, noradrenaline α1 receptor antagonists--prazosin (prazosin group, or prazosin + orexin-A (prazosin-orexin-A group into the lateral ventricle. The depth of coma was evaluated by the duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR and δ wave in electrocorticogram (ECoG. Results  The duration of LORR was significantly longer and the ratio of δ wave higher in the prazosin-treated rats than those in control group (P0.05. But the values were significantly different from those in the orexin-A group (P<0.01. Conclusion  Noradrenaline system may participate in the wake-promoting process of alcohol coma by orexin-A.

  6. Transient Coma Due To Epidural Anesthesia: The Role of Loss of Sensory Input.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dardis, Christopher

    2015-12-21

    Epidural anesthesia is the most commonly used method of pain relief during labor in the USA. It is not classically associated with alterations in level of alertness. Coma during the procedure is rare, with a reported incidence of 0.1-0.3%.

  7. Communication Opportunities via Special Messaging Technology for Two Post-Coma Persons with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Colonna, Fabio; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; de Pace, Claudia; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2011-01-01

    This study extended the assessment of a special messaging technology with two additional post-coma adults who had emerged from a minimally conscious state, but showed multiple disabilities including profound motor and communication impairments. For each participant, the study involved an ABAB design, in which the A represented baseline phases and…

  8. A case report on near manual strangulation and glasgow coma scale.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is considered as a gold standard in estimating the prognosis of the comatose patient. The management of the patient relies heavily on this scale. The mechanism of injury must also be included in scor- ing of the GCS. Survival from strangulation is uncommon, and if it ...

  9. Near-UV OH Prompt Emission in the Innermost Coma of 103P/Hartley 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Forgia, Fiorangela [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bodewits, Dennis; A’Hearn, Michael F.; Protopapa, Silvia; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Sunshine, Jessica; Feaga, Lori; Farnham, Tony, E-mail: fiorangela.laforgia@unipd.it [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft flyby of comet 103P/Hartley 2 occurred on 2010 November 4, 1 week after perihelion with a closest approach (CA) distance of about 700 km. We used narrowband images obtained by the Medium Resolution Imager on board the spacecraft to study the gas and dust in the innermost coma. We derived an overall dust reddening of 15%/100 nm between 345 and 749 nm and identified a blue enhancement in the dust coma in the sunward direction within 5 km from the nucleus, which we interpret as a localized enrichment in water ice. OH column density maps show an anti-sunward enhancement throughout the encounter, except for the highest-resolution images, acquired at CA, where a radial jet becomes visible in the innermost coma, extending up to 12 km from the nucleus. The OH distribution in the inner coma is very different from that expected for a fragment species. Instead, it correlates well with the water vapor map derived by the HRI-IR instrument on board Deep Impact . Radial profiles of the OH column density and derived water production rates show an excess of OH emission during CA that cannot be explained with pure fluorescence. We attribute this excess to a prompt emission process where photodissociation of H{sub 2}O directly produces excited OH*( A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) radicals. Our observations provide the first direct imaging of near-UV prompt emission of OH. We therefore suggest the use of a dedicated filter centered at 318.8 nm to directly trace the water in the coma of comets.

  10. Hyperammonemic coma after craniotomy: Hepatic encephalopathy from upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage or valproate side effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaopeng; Wei, Junji; Gao, Lu; Xing, Bing; Xu, Zhiqin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Postoperative coma is not uncommon in patients after craniotomy. It generally presents as mental state changes and is usually caused by intracranial hematoma, brain edema, or swelling. Hyperammonemia can also result in postoperative coma; however, it is rarely recognized as a potential cause in coma patients. Hyperammonemic coma is determined through a complicated differential diagnosis, and although it can also be induced as a side effect of valproate (VPA), this cause is frequently unrecognized or confused with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGH)-induced hepatic encephalopathy. We herein present a case of valproate-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE) to illustrate the rarity of such cases and emphasize the importance of correct diagnosis and proper treatment. Patient concerns and diagnoses: A 61-year-old woman with meningioma was admitted into our hospital. Radical resection of the tumor was performed, and the patient recovered well as expected. After administration of valproate for 7 days, the patient was suddenly found in a deep coma, and her mental state deteriorated rapidly. The diagnoses of hepatic encephalopathy was confirmed. However, whether it origins from upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage or valproate side effect is uncertain. Interventions and outcomes: The patient's condition fluctuated without improvement during the subsequent 3 days under the treatment of reducing ammonia. With the discontinuation of valproate treatment, the patient regained complete consciousness within 48 hours, and her blood ammonia decreased to the normal range within 4 days. Lessons subsections: VHE is a rare but serious complication in patients after craniotomy and is diagnosed by mental state changes and elevated blood ammonia. Thus, the regular perioperative administration of VPA, which is frequently neglected as a cause of VHE, should be emphasized. In addition, excluding UGH prior to providing a diagnosis and immediately discontinuing VPA

  11. Properties of the Nucleus, Dust Coma, and Gas Coma of Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 As Observed By WISE/NEOWISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Yanga R.; Bauer, J. M.; Lisse, C. M.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Masiero, J. R.; Walker, R. G.; Meech, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present our analysis of mid-infrared imaging of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) [1,2]. The comet was observed on May 3-4, 2010 - not in strong outburst - with imaging at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns (a.k.a. bands W1, W2, W3, and W4). W1 and W2 were sensitive to the reflected-sunlight continuum and W3 and W4 to thermal emission. The comet's coma was seen in all bands, with a point-source clearly embedded in W1, W3, and W4 imaging. A coma-fitting technique [3,4] let us photometrically extract this point-source from the images, thereby letting us measure the nucleus's size, W1-band geometric albedo, and infrared beaming. The dust coma was most clearly seen at bands W1, W3, and W4, letting us estimate the dust production rate, extract spatially-resolved information about the dust albedo and color temperature, and constrain the grain composition and size distribution. W2 imaging shows a coma whose radial surface-brightness profile and photometry suggest we are seeing a gas component, specifically emission from CO and/or CO2, i.e. high-abundance species with emission lines within the bandpass. This lets us estimate 29P’s gas production rate and dust-to-gas ratio independently from earlier methods. We present a comparison of our dust, gas, and nucleus results to those from earlier studies of this comet. References: [1] E. L. Wright et al. 2010, AJ, 140, 1868. [2] A. K. Mainzer et al. 2011, ApJ, 731, 53. [3] C. M. Lisse et al. 1999, Icarus, 140, 189. [4] P. L. Lamy et al. 2004, in Comets II, pp. 223-264. Acknowledgements: This publication makes use of data products from (1) WISE, which is a joint project of UCLA and JPL/Caltech, funded by NASA; and (2) NEOWISE, which is a project of JPL/Caltech, funded by the Planetary Science Division of NASA.

  12. Accuracy of self-reported length of coma and posttraumatic amnesia in persons with medically verified traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Mark; Sander, Angelle M; Maestas, Kacey Little; Pastorek, Nicholas J; Nick, Todd G; Li, Jingyun

    2015-04-01

    To determine the accuracy of self-reported length of coma and posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) in persons with medically verified traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to investigate factors that affect self-report of length of coma and PTA duration. Prospective cohort study. Specialized rehabilitation center with inpatient and outpatient programs. Persons (N=242) with medically verified TBI who were identified from a registry of persons who had previously participated in TBI-related research. Not applicable. Self-reported length of coma and self-reported PTA duration. Review of medical records revealed that the mean medically documented length of coma and PTA duration was 6.9±12 and 19.2±22 days, respectively, and the mean self-reported length of coma and PTA duration was 16.7±22 and 106±194 days, respectively. The average discrepancy between self-report and medical record for length of coma and PTA duration was 8.2±21 and 64±176 days, respectively. Multivariable regression models revealed that time since injury, performance on cognitive tests, and medical record values were associated with self-reported values for both length of coma and PTA duration. In this investigation, persons with medically verified TBI showed poor accuracy in their self-report of length of coma and PTA duration. Discrepancies were large enough to affect injury severity classification. Caution should be exercised when considering self-report of length of coma and PTA duration. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to raise the awareness of the influence of coma-like higher-order aberrations (HOAs) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics. Eleven eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics and with low lenticular astigmatism (LA) were selected for astigmatism analysis and for treatment simulations with topography-guided custom ablation. Vector analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of coma-like corneal HOAs to RA. Two different strategies were used for simulated treatments aiming to regularize irregular corneal optics: With both strategies correction of anterior corneal surface irregularities (corneal HOAs) were intended. Correction of total corneal astigmatism (TCA) and RA was intended as well with strategies 1 and 2, respectively. Axis of discrepant astigmatism (RA minus TCA minus LA) correlated strongly with axis of coma. Vertical coma influenced RA by canceling the effect of the with-the-rule astigmatism and increasing the effect of the against-the-rule astigmatism. After simulated correction of anterior corneal HOAs along with TCA and RA (strategies 1 and 2), only a small amount of anterior corneal astigmatism (ACA) and no TCA remained after strategy 1, while considerable amount of ACA and TCA remained after strategy 2. Coma-like corneal aberrations seem to contribute a considerable astigmatic component to RA in eyes with coma-like-aberrations dominant corneal optics. If topography-guided ablation is programmed to correct the corneal HOAs and RA, the astigmatic component caused by the coma-like corneal HOAs will be treated twice and will result in induced astigmatism. Disregarding RA and treating TCA along with the corneal HOAs is recommended instead.

  14. DEEP GALEX OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMA CLUSTER: SOURCE CATALOG AND GALAXY COUNTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Miller, N.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from a deep 26 ks Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observation of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 A) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 A) wavebands. The observed field is centered ∼0. 0 9 (1.6 Mpc) southwest of the Coma core in a well-studied region of the cluster known as 'Coma-3'. The entire field is located within the apparent virial radius of the Coma cluster, and has optical photometric coverage with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and deep spectroscopic coverage to r ∼ 21. We detect GALEX sources to NUV = 24.5 and FUV = 25.0, which corresponds to a star formation rate of ∼10 -3 M sun yr -1 for galaxies at the distance of Coma. We have assembled a catalog of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically confirmed Coma member galaxies that span a large range of galaxy types from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is ∼80% complete to NUV = 23 and FUV = 23.5. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g., object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence the source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here; we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are

  15. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. II. DATA DESCRIPTION AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Balcells, Marc; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jogee, Shardha; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ∼50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (∼1.75 Mpc or 1 0 ) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin 2 . The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ∼73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described

  16. The Enigmatic (Almost) Dark Galaxy Coma P: The Atomic Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Catherine; Cannon, John M.; Leisman, Lukas; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Salzer, John J.; Brunker, Samantha; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Janesh, William; Janowiecki, Steven; Jones, Michael G.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2018-02-01

    We present new high-resolution H I spectral line imaging of Coma P, the brightest H I source in the system HI 1232+20. This galaxy with extremely low surface brightness was first identified in the ALFALFA survey as an “(Almost) Dark” object: a clearly extragalactic H I source with no obvious optical counterpart in existing optical survey data (although faint ultraviolet emission was detected in archival GALEX imaging). Using a combination of data from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we investigate the H I morphology and kinematics at a variety of physical scales. The H I morphology is irregular, reaching only moderate maxima in mass surface density (peak {σ }{{H}{{I}}}∼ 10 {M}ȯ pc‑2). Gas of lower surface brightness extends to large radial distances, with the H I diameter measured at 4.0 ± 0.2 kpc inside the 1 {M}ȯ pc‑2 level. We quantify the relationships between mass surface density of H I gas and star formation on timescales of ∼100–200 Myr as traced by GALEX far-ultraviolet emission. While Coma P has regions of dense H I gas reaching the {N}{{H}{{I}}}={10}21 cm‑2 level typically associated with ongoing star formation, it lacks massive star formation as traced by Hα emission. The H I kinematics are extremely complex: a simple model of a rotating disk cannot describe the H I gas in Coma P. Using spatially resolved position–velocity analysis we identify two nearly perpendicular axes of projected rotation that we interpret as either the collision of two H I disks or a significant infall event. Similarly, three-dimensional modeling of the H I dynamics provides a best fit with two H I components. Coma P is just consistent (within 3σ) with the known {M}{{H}{{I}}}{--}{D}{{H}{{I}}} scaling relation. It is either too large for its H I mass, has too low an H I mass for its H I size, or the two H I components artificially extend its H I size. Coma P lies within the empirical scatter at the faint end

  17. Etiologia e a morbi-letalidade do coma agudo em crianças Acute coma in children: etiology, morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Löhr Junior

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisou-se a etiologia e a morbi-mortalidade de 104 crianças em coma agudo, ou seja, com uma pontuação menor ou igual a 8 da escala de Glasgow, internadas na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva do Hospital Infantil Pequeno Príncipe(UTI-HIPP no período entre março/98 e janeiro/2001. RESULTADOS: A idade variou de 2 meses a 13 anos, com média de 30,3 ± 27,4 meses e mediana de 20 meses, sendo 57 (54,8% do sexo masculino. O tempo de permanência hospitalar variou de 1 a 114 dias, e 3 casos permaneceram em estado vegetativo persistente. Com relação à etiologia: 31 (29,8% dos casos foram devidos a meningoencefalite, 24 (23,1% estado de mal epiléptico, 19 (18,3% causa tóxico-metabólica, 16 (15,4% hipertensão intracraniana, 7 (6,7% choque/anóxia, 4 (3,8% etiologia indeterminada, 3 (2,9% miscelânea. Com relação à evolução das crianças, 23 (22,1% foram a óbito, 32 (30,8% evoluíram sem seqüelas, 39 (37,5% tiveram alta com seqüelas neurológicas e10 (9,6% não informado. CONCLUSÃO: De acordo com a análise do presente estudo conclui-se que cerca de um terço dos pacientes em coma agudo falece, um terço apresenta seqüelas neurológicas na alta hospitalar e um terço evoluim sem seqüelas.OBJECTIVE: An analysis was conducted on the etiology and the morbi-mortality of pediatric patients in acute coma, hospitalized at the Intensive Care Unit of Hospital Infantil Pequeno Príncipe (UTI-HIPP. METHOD: One hundred and four control sheets of children hospitalized at the UTI-HIPP and diagnosed as being in acute coma were analyzed. The Glasgow coma scale duly modified for children was used, with a score count equal to or lower than 8 points. The observation period was from March/98 to January/2001. All the supplementary exams as well as the neurological conditions of the patients when discharged were analyzed. RESULTS: The study comprised 104 children whose ages varied from 2 months to 13 years, with 57 (54.8% of them being males

  18. Benzonatate toxicity in a teenager resulting in coma, seizures, and severe metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimann, Daniel A; Huang, Craig J; Goto, Collin S; Feng, Sing-Yi

    2012-07-01

    We report a benzonatate overdose in a teenager resulting in life-threatening toxicity to increase awareness of this overdose, and discuss recent pediatric warnings and labeling information provided by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). After an overdose of benzonatate, a 13-yr-old female presented to our emergency department with coma, seizures, hypotension, prolonged QT interval on electrocardiogram, and metabolic acidosis. Benzonatate is an antitussive medication with sodium channel-blocking properties and local anesthetic effects on the respiratory stretch receptors due to a tetracaine-like metabolite. Overdose is reported to cause coma, seizures, hypotension, tachycardia, ventricular dysrhythmias, and cardiac arrest. The FDA recently issued a Drug Safety Communication warning that accidental benzonatate ingestion in children younger than 10 years of age have increased risk of death and added the new information to the Warnings and Precautions section of benzonatate's label.

  19. On the equilibrium distribution of the elements in the gas in the Coma cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramopoulos, F.; Chanan, G. A.; Ku, W. H.-M.

    1981-01-01

    The equilibrium distribution of the elements for the case of an isothermal plasma in a gravitational potential well is given governing equations and a rapidly converging iterative procedure for their solution. Results are applied to the intracluster gas in clusters of galaxies, and implications are identified for the controversy as to whether iron nuclei settle out in the cluster core, and with respect to the interpretation of distribution size and shape for continuum X-ray emission from clusters. A model for the Coma cluster is considered in which the intracluster gas is in equilibrium and partially processed. It is found that this model can account for the angular dependence of the continuum X-ray emission from Coma, as determined by Einstein Observatory observations, at least as well as the uniform composition model.

  20. Coma-free alignment of high resolution electron microscopes with the aid of optical diffractograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemlin, F.; Weiss, K.; Schiske, P.; Kunath, W.; Herrmann, K.-H.

    1978-01-01

    Alignment by means of current commutating and defocusing of the objective does not yield the desired rotational symmetry of the imaging pencils. This was found while aligning a transmission electron microscope with a single field condenser objective. A series of optical diffractograms of micrographs taken under the same tilted illumination yet under various azimuths have been arranged in a tableau, wherein strong asymmetry is exhibited. Quantitative evaluation yields the most important asymmetric aberration to be the axial coma, which becomes critical when a resolution better than 5 A 0 is obtained. The tableau also allows an assessment of the three-fold astigmatism. A procedure has been developed which aligns the microscope onto the coma-free and dispersion-free pencil axis and does not rely on current communication. The procedure demands equal appearance of astigmatic carbon film images produced under the same tilt yet diametrical azimuth. (Auth.)

  1. Latency analyses of CC-NUMA and CC-COMA rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Yan, Y. [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper focuses comparative performance modeling and evaluation of CC-NUMA and CC-COMA on a hierarchical ring shared-memory architecture. Intensive performance measurements of the two models have been conducted on the KSR-1. The experimental results support the analytical models, and present practical observations and comparisons of the two cache coherence memory systems. Our analytical and experimental results show that a CC-COMA system balances the work load well. However the overhead of frequent data movement may match the gains obtained from improving load balance. Although a CC-NUMA system may not automatically balance the load at the system level, it provides an option for a user to explicitly handle data locality for a possible performance improvement.

  2. Planck intermediate results. X. Physics of the hot gas in the Coma cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of Planck satellite data on the Coma Cluster observed via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Planck is able, for the first time, to detect SZ emission up to r ~ 3 X R_500. We test previously proposed models for the pressure distribution in clusters against the azimuthally averaged...... data. We find that the Arnaud et al. universal pressure profile does not fit Coma, and that their pressure profile for merging systems provides a good fit of the data only at rR_500 than the mean pressure profile predicted by the simulations. The Planck image shows significant local steepening of the y...... profile in two regions about half a degree to the west and to the south-east of the cluster centre. These features are consistent with the presence of shock fronts at these radii, and indeed the western feature was previously noticed in the ROSAT PSPC mosaic as well as in the radio. Using Planck y...

  3. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C

    2004-01-01

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060

  4. A NuSTAR observation of the center of the coma cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Wik, Daniel R.; Molendi, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a 55 ks NuSTAR observation of the core of the Coma Cluster. The global spectrum can be explained by thermal gas emission, with a conservative 90% upper limit to non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission of 5.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in a 12' × 12' field of view....... The brightness of the thermal component in this central region does not allow more stringent upper limits on the IC component when compared with non-imaging instruments with much larger fields of view where claims of detections have been made. Future mosaic NuSTAR observations of Coma will further address...

  5. Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale and brain computed tomography-scan findings in head trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nayebaghayee, Hossein; Afsharian, Tahmineh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study aimed to assess the relationship between computed tomography (CT) scan findings and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score with the purpose of introducing GCS scoring system as an acceptable alternative for CT scan to clinically management of brain injuries in head trauma patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on hospitalized patients with the complaints of head trauma. The severity of the head injury was assessed on admission by the GCS score and categorized ...

  6. Early Prediction and Outcome of Septic Encephalopathy in Acute Stroke Patients With Nosocomial Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Dao-Ming; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Septic encephalopathy (SE) is the most common acute encephalopathy in ICU; however, little attention has been focused on risk of SE in the course of acute stroke. Our aim is to investigate the early prediction and outcome of SE in stroke patients with nosocomial coma (NC). Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an ICU of the tertiary teaching hospital in China from January 2006 to December 2009. Ninety-four acute stroke patients with NC were grouped according to with...

  7. Human brain activity patterns beyond the isoelectric line of extreme deep coma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kroeger

    Full Text Available The electroencephalogram (EEG reflects brain electrical activity. A flat (isoelectric EEG, which is usually recorded during very deep coma, is considered to be a turning point between a living brain and a deceased brain. Therefore the isoelectric EEG constitutes, together with evidence of irreversible structural brain damage, one of the criteria for the assessment of brain death. In this study we use EEG recordings for humans on the one hand, and on the other hand double simultaneous intracellular recordings in the cortex and hippocampus, combined with EEG, in cats. They serve to demonstrate that a novel brain phenomenon is observable in both humans and animals during coma that is deeper than the one reflected by the isoelectric EEG, and that this state is characterized by brain activity generated within the hippocampal formation. This new state was induced either by medication applied to postanoxic coma (in human or by application of high doses of anesthesia (isoflurane in animals leading to an EEG activity of quasi-rhythmic sharp waves which henceforth we propose to call ν-complexes (Nu-complexes. Using simultaneous intracellular recordings in vivo in the cortex and hippocampus (especially in the CA3 region we demonstrate that ν-complexes arise in the hippocampus and are subsequently transmitted to the cortex. The genesis of a hippocampal ν-complex depends upon another hippocampal activity, known as ripple activity, which is not overtly detectable at the cortical level. Based on our observations, we propose a scenario of how self-oscillations in hippocampal neurons can lead to a whole brain phenomenon during coma.

  8. Measurements of the gas temperature and iron abundance distribution in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John P.; Gorenstein, P.; Fabricant, D.

    1988-01-01

    The medium energy X-ray detectors onboard the EXOSAT Observatory have been used to determine the gas temperature at several positions in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. Evidence is found at greater than 95 percent confidence for a higher temperature in the center of the cluster than in a position approximately 45 arcmin off-center. No difference in iron abundance is observed between the center and off-center regions and the equilibrium model for the distribution of elements in the Coma Cluster of Abramopoulos, Chanan, and Ku can be rejected with greater than 99.5 percent confidence, in favor of a model with more uniform composition. A phenomenological model is presented of the Coma Cluster, which is consistent with the data presented here, as well as the imaging data from the Einstein Observatory and the Tenma X-ray spectrum. The model has a central isothermal region of temperature about 9 keV extending to about 25 arcmin (about 1 Mpc). Beyond this radius the temperature falls as a polytrope with index about 1.6.

  9. Observation of the Coma cluster of galaxies with ROSAT during the all-sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briel, U. G.; Henry, J. P.; Boehringer, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Coma cluster of galaxies was observed with the position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) during the ROSAT all sky survey. We find evidence for substructure in this cluster. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected from the regions of the NGC 4839 and 4911 subgroups at 6 percent and 1 percent of the total cluster emission respectively. There may be emission associated with the NGC 4874 and 4889 subgroups as well. The NGC 4839 group appears to be in the process of merging with the cluster. These X-ray data show that at least some of the groups previously found in projection are in fact physical objects possessing potential wells deep enough to trap their own X-ray gas. Because of the unlimited field of view of the all sky survey and the low background of the PSPC, we were able to measure the azimuthally averaged surface brightness of Coma out to approximately 100 arcmin, twice as far as was previously possible. Given the validity of our mass models, these new X-ray data imply that within 5/h(50) Mpc the binding mass of the Coma cluster is 1.8 +/- 0.6 x 10 exp 15/h(50) solar mass, and the fraction of cluster mass contained in hot gas is 0.30 +/- 0.14h(50) exp -3/2. Furthermore, the binding mass is more centrally concentrated than is the X-ray gas.

  10. Euthyroid sick syndrome in head injury patients compared with Glasgow Coma and Outcome Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palugniok, R.; Kochanska-Dziurowicz, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of the role of euthyroid sick syndrome and pituitary gland hormonal changes and the prognosis of patient mortality after severe brain injury. METHODS: The research was conducted on 65 patients with isolated severe brain injury. Blood samples were obtained as soon as possible after the injury and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 7th day after the injury. Blood concentrations of T3, rT3, T4, FT4, TSH, and PRL were estimated. The patients' state of health was evaluated in the sixth hour after the injury, using Glasgow Coma Scale, and after 180 days, using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Multidirectional correlation was sought between the concentrations of the estimated hormones and the score obtained in the Glasgow Coma Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale. RESULTS: Cluster analysis showed that concentrations of the hormones in the patients who died are grouped in different clusters from those in the patients who survived. This proves that hormonal patterns are different in these groups. Statistically significant lower T3 concentrations were observed on the 3rd day in comparison with the 0 day. Cumulative proportion surviving was lower for the OP group in comparison with the NOP group and amounted to 0.57. CONCLUSIONS: In all patients covered by the research euthyroid sick syndrome was diagnosed. T3 concentration on the 3rd day after the injury together with the evaluation in Glasgow Coma Scale allows for more precise prognosis. (author)

  11. Hall effect in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Tóth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.; Hansen, K. C.; Fougere, N.; Shou, Y.; Tenishev, V.; Altwegg, K.; Rubin, M.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics simulations have been carried out in studying the solar wind and cometary plasma interactions for decades. Various plasma boundaries have been simulated and compared well with observations for comet 1P/Halley. The Rosetta mission, which studies comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, challenges our understanding of the solar wind and comet interactions. The Rosetta Plasma Consortium observed regions of very weak magnetic field outside the predicted diamagnetic cavity. In this paper, we simulate the inner coma with the Hall magnetohydrodynamics equations and show that the Hall effect is important in the inner coma environment. The magnetic field topology becomes complex and magnetic reconnection occurs on the dayside when the Hall effect is taken into account. The magnetic reconnection on the dayside can generate weak magnetic field regions outside the global diamagnetic cavity, which may explain the Rosetta Plasma Consortium observations. We conclude that the substantial change in the inner coma environment is due to the fact that the ion inertial length (or gyro radius) is not much smaller than the size of the diamagnetic cavity.

  12. New spiro (thio barbiturates based on cyclohexanone and bicyclo [3.1.1]heptan-6-one by nonconcerted [1+5] cycloaddition reaction and their conformational structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Pesyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Crossed-aldol condensation reaction of aromatic aldehydes with ketones such as; acetone and cyclohexanone leads to the efficient formation of cross conjugated α,β-unsaturated ketones in excellent yield. The intermolecular and then intramolecular Michael addition reaction of α,β-unsaturated ketones derived from acetone and cyclohexanone with (thiobarbituric acids lead to synthesis new type of 7,11-diaryl-2,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undecane-1,3,5,9-tetraone and 2,4-diaryl-1'H-spiro[bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-3,5'-pyrimidine]-2',4',6',9(3'H-tetraone, respectively in good yield. Structure elucidation is carried out by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR, UV-Visible, mass spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography techniques. A possible mechanism of the formation is discussed. The structural conformation also demonstrated by coupling constants derived from dihedral angles between vicinal and geminal protons. The 1H NMR spectra of NH protons of spiro compounds derived from barbituric acid show a broad singlet peak instead, these protons in the spiro compounds derived from thiobarbituric acid show two distinct peaks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v28i3.12

  13. A new synthetic methodology for the preparation of biocompatible and organo-soluble barbituric- and thiobarbituric acid based chitosan derivatives for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahzad, Sohail [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Shahzadi, Lubna [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, Nasir [Department of Allied Health Sciences and Chemical Pathology, Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rauf, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Manzoor, Faisal; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rehman, Ihtesham ur [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Kroto Research Institute, The University of Sheffield, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Yar, Muhammad, E-mail: drmyar@ciitlahore.edu.pk [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2016-09-01

    Chitosan's poor solubility especially in organic solvents limits its use with other organo-soluble polymers; however such combinations are highly required to tailor their properties for specific biomedical applications. This paper describes the development of a new synthetic methodology for the synthesis of organo-soluble chitosan derivatives. These derivatives were synthesized from chitosan (CS), triethyl orthoformate and barbituric or thiobarbituric acid in the presence of 2-butannol. The chemical interactions and new functional motifs in the synthesized CS derivatives were evaluated by FTIR, DSC/TGA, UV/VIS, XRD and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity investigation for these materials was performed by cell culture method using VERO cell line and all the synthesized derivatives were found to be non-toxic. The solubility analysis showed that these derivatives were readily soluble in organic solvents including DMSO and DMF. Their potential to use with organo-soluble commercially available polymers was exploited by electrospinning; the synthesized derivatives in combination with polycaprolactone delivered nanofibrous membranes. - Highlights: • Development of a new synthetic methodology • Synthesis of organo-soluble chitosan (CS) derivatives • VERO cells proliferation • Nanofibrous membranes from the synthesized chitosan derivatives and polycaprolactone.

  14. Empirical versus mechanistic modelling: comparison of an artificial neural network to a mechanistically based model for quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationships of a homologous series of barbiturates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorov, I S; Hadjitodorov, S T; Petrov, I; Rowland, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the predictive performance of a mechanistically based model and an empirical artificial neural network (ANN) model to describe the relationship between the tissue-to-unbound plasma concentration ratios (Kpu's) of 14 rat tissues and the lipophilicity (LogP) of a series of nine 5-n-alkyl-5-ethyl barbituric acids. The mechanistic model comprised the water content, binding capacity, number of the binding sites, and binding association constant of each tissue. A backpropagation ANN with 2 hidden layers (33 neurons in the first layer, 9 neurons in the second) was used for the comparison. The network was trained by an algorithm with adaptive momentum and learning rate, programmed using the ANN Toolbox of MATLAB. The predictive performance of both models was evaluated using a leave-one-out procedure and computation of both the mean prediction error (ME, showing the prediction bias) and the mean squared prediction error (MSE, showing the prediction accuracy). The ME of the mechanistic model was 18% (range, 20 to 57%), indicating a tendency for overprediction; the MSE is 32% (range, 6 to 104%). The ANN had almost no bias: the ME was 2% (range, 36 to 64%) and had greater precision than the mechanistic model, MSE 18% (range, 4 to 70%). Generally, neither model appeared to be a significantly better predictor of the Kpu's in the rat.

  15. The interaction between the solar wind and the heterogeneous neutral gas coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Martin; Toth, Gabor; Tenishev, Valeriy; Fougere, Nicolas; Huang, Zhenguang

    2016-07-01

    Comets are surrounded by an extended gas and dust coma. Neutral particles are continuously ionized by solar irradiation and then picked-up by the solar wind. This leads to a complex interaction between the neutral gas coma and the solar wind, which changes over the course of the comet's orbit around the Sun. The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has been in orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. Rosetta carries several instruments to investigate the comet's nucleus and surrounding neutral gas coma and plasma. Part of the payload is the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) that consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. ROSINA was designed to measure the neutral gas abundance and composition and low energy ions in the coma in situ. ROSINA observations have shown that the coma is very heterogeneous both in total density and composition of the neutral gas. This heterogeneity is driven in large part by the complex shape of the nucleus and the varying illumination conditions associated with the comet's rotation. In this presentation we will show the time-dependent distribution of the major volatiles around the comet constrained by ROSINA observations. Furthermore we will investigate the impact of the highly non-symmetric neutral gas coma on the interaction of the solar wind with the comet.

  16. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  17. Neurologic manifestations of diabetic comas: correlation with biochemical alterations in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, R; Arieff, A I

    1975-05-01

    Coma and other neurologic abnormalities are present in patients with either diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or nonketotic coma (NKC), and the cause of such phenomena are not known. Patients with NKC also manifest seizures and focal neurologic changes. Treatment of diabetic coma with insulin may induce cerebral edema by as yet undefined mechanism(s). In patients with DKA, cerebral oxygen utilization is impaired, and there is hyperviscosity of the blood. A substantial part of the brain's energy source is derived from ketones, which in themselves can depress sensorium. Extracellular hyperosomolality is present, which may also contribute to the genesis of coma. In addition, most ketoacidotic patients have associated medical conditions, which may further impair consciousness. Biochemical changes in the brains of animals with DKA include impairment of both phosphofructokinase activity and pyruvate oxidation, and accumulation of citrate. The net effect upon sensorium in ketoacidotic patients probably represents the interaction of most of the above factors and differs markedly among individuals. Patients with NKC manifest not only depression of sensorium, but also focal motor seizures, hemiparesis, and other neurologic changes, such as aphasia, hypereflexia, sensory defects, autonomic changes, and brainstem dysfunction. Most of the aforementioned changes revert to normal after correction of hyperosomolality. Gamma amino butyric acid, which has been shown to elevate the seizure threshold, is normal in brains of ketoacidotic animals, but may be low in nonketotic coma. Also, hyperosomolality per se may produce seizures. Cerebral edema may complicate the treatment of either DKA or NKC. The available experimental evidence suggests that many of the commonly held theories for the production of such brain swelling probably do not occur. There is no breakdown of the sodium pump, sorbitol or fructose do not accumulate in brain, and brain glucose is only about 25 percent of that in

  18. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. INTERGALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND THE MASSIVE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM AT THE CORE OF THE COMA GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; Del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzman, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matkovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is host to a correspondingly large system of globular clusters (GCs). We use imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey to present the first definitive detection of a large population of intracluster GCs (IGCs) that fills the Coma cluster core and is not associated with individual galaxies. The GC surface density profile around the central massive elliptical galaxy, NGC 4874, is dominated at large radii by a population of IGCs that extend to the limit of our data (R +4000 -5000 (systematic) IGCs out to this radius, and that they make up ∼70% of the central GC system, making this the largest GC system in the nearby universe. Even including the GC systems of other cluster galaxies, the IGCs still make up ∼30%-45% of the GCs in the cluster core. Observational limits from previous studies of the intracluster light (ICL) suggest that the IGC population has a high specific frequency. If the IGC population has a specific frequency similar to high-S N dwarf galaxies, then the ICL has a mean surface brightness of μ V ∼ 27 mag arcsec -2 and a total stellar mass of roughly 10 12 M sun within the cluster core. The ICL makes up approximately half of the stellar luminosity and one-third of the stellar mass of the central (NGC 4874+ICL) system. The color distribution of the IGC population is bimodal, with blue, metal-poor GCs outnumbering red, metal-rich GCs by a ratio of 4:1. The inner GCs associated with NGC 4874 also have a bimodal distribution in color, but with a redder metal-poor population. The fraction of red IGCs (20%), and the red color of those GCs, implies that IGCs can originate from the halos of relatively massive, L* galaxies, and not solely from the disruption of

  19. Sinais vitais e expressão facial de pacientes em estado de coma Signos vitales y expresión facial de pacientes en estado de coma Vital signs and facial expression of patients in coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Giesbrecht Puggina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi verificar a influência da música e mensagem oral sobre os Sinais Vitais e Expressão Facial dos pacientes em coma fisiológico ou induzido. Realizou-se um Ensaio Clínico Controlado e Randomizado. A amostra consistiu-se de 30 pacientes de Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, que foram divididos em 2 grupos: Grupo Controle (sem estímulos auditivos e Grupo Experimental (com estímulos auditivos. Os pacientes foram submetidos a 3 sessões, em dias consecutivos. Encontraram-se alterações estatisticamente significativas nos sinais vitais (saturação de O2 - sessão 1; saturação de O2 - sessão 3; freqüência respiratória - sessão 3 durante a mensagem e na expressão facial, sessão 1, durante a música e a mensagem. Aparentemente a mensagem foi um estímulo mais forte do que a música em relação à capacidade de produzir respostas fisiológicas sugestivas de audição.El objetivo era verificar la influencia de la música y del mensaje verbal en los Señales Vitales y la Expresión Facial de los pacientes en coma fisiológico o inducido. Un Ensayo Clínico Controlado y Randomizado fue echo. La muestra fue consistida en 30 pacientes de Unidad de terapia Intensiva, que fueran divididos en 2 grupos: Grupo Control (sin estímulos auditivos y Grupo Experimental (con los estímulos auditivos. Los pacientes fueran sometidos a las 3 sesiones, en días consecutivos. Los cambios estadísticamente significativos en las Señales Vitales fueran encuentrados (saturación del oxigeno - sesión 1; saturación del oxigeno - sesión 3; frecuencia respiratoria - sesión 3 durante el mensaje y en la Expresión Facial, sesión 1, durante música y el mensaje. Aparentemente el mensaje era uno estimulo más fuerte de qué la música en lo que refiere a la capacidad de producir respuestas fisiológicas de audición.The objective was to check music and voice message influence on the Vital Signals and Facial Expressions of patients in physiological or

  20. Myxoedema coma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Louise Havkrog; Laursen, Adam Hoegsbro; Reiter, Nanna

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old man was admitted to department of emergency medicine at a tertiary referral hospital due to dizziness and fatigue. Clinical features on admission were non-pitting oedema, dry skin, very sparse hair, a hoarse voice, hypothermia (rectal temperature 28.7°C), macroglossia, sinus...... bradycardia and slow cerebration. Blood tests revealed severe hypothyroidism. During admission, the patient developed respiratory failure, renal failure, bleeding symptoms and diffuse colitis. The patient was treated with hydrocortisone and levothyroxine and he survived miraculously. This case describes...

