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Sample records for barbados

  1. The Islands, Barbados

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drieman, R.; Hinborch, M.; Monden, M.; Vendrik, E.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Master project report. In Barbados the problem arose of lack of space for development on the existing shoreline. Therefore the project "The Islands" has been conceptualized. In front of the west coast of Barbados, a group of artificial islands will be created. On the islands there will be space for

  2. Rowing to Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    Philpott, Andy; Leyland, Geoff

    2005-01-01

    In October 2003, sixteen boats set off from La Gomera in the Canary Islands headed for Barbados 4800 km distant. Each boat was manned by two oarsmen who were competing in the Transatlantic Challenge, an ocean rowing endurance event. This paper describes an optimization model developed for route planning in this event. It was used successfully by the Holiday Shoppe team to win the race in world record time. We describe the tool, its history, and the way it was used in the race.

  3. Demand elasticity of oil in Barbados

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importation of oil is a significant component of Barbados' imports, rising from 7% of imports in 1998 to over 20% in 2009. This increase has impacted greatly on the level of foreign reserves. As a price-taker, relying entirely on imported oil for our energy needs could prove a continuous drain on the economy. With a view to formulating an appropriate energy policy for Barbados, this paper analyses the demand for oil using monthly data from 1998 to 2009. The paper estimates the elasticities of demand for oil by employing single equation cointegration approach and comparing the results with countries that rely heavily on imported oil and whose policy objective are to alter their energy structure to rely less on imported oil. The results show that the demand for oil imports is price inelastic in the long run. The consumption of oil is responsive to past consumption, prices, income, electricity consumption and the number of appliances imported in the short-run. A policy framework to reduce the use of oil for electricity consumption via alternative energy sources should be considered and the taxation of oil imports given its elasticity is a good source of revenue. - Highlights: → Demand for oil is price inelastic in the long-run (-0.552). → The relationship between oil demand and income is insignificant in the long run. → As electricity consumption increases by 1%, the demand for oil rises by 1.43%. → Need to determine if investments in alternative sources can offset demand for oil. → Investment in alternative resources may be required before gains are realised.

  4. Social Class as Flow and Mutability: The Barbados Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh-Spencer, Heather; Castro, Michelle; Bulut, Ergin; Goel, Koeli; Lin, Chunfeng; McCarthy, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on ethnographic research that examines the contemporary articulation of class identity in the postcolonial elite school setting of Old College high school in Barbados. From the qualitative data derived from this study, we argue that social class is better conceived as a series of flows, mutations, performances and performatives.…

  5. Barbados; Staff Report for the 2005 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 Article IV Consultation highlights that Barbados compares favorably with other Caribbean countries on economic and social indicators. The economy is heavily dependent on tourism and financial services. The population is about 272,000, and per capita income is about US$15,700. Poverty rates are the lowest in the Caribbean. Structural reforms have advanced in taxation, telecommunications, and the public enterprise sector. Corporate and personal tax rates have been further lowered, in ...

  6. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

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    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  7. Gender Earnings Gaps in the Caribbean: Evidence from Barbados and Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Bellony, Annelle; Hoyos, Alejandro; Nopo, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes gender earnings gaps in Barbados and Jamaica, using a matching comparisons approach. In both countries, as in most of the Caribbean region, females’ educational achievement is higher than that of males. Nonetheless, males’ earnings surpass those of their female peers. Depending on the set of control characteristics, males’ earnings surpass those of females by between 14 and 27 percent of average females’ wages in Barbados, and between 8 and 17 percent of average females’ w...

  8. Osteology of a slave burial population from Barbados, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corruccini, R S; Handler, J S; Mutaw, R J; Lange, F W

    1982-12-01

    A unique seventeenth-nineteenth century slave cemetery population from Newton plantation, Barbados, allows examination of craniodental characters in relation to ethnohistorical data. Age-at-death estimates suggest life expectancy at birth of 29 years and low infant mortality; historical demography, however, suggests life expectancy of 20 years and very high infant mortality. Tooth decay, bilateral tooth loss, periodontal disease, root hypercementosis, and severe enamel hypoplasia are high in frequency. The teeth yield evidence of such cultural practices as pipe-smoking and incisor mutilation. Several skeletal features reflect periodic near-starvation. Directional and fluctuating dental asymmetry, relative tooth size, and hypoplasia distribution suggest slaves experienced considerable weaning trauma; metabolic stress at this time exceeded that of prenatal and immediate postnatal periods. Odontometrics and dental and cranial nonmetric traits indicate that modern Blacks are intermediate between the ancestral slaves and modern Whites but more similar to the latter, suggesting effects of environmental covariance exceed those of genetic admixture. Nonmetric trait distributions show nonrandom patterns according to area of burial in the cemetery, a possible result of family segregation. PMID:6762099

  9. ESR dating technique applied to Pleistocene Corals (Barbados Island)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we applied the ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) dating technique to a coral coming from Barbados island. After a preliminary purification treatment, coral samples were milled and separated in different granulometry groups. Powder samples having granulometry values between 125 μm-250 μm and 250 μm-500 μm were irradiated at the Calliope60 Co radioisotope source (R.C. ENEA-Casaccia) at doses between 10-3300 Gγ and their radiation induced ESR signals were measured by a Bruker EMS1O4 spectrometer. The signal/noise ratio turned to be highest far the granulometry between 250 μm-500 μm and consequently the paleo-curve was constructed by using the ESR signals related to this granulometry value. The paleo-curve was fitted with the exponential growth function y = a - b · e-cx which well describes the behaviour of the curve also in the saturation region. Extrapolating the paleo-dose and knowing the annual dose (999±79 μGy/y) we calculated a coral age of 156±12 ky, which is in good agreement with results obtained on coral coming from the same region by other authors

  10. Emotional Intelligence and Gender as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Some University Students in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayombo, Grace A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated emotional intelligence (attending to emotion, positive expressivity and negative expressivity) and gender as predictors of academic achievement among 163 undergraduate psychology students in The University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill Campus, Barbados. Results revealed significant positive and negative correlations…

  11. Relating emotional intelligence to academic achievement among university students in Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    Grace A. Fayombo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between emotional intelligence and academic achievement among 151 undergraduate psychology students at The University of the West Indies (UWI), Barbados, making use of Barchard (2001)'s Emotional Intelligence Scale and an Academic Achievement Scale. Findings revealed significant positive correlations between academic achievement and six of the emotional intelligence components, and a negative correlation with negative expressivity. The emotional intel...

  12. Sharing Best Practices in Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago: Patterns of Policy Implementation and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines policies from multilateral organisations that advocate sharing best practices between developing nations. The article discusses the degree to which these best practices are implemented by small states as indicated by teachers, academics and policymakers in Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago. For the purpose of this article, a…

  13. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of healthcare ethics and law among doctors and nurses in Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    Walrond Errol; Jonnalagadda Ramesh; Hariharan Seetharaman; Moseley Harley

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among healthcare professionals in Barbados in relation to healthcare ethics and law in an attempt to assist in guiding their professional conduct and aid in curriculum development. Methods A self-administered structured questionnaire about knowledge of healthcare ethics, law and the role of an Ethics Committee in the healthcare system was devised, tested and distributed to all levels of staff at the Q...

  14. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities.

  15. Tourist perceptions of beach cleanliness in Barbados: Implications for return visitation

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmann, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    The quality of the natural environment is inexorably linked to tourism in the Caribbean. Tourists are attracted to the beauty of the Caribbean coastal and marine environment, generating significant economic activity and employment. The resulting development and concentration of human activities in the coastal zone may have deleterious effects on environmental quality and tourists’ willingness to return. Using a survey administered to over 2,000 tourists in Barbados, this work examines tourist...

  16. The common property resource problem and the fisheries of Barbados and Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkes, Fikret

    1987-03-01

    Common property resources (CPR) tend to be particularly susceptible to depletion and degredation. This creates problems for sustainable development and for resource stewardship in general since many of the key global resources are common property. The article explores the different definitions of CPR and the traps associated with the harvesting of CPR without understanding the social, economic, and environmental costs related to their exploitation. The commons problem may be approached in terms of a private property solution, the allocation of individual quotas to fishermen, or a communal property solution in which communities of fishermen basically manage their own fisheries. The offshore fishery of Barbados lends itself to the private property solution, and the inshore fishery of Jamaica, to the communal property solution. Drawing from case studies of Jamaica and Barbados fisheries, four principles of CPR use are proposed: (a) the solution of the CPR problem starts with the control of access to the resource, (b) increasing production from a CPR depends on the conservation of the resource base, (c) the sustainable utilization of a CPR is closely connected to the use of technology appropriate for the harvest, and (d) local-level management improves prospects for the sustainable use of a CPR. The case studies illustrate that there may be local, national, and international levels of interest over the resource. Hence, the successful management of such resources as Barbados and Jamaica fisheries requires that conflicting demands for the resources be taken into account, perhaps using a cooperative management approach.

  17. Surveying Caribbean Cultural Landscapes: Mount Plantation, Barbados, and its global connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Finch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first systematic archaeological investigation on Barbados since the 1970s at Mount Plantation, St George, Barbados, has yielded significant material and landscape data relating to world-changing economic and social structures, from the dramatic early 18th-century escalation of slavery to the agro-industrial production in the British Caribbean during the late 19th century. This article focuses on two related research aims. It offers the evaluation of systematic archaeological fieldwork which combines geophysical survey techniques and fieldwalking in the British Caribbean, thus offering the first results from a methodology for rapidly assessing the archaeological potential of plantation sites. Secondly, it systematically characterises the plough-zone archaeology on a Barbadian plantation. The site provides an example of shifts in plantation organisation and labour over the 18th and early 19th centuries, and forms an integral element within the study of created and transformed landscapes owned by the Lascelles family in Barbados and Yorkshire (UK, thus connecting Caribbean cultural landscapes directly with those in Britain.

  18. Long-distance multistep sediment transfer at convergent plate margins (Barbados, Lesser Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limonta, Mara; Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto; Andò, Sergio; Boni, Maria; Bechstädt, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    We present a regional provenance study of the compositional variability and long distance multicyclic transport of terrigenous sediments along the convergent and transform plate boundaries of Central America, from the northern termination of the Andes to the Lesser Antilles arc-trench system. We focus on high-resolution bulk-petrography and heavy-mineral analyses of modern beach and fluvial sediments and Cenozoic sandstones of Barbados island, one of the places in the world where an active accretionary prism is subaerially exposed (Speed et al., 2012). The main source of siliciclastic sediment in the Barbados accretionary prism is off-scraped quartzose to feldspatho-litho-quartzose metasedimentaclastic turbidites, ultimately supplied from South America chiefly via the Orinoco fluvio-deltaic system. Modern sand on Barbados island is either quartzose with depleted heavy-mineral suites recycled from Cenozoic turbidites and including epidote, zircon, tourmaline, andalusite, garnet, staurolite and chloritoid, or calcareous and derived from Pleistocene coral reefs. The ubiquitous occurrence of clinopyroxene and hypersthene, associated with green-brown kaersutitic hornblende in the north or olivine in the south, points to reworking of ash-fall tephra erupted from andesitic (St. Lucia) and basaltic (St. Vincent) volcanic centers in the Lesser Antilles arc transported by the prevailing anti-trade winds in the upper troposphere. Modern sediments on Barbados island and those shed by other accretionary prisms such as the Indo- Burman Ranges and Andaman-Nicobar Ridge (Garzanti et al., 2013) define the distinctive mineralogical signature of Subduction Complex Provenance, which is invariably composite. Detritus recycled dominantly from accreted turbidites and oceanic mudrocks is mixed in various proportions with detritus from the adjacent volcanic arc or carbonate reefs widely developed at tropical latitudes. Ophiolitic detritus may be locally prominent. Quantitative provenance

  19. Neodymium and strontium isotopic constraints on soil sources in Barbados, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Lars E.; Banner, Jay L.