  1. Juan Comas's summary history of the American association of physical anthropologists (1928-1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Marta P; Little, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    This translation of Juan Comas's Summary History of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists was originally published in Spanish by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico, in 1969 (Departamento de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Publication 22). Physical anthropologists from North America and members of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists owe Juan Comas a debt of gratitude for having labored to produce this Summary History of the AAPA. There is much useful and interesting material in this document: extensive endnotes that are helpful to the historian of the profession; an appendix of the Journal issues where the proceedings of annual meetings can be found; a detailed listing of contributors of papers to annual meetings from 1930-1968; a warm acknowledgment and history of the contributions of the Wenner-Gren Foundation to biological anthropology; a history of the Yearbook of Physical Anthropology; and comments on the short-lived PA Newsletter. In addition, there are appendices with the founding AAPA Constitution and By-Laws from 1930 and as they existed in 1968. All of this synoptic information saves the reader with interests in the history of the AAPA considerable effort, especially when few university and college libraries have the full (old and new) series of the AJPA on their shelves. We have tried to provide a translation of Comas's history that is faithful to the original Spanish-language publication. In a few cases, we shortened sentences and applied a slightly more modern usage than was popular in the late 1960s. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Preliminary Evidence for a Virial Shock around the Coma Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Uri; Kushnir, Doron; Loeb, Abraham; Waxman, Eli

    2017-08-01

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe, are thought to grow by accreting mass from their surroundings through large-scale virial shocks. Due to electron acceleration in such a shock, it should appear as a γ-ray, hard X-ray, and radio ring, elongated toward the large-scale filaments feeding the cluster, coincident with a cutoff in the thermal Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) signal. However, no such signature was found until now, and the very existence of cluster virial shocks has remained a theory. We find preliminary evidence for a large γ-ray ring of ˜ 5 {Mpc} minor axis around the Coma cluster, elongated toward the large-scale filament connecting Coma and Abell 1367, detected at the nominal 2.7σ confidence level (5.1σ using control signal simulations). The γ-ray ring correlates both with a synchrotron signal and with the SZ cutoff, but not with Galactic tracers. The γ-ray and radio signatures agree with analytic and numerical predictions if the shock deposits ˜ 1 % of the thermal energy in relativistic electrons over a Hubble time and ˜ 1 % in magnetic fields. The implied inverse Compton and synchrotron cumulative emission from similar shocks can contribute significantly to the diffuse extragalactic γ-ray and low-frequency radio backgrounds. Our results, if confirmed, reveal the prolate structure of the hot gas in Coma, the feeding pattern of the cluster, and properties of the surrounding large-scale voids and filaments. The anticipated detection of such shocks around other clusters would provide a powerful new cosmological probe.

  3. The globular cluster systems of 54 Coma ultra-diffuse galaxies: statistical constraints from HST data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorisco, N. C.; Monachesi, A.; Agnello, A.; White, S. D. M.

    2018-04-01

    We use data from the HST Coma Cluster Treasury program to assess the richness of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of 54 Coma ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs), 18 of which have a half-light radius exceeding 1.5 kpc. We use a hierarchical Bayesian method tested on a large number of mock data sets to account consistently for the high and spatially varying background counts in Coma. These include both background galaxies and intra-cluster globular clusters (ICGCs), which are disentangled from the population of member globular clusters (GCs) in a probabilistic fashion. We find no candidate for a GCS as rich as that of the Milky Way, our sample has GCSs typical of dwarf galaxies. For the standard relation between GCS richness and halo mass, 33 galaxies have a virial mass Mvir ≤ 1011 M⊙ at 90 per cent probability. Only three have Mvir > 1011 M⊙ with the same confidence. The mean colour and spread in colour of the UDG GCs are indistinguishable from those of the abundant population of ICGCs. The majority of UDGs in our sample are consistent with the relation between stellar mass and GC richness of `normal' dwarf galaxies. Nine systems, however, display GCSs that are richer by a factor of 3 or more (at 90 per cent probability). Six of these have sizes ≲1.4 kpc. Our results imply that the physical mechanisms responsible for the extended size of the UDGs and for the enhanced GC richness of some cluster dwarfs are at most weakly correlated.

  4. Mapping of coma anisotropies to plasma structures of weak comets: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gortsas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of coma anisotropies on the plasma environment of comets have been studied by means of a 3-D hybrid model which treats electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas ion dynamics are covered by a kinetic approach. From Earth-based observations as well as from in-situ spacecraft measurements the shape of the coma of many comets is ascertained to be anisotropic. However, most plasma simulation studies deploy a spherically symmetric activity pattern. In this paper anisotropy is studied by considering three different coma shape models. The first model is derived from the Haser model and is characterised by spherically symmetry. This reference model is then compared with two different neutral gas shape models: the dayside restricted model with no nightside activity and a cone shaped model with opening angle of π/2. In all models the integrated surface activity is kept constant. The simulations have been done for the Rosetta target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for two heliocentric distances, 1.30 AU and 3.25 AU. It is found that shock formation processes are modified as a result of increasing spatial confinement. Characteristic plasma structures of comets such as the bow shock, magnetic barrier region and the ion composition boundary exhibit a shift towards the sun. In addition, the cone shaped model leads to a strong increase of the mass-loaded region which in turn leads to a smooth deceleration of the solar wind flow and an increasing degree of mixture between the solar wind and cometary ion species. This creates an additional transport channel of the magnetic field from the magnetic barrier region away which in turn leads to a broadening of this region. In addition, it leads to an ion composition boundary which is only gradually developed.

  5. Masses and K-line absolute magnitudes of γ Leonis and 35 Comae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deming, D.; Dykton, M.

    1979-01-01

    The visual binary system γ Leonis consists of two K giants whose total mass was found by Wilson to be less than 0.6M/sub sun/ when a distance was obtained from K-line absolute magnitudes of both components. Since the orbital period of the system is of order 600 years, the orbital solution has usually been regarded as the most likely explanation of the anomalous mass. We have investigated the uniqueness of the orbital solution. We find that the individual orbital elements are only poorly determined, but that a 3 /P 2 is known to within +- 10%. The anomalous mass of this binary system implies either extensive mass-loss or the need for revisions in the K-line absolute magnitudes. We also investigate the binary system 35 Comae. Wilson has noted that in this system the K-line absolute magnitude of the G8 III primary component implies a total mass of 8 M/sub sun/. However the A component of 35 Comae is not sufficiently luminous to justify such a large total mass. The system has a period of order 700 years, and the uniqueness of the orbital solution is therefore suspect. However, in this case also we have investigated the uniqueness of the orbital solution and find that individual orbital elements are poorly determined, but that a 3 /P 2 is known to within +- 17%. We point out that 35 Comae is known to be very metal rich, in contrast to γ Leonis which is metal poor. We conclude that a composition-dependent correction to the K-line absolute magnitudes provides the simplest explanation of these mass anomalies. Such a correction would also give better agreement with the trigonometric parallaxes of these binary systems

  6. Deep Galex Observations of the Coma Cluster: Source Catalog and Galaxy Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.; Jenkins, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from deep 26 ks GALEX observations of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 Angstroms) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 Angstroms) wavebands. The observed field is centered 0.9 deg. (1.6 Mpc) south-west of the Coma core, and has full optical photometric coverage by SDSS and spectroscopic coverage to r-21. The catalog consists of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically-confirmed Coma member galaxies that range from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is 80% complete to NUV=23 and FUV=23.5, and has a limiting depth at NUV=24.5 and FUV=25.0 which corresponds to a star formation rate of 10(exp -3) solar mass yr(sup -1) at the distance of Coma. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as a position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g. object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is also free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here: conversely, we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV approximately 23 and FUV approximately 24. We have measured the total UV galaxy counts using our catalog and report a 50% excess of counts across FUV=22-23.5 and NUV=21.5-23 relative to previous GALEX

  7. Behaviour of comet Kohoutek /1973f/. [chemical reactions in coma and tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, D. A.; Ip, W.-H.

    1974-01-01

    The spectral identification of CH3CN and HCN provides the first support for the hypothesis first proposed by Wurm (1943), of chemically stable 'parent molecules' for the less stable radicals and ions seen in the coma and the tail. These two molecules were among the earliest discovered in dense interstellar clouds. Circumstantial evidence for the presence of water as the dominant volatile component in the nucleus has been growing for some time. However, a much more volatile species is required to explain the observed behavior of the comet. CO, formaldehyde, or methane would quickly evaporate as the comet approached the sun.

  8. MECHANISMS OF SECONDARY BRAIN DAMAGE IN COMA DEVELOPED IN ACUTE PERIOD OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Константин Владимирович Лукашев

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions. One of the mechanisms of secondary brain damage in patients in coma in acute period of ischemic stroke is a worsening dysfunction of the brain stem followed bythe cerebral autoregulationdisturbance in the absence of a significant increase of intracranial pressure.This causes disturbances of the central hemodynamics, the mechanical and gas exchange properties,the accumulation of extravascular lung water.These processesresult in acute lung injury, itbeing a critical element in the development and progression of systemic hypoxia as a key mechanism of secondary brain damage.

  9. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND SPUR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4921, THE BRIGHTEST SPIRAL GALAXY IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    We resolve a significant fraction of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4921, the brightest spiral galaxy in the Coma cluster. We also find a number of extended bright star clusters (star complexes) in the spur region of the arms. The latter are much brighter and bluer than those in the normal star-forming region, being as massive as 3 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}. The color distribution of the GCs in this galaxy is found to be bimodal. The turnover magnitudes of the luminosity functions of the blue (metal-poor) GCs (0.70 < (V − I) ≤ 1.05) in the halo are estimated V(max) = 27.11 ± 0.09 mag and I(max) = 26.21 ± 0.11 mag. We obtain similar values for NGC 4923, a companion S0 galaxy, and two Coma cD galaxies (NGC 4874 and NGC 4889). The mean value for the turnover magnitudes of these four galaxies is I(max) = 26.25 ± 0.03 mag. Adopting M{sub I} (max) = −8.56 ± 0.09 mag for the metal-poor GCs, we determine the mean distance to the four Coma galaxies to be 91 ± 4 Mpc. Combining this with the Coma radial velocity, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 77.9 ± 3.6 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}. We estimate the GC specific frequency of NGC 4921 to be S{sub N} = 1.29 ± 0.25, close to the values for early-type galaxies. This indicates that NGC 4921 is in the transition phase to S0s.

  10. Evidence for distributed gas sources of hydrogen halides in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, Johan; Dhooghe, Frederik; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Cessateur, Gaël; Combi, Michael R.; Equeter, Eddy; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen; Gasc, Sébastien; Gibbons, Andrew; Gombosi, Tamas; Gunell, Herbert; Hässig, Myrtha; Le Roy, Léna; Maggiolo, Romain; Mall, Urs; Marty, Bernard; Neefs, Eddy; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Rosetta has detected the presence of the hydrogen halides HF, HCl, and HBr in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. These species are known to freeze out on icy grains in molecular clouds. Analysis of the abundances of HF and HCl as a function of cometocentric distance suggests that these hydrogen halides are released both from the nucleus surface and off dust particles in the inner coma. We present three lines of evidence. First, the abundances of HF and HCl relative to the overall neutral gas in the coma appear to increase with distance, indicating that a net source must be present; since there is no hint at any possible parent species with sufficient abundances that could explain the observed levels of HF or HCl, dust particles are the likely origin. Second, the amplitude of the daily modulation of the halide-to-water density due to the rotation and geometry of 67P's nucleus and the corresponding surface illumination is observed to progressively diminish with distance and comet dust activity; this can be understood from the range of dust particle speeds well below the neutral gas expansion speed, which tends to smooth the coma density profiles. Third, strong halogen abundance changes detected locally in the coma cannot be easily explained from composition changes at the surface, while they can be understood from differences in local gas production from the dust particles.

  11. Recurrent tonic-clonic seizures and coma due to ingestion of Type I pyrethroids in a 19-month-old patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampreti, A; Lampati, L; Chidini, G; Rocchi, L; Rolandi, L; Lonati, D; Petrolini, V M; Vecchio, S; Locatelli, C A; Manzo, L

    2013-07-01

    Pyrethroids are synthetic pyrethrin analogues that induce sodium-channel depolarization and hyperexcitation. Severe pyrethroid poisoning is manifested by a "Tremor Syndrome" (Type I cyano-agents) or a "Choreoathetosis/Salivation Syndrome" (Type II non cyano-agents). Very few reports of neurotoxic effects caused by Type I pyrethroids ingestion are available, and no human data concerning Type I pyrethroid blood levels in pediatric poisoning are reported in the medical literature. A 19-month-old female patient presented with irritability and inconsolable crying that rapidly worsened to tonic-clonic seizures and coma (GCS 6). On admission vital signs including BP 110/70 mmHg, HR 110 beats/min, and SpO2 98% on room air were normal. Orotracheal intubation, oxygen administration, and midazolam infusion (4 μg/kg/min) were performed. Intravenous thiopental sodium, up to 18 mg/kg/hour, was administered to control convulsions. An inquiry revealed that 9 h before presentation the patient had ingested an unknown amount of an insecticide containing 7% piperonyl-butoxide and a mixture of the Type I pyrethroids bifenthrin (5%) and esbiothrin (3%). Consequently, gastric lavage was performed, followed by administration of activated charcoal and cathartics. On the subsequent 48 h, the patient returned progressively alert; she was extubated on day 4 and discharged asymptomatically 12 days after hospitalization. After 9, 48, and 72 h of ingestion, the plasma levels were 500, 95, and 40 ng/mL for bifenthrin and 1,640, 640, and 165 ng/mL for piperonyl-butoxide respectively. This pediatric case showed severe pyrethroid neurotoxicity associated with measurable plasma levels of bifenthrin and piperonyl-butoxide. In pediatric pyrethroid poisoning, coma and seizures may represent the main life-threatening features. First-aid therapy including airway maintenance and control of muscle fasciculation and seizures is of major importance. Benzodiazepines and high-dose thiopental sodium were

  12. Coma profundo consecutivo a bloqueo del plexo braquial: A propósito de 1 caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Ángel Labrada Tapia

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso clínico infrecuente de un paciente masculino de 17 años de edad, que sufrió un accidente de tránsito y por el cual mostraba herida avulsiva del miembro superior izquierdo. Se le practicó bloqueo del plexo braquial por la técnica perivascular interescalénica, donde se utilizó como agente anestésico la mepivacaína al 2 %. Minutos después, el paciente cae en coma profundo con resolución muscular total, pupilas midriáticas y arreactivas, reflejo fotomotor, corneal y parpabral ausentes. Se intuba y acopla al respirador mecánico Mark-8, y la hemodinamia se mantuvo sin presentar convulsiones. Posteriormente, de forma paulatina, se recupera totalmente sin dejar secuelasThe clinical unfrequent case of a 17-year-old male patient that had an avulsive wound of the left upper limb as a result of a traffic accident is presented. Block of the brachial plexus was performed by the interscalene perivascular technique. Mepivacaine 2 % was used as an anesthetic. Some minutes later, the patient had a deep coma with total muscular resolution, mydriatic and non-reactive pupils. The photomotor, corneal and eyelid reflexes were absent. He was intubated and coupled to the Mark-8 mechanical respirator. The hemodynamics was maintained without presenting convulsions. Later on, he recovered himself gradually and had no sequelae

  13. DRY MERGER RATE AND POST-MERGER FRACTION IN THE COMA CLUSTER CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Juan P.; Campusano, Luis E.; Haines, Christopher P.; De Propris, Roberto; Weinzirl, Tim; Jogee, Shardha

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the dry merger activity in the Coma cluster, using a spectroscopically complete sample of 70 red-sequence (RS) galaxies, most of which (∼75%) are located within 0.2R 200 (∼0.5 Mpc) from the cluster center, with data from the Coma Treasury Survey obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. The fraction of close galaxy pairs in the sample is the proxy employed for the estimation of the merger activity. We identify 5 pairs and 1 triplet, enclosing a total of 13 galaxies, based on limits on projected separation and line-of-sight velocity difference. Of these systems, none show signs of ongoing interaction, and therefore we do not find any true mergers in our sample. This negative result sets a 1σ upper limit of 1.5% per Gyr for the major dry merger rate, consistent with the low rates expected in present-day clusters. Detailed examination of the images of all the RS galaxies in the sample reveals only one with low surface brightness features identifiable as the remnant of a past merger or interaction, implying a post-merger fraction below 2%

  14. Observing RAM Pressure Stripping and Morphological Transformation in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Michael; West, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The two largest spirals in the Coma cluster, NGC4911 and NGC4921, are being vigorously ram-pressure stripped by the hot intracluster medium. Our HST ACS and WFC3 images have revealed galactic scale shock fronts, giant "Pillars of Creation", rivulets of dust, and spatially coherent star formation in these grand design spirals. We have now obtained HST WFC3 imaging of five additional large Coma spirals to search for and investigate the effects of ram pressure stripping across the wider cluster environment. The results are equally spectacular as the first two examples. The geometry of the interactions in some cases allows an estimation of the various time scales involved, including gas flows out of the disk leading to creation of the ICM, and the attendant triggered star formation in the galaxy disks. The global star formation patterns yield insights into the spatial and temporal ISM-ICM interactions driving cluster galaxy evolution and ultimately transforming morphologies from spiral to S0. These processes were much more common in the early Universe when the intergalactic and intracluster components were initially created from stripping and destruction of member galaxies.

  15. The relationship between pneumonia and Glasgow coma scale assessment on acute stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.; Batubara, C. A.; Dhanu, R.

    2018-03-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most frequent medical complications of a stroke. Despite the well-documented association of a stroke associated infections with increased mortality and worse long-term outcome, on the other hand, the limited data available on independent predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke patients in an emergency unit. To determine the independentrelationship between pneumonia and Glasgow Coma Scale assessment on acute stroke patients. The cohort retrospective study observed 55 acute stroke patients who stayed in intensive care unit Adam Malik General Hospital from January until August 2017. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with Ischemic stroke (OR 5.40; 95% CI: 1.28 – 6.40, p=0.003), higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (p=0.014) and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (p=0.0001). Analysis multivariate logistic regression identified NIHSS as an independent of predictors of pneumonia (95% CI : 1.047 – 1.326, p=0.001). Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficits evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  16. [Redistribution of gastrointestinal ammonia into blood in alcohol coma rat: the role in lethal outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivnitskiĭ, Iu Iu; Shefer, T V; Reĭniuk, V L

    2010-01-01

    At 3 h after the intragastral administration of ethanol (446 mmol/kg) the blood ammonia concentration in v. portae increased 1.4 times, in v. cava inf. caudally of vv. renales inflow - 2.2 times, cranially of vv. hepaticae - 2.5 times, and in blood obtained by decapitation - by 65%7. The rate of ammonia accumulation in 'avage medium injected intraperitoneally was triple as that in intact rats. The exposure to atmospheric ammoniac (0.84-1.07 mg/l) for 3 h resuited in increasing blood ammonia concentration 2.4 times compared with the isolated ethanol action. The ammonia inhalation promoted the lethal action of ethanol with a dose alteration factor of 0.81 and suppressed gas-exchange. The promotion of the ethanol lethal action by the non-lethal ammonium acetate dosage has been observed. These data suggest that in rat, the coma-inducing ethanol ingestion promotes the translocation of intestinal ammonia into the common bloodstream, which has a detrimental effect on the outcome of alcohol coma.

  17. Optical spectroscopy and the UV luminosity function of galaxies in the Abell 1367, Coma and Virgo clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Carrasco, L.

    2003-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy of 93 galaxies, 60 projected in the direction of Abell 1367, 21 onto the Coma cluster and 12 on Virgo, is reported. The targets were selected either because they were detected in previous H\\alpha, UV or r' surveys. The present observations bring to 100% the redshift completeness of H\\alpha selected galaxies in the Coma region and to 75% in Abell 1367. All observed galaxies except one show H\\alpha emission and belong to the clusters. This confirms previous determinations o...

  18. Why do insects enter chill coma? Low temperature and high extracellular potassium compromises muscle function in Locusta migratoria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Findsen, Anders; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    Many insect species enter a comatose state when their body temperature is lowered to a critical limit (critical thermal minimum) but the physiological and cellular processes that underlie chill coma are still unresolved. Several studies have demonstrated that transition into chill-coma involves......-depressing effects that occur secondary to loss of ion-homeostasis. Using isolated tibial muscle of the chill susceptible locust we investigated the relationship between tetanic force production, temperature and extracellular [K+]. Tetanic force was elicited every 10 minutes using 2s trains of 1ms 12-V pulses...

  19. Potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico no prognóstico do coma superficial

    OpenAIRE

    Leite,Libia Camargo Ribeiro; Francisco,Maira de Victor; Duarte,Sinésio Grace; Garcia,Cristiane Fregonesi Dutra; Bizinoto,Samanta Natália

    2013-01-01

    O coma é a redução persistente do nível de consciência, arresponsivo a estímulos, devido à baixa atividade cerebral. Para verificar o nível de consciência, um recurso frequentemente utilizado é a Escala de Coma de Glasgow. Outro método que se destaca é o Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico, o qual avalia a atividade elétrica das vias auditivas ascendentes, desde o trajeto periférico até o mesencéfalo. O exame é simples, imune a medicamentos depressores e ambientes eletricamente ca...

  20. THE REINCARNATION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST: THE IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC REFRACTORY MATERIAL IN INFRARED SPECTRA OF COMETARY COMAE AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi_kimura@cps-jp.org [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, c/o CPS (Center for Planetary Science), Chuo-ku Minatojima Minamimachi 7-1-48, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2013-09-20

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  1. The Reincarnation of Interstellar Dust: The Importance of Organic Refractory Material in Infrared Spectra of Cometary Comae and Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  2. THE REINCARNATION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST: THE IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC REFRACTORY MATERIAL IN INFRARED SPECTRA OF COMETARY COMAE AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks

  3. Evolution of H2O related species in the neutral coma of 67P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, A. M.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H. R.; Bar-Nun, A.; Berthelier, J. J.; Bochsler, P. A.; Briois, C.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M. R.; De Keyser, J.; van Dishoeck, E.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Jäckel, A.; Kopp, E.; Korth, A.; Le Roy, L.; Mall, U.; Maggiolo, R.; Marty, B.; Mousis, O.; Owen, T. C.; Reme, H.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tzou, C. Y.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Walsh, C.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The ROSINA-DFMS mass spectrometer has been probing the coma of 67Psince the spacecraft arrived at the comet in August 2014.The acquired data set covers a large range of viewing geometries forthe ever changing conditions of 67P along its journey to pericenter. With the high temporal resolutionof ROSINA-DFMS we are able to examine diurnal and seasonal changesof different species in the gaseous coma.Large scale heterogeneities in the coma have been reported since the very first measurements of the neutral inventory at 67P.Many of the minor species are seen to follow one of the major compounds,H2O, CO or CO2.In this paper we will present the latest results on H2O related species.We will discuss the possible trapping/building mechanisms responsible for these species and why it is different from other species such asCO, N2 or CO2. Acknowledgements:Work at the University of Michigan was funded by NASA contract JPL-1266313.Work at UoB was funded by the State of Bern, the Swiss National Science Foundationand the European Space Agency PRODEX Program. Work at MPS was funded by the Max-Planck Society and BMWI contract 50QP1302. Work at Southwest Research institute was supported by subcontract #1496541 from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Work at BIRA-IASB was supported by the Belgian Science Policy Office via PRODEX/ROSINA PEA 90020. This work has been carried out thanks to the support of the A*MIDEX project (n° ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the « Investissements d'Avenir » French Government program, managed by the French National Research Agency (ANR). This work was supported by CNES grants at IRAP, LATMOS, LPC2E, UTINAM, CRPG, and by the European Research Council (grant no. 267255 to B. Marty). A. Bar-Nun thanks the Ministry of Science and the Israel Space agency. Work by JHW at Southwest Research Institute was funded by the NASA JPL subcontract NAS703001TONMO710889. EvD and CW are supported by A-ERC grant 291141 CHEMPLAN and an NWO Veni award. We acknowledge herewith the

  4. A spectroscopic survey of dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster: stellar populations, environment and downsizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Allanson, Steven P.; Bridges, Terry J.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Miller, Neal A.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the stellar populations in a sample of 89 faint red galaxies in the Coma cluster, using high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectroscopy from the 6.5-m MMT. Our sample is drawn from two 1° fields, one centred on the cluster core and the other located 1° to the south-west of the cluster centre. The target galaxies are mostly 2-4mag fainter than M* galaxies with these luminosities have been previously studied only using small samples, or at low S/N. For a comparison sample we use published high-S/N data for red-sequence galaxies in the Shapley supercluster. We use state-of-the-art stellar population models (by R. Schiavon) to interpret the absorption-line indices and infer the single-burst-equivalent age and metallicity (Fe/H) for each galaxy, as well as the abundances of the light elements Mg, Ca, C and N. The ages of the Coma dwarfs span a wide range from 10Gyr, with a strong environmental dependence. The oldest galaxies are found only in the core, while most of the galaxies in the outer south-west field have ages ~3Gyr. The galaxies have a metallicity range -1.0 histories perform no better than single-burst models in reproducing the observed line indices. Assuming a star formation history dominated by a single burst, the number of dwarf galaxies on the red sequence in the Coma core has doubled since z ~ 0.7. Assuming instead an abruptly truncated constant star formation rate, the equivalent redshift is z ~ 0.4. These estimates bracket the red-sequence growth time-scales found by direct studies of distant clusters. In the south-west field, the red sequence was established only at z ~ 0.2 for a burst-dominated star formation history (z ~ 0.1 for the truncated case). Our observations confirm previous indications of very recently quenched star formation in this part of the cluster. Our results strongly support the scenario in which much of the cluster passive dwarf population (in this luminosity range) was generated by environment-driven transformation

  5. The focus of family members' functioning in the acute phase of traumatic coma; Part Two: Protecting from suffering and protecting what remains to rebuild life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaeghe, S.T.L.; van Zuuren, F.J.; Defloor, T.; Duijnstee, M.S.H.; Grypdonck, M.H.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aims.  The identification and description of the basic psychological process linked with the focus of family members’ functioning during the acute phase of traumatic coma. Background.  Earlier research learned that hope is a core category in coping with traumatic coma. Hope seems to be the drive to

  6. Neural signature of coma revealed by posteromedial cortex connection density analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briguita Malagurski

    2017-01-01

    A complex pattern of decreased and increased connections was observed, suggesting a network imbalance between internal/external processing systems, within PMC during coma. The number of PMC voxels with hypo-CD positive correlation showed a significant negative association with the CRS-R score, notwithstanding aetiology. Traumatic injury specifically appeared to be associated with a greater prevalence of hyper-connected (negative correlation voxels, which was inversely associated with patient neurological outcome. A logistic regression model using the number of hypo-CD positive and hyper-CD negative correlations, accurately permitted patient's outcome prediction (AUC = 0.906, 95%IC = 0.795–1. These points might reflect adaptive plasticity mechanism and pave the way for innovative prognosis and therapeutics methods.

  7. Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Maira Migliari; Capitani, Eduardo Mello De; Cintra, Maria Letícia; Hyslop, Stephen; Carvalho, Adriana Camargo; Bucaretchi, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory) phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine), is presented. A biopsy from the left thumb blister taken on day 4 revealed focal necrosis of the epidermis and necrosis of sweat gland epithelial cells; direct immunofluorescence was strongly positive for IgG in superficial blood vessel walls but negative for IgM, IgA, C3 and C1q. The patient was discharged on day 21 with no sequelae.

  8. Escala de coma de Glasgow pediátrica modificada para cães

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade,M.B.; Cole,E.F.; Evêncio Neto,J.; Silva,A.C.J.; Aleixo,G.A.S.; Cunha,A.L.T.

    2010-01-01

    Com o objetivo de modificar a escala de coma de Glasgow pediátrica para utilização na medicina veterinária, foram utilizados 30 cães adultos com alterações neurológicas passíveis de avaliação da consciência. A escala modificada para cães foi aplicada em três momentos com intervalos de 48 horas entre eles, resultando em 90 eventos diversos. A escala foi aplicada para avaliação da abertura ocular (AO), da melhor resposta associada à vocalização (MRV) e da melhor resposta motora (MRM). Com a aná...

  9. The relative spatial distributions of high- and low-luminosity galaxies toward Coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzer, J.J.; Hanson, M.M.; Gavazzi, G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative spatial distributions of low- and high-mass galaxies which lie in a field in the direction of the Coma Supercluster are investigated. Three tests are used to compare the distributions of high-luminosity and low-luminosity galaxies in the field: correlation functions, nearest neighbor distributions, and local density environments. All three tests indicate that the low-luminosity galaxies are significantly less confined to the structure defined by the luminous galaxies than are the luminous galaxies themselves. Several galaxies in the low-luminosity subsample are within voids. These findings lend support to various models for the formation of large-scale structure that include biased galaxy formation. In particular, the ratio of the amplitudes of the correlation functions for dwarfs and giants agrees closely with the predictions of the cold dark matter models of White et al. (1987). 54 refs

  10. Coma dust environment observed by GIADA during the Perihelion of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Della Corte, V.; Fulle, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S. L.; Sordini, R.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Zakharov, V.; Bussoletti, E.; Crifo, J. F.; Esposito, F.; Green, S.; Gruen, E.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, T.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Perrin, J. M.; Rodrigo, R.; Weissman, P. R.; Zarnecki, J.; Cosi, M.; Giovane, F.; Gustafson, B.; Herranz, M.; Jeronimo, J. M.; Leese, M.; Lopez-Jimenez, A.; Morales, R.

    2015-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) is an in-situ instrument mounted onboard Rosetta monitoring the dust environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: 1) the Grain Detection System, based on particle detection through light scattering; 2) the Impact Sensor, giving momentum measurement; 3) the Micro-Balances System, constituted of 5 quartz crystal microbalances, giving cumulative deposited dust. The combination of the measurements performed by these 3 subsystems provides: the number, the mass, the momentum and the speed distribution of dust particles emitted from the comet nucleus. We will present the coma dust environment as observed by GIADA during the perihelion phase of the Rosetta space mission. Despite the large distance from the nucleus, more than 200 km, GIADA was able to detect temporal and spatial variation of dust density distribution. Specific high dust spatial density sectors of the coma have been identified and their evolution during the perihelion phase was studied. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF- Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developped from a PI proposal supported by the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project/ESTEC for their outstanding work. Science support provided by NASA through the US Rosetta Project managed by JPL/California Institute of Technology. GIADA calibrated data will be available through the ESA's PSA web site.

  11. Systematic review of prediction of poor outcome in anoxic-ischaemic coma with biochemical markers of brain damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, E. G.; de Haan, R. J.; Hijdra, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether accurate prognostic rules can be derived from the combined results of studies concerning prediction of poor prognosis in anoxic-ischaemic coma with biochemical markers of brain damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or serum. DESIGN: A meta-analysis of prognostic

  12. Predictive value of neurological examination for early cortical responses to somatosensory evoked potentials in patients with postanoxic coma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, A.; Binnekade, J.M.; Verbaan, B.W.; Zandbergen, E.G.J.; Koelman, J.H.T.M.; Weinstein, H.C.; Hijdra, A.; van Horn, J.

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral absence of cortical N20 responses of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) predicts poor neurological outcome in postanoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although SEP is easy to perform and available in most hospitals, it is worthwhile to know how

  13. Rosetta/Alice Measurements of Atomic and Molecular Abundances in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Knight, M. M.; Feldman, P.; Stern, A.; Parker, J. W.; Feaga, L. M.; Steffl, A.; Bertaux, J. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Keeney, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    During the Rosetta orbital phase from August 2014 through September 2016, the Alice far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph routinely monitored the FUV emission from the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). These data, spanning 700-2050 Å, provide both spatial and temporal information on the evolution of the coma composition throughout the encounter. Emissions from hydrogen (Lyman beta at 1025 Å), oxygen (1304 Å triplet, 1356 Å), sulfur (1429 Å and 1479 Å multiplets, 1814 Å triplet), and carbon (1561 Å, 1657 Å) were regularly observed, as well as emission from the CO Fourth Positive and Cameron bands. We present a preliminary analysis of these emissions with a focus on the abundances in the coma and a mapping of the temporal and spatial variations. Both short-term (days) and long-term (months) variations will be discussed in the context of rotational and seasonal timeframes. We also present ratios among various species with the goal of identifying the dominant processes at work in the coma as a function of time. Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its member states and NASA. The Alice team acknowledges continuing support from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory through contract 1336850 to the Southwest Research Institute. RJV's work was supported by a subcontract from Southwest Research Institute to the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

  14. Fatal avian influenza A (H5N1) in a child presenting with diarrhea followed by coma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Menno D.; Bach, Van Cam; Phan, Tu Qui; Vo, Minh Hien; Tran, Tan Thanh; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Beld, Marcel; Le, Thi Phuong; Truong, Huu Khanh; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Tran, Tinh Hien; Do, Quang Ha; Farrar, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In southern Vietnam, a four-year-old boy presented with severe diarrhea, followed by seizures, coma, and death. The cerebrospinal fluid contained 1 white cell per cubic millimeter, normal glucose levels, and increased levels of protein (0.81 g per liter). The diagnosis of avian influenza A (H5N1)

  15. Accuracy of clinical signs, SEP, and EEG in predicting outcome of hypoxic coma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y C; Phan, T G; Jolley, D J; Castley, H C; Ingram, D A; Reutens, D C

    2010-02-16

    Accurate prediction of neurologic outcome after hypoxic coma is important. Previous systematic reviews have not used summary statistics to summarize and formally compare the accuracy of different prognostic tests. We therefore used summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) and cluster regression methods to compare motor and pupillary responses with sensory evoked potential (SEP) and EEG in predicting outcome after hypoxic coma. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase (1966-2007) for reports in English, German, and French and identified 25 suitable studies. An SROC was constructed for each marker (SEP, EEG, M1 and M SEP was larger than those for M1, M SEP (AUC 0.891) and that for M1 (AUC 0.786) was small (0.105, 95% confidence interval 0.023-0.187), only reaching significance on day 1 after coma onset. The use of M SEP) is marginally better than M1 at predicting outcome after hypoxic coma. However, the superiority of SEP diminishes after day 1 and when M SEP is a better marker than clinical signs.

  16. Fractional excretion of beta-2-microglobulin in the urine of patients with normal or reduced renal function and hepatic coma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Dalhoff, K; Joffe, P

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2m) as a differential diagnostic indicator between hepatic nephropathy (HN) and acute tubulointerstitial nephropathy (ATIN) in patients with reduced renal function and hepatic coma, and to determine whether beta 2m e...

  17. Particle Sizes in the Coma of Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková from Arecibo Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Howell, Ellen S.; Harmon, John K.; Lejoly, Cassandra; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Virkki, Anne; Zambrano-Marin, Luisa F.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Harris, Walter M.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Rodriguez Sanchez-Vahamonde, Carolina

    2017-10-01

    Radar observations of cometary comae can provide information about not only the cross-section of the coma, but also constraints on the particle sizes comprising the coma. Harmon et al. (2011) described analysis of radar observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2 to constrain the sizes of its coma particles, as well as modeling to analyze the particle velocity distribution in the coma and orientation with respect to the sun. Arecibo Observatory planetary radar system observations of comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková were obtained 9-16 February 2017 by transmitting a continuous wave of polarized radio waves at the comet. By examining the polarization ratios of the returned signal (whether it has the same sense or opposite sense of the transmitted signal), we can look for non-zero same sense polarization signal. Detectable same sense signal indicates the presence of particles with sizes larger than the Rayleigh transition size criteria, a = λ/2π ≈ 2 cm (for the Arecibo wavelength of 12.6 cm).The observations show strong opposite sense signal return from the comet nucleus, as well as a larger ‘skirt’ of surrounding grains in the coma. Preliminary analysis of this data indicates at least a weak same sense polarized signal, implying a population of grains larger than 2 cm in the coma. The sizes of particles in the coma, compared with the area of the coma, can help us constrain the minimum mass for particles at the Rayleigh size limit in the 45P coma. Further, a detectable grain halo of large particles around 45P would imply significant lofting of grains from the comet nucleus.ReferencesHarmon, John K., et al. "Radar observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2." The Astrophysical Journal Letters 734.1 (2011): L2.

  18. Extending technology-aided leisure and communication programs to persons with spinal cord injury and post-coma multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ricciuti, Riccardo A; Trignani, Roberto; Oliva, Doretta; Signorino, Mario; D'Amico, Fiora; Sasanelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    These two studies extended technology-aided programs to promote leisure and communication opportunities to a man with cervical spinal cord injury and a post-coma man with multiple disabilities. The studies involved the use of ABAB designs, in which A and B represented baseline and intervention phases, respectively. The programs focused on enabling the participants to activate songs, videos, requests, text messages, and telephone calls. These options were presented on a computer screen and activated through a small pressure microswitch by the man with spinal cord injury and a special touch screen by the post-coma man. To help the latter participant, who had no verbal skills, with requests and telephone calls, series of words and phrases were made available that he could activate in those situations. Data showed that both participants were successful in managing the programs arranged for them. The man with spinal cord injury activated mean frequencies of above five options per 10-min session. The post-coma man activated mean frequencies of about 12 options per 20-min session. Technology-aided programs for promoting leisure and communication opportunities might be successfully tailored to persons with spinal cord injury and persons with post-coma multiple disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Technology-aided programs may be critical to enable persons with pervasive motor impairment to engage in leisure activities and communication events independently. Persons with spinal cord injury, post-coma extended brain damage, and forms of neurodegenerative disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, may benefit from those programs. The programs could be adapted to the participants' characteristics, both in terms of technology and contents, so as to improve their overall impact on the participants' functioning and general mood.

  19. ["Shock" therapies in Nazi Germany. The example of Berlin psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzesnitzek, L

    2014-09-01

    The idea that "shock" therapies were introduced by "Nazi-Psychiatry" very early and used radically in a cruel way darkens the image of these therapies until today. A case analysis of patient files of psychiatric hospitals in Berlin is used to recapitulate the introduction of insulin coma, metrazol and electroconvulsive therapy during the National Socialism era. Contrary to the false assumption that these "shock" therapies would have been introduced and preferred by psychiatrists involved with the Nazi regime and "euthanasia", in the case of Berlin these therapies were delayed by them and seldom used.

  20. SUPERMODEL ANALYSIS OF THE HARD X-RAY EXCESS IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Orlandini, M.; Bonamente, M.; Lapi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Supermodel (SM) provides an accurate description of the thermal contribution by the hot intracluster plasma which is crucial for the analysis of the hard excess. In this paper, the thermal emissivity in the Coma cluster is derived starting from the intracluster gas temperature and density profiles obtained by the SM analysis of X-ray observables: the XMM-Newton temperature profile and the ROSAT brightness distribution. The SM analysis of the BeppoSAX/Phoswich Detector System (PDS) hard X-ray (HXR) spectrum confirms our previous results, namely, an excess at the confidence level (c.l.) of ∼4.8σ and a nonthermal (NT) flux of (1.30 ± 0.40) x 10 -11 erg cm -2 erg cm -1 in the energy range 20-80 keV. A recent joint XMM-Newton/Suzaku analysis reports an upper limit of ∼6 x 10 -12 erg cm -2 erg cm -1 in the energy range 20-80 keV for the NT flux with an average gas temperature of 8.45 ± 0.06 keV and an excess of NT radiation at a c.l. above 4σ, without including systematic effects, for an average XMM-Newton temperature of 8.2 keV in the Suzaku/HXD-PIN FOV, in agreement with our earlier PDS analysis. Here we present a further evidence of the compatibility between the Suzaku and BeppoSAX spectra, obtained by our SM analysis of the PDS data, when the smaller size of the HXD-PIN FOV and the two different average temperatures derived by XMM-Newton and by the joint XMM-Newton/Suzaku analysis are taken into account. The consistency of the PDS and HXD-PIN spectra reaffirms the presence of an NT component in the HXR spectrum of the Coma cluster. The SM analysis of the PDS data reports an excess at c.l. above 4σ also for the higher average temperature of 8.45 keV thanks to the PDS FOV being considerably greater than the HXD-PIN FOV.

  1. Hemometabolismo cerebral: variações na fase aguda do coma traumático

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FALCÃO ANTONIO L. E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as interrelações entre as alterações hemometabólicas cerebrais e sistêmicas em pacientes com traumatismo craniencefálico (TCE grave submetidos a um protocolo terapêutico padronizado. DESENHO: estudo prospectivo, intervencionista em pacientes com coma traumático. LOCAL: uma UTI geral em hospital universitário. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: vinte e sete pacientes (21M e 6F, idade 14-58 anos, com TCE grave, com três a oito pontos na escala de coma de Glasgow, foram avaliados prospectivamente segundo um protocolo cumulativo padronizado para tratamento da hipertensão intracraniana aguda, o qual incluía medidas rotineiras da pressão intracraniana (PIC e da extração cerebral de oxigênio (ECO2. Foram analisadas as interrelações hemometabólicas envolvendo: pressão arterial média (PAM, PIC, pressão parcial de gás carbônico arterial (PaCO2, ECO2, pressão de perfusão cerebral (PPC e extração sistêmica de oxigênio (ESO2. INTERVENÇÕES: apenas as padronizadas no protocolo terapêutico. RESULTADOS: não houve correlação entre a ECO2 e a PPC (r = -0,07; p = 0,41. Houve correlação inversa entre a PaCO2 e a ECO2 (r = -0,24; p = 0,005 e direta entre a ESO2 e a ECO2 (r = 0,24; p = 0,01. A mortalidade geral dos pacientes foi de 25,9% (7/27. CONCLUSÃO: 1 a PPC não se correlaciona com a ECO2 em quaisquer níveis de PIC; 2 a ECO2 está estreitamente relacionada aos diferentes níveis de PaCO2 ; e 3 durante a hiperventilação otimizada existe um acoplamento entre a ECO2 e a ESO2.

  2. Low CD4 count plus coma predicts cryptococcal meningitis in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Andreas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Largely due to the lack of diagnostic reagents, the prevalence and clinical presentation of cryptococcal meningitis in Tanzania is poorly understood. This in turn is limiting the impact of increased fluconazole availability. Methods We evaluated a cohort of 149 consecutive HIV-infected adult inpatients presenting with headache or altered mental status for clinical features, CD4 count, cryptococcal infection, and outcome. Cryptococcal meningitis was diagnosed via India ink and latex agglutination assay of CSF (n = 24 and 40 positive, respectively. Associations between cryptococcal meningitis and clinical features were evaluated by t-test. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio of such features were determined. Results Cryptococcal meningitis was associated with confusion, social withdrawal, seizures, fever, tachycardia, meningismus, oral candidiasis, and low Glasgow coma scales and CD4 count. CD4 count Conclusion Cryptococcal meningitis is common among Tanzanian HIV inpatients presenting with headache or altered mental status. Purely clinical features are insensitive for establishing the diagnosis or prognosis. We advocate expanding laboratory capacity for cryptococcal antigen testing to maximize survival.

  3. Robust discrimination between EEG responses to categories of environmental sounds in early coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha eCossy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans can recognize categories of environmental sounds, including vocalizations produced by humans and animals and the sounds of man-made objects. Most neuroimaging investigations of environmental sound discrimination have studied subjects while consciously perceiving and often explicitly recognizing the stimuli. Consequently, it remains unclear to what extent auditory object processing occurs independently of task demands and consciousness. Studies in animal models have shown that environmental sound discrimination at a neural level persists even in anesthetized preparations, whereas data from anesthetized humans has thus far provided null results. Here, we studied comatose patients as a model of environmental sound discrimination capacities during unconsciousness. We included nineteen comatose patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia during the first two days of coma, while recording nineteen-channel electroencephalography (EEG. At the level of each individual patient, we applied a decoding algorithm to quantify the differential EEG responses to human versus animal vocalizations as well as to sounds of living vocalizations versus man-made objects. Discrimination between vocalization types was accurate in eleven patients and discrimination between sounds from living and man-made sources in ten patients. At the group level, the results were significant only for the comparison between vocalization types. These results lay the groundwork for disentangling truly preferential activations in response to auditory categories, and the contribution of awareness to auditory category discrimination.

  4. Giotto IMS measurements of the production rate of hydrogen cyanide in the coma of comet Halley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, W.H.; Rosenbauer, H.; Schwenn, R. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau, (DE)); Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Meier, A. (Bern Univ. (CH). Physikalisches Inst.); Goldstein, B.E. (California Inst. of Techn., Pasadena, CA (US)); Lazarus, A.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Techn., Cambridge, MA (US). Center for Space Research); Shelley, E. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (US)); Kettmann, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US))

    1990-05-01

    The ion composition measurements in the ionosphere of comet Halley by the ion mass spectrometer (IMS) experiment on the Giotto spacecraft are used to estimate the relative abundance of HCN. From a comparison of the normalized number density of ions with mass-to-charge (M/q) ratio of 28 AMU/e with steady-state photochemical models, it can be determined that the production rate of HCN directly from the central nucleus is Q(HCN) <{approx} 2 x 10{sup -4} Q(H{sub 2}O) at the time of Giotto encounter. The related photo chemical model calculations also indicate that Q(NH{sub 3})/Q(H{sub 2}O) {approx} 5 x 10{sup -3} in agreement with recent determination from ground-based observations. The estimated value of Q(HCN) is lower than the relative abundance of Q(HCN)/Q(H{sub 2}O) {approx} 10{sup -3} as derived from radio observations of the 88.6 GHz emission of the J = 1 - 0 transition of HCN. The difference may be the result of time-variations of the coma composition and dynamics as well as other model-dependent effects.

  5. Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale and brain computed tomography-scan findings in head trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayebaghayee, Hossein; Afsharian, Tahmineh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the relationship between computed tomography (CT) scan findings and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score with the purpose of introducing GCS scoring system as an acceptable alternative for CT scan to clinically management of brain injuries in head trauma patients. This study was conducted on hospitalized patients with the complaints of head trauma. The severity of the head injury was assessed on admission by the GCS score and categorized as mild, moderate, or severe head injury. Of all study subjects, 80.5% had GCS 13-15 that among those, 45% had GCS 15. Furthermore, 10.5% had GCS ranged 9-12 and 9% had GCS patients with abnormal CT findings, 33.0% underwent surgery that 61.1% categorized in mild head injury group, 13.9% categorized in moderate head injury group, and 22.2% categorized in severe head injury group. Of those with GCS equal to 15, only 27.0% underwent surgery. The use of GCS score for assessing the level of injury may not be sufficient and thus considering CT findings as the gold standard, the combination of this scoring system and other applicable scoring systems may be more applicable to stratify brain injury level.

  6. Coma Recovery Scale-Revised: evidentiary support for hierarchical grading of level of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Paul; Zafonte, Ross; Giacino, Joseph T

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the neurobehavioral pattern of recovery of consciousness as reflected by performance on the subscales of the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R). Retrospective item response theory (IRT) and factor analysis. Inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Rehabilitation inpatients (N=180) with posttraumatic disturbance in consciousness who participated in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled drug trial. Not applicable. Scores on CRS-R subscales. The CRS-R was found to fit factor analytic models adhering to the assumptions of unidimensionality and monotonicity. In addition, subscales were mutually independent based on residual correlations. Nonparametric IRT reaffirmed the finding of monotonicity. A highly constrained confirmatory factor analysis model, which imposed equal factor loadings on all items, was found to fit the data well and was used to estimate a 1-parameter IRT model. This study provides evidence of the unidimensionality of the CRS-R and supports the hierarchical structure of the CRS-R subscales, suggesting that it is an effective tool for establishing diagnosis and monitoring recovery of consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early prediction and outcome of septic encephalopathy in acute stroke patients with nosocomial coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dao-Ming; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is the most common acute encephalopathy in ICU; however, little attention has been focused on risk of SE in the course of acute stroke. Our aim is to investigate the early prediction and outcome of SE in stroke patients with nosocomial coma (NC). A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an ICU of the tertiary teaching hospital in China from January 2006 to December 2009. Ninety-four acute stroke patients with NC were grouped according to with or without SE. Risk factors for patients with SE were compared with those without SE by univariate and multivariate analysis. Of 94 stroke patients with NC, 46 (49%) had NC with SE and 48 (51%) had NC without SE. The onset-to-NC time was significant later in stroke patients with SE than those without SE (P stroke patients with SE was higher than those without SE (76.1% vs. 45.8%, P = 0.003). High fever and severe SIRS are two early predictors of stroke patients with SE, and survival rates were worse in stroke patients with SE than those without SE.

  8. Nurses' self-confidence and attitudes in using the Glasgow Coma Scale: a primary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Ihsan; Liaw, Sok Y; Chan, Moon F

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine nurses' self-confidence and attitudes towards the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The GCS measures the depth and duration of impaired consciousness. However, there is an increasing evidence that problems are encountered in completing some aspects of the GCS. This descriptive correlational study recruited 114 Registered Nurses (RNs) in one acute care hospital in Singapore. A set of questionnaires were given to the participants. The questionnaire had three parts, which collected data on demographics, attitudes and self-confidence. Data analysis showed the type of clinical discipline (B=0.19), seniority in nursing (Staff Grade) (B=0.28) and higher attitude scores towards the GCS (B=0.41) were significant factors determining a nurse's confidence in using the GCS. A longer length of time working in a Neuroscience setting (B=0.21) and higher self-confidence scores (B=0.41) were significant factors determining a nurse's attitude towards the GCS. To ensure patient safety, the GCS has to be performed accurately. This study has shown there are differences in attitudes and self-confidence in using the GCS between nurses of different demographics, and that there are a variety of factors influencing their attitudes and confidence. Mentoring and educational interventions are suggested in order to reduce safety risks resulting from lower proficiency in using the GCS. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  9. Large scale diffuse light in the Coma cluster: A multi-scale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, C.; Slezak, E.; Durret, F.; Conselice, C. J.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Mazure, A.; Pelló, R.; Picat, J. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained wide field images of the Coma cluster in the B, V, R and I bands with the CFH12K camera at CFHT. To search for large scale diffuse emission, we have applied to these images an iterative multiscale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique which made it possible to model all the sources (stars and galaxies) and subtract them from the original images. We found various concentrations of diffuse emission present in the central zone around the central galaxies NGC 4874 and NGC 4889. We characterize the positions, sizes and colors of these concentrations. Some sources do not seem to have strong star formation, while one probably exhibits spiral-like colors. One possible origin for the star forming diffuse emission sources is that in the region of the two main galaxies NGC 4874 and NGC 4889 spiral galaxies have recently been disrupted and star formation is still active in the dispersed material. We also use the characteristics of the sources of diffuse emission to trace the cluster dynamics. A scenario in which the group around NGC 4874 is moving north is consistent with our data.

  10. Enorme kyste hydatique cérébral révélé par un coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Rami, Mohamed; Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Bouabdallah, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    La localisation cérébrale du kyste hydatique est rare (2%), nous rapportons le cas d'une fille de 6 ans, admise aux urgences pour un coma d'installation progressive et dont le bilan radiologique a montré un énorme kyste cérébral fronto-pariétal, le diagnostic de kyste hydatique a été retenu après traitement chirurgical. C'est le premier cas du kyste hydatique, à notre connaissance, qui a été révélé par un coma, la malade a bien évolué après le traitement chirurgicale sans récidive après deux ans de recul. PMID:23346278

  11. Recorrência da Crise Convulsiva após Terapia Anticonvulsivante com Sulfato de Magnésio em Pacientes com Eclâmpsia Recurrence of Seizures after Anticonvulsant Therapy with Magnesium Sulfate in Patients with Eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Maria Ramos de Amorim

    2000-04-01

    . Patients and Methods: a prospective cohort study was conducted, enrolling all cases of eclampsia managed at IMIP between January/1995 and June/1998. Magnesium sulfate and oxygen therapy were administered routinely and interruption of pregnancy was performed after maternal stabilization. The frequency of recurrence of seizures and its association with maternal complications were determined. chi² test for association was used at a 5% level of significance. Results: twelve cases presented recurrence of convulsions after magnesium sulfate (10% and all received a repeated dose. In four of them convulsions persisted and they received intravenous diazepam. After diazepam, one patient still had seizures, with unsuccessful administration of phenytoin and therefore barbituric coma was induced (thionembutal. This patient had a CT-scan with evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage. Maternal complications were significantly more frequent in the group with recurrence: coma (16.7% versus 0.95, acidosis (50% versus 2.9%, pulmonary edema (16.7% versus 2.9%, cerebral hemorrhage (16.7% versus 0% and acute renal failure (16.7% versus 1.9%. Three cases of maternal death occurred in patients with recurrence (25% versus 2 cases in patients without recurrence (1.9%. Conclusions: rate of recurrence after anticonvulsant therapy with magnesium sulfate is low (10% but it is associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality. These cases must be managed in an intensive care unit and submitted to routine CT-scan because cerebral hemorrhage can be the cause of recurrence.

  12. Evidence of Absence of Tidal Features in the Outskirts of Ultra Diffuse Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Lamiya; van Dokkum, Pieter; Merritt, Allison; Abraham, Roberto; Yagi, Masafumi; Koda, Jin

    2017-12-01

    We study the presence of tidal features associated with ultra diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in galaxy clusters. Specifically, we stack deep Subaru images of UDGs in the Coma cluster to determine whether they show position angle twists at large radii. Selecting galaxies with central surface brightness μ (g,0)> 24 magarcsec-2 and projected half-light radius {r}e> 1.5 {kpc}, we identify 287 UDGs in the Yagi et al. catalog of low surface brightness Coma objects. The UDGs have apparent spheroidal shapes with median Sérsic index =0.8 and median axis ratio =0.7. The images are processed by masking all background objects and rotating to align the major axis before stacking them in bins of properties such as axis ratio, angle of major axis with respect to the cluster center, and separation from cluster center. Our image stacks reach further than 7 kpc (≳4r e). Analysis of the isophotes of the stacks reveals that the ellipticity remains constant up to the last measured point, which means that the individual galaxies have a non-varying position angle and axis ratio and show no evidence for tidal disruption out to ˜ 4{r}e. We demonstrate this explicitly by comparing our stacks with stacks of model UDGs with and without tidal features in their outskirts. We infer that the average tidal radius of the Coma UDGs is >7 kpc and estimate that the average dark matter fraction within the tidal radius of the UDGs inhabiting the innermost 0.5 Mpc of Coma is >99%.

  13. An adaptive and generalizable closed-loop system for control of medically induced coma and other states of anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiao; Shanechi, Maryam M.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Design of closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems is an important topic, particularly for medically induced coma, which needs to be maintained for long periods. Current CLADs for medically induced coma require a separate offline experiment for model parameter estimation, which causes interruption in treatment and is difficult to perform. Also, CLADs may exhibit bias due to inherent time-variation and non-stationarity, and may have large infusion rate variations at steady state. Finally, current CLADs lack theoretical performance guarantees. We develop the first adaptive CLAD for medically induced coma, which addresses these limitations. Further, we extend our adaptive system to be generalizable to other states of anesthesia. Approach. We designed general parametric pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and neural observation models with associated guidelines, and derived a novel adaptive controller. We further penalized large steady-state drug infusion rate variations in the controller. We derived theoretical guarantees that the adaptive system has zero steady-state bias. Using simulations that resembled real time-varying and noisy environments, we tested the closed-loop system for control of two different anesthetic states, burst suppression in medically induced coma and unconsciousness in general anesthesia. Main results. In 1200 simulations, the adaptive system achieved precise control of both anesthetic states despite non-stationarity, time-variation, noise, and no initial parameter knowledge. In both cases, the adaptive system performed close to a baseline system that knew the parameters exactly. In contrast, a non-adaptive system resulted in large steady-state bias and error. The adaptive system also resulted in significantly smaller steady-state infusion rate variations compared to prior systems. Significance. These results have significant implications for clinically viable CLAD design for a wide range of anesthetic states, with potential cost

  14. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidade e relação com a Escala de Coma de Glasgow

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e; Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso de

    2007-01-01

    Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sa...

  15. A Cluster Of Activities On Coma From The Hubble Space Telescope, StarDate, And McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jogee, S.; Fricke, K.; Preston, S.

    2011-01-01

    With a goal of providing a vast audience of students, teachers, the general public, and Spanish-speakers with activities to learn about research on the Coma cluster of galaxies based on the HST ACS Treasury survey of Coma, McDonald Observatory used a many-faceted approach. Since this research offered an unprecedented legacy dataset, part of the challenge was to convey the importance of this project to a diverse audience. The methodology was to create different products for different (overlapping) audiences. Five radio programs were produced in English and Spanish for distribution on over 500 radio stations in the US and Mexico with a listening audience of over 2 million; in addition to the radio listeners, there were over 13,000 downloads of the English scripts and almost 6000 of the Spanish. Images were prepared for use in the StarDate Online Astronomy Picture of the Week, for ViewSpace (used in museums), and for the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. A high-school level activity on the Coma Cluster was prepared and distributed both on-line and in an upgraded printed version of the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. This guide has been distributed to over 1700 teachers nationally. A YouTube video about careers and research in astronomy using the Coma cluster as an example was produced. Just as the activities were varied, so were the evaluation methods. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant/Contract/Agreement No. HST-EO-10861.35-A issued through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Study of the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko based on the ROSINA/RTOF instrument onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, M.; Garnier, P.; Lasue, J.; Reme, H.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H. R.; Bieler, A. M.; Calmonte, U.; Fiethe, B.; Galli, A.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Jäckel, A.; Mall, U.; Le Roy, L.; Rubin, M.; Tzou, C. Y.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The ROSETTA spacecraft of ESA is in the environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. Among the experiments onboard the spacecraft, the ROSINA experiment (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) includes two mass spectrometers (DFMS and RTOF) to analyze the composition of neutrals and ions, and a pressure sensor (COPS) to monitor the density and velocity of neutrals in the coma [1]. We will here analyze and discuss the data of the ROSINA/RTOF instrument during the comet escort phase. The Reflectron-type Time-Of-Flight (RTOF) mass spectrometer possesses a wide mass range and a high temporal resolution [1,2]. It was designed to measure cometary neutral gas as well as cometary ions. A detailed description of the main volatiles (H2O, CO2, CO) dynamics and of the heterogeneities of the coma will then be provided. The influence of various parameters on the coma measurements is investigated on a statistical basis, with the parameters being distance to the comet, heliocentric distance, longitude and latitude of nadir point. Our analysis of the northern hemisphere summer season shows the presence of water vapor mostly in the illuminated northern hemisphere near the neck region with cyclic diurnal variations whereas CO2 was confined to the cold southern hemisphere with a more spatially homogeneous composition, in agreement with previous observations of 67P [2] or Hartley 2 [3]. A comparison will also be provided with the COPS total density and DFMS abundance measurements. [1] Balsiger et al., "ROSINA - Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis", Space Sci. Rev., 2007. [2] Scherer et al., "A novel principle for an ion mirror design in time-of-flight mass spectrometry," Int. Jou. Mass Spectr., 2006. [3] Hässig et al., "Time variability and heterogeneity in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko", Science, 2015. [4] A'Hearn et al., "EPOXI at comet Hartley 2", Science, 2011.

  17. Fractional excretion of beta-2-microglobulin in the urine of patients with normal or reduced renal function and hepatic coma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Dalhoff, K; Joffe, P

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2m) as a differential diagnostic indicator between hepatic nephropathy (HN) and acute tubulointerstitial nephropathy (ATIN) in patients with reduced renal function and hepatic coma, and to determine whether beta 2m...... to the small number of patients. FE-beta 2m could not predict the development of renal failure earlier than the increase in S-Cr or decrease in Cr-Cl. However, a few patients who survived paracetamol intoxication had increased FE-beta 2M in the beginning of the coma and normal S-Cr and Cr-Cl. Patients who died...... excretion could be used as a marker of renal impairment before increased serum creatinine (S-Cr) concentration or decreased creatinine clearance (Cr-Cl). Finally, the use of beta 2m as a prognostic indicator was investigated. Eighteen patients in hepatic coma grade III-IV were entered in the study and were...

  18. Predictive Value of Glasgow Coma Score and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness Score on the Outcome of Multiple Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratloo, Alireza; Shokravi, Masumeh; Safari, Saeed; Aziz, Awat Kamal

    2016-03-01

    The Full Outline of Unresponsiveness (FOUR) score was developed to compensate for the limitations of Glasgow coma score (GCS) in recent years. This study aimed to assess the predictive value of GCS and FOUR score on the outcome of multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency department. The present prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency department. GCS and FOUR scores were evaluated at the time of admission and at the sixth and twelfth hours after admission. Then the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity, specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive value of GCS and FOUR score were evaluated to predict patients' outcome. Patients' outcome was divided into discharge with and without a medical injury (motor deficit, coma or death). Finally, 89 patients were studied. Sensitivity and specificity of GCS in predicting adverse outcome (motor deficit, coma or death) were 84.2% and 88.6% at the time of admission, 89.5% and 95.4% at the sixth hour and 89.5% and 91.5% at the twelfth hour, respectively. These values for the FOUR score were 86.9% and 88.4% at the time of admission, 89.5% and 100% at the sixth hour and 89.5% and 94.4% at the twelfth hour, respectively. Findings of this study indicate that the predictive value of FOUR score and GCS on the outcome of multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency department is similar.

  19. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  20. Modeling of the Inner Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Constrained by VIRTIS and ROSINA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.; Bieler, A. M.; Migliorini, A.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Toth, G.; Huang, Z.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Piccioni, G.; Debout, V.; Erard, S.; Leyrat, C.; Fink, U.; Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Tzou, C. Y.; Le Roy, L.; Calmonte, U.; Berthelier, J. J.; Rème, H.; Hässig, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Fiethe, B.; De Keyser, J.

    2015-12-01

    As it orbits around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the Rosetta spacecraft acquires more information about its main target. The numerous observations made at various geometries and at different times enable a good spatial and temporal coverage of the evolution of CG's cometary coma. However, the question regarding the link between the coma measurements and the nucleus activity remains relatively open notably due to gas expansion and strong kinetic effects in the comet's rarefied atmosphere. In this work, we use coma observations made by the ROSINA-DFMS instrument to constrain the activity at the surface of the nucleus. The distribution of the H2O and CO2 outgassing is described with the use of spherical harmonics. The coordinates in the orthogonal system represented by the spherical harmonics are computed using a least squared method, minimizing the sum of the square residuals between an analytical coma model and the DFMS data. Then, the previously deduced activity distributions are used in a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model to compute a full description of the H2O and CO2 coma of comet CG from the nucleus' surface up to several hundreds of kilometers. The DSMC outputs are used to create synthetic images, which can be directly compared with VIRTIS measurements. The good agreement between the VIRTIS observations and the DSMC model, itself constrained with ROSINA data, provides a compelling juxtaposition of the measurements from these two instruments. Acknowledgements Work at UofM was supported by contracts JPL#1266313, JPL#1266314 and NASA grant NNX09AB59G. Work at UoB was funded by the State of Bern, the Swiss National Science Foundation and by the ESA PRODEX Program. Work at Southwest Research institute was supported by subcontract #1496541 from the JPL. Work at BIRA-IASB was supported by the Belgian Science Policy Office via PRODEX/ROSINA PEA 90020. The authors would like to thank ASI, CNES, DLR, NASA for supporting this research. VIRTIS was built

  1. Modeling of the VIRTIS-M Observations of the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougere, Nicolas; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Bieler, Andre; Migliorini, Alessandra; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Toth, Gabor; Huang, Zhenguang; Gombosi, Tamas; Hansen, Kenneth; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Debout, Vincent; Erard, Stephane; Leyrat, Cedric; Fink, Uwe; Rubin, Martin; Altwegg, Kathrin; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Le Roy, Lena; Calmonte, Ursina; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Reme, Henri; Hassig, Myrtha; Fuselier, Stephen; Fiethe, Bjorn; De Keyser, Johan

    2015-11-01

    The recent images of the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG) made by the infrared channel of the VIRTIS-M instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft show the gas distribution as it expands in the coma (Migliorini et al. 2015, DPS abstract).Since VIRTIS is a remote sensing instrument, a proper modeling of these observations requires the computation of the full coma of comet CG, which necessitates the use of a kinetic approach due to the rather low gas densities. Hence, we apply a Direct Simulation Monde Carlo (DSMC) method to solve the Boltzmann equation and describe CG’s coma from the nucleus surface up to a few hundreds of kilometers. The model uses the SHAP5 nucleus shape model from the OSIRIS team. The gas flux distribution takes into account solar illumination, including self-shadowing. The local activity at the surface of the nucleus is given by spherical harmonics expansion reproducing best the ROSINA-DFMS data. The densities from the DSMC model outputs are then integrated along the line-of-sight to create synthetic images that are directly comparable with the VIRTIS-M column density measurements.The good agreement between the observations and the model illustrates our continuously improving understanding of the physics of the coma of comet CG.AcknowledgementsWork at UofM was supported by contracts JPL#1266313, JPL#1266314 and NASA grant NNX09AB59G. Work at UoB was funded by the State of Bern, the Swiss National Science Foundation and by the European Space Agency PRODEX Program. Work at Southwest Research institute was supported by subcontract #1496541 from the JPL. Work at BIRA-IASB was supported by the Belgian Science Policy Office via PRODEX/ROSINA PEA 90020. The authors would like to thank ASI, CNES, DLR, NASA for supporting this research. VIRTIS was built by a consortium formed by Italy, France and Germany, under the scientific responsibility of the IAPS of INAF, which guides also the scientific operations. The consortium includes also the

  2. Potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico no prognóstico do coma superficial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Camargo Ribeiro Leite

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available O coma é a redução persistente do nível de consciência, arresponsivo a estímulos, devido à baixa atividade cerebral. Para verificar o nível de consciência, um recurso frequentemente utilizado é a Escala de Coma de Glasgow. Outro método que se destaca é o Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico, o qual avalia a atividade elétrica das vias auditivas ascendentes, desde o trajeto periférico até o mesencéfalo. O exame é simples, imune a medicamentos depressores e ambientes eletricamente carregados, sendo o mais adequado dos potenciais para a monitoração dos estados de coma. O presente estudo teve por objetivo verificar as características do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico no estado de coma leve (Glasgow 7 - 8 e suas respectivas contribuições. Foi realizado um estudo prospectivo transversal em dois pacientes em coma (Glasgow 7, estado secundário a traumatismo cranioencefálico. Os resultados do exame evidenciaram presença de atividade elétrica em toda extensão da via estudada, em ambos os casos, com indicações de diferentes alterações, quanto à redução na latência entre os intervalos, morfologia e replicação das ondas. Tais diferenças foram contempladas com a evolução de cada caso: caso 1 evoluiu a alta hospitalar e caso 2 evoluiu a óbito. Os resultados confirmaram os achados da literatura, que descreve que a presença do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico normal está associada à boa evolução do caso clínico, enquanto alterações no exame podem sinalizar para um mau prognóstico.

  3. Assessment of nurse's knowledge about Glasgow coma scale at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wesley Cajaíba; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    To assess knowledge of nurses of emergency services and intensive care units about Glasgow Coma Scale. This cross-sectional analytical study included 127 nurses of critical units of an university hospital. We used structured interview with 12 questions to evaluate their knowledge about the scale. Association of Knowledge with professionals' sociodemographic variables were verified by the Fisher-test, χ2 and likelihood ratio. Most of participants were women mean aged 31.1 years, they had graduated more than 5 years previously, and had 1 to 3 years of work experience. In the assessment of best score possible for Glasgow scale (question 3) nurses who had graduate more than 5 years ago presented a lower percentage success rate (p=0.0476). However, in the question 7, which evaluated what interval of the scale indicated moderate severity of brain trauma injury, those with more years of experience had higher percentage of correct answers (p=0.0251). In addition, nurses from emergency service had more correct answers than nurses from intensive care unit (p=0.0143) in the same question. Nurses graduated for more than 5 years ago had a lower percentage of correct answers in question 7 (p=0.0161). Nurses with more work experience had a better score (p=0.0119) to identify how assessment of motor response should be started. Number of year since graduation, experience, and work at critical care units interfered in nurses' knowledge about the scale, which indicates the need of training. Avaliar o conhecimento de enfermeiros de unidades críticas, serviços de emergência e unidades de terapia intensiva em relação à escala de coma de Glasgow. Estudo transversal e analítico com 127 enfermeiros de unidades críticas de um hospital universitário. Utilizou-se entrevista estruturada com 12 questões que avaliaram conhecimento sobre a escala. Associação do conhecimento com variáveis sociodemográficas dos profissionais foi verificada pelo teste de Fisher, teste χ2 e razão de

  4. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  5. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using (23)Na and proton MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Milton L; Harrington, Michael G; Schepkin, Victor D; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm(3) and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. FK COMAE BERENICES, KING OF SPIN: THE COCOA-PUFS PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, Thomas R. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Kashyap, V.; Saar, S.; Drake, J. J.; Testa, P.; Cohen, O.; Garraffo, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Huenemoerder, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Korhonen, H. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Granzer, T.; Strassmeier, K., E-mail: Thomas.Ayres@Colorado.edu [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    COCOA-PUFS is an energy-diverse, time-domain study of the ultra-fast spinning, heavily spotted, yellow giant FK Comae Berenices (FK Com: HD117555; G4 III). This single star is thought to be a recent binary merger, and is exceptionally active by measure of its intense ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray emissions, and proclivity to flare. COCOA-PUFS was carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope in the UV (1200–3000 Å), using mainly its high-performance Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, but also high precision Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; Chandra X-ray Observatory in the soft X-rays (0.5–10 keV), utilizing its High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer; together with supporting photometry and spectropolarimetry in the visible from the ground. This is an introductory report on the project. FK Com displayed variability on a wide range of timescales over all wavelengths during the week-long main campaign, including a large X-ray flare; “super-rotational broadening” of the far-ultraviolet “hot lines” (e.g., Si iv 1393 Å; 8 × 10{sup 4} K) together with chromospheric Mg ii 2800 Å and C ii 1335 Å (1–3 × 10{sup 4} K); large Doppler swings suggestive of bright regions alternately on advancing and retreating limbs of the star; and substantial redshifts of the epoch-average emission profiles. These behaviors paint a picture of a highly extended, dynamic, hot (∼10 MK) coronal magnetosphere around the star, threaded by cooler structures perhaps analogous to solar prominences and replenished continually by surface activity and flares. Suppression of angular momentum loss by the confining magnetosphere could temporarily postpone the inevitable stellar spindown, thereby lengthening this highly volatile stage of coronal evolution.

  7. FK Comae Berenices, King of Spin: The COCOA-PUFS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Kashyap, V.; Saar, S.; Huenemoerder, D.; Korhonen, H.; Drake, J. J.; Testa, P.; Cohen, O.; Garraffo, C.; Granzer, T.; Strassmeier, K.

    2016-03-01

    COCOA-PUFS is an energy-diverse, time-domain study of the ultra-fast spinning, heavily spotted, yellow giant FK Comae Berenices (FK Com: HD117555; G4 III). This single star is thought to be a recent binary merger, and is exceptionally active by measure of its intense ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray emissions, and proclivity to flare. COCOA-PUFS was carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope in the UV (1200-3000 Å), using mainly its high-performance Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, but also high precision Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; Chandra X-ray Observatory in the soft X-rays (0.5-10 keV), utilizing its High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer; together with supporting photometry and spectropolarimetry in the visible from the ground. This is an introductory report on the project. FK Com displayed variability on a wide range of timescales over all wavelengths during the week-long main campaign, including a large X-ray flare; “super-rotational broadening” of the far-ultraviolet “hot lines” (e.g., Si IV 1393 Å 8 × 104 K) together with chromospheric Mg II 2800 Å and C II 1335 Å (1-3 × 104 K); large Doppler swings suggestive of bright regions alternately on advancing and retreating limbs of the star; and substantial redshifts of the epoch-average emission profiles. These behaviors paint a picture of a highly extended, dynamic, hot (˜10 MK) coronal magnetosphere around the star, threaded by cooler structures perhaps analogous to solar prominences and replenished continually by surface activity and flares. Suppression of angular momentum loss by the confining magnetosphere could temporarily postpone the inevitable stellar spindown, thereby lengthening this highly volatile stage of coronal evolution. COordinated Campaign of Observations and Analysis, Photosphere to Upper Atmosphere, of a Fast-rotating Star.

  8. FK COMAE BERENICES, KING OF SPIN: THE COCOA-PUFS PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Kashyap, V.; Saar, S.; Drake, J. J.; Testa, P.; Cohen, O.; Garraffo, C.; Huenemoerder, D.; Korhonen, H.; Granzer, T.; Strassmeier, K.