    1996-11-01

    Neodymium and strontium isotopic compositions and Sm/Nd ratios are used to constrain the sources of silicate-rich soils developed on uplifted Pleistocene coral-reef limestones on Barbados, West Indies. The geographic and geologic setting of Barbados facilitates the application of these tracers to the evaluation of the following soil sources: (1) Pleistocene reef limestone regolith, (2) Tertiary carbonate rocks, sandstones, and mudstones that are exposed in northeastern Barbados, (3) volcanic ash erupted from the Lesser Antilles arc, (4) Saharan dust transported by trade winds, and (5) fertilizer. The soils have ɛNd values that range from -6.6 to -1.9, 87Sr /86Sr values of 0.70890 to 0.71067, and Sm/Nd ratios of 0.223-0.260. The Pleistocene limestone component is the most significant source of Sr in the soils and a negligible source of Nd. Comparison of Sm and Nd concentrations and neodymium isotopic compositions of soil samples that are weathered to varying extents indicates that Sm and Nd are relatively unfractionated and retained in the soils during weathering. ɛNd and Sm/Nd variations in the soils, therefore, primarily reflect the compositions and proportions of the silicate sources. Mass balance calculations based on SmNd systematics require that the silicate soil components contain between 30-85% volcanic ash, with the remaining silicate fraction comprised of old, continentally-derived sediment. In contrast to Sm and Nd, Sr is mobilized and removed from the soils during weathering. Strontium from volcanic and carbonate sources is preferentially removed relative to continental silicate sources. The strontium isotopic compositions of the soils, therefore, reflect the combined effects of the degree of weathering and the compositions and proportions of the soil sources. Mass balance calculations indicate that at least 35-60% of the initial Sr in the soils has been removed by weathering. These results illustrate (1) the utility of radiogenic isotopes in

  20. Clouds at Barbados are representative of clouds across the trade wind regions in observations and climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Brian; Nuijens, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Trade wind regions cover most of the tropical oceans, and the prevailing cloud type is shallow cumulus. These small clouds are parameterized by climate models, and changes in their radiative effects strongly and directly contribute to the spread in estimates of climate sensitivity. This study investigates the structure and variability of these clouds in observations and climate models. The study builds upon recent detailed model evaluations using observations from the island of Barbados. Using a dynamical regimes framework, satellite and reanalysis products are used to compare the Barbados region and the broader tropics. It is shown that clouds in the Barbados region are similar to those across the trade wind regions, implying that observational findings from the Barbados Cloud Observatory are relevant to clouds across the tropics. The same methods are applied to climate models to evaluate the simulated clouds. The models generally capture the cloud radiative effect, but underestimate cloud cover and show an array of cloud vertical structures. Some models show strong biases in the environment of the Barbados region in summer, weakening the connection between the regional biases and those across the tropics. Even bearing that limitation in mind, it is shown that covariations of cloud and environmental properties in the models are inconsistent with observations. The models tend to misrepresent sensitivity to moisture variations and inversion characteristics. These model errors are likely connected to cloud feedback in climate projections, and highlight the importance of the representation of shallow cumulus convection.

  1. Local Geographies of Crime and Punishment in a Plantation Colony: Gender and Incarceration in Barbados, 1878-1928

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia A. Green

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines gendered profiles of crime and punishment in Barbados between 1878 and 1928. During this period, Barbados stood out from the rest of the Caribbean in levels of imprisonment of women. The context of unusually high levels of female committals to custody – related to (1 women’s prominence in the labor force, (2 entrapment within conditions of near-total plantation monopoly, (3 high levels of male migration and (most importantly criminalization of so-called “abandoned” dependants – provides the backdrop for an examination of penal regimes in Barbados. Using spatial frames, particularly those generated in studies of “colonial geographies,” the article surveys gender differences in crimes, institutional arrangements, and punishments within prison. It also analyzes penal system changes that occurred over the period, signaling the transition to a new disciplinary regime.

  2. Productivity of Sumateran Composite dan Barbados Cross sheep breed in the field condition

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    Bambang Setiadi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Two years field study has been carried out in the Purwakarta district , West Java, to evaluate sheep productivity of Sumateran Composite (K and Barbados cross (BC breeds introduced to the farmers, compared with locally thin tail sheep breed (L that were maintained by the farmers. Genotype compositions of K sheep were Barbados Blackbelly 25%, St. Croix 25%, and Sumateran sheep 50%; and for BC were Barbados Blackbelly 50% and Sumateran sheep 50%. Sheep those were introduced was new breed from breeding improvement of Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production. Litter size of K, BC, and L ewes was 1.3; 1.4; and 1.5 respectively. Pre-weaning mortality rate were 5.0; 5.0 and 8.0% respectively for K, BC, and L lambs. Ewe Reproduction Rate (LRI = number of lamb at weaning/ewe/year of L (2.14 was higher than BC (2.0 and K (1.85. The ewe productivity (PI = kg lambs/ewe/year is the average of weaning weight timed LRI. Because the weaning weight of L (7.0 kg were significantly lowest than BC (10.5 kg and K (9.25 kg will affect on PI. PI of L (14.98 ewe were significantly (P<00.5 lowest than BC (21 and K (17.11. Body weight of crossbred (K X L and BCxL under the same physiologic status were similarly with BC and K. According to the result of productivity evaluation of introduced sheep breed in the field condition, can be sumarize that productivity of K and BC sheep were significantly better than locally thin tail sheep.

  3. Effects of wet deposition on optical properties of the atmosphere over Bermuda and Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Deborah L.; Keene, William C.; Moody, Jennie L.; Maring, Hal; Galloway, James N.

    2003-02-01

    Substantial spatial and temporal variabilities in chemical and physical properties of aerosols complicate attempts to model associated influences on global climate. Although wet deposition is the major mechanism by which most aerosols are removed from the atmosphere, direct effects of precipitation on radiative properties of the atmosphere are not well understood. To address this issue, attenuation coefficients for total insoluble constituents (ACt) and for nonvolatile (at 500°C) insoluble constituents (ACnv; primarily crustal dust) of precipitation at Bermuda and Barbados were measured at six wavelengths between 414 and 859 nm. Coefficients for volatile (at 500°C) insoluble constituents (ACv; primarily carbonaceous species) were calculated by difference. Between April and September, ACt at Bermuda was dominated by mineral constituents transported from North Africa, whereas carbonaceous species from North America were relatively low and exhibited no systematic seasonal variability. ACt and ACnv at Barbados were dominated by mineral dust, especially between April and September. Relative to ACv, ACnv decreased more rapidly with increasing wavelength. The wavelength dependencies of ACs for volatile and nonvolatile constituents at Bermuda were statistically indistinguishable from those at Barbados. The optical and chemical characteristics of precipitation were compared with scattering and absorption by ambient aerosols in associated air parcels to evaluate the influence of scavenging on the radiative properties of air. Although discernible relationships were evident, the small number of cases limited their applicability as reliable empirical predictors. However, these data do provide useful constraints for validating models of aerosol scavenging and wet removal on the optical properties of the troposphere.

  4. Three-dimensional GPR study of a prehistoric site in Barbados, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Brian M.; McFarland, Douglas P.; Hackenberger, Steven

    2001-07-01

    Prior results of surface artifact collecting, test excavations, and auger sampling on an archaeological site in Barbados suggested that we experiment with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) as a method to target areas for future study. The site is associated with village occupations of Amerindians that are dated to between ˜2000 and 500 years ago. Archaeological features include burials, hearths, ceramic lined wells and postholes. Artifact middens contain pottery sherds, conch shells, and other marine resource debris. The site selected was located at the southern tip of Barbados and is situated on a deep stabilized surface behind a large active dune system. The soil layer consists of dry, clean quartz sand. We obtained limited ground truth at the site by hand auguring in areas of field-identified anomalies, and by auguring control holes away from anomalies. Anomalies were usually large diffractors such as conch shells and rocks. We used 3D visualisation software to perform standard processing enhancements and to assemble the parallel lines into three-dimensional volumes. The dimensions, distribution, and shapes of time-sliced amplitude anomalies were consistent with those of previously excavated burials, poles, and pit structures. In particular, we interpret the data as indicating the presence of a circular house structure with four center posts; this structure was previously unknown at this site. The work presented here builds upon and extends earlier excavation-based findings at this site, and will allow for better-focused excavations in the future.

  5. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados.

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    Oxenford, Hazel A; Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world's coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future. PMID:27326377

  6. Analytic hierarchy process helps select site for limestone quarry expansion in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prasanta Kumar; Ramcharan, Eugene K

    2008-09-01

    Site selection is a key activity for quarry expansion to support cement production, and is governed by factors such as resource availability, logistics, costs, and socio-economic-environmental factors. Adequate consideration of all the factors facilitates both industrial productivity and sustainable economic growth. This study illustrates the site selection process that was undertaken for the expansion of limestone quarry operations to support cement production in Barbados. First, alternate sites with adequate resources to support a 25-year development horizon were identified. Second, technical and socio-economic-environmental factors were then identified. Third, a database was developed for each site with respect to each factor. Fourth, a hierarchical model in analytic hierarchy process (AHP) framework was then developed. Fifth, the relative ranking of the alternate sites was then derived through pair wise comparison in all the levels and through subsequent synthesizing of the results across the hierarchy through computer software (Expert Choice). The study reveals that an integrated framework using the AHP can help select a site for the quarry expansion project in Barbados.

  7. Spirituality, gender, and drug use among students from one University in Barbados

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    Mia Amour Jules

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La investigación tuvo como objetivo aclarar la relación entre la espiritualidad , el sexo y el consumo de drogas entre los estudiantes de pregrado de una universidad en Barbados . Una muestra por cuotas de 250 estudiantes fue requerido por la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales como el estudio fue parte de un estudio multicéntrico grande que participen estudiantes de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales de otros siete países participantes de América Latina y el Caribe . Relaciones negativas significativas fueron encontradas entre el nivel de un estudiante de la espiritualidad y de su uso de drogas lícitas e ilícitas en los últimos 12 y tres meses . Hombres y mujeres también difieren significativamente en términos de consumo de drogas ilícitas (últimos 12 y tres meses . Sin embargo no se encontraron diferencias de género en su relación con el uso de drogas lícitas . Por otra parte , las mujeres poseían niveles significativamente más altos de espiritualidad que sus homólogos masculinos . Además la investigación cualitativa debe llevarse a cabo dentro de este grupo de edad en el contexto de Barbados para explicar mejor estos hallazgos .

  8. Nd and SR isotopic compositions of tektite material from Barbados and their relationship to North American tektites

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    Ngo, H. H.; Wasserburg, J.; Glass, B. P.

    1985-06-01

    The isotopic composition of microtektites from Barbados was determined to establish their possible source and their relationship to known tektite strewn fields. Analyzed samples included microtektites and tektite fragments from the Barbados oceanic beds, samples of deep sea ooze, in which they occur, and of underlying volcanic ash, as well as glass beads from Lake Wanapitei Crater. Isotope ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86, Nd-143/Nd-144, Rb-87/Sr-86, and Sm-147/Nd-144) were determined, and the epsilon values for Sr and Nd plotted on the diagram available for the fields of North America, Australia, Ivory Coast, and Moldavite tektites. The epsilon coordinates of all Barbados microtektite and bulk tektite samples plot precisely within the narrow field determined by North American tektites (epsilon Sr, 111; epsilon Nd, -6.2), yield an Nd model age of 0.6 AE, and are distinct from all other fields. The isotopic signatures of samples from sea ooze, ash layer, and of the Lake Wanapitei glass beads are clearly different from all known tektite classes. It is concluded that the Barbados tektites are of the same source and temporal event as the North American tektites.

  9. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Barbados; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Barbados, an independent nation in the Lesser Antilles island chain in the eastern Caribbean. Barbados’ electricity rates are approximately $0.28 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  10. Relating emotional intelligence to academic achievement among university students in Barbados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace A. Fayombo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationships between emotional intelligence and academic achievement among 151 undergraduate psychology students at The University of the West Indies (UWI, Barbados, making use of Barchard (2001's Emotional Intelligence Scale and an Academic Achievement Scale. Findings revealed significant positive correlations between academic achievement and six of the emotional intelligence components, and a negative correlation with negative expressivity. The emotional intelligence components also jointly contributed 48% of the variance in academic achievement. Attending to emotions was the best predictor of academic achievement while positive expressivity, negative expressivity and empathic concern were other significant predictors. Emotion-based decision-making, responsive joy and responsive distress did not make any significant relative contribution to academic achievement, indicating that academic achievement is only partially predicted by emotional intelligence. These results were discussed in the context of the influence of emotional intelligence on university students' academic achievement.

  11. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of healthcare ethics and law among doctors and nurses in Barbados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walrond Errol

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among healthcare professionals in Barbados in relation to healthcare ethics and law in an attempt to assist in guiding their professional conduct and aid in curriculum development. Methods A self-administered structured questionnaire about knowledge of healthcare ethics, law and the role of an Ethics Committee in the healthcare system was devised, tested and distributed to all levels of staff at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Barbados (a tertiary care teaching hospital during April and May 2003. Results The paper analyses 159 responses from doctors and nurses comprising junior doctors, consultants, staff nurses and sisters-in-charge. The frequency with which the respondents encountered ethical or legal problems varied widely from 'daily' to 'yearly'. 52% of senior medical staff and 20% of senior nursing staff knew little of the law pertinent to their work. 11% of the doctors did not know the contents of the Hippocratic Oath whilst a quarter of nurses did not know the Nurses Code. Nuremberg Code and Helsinki Code were known only to a few individuals. 29% of doctors and 37% of nurses had no knowledge of an existing hospital ethics committee. Physicians had a stronger opinion than nurses regarding practice of ethics such as adherence to patients' wishes, confidentiality, paternalism, consent for procedures and treating violent/non-compliant patients (p = 0.01 Conclusion The study highlights the need to identify professionals in the workforce who appear to be indifferent to ethical and legal issues, to devise means to sensitize them to these issues and appropriately training them.