    2016-01-01

    COCOA-PUFS is an energy-diverse, time-domain study of the ultra-fast spinning, heavily spotted, yellow giant FK Comae Berenices (FK Com: HD117555; G4 III). This single star is thought to be a recent binary merger, and is exceptionally active by measure of its intense ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray emissions, and proclivity to flare. COCOA-PUFS was carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope in the UV (1200–3000 Å), using mainly its high-performance Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, but also high precision Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; Chandra X-ray Observatory in the soft X-rays (0.5–10 keV), utilizing its High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer; together with supporting photometry and spectropolarimetry in the visible from the ground. This is an introductory report on the project. FK Com displayed variability on a wide range of timescales over all wavelengths during the week-long main campaign, including a large X-ray flare; “super-rotational broadening” of the far-ultraviolet “hot lines” (e.g., Si iv 1393 Å; 8 × 10 4 K) together with chromospheric Mg ii 2800 Å and C ii 1335 Å (1–3 × 10 4 K); large Doppler swings suggestive of bright regions alternately on advancing and retreating limbs of the star; and substantial redshifts of the epoch-average emission profiles. These behaviors paint a picture of a highly extended, dynamic, hot (∼10 MK) coronal magnetosphere around the star, threaded by cooler structures perhaps analogous to solar prominences and replenished continually by surface activity and flares. Suppression of angular momentum loss by the confining magnetosphere could temporarily postpone the inevitable stellar spindown, thereby lengthening this highly volatile stage of coronal evolution

  9. Factors Influencing the Reliability of the Glasgow Coma Scale: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Florence Cm; Synnot, Anneliese; van den Brande, Ruben; Gruen, Russell L; Maas, Andrew Ir

    2017-06-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) characterizes patients with diminished consciousness. In a recent systematic review, we found overall adequate reliability across different clinical settings, but reliability estimates varied considerably between studies, and methodological quality of studies was overall poor. Identifying and understanding factors that can affect its reliability is important, in order to promote high standards for clinical use of the GCS. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that influence reliability and to provide an evidence base for promoting consistent and reliable application of the GCS. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL from 1974 to July 2016. Studies assessing the reliability of the GCS in adults or describing any factor that influences reliability were included. Two reviewers independently screened citations, selected full texts, and undertook data extraction and critical appraisal. Methodological quality of studies was evaluated with the consensus-based standards for the selection of health measurement instruments checklist. Data were synthesized narratively and presented in tables. Forty-one studies were included for analysis. Factors identified that may influence reliability are education and training, the level of consciousness, and type of stimuli used. Conflicting results were found for experience of the observer, the pathology causing the reduced consciousness, and intubation/sedation. No clear influence was found for the professional background of observers. Reliability of the GCS is influenced by multiple factors and as such is context dependent. This review points to the potential for improvement from training and education and standardization of assessment methods, for which recommendations are presented. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  10. Radial gradients in initial mass function sensitive absorption features in the Coma brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L.; Vaughan, Sam P.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph, we trace radial variations of initial mass function (IMF)-sensitive absorption features of three galaxies in the Coma cluster. We obtain resolved spectroscopy of the central 5 kpc for the two central brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) NGC4889, NGC4874, and the BCG in the south-west group NGC4839, as well as unresolved data for NGC4873 as a low-σ* control. We present radial measurements of the IMF-sensitive features: sodium Na ISDSS, calcium triplet CaT, and iron-hydride FeH0.99, along with the magnesium Mg I0.88 and titanium oxide TiO0.89 features. We employ two separate methods for both telluric correction and sky subtraction around the faint FeH feature to verify our analysis. Within NGC4889 we find strong gradients of Na ISDSS and CaT but a flat FeH profile, which, from comparing to stellar population synthesis models, suggests an old, α-enhanced population with a Chabrier, or even bottom-light IMF. The age and abundance are in line with previous studies but the normal IMF is in contrast to recent results suggesting an increased IMF slope with increased velocity dispersion. We measure flat Na ISDSS and FeH profiles within NGC4874, and determine an old, possibly slightly α-enhanced and Chabrier IMF population. We find an α-enhanced, Chabrier IMF population in NGC4873. Within NGC4839 we measure both strong Na ISDSS and strong FeH, although with a large systematic uncertainty, suggesting a possible heavier IMF. The IMFs we infer for these galaxies are supported by published dynamical modelling. We stress that IMF constraints should be corroborated by further spectral coverage and independent methods on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis.

  11. Comparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting mortality in critically ill patients*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Kramer, Andrew A; Rohs, Thomas; Hanna, Susan; Sadaka, Farid; O'Brien, Jacklyn; Bible, Shonna; Dickess, Stacy M; Foss, Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Impaired consciousness has been incorporated in prediction models that are used in the ICU. The Glasgow Coma Scale has value but is incomplete and cannot be assessed in intubated patients accurately. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score may be a better predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. Thirteen ICUs at five U.S. hospitals. One thousand six hundred ninety-five consecutive unselected ICU admissions during a six-month period in 2012. Glasgow Coma Scale and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score were recorded within 1 hour of admission. Baseline characteristics and physiologic components of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system, as well as mortality were linked to Glasgow Coma Scale/Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score information. None. We recruited 1,695 critically ill patients, of which 1,645 with complete data could be linked to data in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of predicting ICU mortality using the Glasgow Coma Scale was 0.715 (95% CI, 0.663-0.768) and using the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was 0.742 (95% CI, 0.694-0.790), statistically different (p = 0.001). A similar but nonsignificant difference was found for predicting hospital mortality (p = 0.078). The respiratory and brainstem reflex components of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score showed a much wider range of mortality than the verbal component of Glasgow Coma Scale. In multivariable models, the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was more useful than the Glasgow Coma Scale for predicting mortality. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score might be a better prognostic tool of ICU mortality than the Glasgow Coma Scale in critically ill patients, most likely a result of incorporating brainstem reflexes and respiration into the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score.

  12. Pre- and Post-equinox ROSINA production rates calculated using a realistic empirical coma model derived from AMPS-DSMC simulations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kenneth; Altwegg, Kathrin; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bieler, Andre; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; De Keyser, Johan; Fiethe, Björn; Fougere, Nicolas; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, Tamas; Hässig, Myrtha; Huang, Zhenguang; Le Roy, Lena; Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Toth, Gabor; Tzou, Chia-Yu

    2016-04-01

    We have previously used results from the AMPS DSMC (Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) model to create an empirical model of the near comet coma (empirical model to the post-equinox, post-perihelion time period. In addition, we extend the coma model to significantly further from the comet (~100,000-1,000,000 km). The empirical model characterizes the neutral coma in a comet centered, sun fixed reference frame as a function of heliocentric distance, radial distance from the comet, local time and declination. Furthermore, we have generalized the model beyond application to 67P by replacing the heliocentric distance parameterizations and mapping them to production rates. Using this method, the model become significantly more general and can be applied to any comet. The model is a significant improvement over simpler empirical models, such as the Haser model. For 67P, the DSMC results are, of course, a more accurate representation of the coma at any given time, but the advantage of a mean state, empirical model is the ease and speed of use. One application of the empirical model is to de-trend the spacecraft motion from the ROSINA COPS and DFMS data (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Comet Pressure Sensor, Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer). The ROSINA instrument measures the neutral coma density at a single point and the measured value is influenced by the location of the spacecraft relative to the comet and the comet-sun line. Using the empirical coma model we can correct for the position of the spacecraft and compute a total production rate based on the single point measurement. In this presentation we will present the coma production rate as a function of heliocentric distance both pre- and post-equinox and perihelion.

  13. The role of Barbie box sequences as cis-acting elements involved in the barbiturate-mediated induction of cytochromes P450BM-1 and P450BM-3 in Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Q; He, J S; Fulco, A J

    1995-03-03

    In a previous publication (He, J.-S., and Fulco, A. J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7864-7869), we reported that a 15-17-base pair DNA sequence (designated a Barbie box element) in the 5'-regulatory regions of cytochrome P450BM-1 and P450BM-3 genes from Bacillus megaterium was recognized by a barbiturate-regulated protein. It is now recognized that essentially all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes whose 5'-flanking regions are known and that encode barbiturate-inducible proteins contain the Barbie box element. A 4-base pair sequence (AAAG) is found in the same relative position in all Barbie box elements. In B. megaterium, mutation of the Barbie box located in the P450BM-1 gene leads to the constitutive synthesis of cytochrome P450BM-1 and a 10-fold increase of expression of Bm1P1, a small gene located upstream of the P450BM-1 gene, that encodes a putative regulatory protein. Mutation of the P450BM-3 Barbie box significantly increased the expression of both P450BM-3 and Bm3P1 (another small gene located upstream of the P450BM-3 gene that encodes a second putative regulatory protein) in response to pentobarbital induction but left the basal levels unaffected. In gel mobility shift assays, Bm3R1, a repressor of the P450BM-3 gene, was found to specifically interact with the Barbie box sequences of the B. megaterium P450 genes. Mutated Barbie boxes showed a decreased binding affinity for Bm3R1 compared to their wild type (unmutated) counterparts. Barbie box sequences were also shown to specifically interact with putative positive regulatory factors of B. megaterium cells. These putative positive factors were induced by pentobarbital and were also present at high levels during late stationary phase of B. megaterium cell cultures grown in the absence of barbiturates. The mutated Barbie box sequences had greater binding affinity for these positive factors than did unmutated Barbie box sequences. DNase I footprinting analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the P450BM-1 gene

  14. Effect of coma and spherical aberration on depth-of-focus measured using adaptive optics and computationally blurred images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Richard; Benard, Yohann; Lopez-Gil, Norberto

    2012-03-01

    To compare the effect of primary spherical aberration and vertical coma on depth of focus measured with 2 methods. Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, and Université Paris-Sud, Orsay, France. Evaluation of technology. The subjective depth of focus, defined as the interval of vision for which the target was still perceived acceptable, was evaluated using 2 methods. In the first method, the subject changed the defocus term by reshaping the mirror, which also corrected the subject's aberrations and induced a certain value of coma or primary spherical aberration. In the second procedure, the subject changed the displayed images, which were calculated for various defocuses and with the desired aberration using a numerical eye model. Depth of focus was measured using a 0.18 diopter (D) step in 4 nonpresbyopic subjects corrected for the entire eye aberrations with a 6.0 mm and 3.0 mm pupil and with the addition of 0.3 μm and 0.6 μm of positive primary spherical aberration or vertical coma. There was good concordance between the depth of focus measured with both methods (differences within 1/3 D, r(2) = 0.88). Image-quality metrics failed to predict the subjective depth of focus (r(2) < 0.41). These data confirm that defocus in the retinal image can be generated by optical or computational methods and that both can be used to assess the effect of higher-order aberrations on depth of focus. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of comatose patients: a Portuguese instrument based on the Coma Recovery Scale - revised and using nursing standard terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, João F F L; Jesus, Luis M T; Voegeli, David; Sá-Couto, Pedro; Fernandes, Júlia; Morgado, Marília

    2011-05-01

    To translate and adapt the Coma Recovery Scale - Revised to Portuguese using the ICNP® (International Classification of Nursing Practice) terminology and to determine if it can be administered reliably across examiners. Assessment tools for the person in a coma can contribute to the planning, implementation and evaluation of care. It also strengthens the autonomy and responsibility of nurses, contributing to the safety, quality and satisfaction of those who deliver and receive care. This allows the sharing of information amongst healthcare professionals and supports decision-making within a multidisciplinary team. A convenience sample of 20 patients admitted to an intensive care unit constituted the study participants. The data were collected during 2009. The instrument was administered by the same two raters in all the patients on two consecutive days. The total and subscale score agreement was then examined, using inter-rater and test-retest analyses. The intercorrelation dependencies between the subscales were also analysed. The results of the analyses suggest that the instrument can be used reliably, even when there are some patient fluctuations. The correlation of the subscale scores was high and better than the results presented for the original Coma Recovery Scale - Revised, indicating that this scale is a homogeneous measure of neurobehavioural function. The new instrument can be administered reliably by trained examiners and produces a high degree of reproducibility in scores between raters over repeated assessments. We believe that assessment tools that can assess the communication ability of patients will be relevant to evaluating the continuity of care, and promote the effectiveness of care. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A 1D Model of Radial Ion Motion Interrupted by Ion-Neutral Interactions in a Cometary Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigren, E.; Eriksson, A. I.

    2017-04-01

    Because ion-neutral reaction cross sections are energy dependent, the distance from a cometary nucleus within which ions remain collisionally coupled to the neutrals is dictated not only by the comet’s activity level but also by the electromagnetic fields in the coma. Here we present a 1D model simulating the outward radial motion of water group ions with radial acceleration by an ambipolar electric field interrupted primarily by charge transfer processes with H2O. We also discuss the impact of plasma waves. For a given electric field profile, the model calculates key parameters, including the total ion density, n I , the H3O+/H2O+ number density and flux ratios, R dens and R flux, and the mean ion drift speed, , as a function of cometocentric distance. We focus primarily on a coma roughly resembling that of the ESA Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko near its perihelion in 2015 August. In the presence of a weak ambipolar electric field in the radial direction the model results suggest that the neutral coma is not sufficiently dense to keep the mean ion flow speed close to that of the neutrals by the spacecraft location (˜200 km from the nucleus). In addition, for electric field profiles giving n I and within limits constrained by measurements, the R dens values are significantly higher than values typically observed. However, when including the ion motion in large-amplitude plasma waves in the model, results more compatible with observations are obtained. We suggest that the variable and often low H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios observed may reflect nonradial ion trajectories strongly influenced by electromagnetic forces and/or plasma instabilities, with energization of the ion population by plasma waves.

  17. CT-angiography source images indicate less fatal outcome despite coma of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Lars P; Khomenko, Andrei; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Jessica; Barlinn, Kristian; Zerna, Charlotte; van der Hoeven, Erik Jrj; Algra, Ale; Kapelle, L Jaap; Michel, Patrik; Bodechtel, Ulf; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter; Puetz, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Background Coma is associated with poor outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion. Aims We sought to assess whether the posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and the Pons-Midbrain Index applied to CT angiography source images predict the outcome of comatose patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study. Methods Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study was a prospective, observational registry of patients with acute basilar artery occlusion with 48 recruiting centers worldwide. We applied posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and Pons-Midbrain Index to CT angiography source images of Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study patients who presented with coma. We calculated adjusted risk ratios to assess the association of dichotomized posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (≥8 vs. International Cooperation Study registry, CT angiography source images were available for review in 158 patients. Among these, 78 patients (49%) presented with coma. Compared to non-comatose patients, comatose patients were more likely to die (risk ratios 2.34; CI 95% 1.56-3.52) and less likely to have a favourable outcome (risk ratios 0.44; CI 95% 0.24-0.80). Among comatose patients, a Pons-Midbrain Index < 3 was related to reduced mortality (adjusted RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.46-0.96), but not to favourable outcome (adjusted RR 1.19; 95% CI 0.39-3.62). Posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score dichotomized at ≥ 8 vs. <8 was not significantly associated with death (adjusted RR 0.70; 95% CI 0.46-1.05). Conclusion In comatose patients with basilar artery occlusion, the extent of brainstem ischemia appears to be related to mortality but not to favourable outcome.

  18. CONSTRAINING THE DUST COMA PROPERTIES OF COMET C/SIDING SPRING (2013 A1) AT LARGE HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Samarasinha, Nalin H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnham, Tony L.; A' Hearn, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mutchler, Max J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218-2463 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Space Department, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Delamere, W. Alan, E-mail: jyli@psi.edu, E-mail: nalin@psi.edu, E-mail: msk@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: farnham@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: ma@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: mutchler@stsci.edu, E-mail: carey.lisse@jpuapl.edu, E-mail: alan@delamere.biz [Delamere Support Service, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    The close encounter of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) with Mars on 2014 October 19 presented an extremely rare opportunity to obtain the first flyby quality data of the nucleus and inner coma of a dynamically new comet. However, the comet's dust tail potentially posed an impact hazard to those spacecraft orbiting Mars. To characterize the comet at large heliocentric distances, study its long-term evolution, and provide critical inputs to hazard modeling, we imaged C/Siding Spring with the Hubble Space Telescope when the comet was at 4.58, 3.77, and 3.28 AU from the Sun. The dust production rate, parameterized by the quantity Afρ, was 2500, 2100, and 1700 cm (5000 km radius aperture) for the three epochs, respectively. The color of the dust coma is (5.0 ± 0.3)%/100 nm for the first two epochs, and (9.0 ± 0.3)%/100 nm for the last epoch, and reddens with increasing cometocentric distance out to ∼3000 km from the nucleus. The spatial distribution and the temporal evolution of the dust color are most consistent with the existence of icy grains in the coma. Two jet-like dust features appear in the northwest and south-southeast directions projected in the sky plane. Within each epoch of 1-2 hr, no temporal variations were observed for either feature, but the position angle of the south-southeastern feature varied between the three epochs by ∼30°. The dust feature morphology suggests two possible orientations for the rotational pole of the nucleus, (R.A., decl.) = (295° ± 5°, +43° ± 2°) and (190° ± 10°, +50° ± 5°), or their diametrically opposite orientations.

  19. FUV Spectral Signatures of Molecules and the Evolution of the Gaseous Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Paul D.; A’Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2018-01-01

    The Alice far-ultraviolet imaging spectrograph onboard Rosetta observed emissions from atomic and molecular species from within the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko during the entire escort phase of the mission from 2014 August to 2016 September. The initial observations showed that emissions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen close to the surface were produced by energetic electron impact dissociation of H2O. Following delivery of the lander, Philae, on 2014 November 12, the trajectory of Rosetta shifted to near-terminator orbits that allowed for these emissions to be observed against the shadowed nucleus that, together with the compositional heterogeneity, enabled us to identify unique spectral signatures of dissociative electron impact excitation of H2O, CO2, and O2. CO emissions were found to be due to both electron and photoexcitation processes. Thus, we are able, from far-ultraviolet spectroscopy, to qualitatively study the evolution of the primary molecular constituents of the gaseous coma from start to finish of the escort phase. Our results show asymmetric outgassing of H2O and CO2 about perihelion, H2O dominant before and CO2 dominant after, consistent with the results from both the in situ and other remote sensing instruments on Rosetta.

  20. Stellar Occultations in the Coma of Comet 67/P Chuyumov-Gerasimenko Observed by the OSIRIS Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissl, Richard; Kueppers, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of an analysis on a large part of the existing Image data from the OSIRIS camera system onboard the Rosetta Spacecraft, in which stars of sufficient brightness (down to a limiting magnitude of 6) have been observed through the coma of Comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko ("C-G"). Over the course of the Rosetta main mission the Coma of the comet underwent large changes in density and structure, owed to the changing insolation along the orbit of C-G. We report on the changes of the stellar signals in the wavelength ranges, covered by the filters of the OSIRIS Narrow-Angle (NAC) and Wide-Angle (WAC) cameras.Acknowledgements: OSIRIS was built by a consortium led by the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen, Germany, in collaboration with CISAS, University of Padova, Italy, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Granada, Spain, the Scientific Support Office of the European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Madrid, Spain, the Universidad Politéchnica de Madrid, Spain, the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Uppsala University, Sweden, and the Institut für Datentechnik und Kommunikationsnetze der Technischen Universität Braunschweig, Germany.

  1. Familiares de pacientes em coma internados na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva: percepções e comportamentos

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    Deise Godoes Santos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi analisar as percepções e os comportamentos dos familiares frente ao paciente em estado de coma na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI. Estudo descritivo, realizado com 15 familiares de pacientes em coma internados em UTI, por meio de entrevista e observação participante, em agosto/setembro de 2011. Análise de conteúdo, segundo Minayo, evidenciou familiares satisfeitos com o atendimento e com a equipe, tendo consciência do estado de saúde do seu familiar internado, apresentando forte sentimento de impotência e sofrimento vivenciado pela situação, porém com esperança, encontrando conforto na espiritualidade. Manifestaram contato verbal e não verbal com o paciente e resgate do passado. A observação identificou os contatos não verbais mais manifestados pelo toque e carinho. Concluiu-se que a percepção mais evidenciada foi a satisfação com o atendimento e a equipe e o comportamento mais evidenciado a emoção. Os achados indicam uma assistência humanizada, atendendo à Política Nacional de Humanização.

  2. The Hydrogen Bonded Structures of Two 5-Bromobarbituric Acids and Analysis of Unequal C5–X and C5–X′ Bond Lengths (X = X′ = F, Cl, Br or Me in 5,5-Disubstituted Barbituric Acids

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    Thomas Gelbrich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the methanol hemisolvate of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid (1MH displays an H-bonded layer structure which is based on N–H∙∙∙O=C, N–H∙∙∙O(MeOH and (MeOHO–H∙∙∙O interactions. The barbiturate molecules form an H-bonded substructure which has the fes topology. 5,5′-Methanediylbis(5-bromobarbituric acid 2, obtained from a solution of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid in nitromethane, displays a N–H···O=C bonded framework of the sxd type. The conformation of the pyridmidine ring and the lengths of the ring substituent bonds C5–X and C5–X′ in crystal forms of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid and three closely related analogues (X = X′ = Br, Cl, F, Me have been investigated. In each case, a conformation close to a C5-endo envelope is correlated with a significant lengthening of the axial C5–X′ in comparison to the equatorial C5–X bond. Isolated molecule geometry optimizations at different levels of theory confirm that the C5-endo envelope is the global conformational energy minimum of 5,5-dihalogenbarbituric acids. The relative lengthening of the axial bond is therefore interpreted as an inherent feature of the preferred envelope conformation of the pyrimidine ring, which minimizes repulsive interactions between the axial substituent and pyrimidine ring atoms.

  3. Characteristics of Patients with an Abnormal Glasgow Coma Scale in the Prehospital Setting

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    Durant, Edward

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This cross-sectional study describes the characteristics of patients with an abnormal Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in the prehospital setting.Methods: We reviewed existing prehospital care reports (PCRs in the San Mateo County, California, emergency medical services (EMS database from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Adults age 18 or greater with a documented GCS fit inclusion criteria. We excluded single and multisystem trauma patients, as well as patients in cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, or listed as deceased from the study. We classified the remaining patients as a normal GCS of 15 or abnormal (defined as less than 15 at any time during paramedic contact, and then further sub-classified into mild (GCS 13-14, moderate (GCS 9-12 or severe (GCS 3-8.Results: Of the 12,235 unique prehospital care record in the database, 9,044 (73.9% met inclusion criteria, comprised of 2,404 (26.6% abnormal GCS patients and 6,640 (73.4% normal GCS patients. In the abnormal GCS category, we classified 1,361 (56.6% patients as mild, 628 (26.1% as moderate, and 415 (17.3% as severe. Where sex was recorded, we identified 1,214 (50.5% abnormal GCS patients and 2,904 (43.7% normal GCS patients as male. Mean age was 65.6 years in the abnormal GCS group and 61.4 in the normal GCS group (p<0.0001. Abnormal GCS patients were more likely to have a history of conditions known to be associated, such as alcohol abuse (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.75-3.00, diabetes (OR 1.34, 95% CI=1.17-1.54, substance abuse (OR 1.6, CI=1.09-2.3, stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR 2.0, CI=1.64-2.5, and seizures (OR 3.0, CI=1.64-2.5. Paramedics established intravenous (IV access on 1,821 (75.7%, OR 1.94, CI=1.74-2.2 abnormal GCS patients and administered medications to 777 (32.3%, OR 1.01, CI=0.92-1.12. Compared to patients with normal GCS, patients with a mildly abnormal GCS were less likely to receive medications (OR 0.61, CI=0.53-0.70 while those with a

  4. GIADA on-board Rosetta: comet 67P/C-G dust coma characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, Alessandra; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Fulle, Marco; Sordini, Roberto; Ivanovski, Stavro; Accolla, Mario; Ferrari, Marco; Lucarelli, Francesca; Zakharov, Vladimir; Mazzotta Epifani, Elena; López-Moreno, José J.; Rodríguez, Julio; Colangeli, Luigi; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bussoletti, Ezio; Crifo, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Francesca; Green, Simon F.; Grün, Eberhard; Lamy, Philippe L.

    2015-04-01

    21ESA-ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, s/n., Urb. Villafranca del Castillo, 28692 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid, Spagna GIADA consists of three subsystems: 1) the Grain Detection System (GDS) to detect dust grains as they pass through a laser curtain, 2) the Impact Sensor (IS) to measure grain momentum derived from the impact on a plate connected to five piezoelectric sensors, and 3) the MicroBalances System (MBS); five quartz crystal microbalances in roughly orthogonal directions providing the cumulative dust flux of grains smaller than 10 microns. GDS provides data on grain speed and its optical cross section. The IS grain momentum measurement, when combined with the GDS detection time, provides a direct measurement of grain speed and mass. These combined measurements characterize single grain dust dynamics in the coma of 67P/CG. No prior in situ dust dynamical measurements at these close distances from the nucleus and starting from such high heliocentric distances are available up to date. We present here the results obtained by GIADA, which began operating in continuous mode on 18 July 2014 when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of 3.7 AU. The first grain detection occurred when the spacecraft was 814 km from the nucleus on 1 August 2014. From August the 1st up to December the 11th, GIADA detected more than 800 grains, for which the 3D spatial distribution was determined. About 700 out of 800 are GDS only detections: "dust clouds", i.e. slow dust grains (≈ 0.5 m/s) crossing the laser curtain very close in time (e.g. 129 grains in 11 s), probably fluffy grains. IS only detections are about 70, i.e. ≈ 1/10 of the GDS only. This ratio is quite different from what we got for the early detections (August - September) when the ration was ≈ 3, suggesting the presence of different types of particle (bigger, brighter, less dense).The combined GDS+IS detections, i.e. measured by both the GDS and IS detectors, are about 70 and allowed us to extract the

  5. Combining DSMC Simulations and ROSINA/COPS Data of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to Develop a Realistic Empirical Coma Model and to Determine Accurate Production Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K. C.; Fougere, N.; Bieler, A. M.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Huang, Z.; Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; Tzou, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We have previously published results from the AMPS DSMC (Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) model and its characterization of the neutral coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko through detailed comparison with data collected by the ROSINA/COPS (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/COmet Pressure Sensor) instrument aboard the Rosetta spacecraft [Bieler, 2015]. Results from these DSMC models have been used to create an empirical model of the near comet coma (empirical model characterizes the neutral coma in a comet centered, sun fixed reference frame as a function of heliocentric distance, radial distance from the comet, local time and declination. The model is a significant improvement over more simple empirical models, such as the Haser model. While the DSMC results are a more accurate representation of the coma at any given time, the advantage of a mean state, empirical model is the ease and speed of use. One use of such an empirical model is in the calculation of a total cometary coma production rate from the ROSINA/COPS data. The COPS data are in situ measurements of gas density and velocity along the ROSETTA spacecraft track. Converting the measured neutral density into a production rate requires knowledge of the neutral gas distribution in the coma. Our empirical model provides this information and therefore allows us to correct for the spacecraft location to calculate a production rate as a function of heliocentric distance. We will present the full empirical model as well as the calculated neutral production rate for the period of August 2014 - August 2015 (perihelion).

  6. Pentobarbital coma for refractory intra-cranial hypertension after severe traumatic brain injury: mortality predictions and one-year outcomes in 55 patients.

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    Marshall, Gary T; James, Robert F; Landman, Matthew P; O'Neill, Patrick J; Cotton, Bryan A; Hansen, Erik N; Morris, John A; May, Addison K

    2010-08-01

    To identify predictors of mortality and long-term outcomes in survivors after pentobarbital coma (PBC) in patients failing current treatment standards for severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI). This is a retrospective cohort study of severe TBI patients receiving PBC at Level I Trauma Center and tertiary university hospital. Four thousand nine hundred thirty-four patients were admitted to the trauma intensive care unit with severe TBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale >or= 3) between April 1998 and December 2004. Six hundred eleven received intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and 58 received PBC. Three patients underwent craniotomy for intracranial mass lesion and were excluded. The study group received standardized medical management for severe TBI including opiates, benzodiazepines, elevation of the head of bed, avoidance of hypotension and hypercapnia and hyperosmolar therapy (HOsmRx). In addition, 31 of 55 patients (56%) underwent placement of intraventricular catheters for cerebrospinal fluid drainage. If routine medical management and cerebrospinal fluid diversion failed to control ICP, then the patient was determined to have refractory intracranial hypertension (RICH) and PBC treatment was initiated. PBC was performed with pentobarbital infusion with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring to ensure adequate burst suppression. The measurements include serum sodium (Na) and osmolality (Osm) were assessed as indicators for initiation of PBC and to estimate the 50% mortality cut-points when controlling for ICP. Follow-up functional outcomes were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and stratified according to admission Glasgow Coma Scale score and Marshall computed tomography classification. Of the 55 PBC patients, 22 (40%) survived at discharge. 19 of 22 had long-term follow-up (1 year or more) available. Of these, 13 (68%) were normal or functionally independent (Glasgow Outcome Scale score 4 or 5). Serum Na and Osm were associated with death (p < 0

  7. Three non-aspartate amino acid mutations in the ComA Response regulator receiver motif severely decrease surfactin production, competence development and spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

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    Wang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Chuping; Liu, Youzhou; Nie, Yafeng; Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Rongsheng; Chen, Zhiyi

    2010-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a broad spectrum of bioactive peptides. The lipopeptide surfactin belongs to one wellknown class, which includes amphiphilic membrane-active biosurfactants and peptide antibiotics. Both the srfA promoter and the ComP-ComA signal transduction system are an important part of the factor that results in the production of surfactin. Bs-M49, obtained by means of low-energy ion implantation in wild-type Bs-916, produced significantly lower levels of surfactin, and had no obvious effects against R. solani. Occasionally, we found strain Bs- M49 decreased spore formation and the development of competence. Blast comparison of the sequences from Bs- 916 and M49 indicate that there is no difference in the srfA operon promoter PsrfA, but there are differences in the coding sequence of the comA gene. These differences result in three missense mutations within the M49 ComA protein. RT-PCR analyses results showed that the expression levels of selected genes involved in competence and sporulation in both the wild-type Bs-916 and mutant M49 strains were significantly different. When we integrated the comA ORF into the chromosome of M49 at the amyE locus, M49 restored hemolytic activity and antifungal activity. Then, HPLC analyses results also showed the comA-complemented strain had a similar ability to produce surfactin with wild-type strain Bs-916. These data suggested that the mutation of three key amino acids in ComA greatly affected the biological activity of Bacillus subtilis. ComA protein 3D structure prediction and motif search prediction indicated that ComA has two obvious motifs common to response regulator proteins, which are the Nterminal response regulator receiver motif and the Cterminal helix-turn-helix motif. The three residues in the ComA N-terminal portion may be involved in phosphorylation activation mechanism. These structural prediction results implicate that three mutated residues in the ComA protein may play an important role in

  8. Evolution of the chemical element abundances with age in open clusters: The Hyades, Pleiades, Coma Berenices and M6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçoǧlu, T.; Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Fossati, L.

    2014-12-01

    We compare the averaged photospheric abundances of A and F stars in open clusters of different ages: M6 (˜80 Myr), Pleiades (˜100 Myr), Coma Berenices (˜450 Myr), and the Hyades (˜800 Myr). The variation in the averaged abundances among F stars generally reflects the differences between the initial compositions of the clusters in their various birthplaces. The differences of the averaged chemical composition of A stars may also reveal the effects of radiative difussion for the stars of different ages. We also discuss the methods, resolutions and wavelength coverages of spectra and discrepancies in the derived microturbulent velocities among the various studies to check if these studies are comparable. We also present the pattern of mean abundances and metallicity for the M6 cluster determined by spectral analysis of GIRAFFE spectra acquired with the VLT, Paranal Observatory.

  9. Clinical Presentation Of The Abuse Of Insulin: Hypoglycaemic Coma And Aspiration Pneumonia In Non-Professional Bodybuilders

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    Petrovic Ivica

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of medications that improve the physical performance of an individual represents a very serious worldwide health problem. The abuse of these medications is increasing. Herein, we describe a patient, at the age of 20, who was hospitalized due to loss of consciousness and difficulty breathing. At admission, the patient was unconsciousness, tahi-dyspnoic, and had a pale complexion and an athletic build. In gas analyses, extremely low saturation was observed, followed by acidosis, heavy hypoxia with normocapnia, higher lactates, hypocalcaemia and severe hypoglycaemia. The patient was treated with a hypertonic solution of glucose and intubated, with the aspiration of sanious content from the respiratory tract. After treatment, the patient woke from coma but was very confused. In the first 6 hours of hospitalization, severe hypoglycaemia occurred several times, despite the continuous administration of glucose. Due to the growth of inflammatory syndrome since the first day of hospitalization, the patient was kept in the hospital for treatment along with the administration of antibiotic treatment. On the fourth day of hospitalization, the patient stated that for the last year, he had been taking testosterone at a dose of 1 g a week, as well as tamoxifen pills and 15 i.j. of fast-acting human insulin (Actrapid® daily for their combined anabolic effect. Hypoglycaemic coma, caused by the abuse of insulin, represents a severe complication in patients, which can be followed by confusion, a slowed thinking process, the weakening of cognitive functions and even death. It is necessary to invest great efforts into the prevention of the purchase of these medications via the Internet or on the black market for purposes of abuse in order to prevent such serious and life-threatening complications.

  10. Elevated transaminases as a predictor of coma in a patient with anorexia nervosa: a case report and review of the literature

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    Yoshida Shuhei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Liver injury is a frequent complication associated with anorexia nervosa, and steatosis of the liver is thought to be the major underlying pathology. However, acute hepatic failure with transaminase levels over 1000 IU/mL and deep coma are very rare complications and the mechanism of pathogenesis is largely unknown. Case presentation A 37-year-old Japanese woman showed features of acute liver failure and hepatic coma which were not associated with hypoglycemia or hyper-ammonemia. Our patient's consciousness was significantly improved with the recovery of liver function and normalization of transaminase levels after administration of nutritional support. Conclusions Our case report demonstrates that transaminase levels had an inverse relationship with the consciousness of our patient, although the pathogenesis of coma remains largely unknown. This indicates that transaminase levels can be one of the key predictors of impending coma in patients with anorexia nervosa. Therefore, frequent monitoring of transaminase levels combined with rigorous treatment of the underlying nutritional deficiency and psychiatric disorder are necessary to prevent this severe complication.

  11. Post-Coma Persons with Extensive Multiple Disabilities Use Microswitch Technology to Access Selected Stimulus Events or Operate a Radio Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Alberti, Gloria; Oliva, Doretta; Megna, Gianfranco; Iliceto, Carla; Damiani, Sabino; Ricci, Irene; Spica, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The present two studies extended research evidence on the use of microswitch technology by post-coma persons with multiple disabilities. Specifically, Study I examined whether three adults with a diagnosis of minimally conscious state and multiple disabilities could use microswitches as tools to access brief, selected stimulus events. Study II…

  12. A comparison of the near-infrared spectral features of early-type galaxies in the Coma Cluster, the Virgo cluster and the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdashelt, Mark L.; Frogel, Jay A.

    1993-01-01

    Earlier researchers derived the relative distance between the Coma and Virgo clusters from color-magnitude relations of the early-type galaxies in each cluster. They found that the derived distance was color-dependent and concluded that the galaxies of similar luminosity in the two clusters differ in their red stellar populations. More recently, the color-dependence of the Coma-Virgo distance modulus has been called into question. However, because these two clusters differ so dramatically in their morphologies and kinematics, it is plausible that the star formation histories of the member galaxies also differed. If the conclusions of earlier researchers are indeed correct, then some signature of the resulting stellar population differences should appear in the near-infrared and/or infrared light of the respective galaxies. We have collected near-infrared spectra of 17 Virgo and 10 Coma early-type galaxies; this sample spans about four magnitudes in luminosity in each cluster. Seven field E/S0 galaxies have been observed for comparison. Pseudo-equivalent widths have been measured for all of the field galaxies, all but one of the Virgo members, and five of the Coma galaxies. The features examined are sensitive to the temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity of the reddest stars. A preliminary analysis of these spectral features has been performed, and, with a few notable exceptions, the measured pseudo-equivalent widths agree well with previously published values.