  12. Evaluation of small wind turbines in distributed arrangement as sustainable wind energy option for Barbados

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The island of Barbados is 99% dependent on fossil fuel imports to satisfy its energy needs, which is unsustainable. This study proposes a 10 MW distributed wind energy scheme using micro wind turbines (WT) of horizontal (HAWT) and vertical axis (VAWT) configurations. These units are rated less than 500 W, and the scheme is hereafter referred to as mWT10. mWT10 is compared to the proposed 10 MW medium WT farm by the Barbados Light and Power Company (BL and P). The economic bottom line is the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). The results highlight the BL and P proposal as the best economic option at BDS$0.19 per kWh, while that of both mWT10 configurations exceeds the conventional cost of BDS$0.25 by two to nine times. This is attributed to significantly higher relative installation and operational costs. However, the financial gap between mWT10 LCOE and the retail price of electricity is much smaller due to a large fuel surcharge passed on to each customer. Annual additional benefits of using wind energy include: greenhouse gas emissions savings of 6-23 kt of carbon dioxide; and anavoided fuel costs of BDS$1.5-5.3 million. The distributed mWT10 using HAWTs competes directly with the BL and P farm, however, it provides these benefits without the visual or ecological impacts of the larger machines. Conversely, VAWTs have features that favour a visually discrete and widely repeatable scheme but suffer relatively high costs. Therefore, this study illustrates the great potential of small wind turbines to be competitive with conventional wind farms, thus challenging the small wind industry to meet its potential by producing reliable and robust machines at lower cost. (author)

  13. Effects of African dust deposition on phytoplankton in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean off Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chia-Te; Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-05-01

    Bioassay incubation experiments conducted with nutrients and local atmospheric aerosol amendments indicate that phosphorus (P) availability limited phytoplankton growth in the low-nutrient low-chlorophyll (LNLC) ocean off Barbados. Atmospheric deposition provides a relatively large influx of new nutrients and trace metals to the surface ocean in this region in comparison to other nutrient sources. However, the impact on native phytoplankton is muted due to the high ratio of nitrogen (N) to P (NO3:SRP > 40) and the low P solubility of these aerosols. Atmospheric deposition induces P limitation in this LNLC region by adding more N and iron (Fe) relative to P. This favors the growth of Prochlorococcus, a genus characterized by low P requirements and highly efficient P acquisition mechanisms. A global three-dimensional marine ecosystem model that includes species-specific phytoplankton elemental quotas/stoichiometry and the atmospheric deposition of N, P, and Fe supports this conclusion. Future increases in aerosol N loading may therefore influence phytoplankton community structure in other LNLC areas, thereby affecting the biological pump and associated carbon sequestration.

  14. The costs of adolescent childbearing: evidence from Chile, Barbados, Guatemala, and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvinic, M

    1998-06-01

    Findings from Chile, Barbados, Guatemala, and Mexico are reviewed in this article to shed light on the consequences of adolescent childbearing for mothers' economic and social opportunities and the well-being of their first-born children. The studies include retrospective information and a comparison group of adult childbearers to account for the effects of background factors (poverty) and the timing of observations. The findings show that early childbearing is associated with negative economic rather than social effects, occurring for poor rather than for all mothers. Among the poor, adolescent childbearing is associated with lower monthly earnings for mothers and lower child nutritional status. Also, among this group of women only, improvements in the child's well-being are associated with mother's education and her contribution to household income. These findings suggest that social policy that expands the educational and income-earning opportunities of poor women could help to contain the intergenerational poverty associated with early childbearing among the poor. PMID:9664632

  15. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Knoth, O.; Haarig, M.; Ansmann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results accurately reproduce the

  16. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jähn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulations (LES are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ~ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the formation of the daytime convective plume and the mean vertical wind structure.

  17. The use of FAMACHA in estimation of gastrointestinal nematodes and total worm burden in Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Konto; Abba, Yusuf; Ramli, Nur Syairah Binti; Marimuthu, Murugaiyah; Omar, Mohammed Ariff; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Sadiq, Muhammad Abubakar; Tijjani, Abdulnasir; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Lila, Mohammed Azmi Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes and total worm burden of Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep was investigated among smallholder farms in Salak Tinggi district of Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 50 sheep raised in smallholder farms comprising of 27 Damara cross and 23 Barbados Blackbelly cross were categorized based on their age into young and adults. Fecal samples were collected and examined for strongyle egg count by using modified McMaster technique. Severity of infection was categorized into mild, moderate, and heavy, based on egg per gram (EPG). Five sheep were randomly selected and slaughtered to examine the presence of adult gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes through total worm count (TWC). Faffa Malan Chart (FAMACHA) score was used for investigation of worm load based on the degree of anemia. The study revealed an overall EPG prevalence of 88 %, of which 84.1 % had mild infection. There was a significant difference (p = 0.002) in EPG among the two breeds. Based on age, significant difference (p = 0. 004) in EPG was observed among Barbados Blackbelly cross, but not for Damara cross (p = 0.941). The correlation between severity of infection and the FAMACHA score was significant (r = 0.289; p = 0.042). Haemonchus spp. were the most predominant nematode found in the gastrointestinal tract, followed by Trichostrongylus and Oesophagostomum spps. EPG and TWC for Haemonchus were positively correlated, but not significant (r = 0.85, p = 0.066). From regression analysis, 73 % of the variability in TWC for Haemonchus could be explained by EPG. Thus, it can be concluded that FAMACHA score correlates well with severity of infection of a nematode and can be used to assess the strongyle nematode burden in the different sheep crosses. PMID:27038194

  18. Propagation Techniques and Agronomic Requirements for the Cultivation of Barbados Aloe (Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F.)—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, Giuseppe; Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; De Lucia, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Barbados aloe (Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F.) has traditionally been used for healing in natural medicine. However, aloe is now attracting great interest in the global market due to its bioactive chemicals which are extracted from the leaves and used in industrial preparations for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food products. Aloe originated from tropical and sub-tropical Africa, but it is also now cultivated in warm climatic areas of Asia, Europe, and America. In this review, the most important factors affecting aloe production are described. We focus on propagation techniques, sustainable agronomic practices and efficient post harvesting and processing systems. PMID:27721816

  19. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähn, Michael; Muñoz-Esparza, Domingo; Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Knoth, Oswald; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Tegen, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with ASAM (All Scale Atmospheric Model) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. This method is now also validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment) field campaign is used for both model initialization and comparisons. Several sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Additional simulation cases deal with modified surface characteristics and their impacts on the simulation results. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure and accurately reproduces the development of the daytime convective boundary layer measured by the Raman lidar.

  20. Investigation of cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of Malpighia glabra L. (barbados cherry fruit pulp and vitamin C on plant and animal test systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Düsman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fruits are important sources of nutrients in human diet, and Barbados Cherry (Malpighia glabra L. is of particular interest due to its high content of antioxidants. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables protect individuals against diseases and cancer, but excessive intake of vitamins may act as pro-oxidant and generate changes in DNA. To evaluate the effect of different in natura (BAN and frozen (BAF Barbados Cherry pulp concentrations and synthetic vitamin C in liquid form (VC on the chromosome level and the cell cycle division, root meristeme cells of Allium cepa L. and bone marrow cells of Wistar rats Rattus norvegicus, were used as test system. In Allium cepa L., BAN, at the highest concentration (0.4 mg.mL-1 and BAF, at the lowest concentration (0.2 mg.mL-1, inhibited cell division, and there was recovery of cell division after the recovery period in water only for BAN. In the Wistar rats, all treatments with Barbados Cherry, either acute or subchronic, were not cytotoxic or mutagenic; only the highest concentration of VC increased significantly the rate of chromosomal abnormalities. The data obtained are important to reinforce the use of Barbados Cherry fruit in the diet.

  1. Intermedial Museum Performance: A Reflection on the Use of Intermedial Performance as a Medium of Immersion at the Barbados Museum & Historical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The Barbados Museum & Historical Society (BMHS) is seeking to attract a larger percentage of patrons from among the younger demographic, many of whom are technologically inclined. The intermedial performance approach was therefore recommended as a means of bridging the gap with this age group by allowing them to become "experiencers"…

  2. The Relationship between Socio-Demographics and Stress Levels, Stressors, and Coping Mechanisms among Undergraduate Students at a University in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Nadini; Persaud, Indeira

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to learn about stress experienced by students enrolled in the Faculty of Social Sciences (FSS) at the University of the West Indies (UWI) in Barbados. This research was primarily undertaken to help UWI administrators/academic staff understand and address student stress. One hundred and six FSS students responded to:- (1) student…

  3. EFFECTS OF "SWIM WITH THE TURTLES" TOURIST ATTRACTIONS ON GREEN SEA TURTLE (CHELONIA MYDAS) HEALTH IN BARBADOS, WEST INDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kimberly; Norton, Terry; Mohammed, Hamish; Browne, Darren; Clements, Kathleen; Thomas, Kirsten; Yaw, Taylor; Horrocks, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Along the West Coast of Barbados a unique relationship has developed between endangered green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and humans. Fishermen began inadvertently provisioning these foraging turtles with fish offal discarded from their boats. Although initially an indirect supplementation, this activity became a popular attraction for visitors. Subsequently, demand for this activity increased, and direct supplementation or provisioning with food began. Food items offered included raw whole fish (typically a mixture of false herring [Harengula clupeola] and pilchard [Harengula humeralis]), filleted fish, and lesser amounts of processed food such as hot dogs, chicken, bread, or various other leftovers. Alterations in behavior and growth rates as a result of the provisioning have been documented in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine how tourism-based human interactions are affecting the overall health of this foraging population and to determine what potential health risks these interactions may create for sea turtles. Juvenile green sea turtles (n=29) were captured from four sites off the coast of Barbados, West Indies, and categorized into a group that received supplemental feeding as part of a tour (n=11) or an unsupplemented group (n=18) that consisted of individuals that were captured at sites that did not provide supplemental feeding. Following capture, a general health assessment of each animal was conducted. This included weight and morphometric measurements, a systematic physical examination, determination of body condition score and body condition index, epibiota assessment and quantification, and clinical pathology including hematologic and biochemical testing and nutritional assessments. The supplemented group was found to have changes to body condition, vitamin, mineral, hematologic, and biochemical values. Based on these results, recommendations were made to decrease negative behaviors and health impacts for turtles as a result

  4. Artificial reefs and marine protected areas: a study in willingness to pay to access Folkestone Marine Reserve, Barbados, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride-Smith, Anne E; Wheeler, Philip M; Johnson, Magnus L

    2016-01-01

    Artificial reefs in marine protected areas provide additional habitat for biodiversity viewing, and therefore may offer an innovative management solution for managing for coral reef recovery and resilience. Marine park user fees can generate revenue to help manage and maintain natural and artificial reefs. Using a stated preference survey, this study investigates the present consumer surplus associated with visitor use of a marine protected area in Barbados. Two hypothetical markets were presented to differentiate between respondents use values of either: (a) natural reefs within the marine reserve or (b) artificial reef habitat for recreational enhancement. Information was also collected on visitors' perceptions of artificial reefs, reef material preferences and reef conservation awareness. From a sample of 250 visitors on snorkel trips, we estimate a mean willingness to pay of US$18.33 (median-US$15) for natural reef use and a mean value of US$17.58 (median-US$12.50) for artificial reef use. The number of marine species viewed, age of respondent, familiarity with the Folkestone Marine Reserve and level of environmental concern were statistically significant in influencing willingness to pay. Regression analyses indicate visitors are willing to pay a significant amount to view marine life, especially turtles. Our results suggest that user fees could provide a considerable source of income to aid reef conservation in Barbados. In addition, the substantial use value reported for artificial reefs indicates a reef substitution policy may be supported by visitors to the Folkestone Marine Reserve. We discuss our findings and highlight directions for future research that include the need to collect data to establish visitors' non-use values to fund reef management.

  5. Artificial reefs and marine protected areas: a study in willingness to pay to access Folkestone Marine Reserve, Barbados, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride-Smith, Anne E; Wheeler, Philip M; Johnson, Magnus L

    2016-01-01

    Artificial reefs in marine protected areas provide additional habitat for biodiversity viewing, and therefore may offer an innovative management solution for managing for coral reef recovery and resilience. Marine park user fees can generate revenue to help manage and maintain natural and artificial reefs. Using a stated preference survey, this study investigates the present consumer surplus associated with visitor use of a marine protected area in Barbados. Two hypothetical markets were presented to differentiate between respondents use values of either: (a) natural reefs within the marine reserve or (b) artificial reef habitat for recreational enhancement. Information was also collected on visitors' perceptions of artificial reefs, reef material preferences and reef conservation awareness. From a sample of 250 visitors on snorkel trips, we estimate a mean willingness to pay of US$18.33 (median-US$15) for natural reef use and a mean value of US$17.58 (median-US$12.50) for artificial reef use. The number of marine species viewed, age of respondent, familiarity with the Folkestone Marine Reserve and level of environmental concern were statistically significant in influencing willingness to pay. Regression analyses indicate visitors are willing to pay a significant amount to view marine life, especially turtles. Our results suggest that user fees could provide a considerable source of income to aid reef conservation in Barbados. In addition, the substantial use value reported for artificial reefs indicates a reef substitution policy may be supported by visitors to the Folkestone Marine Reserve. We discuss our findings and highlight directions for future research that include the need to collect data to establish visitors' non-use values to fund reef management. PMID:27547521

  6. EFFECTS OF "SWIM WITH THE TURTLES" TOURIST ATTRACTIONS ON GREEN SEA TURTLE (CHELONIA MYDAS) HEALTH IN BARBADOS, WEST INDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kimberly; Norton, Terry; Mohammed, Hamish; Browne, Darren; Clements, Kathleen; Thomas, Kirsten; Yaw, Taylor; Horrocks, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Along the West Coast of Barbados a unique relationship has developed between endangered green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and humans. Fishermen began inadvertently provisioning these foraging turtles with fish offal discarded from their boats. Although initially an indirect supplementation, this activity became a popular attraction for visitors. Subsequently, demand for this activity increased, and direct supplementation or provisioning with food began. Food items offered included raw whole fish (typically a mixture of false herring [Harengula clupeola] and pilchard [Harengula humeralis]), filleted fish, and lesser amounts of processed food such as hot dogs, chicken, bread, or various other leftovers. Alterations in behavior and growth rates as a result of the provisioning have been documented in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine how tourism-based human interactions are affecting the overall health of this foraging population and to determine what potential health risks these interactions may create for sea turtles. Juvenile green sea turtles (n=29) were captured from four sites off the coast of Barbados, West Indies, and categorized into a group that received supplemental feeding as part of a tour (n=11) or an unsupplemented group (n=18) that consisted of individuals that were captured at sites that did not provide supplemental feeding. Following capture, a general health assessment of each animal was conducted. This included weight and morphometric measurements, a systematic physical examination, determination of body condition score and body condition index, epibiota assessment and quantification, and clinical pathology including hematologic and biochemical testing and nutritional assessments. The supplemented group was found to have changes to body condition, vitamin, mineral, hematologic, and biochemical values. Based on these results, recommendations were made to decrease negative behaviors and health impacts for turtles as a result

  7. They called it the ‘abominable crime’: an analysis of heterosexual support for anti-gay laws in Barbados, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago

    OpenAIRE

    Jackman, Mahalia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate support for current buggery/sodomy laws in three Caribbean countries—Barbados, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago. To complete this task, data from the 2013 Caribbean Development Research Services (CADRES) ‘Attitudes towards homosexuals’ surveys were employed. The data analysis revealed that a majority of heterosexuals in the sample generally supported the maintenance and enforcement of the anti-gay laws, and the main predictors of said support were race, cou...

  8. "The Major Forces that Need to Back Medical Tourism Were … in Alignment": Championing Development of Barbados's Medical Tourism Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy; Whitmore, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Governments around the world have expressed interest in developing local medical tourism sectors, framing the industry as an opportunity for economic growth and health system improvement. This article addresses questions about how the desire to develop a medical tourism sector in a country emerges and which stakeholders are involved in both creating momentum and informing its progress. Presenting a thematic analysis of 19 key informant interviews conducted with domestic and international stakeholders in Barbados's medical tourism sector in 2011, we examine the roles that "actors" and "champions" at home and abroad have played in the sector's development. Physicians and the Barbadian government, along with international investors, the Medical Tourism Association, and development agencies, have promoted the industry, while actors such as medical tourists and international hospital accreditation companies are passively framing the terms of how medical tourism is unfolding in Barbados. Within this context, we seek to better understand the roles and relationships of various actors and champions implicated in the development of medical tourism in order to provide a more nuanced understanding of how the sector is emerging in Barbados and elsewhere and how its development might impact equitable health system development. PMID:25813504

  9. Teacher Quality Indicators as Predictors of Instructional Assessment Practices in Science Classrooms in Secondary Schools in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunkola, Babalola J.; Archer-Bradshaw, Ramona E.

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the self-reported instructional assessment practices of a selected sample of secondary school science teachers in Barbados. The study sought to determine if there were statistically significant differences in the instructional assessment practices of teachers based on their sex and teacher quality (teaching experience, professional qualification and teacher academic qualification). It also sought to determine the extent to which each of these four selected variables individually and jointly affected the teachers' report of their instructional assessment practices. A sample of 55 science teachers from nine secondary schools in Barbados was randomly selected to participate in this study. Data was collected by means of a survey and was analyzed using the means and standard deviations of the instructional assessment practices scores and linear, multiple and binary logistic regression. The results of the study were such that the majority of the sample reported good overall instructional assessment practices while only a few participants reported moderate assessment practices. The instructional assessment practices in the area of student knowledge were mostly moderate as indicated by the sample. There were no statistically significant differences between or among the mean scores of the teachers' reported instructional assessment practices based on sex ( t = 0.10; df = 53; p = 0.992), teaching experience ( F[4,50] = 1.766; p = 0.150), the level of professional qualification (F[3,45] = 0.2117; p = 0.111) or the level of academic qualification (F[2,52] = 0.504; p = 0.607). The independent variables (teacher sex, teaching experience, teacher professional qualification or teacher academic qualification) were not significant predictors of the instructional assessment practices scores. However, teacher sex was a significant predictor of the teachers' report of good instructional assessment practices. The study also found that the joint effect of the

  10. Full genomic characterization of a novel genotype combination, G4P[14], of a human rotavirus strain from Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Ka Ian; Roy, Sunando; Esona, Mathew D; Jones, Starlene; Sobers, Stephanie; Morris-Glasgow, Victoria; Rey-Benito, Gloria; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-12-01

    Since 2004, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has carried out rotavirus surveillance in Latin America and the Caribbean. Here we report the characterization of human rotavirus with the novel G-P combination of G4P[14], detected through PAHO surveillance in Barbados. Full genome sequencing of strain RVA/Human-wt/BRB/CDC1133/2012/G4P[14] revealed that its genotype is G4-P[14]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1. The possession of a Genogroup 1 (Wa-like) backbone distinguishes this strain from other P[14] rotavirus strains. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that this strain was likely generated by genetic reassortment between human, porcine and possibly other animal rotavirus strains and identified 7 lineages within the P[14] genotype. The results of this study reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission in generating human rotavirus diversity through reassortment. Continued surveillance is important to determine if rotavirus vaccines will protect against strains that express the P[14] rotavirus genotype. PMID:25251674

  11. Revised paleoenvironmental analysis of the Holocene portion of the Barbados sea-level record: Cobbler's Reef revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Marguerite A.

    2016-06-01

    Sample elevations corrected for tectonic uplift and assessed relative to local modeled sea levels provide a new perspective on paleoenvironmental history at Cobbler's Reef, Barbados. Previously, 14C-dated surface samples of fragmented Acropora palmata plotted above paleo sea level based on their present (uplifted) elevations, suggesting supratidal rubble deposited during a period of extreme storms (4500-3000 cal BP), precipitating reef demise. At several sites, however, A. palmata persisted, existing until ~370 cal BP. Uplift-corrected A. palmata sample elevations lie below the western Atlantic sea-level curve, and ~2 m below ICE-6G-modeled paleo sea level, under slow rates of sea-level rise, negating the possibility that Cobbler's Reef is a supratidal storm ridge. Most sites show limited age ranges from corals likely damaged/killed on the reef crest, not the mixed ages of rubble ridges, strongly suggesting the reef framework died off in stages over 6500 yr. Reef crest death assemblages invoke multiple paleohistoric causes, from ubiquitous hurricanes to anthropogenic impacts. Comparison of death assemblage ages to dated regional paleotempestological sequences, proxy-based paleotemperatures, recorded hurricanes, tsunamis, European settlement, deforestation, and resulting turbidity, reveals many possible factors inimical to the survival of A. palmata along Cobbler's Reef.

  12. Sedimentology and diagenesis of windward-facing fore-reef calcarenites, Late Pleistocene of Barbados, West Indies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Late Pleistocene reef terraces in southeastern Barbardos developed extensive fore-reef sand facies during deposition in response to high-energy windward-facing conditions. Sedimentology and diagenesis of these deposits illustrate significant contrasts with previous studies from the leeward west coast. These calcarenites are dominantly skeletal packstones with less common grainstones and wackestones present. The fore-reef sand facies occurs within progradational reef sequences, being conformably overlain by deep-water head coral facies. Medium-bedded, laterally continuous sand sheets retain original depositional slopes, dipping seaward at 10/degrees/-15/degrees/. These fore-reef deposits, in places, are over 30 m thick (average 20 m) and developed rapidly during late Pleistocene glacio-eustatic sea level highstands. Sedimentation rate ranges from 2 to 5 m/1000 years. Areal extent of fore-reef calcarenites in southeastern Barbados is estimated to be 8-10 km/sup 2/. Lithologically, the packstones are composed of an abundance of coralline red algae and the benthic foraminifer Amphistegina sp. Other volumetrically significant allochems include echinoids, mollusks, rhodoliths, peloids, and micritized grains. Micrite in the wackestone and packstone lithologies is likely derived from intense physical/mechanical abrasion of shoal-water reef facies. Diagenesis of these lithologies reflects a complex interplay of meteoric, mixing zone, and marine environments as a result of glacio-eustasy. Differences in diagenetic character are derived from differences in terrace ages, terrace geometry, a paleotopographic control on meteoric ground-water distribution, and high-energy coastal conditions. Diagenetic fabrics include equant, blocky meteoric phreatic calcite; limpid dolomite of mixing zone origin: and peloidal and isopachous fibrous cements from marine precipitation.

  13. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  14. Tectonic and Sedimentation Interactions in the East Caribbean Subduction Zone: AN Overview from the Orinoco Delta to the Barbados Accretionary Prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent marine geophysical acquisitions and piston-coring allow to better understand the close interactions between the sand-rich Orinoco turbidite system and the compressional structures of the Barbados prism. Because of the morphologic and tectonic control in the east-Caribbean active margin, the Orinoco turbiditic pattern system does not exhibit a classic fan geometry. The sea-floor geometry between the slope of the front of the Barbados prism and the slope of the South-American margin induces the convergence of the turbidite channels toward the abyssal plain, at the front of the accretionary prism. Also, whereas in most passive margins the turbidite systems are organized upstream to downstream as canyon, then channel-levee, then lobes, here, due to the tectonic control, the sedimentary system is organized as channel-levee, then canyons, then channelized lobes. At the edge of the Orinoco platform, the system has multiple sources with several distributaries and downward the channel courses are complex with frequent convergences or divergences that are emphasized by the effects of the undulating seafloor tectonic morphologies associated with active thrust tectonics and mud volcanism. On top of the accretionary prism, turbidite sediments are filling transported piggy-back basins whose timing of sedimentation vs. deformation is complex. Erosion processes are almost absent on the highly subsiding Orinoco platform and in the upper part of the turbidite system. Erosion processes develop mostly between 2000 and 4000 m of water depth, above the compressional structures of the Barbados prism (canyons up to 3 km wide and 300 m deep). In the abyssal plain, turbiditic channels develop on very long distance (> 1000 km) joining the mid-Atlantic channel (sourced mostly by the Amazon), filling several elongated basins corresponding to transform faults (notably the Barracuda Basin), and finally sourcing the Puerto-Rico trench, the deepest morphologic depression of this region

  15. Spatial distribution of diverse cold seep communities living on various diapiric structures of the southern Barbados prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olu, K.; Sibuet, M.; Harmegnies, F.; Foucher, J.-P.; Fiala-Médioni, A.

    Three sectors of the south Barbados prism between 1000 and 2000 m depth were explored by the French submersible Nautile. Chemosynthesis-based benthic communities were discovered on several structures affected by diapirism, including mud volcanoes, domes and an anticlinal ridge. The communities are associated with the expulsion of methane-rich fluids which is a wide-spread process in the area. These communities are dominated by large bivalves and vestimentiferans which harbour chemoautotrophic symbiotic bacteria. The symbiotic bivalves include two species of Mytilidae and one of Vesicomyidae, with dominance of a methanotrophic mussel. Cartography of the benthic communities, interpretation of thermal measurements and observation of sedimentary patterns have been used to define the life habits of each of the three species of symbiotic bivalves. Each species has a characteristic preference for different conditions of edaphic and fluid flow: the dominant methanotrophic mussel appears to require high velocity vents and hard substratum. The vesicomyids and the other species of mussel are able to take up sulfide from the sediments, and so are associated with low seepages, but also require soft sediment. The three bivalve species are assumed successively to colonize the top of a diapiric ridge, in a succession related to the temporal evolution of fluid flow and sedimentation. The composition of the bivalve assemblages, their densities and biomasses all differ between the several mud volcanoes and domes studied, and these parameters are thought to be related to the spatial and temporal variations of fluid expulsion through the structures, and the lithification processes linked to fluid expulsion. One very active dome is at present colonized by an exceptionally large and dense population of the methanotrophic mussel. In contrast, communities in another area, on the domes and volcanoes that are currently inactive, were colonized by only a few living vesicomyids and mussels

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers reported by patients receiving diabetes and hypertension primary health care in Barbados: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams O Peter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficiencies in the quality of diabetes and hypertension primary care and outcomes have been documented in Barbados. This study aimed to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by people with diabetes and hypertension in Barbados that might contribute to these deficiencies. Methods Five structured focus groups were conducted for randomly selected people with diabetes and hypertension. Results Twenty-one patients (5 diabetic, 5 hypertensive, and 11 with both diseases with a mean age of 59 years attended 5 focus group sessions. Patient factors that affected care included the difficulty in maintaining behaviour change. Practitioner factors included not considering the "whole person" and patient expectations, and not showing enough respect for patients. Health care system factors revolved around the amount of time spent accessing care because of long waiting times in public sector clinics and pharmacies. Society related barriers included the high cost and limited availability of appropriate food, the availability of exercise facilities, stigma of disease and difficulty taking time off work. Attendees were not familiar with guidelines for diabetes and hypertension management, but welcomed a patient version detailing a place to record results, the frequency of tests, and blood pressure and blood glucose targets. Appropriate education from practitioners during consultations, while waiting in clinic, through support and education groups, and for the general public through the schools, mass media and billboards were recommended. Conclusions Primary care providers should take a more patient centred approach to the care of those with diabetes and hypertension. The care system should provide better service by reducing waiting times. Patient self-management could be encouraged by a patient version of care guidelines and greater educational efforts.