  13. Technology-Aided Leisure and Communication Opportunities for Two Post-Coma Persons Emerged from a Minimally Conscious State and Affected by Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed technology-aided programs for helping two post-coma persons, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state and were affected by multiple disabilities, to (a) engage with leisure stimuli and request caregiver's procedures, (b) send out and listen to text messages for communication with distant partners, and (c) combine…

  14. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey - X. Nuclear star clusters in low-mass early-type galaxies : scaling relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Seth, Anil; Balcells, Marc; Dominguez, Lilian; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Erwin, Peter; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Jogee, Shardha; Lucey, John; Phillipps, Steven; Puzia, Thomas; Valentijn, Edwin; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Weinzirl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling relations between structural properties of nuclear star clusters and their host galaxies for a sample of early-type dwarf galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Coma Cluster Survey. We have analysed the light profiles of 200

  15. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and FERMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E greater than100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99 confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) x 10(sup -8) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (VERITAS,greater than 220 GeV) and approximately 2 x 10(sup -6) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be less than 16% from VERITAS data and less than 1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 50. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of approximately (2-5.5)microG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark

  16. Immediate and Long-Term Outcome of Acute H2S Intoxication Induced Coma in Unanesthetized Rats: Effects of Methylene Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonobe, Takashi; Chenuel, Bruno; Cooper, Timothy K.; Haouzi, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute hydrogen sulfide (H2S) poisoning produces a coma, the outcome of which ranges from full recovery to severe neurological deficits. The aim of our study was to 1- describe the immediate and long-term neurological effects following H2S-induced coma in un-anesthetized rats, and 2- determine the potential benefit of methylene blue (MB), a compound we previously found to counteract acute sulfide cardiac toxicity. Methods NaHS was administered IP in un-sedated rats to produce a coma (n = 34). One minute into coma, the rats received MB (4 mg/kg IV) or saline. The surviving rats were followed clinically and assigned to Morris water maze (MWM) and open field testing then sacrificed at day 7. Results Sixty percent of the non-treated comatose rats died by pulseless electrical activity. Nine percent recovered with neurological deficits requiring euthanasia, their brain examination revealed major neuronal necrosis of the superficial and middle layers of the cerebral cortex and the posterior thalamus, with variable necrosis of the caudate putamen, but no lesions of the hippocampus or the cerebellum, in contrast to the typical distribution of post-ischemic lesions. The remaining animals displayed, on average, a significantly less effective search strategy than the control rats (n = 21) during MWM testing. Meanwhile, 75% of rats that received MB survived and could perform the MWM test (P<0.05 vs non-treated animals). The treated animals displayed a significantly higher occurrence of spatial search than the non-treated animals. However, a similar proportion of cortical necrosis was observed in both groups, with a milder clinical presentation following MB. Conclusion In conclusion, in rats surviving H2S induced coma, spatial search patterns were used less frequently than in control animals. A small percentage of rats presented necrotic neuronal lesions, which distribution differed from post-ischemic lesions. MB dramatically improved the immediate survival and spatial

  17. Immediate and Long-Term Outcome of Acute H2S Intoxication Induced Coma in Unanesthetized Rats: Effects of Methylene Blue.

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    Takashi Sonobe

    Full Text Available Acute hydrogen sulfide (H2S poisoning produces a coma, the outcome of which ranges from full recovery to severe neurological deficits. The aim of our study was to 1--describe the immediate and long-term neurological effects following H2S-induced coma in un-anesthetized rats, and 2--determine the potential benefit of methylene blue (MB, a compound we previously found to counteract acute sulfide cardiac toxicity.NaHS was administered IP in un-sedated rats to produce a coma (n = 34. One minute into coma, the rats received MB (4 mg/kg i.v. or saline. The surviving rats were followed clinically and assigned to Morris water maze (MWM and open field testing then sacrificed at day 7.Sixty percent of the non-treated comatose rats died by pulseless electrical activity. Nine percent recovered with neurological deficits requiring euthanasia, their brain examination revealed major neuronal necrosis of the superficial and middle layers of the cerebral cortex and the posterior thalamus, with variable necrosis of the caudate putamen, but no lesions of the hippocampus or the cerebellum, in contrast to the typical distribution of post-ischemic lesions. The remaining animals displayed, on average, a significantly less effective search strategy than the control rats (n = 21 during MWM testing. Meanwhile, 75% of rats that received MB survived and could perform the MWM test (P<0.05 vs non-treated animals. The treated animals displayed a significantly higher occurrence of spatial search than the non-treated animals. However, a similar proportion of cortical necrosis was observed in both groups, with a milder clinical presentation following MB.In conclusion, in rats surviving H2S induced coma, spatial search patterns were used less frequently than in control animals. A small percentage of rats presented necrotic neuronal lesions, which distribution differed from post-ischemic lesions. MB dramatically improved the immediate survival and spatial search strategy in the

  18. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: applicability and relation with the Glasgow Coma Scale Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidad y relación con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidade e relação com a Escala de Coma de Glasgow

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    Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sample consisted of 73 victims of blunt traumatic brain injury, admitted at this institution between January 03rd and May 03rd 2001. Regarding the applicability, the test could be applied in patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score > 12; however, the end of post traumatic amnesia was verified in patients who scored > 14 on the scale. A significant relationship (r s = 0.65 was verified between these measures, although different kinds of relationship between the end of the amnesia and changes in consciousness were observed.Restricciones en la aplicación del Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test y los cuestionamientos sobre la relación entre conciencia y amnesia post-traumática motivaron este estudio que visa identificar, a través de la puntuación de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow, el periodo más adecuado para la aplicación de la prueba de amnesia, y observar la relación entre los resultados de esos dos indicadores. El estudio prospectivo y longitudinal fue realizado en un centro de referencia para traumas en São Paulo - Brasil. El número fue de 73 victimas de trauma craneoencefálico contuso, internadas en esta institución en el periodo de 03/01 a 03/05/2001. Con relación a la aplicabilidad, la prueba puede ser aplicada en los pacientes con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow > 12, pero el término de la amnesia post-traumática fue observado en los pacientes con puntuación > 14 en la escala. Correlación significativa (rs = 0,65 fue observada entre esas

  19. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  20. Estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem na enfermagem: análise pela Escala de Coma de Glasgow Estrategias de enseñanza y aprendizaje en enfermería: análisis por la Escala de coma de Glasgow Teaching-learning strategies in nursing: analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva Morita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Usando como tema a Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl, este estudo objetivou analisar e verificar a retenção do conhecimento frente às estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem e autoaprendizado oferecidas, e verificar o grau de conhecimento adquirido neste processo e a possível associação entre ser ou não aluno que trabalha na enfermagem. Estudo descritivo de abordagem quantitativa. Participaram 62 alunos regularmente matriculados no primeiro semestre do 4º ano de enfermagem. As estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem utilizadas foram: aula expositiva com diapositivos e videoteipe e texto-base. Dos participantes, 41,9% eram trabalhadores na enfermagem; 61,3% informaram ter cuidado de pacientes com alteração do nível de consciência, com predomínio no grupo em que trabalha. Houve incremento estatisticamente significante no percentual de acerto após a aula expositiva e o videoteipe, não havendo alteração no resultado após o autoaprendizado. Não houve diferença no grau de conhecimento adquirido entre os grupos.Usando como tema la Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl, este estudio objetivó analizar y verificar la retención del conocimiento frente a las estrategias de enseñanza aprendizaje y auto aprendizaje ofrecidas; y, verificar el grado de conocimiento adquirido en ese proceso y la posible asociación entre ser o no alumno que trabaja en enfermería. Estudio descriptivo de abordaje cuantitativo. Participaron 62 alumnos regularmente matriculados en el primer semestre del 4ºaño de enfermería. Las estrategias de enseñanza aprendizaje utilizadas fueron: clase expositiva con diapositivas y videotape y texto base. De los participantes, 41,9% eran trabajadores de enfermería; 61,3% informaron haber cuidado de pacientes con alteración del nivel de conciencia, con predominio en el grupo que trabaja. Hubo un incremento estadísticamente significativo en el porcentaje de aciertos después de la clase expositiva e videotape, no hubo alteración en

  1. Escala de coma de Glasgow e qualidade de vida pós-trauma cranioencefálico Escala de coma de Glasgow y calidad de vida post-trauma craneoencefálico Glasgow Coma Scale and quality of life after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Helena Costanti Settervall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho de diferentes escores da Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl observados nas primeiras 72 horas pós trauma perante a qualidade de vida e mudança percebida do estado de saúde, após um ano do evento traumático. MÉTODOS: Estudo de abordagem quantitativa, observacional, longitudinal, descritivo e correlacional com vítimas de trauma cranioencefálico contuso (TCEC avaliadas, diariamente durante a internação hospitalar, e após um ano por meio do Medical Outcome Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. RESULTADOS: sob as curvas Reciever Operator Characteristics dos valores da ECGl referentes à mudança percebida do estado de saúde não apresentaram diferença significativa e variaram de 0,63 a 0,71. Correlação, estatisticamente significante, porém fraca, foi observada entre os escores da ECGl e alguns dos domínios do SF-36. CONCLUSÃO: Verificou-se que os diferentes valores da ECGl apresentaram limitações para que fossem aplicados na prática clínica para estimar as consequências do TCEC a longo prazo.OBJETIVO: Evaluar el desempeño de diferentes escores de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl observados en las primeras 72 horas post trauma frente a la calidad de vida y cambio percibido en el estado de salud, después de un año del evento traumático. MÉTODOS: Estudio de abordaje cuantitativo, observacional, longitudinal, descriptivo y correlacional realizado con víctimas de trauma craneoencefálico contuso (TCEC evaluadas, diariamente durante el internamiento hospitalario, y después de un año por medio del Medical Outcome Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. RESULTADOS: bajo las curvas Reciever Operator Characteristics de los valores de la ECGl referentes al cambio percibido en el estado de salud no presentaron diferencia significativa y variaron de 0,63 a 0,71. Correlación, estadísticamente significativa, no obstante débil, fue observada entre los escores de la ECGl y algunos de los

  2. In-hospital mortality and the Glasgow Coma Scale in the first 72 hours after traumatic brain injury Escala de Coma de Glasgow en las primeras 72 horas postrauma encefalocraneano y mortalidad hospitalaria Escala de Coma de Glasgow nas primeiras 72 horas após trauma cranioencefálico e mortalidade hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Helena Costanti Settervall

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study verifies and compares the performance of three different scores obtained in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in the first 72 hours post trauma in predicting in-hospital mortality. The studied scores included those obtained after initial care was provided at the hospital, and the worst and best scores obtained in the scale in the first 72 hours post trauma. The scale’s predictive ability was assessed by the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC curve. A total of 277 victims with different severity levels of blunt traumatic brain injuries were studied. The performance of the three scores that were analyzed to predict hospital mortality was moderate (0.74 to 0.79 and the areas under the curve did not present statistically significant differences. These findings suggest that any of the three studied scores can be applied in clinical practice to estimate the outcome of victims with blunt traumatic brain injuries, taking into consideration the instrument’s moderate discriminatory power.El estudio tiene como objetivos verificar y comparar el desempeño de puntajes de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl observados en las primeras 72 horas postrauma para predecir la mortalidad hospitalaria. Los valores analizados fueron los puntajes obtenidos después de la atención inicial intra-hospitalaria, además de los peores y mejores resultados de la escala en las primeras 72 horas postrauma. La capacidad de predicción de los puntajes de la ECGl para el Estado Vital a la Salida Hospitalaria fue evaluada, utilizando la curva Reciever Operator Characteristic. Fueron estudiadas 277 víctimas, con trauma encefalocraneano contuso de diferentes gravedades. El desempeño de los puntajes de la ECGl para el estado vital a la salida hospitalaria fue moderado (0,74 a 0,79 y las áreas bajo la curva no presentaron diferencia significativa. Los resultados sugieren que cualquiera de los tres valores de la ECGl analizados pueden ser aplicados en la práctica cl

  3. Metalogenic study of the uraniferous ore deposit at La Coma, Municipio of General Bravo, N.L. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferriz D, H.

    1977-01-01

    The uraniferous ore deposit at la Coma is located in a sandy-clayish sequence of the cold formation (non marine member) of the middle oligocene under peneconcordant lenses within a sandy body, situated on the North flank of a microdelta formed by small streams which ran from West to East. The metalogenic study of this ore deposit, permits us to establish mineralization controls and guides for the optimization of the uranium prospecting in the miogeoclinical of the Gulf of Mexico setting. The study was carried out on the basis of sedimentalogic and metalogenic criteria, and it was found that the mineralization process seems to be related to the formation and filling of a paleochannel which cut the microdelta permeable beds. The uraniferous solutions migrated through the conglomeratic filling of the paleochannel and reached this way the permeable horizons of the microdelta, where they infiltrated adopting a pattern like an apron. In the sites where the solutions reached sandy lenses rich in organic matter, the soluble compounds containing the uranium suffered a decomposition with the consequent absorption of the uranium by the organic matter, due to the decrease of the pH value. In conclusion, the favorableness of the environment for mineralization is defined by the convergence of the described paleo-geomorphologic elements. (author)

  4. Prehospital non-drug assisted intubation for adult trauma patients with a Glasgow Coma Score less than 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher Charles Douglas; Brison, Robert J; Howes, Daniel; Stiell, Ian G; Pickett, William

    2013-11-01

    Prehospital airway management for adult trauma patients remains controversial. We sought to review the frequency that paramedic non-drug assisted intubation or attempted intubation is performed for trauma patients in Ontario, Canada, and determine its association with mortality. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Ontario Trauma Registry's Comprehensive Data Set for 2002-2009. Eligible patients were greater than 16 years of age, had an initial Glasgow Coma Score of less than 9 and were cared for by ground-based non-critical care paramedics. The primary outcome was mortality. Outcomes were compared between patients undergoing prehospital intubation versus basic airway management. Logistic regression analyses were used to quantify the association between prehospital intubation and mortality. Of the 2229 patients included in the analysis, 671 (30.1%) underwent prehospital intubation. Annual rates of prehospital intubation declined from 33.7% to 14.0% (ptrendtrauma is being performed less frequently in Ontario, Canada. Within our study population, paramedic non-drug assisted intubation or attempted intubation was associated with a heightened risk of mortality.

  5. Cometary science. Dust measurements in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko inbound to the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, Alessandra; Sierks, Holger; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Fulle, Marco; Gutierrez, Pedro J; Lara, Luisa; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe L; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst Uwe; López-Moreno, José J; Accolla, Mario; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F; Altobelli, Nicolas; Angrilli, Francesco; Barucci, M Antonietta; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bertini, Ivano; Bodewits, Dennis; Bussoletti, Ezio; Colangeli, Luigi; Cosi, Massimo; Cremonese, Gabriele; Crifo, Jean-Francois; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; Debei, Stefano; De Cecco, Mariolino; Esposito, Francesca; Ferrari, Marco; Fornasier, Sonia; Giovane, Frank; Gustafson, Bo; Green, Simon F; Groussin, Olivier; Grün, Eberhard; Güttler, Carsten; Herranz, Miguel L; Hviid, Stubbe F; Ip, Wing; Ivanovski, Stavro; Jerónimo, José M; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Joerg; Kramm, Rainer; Kührt, Ekkehard; Küppers, Michael; Lazzarin, Monica; Leese, Mark R; López-Jiménez, Antonio C; Lucarelli, Francesca; Lowry, Stephen C; Marzari, Francesco; Epifani, Elena Mazzotta; McDonnell, J Anthony M; Mennella, Vito; Michalik, Harald; Molina, Antonio; Morales, Rafael; Moreno, Fernando; Mottola, Stefano; Naletto, Giampiero; Oklay, Nilda; Ortiz, José L; Palomba, Ernesto; Palumbo, Pasquale; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Rodríguez, Julio; Sabau, Lola; Snodgrass, Colin; Sordini, Roberto; Thomas, Nicolas; Tubiana, Cecilia; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Weissman, Paul; Wenzel, Klaus-Peter; Zakharov, Vladimir; Zarnecki, John C

    2015-01-23

    Critical measurements for understanding accretion and the dust/gas ratio in the solar nebula, where planets were forming 4.5 billion years ago, are being obtained by the GIADA (Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator) experiment on the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Between 3.6 and 3.4 astronomical units inbound, GIADA and OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) detected 35 outflowing grains of mass 10(-10) to 10(-7) kilograms, and 48 grains of mass 10(-5) to 10(-2) kilograms, respectively. Combined with gas data from the MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter) and ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) instruments, we find a dust/gas mass ratio of 4 ± 2 averaged over the sunlit nucleus surface. A cloud of larger grains also encircles the nucleus in bound orbits from the previous perihelion. The largest orbiting clumps are meter-sized, confirming the dust/gas ratio of 3 inferred at perihelion from models of dust comae and trails. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Electroencephalography reactivity for prognostication of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A comparison of quantitative analysis and visual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Su, Yingying; Jiang, Mengdi; Chen, Weibi; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yunzhou; Gao, Daiquan

    2016-07-28

    Electroencephalogram reactivity (EEG-R) is a positive predictive factor for assessing outcomes in comatose patients. Most studies assess the prognostic value of EEG-R utilizing visual analysis; however, this method is prone to subjectivity. We sought to categorize EEG-R with a quantitative approach. We retrospectively studied consecutive comatose patients who had an EEG-R recording performed 1-3 days after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or during normothermia after therapeutic hypothermia. EEG-R was assessed via visual analysis and quantitative analysis separately. Clinical outcomes were followed-up at 3-month and dichotomized as recovery of awareness or no recovery of awareness. A total of 96 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 38 (40%) patients recovered awareness at 3-month followed-up. Of 27 patients with EEG-R measured with visual analysis, 22 patients recovered awareness; and of the 69 patients who did not demonstrated EEG-R, 16 patients recovered awareness. The sensitivity and specificity of visually measured EEG-R were 58% and 91%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the quantitative analysis was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.87-0.97), with the best cut-off value of 0.10. EEG-R through quantitative analysis might be a good method in predicting the recovery of awareness in patients with post-anoxic coma after CPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Interobserver reliability of the Glasgow coma scale in critically ill patients with neurological and/or neurosurgical disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M M; Sánchez-Izquierdo, R; Sánchez-Muñoz, E I; Martínez-Yegles, I; Fraile-Gamo, M P; Arias-Rivera, S

    2014-01-01

    The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is a common tool used for neurological assessment of critically ill patients. Despite its widespread use, the GCS has some limitations, as sometimes different observers may value differently the same response. To evaluate the interobserver agreement, among intensive care nurses with a minimum of 3 years experience, both in the overall estimate of GCS and for each of its components. Prospective observational study including 110 neurological and/or neurosurgical patients conducted in a critical care unit of 18 beds, from October 2010 until December 2012. Registered variables: Demographic characteristics, reason for admission, overall GCS and its components. The neurological evaluation was conducted by a minimum of 3 nurses. One of them applied an algorithm and consensual assessment technique and all, independently, valued response to stimuli. Interobserver agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee for Clinical Trails. The intraclass correlation coefficient (confident interval) for scale was: Overall GCS: 0.989 (0.985-0.992); ocular response: 0.981 (0.974-0.986); verbal response: 0.971 (0.960-0.979); motor response: 0.987 (0.982-0.991). In our cohort of patients we observed a high level of consistency in the application of both the GCS as in each of its components. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  8. CHANGES IN THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE INNER COMA OF 67P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO WITH DECREASING HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodewits, D.; A’Hearn, M. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Lara, L. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia–CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia, E-18008 Granada (Spain); La Forgia, F.; Lazzarin, M.; Barbieri, C. [University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Gicquel, A.; Kovacs, G.; Shi, X.; Tubiana, C.; Sierks, H. [Max-Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg, 3 D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Knollenberg, J. [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Institut für Planetenforschung, Rutherfordstrasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Lin, Z.-Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Snodgrass, C. [Planetary and Space Sciences, Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Lamy, P. L. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille), UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Rodrigo, R. [Centro de Astrobiología, CSIC-INTA, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Koschny, D. [Scientific Support Office, European Space Research and Technology Centre/ESA, Keplerlaan 1, Postbus 299, 2201 AZ Noordwijk ZH (Netherlands); Rickman, H., E-mail: Dennis@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); and others

    2016-11-01

    The Wide Angle Camera of the OSIRIS instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft is equipped with several narrow-band filters that are centered on the emission lines and bands of various fragment species. These are used to determine the evolution of the production and spatial distribution of the gas in the inner coma of comet 67P with time and heliocentric distance, here between 2.6 and 1.3 au pre-perihelion. Our observations indicate that the emission observed in the OH, O i, CN, NH, and NH{sub 2} filters is mostly produced by dissociative electron impact excitation of different parent species. We conclude that CO{sub 2} rather than H{sub 2}O is a significant source of the [O i] 630 nm emission. A strong plume-like feature observed in the CN and O i filters is present throughout our observations. This plume is not present in OH emission and indicates a local enhancement of the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio by as much as a factor of 3. We observed a sudden decrease in intensity levels after 2015 March, which we attribute to decreased electron temperatures in the first few kilometers above the surface of the nucleus.

  9. Extremely organic-rich coma of comet C/2010 G2 (Hill) during its outburst in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Russo, Neil Dello; Vervack, Ron Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.; DiSanti, Mike A.; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel; Manfroid, Jean; Gillon, Michael; Cochran, Anita L.; Harris, Walter M.; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas; Crovisier, Jacques; McKay, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    We performed high-dispersion near-infrared spectroscopic observations of comet C/2010 G2 (Hill) at 2.5 AU from the Sun using NIRSPEC (R ≈ 25,000) at the Keck II Telescope on UT 2012 January 9 and 10, about a week after an outburst had occurred. Over the two nights of our observations, prominent emission lines of CH 4 and C 2 H 6 , along with weaker emission lines of H 2 O, HCN, CH 3 OH, and CO were detected. The gas production rate of CO was comparable to that of H 2 O during the outburst. The mixing ratios of CO, HCN, CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , and CH 3 OH with respect to H 2 O were higher than those for normal comets by a factor of five or more. The enrichment of CO and CH 4 in comet Hill suggests that the sublimation of these hypervolatiles sustained the outburst of the comet. Some fraction of water in the inner coma might exist as icy grains that were likely ejected from nucleus by the sublimation of hypervolatiles. Mixing ratios of volatiles in comet Hill are indicative of the interstellar heritage without significant alteration in the solar nebula.

  10. Technology-aided programs for post-coma patients emerged from or in a minimally conscious state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio E. Lancioni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-coma persons in a minimally conscious state (MCS or emerged/emerging from such state (E-MCS, who are affected by extensive motor impairment and lack of speech, may develop an active role and interact with their environment with the help of technology-aided intervention programs. Although a number of studies have been conducted in this area during the last few years, new evidence about the efficacy of those programs is warranted. These three studies were an effort in that direction. Study I assessed a technology-aided program to enable six MCS participants to access preferred environmental stimulation independently. Studies II and III assessed technology-aided programs to enable six E-MCS participants to make choices. In Study II, three of those participants were led to choose among leisure and social stimuli, and caregiver interventions automatically presented to them. In Study III, the remaining three participants were led to choose (a among general stimulus/intervention options (e.g., songs, video-recordings of family members, and caregiver interventions and then (b among variants of those options. The results of all three studies were largely positive with substantial increases of independent stimulation access for the participants of Study I and independent choice behavior for the participants of Studies II and III. The results were analyzed in relation to previous data and in terms of their implications for daily contexts working with MCS and E-MCS persons affected by multiple disabilities.

  11. Outcome of Physical Therapy Intervention on Ventilator Weaning and Functional Status

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Pei-Hsuan; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Wang, Yen-Ching; Yang, Chih-Jen; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Wang, Tung-Heng; Chuang, I-Chun; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-01-01

    Our study aimed to understand the characteristics of ventilator dependence in patients at a respiratory care center and the potential effects of physical therapy on ventilator weaning and patients' functional status. Prospective data collection consisted of the following: (1) demographic data, including name, gender, age, diagnosis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation as a severity of the disease, modified Glasgow Coma Scale, mobility at the time of admission, and days of hospi...

  12. Temporal Variations of Water Vapor in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as Observed by Rosetta’s Alice FUV Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffl, Andrew J.; Feaga, Lori M.; A'Hearn, Michael; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feldman, Paul D.; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Medina, Richard; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Pineau, Jon; Schindhelm, Eric; Stern, S. Alan; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2017-10-01

    During the Rosetta mission, the Alice far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph obtained spatially-resolved spectra of the coma and nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko over the wavelength range of 700-2050Å. Typically, Alice detected emissions from the neutral atomic daughter and granddaughter products (H, O, C, and S) of the primary molecular species in the coma: H2O, CO2, CO, and O2. However, during a six-month period centered near perihelion, Alice directly detected water vapor in absorption of sunlight reflected from the nucleus. We present here analyses of the water vapor column density as measured by the Alice FUV spectrograph. Alice is sensitive to water vapor at column densities greater than ~1016 cm-2 along the sum of the Sun-nucleus and nucleus-spacecraft lines of sight. Due to the excellent temporal coverage provided by the Alice instrument (exposures were typically obtained every 5-10 minutes), we are able to show variations of water vapor in the coma caused by the changing heliocentric distance of the comet, the comet’s ~12-hour rotation period, and short-term outbursts. We compare our water vapor column densities to those derived from other instruments aboard the Rosetta spacecraft and use models to estimate the water production rate.Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its member states and NASA. The Alice team acknowledges continuing support from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory through contract 1336850 to the Southwest Research Institute.

  13. La fisiología en las películas: Coma, CO y la comprensión del intercambio gaseoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep?E BAÑOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo analiza la película Coma dirigida por Michael Chricton en 1978 e inspirada en la novela del mismo nombre de Robin Cook. Bajo el formato de thriller médico, muestra una serie de casos de coma que suceden en pacientes jóvenes y sanos sometidos a intervenciones quirúrgicas menores. La protagonista descubre que los afectados son traslados a una institución donde se les extraen los órganos para su comercio ilegal. También investiga la causa del coma, consecuencia de la intoxicación homicida con monóxido de carbono mientras los pacientes se encuentran en quirófano. La película tiene el interés docente de estimular la comprensión de los fenómenos de transporte de oxígeno por la hemoglobina, así como su afinidad por diversos gases, como el dióxido de carbono y el monóxido de carbono. Los estudiantes deben aplicar sus conocimientos fisiológicos para comprender cómo se realiza la intoxicación y sus características clínicas, así como las bases de su tratamiento.

  14. ON THE ELECTRON-TO-NEUTRAL NUMBER DENSITY RATIO IN THE COMA OF COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO: GUIDING EXPRESSION AND SOURCES FOR DEVIATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigren, E.; Eriksson, A. I.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Odelstad, E. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Galand, M.; Schwartz, S. J., E-mail: erik.vigren@irfu.se [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-10

    We compute partial photoionization frequencies of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CO, the major molecules in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, the target comet of the ongoing ESA Rosetta mission. Values are computed from Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energy and Dynamics/Solar EUV Experiment solar EUV spectra for 2014 August 1, 2015 March 1, and for perihelion (2015 August, as based on prediction). From the varying total photoionization frequency of H{sub 2}O, as computed from 2014 August 1 to 2015 May 20, we derive a simple analytical expression for the electron-to-neutral number density ratio as a function of cometocentric and heliocentric distance. The underlying model assumes radial movement of the coma constituents and does not account for chemical loss or the presence of electric fields. We discuss various effects/processes that can cause deviations between values from the analytical expression and actual electron-to-neutral number density ratios. The analytical expression is thus not strictly meant as predicting the actual electron-to-neutral number density ratio, but is useful in comparisons with observations as an indicator of processes at play in the cometary coma.

  15. Primate study suggests pentobarbital may help protect the brain during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolnick, A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation therapy, an often indispensable treatment for a wide range of brain tumors, is a double-edged sword, especially when used to treat children. Research reported at the 72nd Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Atlanta, Ga., now suggests that pentobarbital and perhaps other barbiturates may help protect the brain from radiation-induced damage, especially to the pituitary and hypothalmus, where such damage can lead to serious, life-long problems for children. Jeffrey J. Olson, MD, now assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, reported the results of a study of the radioprotective effects of pentobarbital on the brain of a primate, which he and colleagues at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recently completed

  16. 'Electroshock Therapy' in the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzesnitzek, Lara; Lang, Sascha

    2017-01-01

    The history of 'electroshock therapy' (now known as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)) in Europe in the Third Reich is still a neglected chapter in medical history. Since Thomas Szasz's 'From the Slaughterhouse to the Madhouse', prejudices have hindered a thorough historical analysis of the introduction and early application of electroshock therapy during the period of National Socialism and the Second World War. Contrary to the assumption of a 'dialectics of healing and killing', the introduction of electroshock therapy in the German Reich and occupied territories was neither especially swift nor radical. Electroshock therapy, much like the preceding 'shock therapies', insulin coma therapy and cardiazol convulsive therapy, contradicted the genetic dogma of schizophrenia, in which only one 'treatment' was permissible: primary prevention by sterilisation. However, industrial companies such as Siemens-Reiniger-Werke AG (SRW) embraced the new development in medical technology. Moreover, they knew how to use existing patents on the electrical anaesthesia used for slaughtering to maintain a leading position in the new electroshock therapy market. Only after the end of the official 'euthanasia' murder operation in August 1941, entitled T4, did the psychiatric elite begin to promote electroshock therapy as a modern 'unspecific' treatment in order to reframe psychiatry as an 'honorable' medical discipline. War-related shortages hindered even the then politically supported production of electroshock devices. Research into electroshock therapy remained minimal and was mainly concerned with internationally shared safety concerns regarding its clinical application. However, within the Third Reich, electroshock therapy was not only introduced in psychiatric hospitals, asylums, and in the Auschwitz concentration camp in order to get patients back to work, it was also modified for 'euthanasia' murder.

  17. Comet C2012 S1 (ISON)s Carbon-rich and Micron-size-dominated Coma Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D.; De Buizer, J.; Kelley, M.; Sitko, M.; Woodward, C.; Harker, D.; Reach, W.; Russell, R.; Kim, D.; Yanamadra-Fisher, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was unique in that it was a dynamically new comet derived from the Nearly Isotropic Oort cloud reservoir of comets with a sun-grazing orbit. We present thermal models for comet ISON (rh approx.1.15 AU, 2013-Oct-25 11:30 UT) that reveal comet ISON's dust was carbon-rich and dominated by a narrow size distribution dominated by approx. micron-sized grains. We constrained the models by our SOFIA FORCAST photometry at 11.1, 19.7 and 31.5 microns and by a silicate feature strength of approx.1.1 and an 8-13microns continuum greybody color temperature of approx. 275-280 K (using Tbb ? r-0.5 h and Tbb approx. 260-265 K from Subaru COMICS, 2013-Oct-19 UT)[1,2]. N-band spectra of comet ISON with the BASS instrument on the NASA IRTF (2013-Nov-11-12 UT) show a silicate feature strength of approx. 1.1 and an 11.2microns forsterite peak.[3] Our thermal models yield constraints the dust composition as well as grain size distribution parameters: slope, peak grain size, porosity. Specifically, ISON's dust has a low silicate-to- amorphous carbon ratio (approx. 1:9), and the coma size distribution has a steep slope (N4.5) such that the coma is dominated by micron-sized, moderately porous, carbon-rich dust grains. The N-band continuum color temperature implies submicronto micron-size grains and the steep fall off of the SOFIA far-IR photometry requires the size distribution to have fewer relative numbers of larger and cooler grains compared to smaller and hotter grains. A proxy for the dust production rate is f? approx.1500 cm, akin to Af?. ISON has a moderate-to-low dust-to-gas ratio. Comet ISON's dust grain size distribution does not appear similar to the few well-studied long-period Nearly Isotropic Comets (NICs), namely C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) that had smaller and/or more highly porous grains and larger sizes, or C/2007 N4 (Lulin) and C/2006 P1 (McNaught) that had large and/or compact grains. Radial transport to comet-forming disk distances

  18. Life-threatening coma and full-thickness sunburn in a patient treated with transdermal fentanyl patches: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindali Katia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fentanyl transdermal patches have been widely used in the treatment of chronic pain and in palliative care settings since 1991 in cases where prolonged opioid use is often necessary. Transdermal drug delivery is deemed safe and effective with the advantages of delivering a steady dose of the drug and improving patient compliance due to its ease of use. However, intentional and unintentional misuse and overdose using transdermal opioid patches has been widely reported in the literature. Case presentation We describe the case of a 77-year-old Caucasian woman who developed severe opioid toxicity while sun tanning, likely due to altered fentanyl transdermal patch function in a heated environment. As a result of prolonged sun exposure due to an opioid-induced coma she then sustained hyperthermia and severe burns to her abdomen and lower limbs. This inadvertent fentanyl overdose necessitated initial treatment in intensive care and follow on care in a specialist burn unit. Conclusion Patients who are using fentanyl patches and their relatives should be educated about how to use the patch safely. Healthcare practitioners should warn patients about the possibility of overdosing on transdermally delivered drugs if used incorrectly. They should avoid strenuous activities and external heat sources such as warming blankets, hot water bottles, saunas, hot tubs or sunbathing and should seek medical attention if they develop a fever. Additionally, any burns sustained in the context of altered consciousness levels such as in this case with opioid overdose should raise suspicion about a potential deeper burn injury than is usually observed.

  19. Escala de Coma de Glasgow: subestimação em pacientes com respostas verbais impedidas Escala de Coma de Glasgow: subestimación en pacientes con respuestas verbales impedidas Glasgow Coma Scale: underestimation in patients with verbal responses impeded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sumie Koizumi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Questão freqüente no uso da Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECGl, na fase aguda, em pacientes internados devido ao trauma crânio-encefálico (TCE é a subestimação decorrente de situações impeditivas como intubação endotraqueal/traqueostomia, sedação e edema palpebral. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar e determinar a subestimação na pontuação total da ECGl quando se utiliza a pontuação 1 nas situações de impedimento para a sua avaliação. A amostra estudada foi de 76 pacientes internados com TCE no Hospital das Clínicas da FMUSP. Em 42 (55,3% pacientes, não havia impedimentos e foram realizadas 136 avaliações. Em 34 (44,7%, havia impedimentos caracterizados por intubação ou traqueostomia, podendo estar ou não associados com edema palpebral e sedação, e o total de avaliações foi de 310. A pontuação nesses pacientes total variou de 3 a 11, com os escores mais freqüentes de 3 e 6. Pelos valores estimados pela regressão linear, a partir das pontuações obtidas em AO e MRM foram obtidas as seguintes subestimações: média=1,03 ±1,36, mediana=0,54 (intubação ou traqueostomia; média=0,40 ±0,79, mediana=0,00 (intubação ou traqueostomia + sedação; média=0,57 ±0,96, mediana=0,27 (intubação ou traqueostomia + sedação + edema palpebral. Conclui-se que, no TCE grave, a pontuação total da ECGl fixando a MRV em 1, embora subestimada, encontra-se próxima da real.Cuestionamiento frecuente en el uso de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECG, en la fase aguda, en pacientes internados debido al trauma craneoencefalico es la subestimación decorrient de situaciones impeditivas como intubación endotraqueal/traqueostomía, sedación y edema palpebral. El objetivo de ese estudio fue identificar y determinar la subestimación en la puntuación total de la ECG cuando es utilizada la puntuación 1 en las situaciones de impedimiento para su avaliación. La muestra estudiada fue de 76 pacientes internados por TEC en el

  20. Stupor and Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause. The doctor may check the person's wallet, purse, or pockets for medical identification (such as a ... which it occurred. The doctor also talks to family members and friends, who should honestly provide emergency ...

  1. Stupor and Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News 'Smart Dresser' Might Help Alzheimer's Patients Clothe Themselves Care ... for medical identification (such as a hospital identification card) or drugs, which may also help identify the ...

  2. What Is a Coma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually needs to be cared for in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the hospital. There, the person ... a ventilator (say: VEN-tih-lay-ter), a machine that pumps air into the ... a fork or spoon , or learning to walk all over again. They also may ...

  3. Subaru weak-lensing survey of dark matter subhalos in the Coma cluster: Subhalo mass function and statistical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Nobuhiro [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Futamase, Toshifumi; Kuroshima, Risa [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kajisawa, Masaru, E-mail: nobuhiro.okabe@ipmu.jp [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    We present a 4 deg{sup 2} weak gravitational lensing survey of subhalos in the very nearby Coma cluster using the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The large apparent size of cluster subhalos allows us to measure the mass of 32 subhalos detected in a model-independent manner, down to the order of 10{sup –3} of the virial mass of the cluster. Weak-lensing mass measurements of these shear-selected subhalos enable us to investigate subhalo properties and the correlation between subhalo masses and galaxy luminosities for the first time. The mean distortion profiles stacked over subhalos show a sharply truncated feature which is well-fitted by a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) mass model with the truncation radius, as expected due to tidal destruction by the main cluster. We also found that subhalo masses, truncation radii, and mass-to-light ratios decrease toward the cluster center. The subhalo mass function, dn/dln M {sub sub}, in the range of 2 orders of magnitude in mass, is well described by a single power law or a Schechter function. Best-fit power indices of 1.09{sub −0.32}{sup +0.42} for the former model and 0.99{sub −0.23}{sup +0.34} for the latter, are in remarkable agreement with slopes of ∼0.9-1.0 predicted by the cold dark matter paradigm. The tangential distortion signals in the radial range of 0.02-2 h {sup –1} Mpc from the cluster center show a complex structure which is well described by a composition of three mass components of subhalos, the NFW mass distribution as a smooth component of the main cluster, and a lensing model from a large scale structure behind the cluster. Although the lensing signals are 1 order of magnitude lower than those for clusters at z ∼ 0.2, the total signal-to-noise ratio, S/N = 13.3, is comparable, or higher, because the enormous number of background source galaxies compensates for the low lensing efficiency of the nearby cluster.