  17. Diabetes and hypertension guidelines and the primary health care practitioner in Barbados: knowledge, attitudes, practices and barriers-a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Anne O

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Audits have shown numerous deficiencies in the quality of hypertension and diabetes primary care in Barbados, despite distribution of regional guidelines. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by primary care practitioners in Barbados concerning the recommendations of available diabetes and hypertension guidelines. Methods Focus groups using a moderator's manual were conducted at all 8 public sector polyclinics, and 5 sessions were held for private practitioners. Results Polyclinic sessions were attended by 63 persons (17 physicians, 34 nurses, 3 dieticians, 3 podiatrists, 5 pharmacists, and 1 other, and private sector sessions by 20 persons (12 physicians, 1 nurse, 3 dieticians, 2 podiatrists and 2 pharmacists. Practitioners generally thought they gave a good quality of care. Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council 1995 diabetes and 1998 hypertension guidelines, and the Ministry of Health 2001 diabetes protocol had been seen by 38%, 32% and 78% respectively of polyclinic practitioners, 67%, 83%, and 33% of private physicians, and 25%, 0% and 38% of non-physician private practitioners. Current guidelines were considered by some to be outdated, unavailable, difficult to remember and lacking in advice to tackle barriers. Practitioners thought that guidelines should be circulated widely, promoted with repeated educational sessions, and kept short. Patient oriented versions of the guidelines were welcomed. Patient factors causing barriers to ideal outcome included denial and fear of stigma; financial resources to access an appropriate diet, exercise and monitoring equipment; confusion over medication regimens, not valuing free medication, belief in alternative medicines, and being unable to change habits. System barriers included lack of access to blood investigations, clinic equipment and medication; the lack of human resources in polyclinics; and an uncoordinated

  18. Long-term high frequency measurements of ethane, benzene and methyl chloride at Ragged Point, Barbados: Identification of long-range transport events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Archibald

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHere we present high frequency long-term observations of ethane, benzene and methyl chloride from the AGAGE Ragged Point, Barbados, monitoring station made using a custom built GC-MS system. Our analysis focuses on the first three years of data (2005–2007 and on the interpretation of periodic episodes of high concentrations of these compounds. We focus specifically on an exemplar episode during September 2007 to assess if these measurements are impacted by long-range transport of biomass burning and biogenic emissions. We use the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model, NAME, run forwards and backwards in time to identify transport of air masses from the North East of Brazil during these events. To assess whether biomass burning was the cause we used hot spots detected using the MODIS instrument to act as point sources for simulating the release of biomass burning plumes. Excellent agreement for the arrival time of the simulated biomass burning plumes and the observations of enhancements in the trace gases indicates that biomass burning strongly influenced these measurements. These modelling data were then used to determine the emissions required to match the observations and compared with bottom up estimates based on burnt area and literature emission factors. Good agreement was found between the two techniques highlight the important role of biomass burning. The modelling constrained by in situ observations suggests that the emission factors were representative of their known upper limits, with the in situ data suggesting slightly greater emissions of ethane than the literature emission factors account for. Further analysis was performed concluding only a small role for biogenic emissions of methyl chloride from South America impacting measurements at Ragged Point. These results highlight the importance of long-term high frequency measurements of NMHC and ODS and highlight how these data can be used to determine sources of emissions

  19. Plant survival of barbados cherry genotypes after frost injury in northern Parana State/ Recuperação de plantas de genótipos de aceroleira afetadas por geada no norte do Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Cristina de Batista Fonseca

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Barbados cherry is a tropical fruit that when cultivated in subtropical areas is exposed to frosts which cause considerable damages to the leaves and can kill plants. The frosts of July 2000 in Northern Paraná State made possible the evaluation of 19 Barbados cherry genotypes propagated through cuttings. A minimum air temperature of –1,3°C was recorded on 17 July at the meteorological station; the minimum ground temperature was around –5,4°C. All plants were severely injured in 100% of leaves. The evaluation was made the following year to the frost, through sprouts status. It was observed that Barbados cherry genotypes present differences in cold hardiness. Some genotypes were killed and others survived, with good vegetation on the next year. The following genotypes presented the best recovery: ‘Cícero’, ‘Roseli’, ‘Carolina’ and ‘Lígia.’ The findings are discussed in relation to temperature limits reported in the literature.A aceroleira é uma planta de clima tropical que também tem sido cultivada em áreas subtropicais, ficando com isso sujeita à ocorrência de geadas, que causam danos consideráveis à folhagem e podem levar as plantas à morte. As geadas de julho de 2000 no Norte do Paraná possibilitaram a avaliação de 19 genótipos de acerola, propagados vegetativamente. A temperatura mínima foi de –1,3° C no abrigo meteorológico em 17 de julho, que corresponde a – 5,4 °C na relva. Todas as plantas tiveram danos em 100% das folhas. No ano seguinte à geada, avaliou-se a recuperação das plantas com base na brotação apresentada. Com os resultados obtidos, conclui-se que os genótipos de aceroleira apresentam respostas diferentes à geada, sendo que alguns são levados à morte e outros conseguem se recuperar na estação de crescimento seguinte. Os genótipos que apresentaram melhor recuperação foram: ‘Cícero’, ‘Roseli’, ‘Carolina’ e ‘Lígia’. Os resultados são discutidos em rela

  20. Agreement of 14 August 1996 between the Government of Barbados and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains two parts. Part I stipulates the agreement of Barbados to accept safeguards on all source or special fissionable material in all peaceful nuclear activities within its territory, under its jurisdiction or carried out under its control anywhere, for the exclusive purpose of verifying that such material is not diverted to nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices. Part II specifies the procedures to be applied in the implementation of the safeguards provisions of Part I

  1. Comprimento de estacas e parte do ramo na formação de mudas de aceroleira Size and part of the branch to be used as barbados cherry cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane de Lourdes Silva de Lima

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A capacidade rizogênica, a brotação e o vigor de estacas caulinares de aceroleira foram avaliados em condições de casa de vegetação na Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, em Fortaleza-CE, no período de novembro de 2000 a janeiro de 2001, objetivando determinar a parte do ramo e o tamanho mais apropriado para estaquia. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, no esquema fatorial 3x3, correspondendo a três posições no ramo (apical, mediano e basal e três comprimentos de estacas (10; 15 e 20 cm, com três repetições de 10 estacas por parcela. As estacas, colhidas de plantas com 2,5 anos de idade, foram plantadas em tubetes de 288cm³ contendo uma mistura de casca de arroz carbonizada e vermicomposto, na proporção volumétrica de 2:3, e cultivadas por um período de 60 dias sob condições de nebulização intermitente. Avaliaram-se a percentagem de estacas enraizadas, o peso da matéria seca do sistema radicular e parte aérea, o número de folhas, de gemas sem brotação e as ramificações emitidas por estaca. Os resultados indicaram que estacas caulinares com 10 centímetros de comprimento e colhidas da porção mediana dos ramos são mais apropriadas para a produção de mudas de aceroleira por estaquia, sob condições de casa de vegetação com nebulização intermitente.The rhizogenic capacitity, sprouting and vigor of cuttings from barbados cherry (Malpighia emarginata D.C were evaluated in greenhouse conditions at the EMBRAPA - National Center for Research of Tropical Agroindustry, Fortaleza-CE, from November 2000 to January 2001, aiming to identify the best branch part and size for cuttings preparation. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design, in a 3x3 factorial scheme, corresponding to three positions on the branch (apical, median and basal and three length (10, 15 and 20 cm, with three replications composed by 10 cuttings each, and cultured on tubets of 288 cm³, filled wich a misture

  2. La delimitación de áreas marinas y submarinas entre barbados y Trinidad-Tobago y, entre Guyana y Surinam, sobre los derechos de jurisdicción de Venezuela en el Océano Atlántico

    OpenAIRE

    Yennybel Mirabal Montiel; Norma Valecillo Jaimes

    2015-01-01

    El propósito de la investigación, es analizar los efectos de las sentencias dictadas por el Tribunal Internacional del Derecho del Mar, que establecieron el límite marítimo entre Barbados y Trinidad-Tobago y, Guyana y Surinam, sobre los derechos de jurisdicción de Venezuela en el espacio marítimo que se proyecta hacia el Océano Atlántico. La misma, se desarrolló a través de la modalidad de investigación documental y un estudio analítico y de tipo conceptual, enmarcado en una revisión y selecc...

  3. La delimitación de áreas marinas y submarinas entre barbados y Trinidad-Tobago y, entre Guyana y Surinam, sobre los derechos de jurisdicción de Venezuela en el Océano Atlántico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yennybel Mirabal Montiel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de la investigación, es analizar los efectos de las sentencias dictadas por el Tribunal Internacional del Derecho del Mar, que establecieron el límite marítimo entre Barbados y Trinidad-Tobago y, Guyana y Surinam, sobre los derechos de jurisdicción de Venezuela en el espacio marítimo que se proyecta hacia el Océano Atlántico. La misma, se desarrolló a través de la modalidad de investigación documental y un estudio analítico y de tipo conceptual, enmarcado en una revisión y selección bibliográfica de las principales fuentes documentales en Venezuela y el mundo sobre el Derecho del Mar, debido a que éste establece el marco fundamental para todos los aspectos de derecho, jurisdicción y usufructo de los Estados, en relación con los espacios marítimos. Con esta investigación, se pretende dar una visión aproximada de la realidad que se presenta en la fachada atlántica de Venezuela y, como ésta, se ve afectada por los intereses y las pretensiones de Estados vecinos, debido a que del resultado de las delimitaciones de áreas marinas y submarinas adyacentes al frente atlántico, dependerá la preservación de los derechos del Estado venezolano correspondientes al territorio del estado Delta Amacuro y al territorio de la Guayana Esequiba.

  4. Deep Cenezoic Sediments in Front of the Barbados Ridge Complex, Odp Site 672: Hemipelagites, Turbidites, and Possible Contourites in Western Central Atlantic Ocean Sédiments cénozoïques au front du complexe de la Barbade, site ODP 672 : hémipélagites, turbidites, et possibles contourites dans l'Atlantique central occidental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascle A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The cenozoic sediments cover of western central Atlantic oceanic floor was cored at about 5 000 m depth, close to the deformation front of the Barbados Accretionary Prism. Good preservation of sedimentary structures and high recovery rate allowed the recognition and study of hemipelagic calcareous or siliceous clays and muds, with or without interbedded airfall volcanic ash beds, and with or without interbedded coarser deposits coming from lateral inputs. The latters are either calcareous fine-grained turbidites coming from local shallower oceanic areas, or terrigenous and calcareous (more hypothetical contourites (reworking turbidites related to bottom currents running along the South-America margin. Fluid-escape veinstructures, related to dewatering process - upward, vertical to almost horizontal advection - were identified, especially in relation with the beginning of offscraping stress in early Miocene incipient décollementhorizon. Twenty-four color print photos of splitted cores are presented; the macroscopic features they show are commented and discussed. La couverture sédimentaire cénozoïque du plancher océanique de l'Atlantique Central occidental a été carottée à environ 5000 m de profondeur, à proximité du front de déformation du prisme d'accrétion de la Barbade. Une bonne préservation des structures sédimentaires et un taux de récupération élevé ont permis la reconnaissance et l'étude d'argilites et shales hémipélagiques, calcaires ou siliceuses, localement intercalées de lits de cendres volcaniques, et auxquelles s'ajoutent des niveaux plus grossiers attribués à des apports latéraux. Ces derniers consistent, soit en turbidites calcareuses à grain fin provenant de hauts-fonds océaniques proches, soit en (plus hypothétiques contourites calcareuses et terrigènes (remaniant des turbidites attribuées à l'activité de courants profonds longeant la marge sud-américaine. Des veinesd'échappement de fluides

  5. Childhood lead exposure in an enslaved African community in Barbados

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Hannes; Shuler, Kristrina; Chenery, Simon

    2013-01-01

    a clear association between low (i.e., below 1 ppm) enamel lead concentrations and higher enamel 87Sr/86Sr ratios which have previously been interpreted as being indicative of African birth, suggesting that individuals with low enamel lead levels were indeed born in Africa as opposed to the New World...

  6. Education and work : case studies of Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    Lochan, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    Describes education and training institutions and training programmes used in preparing youth for employment. Also provides an overview of the educational and training systems in each country. Includes a literature review on education and productivity.

  7. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    Hazel A Oxenford; Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world’s coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representa...

  8. VOLATILE COMPOUNDS IDENTIFIED IN BARBADOS CHERRY ‘BRS-366 JABURÚ’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Garcia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In foods, the flavor and aroma are very important attributes, thus the main objective of this study was to identify the volatile compounds (VC of the "BRS-366 Jaburú" acerola variety, for which we used the solid phase microextraction method (SPE. The separation and identification of volatile compounds was made using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Three fibers were evaluated, Polydimethylsiloxane / Divinylbenzene (PDMS / DVB, 65 micrometres Divinylbenzene / Carboxen / Polydimethylsiloxane (DVB / CAR / PDMS 50/30 m and polyacrylate (PA 85 uM to compare the extraction of its components. Thirty-three volatile compounds were identified and classified into eight chemical classes: carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, hydrocarbons, phenylpropanoids and terpenoids. The peak areas of each of the extracted compounds were expressed as percentages to indicate the relative concentration of each, of which ethyl acetate is distinguished by being responsible for the fruity aroma notes. Thus, the fiber PDMS / DVB was the best as it enabled to extract a greater amount of volatile compounds

  9. Business culture in the Caribbean region: differences and similarities between Jamaica, Barbados and Bermuda.

    OpenAIRE

    MUJURU, SHEPHERD

    2012-01-01

    Globalization has led to the creation of extensive business networks and collaboration around the world, which business organizations should not ignore if they are to survive and grow in these volatile markets of the 21st century. However, cultural diversity is one of many barriers limiting the smooth foreign market entry for business organizations, executive managers and other in-ternational employees. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate specific business cultural elements of thr...

  10. Barbados Oxygen Isotope Data (delta 18O) for the Late Pleistocene

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral-based delta18O time-series derived from measurements made on submerged or drowned coral reef sequence. The core samples used have been described elsewhere...

  11. Multibeam collection for KN197-08: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2010-05-22 to 2010-06-24, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for MV1110: Multibeam data collected aboard Melville from 2011-09-03 to 2011-10-08, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for AT21-04: Multibeam data collected aboard Atlantis from 2012-07-13 to 2012-07-29, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for AT21-02: Multibeam data collected aboard Atlantis from 2012-06-01 to 2012-06-17, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Academic Achievement, Pupil Participation and Integration of Group Work Skills in Secondary School Classrooms in Trinidad and Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Anthony; Jules, Vena; Kutnick, Peter; Layne, Clarissa

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown a positive relationship between a rise in schooling levels and economic production [World Bank, 2005. A Time to Choose: Caribbean Development in the 21st Century. World Bank, Washington, DC; Jules, V., Panneflek, A., 2000. EFA in the Caribbean: Assessment 2000, Sub-Regional Report, vol. 2, The State of Education in the Caribbean…

  16. Understanding the impacts of medical tourism on health human resources in Barbados: a prospective, qualitative study of stakeholder perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie; Turner, Leigh; Johnston, Rory

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourism is a global health practice where patients travel internationally with the intention of receiving medical services. A range of low, middle, and high income countries are encouraging investment in the medical tourism sector, including countries in the Caribbean targeting patients in North America and Europe. While medical tourism has the potential to provide economic and employment opportunities in destination countries, there are concerns that it could encourage ...

  17. An analysis of the subtypes of dengue fever infections in Barbados 2003–2007 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gittens-St Hilaire M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with IgM antibodies to dengue fever infection to determine the serotypes present by molecular techniques. A representative sample (~20%/per year of patients diagnosed with dengue fever infection were selected based on the detection of IgM antibodies in the acute phase serum sample. RNA was extracted from each sample and reverse transcribed. Following this, the amplicons were electrophoresed and serotyped based on band sizes. Results This study consisted of 71 males and 101 females ranging in age from 0 – 50+ yrs giving a total of 172 persons with an average of 34.4 patients per year. Onset averaged 6.9 days ranging from 0–90 days. Common symptoms were as follows: fever (69%, headache (52%, arthralgia (36%, ocular pain (32%, emesis (15% and lumbar pain (15%. All patients investigated with the exception of one, were infected with DENV-3. Conclusion DENV-3 is currently circulating on the island and not DENV-1 or DENV-2 as in previous years. This has implications for the enhancement of clinical, laboratory and environmental surveillance systems.

  18. Review: Allsopp, J. & Jennings, Z. (eds.) Language Education in the Caribbean: Selected Articles by Dennis Craig. Jamaica, Barbados & Trinidad and Tobago: University of the West Indies Press

    OpenAIRE

    Migge, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Language Education in the Caribbean opens with a preface highlighting Craig’s proactive social engagement through a discussion of his popular Viewpoint columns written for the Guyana Broadcasting Company and an introduction outlining the main concerns of his academic publications. It then reprints four of his articles dealing with the socio-linguistic context of the English-official Caribbean and four focusing on effective teaching and learning policies and approaches for this context. With r...

  19. Multibeam collection for RB0601: Multibeam data collected aboard Ronald Brown from 2006-02-15 to 2006-03-05, departing from Charleston, SC and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  20. Multibeam collection for RB0702: Multibeam data collected aboard Ronald Brown from 2007-04-14 to 2007-04-29, departing from San Juan, Puerto Rico and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  1. Multibeam collection for RB1103: Multibeam data collected aboard Ronald Brown from 2011-11-29 to 2011-11-29, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Charleston, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  2. Multibeam collection for RB0703: Multibeam data collected aboard Ronald Brown from 2007-05-02 to 2007-05-29, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for KN189-03: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2007-05-28 to 2007-06-11, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Reykjavik, Iceland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Multibeam collection for RC2602: Multibeam data collected aboard Robert Conrad from 1985-02-04 to 1985-02-26, departing from Ascension Island and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Multibeam collection for KN197-04: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2010-02-19 to 2010-03-12, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Fortaleza, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  6. Multibeam collection for RC2605: Multibeam data collected aboard Robert Conrad from 1985-04-03 to 1985-05-05, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Panama City, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  7. Multibeam collection for EW9207: Multibeam data collected aboard Maurice Ewing from 1992-06-06 to 1992-07-06, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for KN210-04: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2013-03-25 to 2013-05-09, departing from Montevideo, Uruguay and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for KN145L18: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 1996-05-20 to 1996-06-19, departing from Montevideo, Uruguay and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for EW0308: Multibeam data collected aboard Maurice Ewing from 2003-10-02 to 2003-10-18, departing from Bergen, Norway and returning to Bridgetown, Barbados

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for EW9210: Multibeam data collected aboard Maurice Ewing from 1992-09-29 to 1992-11-09, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to St. George's, Bermuda

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Improving the Quality of Basic Education, Volume 6. Country Papers: Antigua, Bermuda, India, St. Kitts, Nevis, Turks & Caicos Islands. Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers (11th, Barbados, October 29-November 2, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commonwealth Inst., London (England).

    Commonwealth Ministries of Education were asked to report on how they are undertaking the improvement of the quality of basic education in their respective countries. The papers in this volume focus on: (1) Antigua; (2) Bermuda; (3) India; (4) St. Kitts and Nevis; and (5) Turks and Caicos Islands. Charts and statistical data support each country's…

  13. Multibeam collection for EW0309: Multibeam data collected aboard Maurice Ewing from 2003-10-22 to 2003-11-09, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to St. George's, Bermuda

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for MV1111: Multibeam data collected aboard Melville from 2011-10-10 to 2011-10-31, departing from Bridgetown, Barbados and returning to Port Elizabeth, South Africa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. 7 CFR 305.17 - Authorized treatments; exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Uruguay, Vietnam, Yemen, and Zaire. (3) Mangoes with seeds from Hawaii and from Barbados, Dominica, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Lucia, and all countries outside of North, Central, and South...

  16. Faults of the Caribbean Region (flt6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset describes faults and structural features of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin...

  17. La Leche League International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arabic, French) Argentina (Spanish) Australia (English) Austria, La Leche Liga Österreich (German) Barbados (English) Belgium (Dutch) Belgium ( ... Policy Store Donate Copyright © 2008-2016 by La Leche League International and those posting information. All Rights ...

  18. 26 CFR 301.7701-2 - Business entities; definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Internal Revenue Code and related provisions under 26 CFR subchapter C, Employment Taxes and..., Sociedad Anonima Australia, Public Limited Company Austria, Aktiengesellschaft Barbados, Limited Company Belgium, Societe Anonyme Belize, Public Limited Company Bolivia, Sociedad Anonima Brazil,...

  19. Chironomus larvae (Chironomidae: Diptera) as water quality indicators along an environmental gradient in a neotropical urban stream

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja Gomes Machado; Danielle Christine Stenner Nassarden; Francyele dos Santos; Isabelle Christina Gonçalves Boaventura; Gregory Perrier; Fernanda Silveira Carvalho de Souza; Eucarlos de Lima Martins; Marcelo Sacardi Biudes

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic interference in urban lotic systems is a factor affecting the biota of waterbodies. Aquatic macro invertebrates are an important food source for fish and are valuable indicators of water quality. The objective of this work was to study Chironomus larvae (Chironomidae: Diptera) distribution along an environmental gradient in Barbado Stream, Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. No individual Chironomus was found in the springs of Barbado Stream, which may indicate preservation of the area. During ...

  20. An epidemiological study of rates of illness in passengers and crew at a busy Caribbean cruise port

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Cathy Ann; Morris, Euclid; Unwin, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Caribbean has one of the largest cruise ship industries in the world, with close to 20 million visitors per year. The potential for communicable disease outbreaks on vessels and the transmission by ship between countries is high. Barbados has one of the busiest ports in the Caribbean. Our aim was to describe and analyse the epidemiology of illnesses experienced by passengers and crew arriving at the Bridgetown Port, Barbados between 2009 and 2013. Methods Data on the illnesses ...

  1. Diagnóstico e quantificação de doenças fúngicas da acerola no Estado da Paraíba Diagnostic and quantification of barbados cherry diseases in the State of Paraíba, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes A. Almeida; Egberto Araújo; Hermes Gonçalves Junior; Artur F. Barreto; Renato A. G. Carvalho

    2003-01-01

    Objetivando o diagnóstico e quantificação das doenças da acerola (Malpighia emarginata) no Estado da Paraíba, realizou-se um levantamento nas microrregiões do Sertão, Curimatau, Brejo e Litoral. As doenças identificadas foram a cercosporiose (Cercospora sp.), fusariose (Fusarium oxysporum), fumagina (Capnodium sp.), antracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) e mancha de Alternaria (Alternaria sp.). Além dessas, no teste de patogenicidade, verificou-se o desenvolvimento de lesões circulares, ...

  2. Development and Leaf Consumption by Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Reared on Leaves of Agroenergy Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, M F; Nava, D E; Geissler, L O; Melo, M; Garcia, M S; Krüger, R

    2013-12-01

    Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a polyphagous pest that threatens more than 24 species of crop plants including those used for biodiesel production such as Ricinus communis (castor bean), Jatropha curcas (Barbados nut), and Aleurites fordii (tung oil tree). The development and leaf consumption by S. cosmioides reared on leaves of these three species were studied under controlled laboratory conditions. The egg-to-adult development time of S. cosmioides was shortest when reared on castor bean leaves and longest when reared on tung oil tree leaves. Larvae reared on castor bean and Barbados nut leaves had seven instars, whereas those reared on tung oil tree leaves had eight. Females originating from larvae reared on castor bean and Barbados nut leaves showed greater fecundity than did females originating from larvae reared on tung oil tree leaves. Insects fed on castor bean leaves had shorter life spans than those fed on tung oil tree and Barbados nut leaves although the oviposition period did not differ significantly. The intrinsic and finite rates of increase were highest for females reared on castor bean leaves. Total leaf consumption was highest for larvae reared on tung oil tree leaves and lowest for those reared on Barbados nut leaves. We conclude that castor bean is a more appropriate host plant for the development of S. cosmioides than are Barbados nut and tung oil tree. PMID:27193276

  3. Development and Leaf Consumption by Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Reared on Leaves of Agroenergy Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, M F; Nava, D E; Geissler, L O; Melo, M; Garcia, M S; Krüger, R

    2013-12-01

    Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a polyphagous pest that threatens more than 24 species of crop plants including those used for biodiesel production such as Ricinus communis (castor bean), Jatropha curcas (Barbados nut), and Aleurites fordii (tung oil tree). The development and leaf consumption by S. cosmioides reared on leaves of these three species were studied under controlled laboratory conditions. The egg-to-adult development time of S. cosmioides was shortest when reared on castor bean leaves and longest when reared on tung oil tree leaves. Larvae reared on castor bean and Barbados nut leaves had seven instars, whereas those reared on tung oil tree leaves had eight. Females originating from larvae reared on castor bean and Barbados nut leaves showed greater fecundity than did females originating from larvae reared on tung oil tree leaves. Insects fed on castor bean leaves had shorter life spans than those fed on tung oil tree and Barbados nut leaves although the oviposition period did not differ significantly. The intrinsic and finite rates of increase were highest for females reared on castor bean leaves. Total leaf consumption was highest for larvae reared on tung oil tree leaves and lowest for those reared on Barbados nut leaves. We conclude that castor bean is a more appropriate host plant for the development of S. cosmioides than are Barbados nut and tung oil tree.

  4. Chironomus larvae (Chironomidae: Diptera as water quality indicators along an environmental gradient in a neotropical urban stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Gomes Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic interference in urban lotic systems is a factor affecting the biota of waterbodies. Aquatic macro invertebrates are an important food source for fish and are valuable indicators of water quality. The objective of this work was to study Chironomus larvae (Chironomidae: Diptera distribution along an environmental gradient in Barbado Stream, Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. No individual Chironomus was found in the springs of Barbado Stream, which may indicate preservation of the area. During the study period, we found 40.3 and 94.4 individuals/m2 at points 3 and 4 (low course, respectively. There is eutrophication in these sites due to domestic sewage discharges, indicating low quality water. The Barbado Stream needs restoration projects that include an awareness of the residents of their neighborhood’s environmental importance, and investments in the sanitation sector to prioritize the collection and treatment of wastewater and solid waste collection.

  5. Primary productivity and nitrogen fixation by Trichodesmium spp. in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parab, S.G.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    from 289 to 276 525 mgCm-2d-1 (Morel, et al., 1996). Steven (1971) reported an annual average of 288 mgCm-526 2d-1 for a station off the NW coast of Barbados. Beers, et al. (1968) found an annual mean 527 of 110 mgCm-2d-1 for a station...