  4. Evaluación Microbiológica y Sanitaria de puestos de venta ambulatoria de alimentos del distrito de Comas, Lima - Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J Quispe M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la calidad microbiológica y sanitaria de los puestos de venta ambulatoria de alimentos (PVAA del distrito de Comas. Materiales y métodos: De agosto a noviembre del 2000, se evaluaron la calidad microbiológica y sanitaria de 61 PVAA del Distrito de Comas, Lima-Perú. Para la parte microbiológica se analizaron el número de coliformes fecales y la presencia de Salmonella spp en muestras de alimentos (02, agua, superficies inertes y superficies vivas; y para la evaluación sanitaria se empleó una encuesta de factores de riesgo (20 características. Resultados: 60.7% de PVAA superaron los límites aceptables de coliformes fecales en una o más muestras analizadas. Por tipo de muestra de alimentos, 41.0% de PVAA tuvieron un alimento no apto para el consumo humano (NAPCH y 19.7% ambos alimentos NAPCH (coliformes fecales100 NMP/g, y respecto a las muestras de agua, superficies inertes y superficies vivas, se encontraron resultados microbiológicos inaceptables (coliformes fecales100 NMP/g en 32.8%, 42.6% y 49.2% de los PVAA, respectivamente. No se encontró Salmonella spp en ninguna de las muestras evaluadas. Sobre la evaluación sanitaria, 90.2% de los PVAA tuvieron "Riesgo Sanitario Alto", observándose deficiencias estructurales y culturales de manipulación e higiene de alimentos. Finalmente, se encontró relación entre los resultados microbiológicos; y las características de evaluación sanitaria. Conclusiones: La calidad microbiológica y sanitaria de los PVAA del distrito de Comas presentaron deficiencias, constituyéndose en un problema potencial de salud para nuestro medio.

  5. Constraining the Volatile Composition and Coma Photochemistry in Jupiter Family Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak with High Resolution IR and Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam; DiSanti, Michael; Cochran, Anita; Dello Russo, Neil; Bonev, Boncho; Vervack, Ronald; Gibb, Erika; Roth, Nathan; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2018-01-01

    Over the past 20 years optical and IR spectroscopy of cometary comae has expanded our understanding both of cometary volatile composition and coma photochemistry. However, these observations tend to be biased towards Nearly Isotropic Comets (NIC'S) from the Oort Cloud, rather than the generally fainter and less active Jupiter Family Comets (JFC's) that are thought to originate from the Scattered Disk. However, early 2017 provided a rare opportunity to study several JFC's. We present preliminary results from IR and optical spectroscopy of JFC 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak obtained during its 2017 apparition. IR spectra were obtained with the NIRSPEC instrument on Keck II and the new iSHELL spectrograph on NASA IRTF. High spectral resolution optical spectra were obtained with the Tull Coude spectrograph on the 2.7-meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We will discuss mixing ratios of HCN, NH3, C2H6, C2H2, H2CO, and CH3OH compared to H2O and compare these to previous observations of comets. Preliminary results from the NIRSPEC observations indicate that 41P has typical C2H2 and HCN abundances compared to other JFC's, while the C2H6 abundance is similar to that of NIC's, but is enriched compared to other JFC's. H2CO appears to be heavily depleted in 41P. Analysis of the iSHELL spectra is underway and we will include results from these observations, which complement those from NIRSPEC and extend the scope or our compositional study by measuring additional molecules. We will also present abundances for CN, C2, NH2, C3, and CH obtained from the optical spectra and discuss the implications for the coma photochemistry.This work is supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program, administered by the Universities Space Research Association, with additional funding from the NSF and NASA PAST.

  6. A escala de coma de Glasgow como indicador de mortalidade e qualidade de vida em vítimas de trauma cranioencefálico contuso

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Helena Costanti Settervall

    2010-01-01

    As consequências do trauma cranioencefálico contuso incluem além da mortalidade, alterações físicas, cognitivas e comportamentais que alteram a qualidade de vida das vítimas pós-trauma. A Escala de Coma de Glasgow é reconhecida na literatura científica, como um indicador com potencial para estimar o prognóstico das vítimas de trauma cranioencefálico contuso e tem sido extensivamente estudada para prever resultados a curto e longo prazos. No entanto, por tratar-se de um índice fisiológico, su...

  7. Liderazgo directivo en la disciplina y la convivencia escolar en la Institución Educativa Estados Unidos UGEL 04 Comas

    OpenAIRE

    Berrospi Uribe, Daniel Domingo

    2017-01-01

    La presente investigación tuvo como objetivo determinar la influencia del liderazgo directivo en la disciplina y la convivencia escolar en la institución educativa “Estados Unidos” UGEL 04 Comas. Se trata de una investigación de enfoque cuantitativo de diseño de estudio no experimental transversal correlacional causal y el tipo de estudio se inscribe dentro de la investigación básica de nivel explicativo. La muestra estuvo conformada por 60 docentes de un universo de 70 y 28...

  8. The Inner Coma Physical Environments of Ecliptic Comets 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova, 2P/Encke, and 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak Revealed Through Long-Slit Spectroscopy at NASA IRTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Roth, Nathan; Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Gibb, Erika L.; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Combi, Michael R.; Fougere, Nicolas; Kawakita, Hideyo; McKay, Adam J.; Saki, Mohammad; Cordiner, Martin; Protopapa, Silvia; de Val-Borro, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the physical processes in the inner regions of cometary atmospheres is vital for interpretation of molecular cometary emission at all wavelengths. Furthermore, because ecliptic comets are continuously evaluated as space mission targets, understanding their coma environments is a central theme in both enhancing the science return of past missions (EPOXI, Rosetta) and in selecting future mission targets. With this motivation, we report long-slit high-resolution observations of H2O emission in the comae of three ecliptic comets observed in early 2017: 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova, 2P/Encke, and 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak. Using the new crossed-dispersed spectrograph iSHELL at NASA IRTF, we detected a suite of water rovibrational emission lines from these comets and measured the spatial distributions of H2O rotational temperatures and molecular column densities. Both parameters are highly diagnostic of the physical environment in cometary comae, the competition between cooling and heating processes in these environments, and the presence (or lack thereof) of extended coma sources of gas-phase H2O. Comets 2P and 45P allowed a rare glimpse into coma physics at small (staff for their help with these challenging observations, most of which were done during daytime.

  9. The Role of Therapy Education of Islamic Meaning to Overcome Today’s Global Human Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Aminah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern community are exposed to current issues related to the very complex personality. Islam offers a therapeutic meaning to overcome the global human crisis through the holy Qu’ran. This study aims to provide a qualitative analysis of logotherapy alternative to global human who experience critical conditions such as the door of death (sakaratul maut, acute illnesses, HIV Aids, kidney illness, stroke, coma, depression / stress, due to the hazards, and other refractory disease. The study showed that the therapy of Islamic meaning based on the holy Qur’an is broader and more comprehensive than the meaning therapy by Viktor E. Frankl.

  10. A Study on Brown Seaweed Therapy ( Sargassum sp. toward MDA Levels and Histological Improvement on Rat Foot Suffering Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Fauziah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (AR, an autoimun disease, is characterized by the inflammation in the joint area caused an excessive of free radicals. An excessive of free radicals in the body cause oxidative stress, that increasing levels of malondialdehyde (MDA as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and the decreasing levels of anti-oxidants. The treated with extract of brown seaweed (Sargassum sp. intended to find out the MDA levels in serum and the histological of the foot joints rheumatoid arthritis rats. Malondialdehyde levels are determined through a TBA test (Thio Barbituric acid, meanwhile the histological of the rat foot joints was determined by Hematoxylen-Eosin staining (HE. The results showed the brown seaweed extract therapy (Sargassum sp. was significantly (p <0.01 reduce levels of malondialdehyde (MDA in the serum of 21,24% and improving histological foot joints rheumatoid arthritis rats.

  11. Crystal structure of the peptidase domain of Streptococcus ComA, a bifunctional ATP-binding cassette transporter involved in the quorum-sensing pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Seiji; Yano, Takato; Ebihara, Akio; Okamoto, Akihiro; Manzoku, Miho; Hayashi, Hideyuki

    2010-04-02

    ComA of Streptococcus is a member of the bacteriocin-associated ATP-binding cassette transporter family and is postulated to be responsible for both the processing of the propeptide ComC and secretion of the mature quorum-sensing signal. The 150-amino acid peptidase domain (PEP) of ComA specifically recognizes an extended region of ComC that is 15 amino acids in length. It has been proposed that an amphipathic alpha-helix formed by the N-terminal leader region of ComC, as well as the Gly-Gly motif at the cleavage site, is critical for the PEP-ComC interaction. To elucidate the substrate recognition mechanism, we determined the three-dimensional crystal structure of Streptococcus mutans PEP and then constructed models for the PEP.ComC complexes. PEP had an overall structure similar to the papain-like cysteine proteases as has long been predicted. The active site was located at the bottom of a narrow cleft, which is suitable for binding the Gly-Gly motif. Together with the results from mutational experiments, a shallow hydrophobic concave surface of PEP was proposed as a site that accommodates the N-terminal helix of ComC. This dual mode of substrate recognition would provide the small PEP domain with an extremely high substrate specificity.

  12. ON THE ORIGIN OF INNER COMA STRUCTURES OBSERVED BY ROSETTA DURING A DIURNAL ROTATION OF COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Tobias; Noack, Matthias [Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum für Informationstechnik, Takustr. 7, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-20

    The Rosetta probe around comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67P) reveals an anisotropic dust distribution of the inner coma with jet-like structures. The physical processes leading to jet formation are under debate, with most models for cometary activity focusing on localized emission sources, such as cliffs or terraced regions. Here we suggest, by correlating high-resolution simulations of the dust environment around 67P with observations, that the anisotropy and the background dust density of 67P originate from dust released across the entire sunlit surface of the nucleus rather than from few isolated sources. We trace back trajectories from coma regions with high local dust density in space to the non-spherical nucleus and identify two mechanisms of jet formation: areas with local concavity in either two dimensions or only one. Pits and craters are examples of the first case; the neck region of the bi-lobed nucleus of 67P is an example of the latter case. The conjunction of multiple sources, in addition to dust released from all other sunlit areas, results in a high correlation coefficient (∼0.8) of the predictions with observations during a complete diurnal rotation period of 67P.

  13. Glasgow Coma Scale Versus Full Outline of UnResponsiveness Scale for Prediction of Outcomes in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvand, Elham; Jalali, Rostam; Mirzaei, Maryam; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad; Ahmadi, Mahnaz; Amraii, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most applied tool for classifying intensity of coma and predicting patient outcomes with traumatic brain injuries. The present study was conducted with the aim of comparing two criteria of Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) scale and GCS in predicting prognosis in patients with traumatic brain injuries. In this prospective study, 198 patients with traumatic brain injuries were investigated. FOUR and GCS criteria for each patient were determined by four well-educated nurses. The area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was determined for in-hospital mortality outcomes. Of all patients, 65.2% survived and 34.8% died, and FOUR had correctly predicted 82% of them. FOUR had 0.76 sensitivity and GCS had a sensitivity 0.85. Mean scores for mortality and survival rates were 4.59±2.36 and 10.71±2.24 in GCS, and 3.15±3.52 and 12.77±2.43 in FOUR, respectively. The area under ROC curve was 0.961 for FOUR and 0.928 for GCS. The area under the curve was high for FOUR in scores 6 and 7, and for GCS in scores 5 and 6. FOUR score is a valuable, sensitive and specific diagnostic criterion for predicting outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injuries.

  14. Coma e síndrome de herniação transtentorial consequentes a lesão hemisférica não expansiva aguda Coma and central herniation syndrome due to an acute non-expanding hemispheral mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo De Oliveira-Souza

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho retrata o caso de uma paciente que entrou em coma por infarto extenso do hemisfério cerebral direito e desenvolveu sinais clínicos característicos do estágio diencefálico da herniação transtentorial central. A TC, todavia, não evidenciou os efeitos classicamente descritos de compressão ou distorção da transição mesodiencefálica, mas duas imagens hipodensas, de idades diferentes, alojadas, repectivamente, nos territórios superficial e profundo das artérias cerebral média e anterior e no lobo frontal direito. Concordando com a piora clínica ao longo dos seis dias que antecederam a morte, a última TC revelou as imagens esperadas de deslocamentos do encéfalo. O caso se assemelha a outros da literatura, em testemunho de que os sinais clínicos de efeitos de massa no interior do crânio podem ser reproduzidos por comprometimento funcional agudo mono-hemisférico na ausência de deslocamentos físicos da massa encefálica. O papel desempenhado por distorções encefálicas na gênese e no prognóstico de curto-prazo do coma permanece em aberto.An 81 -year-old woman developed left hemiplegia and coma due to a right hemisphere infarct and died 6 days later. When first seen in coma she had the classical signs of descending central herniation in the diencephalic stage. The CT scan of the third day showed a large hypodense area occupying the superficial and deep territories of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries on the left as well as a frontal cortico-subcortical hypodense area indicative of an older infarct on the opposite hemisphere. No mass effects were apparent. She followed a downhill course with signs of brainstem deterioration. A second CT scan a few hours before death revealed the expected pattern of brain shift and herniations. This case adds to the available evidence showing that the clinical signs of encroachment of supratentorial structures upon the basal forebrain can be reproduced by an acute mono

  15. An empirical model of H2O, CO2 and CO coma distributions and production rates for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko based on ROSINA/DFMS measurements and AMPS-DSMC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kenneth C.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bieler, Andre; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael R.; De Keyser, Johan; Fiethe, Björn; Fougere, Nicolas; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, T. I.; Hässig, Myrtha; Huang, Zhenguang; Le Roy, Léna; Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Toth, Gabor; Tzou, Chia-Yu; ROSINA Team

    2016-10-01

    We have previously used results from the AMPS DSMC (Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) model to create an empirical model of the near comet water (H2O) coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In this work we create additional empirical models for the coma distributions of CO2 and CO. The AMPS simulations are based on ROSINA DFMS (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer) data taken over the entire timespan of the Rosetta mission. The empirical model is created using AMPS DSMC results which are extracted from simulations at a range of radial distances, rotation phases and heliocentric distances. The simulation results are then averaged over a comet rotation and fitted to an empirical model distribution. Model coefficients are then fitted to piecewise-linear functions of heliocentric distance. The final product is an empirical model of the coma distribution which is a function of heliocentric distance, radial distance, and sun-fixed longitude and latitude angles. The model clearly mimics the behavior of water shifting production from North to South across the inbound equinox while the CO2 production is always in the South.The empirical model can be used to de-trend the spacecraft motion from the ROSINA COPS and DFMS data. The ROSINA instrument measures the neutral coma density at a single point and the measured value is influenced by the location of the spacecraft relative to the comet and the comet-sun line. Using the empirical coma model we can correct for the position of the spacecraft and compute a total production rate based on single point measurements. In this presentation we will present the coma production rates as a function of heliocentric distance for the entire Rosetta mission.This work was supported by contracts JPL#1266313 and JPL#1266314 from the US Rosetta Project and NASA grant NNX14AG84G from the Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  16. Correlação entre a escala de coma de Glasgow e os achados de imagem de tomografia computadorizada em pacientes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Lenharo Morgado; Luiz Antônio Rossi

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Determinar a correlação da escala de coma de Glasgow, fatores causais e de risco, idade, sexo e intubação orotraqueal com os achados tomográficos em pacientes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo transversal prospectivo de 102 pacientes, atendidos nas primeiras 12 horas, os quais receberam pontuação segundo a escala de coma de Glasgow e foram submetidos a exame tomográfico. RESULTADOS: A idade média dos pacientes foi de 37,77 ± 18,69 anos, com ...

  17. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  18. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantson, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Intensive Care, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neuroradiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Nassogne, Marie-Cecile [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Guerit, Jean-Michel [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 {mu}mol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  19. Contribución de las áreas verdes urbanas a la calidad ambiental del distrito de Comas-Lima, al año 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Malca Casavilca, Nora Rosa Concepción

    2012-01-01

    La investigación demostró que la gestión de las áreas verdes urbanas guarda relación con la calidad ambiental y el control de la contaminación, y evaluó la gestión municipal del distrito de Comas al 2011, desde la perspectiva de la población, para ello se aplicó una encuesta a 449 pobladores. Se demostró que más del 80% considera que la gestión de áreas verdes está relacionada con la calidad ambiental, más sólo el 40% consideró que éstas contribuyen a controlar la contaminación. Se concluyó q...

  20. QTL for the thermotolerance effect of heat hardening, knowckdown resistance to heat and chill-coma recovery in an intercontinental set of recombinant inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norry, Fabian M.; Scannapieco, Alejandra C.; Sambucetti, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    The thermotolerance effect of heat hardening (also called short-term acclimation), knockdown resistance to high temperature (KRHT) with and without heat hardening and chill-coma recovery (CCR) are important phenotypes of thermal adaptation in insects and other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster......-hardened and nonhardened RIL. Composite interval mapping revealed a more complex genetic architecture for KRHT without heat-hardening than for KRHT in heat-hardened insects. Five quantitative trait loci (QTL) were found for KRHT, but only two of them were significant after heat hardening. KRHT and CCR showed trade......-off associations for QTL both in the middle of chromosome 2 and the right arm of chromosome 3, which should be the result of either pleiotropy or linkage. The major QTL on chromosome 2 explained 18% and 27-33% of the phenotypic variance in CCR and KRHT in nonhardened flies, respectively, but its KRHT effects...

  1. Typology of dust particles collected by the COSIMA mass spectrometer in the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov Gerasimenko from Rendez-Vous to perihelion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Y.; Hilchenbach, M.; Ligier, N.; Merouhane, S.; Hornung, K.

    2015-10-01

    COSIMA is a TOF/SIMS spectrometer dedicated to the analysis of cometary grains collected insitu on the the Rosetta orbiter. The grains are collected on targets 10 mm x 10 mm in area exposed by sets of 3("target assembly") in front of a funnel providing a 20° x 40° FOV to the outside environment of the spacecraft. 4 target assemblies have been exposed from August 8th 2014 (distant approach phase) to April 29th, 2015 on a weekly basis, except during near comet passages (daily basis). 10 of the 12 targets exposed up to now are covered by "metal black" layers (gold or silver) so as to maximize grain collection efficiency [1], the other two targets being silver foils. The collected grains are detected by a microscope, COSISCOPE, using two LED's at grazing incidence and a 14 μm pixel size (714 pixels across the target). This set up was designed so as not to miss the small particles expected to dominate the distribution of collected dust as well as the imprints resulting from rebounding particles when simulating impacts at speeds of up to 300 m/s as predicted by models of the inner coma [2]. The number and size of collected particles far exceeded expectations, with more than 10000 identified particles, including more than 80 collected dust particles with sizes of 7 pixels (100 μm) or more, making it possible to characterize the diversity of cometary grains collected in-situ at very low velocities in the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The first results demonstrated that cometary dust close to the nucleus is dominated by fluffy aggregates [3]. At EPSC, we will present the results on the pre-perihelion phase (August 2014 to August 2015).

  2. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway.

  3. Current emergency therapy. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlich, R.F.; Spyker, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 50 selections. Some of the titles are: Ethanol; Hydrocarbons; Lead; Rubella and Congenital Rubella; Tachycardias; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Acute Otitis Media; and Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Coma in Adults.

  4. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  5. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Hand Therapy is a type of rehabilitation performed by an occupational or physical therapist with patients that suffer from conditions affecting the hands and upper extremities. Therapy enables patients to hasten ...

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007474.htm Electroconvulsive therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression ...

  7. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  8. Therapy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Independent School District, TX.

    Reviewed are the goals and activities of the therapy services in the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program. Specific sections detail activities for speech therapy (such as diagnostic assessment, habilitation, consultation, and reporting procedures), occupational therapy (including identification and assessment, and services to children,…

  9. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  10. A comparative study of cognitive function following traumatic brain injury: Significance of initial Glasgow coma scale score to predict cognitive outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Majumder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability all over the world. It is associated with diversities of outcomes including cognitive deficits. The worse cognitive outcome is often associated with more severe degree of TBI as measured by initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score. Materials and Methods: Present study compared the cognitive function of TBI patients having initial GCS score 9-10 with those having the initial GCS score 11-12. The assessment on Postgraduate Institute battery of brain dysfunction was conducted when the patients came for their follow-up visit at a tertiary health care facility between 6 months and 12 months of sustaining TBI. Results: There was moderate degree of cognitive dysfunction in the group with initial GCS score of 9-10 and no dysfunction in the group with initial GCS score of 11-12. Conclusion: The initial GCS score of 10 may be critical to predict cognitive deficits among TBI patients during 6-12 months of recovery period.

  11. Pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of postmortem cerebrospinal fluid from rats with drug-induced seizure or coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawaku, Yoshimasa; Hirakawa, Keiko; Koike, Kaoru; Kanetake, Jun; Ohno, Youkichi

    2017-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is routinely subjected to gross evaluation in postmortem investigations; however, its use in chemical evaluations has not been fully realized. Analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra with pattern recognition methods was applied to CSF samples. Rats were treated with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) to induce seizure or pentobarbital (PB) to induce coma, and postmortem CSF was collected after CO 2 gas euthanization. Pattern recognition analysis of the NMR data was performed on individual postmortem CSF samples. The aim of this study was to determine if pattern recognition analysis of NMR data could be used to classify the rats according to their drug treatment. The applicability of NMR data with pattern recognition analysis using postmortem CSF was also assessed. Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) score plots indicated that the PTZ, PB, and NS (control) groups were clustered and clearly separated. PLS-DA correlation loading plots showed respective spectral and category variances of 41% and 42% for factor 1, and 17% and 27% for factor 2. Thus, factors 1 and 2 together described 58% (41%+17%) and 69% (42%+27%) of the variation, respectively. NMR study of postmortem CSF has the potential to be utilized as both a novel forensic neurochemistry method and in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Technology-aided recreation and communication opportunities for post-coma persons affected by lack of speech and extensive motor impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; D'Amico, Fiora; Sasanelli, Giovanni; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa

    2013-09-01

    This study assessed technology-aided intervention programs for two post-coma men who had re-acquired consciousness, but were unable to engage in personally or socially relevant occupations, given their lack of functional speech and their extensive motor disabilities. The microswitches used for accessing the program contents consisted of (a) a pressure sensor fixed in the palm of the first man's hand that could be activated with a small hand closure movement, and (b) an optic sensor fixed under the chin of the second man that could be activated by mouth opening movements. The programs' content consisted of recreation and communication options, which involved activating music, videos, and basic requests, sending and receiving (listening to) text messages, and placing phone calls. The results showed that the men (a) used the technology-aided programs successfully to manage the recreation and communication options available and (b) showed consistent preference for the sessions with the technology-aided program over other daily events. Family and staff members interviewed about the participants' programs (seven members for each participant) thought that the participants enjoyed the intervention sessions with the programs and that the programs had beneficial effects for them. Implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Technology-based intervention programs to promote stimulation control and communication in post-coma persons with different levels of disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bosco, Andrea; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    Post-coma persons in a minimally conscious state and with extensive motor impairment or emerging/emerged from such a state, but affected by lack of speech and motor impairment, tend to be passive and isolated. A way to help them develop functional responding to control environmental events and communication involves the use of intervention programs relying on assistive technology. This paper provides an overview of technology-based intervention programs for enabling the participants to (a) access brief periods of stimulation through one or two microswitches, (b) pursue stimulation and social contact through the combination of a microswitch and a sensor connected to a speech generating device (SGD) or through two SGD-related sensors, (c) control stimulation options through computer or radio systems and a microswitch, (d) communicate through modified messaging or telephone systems operated via microswitch, and (e) control combinations of leisure and communication options through computer systems operated via microswitch. Twenty-six studies, involving a total of 52 participants, were included in this paper. The intervention programs were carried out using single-subject methodology, and their outcomes were generally considered positive from the standpoint of the participants and their context. Practical implications of the programs are discussed. PMID:24574992

  14. Diurnal and seasonal variations of gas emissions in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko observed with OSIRIS/Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Forgia, F.; Lazzarin, M.; Bodewits, D.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertini, I.; Penasa, L.; Naletto, G.; Cremonese, G.; Massironi, M.; Ferri, F.; Frattin, E.; Lucchetti, A.; Ferrari, S.; Barbieri, C.

    2017-09-01

    The gas filters of OSIRIS/Wide Angle Camera (WAC) on board Rosetta spacecraft allowed to study the gaseous emissions of the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. OH, NH, CN, NH2 and OI gas species have been monitored between January and September 2015, i.e. from 2.47 AU pre-perihelion, to 1.37 AU post-perihelion, allowing the study of seasonal variations. Each gas sequence covers slightly more than one comet rotation period allowing also the study of diurnal changes. We measured the gas column density between 1 and 3 km from the nucleus limb in the sunward direction. Results will be presented on the gas diurnal light curves and on the long-term variations such as the dependence and correlation with time, heliocentric distance, range, phase angle and sub-solar point. Gas ratios are studied searching for evidence of any compositional change with time and orbital evolution. We searched for connections between particular "active zones" on the nucleus surface. This study will be helpful in connecting ground based observations of 67P with Rosetta in situ observations.

  15. Evidence of altered pressure pain thresholds in persons with disorders of consciousness as measured by the Nociception Coma Scale-Italian version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Davide; Schnakers, Caroline; Pagani, Marco; Arenare, Francesca; Devalle, Guya; Giunco, Fabrizio; Guizzetti, GianBattista; Lanfranchi, Maurizio; Giovannetti, Ambra M; Covelli, Venusia; Bersano, Anna; Nigri, Anna; Minati, Ludovico; Rossi Sebastiano, Davide; Parati, Eugenio; Bruzzone, MariaGrazia; Franceschetti, Silvana; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-02-28

    Pain assessment in patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC) is a controversial issue for clinicians, who require tools and standardised procedures for testing nociception in non-communicative patients. The aims of the present study were, first, to analyse the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Nociception Coma Scale and, second, to evaluate pressure pain thresholds in a group of patients with DoC. The authors conducted a multi-centre study on 40 healthy participants and 60 DoC patients enrolled from six hospitals in Italy. For each group an electronic algometer was used to apply all nociceptive pressure stimuli. Our results show that the Italian version of the NCS retains the good psychometric properties of the original version and is therefore suitable for standardised pain assessment in clinical practice. In our study, pressure pain thresholds measured in a group of patients in vegetative and minimally conscious state were relatively lower than pain threshold values found in a group of healthy participants. Such findings motivate additional investigation on possible pain sensitisation in patients with severe brain injury and multiple co-morbidities, and on application of tailored therapeutic approaches useful for pain management in patients unable verbally to communicate their feelings.

  16. Present status of severe head injured patients with an admission glasgow coma scale score of 3 based on the Japan neurotrauma data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzura, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Severe head injured patients presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3 have been hesitated to treat aggressively. We analyzed present status of patients with GCS score of 3 from the Project 2004 in the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank. Among 1,101 cases registered, 805 cases with GCS score of 8 or less on admission. Of those, 215 cases with GCS score of 3 were classified the survival group (51 cases) and the dead group (164 cases) and compared each group. These results showed that the characteristics associated with favorable outcome including absence of cardiopulmonary arrest, no abnormality of pupil findings, stable condition of respiration and circulation, serum glucose level (less than 184 mg/dl), absence of initial CT findings including skull base fracture, pneumocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage, no serious extracranial injures including Injury Severity Scale score of less than 25, critic al care including intracranial pressure monitoring and temperature management. We suggest that it is important to treat brain and systemic problems aggressively in severe head injured patients with GCS score of 3. (author)

  17. 40Hz auditory steady-state responses in patients with disorders of consciousness: Correlation between phase-locking index and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Marek; Górska, Urszula; Griskova-Bulanova, Inga

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to elucidate whether 40Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR) could be sensitive to the state of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) as estimated with Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) diagnostic tool. Fifteen DOC patients and 24 healthy controls took part in the study. The 40Hz click trains were used to evoke ASSRs. Mean evoked amplitude (EA) and phase-locking index (PLI) within 38-42Hz window were calculated for 100ms bins, starting from -200 to 700ms relative to stimulus onset. The PLI values from the patient group in the period of 200-500ms after the stimulus onset positively correlated with the CRS-R total score and with the scores of the Auditory and Visual subscales. The phase-locking index of 40Hz auditory steady-state responses can be an indicator of the level of dysfunction of the central nervous system in DOC. Our results emphasize the role of central auditory system integrity in determining the level of functioning of DOC patients and suggest the possibility to use the ASSR protocol as an objective diagnostic method in DOC patients. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improvement of iturin A production in Bacillus subtilis ZK0 by overexpression of the comA and sigA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Ding, Z T; Zhong, J; Zhou, J Y; Shu, D; Luo, D; Yang, J; Tan, H

    2017-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis ZK0, which was isolated from cotton, produces a type of lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A that inhibits the growth of pathogenic fungi on agricultural crops. However, the low level of iturin A production by B. subtilis ZK0 does not support its large-scale application. In this study, B. subtilis ZK0 was subjected to genetic manipulation to improve iturin A production. By the independent or simultaneous overexpression of two regulatory genes (comA and sigA), iturin A production by B. subtilis ZK0 was significantly increased. When both genes were simultaneously overexpressed under optimal conditions, iturin A production increased up to 215 mg l -1 (an approximate 43-fold increase compared with B. subtilis ZK0). Moreover, overexpression of both genes was unexpectedly found to inhibit biofilm formation by B. subtilis ZK0, indicating that the phenomenon of 'stuck fermentation' would be avoided during B. subtilis ZK0 fermentation. In conclusion, a genetic manipulation method that improves iturin A production and inhibits biofilm formation in B. subtilis ZK0 is reported for the first time and this method has the potential to be widely applied in B. subtilis ZK0 commercial fermentation. This study provides new perspectives on improving iturin A production by Bacillus subtilis. Our newly engineered strains could be applied to commercial fermentation by enhancing yields of iturin A and reducing the rate of 'stuck fermentation'. Increased production would facilitate more widespread application of this powerful antibiotic. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. The Deep Impact Coma of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 as a Time-of-Flight Experiment Motivates DDSCAT Models for Porous Aggregate Grains with Silicate Crystal Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Harker, D. E.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.; Richard, D. T.; Kolokolova, L.; Moreno, F.

    2010-10-01

    Spitzer IRS spectra of short-period Ecliptic Comets (ECs) have silicate features, and many have distinct crystalline silicate peaks. These Spitzer spectra, when fitted with thermal models after subtraction of the relatively strong contribution of the nuclear flux to the IR spectrum (e.g., Harker et al. 2007), demonstrate ECs have weaker silicate features than long-period Nearly-Isotropic Comets (NICs). There are exceptions, however, as some NICs also have weak features like most ECs. Grains with lower porosities (lower fraction of vacuum) can explain weaker silicate features (Kelley and Wooden 2009; Kolokolova et al. 2007). Alternatively, omitting the smallest (submicron) solid grains can reduce the contrast of the silicate feature (Lisse et al. 2006). However, so far, only models for solid submicron crystals fit the crystalline peaks in spectra of comets with weak silicate features. This presents a dilemma: how can the coma be devoid of small grains except for the crystals? The Spitzer spectra of the Deep Impact event with EC 9P/Tempel 1 provides a data set to model larger porous grains with crystal inclusions because the post-impact coma was a time-of-flight experiment: an impulsive release of grains were size-sorted in time by their respective gas velocities so that the smaller grains departed the inner coma quicker than larger grains. A velocity law derived from fitting small beam Gemini spectra (Harker et al. 2007) indicates that at 20 hour post-impact the (pre-impact subtracted) Spitzer IRS spectrum contained grains larger than 10-20 micron radii, moving at 20 m/s, that produced a weak silicate feature with an 11.2 micron crystalline olivine peak. Furthermore, this feature looks like the silicate feature from the nominal coma. We present some results of a computational effort to model discrete crystals and mixed-mineral porous aggregate grains with silicate crystal inclusions using DDSCAT on the NAS Pleiades supercomputer.

  20. Deficiência da 3-OH-3-metil-glutaril-CoA-liase como causa de coma no período neonatal: relato de caso 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA-lyase deficiency as coma etiology in the neonatal period: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERASMO BARBANTE CASELLA

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos um paciente que apresentou dois episódios de coma no primeiro mês de vida, com descompensação metabólica, nos quais se observou hipoglicemia e acidose metabólica acentuada, sem cetonúria. O estudo dos ácidos orgânicos urinários demonstrou elevação acentuada de 3-OH-3-metil-glutárico, 3-metil-glutacônico, 3-metil-glutárico e 3-OH-isovalérico. Os sinais e sintomas clínicos associados às alterações metabólicas citadas permitiram o diagnóstico da deficiência da 3-OH-3-metil-glutaril-CoA-liase, entidade de origem autossômica recessiva, passível de ser tratada, como no caso estudado, com dieta hipoproteica, restrita em leucina, hipogordurosa e rica em carboidratos, associada a L-carnitina e evitando-se períodos prolongados de jejum.We report a patient that presented two episodes of coma in the neonatal period, with severe metabolic acidosis and hypoglycemia, without ketosis. The urinary organic acid analysis showed increased amounts of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaric, 3-methylglutaconic, 3-methylglutaric and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. The deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase was diagnosed by the clinical and metabolic features. This disease shows autosomal recessive inheritance and the treatment is done by a diet with restriction of protein (mainly leucine and lipids, high in carbohydrate content, and the avoidance of fasting and carnitine supplementation.

  1. Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings Bolhas do coma pós-intoxicação por depressores do sistema nervoso central: relato de caso incluindo achados histopatológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Migliari Branco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine, is presented. A biopsy from the left thumb blister taken on day 4 revealed focal necrosis of the epidermis and necrosis of sweat gland epithelial cells; direct immunofluorescence was strongly positive for IgG in superficial blood vessel walls but negative for IgM, IgA, C3 and C1q. The patient was discharged on day 21 with no sequelae.Formação de bolhas e necrose de glândula sudoríparas écrinas é uma manifestação cutânea associada com estados de diminuição da consciência, mais frequentemente relatada após superdosagens de depressores do sistema nervoso central, particularmente fenobabital. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente de 45 anos que desenvolveu "bolhas do coma" após tentativa de suicídio por fenobarbital (confirmada laboratorialmente, associada a outros depressores do sistema nervoso central (clonazepam, prometazina, oxcarbazepina e quetiapina. Biópsia da bolha do 1o quirodáctilo esquerdo no 4o dia de internação revelou necrose focal da epiderme e necrose de células epiteliais de glândula sudorípara; a imunofluorescência direta foi fortemente positiva para IgG na parede superficial dos vasos sanguíneos, mas negativa para IgM, IgA, C3 e C1q. A paciente teve alta no 21o dia, sem seqüelas.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Atomic Species in the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as Observed by Rosetta’s ALICE UV Spectrograph during Great Circle Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Vervack, Ronald J.; A'Hearn, Michael; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Bieler, Andre; Combi, Michael R.; Fougere, Nicolas; Keeney, Brian A.; Medina, Richard; Noonan, John; Pineau, Jon; Versteeg, Maarten H.

    2017-10-01

    The Alice far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on the Rosetta orbiter obtained spatially resolved spectra of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) from 700-2050 Å with a spectral resolution of 8-12 Å. Observations of 67P were obtained by Alice continually from arrival at the comet in August 2014 through the end of the mission in September 2016. “Great Circle” observations were performed every few weeks from January 2015 through May 2016 to survey the coma away from the nucleus. These sequences consisted of a series of slews along a celestial great circle passing through the nucleus, e.g., covering off-nadir angles from approximately 0-180°, with pauses for observations by Alice and other instruments. Alice’s line of sight during these scans included signal to the edge of the coma, thus sampling very different parts of the coma than most other instruments.We report here on observations acquired during these Great Circle scans that allow us to investigate the spatial distributions of various emissions, as well as seasonal variations in the coma composition. Bright lines consistently included H Ly-b, the OI triplet near 1304 Å, CI near 1657 Å, and the SI triplet near 1820 Å. Spatial distributions of the OI, CI, and SI brightnesses have been determined and are being fitted with Haser models. The process is more complicated than for traditional remote sensing FUV observations due to Rosetta’s location in the coma and because resonant scattering does not always dominate the excitation. Preliminary modeling yields H2O and CO2 production rates consistent with contemporaneous measurements obtained by other instruments on Rosetta and production rates that generally peak a few weeks after perihelion. A surprising phenomenon is a slight increase in OI brightness at large off-nadir angles for some Great Circles while the other measured emissions continue to decrease. We are investigating possible explanations.Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its

  3. Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the widespread and erroneous belief that they are natural and do no harm, and because their use offers the opportunity for more control over treatment options and procedures. Alternative therapies can reduce stress, pain, and/or fatigue. Some therapies are covered ...

  4. Moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: effect of blood alcohol concentration on Glasgow Coma Scale score and relation to computed tomography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundhaug, Nils Petter; Moen, Kent Gøran; Skandsen, Toril; Schirmer-Mikalsen, Kari; Lund, Stine B; Hara, Sozaburo; Vik, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The influence of alcohol is assumed to reduce consciousness in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but research findings are divergent. The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of different levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores in patients with moderate and severe TBI and to relate the findings to brain injury severity based on the admission CT scan. In this cohort study, 265 patients (age range 16-70 years) who were admitted to St. Olavs University Hospital with moderate and severe TBI during a 7-year period were prospectively registered. Of these, 217 patients (82%) had measured BAC. Effects of 4 BAC groups on GCS score were examined with ordinal logistic regression analyses, and the GCS scores were inverted to give an OR > 1. The Rotterdam CT score based on admission CT scan was used to adjust for brain injury severity (best score 1 and worst score 6) by stratifying patients into 2 brain injury severity groups (Rotterdam CT scores of 1-3 and 4-6). Of all patients with measured BAC, 91% had intracranial CT findings and 43% had BAC > 0 mg/dl. The median GCS score was lower in the alcohol-positive patients (6.5, interquartile range [IQR] 4-10) than in the alcohol-negative patients (9, IQR 6-13; p brain injury itself seemed to overrun the depressing effect of the alcohol on the CNS. This finding is in agreement with the assumption of many clinicians in the emergency situation.

  5. Factors influencing pediatric Injury Severity Score and Glasgow Coma Scale in pediatric automobile crashes: results from the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Peter F; Brown, J Kristine; Sochor, Mark R; Wang, Stewart C; Eichelberger, Martin E

    2006-11-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for more than 50% of pediatric injuries. Triage of pediatric patients to appropriate centers can be based on the crash/injury characteristics. Pediatric motor vehicle crash/injury characteristics can be determined from an in vitro laboratory using child crash dummies. However, to date, no detailed data with respect to outcomes and crash mechanism have been presented with a pediatric in vivo model. The Crash Injury Research Engineering Network is comprised of 10 level 1 trauma centers. Crashes were examined with regard to age, crash severity (DeltaV), crash direction, restraint use, and airbag deployment. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) as outcomes. Standard age groupings (0-4, 5-9, 10-14, and 15-18) were used. The database is biases toward a survivor population with few fatalities. Four hundred sixty-one motor vehicle crashes with 2500 injuries were analyzed (242 boys, 219 girls). Irrespective of age, DeltaV > 30 mph resulted in increased ISS and decreased GCS (eg, for 0-4 years, DeltaV 30: ISS = 19.5, GCS = 10.6; P 15) injuries than did backseat passengers (odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-3.4). A trend was noted for children younger than 12 years sitting in the front seat to have increased ISS and decreased GCS with airbag deployment but was limited by case number. A reproducible pattern of increased ISS and lower GCS characterized by high severity, lateral crashes in children was noted. Further analysis of the specific injuries as a function and the crash characteristic can help guide management and prevention strategies.

  6. The use of brain CT Scan in craniocerebral trauma with Glasgow coma scale scores of 13 – 15 in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital 1999-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofizal Jannis

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available There is still a controversy among the neurologists whether brain CT scan must be performed on the mild head trauma patients. This study was executed to find out the correlation between the brain CT scan image findings and its clinical impairment among the mild head trauma patients with Glasgow coma scale (GCS score of 13 to 15. The study was a retrospective study by analyzing the uniform medical records of the head trauma patients hospitalized at the Neurology ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital within the period of 1999 to 2001. During that period 1,663 patients were hospitalized due to head trauma, and 1,166 of them (70.1 % were suffered from mild head trauma patients with GCS score of 13-15. Among those with brain CT scan examinations (N: 271, the neurological abnormalities were found on 144 (53.1% of patients, consisted of cerebral edema (11,4%, intracerebral hemorrhage (5.5%, epidural hemorrhage (16.2%, subdural hemorrhage (18.1%, subarachnoid hemorrhage (5.5%, and combination (13.8%. The further analysis showed that cranial nerves disturbance, amnesia, loss of conciousness for more than 10 minutes, and vomiting are significantly correlated to the brain CT scan abnormality. Combination of the above four clinical signs and symptoms have sensitivity of 90 % in predicting brain insults. This findings may be used as a simple set of clinical criteria for identifying mild head trauma patients who need undergo CT scan examination. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 156-60 Keywords: mild head injury, brain CT scan

  7. Comparison of 3D kinetic and hydrodynamic models to ROSINA-COPS measurements of the neutral coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Andre; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; De Keyser, Johan; Fiethe, Björn; Fougere, Nicolas; Fuselier, Stephen; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas; Hansen, Kenneth; Hässig, Myrtha; Huang, Zhenguang; Jäckel, Annette; Jia, Xianzhe; Le Roy, Lena; Mall, Urs A.; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Tóth, Gábor; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2015-11-01

    67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a Jupiter-family comet and the object of investigation of the European Space Agency mission Rosetta. This report presents the first full 3D simulation results of 67P's neutral gas coma. In this study we include results from a direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a hydrodynamic code, and a purely geometric calculation which computes the total illuminated surface area on the nucleus. All models include the triangulated 3D shape model of 67P as well as realistic illumination and shadowing conditions. The basic concept is the assumption that these illumination conditions on the nucleus are the main driver for the gas activity of the comet. As a consequence, the total production rate of 67P varies as a function of solar insolation. The best agreement between the model and the data is achieved when gas fluxes on the night side are in the range of 7% to 10% of the maximum flux, accounting for contributions from the most volatile components. To validate the output of our numerical simulations we compare the results of all three models to in situ gas number density measurements from the ROSINA COPS instrument. We are able to reproduce the overall features of these local neutral number density measurements of ROSINA COPS for the time period between early August 2014 and January 1 2015 with all three models. Some details in the measurements are not reproduced and warrant further investigation and refinement of the models. However, the overall assumption that illumination conditions on the nucleus are at least an important driver of the gas activity is validated by the models. According to our simulation results we find the total production rate of 67P to be constant between August and November 2014 with a value of about 1 × 1026 molecules s-1.

  8. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of mild head injury - is it appropriate to classify patients with glasgow coma scale score of 13 to 15 as 'mild injury'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Y.; Saeki, N.; Yamaura, A.; Okimura, Y.; Tanaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to examine the relation between Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score and findings on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of patients with mild head injury presenting GCS Scores between 13 and 15. Methods. Data were collected from all consecutive patients with mild head injury who were referred to our hospital between July 1 and October 31, 1999. All patients were recommended to undergo CT and MR imaging examinations. Patients younger than 14 years of age were excluded. Results. Ninety patients were recruited into this study. CT scans were obtained in 88 patients and MR imaging were obtained in 65 patients. Of those 90 patients, 2 patients scored 13 points, 5 scored 14 points and 83 (92.2 %) 15 points. Patients with GCS score of 13 points demonstrated parenchymal lesions an both CT and MR imaging. Those with 14 points revealed absence of parenchymal abnormality an CT, but presence of parenchymal lesions an MR imaging. Patients in advanced age (chi square test, p < 0.0001), and those with amnesia (p = 0005, not significant), although scoring 15 points, revealed a tendency to abnormal intracranial lesions on CT scans. Conclusion. It is doubtful whether patients with GCS score 13 should be included in the mild head injury category, due to obvious brain damage on CT scans. MR imaging should be performed on patients with GCS score 14, since the parenchymal lesions are not clearly demonstrated an CT scans. Even if patients scored GCS 15, patients which amnesia or of advanced age should undergo CT scans at minimum, and MR imaging when available. (author)

  9. Hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale score and ICH score: which predicts the 30-day mortality better for intracerebral hematoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality.This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018, 0.715 (P = 0.0008 (by ABC/2 to 0.738 (P = 0.0002 (by CAVA, 0.877 (P<0.0001 (by ABC/2 to 0.882 (P<0.0001 (by CAVA, and 0.912 (P<0.0001, respectively.Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score.

  10. Polar ionic conductivity profile in fair weather conditions. Terrestrial test of the Huygens/Hasi-PWA instrument aboard the Comas Sola balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, J. J.; Molina-Cuberos, G. J.; Rodrigo, R.; Hamelin, M.; Schwingenschuh, K.

    2001-12-01

    The permittivity wave and altimetry (PWA) instrument is a part of the CASSINI/HUYGENS HASI experiment and was designed to determine the electrical parameters of the atmosphere of Titan in 2004. In December 1995, a balloon campaign was conducted in León, Spain, to test the HASI onboard hardware and software using a HUYGENS probe mock-up in an electromagnetic-disturbance-free environment (mainly from power emission lines at 50Hz). This work is concerned with the measurements of small ion polar conductivities and DC fields using the PWA relaxation probes (RP). The two RP electrodes were periodically set to +/-5V relative to the conductive surface of the mock-up and allowed to discharge in the surrounding atmosphere. The polar components of conductivity are calculated from the discharge time, and the DC field from the floating potential differences once the electrodes reach equilibrium. In spite of some observed effects, such as mock-up charging or oscillations in the measurement of potential, the conductivity measurements are coherent and in good agreement with the obtained results in other experiments. The conductivity data were collected in `fair-weather' conditions, up to 30km during a 4-h flight, every 72s, giving an altitude resolution better than 400m. We also discuss the DC field data that do not lead, in presence of charging effects, to a straightforward measurement of the natural DC field. The Comas Solá balloon flight, first real test of the PWA experiment in the terrestrial atmosphere, confirmed the validity of the ionic conductivity measurements but raised the problem of a reliable interpretation of the DC field.

  11. Intensive therapy of severe complications of influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kozhokaru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition of risk factors and clinical characteristics of heavy complications of influenza for working out of criteria of polymodal intensive therapy and resuscitation was the work purpose. Results of linical supervision by 114 sick heavy form of influenza with pulmonary and extra pulmonary complications are presented. All patients suffered from virus pneumonia and sharp defeat of lungs /sharp respirator distress-syndrome (OPL/ORDS. Pulmonary complications included bacterial (85, 96 % and micotic (2, 63 % pneumonia, thrombosis of legoch arteries (19,29 %, the sharp respiratory insufficiency, caused by the polyneuropathy of a critical condition of the patient (18,42 %, the exssudative pleuritis (9,65 %, spontaneous pheumothorax (4,39 %, spontaneous pheumomediastinum (2,69 %. Extra pulmonary complications concerned the swell of brain at 100 % of patients, including, with development of a brain coma (26,32 %, sepsis (85,96 %, including, with development of septic shock (68,42 %, syndrome of disseminated intravenous coagulation (49,12 %, multyorgan insufficiency (56,14 %, sharp heavy miocarditis (22,81 %, sharp nephritic insufficiency (18,42 %, sharp hepatic insufficiency (10,52 %. Early development of pathophysiological processes (the expressed infringements of a gas exchange and an acid-base condition, a secondary immunodeficiency, heamodynamical insufficiency,m etc. leads to underestimation of severity of the patient’s condition and to failer of algorithm of polymodal intensive therapy. Development of severe complications(sepsis, septic shock, sharp respirator distress-syndrome demands expansion for epidemic of specialized medicalstructures on rendering timely intensive therapy and resuscitation.

  12. Effect of quinine and artesunate combination therapy on platelet count of children with severe malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Parul; Narang, Manish; Gomber, Sunil; Saha, Rumpa

    2017-05-01

    There are several case reports of quinine-induced thrombocytopenia but no clinical trials to ascertain its incidence and significance in severe malaria. The primary objective was to assess the effect of quinine on the platelet count in children with severe malaria and to compare it with artesunate combination therapy (ACT), and the secondary objective was to assess outcome of treatment with quinine and ACT. An open-labelled, randomised, controlled trial was undertaken in 100 children aged 6 months to 12 years who were diagnosed with malaria by microscopy and/or rapid diagnostic test kits with at least one WHO clinical or laboratory criterion for severe malaria. All subjects were commenced on either quinine or ACT. Clindamycin was added to artesunate as a combination drug (ACT). It was also given to patients on quinine to avoid its confounding effect on the results. Platelet counts were undertaken every 24 hours for 7 consecutive days, temperature and coma score (Blantyre coma score ≥3 in children 4 years) was recorded 6-hourly and peripheral smears were taken 12-hourly until two consecutively negative smears were obtained. The primary outcome was a fall in the platelet count by ≥20% from the time of drug initiation until day 7. The secondary outcome was comparison of the efficacy, parasite clearance time, fever clearance time, coma recovery time and adverse effects of quinine vs ACT. 30.4% patients in the quinine group (n = 48) had ≥20% fall in platelet count and 10.8% of patients in the ACT group (n = 46) (P = 0.02). Despite the fall in platelet count, there was no bleeding. The efficacy of ACT was significantly better than quinine but the other treatment outcomes showed insignificant difference. Quinine should be used with caution in patients with severe malaria because of the potential risk of quinine-induced thrombocytopenia.

  13. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapists have graduate degrees and can demonstrate their competence in sex therapy by becoming credentialed by the ... ways to resolve your concerns and improve your communication and intimacy. Talking about sex and intimacy may ...

  14. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  15. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best for you. Oxygen is usually delivered through nasal prongs (an oxygen cannula) or a face mask. Oxygen equipment can attach to other medical equipment such as CPAP machines and ventilators. Oxygen therapy can help you ...

  16. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  17. Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with children with ADHD. Behavior therapy recognizes the limits that having ADHD puts on a child. It ... be tiring and trying. It can test the limits of even the best parents. Parent training and ...

  18. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relating to each other Set individual and family goals and work on ways to achieve them Results Family therapy doesn't automatically solve family conflicts or make an unpleasant situation go away. But ...

  19. Coma in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. de Jong (Fransina); P.A.W. te Boekhorst (Peter); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); B.C. Jacobs (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThrombotic thrombocy topenic purpura (TTP) is characterised by a thrombotic, haemolytic microangiopathy leading to microvascular occlusion, haemolysis and ischaemic dysfunction of various organs including the brain. TTP may present with a variety of neurological symptoms, including

  20. EEG monitoring in postanoxic coma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloostermans, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) contains information that is useful for the prediction of both poor and good neurological outcome in patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest treated with mild hypothermia. The combined group of iso-electric, low voltage or burst-suppression

  1. Effectiveness of Self Instructional Module on Knowledge and Skills Regarding Use of Glasgow Coma Scale in Neurological Assessment of Patients among Nurses Working in Critical Care Units of KLE Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Madhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The brain is the central unit that controls all the functions of our body. The brain cannot function all by its self without the neurons. The proper functioning of the brain and its relationship with the world is known as consciousness. The level of consciousness is the sensitive and reliable indicator of the patient’s neurological status. The alteration in the consciousness helps to determine if there is any damage in the nervous system that can occur even without visible damage to the head. There are numerous tools used to determine level of consciousness. The most common tool used to determine level of consciousness is the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS. It was used with ease and helped to standardize clinical observations of the patients with impaired consciousness. A proper neurological assessment using the Glasgow Coma Scale is the essential part of nursing care. It is very essential for the nurse to have knowledge and skills about neurological assessment and the Glasgow Coma Scale.Hence the present study to evaluate the effectiveness of Self Instructional Module (SIM on knowledge and skill regarding Glasgow Coma Scale was undertaken. Aim and Objectives: 1]To assess the knowledge and skills regarding the use of Glasgow Coma Scale in neurological assessment of patients among the staff nurses. 2] To determine the effectiveness of the Self Instructional Module on knowledge and skills regarding the GCS in neurological assessment of patients. 3] To find association between the pre test knowledge and skills scores and demographic variables. 4] To find the correlation between the knowledge score sand the skills scores regarding the GCS in neurological assessment of patients. Material and Methods: The study was evaluative in nature. A purposive sampling technique was used for the study. A total of 55 staff nurses working in Critical Care Units of KLES Hospital and MRC,Belgaum were selected for the study. A structured questionnaire and an

  2. Acute outcomes of isolated cerebral contusions in children with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14 to 15 after blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, Paul; Cabrera, Keven I; Kuppermann, Nathan; Dayan, Peter S

    2015-05-01

    Little data exist to guide the management of children with cerebral contusions after minor blunt head trauma. We therefore aimed to determine the risk of acute adverse outcomes in children with minor blunt head trauma who had cerebral contusions and no other traumatic brain injuries on computed tomography (i.e., isolated cerebral contusions). We conducted a secondary analysis of a public use data set originating from a prospective cohort study performed in 25 PECARN (Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network) emergency departments of children younger than 18 years with blunt head trauma resulting from nontrivial injury mechanisms and with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15. In this analysis, we included only children with isolated cerebral contusions. We defined a normal mental status as a GCS score of 15 and no other signs of abnormal mental status. Acute adverse outcomes included intubation longer than 24 hours because of the head trauma, neurosurgery, or death from the head injury. Of 14,983 children with GCS scores of 14 or 15 who received cranial computed tomography scans in the parent study, 152 (1.0%; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-1.2%) had cerebral contusions, of which 54 (35.8%) of 151 with available data were isolated. The median age of those with isolated cerebral contusions was 9 years (interquartile range, 1-13); 31 (57.4%) had a normal mental status. Of 36 patients with available data on isolated cerebral contusion size, 34 (94.4%) were described as small. 43 (79.6%) of 54 patients with isolated cerebral contusions were hospitalized, including 16 (29.6%) of 54 to an intensive care unit. No patients with isolated cerebral contusions died, were intubated longer than 24 hours for head trauma, or required neurosurgery (95% confidence interval for all outcomes, 0-6.6%). Children with small isolated cerebral contusions after minor blunt head trauma are unlikely to require further acute intervention, including neurosurgery, suggesting that

  3. Correlação entre a escala de coma de Glasgow e os achados de imagem de tomografia computadorizada em pacientes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Lenharo Morgado

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a correlação da escala de coma de Glasgow, fatores causais e de risco, idade, sexo e intubação orotraqueal com os achados tomográficos em pacientes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo transversal prospectivo de 102 pacientes, atendidos nas primeiras 12 horas, os quais receberam pontuação segundo a escala de coma de Glasgow e foram submetidos a exame tomográfico. RESULTADOS: A idade média dos pacientes foi de 37,77 ± 18,69 anos, com predomínio do sexo masculino (80,4%. As causas foram: acidente automobilístico (52,9%, queda de outro nível (20,6%, atropelamento (10,8%, queda ao solo ou do mesmo nível (7,8% e agressão (6,9%. No presente estudo, 82,4% dos pacientes apresentaram traumatismo cranioencefálico de classificação leve, 2,0% moderado e 15,6% grave. Foram observadas alterações tomográficas (hematoma subgaleal, fraturas ósseas da calota craniana, hemorragia subaracnoidea, contusão cerebral, coleção sanguínea extra-axial, edema cerebral difuso em 79,42% dos pacientes. Os achados tomográficos de trauma craniano grave ocorreram em maior número em pacientes acima de 50 anos (93,7%, e neste grupo todos necessitaram de intubação orotraqueal. CONCLUSÃO: Houve significância estatística entre a escala de coma de Glasgow, idade acima de 50 anos (p < 0,0001, necessidade de intubação orotraqueal (p < 0,0001 e os achados tomográficos.

  4. La desintegración familiar y el rendimiento académico de los estudiantes del V Ciclo de la Red 01 Sol Mar y Arena, UGEL 04-Comas, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mancisidor Pasco, Freedy Edulfo

    2013-01-01

    La presente investigación trató sobre la relación entre la desintegración familiar y el rendimiento académico en el área de comunicación integral en los estudiantes del V ciclo Red Nº 01 “Sol, Mar y Arena”-UGEL 04-Comas, El objetivo general fue establecer la relación entre la desintegración familiar y el rendimiento académico. El diseño de investigación es no experimental, transeccional y correlacional; la muestra estuvo conformada por 288 estudiantes del V, ciclo a quien...

  5. Dust Measurements in the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Inbound to the Sun Between 3.7 and 3.4 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, Alessandra; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Fulle, Marco; Ferrari, Marco; Sordini, Roberto; Ivanovski, Stavro; Accolla, Mario; Lucarelli, Francesca; Zakharov, Vladimir; Mazzotta Epifani, Elena; López-Moreno, José J.; Rodríguez, Julio; Colangeli, Luigi; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bussoletti, Ezio; Crifo, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Francesca; Green, Simon F.; Grün, Eberhard; Lamy, Philippe L.

    2015-04-01

    (21) ESA-ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, s/n., Urb. Villafranca del Castillo, 28692 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid, Spagna, (22) Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany, (23) Center of Studies and Activities for Space (CISAS), University of Padova, I-35131 Padova, Italy, (24) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, I-35131 Padova, Italy Comets are the most primitive bodies in the solar system. They retain a cosmo-chemical record of conditions in the solar nebula when the planets were forming, 4.5 billion years ago. While accurate measurements of the gas loss rate from comets are possible under favorable conditions even from Earth, estimates of the dust loss rate so far have been much more uncertain. Multi-parametric models are needed to extract global dust parameters from the dust features of comets (e.g. coma, tails and trails) observed from ground and Earth orbiting telescopes, and it is often difficult to establish the uniqueness of these model results. Critical measurements for understanding the process of accretion and the refractory to volatiles ratio in the solar nebula are being obtained by the Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator (GIADA) experiment onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft, now orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/CG). GIADA measures the mass, momentum and velocity of individual grains, providing the dust loss rate over three orders of magnitude in mass for grains from tens to hundreds of microns in diameter. GIADA consists of three subsystems: 1) the Grain Detection System (GDS) to detect dust grains as they pass through a laser curtain, 2) the Impact Sensor (IS) to measure grain momentum derived from the impact on a plate connected to five piezoelectric sensors, and 3) the Mi-croBalances System (MBS); five quartz crystal microbalances in roughly orthogonal directions providing the cumu-lative dust flux of grains smaller than 10 microns. GDS provides

  6. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  7. Radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Hoefnagel, C A

    1999-09-11

    Nuclear medicine therapy uses unsealed radioactive sources for the selective delivery of radiation to tumours or target organs. For benign disorders such as thyrotoxicosis and arthritis radionuclide therapy provides an alternative to surgery or medical treatment. In cancer treatment, it often combines the advantage of target selectivity (like brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy) with that of being systemic, as with chemotherapy, and it may be used as part of a therapeutic strategy with curative intent or for disease control and palliation. Toxicity is generally limited to the haematopoietic tissue and few side-effects are observed. When cure is feasible, the long-term consequences of radionuclide therapy (eg, fertility disorders and leukaemia or other secondary cancers) do compare favourably with the risks associated with and accepted for chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  8. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols...... model of Art Therapy with this population. This article focuses on the psychological aspect of creativity related to mild depression with an emphasis on the interaction between the conscious and the unconscious part of the psyche....

  9. New spiro (thio) barbiturates based on cyclohexanone and bicyclo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diaryl-1'H-spiro[bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-3,5'-pyrimidine]-2',4',6',9(3'H)-tetraone, respectively in good yield. Structure elucidation is carried out by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR, UV-Visible, mass spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography techniques.

  10. Animal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D A

    1997-01-01

    This article explores the concept of animal therapy. The discussion includes a brief history of animal therapy, its importance, its relationship to rehabilitation, and its usefulness as a tool to influence adaptation, change, power, communication, advocacy, teaching, accountability, responsibility, and locus of control. This theoretical concept is important because of the joy and unconditional love animals can provide their owners. Relationships with animals can promote feelings of self-worth, help offset loneliness, reduce anxiety, provide contact, comfort, security, and the feeling of being needed.

  11. Emerging Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Amaliris; Musallam, Khaled M; Taher, Ali T; Rivella, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    At present, the only definitive cure for β-thalassemia is a bone marrow transplant (BMT); however, HLA-blood-matched donors are scarcely available. Current therapies undergoing clinical investigation with most potential for therapeutic benefit are the β-globin gene transfer of patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells followed by autologous BMT. Other emerging therapies deliver exogenous regulators of several key modulators of erythropoiesis or iron homeostasis. This review focuses on current approaches for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies caused by disruptions of β-globin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  13. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  14. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  15. Effect of Age on Glasgow Coma Scale in Patients with Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: An Approach with Propensity Score-Matched Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Shyuan Rau

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most widely used methods of describing traumatic brain injury (TBI are the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS. Recent evidence suggests that presenting GCS in older patients may be higher than that in younger patients for an equivalent anatomical severity of TBI. This study aimed to assess these observations with a propensity-score matching approach using the data from Trauma Registry System in a Level I trauma center. Methods: We included all adult patients (aged ≥20 years old with moderate to severe TBI from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2016. Patients were categorized into elderly (aged ≥65 years and young adults (aged 20–64 years. The severity of TBI was defined by an AIS score in the head (AIS 3‒4 and 5 indicate moderate and severe TBI, respectively. We examined the differences in the GCS scores by age at each head AIS score. Unpaired Student’s t- and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Categorical data were compared using either the Pearson chi-square or two-sided Fisher’s exact tests. Matched patient populations were allocated in a 1:1 ratio according to the propensity scores calculated using NCSS software with the following covariates: sex, pre-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, sodium, glucose, and alcohol level. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the effects of age on the GCS score in each head AIS stratum. Results: The study population included 2081 adult patients with moderate to severe TBI. These patients were categorized into elderly (n = 847 and young adults (n = 1234: each was exclusively further divided into three groups of patients with head AIS of 3, 4, or 5. In the 162 well-balanced pairs of TBI patients with head AIS of 3, the elderly demonstrated a significantly higher GCS score than the young adults (14.1 ± 2.2 vs. 13.1 ± 3

  16. Anais da XXXIV Semana Médica, X COMA e VII Congresso de Iniciação Científica 21 a 24 de Maio de 2014 / Annals of XXXIV Medical Week, and X COMA and VII Congress of Scientific Initiation 21-24 May, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilo César do Vale Baracho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available É com grande prazer e satisfação que preparamos a 34ª Semana Médica, XI Congresso Médico Acadêmico (COMA e VII Congresso de Iniciação Científica. Como de costume, o evento oferecerá diversificada programação, contando com renomados especialistas de cada área a ser abordada. Todo esse conteúdo trabalhado na forma de palestras, minicursos e mesa-redonda. Para esse ano, foram selecionados temas para as palestras e discussões tais como: transplantes de órgãos e tecidos, doenças cardiovasculares, emergências médicas e doenças hepáticas relacionadas ao uso de esteroides anabolizantes. Já para os minicursos, teremos temas como: arritmias cardíacas, neurociências/neurologia/neurocirurgia, cirurgia geral, saúde e espiritualidade, manejo da dor, novos procedimentos na área da estética e medicina fetal. Completando nossa programação científica, teremos a tradicional Seção de Temas Livres e a Seção de Apresentação dos Trabalhos de Conclusão de Curso (TCC’s. Por outro lado, a confraternização de encerramento está sendo preparada por nós, com o mesmo carinho, dedicação e zelo de sempre, assim como o Show Med e a apresentação cultural da abertura do evento. Dessa forma nós, da comissão organizadora, desejamos a todos momentos de muito aprendizado, reflexão, trocas de experiência e entretenimento.

  17. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  18. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  19. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  20. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  1. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  2. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  3. Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Storr, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address to physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strength and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in therapeutic context, clients, abilities are strengthened and transfer to other areas of their liv...

  4. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  5. Nutritional Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  7. Outcome of physical therapy intervention on ventilator weaning and functional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Hsuan; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Wang, Yen-Ching; Yang, Chih-Jen; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Wang, Tung-Heng; Chuang, I-Chun; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Our study aimed to understand the characteristics of ventilator dependence in patients at a respiratory care center and the potential effects of physical therapy on ventilator weaning and patients' functional status. Prospective data collection consisted of the following: (1) demographic data, including name, gender, age, diagnosis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation as a severity of the disease, modified Glasgow Coma Scale, mobility at the time of admission, and days of hospitalization; (2) Rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) as a predictive indicator of ventilator weaning, including indicators of ventilator weaning were collected from the respiratory flow sheet; and (3) Barthel index. Between July 1 and December 31, 2007, 126 patients were admitted to the respiratory care center, and those who required mechanical ventilation for more than 14 days were enrolled. Fifty-five subjects received physical therapy. The RSBI in patients who received physical therapy was 75.7 +/- 37.9 before therapy and 80.0 +/- 48.5 afterwards, while the Barthel index increased from 0.8 +/- 1.4 to 1.9 +/- 2.5 (p physical therapy lengthened, but not significantly (r = 0.12, p = 0.44). The success rate of ventilator weaning in patients receiving physical therapy intervention versus non-physical therapy intervention was 58.2% and 40.9%, respectively. The results indicated that lengthening the physical therapy intervention time enhanced the ventilator weaning success rate while mobility was not affected (r = -0.11, p = 0.41). Physical therapy may be offered to ventilator-dependent patients in line with their individual needs to improve or maintain basic mobility. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcome of Physical Therapy Intervention on Ventilator Weaning and Functional Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsuan Yang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to understand the characteristics of ventilator dependence in patients at a respiratory care center and the potential effects of physical therapy on ventilator weaning and patients' functional status. Prospective data collection consisted of the following: (1 demographic data, including name, gender, age, diagnosis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation as a severity of the disease, modified Glasgow Coma Scale, mobility at the time of admission, and days of hospitalization; (2 Rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI as a predictive indicator of ventilator weaning, including indicators of ventilator weaning were collected from the respiratory flow sheet; and (3 Barthel index. Between July 1 and December 31, 2007, 126 patients were admitted to the respiratory care center, and those who required mechanical ventilation for more than 14 days were enrolled. Fifty-five subjects received physical therapy. The RSBI in patients who received physical therapy was 75.7 ± 37.9 before therapy and 80.0 ± 48.5 afterwards, while the Barthel index increased from 0.8 ± 1.4 to 1.9 ± 2.5 (p < 0.05. The RSBI decreased as time of physical therapy lengthened, but not significantly (r = 0.12, p = 0.44. The success rate of ventilator weaning in patients receiving physical therapy intervention versus non-physical therapy intervention was 58.2% and 40.9%, respectively. The results indicated that lengthening the physical therapy intervention time enhanced the ventilator weaning success rate while mobility was not affected (r = −0.11, p = 0.41. Physical therapy may be offered to ventilator-dependent patients in line with their individual needs to improve or maintain basic mobility.

  9. Interferential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganne, J M

    1976-09-01

    Interferential Therapy is a "new-comer" to the field of physical medicine, but it is gradually acquiring a particular identity. As the name implies, a current is generated within the tissues as a result of the interaction of two separate circuits. It can therefore be appreciated that four electrodes are required, two for each circuit. The two currents generated by the unit are medium frequency currents in the 4000 cycle per second range. One of these can be varied so that it is slightly out of phase with the other in such a way that a low frequency beat is generated where the two currents cross within the tissues, and this is equal to the difference between the two medium frequencies. The interferential current produced is an evenly alternating sinusoidal one, without polar effects (Diagram 1). Its frequency can be varied from 0 to 100 or 150, depending on the unit. It is evident that such a current can be made to scan the tissues more deeply, more accurately and more widely than the old sinusoidal current, depending on the way electrodes are placed, to determine where the low frequency current will be produced. Further, it has less superficial sensory effect, provided it is applied correctly. It is undoubtedly an effective therapy for controlling pain. Copyright © 1976 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  11. [Use of cytoflavin into the complex intensive therapy of acute cerebral insufficiency caused by poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, S; Shilov, V; Aleksandrov, M; Batotsyrenov, B; Loladze, A

    2012-02-01

    In the result of treatment of 147 patients with toxic acute brain insufficiency were revealed that the employment of citoflavin (20 ml with 400 ml 5% glucosae twice a day) in 7 days intensive therapy of acute brain insufficiency leaded to decrease of hypoxic brain damages and intensity of brain depression, what was revealed in improvement of brain bioelectric activity. Rehabilitation of central nervous system regulation function and life-support systems leaded to quick rehabilitation of respiratory part of oxygen transport. These changes in acute period leaded to quick reparation of cognitive-mnestic functions and social adaptation. The employment of citoflavin leaded to improvement of clinic of toxicohypoxic encephalopathy and to decrease of secondary lung complications (decrease of coma-period from 45,3 ± 8,2 to 27,7 ± 6,9 hours; decrease of secondary lung complications from 72,7% to 35,9%).

  12. Mannitol as adjunct therapy for childhood cerebral malaria in Uganda: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byarugaba Justus S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several reports have suggested that raised intracranial pressure (ICP is a major contributor to death among children with cerebral malaria. Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, effectively lowers ICP and is used to treat post-traumatic raised ICP. It is not clear whether intravenous mannitol given to children with cerebral malaria improves clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of mannitol as adjunct therapy on the clinical outcome of children with cerebral malaria. Methods This randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial was carried out at the Emergency Paediatric ward of Mulago Hospital, Uganda's national referral and teaching hospital. One hundred and fifty six children aged 6 to 60 months with cerebral malaria were randomized to either one dose of mannitol 1 g/kg or placebo, in addition to intravenous quinine. Main outcome measures included coma recovery time; time to sit unsupported, begin oral intake; duration of hospitalization; death and adverse effects. Results Time to regain consciousness (p = 0.11, sit unsupported (p = 0.81, time to start oral intake (p = 0.13 and total coma duration (p = 0.07 were similar in both groups. There was no significant difference in the mortality between the placebo (13/80 or 16.3% and mannitol (10/76 or 13.2% groups: RR = 1.2 (CI 0.5–2.7. No adverse effects were observed after administration of mannitol. Conclusion Mannitol had no significant impact on clinical outcome of cerebral malaria. It is difficult to recommend intravenous mannitol as adjunct therapy for childhood cerebral malaria. Clinical registration number ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00113854

  13. Antibiotic Therapy in Comatose Mechanically Ventilated Patients Following Aspiration: Differentiating Pneumonia From Pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascarrou, Jean Baptiste; Lissonde, Floriane; Le Thuaut, Aurélie; Bachoumas, Konstantinos; Colin, Gwenhael; Henry Lagarrigue, Matthieu; Vinatier, Isabelle; Fiancette, Maud; Lacherade, Jean Claude; Yehia, Aihem; Joret, Aurélie; Lebert, Christine; Bourdon, Sandra; Martin Lefèvre, Laurent; Reignier, Jean

    2017-08-01

    To determine the proportion of patients with documented bacterial aspiration pneumonia among comatose ICU patients with symptoms suggesting either bacterial aspiration pneumonia or non-bacterial aspiration pneumonitis. Prospective observational study. University-affiliated 30-bed ICU. Prospective cohort of 250 patients admitted to the ICU with coma (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8) and treated with invasive mechanical ventilation. None. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with microbiologically documented bacterial aspiration pneumonia. Patients meeting predefined criteria for aspiration syndrome routinely underwent telescopic plugged catheter sampling during bronchoscopy before starting probabilistic antibiotic treatment. When cultures were negative, the antibiotic treatment was stopped. Of 250 included patients, 98 (39.2%) had aspiration syndrome, including 92 before mechanical ventilation discontinuation. Telescopic plugged catheter in these 92 patients showed bacterial aspiration pneumonia in 43 patients (46.7%). Among the remaining 49 patients, 16 continued to receive antibiotics, usually for infections other than pneumonia; of the 33 patients whose antibiotics were discontinued, only two subsequently showed signs of lung infection. In the six patients with aspiration syndrome after mechanical ventilation, and therefore without telescopic plugged catheter, antibiotic treatment was continued for 7 days. Mechanical ventilation duration, ICU length of stay, and mortality did not differ between the 43 patients with bacterial aspiration pneumonia and the 49 patients with non-bacterial aspiration pneumonitis. The 152 patients without aspiration syndrome did not receive antibiotics. Among comatose patients receiving mechanical ventilation, those without clinical, laboratory, or radiologic evidence of bacterial aspiration pneumonia did not require antibiotics. In those with suspected bacterial aspiration pneumonia, stopping empirical antibiotic therapy

  14. Robotic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, H. I.; Hogan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a remarkable shift in the neuro-rehabilitation paradigm. Neuroscientists and clinicians moved away from the perception that the brain is static and hardwired, to a new dynamic understanding that plasticity is a fundamental property of the adult human brain and might be harnessed to remap or create new neural pathways. Capitalizing on this innovative understanding, we introduced a paradigm shift in the clinical practice in 1989 when we initiated the development of the MIT-Manus robot for neuro-rehabilitation and deployed it in the clinic in 1994 10. Since then, we and others have developed and tested a multitude of robotic devices for stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Here we discuss whether robotic therapy has achieved a level of maturity to justify its broad adoption in the clinical realm as a tool for motor recovery. PMID:23080044

  15. Severe Acute Valproic Acid Intoxication Successfully Treated with Liver Support Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongchun; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Shuhua; Li, Chuan; He, Qunpeng; Zhu, Tingting; Fan, Rong; Gong, Dehua

    2017-10-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is widely used for the treatment of epilepsy. However, its overdose can cause intoxication and could be life-threatening. Due to the lack of specific antidote and poorness of endogenous clearance, extracorporeal treatment for severe intoxication cases is indicated. Here, we report a case of severe intoxication of VPA which was successfully treated with liver support therapy. A previously healthy woman was admitted due to coma and hypotension after intentional ingestion of 20 g of sodium valproate. Her serum concentration of VPA measured on admission was 420.84 mg/L. In addition to standard therapy, she received two sessions of extracorporeal blood purification using a system based on fractionated plasma separation and adsorption mode integrated with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (FPSA-CVVH), which is usually used for liver support therapy at our hospital. Her serum concentration of VPA decreased dramatically to 40.18 mg/L and her consciousness recovered completely within 24 hr after admission. Therefore, although haemodialysis has been reported to be effective in the treatment for VPA poisoning, FPSA-CVVH may provide an option for patients who require bedside therapy but have an unstable haemodynamic status or other conditions that result in inability to endure haemodialysis. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  16. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  17. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  18. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  19. American Art Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WELCOME BOARD OF DIRECTORS NATIONAL STAFF STRATEGIC PLAN VALUES STATEMENT FINANCIAL INFORMATION COLLABORATORS ABOUT ART THERAPY FEATURED MEMBERS ETHICS VIDEOS: ART THERAPY IN ACTION STORY LIBRARY SHARE ...