  6. Atmospheric tritium. Progress report, July 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the development of field equipment for sampling tritium in environmental samples. The performance of prototype tritiated hydrocarbon samples is discussed. Data are presented on the content of tritium in samples of rain water collected in Miami, Florida, Western Samoa, and Barbados during 1975, and tritium compounds in atmospheric samples collected at various world locations during 1975

  7. Decapod crustaceans from the Neogene of the Caribbean: diversity, distribution and prospectus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, J.S.H.; Portell, R.W.; Donovan, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The Neogene decapod crustaceans are reviewed from Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, Anguilla, Barbados, Carriacou, Costa Rica, Cuba, Florida, Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic), Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts, Tintamare Island, Trinidad and Venezuela. The most widely distributed ta

  8. Dunking behaviour in Carib grackles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morand-Ferron, J.; Lefebvre, L.; Reader, S.M.; Sol, D.; Elvin, S.

    2004-01-01

    Dunking behaviour, the dipping of food in water, has been anecdotally observed in more than 25 species of birds in the wild, but its function and ecology have not been systematically studied. In experiments conducted in the field and in captivity on Carib grackles, Quiscalus lugubris, in Barbados, w

  9. A Study of Public Library Users in Some Countries of Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Alvaro Agudo

    This user survey was part of a three-part diagnostic study that sought to obtain information on how public libraries operate in Latin America (Argentina, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, and Venezuela) and the Caribbean (Barbados, Grenada, Jamaica, and Surinam) and the social role performed by this type of service in the region.…

  10. Environmental Education Manual. Teacher's Guide to Environmental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Stafford; Williams, Eugenie

    This five-unit volume is intended for use principally as a guide to the teaching of environmental education in upper secondary schools in Barbados. Topic areas of units include: (1) the environment and environmental conservation; (2) erosion/conservation and land use/misuse; (3) destruction/protection of wildlife and the importance, destruction,…

  11. Review of the windpower activities at the Brace Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawand, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    A chronology of windpower studies at the experimental station on Barbados is presented that includes the various development activities on wheeling windmills whose power output is utilized through electrical and electronic systems. A list of institute publications on windpower is included.

  12. THE ATMOSPHERIC CYCLING AND AIR-SEA EXCHANGE OF MERCURY SPECIES IN THE SOUTH AND EQUATORIAL ATLANTIC OCEAN. (R829796)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of gas-, particle- and precipitation-phases of atmospheric mercury(Hg) were made in the South and equatorial Atlantic Ocean as part of the 1996IOC Trace Metal Baseline Study (Montevideo, Uruguay to Barbados). Total gaseousmercury (TGM) ranged from ...

  13. Copepoda associated with West Indian Invertebrates – IV The genera Octopicola, Pseudanthessius and Meomicola (Cyclopoida, Lichomolgidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, Jan H.; Humes, Arthur G.; Gooding, Richard U.

    1963-01-01

    Our thanks are due to the following for their identifications of host animals: Dr. W. ADAM, Muséum Royal d’Histoire Naturelle, Brussels (cephalopods from Curaçao); Dr. GILBERT L. VOSS, University of Miami Marine Laboratory, Florida (cephalopods from Barbados); Mrs. R. E. TEAGLE, British Museum (Natu

  14. Educational Developments in the British West Indies: A Historical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Chad O.

    2012-01-01

    Formal education within the English-speaking Caribbean Community (CARICOM) may be traced back to the establishment of Codrington grammar school in Barbados in 1743. After more than two centuries of British colonial rule the educational systems within CARICOM states continue to reflect the academic traditions of their former colonizer. Prior to…

  15. Island-specific preferences of tourists for environmental features: implications of climate change for tourism dependent states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uyarra, M.C.; Cote, I.M. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation; Gill, J.A. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences; Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Norwich (United Kingdom); Tinch, R.T. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences; Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Viner, D. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Climate Research Unit; Watkinson, A.R. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation; East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences

    2005-03-15

    Climate change may affect important environmental components of holiday destinations, which might have repercussions for tourism-dependent economies. This study documents the importance of environmental attributes in determining the choice and holiday enjoyment of tourists visiting Bonaire and Barbados, two Caribbean islands with markedly different tourism markets and infrastructure. Three hundred and sixteen and 338 participants from Bonaire and Barbados, respectively, completed standardized questionnaires. Warm temperatures, clear waters and low health risks were the most important environmental features determining holiday destination choice. However, tourists in Bonaire thereafter prioritized marine wildlife attributes (i.e. coral and fish diversity and abundance) over other environmental features, whereas tourists in Barbados exhibited stronger preferences for terrestrial features, particularly beach characteristics. The willingness of tourists to revisit these islands was strongly linked to the state of the preferred environmental attributes. More than 80% of tourists in Bonaire and Barbados would be unwilling to return for the same holiday price in the event, respectively, of coral bleaching as a result of elevated sea surface temperatures and reduced beach area as a result of sea level rise. Climate change might have a significant impact on Caribbean tourism economy through alteration of environmental features important to destination selection. Island-specific management strategies, such as focusing resources on the protection of key marine or terrestrial features, may provide a means of reducing the environmental and economic impacts of climate change. (author)

  16. A Systematic Review of the Hispaniolan Snake Genus Hypsirhynchus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Albert

    1971-01-01

    One of the least known of the endemic Hispaniolan colubrid snake genera is Hypsirhynchus. The genus was proposed by GUNTHER (1858) for one specimen of a new snake, purportedly from the island of Barbados, to which he gave the name H. ferox. COPE (1862) later described H. scalaris from Hispaniola (ty

  17. Identifying African dust sources that contribute to the seasonal cycles of dust transport to the Caribbean Basin and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospero, J. M.; Ginoux, P. A.; Molinie, J.

    2014-12-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados have yielded a detailed picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin that shows a strong seasonal cycle with a maximum in boreal summer and a minimum in winter. Recently Prospero et al. (Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 2014) presented 10 years (2002 - 2011) of aerosol measurements made at Cayenne, French Guiana, along with concurrent dust measurements on Barbados. The Cayenne study, coupled with satellite products and other evidence, shows that during spring African dust is carried to a broad region of northeastern South America in quantities comparable to, or greater than, those measured at Barbados in summer. Various lines of evidence suggest that the sources that impact on Cayenne in spring are mainly in the Sahel region, including the Bodélé Depression. In summer transport to Barbados is believed to be most affected by emissions that lie in more northerly regions. Thus the record of measurements at Cayenne and Barbados provide a data set that could be used to test the ability of dust transport models to replicate the seasonal shift of dust sources and the consequent impact on transport to these two sites. Here we attempt to link the measurements at Cayenne and Barbados to specific source regions using the GFDL global climate model (Donner et al., 2011) which simulates aerosol mass distributions for dust and other aerosol components. Winds are nudged with the NCEP re-analysis as in Li et al. (2008). The model is run repeatedly over the years 1999-2010, activating dust sources in only one North African country in each run (e.g., Mali, Mauritania, Algeria, Niger, etc.). The model accurately depicts the strong seasonal contrast in dust transport to Barbados and Cayenne and shows the changing impact of African sources over the course of the year. In our presentation we will discuss the model results and compare them to the measurements at the receptor sites. It is notable that during the dust seasons at

  18. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Harassment Policy in Jamaica: The Absence of a National Sexual Harassment Policy, and the Way Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, R.; P.A. Bourne

    2012-01-01

    Within the Caribbean only countries such as Belize, Bahamas and Guyana have legitimized legislation against sexual harassment. Countries such as Jamaica, Barbados and St. Kitts and Nevis have draft bills before parliament. In the Jamaican context, the country in September 1981 signed the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) which came into effect in 1984 which deals with the issue of sexual harassment under Articles 2 (Policy Measures and Legislat...

  19. Decapod crustaceans from the Neogene of the Caribbean: diversity, distribution and prospectus

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, J.S.H.; Portell, R.W.; Donovan, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The Neogene decapod crustaceans are reviewed from Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, Anguilla, Barbados, Carriacou, Costa Rica, Cuba, Florida, Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic), Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts, Tintamare Island, Trinidad and Venezuela. The most widely distributed taxa, both stratigraphically and geographically, are callianassids and Calappa (both with easily identifiable dactyli), and portunids. The latter include eleven genera in the study area; of these, Ca...

  20. Estimative of the nutritional value of agroindustrial byproducts by using in vitro gas production technique
    Estimativa do valor nutricional de subprodutos agroindustriais pelo uso da técnica de produção de gás

    OpenAIRE

    Elzânia Sales Pereira; Ivone Yurika Mizubuti; Edson Luis de Azambuja Ribeiro; José Neuman Miranda Neiva; Patrícia Guimarães Pimentel; Labib Santos Duarte; Greicy Mitzi Bezerra Moreno; Andréa Pereira Pinto; Marcus Roberto Goes Ferreira Costa; José Nery Rocha Júnior

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the total carbohydrates fractions and to estimate the digestion rate of non-fibrous carbohydrates of agroindustrial byproducts by using the gas production technique. The agroindustrial byproducts evaluated were the following: cashew, passion fruit, pineapple, barbados cherry, annatto and melon, and each sample was incubated in quadruplicate. After mixing all contents thoroughly, the bottles were placed in an incubator at 39ºC, and connecting the lid...

  1. DYNAMIQUE DES PRISMES OROGÉNIQUES, LE RÔLE DES FLUIDES

    OpenAIRE

    Deville, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The work presented is a dossier presented to anobyainaccreditation to supervise research (HDR). It concerns the role of fluids in orogenic prisms. The presentation is organized around three approaches: (1) an integrated approach to iconic sites: a mature accretionary prism (the prism of Barbados) and a chain collision (Western Alps), (2) a methodological approach, and (3) a thematic approach to study processes poorly understood and to discuss problems of structure and dynamics of convergent o...

  2. Family narratives and migration dynamics : Barbadians to Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Chamberlain

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Uses life-story interviews of Barbadian migrant families in both Barbados and the UK to study the family as the tool and the material which creates and shapes historical mentalities and identities. The author shows how the links between family and migration continue to play a role in the motivation of migrants. Also published in Immigrants & Minorities 14(2 1995, p. 153-169

  3. Ocean Data and Information Network for the Caribbean and South America Region (ODINCARSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, R.

    2005-01-01

    ODINCARSA was set up primarily as a mechanism for assessing the current and potential state of development of national data centers and to create the means for mutual capacity building in South America and the Caribbean. It further sought to develop a cooperation network for managing and exchanging oceanographic data and information within these regions. ODINCARSA is a network which is integrated by 19 IOC Member States: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Cuba, Dom...

  4. Ocean Data and Information Network for the Caribbean and South America Regions (ODINCARSA): Report of Activities 2005-2006 and Proposed Work Plan 2007-2008.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez Güingla, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    ODINCARSA was set up primarily as a mechanism for assessing the current and potential state of development of national data centers and to create the means for mutual capacity building in South America and the Caribbean. It further sought to develop a cooperation network for managing and exchanging oceanographic data and information within these regions. ODINCARSA is a network which is integrated by 19 IOC Member States: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Cuba, ...

  5. Child Sexual Abuse in the Eastern Caribbean: The report of a study carried out across the Eastern Caribbean during the period October 2008 to June 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Adele; Trotman Jemmott, Ena

    2009-01-01

    This report from the Centre for Applied Childhood Studies at the University of Huddersfield in the United Kingdom (UK) and the UK-based Action for Children describes an action research project study that investigated child sexual abuse across several Caribbean countries. The study, "Perceptions of, Attitudes to, and Opinions on Child Sexual Abuse in the Eastern Caribbean", was carried out across 6 countries - Anguilla, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, and St. Kitts and Nevis - in an e...

  6. Role orientations of Third World urban planners

    OpenAIRE

    P L Knox; C O Masilela

    1990-01-01

    Although urban planners in Third World countries enjoy relatively high levels of power and autonomy, little is known about their values, attitudes, and professional role orientations. The findings are reported of a questionnaire survey designed to elicit information on the professional culture of planners from Barbados, India, Jamaica, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Particular attention is given to respondents' perceived attributes of a 'good planner' and to their attitudes to specific issues relating...

  7. The children of Africa in the colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Melanie J.; Professor Alan Knight, Professor Colin Clarke

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is a study of free people of colour during the era of emancipation in Barbados, with a particular focus on their relationships with and attitudes towards slaves. It examines the period between the 1816 slave rebellion and the 1854 cholera epidemic, encompassing the apprenticeship period of 1834-1838. The thesis argues that differences of class, political ideology, gender and the specific nature of their relationships with slaves determined emancipation's impact on ...

  8. Sex Feel Good: Enjoyment of Sexual Intercourse by Some Barbadian Teenagers

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Hutchinson Miller Ph.D

    2013-01-01

    Within Caribbean societies and Barbados in particular issues on human sexuality are approached from a pathological, controlling, and judgmental perspective. These views resist an acknowledgment that children are sexual beings which manifestations are more evident during the teen years. Despite societal resistance, teenage pregnancies and sexual abuse forced societies to deal even if reluctantly with teenage sexuality. Based on Caribbean conservative approach to matters around sexuality it com...