  20. [Music therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, P A; Dallaire, C

    1993-02-01

    Music stands for the mystical expression of life cycles celebrations: birth, death, renewal of seasons, hunting, rituals of passage... It serves in other familiar conjunctures, such as the dentist chair, waiting rooms and on the telephone, helping us to relax or increase our patience. However, music is not for everyone at all times. With each individual, its significance varies according to the moment and the situation. If a nurse can make use of it with some persons, it is because they have convinced her that music can be of comfort to them and can reduce their pain and anxiety. The role of the caregiver is to attend to the sick by different means. Music is one of them. By being alert and prudent, nurses can provide a care traditionally perpetuated as comforting. Music therapy is the controlled use of music and its elements to help the physiological, psychological and emotional integration of the individual in the course of a treatment for illness or incapacity. Its active mode implies that clients participate by playing an instrument or by singing to express oneself. It opens or maintains the field of communication. In the passive mode, therapists use tapes, disks or interpret pieces of music themselves. Its meaning, its power, take on other dimensions. When introducing music on a palliative care unit, for example, an initial assessment of each client is required to discover and monitor the degree of their acceptance. Thereafter, a continuous evaluation ensures that appropriate adjustments are made in the choice of music offered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. A review of drug therapy for sporadic fatal insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaee Damavandi, Pardis; Dove, Martin T; Pickersgill, Richard W

    2017-09-03

    Sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI) is a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease characterised by gradual to perpetual insomnia, followed by dysautonomia, coma and death. 1 The cause of sFI was recently mapped to a mutation in a protein, the prion, found in the human brain. It is the unfolding of the prion that leads to the generation of toxic oligomers that destroy brain tissue and function. Recent studies have confirmed that a methionine mutation at codon 129 of the human Prion is characteristic of sFI. Current treatment slows down the progression of the disease, but no cure has been found, yet. We used Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics simulation methods, to study the toxic Fatal-Insomnia-prion conformations at local unfolding. The idea was to determine these sites and to stabilise these regions against unfolding and miss-folding, using a small ligand, based on a phenothiazine "moiety". As a result we here discuss current fatal insomnia therapy and present seven novel possible compounds for in vitro and in vivo screening.

  2. Re-analysis of the Giotto mission data obtained by the Halley Multicolour Camera (HMC) with aim of large particles detection in the inner coma of comet 1P/Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygina, O. S.; Keller, H. U.; Blum, J.

    2015-10-01

    The Giotto spacecraft (SC) mission was the ESA's first interplanetary mission, that made close-up observations of a comet. The Giotto spaceprobe passed the nucleus of comet Halley at a fly-by distance of only 596 km early on 14 March 1986. During the approach, 2304 images of the comet were taken by the Halley Multicolour Camera (HMC) through different filters. The HMC experiment was a high-resolution imaging system onboard the spin-stabilized SC. Its spin axis was closely aligned with the SC-comet relative-velocity vector. Pointing of the camera was achieved by the spinning motion of the SC for one dimension and by rotation about an axis perpendicular to the spin of the SC for the other dimension. The spin period was about 4 seconds and the nominal imaging resolution was 22 m at 1000 km distance [1, 2]. HMC was taking images in the so-called Time Delay and Integration mode [2]. In this mode, only a narrow part of the CCD detector was uncovered, and vertical scan-out was provided by the spacecraft (and therefore the camera) spinning. During this spinning charges were transferred line-by-line in the same direction. The slit was made wider than 1 pixel, which increased exposure time but degraded the sharpness to some extent. The portion of the sky swept by the exposed lines during image acquisition was a section of an annulus resulting in over-sampling at the end of the exposed lines nearest the SC spin axis and under-sampling at the other end [2]. Several impacts of dust particles on the spacecraft were detected during the fly-by by the analysis of the changes in the SC attitude and spin period [1]. The changes occurred in large steps, requiring many impacts of massive dust particles well above an effective mass of 10 mg, which implies that a significant part of the cometary dust mass is contained in rather large particles. Moreover, since the time of the Giotto mission, large dust particles have been detected in the inner coma of other comets. The coma of comet 103P

  3. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  4. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  5. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  6. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  7. Brain death organ donation potential and life support therapy limitation in neurocritical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, M A; Pont, T; Sandiumenge, A; Oliver, E; Gener, J; Badía, M; Mestre, J; Muñoz, E; Esquirol, X; Llauradó, M; Twose, J; Quintana, S

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the profile, incidence of life support therapy limitation (LSTL) and donation potential in neurocritical patients. A multicenter prospective study was carried out. Nine hospitals authorized for organ harvesting for transplantation. All patients consecutively admitted to the hospital with GCS death (BD) and organ donation incidence were recorded. A total of 549 patients were included, with a mean age of 59.0 ± 14.5 years. The cause of coma was cerebral hemorrhage in 27.0% of the cases.LSTL was applied in 176 patients (32.1%). In 78 cases LSTL consisted of avoiding ICU admission. Age, the presence of contraindications, and specific causes of coma were associated to LSTL. A total of 58.1% of the patients died (n=319). One-hundred and thirty-three developed BD (24.2%), and 56.4% of these became organ donors (n=75). The presence of edema and mid-line shift on the CT scan, and transplant coordinator evaluation were associated to BD. LSTL was associated to a no-BD outcome. Early LSTL (first 4 days) was applied in 9 patients under 80 years of age, with no medical contraindications for donation and a GCS ≤ 4 who finally died in asystole. LSTL is a frequent practice in neurocritical patients. In almost one-half of the cases, LSTL consisted of avoiding admission to the ICU, and on several occasions the donation potential was not evaluated by the transplant coordinator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. Anais da 35ª Semana Médica, XII Congresso Médico Acadêmico – COMA, VII Congresso de Iniciação científica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilo César do Vale Baracho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Caros Congressistas, É com imensa satisfação que anunciamos a XXXV Semana Médica que ocorrerá de 27 a 30 de maio, juntamente com o XII Congresso Médico Acadêmico – COMA e o VII Congresso de Iniciação Científica, todos preparados com muita qualidade e critério. Desejamos que nosso evento seja representativo de todas as áreas de saúde, e para tanto, procuramos organizá-lo priorizando os temas de interesse dos alunos. Além do excelente programa científico, teremos também as iniciativas que estimulam o convívio e a cultura, como o Show Med 2015 e a Confraternização de Encerramento. Mais uma vez, contamos com o apoio imprescindível de nossos patrocinadores, sem o qual não era possível fazer um evento com esta dimensão. Esperamos contar com a sua presença para que, juntos, possamos viabilizar as atividades científicas e culturais deste acontecimento! Sejam bem vindos!

  9. Programa de coordinación motriz fina en el aprendizaje de la escritura en niños de cinco años de la I.E.P. “Santa María Reina” del distrito de Comas 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Carhuanina, Elizabeth Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    El presente trabajo de investigación, tuvo como problema general: ¿Cuál será el efecto después de aplicar el Programa de Coordinación motriz fina en el aprendizaje de la escritura en niños de cinco años de la I.E.P. Santa María Reina- Comas- 2016? .Y cuyo objetivo general fue Demostrar que efecto produce al aplicar el Programa de Coordinación motriz en el aprendizaje de la escritura en niños de cinco años de la I.E.P. Santa María Reina- Comas- 2016. El tipo de investigaci...

  10. Occupational therapy students' perceptions of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Merrill June; Rodger, Sylvia; Hall, Anna R

    2012-10-01

    An understanding of students' perceptions of occupational therapy on entry is required to recognise how professional socialisation occurs through curriculum. Findings pertain to a qualitative study investigating students' perceptions of occupational therapy upon entry to two occupational therapy programmes in Australia. Students commencing Bachelor of Occupational Therapy and Masters of Occupational Therapy Studies programmes participated in the study (n = 462). A purpose-designed questionnaire was distributed to students in the first lecture of each programme. Preliminary analysis comprised identification of keywords/phrases and coding categories were generated from patterns of keywords. Frequency counts and percentages of keywords/phrases within categories were completed. Students' responses were categorised as 'what' occupational therapists do; 'how' they do it; 'why' they do it; and 'who' they work with. In 'what' occupational therapists do students frequently described 'helping' people. Both undergraduate and graduate entry masters students used the term 'rehabilitation' to describe how occupational therapy is done, with graduate entry students occasionally responding with 'through occupation' and 'modifying the environment'. Students perceived the 'why' of occupational therapy as getting back to 'everyday activities', with some students emphasising returning to 'normal' activities or life. Regarding the 'who' category, students also thought occupational therapists worked with people with an 'injury' or 'disability'. Students entered their occupational therapy programmes with perceptions consistent with the general public's views of occupational therapy. However, graduate entry students exposed to a pre-reading package prior to entry had more advanced occupational therapy concepts than undergraduate students. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other health disability; and persons with autism, dementia, depression, and other disorders. Art therapy helps people resolve conflicts, improve interpersonal skills, manage problematic behaviors, reduce negative stress, and ...

  12. Radionuclide antisense therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Xiaohong

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide antisense therapy achieves the joint goals of antisense therapy and internal radiation therapy. There have been a small number of investigations on the radionuclide antisense therapy in tissue culture and in animal studies. Considerable research is required before this novel technique can become a working practice. The authors reviewed some question and development on the radionuclide antisense therapy, such as selection of the target gene sequence, labelling the antisense oligonucleotide, improvement of the uptake and target of radionuclide antisense oligonucleotides and evaluation of the toxicity of the radionuclide antisense therapy

  13. Radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomottogoo, G.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation therapy experienced at the hospital are classified into two sections:palliative and radically. A radically therapy can be done before or after surgery. Therapy after surgery is done when the results of the surgery have certain limits. The radiation therapy is accomplished within 2-3 weeks and 6 weeks at latest. A conclusion:1.To improving and increasing of radically radiation therapy method is necessary in the present time. 2.Monitoring, management and supervision capacity of the cancer radiation therapy for the nearest and future results should be strengthened

  14. Therapeutic approaches to cerebral vasospasm complicating ruptured aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Barbarawi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a serious complication of ruptured aneurysm. In order to avoid short- and long-term effects of cerebral vasospasm, and as there is no single or optimal treatment modality employed, we have instituted a protocol for the prevention and treatment of vasospasm in patients suffering aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. We then reviewed the effectiveness of this protocol in reducing the mortality and morbidity rate in our institution. In this study we present a retrospective analysis of 52 cases. Between March 2004 and December 2008 52 patients were admitted to our service with aneurysmal SAH. All patients commenced nimodipine, magnesium sulphate (MgSO4 and triple H therapy. Patients with significant reduction in conscious level were intubated, ventilated and sedated. Intracranial pressure (ICP monitoring was used for intubated patients. Sodium thiopental coma was induced for patients with refractory high ICP; angiography was performed for diagnosis and treatment. Balloon angioplasty was performed if considered necessary. Using this protocol, only 13 patients (25% developed clinical vaso-spasm. Ten of them were given barbiturates to induce coma. Three patients underwent transluminal balloon angioplasty. Four out of 52 patients (7.7% died from severe vasospasm, 3 patients (5.8% became severely disabled, and 39 patients (75% were discharged in a condition considered as either normal or near to their pre-hemorrhage status. Our results confirm that the aforementioned protocol for treatment of cerebral vasospasm is effective and can be used safely.

  15. Role of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Management of Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of a Large Level I Trauma Center in Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Sadraei, Nazanin; Niakan, Amin; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Sadraei, Amin

    2016-10-01

    To determine the role of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to a large level I trauma center in Southern Iran. This was a cohort study performed during a 2-year period in a level I trauma center in Southern Iran including all adult patients (>16 years) with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score, 3-8) who underwent ICP monitoring through ventriculostomy. The management was based on the recorded ICP values with threshold of 20 mm Hg. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in patients with intractable intracranial hypertension (persistent ICP ≥25 mm Hg). In unresponsive patients, barbiturate coma was induced. Patients were followed for 6 months and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended was recorded. The determinants of favorable and unfavorable outcome were also determined. Overall, we included 248 patients with mean age of 34.6 ± 16.6 years, among whom there were 216 men (87.1%) and 32 women (12.9%). Eighty-five patients (34.2%) had favorable and 163 (65.8%) unfavorable outcomes. Those with favorable outcome had significantly lower age (P = 0.004), higher GCS score on admission (P intracranial hypertension (P intracranial hypertension, and maximum recorded ICP are important determinants of outcome in patients with severe TBI. ICP monitoring assisted us in targeted therapy and management of patients with severe TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  17. Successful Treatment with Triple Therapy of Amphotericin B, Voriconazole and Flucytosine on an AIDS Patients with Severe Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zhi-liang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man (body weight = 63 kg with AIDS complaining fever and headache after having commenced anti-retroviral therapy (ART for a week was admitted to our hospital. Five lumbar punctures performed during 38 days could not confirm a cryptococcal meningitis (CM based on staining or culture methods for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The disease quickly progressed with serious hearing/vision impairment and frequent onset of seizure and coma after being treated with corticosteroids for five days, and then CM was confirmed. Subsequent lumbar puncture showed elevated intracranial pressure as high as 870 mm H2O, even though treated with standard antifungal regimens for CM. His disease was finally controlled by a new triple therapy with amphotericin B (0.7 mg•kg-1•day-1, intravenously, flucytosine (100 mg/kg perday, orally in four divided doses, and voriconazole (200 mg every 12 hours and ART containing lamivudine (300 mg/day, stavuding (30 mg, twice a day and efavirenz (300 mg, orally every night. Although it is rare, negative CSF stain or culture for cryptococci in AIDS patients with CM can persist for a long time. Corticosteroids should be used cautiously when an effective anti-fungal therapy is not administered. Triple therapy with amphotericin B, flucytosine and voriconazole may be selectively applied in severe CM. Voriconazole can be co-administered with efavirenz with modified dosing

  18. Adlerian Marriage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon; Dinkmeyer, Don, Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the assumptions, processes, and techniques used in Alderian marriage therapy. Describes purpose of therapy as assessing current beliefs and behaviors while educating the couple in new procedures that can help the couple establish new goals. (Author/ABL)

  19. Kidney Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Kidney Replacement Therapy Diabetes sometimes damages kidneys so badly that ... Dialysis Dialysis, the more common form of kidney-replacement therapy, is a way of cleaning the blood ...

  20. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  1. Proton Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public interest in this form of radiation therapy is growing, but members of the medical and research communities are concerned that enthusiasm for this promising therapy may be getting ahead of the research.

  2. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  3. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Occupational Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Occupational Therapy What's in this ... care for some kids. Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  4. Predicting Marital Therapy Dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Scot M.; Crane, D. Russell

    1991-01-01

    Attempted to predict therapy dropouts using data gathered at marital therapy intake with 474 couples seeking marital therapy who attended at least 1 session. Significant predictors of dropping out included having less than two children, having a male intake clinician, and presenting problem relating only to one spouse. (Author/ABL)

  5. Aquatic Therapy for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Greta; Moore, Kelsey; Rodia, Rachel; Moser, Christy Szczech

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic therapy has long been highlighted in the literature as a potentially powerful therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight basic definitions of aquatic therapy, review salient research, and identify specific diagnoses that may benefit from aquatic therapy. Online resources, blogs, and books that occupational therapists may find…

  6. Sacral neuromodulation: Therapy evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannah H Thompson

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions : Our understanding of SNM, as well as technological advances in therapy delivery, expands the pool of patients for which this form of therapy may prove beneficial. Less invasive instrumentation may even make this form of therapy appealing to patients without refractory symptoms.

  7. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page What is biological therapy? What is the immune system and what role does it have in biological therapy for cancer? ... trials (research studies involving people). What is the immune system and what role does it have in biological therapy for cancer? ...

  8. [Spanish versions of the Simplified Motor Score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in out-of-hospital treatment of head injury in adults: a preliminary study of each scale's ability to predict adverse events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Guillem; Mayol, Sergi; García, Esteban; Casajuana, Edgar; Quintana, Salvador

    2015-06-01

    To determine the ability of the modified (Spanish) version of the Simplified Motor Score (mSMS) to predict adverse events during hospitalization and to compare its predictive ability to that of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in adults with head injuries treated outside the hospital. Observational study of retrospective cohorts including all patients over the age of 14 years attended for head injuries occurring within 24 hours of treatment by an advanced life-support unit staffed by nurses between May 1, 2013, and May 1, 2014. The mSMS was a translation of the English original, created through a process of discussions of direct and back translations to arrive at consensus. Out-of-hospital patient records were searched to find GCS and mSMS scores. To predict the ability of each scale to predict brain injuries, neurosurgery, intubation, and/or inhospital death, we calculated the area under the receiving operator characteristic curves (AUCs). Of the total of 115 head-injury patients attended, 64 met the inclusion criteria. The mean (SD) age was 47 (24) years. Twelve (18.8%) patients developed some form of adverse event during hospitalization; 91.6% had brain damage, 58.3% required intubation, 8.3% required surgery, and 41.6% died. The AUC for the GCS was 0.907 (95% CI, 0.81-1.00; P<.001); the AUC for the mSMS was 0.796 (95% CI, 0.64-0.95; P=.001). Although the ability of the mSMS to predict in-hospital adverse outcomes is good, it is inferior to the GCS in adults with head injuries attended outside the hospital.

  9. Common intensive care scoring systems do not outperform age and glasgow coma scale score in predicting mid-term mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage treated in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallenius, Marika; Skrifvars, Markus B; Reinikainen, Matti; Bendel, Stepani; Raj, Rahul

    2017-10-25

    Intensive care scoring systems are widely used in intensive care units (ICU) around the world for case-mix adjustment in research and benchmarking. The aim of our study was to investigate the usefulness of common intensive care scoring systems in predicting mid-term mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) treated in intensive care units (ICU). We performed a retrospective observational study including adult patients with spontaneous ICH treated in Finnish ICUs during 2003-2012. We used six-month mortality as the primary outcome of interest. We used logistic regression to customize Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) for six-month mortality prediction. To assess the usefulness of the scoring systems, we compared their discrimination and calibration with two simpler models consisting of age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and premorbid functional status. Totally 3218 patients were included. Overall six-month mortality was 48%. APACHE II and SAPS II outperformed SOFA (area under the receiver operator curve [AUC] 0.83 and 0.84, respectively, vs. 0.73) but did not show any benefit over the simpler models in terms of discrimination (AUC 0.84, p > 0.05 for all models). SAPS II showed satisfactory calibration (p = 0.058 in the Hosmer-Lemeshow test), whereas all other models showed poor calibration (p predictive ability of APACHE II and SAPS II comes from their age and GCS score components. SOFA performed significantly poorer than the other models and is not applicable as a prognostic model for ICH patients. All models displayed poor calibration, highlighting the need for improved prognostic models for ICH patients. The common intensive care scoring systems did not outperform a simpler model based on only age and GCS score. Thus, the use of previous intensive care scoring systems is not warranted in ICH patients.

  10. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  11. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  13. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  14. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  15. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  16. Fertility and cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life

  17. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within t...... the same partner constellation. Through this training they learn as a therapeutic method to contain and incorporate experiences from being in the client role into managing the therapist role.......This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  18. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Non Ketotic Coma and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhabdomyolysis is usually attributed to trauma. However there is an association of rhabdomyolysis with hyperosmolar states. Recognition of this association will enable better management of the patient and reduce the burden on the care taker by preventing the onset of complications that can prove fatal. It is also important ...

  20. Prediction of Recovery from Coma After CPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very small. Neurologists from the American Academy of Neurology are doctors who treat diseases of the brain and nervous system. Experts in neurology carefully reviewed all of the available scientific studies ...

  1. The FK Comae candidate UX Librae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, B. W.; Goodrich, B. D.; Africano, J. L.; Noah, P. V.; Meredith, R. J.; Palmer, L. H.; Quigley, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    New optical spectroscopic and photometric data are presented for the active chromosphere FK Com candidate UZ Lib. The star is shown to have an extremely large photometric amplitude in V of 0.35 mag, and its rotation period is established as 4.75 + or - 0.01 days. The optical spectrum is that of an early K giant, broadened by a rotation velocity of approximately 65 km/s. H-alpha is visible as a very broad emission feature, with a profile resembling that seen in FK Com. The emission intensity and profile are variable over the rotation period, with the strongest emission present at photometric minimum, in accord with dark starspot models. The photospheric absorption line profiles show variable asymmetries and distortions which are interpreted as due to the effects of the dark starspot rotating across the line of sight. New radial velocity measures are combined with published data to demonstrate the UZ Lib is a member of a binary system in synchronous rotation with a secondary of mass approximately 0.5 solar masses. This information is considered in light of the conflicting models for the origin of the optical and spectral variability of the FK Com stars, as well as their uncertain evolutionary status.

  2. Festival food coma in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Chetan; Graham, Christie; Selvadurai, Hiran; Gaskin, Kevin; Cooper, Peter; van Asperen, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis liver disease and portal hypertension are at risk of developing acute hepatic encephalopathy. Even in the presence of normal synthetic liver function these children may have porto-systemic shunting. We report a case of an adolosecent who had cystic fibrosis liver disease and presented with life threatening hepatinc encephalopathy. This case illustrates that it is necessary to consider an appropriate dietary regimen in adolosecents with liver disease to prevent hepatic decompensation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pain in photodynamic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mircea Tampa; Maria Isabela Sârbu; Mădălina-Irina Mitran; Cristina-Iulia Mitran; Adrian Dumitru; Vasile Benea; Simona-Roxana Georgescu

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a modern treatment with applications in several medical specialties, which has been intensely studied in the last years. The main indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma and Bowen's disease- common skin disorders in which photodynamic therapy proved its efficacy. At present, the use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of other skin disorders is profoundly researched. Pain is the most common and redoubtable adverse effect...

  4. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, S D; Smith, C; Smith, E M; Miller, J M

    1991-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains an extremely valuable tool in the treatment of certain psychiatric disorders. Despite the sensationalism of the past decade, ECT is the treatment of choice in severe depression that is unresponsive to other therapies or in patients who are overtly suicidal. In addition, ECT is particularly valuable in the elderly population, who are at risk for serious complications from the side effects associated with drug therapy. This report describes a case of recurrent depression in which ECT was successfully used.

  6. A Comparison of Pharmacologic Therapeutic Agents Used for the Reduction of Intracranial Pressure After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnemari, Ahmed M; Krafcik, Brianna M; Mansour, Tarek R; Gaudin, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    In neurotrauma care, a better understanding of treatments after traumatic brain injury (TBI) has led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality in this population. TBI represents a significant medical problem, and complications after TBI are associated with the initial injury and postevent intracranial processes such as increased intracranial pressure and brain edema. Consequently, appropriate therapeutic interventions are required to reduce brain tissue damage and improve cerebral perfusion. We present a contemporary review of literature on the use of pharmacologic therapies to reduce intracranial pressure after TBI and a comparison of their efficacy. This review was conducted by PubMed query. Only studies discussing pharmacologic management of patients after TBI were included. This review includes prospective and retrospective studies and includes randomized controlled trials as well as cohort, case-control, observational, and database studies. Systematic literature reviews, meta-analyses, and studies that considered conditions other than TBI or pediatric populations were not included. Review of the literature describing the current pharmacologic treatment for intracranial hypertension after TBI most often discussed the use of hyperosmolar agents such as hypertonic saline and mannitol, sedatives such as fentanyl and propofol, benzodiazepines, and barbiturates. Hypertonic saline is associated with faster resolution of intracranial hypertension and restoration of optimal cerebral hemodynamics, although these advantages did not translate into long-term benefits in morbidity or mortality. In patients refractory to treatment with hyperosmolar therapy, induction of a barbiturate coma can reduce intracranial pressure, although requires close monitoring to prevent adverse events. Current research suggests that the use of hypertonic saline after TBI is the best option for immediate decrease in intracranial pressure. A better understanding of the efficacy of

  7. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  8. Marital and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Hargun; Anand, Tanya; Suman, L N

    2018-02-01

    Substance abuse is a family disease that adversely impacts both the user and the user's family. The family can act as a risk factor for the development of substance abuse among children and adults. The family can also be involved in therapy to either help the recovery process or prevent substance abuse. Marital and family therapy have been found to be effective in reducing the severity of substance use, lowering marital and family conflict, improving family communication and cohesion as well as effective parenting practices. Behavioural Couples Therapy has been found to have good empirical support for bringing about the desired changes in both substance abuse and marital relationship. While targeting entire families, the most common evidenced based family interventions are Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, Family Behaviour Therapy, Functional Family Therapy and Community Reinforcement Programme. Marital and family therapy have to be sensitive to gender and culture. Effective use of marital and family therapy requires adequate training to equip practitioners in adequately treating not only substance use disorders and family pathology, but also in treating co-morbid mental health conditions.

  9. Is Bicarbonate Therapy Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    Despite concerns about the negative effects of metabolic acidosis, there is minimal evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration is an effective treatment. In addition, sodium bicarbonate therapy is associated with many adverse effects, including paradoxic intracellular acidosis, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. Definitive recommendations regarding bicarbonate therapy are challenging as there is little high-quality evidence available. In most clinical scenarios of metabolic acidosis, treatment efforts should focus on resolution of the underlying cause, and sodium bicarbonate therapy should be used with caution, if at all. An exception to this is kidney disease, wherein sodium bicarbonate therapy may have a valuable role. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.

  11. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  12. Reverse shock index multiplied by Glasgow Coma Scale score (rSIG) is a simple measure with high discriminant ability for mortality risk in trauma patients: an analysis of the Japan Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akio; Tanaka, Noriko

    2018-04-11

    The shock index (SI), defined as heart rate (HR) divided by systolic blood pressure (SBP), is reported to be a more sensitive marker of shock than traditional vital signs alone. In previous literature, use of the reverse shock index (rSI), taken as SBP divided by HR, is recommended instead of SI for hospital triage. Among traumatized patients aged > 55 years, SI multiplied by age (SIA) might provide better prediction of early post-injury mortality. Separately, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score has been shown to be a very strong predictor. When considering these points together, rSI multiplied by GCS score (rSIG) or rSIG divided by age (rSIG/A) could provide even better prediction of in-hospital mortality. This retrospective, multicenter study used data from 168,517 patients registered in the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period 2006-2015. We calculated areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) to measure the discriminant ability by comparing those of SI (or rSI), SIA, rSIG, and rSIG/A for in-hospital mortality and for 24-h blood transfusion. The highest ROC AUC (AUROC), 0.901(0.894-0.908) for in-hospital mortality in younger patients (aged < 55 years), was seen for rSIG. In older patients (aged ≥ 55 years), the AUROC of rSIG/A, 0.845(0.840-0.850), was highest for in-hospital mortality. However, the difference between rSIG and rSIG/A was slight and did not seem to be clinically important. rSIG also had the highest AUROC of 0.745 (0.741-749) for 24-h blood transfusion. rSIG ((SBP/HR) × GCS score) is easy to calculate without the need for additional information, charts or equipment, and can be a more reliable triage tool for identifying risk levels in trauma patients.

  13. Diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats: diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mot, T.,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a disease of humans and animals, which causes increased levels of blood sugar (glucose. Normally,glucose is brought into the cells by a hormone - insulin.The cells then metabolize glucose to make energy used for all functions of the body. Animals suffering from DM either lack insulin, or the cells cannotuse the insulin that is there. As a result, blood glucose levels increase, and the cells have to use other substances for energy. When blood glucose levels become too high, glucose is found in the urine, causing increased frequency of urination and increased drinking. When blood glucose remains elevated over a period of time, other metabolic changes can occur, such as weight loss, acidosis, seizures, coma, blindness, cataracts, and nerve damage. Animals that are eating normally and not showing signs of illness may only require a blood or urine test to diagnose DM. Concurrent diseases (such as infection, Cushing’s disease, hyperthyroidism, pancreatitis, gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatic lipidosis, or kidney disease make diabetes more difficult to diagnose and manage. A complete blood screen and other specific tests may be recommended to obtain the diagnosis and baseline values for treatment and future monitoring. The treatment for diabetes in dogs is similar to the treatment for diabetes in humans, through diet and insulin therapy. Dogs and cats with DM are usually treated with insulin. Insulin is a protein and, as such, not suitable for oral administration. Thus, it is administered once or several times daily by the subcutaneous route. Adjustment of the blood glucose concentration demands long hospital care, and subsequently the owner constantly has to keep a strict schedule at home. In veterinary practice the main groups of oral antidiabetic (used in human medicine either are: carbohydrate absorption inhibitors (e.g. acarbose; insulin sensitisers (biguanides such as metformin, thiazolidinedions

  14. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  15. El Liderazgo transaccional y el comportamiento organizacional en las instituciones educativas públicas "Ramón Castilla" y "Túpac Amaru" del distrito de Comas, de la Unidad de Gestión Educativa Local Nº 04, provincia y departamento de Lima, año 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Quesada Susanibar, Teresa de Jesús

    2014-01-01

    La investigación tiene por finalidad demostrar la relación entre el liderazgo transaccional y el comportamiento organizacional en las instituciones educativas públicas “Ramón Castilla” y “Túpac Amaru” del distrito de Comas, de la Unidad de Gestión Educativa Local N° 04, provincia y departamento de Lima, año 2012. Es una investigación básica, en razón que sus resultados enriquecen el conocimiento científico en materia educativa. Es de nivel descriptivo y asume el diseño correlacional, debido a...

  16. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  17. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  18. Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ... Information Translations Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Expand Section Radiation Therapy - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  19. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... It is a form of therapy where the patient is helped to recognise patterns of ... The article briefly discusses the development of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), and makes mention of the important contri- butions made by South ..... was the displace- ment of aspects of the Newtonian paradigm of physics by.

  20. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  1. INITIATING ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    2005-09-02

    Sep 2, 2005 ... than if they had started ART immediately', because most patients will eventually fail therapy. Therefore I do ... deal with those who are suffering most. REFERENCES. 1. Cole S, Li R, Anastos K, Detels ... Antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes are a part of the response to the massive mortality occurring in ...

  2. Therapy of Lies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Conversion therapy comes in many forms, ranging from informal chats with counselors to aggressive physical coercion, but all are based on the belief that a gay male or a lesbian can be changed "back" to heterosexual behavior. It is not just alarmed parents who turn to this therapy. Many LGBT individuals seek out such treatment in an effort to…

  3. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  5. Therapy in Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  6. Animal-Assisted Therapy and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Gena; Stella, Tiffany; Wilkison, Megan; Szczech Moser, Christy; Hoelzel, Allison; Hendricks, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of animals for therapeutic purposes has been documented in the literature for centuries. This review will highlight evidence of the benefits of animal-assisted therapy as well as provide a plethora of resources for therapists interested in learning more about how animals can provide restorative benefits for their clients.

  7. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  8. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapy – music therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  9. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy

  10. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  11. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  12. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy. (author)

  13. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  14. Novas terapias para hipertensão endocraniana New therapies for intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Prata Barbosa

    2003-11-01

    revisited, including pathophysiology, monitoring, the traditional approach, and also the presentation of recently proposed therapies. SOURCE OF DATA: The main medical literature data bases (especially Medline and Lilacs were searched for articles published in the last 10 years, and traditional text books and dissertations focusing the subject were consulted. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Intracranial hypertension may be associated with several cerebral neurologic lesions from traumatic, infectious or metabolic origin, and in severe cases may represent an important factor for morbidity and mortality. Increases in intracranial pressure interfere with cerebral blood flow; in order to maintain an adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, it is necessary to both reduce and control intracranial hypertension and combat low blood pressure from the very beginning of treatment. Adequate monitoring is essential, and the main points addressed in conventional management include elevation of the head of bed to 30° C, central positioning of the head, optimization of hypocapnia, perfect metabolic and hydro-electrolyte balance, sedation, anti-convulsive therapy, liquor drainage, and the use of barbiturics, mannitol and furosemide. New therapies currently under investigation include the use of dexanabinol, hypertonic saline solutions, moderate hypothermia, decompressive craniectomy, optimization of cerebral perfusion pressure, and reduction in cerebral microvasculature pressure (Lund therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The use of new therapies to effectively control intracranial hypertension, especially in cases that are refractory to the usual treatment, represent a promising scenario in the management of this problem.

  15. Intoxicação aguda por nitrogênio através de inalação em paciente com insuficiência respiratória e coma: relato de caso Acute nitrogen intoxication by patient inhalation with breathing insufficiency and coma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Masjuan Torrecillas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Apresentação de um caso único não encontrado na literatura nacional. O objetivo deste relato foi apresentar um caso de grave intoxicação por nitrogênio líquido (NO, com edema agudo de pulmão e encefalopatia isquêmica, em que se obteve bom desfecho, provavelmente, pela rapidez no atendimento e na administração adequada da terapêutica. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 26 anos, encontrado desacordado havia aproximadamente uma hora, em sala fechada onde havia uma máquina utilizada para manutenção do gelo de pista de patinação. Constatou-se aspiração de conteúdo gástrico e edema das vias respiratórias altas. A intubação na emergência foi difícil pelo intenso edema de laringe. O paciente desenvolveu edema agudo de pulmão e sinais de edema encefálico por encefalopatia anóxica. Evoluiu com melhora pulmonar lenta com ventilação protetora para síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda (volume corrente de 5 mL/kg, PEEP de 15 cmH2O e corticoterapia com hidrocortisona (200 mg a cada seis horas para tratamento de broncoespasmo. CONCLUSÕES: Trata-se do primeiro caso publicado em nosso meio de intoxicação por nitrogênio. Na literatura internacional encontram-se várias citações de situações semelhantes ao deste caso pelo fato de existir varias pistas de gelo para prática de esportes como por exemplo o hockey. Há relatos de exacerbações de quadros de broncoespasmo nas pessoas que assistem ao jogo, apresentando-se de forma tardia, por vezes até sete a dez horas após a exposição aos vapores que exalam destas pistas que são ricas em nitrogênio.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To present the first case reported in the Brazilian literature of liquid nitrogen intoxication. The objective of this report was to present a case of severe intoxication by liquid nitrogen, with acute lung edema and ischemic encephalopathy, which a good outcome, due to a fast diligence and a proper therapy

  16. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... novel targeted therapies can act as radiosensitizers. Systemic Radiation Therapy Certain cancers may be treated with radioactive drugs ... intravenous). This type of treatment is called systemic radiation therapy because the medicine goes to the entire body. ...

  17. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Does photodynamic therapy enhance standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy enhanced standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry. Photodynamic therapy when used as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy kills more bacteria than when conventional periodontal therapy is used alone. To address the focused question, "Does photodynamic therapy enhance killing of oral bacteria?" PubMed/MEDLINE(®) and Google Scholar databases were explored. Original human and experimental studies and studies using photodynamic therapy for killing oral bacteria were included. Letters to the Editor, historic reviews, and unpublished data were excluded. Photodynamic therapy significantly reduces periodontopathogenic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Photodynamic therapy kills cariogenic bacteria (such as Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis), bacteria associated with infected root canals, and those associated with periimplantitis. Photodynamic therapy, when used as an adjunct to conventional oral disinfection protocols, enhances standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry.

  19. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...... of the data indicated that the survey subscale measuring political activism (p research...

  20. Complications of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.S.; Parker, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review systematically the toxicity of contemporary chemotherapy and irradiation on normal tissues of growing children. Whenever possible, the separate toxicity of chemotherapy, irradiation, and combination therapy is addressed. However, it is not always possible to quantitate specifically such reactions in the face of multiple drug therapy, which may enhance radiation injury or reactivate prior radiation injury. Prior detailed reviews have provided important sources of information concerning radiation injury for this more general discussion. The information provided will assist both the clinician and the radiologist in the recognition of early and late complications of therapy in pediatric oncology