  9. Report on the CSC project group meeting on alternative energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under its coordinated R and D programme the Commonwealth Science Council in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Consumer Affairs, Barbados, organized a meeting to identify suitable projects for inter-country collaboration. Specifically the meeting had three aims: 1. Review present state of activities in alternative energy resources and assess small scale energy needs in the region. 2. Identify specific projects for inter-country collaboration. 3. Draft joint project proposals for such collaboration. A small group of experts (Annex VII) from Britain, Canada, USA and CSC secretariat staff made detailed plans for the Barbados meeting. With a view to assessing real energy needs locally, the Group recommended that a study be undertaken in Barbados prior to the meeting. A report on such a study was presented at the meeting. Member countries were also invited to prepare country papers. In addition, following the planning Group's recommendation, several technical papers were prepared. These covered subjects ranging from conceptual aspects to clarify objectives, assumptions and criteria to a review of all alternative energy technologies

  10. Helping To Integrate The Visually Challenged Into Mainstream Society Through A Low-Cost Braille Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Jordan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The visually challenged are often alienated from mainstream society because of their disabilities. This problem is even more pronounced in developing countries which often do not have the resources necessary to integrate this people group into their communities or even help them to become independent. It should therefore be the aim of governments in developing countries to provide this vulnerable people group with access to assistive technologies at a low cost. This paper describes an ongoing project that aims to provide low-cost assistive technologies to the visually challenged in Barbados. As a part of this project a study was conducted on a sample of visually challenged members of the Barbados Association for the Blind and Deaf to determine their ICT skills, knowledge of Braille and their use of assistive technologies. An analysis of the results prompted the design and creation of a low-cost Braille device prototype. The cost of this prototype was about one-half that of a commercially available device and can be used without a screen reader. This device should help create equal opportunities for the visually challenged in Barbados and other developing countries. It should also allow the visually challenged to become more independent.

  11. Sex Feel Good: Enjoyment of Sexual Intercourse by Some Barbadian Teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Hutchinson Miller Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Within Caribbean societies and Barbados in particular issues on human sexuality are approached from a pathological, controlling, and judgmental perspective. These views resist an acknowledgment that children are sexual beings which manifestations are more evident during the teen years. Despite societal resistance, teenage pregnancies and sexual abuse forced societies to deal even if reluctantly with teenage sexuality. Based on Caribbean conservative approach to matters around sexuality it comes as no surprise that concerns around teenage sexuality is concentrated within discussions, discourses and scholarship about reproductive health, sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. Based on the literature researched for Barbados and the rest of the Caribbean teenage sexual desire, and pleasurable sexual intercourses are virtually none-existent. It is the intention with this paper to contribute to scholarship on teenage sexual pleasure within Barbadian society. For its analysis the paper will utilize data collected from a teen sexuality research done during 2011-2012 among two secondary schools in Barbados. The main objective is to demonstrate that Barbadian teenagers are involved and enjoying sexual intercourse and other sexually related activities despite hegemonic discourses of sexual repression and control.

  12. A Novel Multiproxy Approach to High-resolution Speleothem Paleoclimate Reconstruction in the Caribbean Region During the Late Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J.; Ouellette, G.; Celestian, A. J.; Kintzel, E.; Cole, J.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V. J.; Durkee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Barbados is the easternmost island in the Caribbean region, and is uniquely situated between the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Being an isolated island with a karstified aquifer providing the majority of the nation's water resources, Barbados has found itself in water scarce situations in recent years. Groundwater recharge is determined mainly by precipitation variability, and thus a better understanding of long-term shifts in rainfall patterns in the region will aid in future water resource management. To date, speleothem proxy records provide robust, absolutely-dated records of past climatic changes, such as precipitation, yet continued improvement in analytical methods is needed to fully exploit their usefulness as paleoclimate records. This study presents a paleoclimate reconstruction for the Late Holocene on Barbados using stable and radiogenic isotope ratios in speleothem lamina as proxies. In addition, it introduces the use of novel mineralogical analyses using Raman spectroscopy and large chamber-scanning electron microscopy to supplement the oxygen isotope record. For the past 1,500 years, the speleothem record indicates average δ18O values near -4.1 0/00, maximum δ18O values around -3.2 ‰ that coincide with the Little Ice Age climate event, while minimum δ18O values around -5.3 ‰ occur during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. Raman spectral analysis shows a recent period of increased Mg substitution, which may result from changes in groundwater recharge and potentially represents anthropogenic changes to the island's epikarst aquifer caused by European settlement and sugar cane cultivation on Barbados. Electron imaging revealed chemically distinct layers of detritus within the stalagmite sample, facilitating precise sampling for U-series dating while also providing some information on the nature of bedrock weathering. Additionally, time series analysis of the isotope record indicates multidecadal and multicentennial periodicities that conform well

  13. Regional strategy tested in Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia have joined forces in the world's 1st regional Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) effort -- the Caribbean CSM. The Barbados Family Planning Association (BFPS) is overseeing the operation, which begins selling 2 contraceptive pills and a condom in early February. Costs and start-up times were shaved by adopting brand names and advertising materials from Jamaica's highly successful CSM project. Jamaica's popular "Panther" condom and "Perle" oral contraceptive (OC) are being used by the Caribbean CSM project. Perle's 9-year-old package has been redesigned and the Caribbean CSM project also is selling a 2nd, low-dose version called "Perle-LD." The products are manufactured in the US by Syntex as Noriday and Norminest, respectively. But the regional approach's financial gains also had a debit side, most notably a tripling of bureaucratic procedures. Part of project difficulties stem from differences among the 3 Caribbean countries. While sharing a common cultural heritage, St. Lucians speak a patois dialect in addition to the English prevalent on the other islands. The biggest hurdle was overcoming an economic disparity between Barbados and its less affluent neighbors, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. The CSM project decided to try a 2-tier product pricing strategy. In US currency, prices run $1.75 per cycle for both OCs on Barbados, but $1.26 on St. Vincent and St. Lucia. A Panther 3-pack costs 75 cents on Barbados and 42 cents on the othe 2 islands. The project is being promoted with generic family planning media advertisements. The project also has held physician orientation seminars on each island. The pilot program will be accompanied by retailer training seminars. In addition the project may introduce a spermicidal foaming tablet, once the US Food and Drug Administration approvs a new American-made product. The unique Caribbean CSM project may spread an idea as potent as the family planning message. Its success could transmit the

  14. Regional strategy tested in Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia have joined forces in the world's 1st regional Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) effort -- the Caribbean CSM. The Barbados Family Planning Association (BFPS) is overseeing the operation, which begins selling 2 contraceptive pills and a condom in early February. Costs and start-up times were shaved by adopting brand names and advertising materials from Jamaica's highly successful CSM project. Jamaica's popular "Panther" condom and "Perle" oral contraceptive (OC) are being used by the Caribbean CSM project. Perle's 9-year-old package has been redesigned and the Caribbean CSM project also is selling a 2nd, low-dose version called "Perle-LD." The products are manufactured in the US by Syntex as Noriday and Norminest, respectively. But the regional approach's financial gains also had a debit side, most notably a tripling of bureaucratic procedures. Part of project difficulties stem from differences among the 3 Caribbean countries. While sharing a common cultural heritage, St. Lucians speak a patois dialect in addition to the English prevalent on the other islands. The biggest hurdle was overcoming an economic disparity between Barbados and its less affluent neighbors, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. The CSM project decided to try a 2-tier product pricing strategy. In US currency, prices run $1.75 per cycle for both OCs on Barbados, but $1.26 on St. Vincent and St. Lucia. A Panther 3-pack costs 75 cents on Barbados and 42 cents on the othe 2 islands. The project is being promoted with generic family planning media advertisements. The project also has held physician orientation seminars on each island. The pilot program will be accompanied by retailer training seminars. In addition the project may introduce a spermicidal foaming tablet, once the US Food and Drug Administration approvs a new American-made product. The unique Caribbean CSM project may spread an idea as potent as the family planning message. Its success could transmit the

  15. Nivel de infección por estróngilos digestivos de padrotes ovinos y de sus hijas como criterio de selección de ovinos helmintorresistentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Morales-Contreras

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mediante el análisis multivariado de correspondencia lineal simple, se evaluó laasociación entre los niveles de infección por nemátodos gastrointestinales, expresados en recuentos de huevos por gramo de heces (h.p.g. y categorizados como Negativo, Leve, Moderado y Alto, tanto de las hijas agrupadas por padrote, como de los padrotes. El padrote de raza Bergamasca se asoció con hijas con niveles de infección leves o moderados, mientras que uno de los padrotes de la raza Barbados Barriga Negra, el BBN 1, se asoció con hijas negativas a la infección por estróngilos digestivos, y el otro (BBN 2, con niveles altos de infección de sus hijas. Al analizar cada padrote con sus respectivos niveles de infección se ve que el padrote Bergamasca se asocia con niveles moderados de infección, mientras que el Barbados Barriga Negra 1 (BBN 1 lo hizo con niveles de infección que oscilan entre leves y moderados. El padrote Barbados Barriga Negra 2 (BBN 2 mostró buena correspondencia con niveles de infección altos. Los resultados obtenidos evidencian una buena asociación entre los niveles de infección observados en los padrotes y el de cada lote de hijas separadas por cada padre. Conociendo que el recuento de h.p.g es una expresión fenotípica de resistencia frente a la infección por estróngilos digestivos, característica de índole genética y, por consiguiente heredable, concluimos que el padrote que expresó mejor capacidad helmintorresistente fue el BBN 1.

  16. Atlantic Warm Pool Trigger for the Younger Dryas Climate Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, N. A.; Mortlock, R. A.; Wright, J. D.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Teneva, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence that variability in the size and heat content of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool impacts circum-North Atlantic climate via the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation mode (Wang et al., 2008). The Atlantic Warm Pool spans the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the western tropical North Atlantic. Barbados is located near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool and coupled ocean models suggest that Barbados remains near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool under varying wind stress simulations. Measurements of the oxygen isotope paleothermometer in Acropora palmata coral species recovered from cores offshore Barbados, show a 3oC monotonic decrease in sea surface temperature from 13106 ± 83 to 12744 ± 61 years before present (errors given as 2 sigma). This interval corresponds to a sea level rise from 71.4 meters to 67.1 meters below present levels at Barbados. The 3oC temperature decrease is captured in eight A. palmata specimens that are in stratigraphic sequence, 230Th/234U dated, and analyzed for oxygen isotopes. All measurements are replicated. We are confident that this is the warm pool equivalent of the Younger Dryas climate event. The initiation of this temperature drop in the Atlantic Warm Pool predates the Younger Dryas start in Greenland ice cores, reported to start at 12896 ± 138 years (relative to AD 2000) (Rasmussen et al., 2006), while few other Younger Dryas climate records are dated with similar accuracy to make the comparison. Rasmussen, S.O., Andersen, K.K., Svensson, A.M., Steffensen, J.P., Vinther, B.M., Clausen, H.B., Siggaard-Andersen, M.L., Johnsen, S.J., Larsen, L.B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Bigler, M., Röthlisberger, R., Fischer, H., Goto-Azuma, K., Hansson, M.E., and Ruth, U., 2006, A new Greenland ice core chronology for the last glacial termination: J. Geophys. Res., v. 111, p. D06102. Wang, C., Lee, S.-K., and Enfield, D.B., 2008, Atlantic Warm Pool acting as a link between Atlantic Multidecadal

  17. Dust Transport Across the Atlantic Studied by Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar During the Saltrace Experiment in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-06-01

    During the SALTRACE field experiment, conducted during June/July 2013, the Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic was analyzed by a set of ground based, in-situ and airborne instruments, including a 2-μm coherent DWL (Doppler wind lidar) mounted onboard the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. An overview of the measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction, horizontal and vertical winds retrieved from the DWL are presented together with a brief description of the applied methods. The retrieved measurements provide direct observation of Saharan dust transport mechanisms across the Atlantic as well as island induced lee waves in the Barbados region.

  18. Peter Blackman, Footprints – Poems by Peter Blackman

    OpenAIRE

    Eric, Doumerc

    2015-01-01

    Peter Blackman (1909-1993) was born in Barbados in 1909 and, after receiving a traditional colonial education at Harrison College, one of the island’s best schools, he studied theology at the University of Durham on a scholarship obtained through the Anglican Church. In 1935 he became a priest and was sent to Gambia. On arrival, he noticed that black priests ranked lower than white priests and were paid less too. He challenged the authorities over this blatant racism, but finally decided to r...

  19. Relation between phylogeny of African green monkey CD4 genes and their respective simian immunodeficiency virus genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Diop, Ousmane;

    1997-01-01

    An apparent species-specific relatedness of SIVagm suggests a coevolution with their natural hosts. However, the exact species or subspecies classification of African green monkeys, AGM, is uncertain because current classification schemes rely on phenotype markers, while more definitive genetic...... data are lacking. In this study, the CD4 protein involved in tissue type recognition was gentically cloned and sequence from PBMC RNA from all AGM species, including Barbados green monkeys (BGM). Phylogenetic trees were constructed that also included genomic CD4 nucleotide sequences from patas, sooty...

  20. Evaluating alcohol related birth defects in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shuler, Kristrina A.; Schroeder, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol Related Birth Defects (ARBD) are yet undocumented among past communities, although alcohol is the leading cause of non-heritable birth defects in the US today. We evaluate potential ARBD at Newton Plantation, Barbados (ca. 1660-1820), where earlier studies suggest frequent, community......-wide consumption of lead-tainted rum by enslaved Africans. Skeletons excavated in 1997-1998 (n= 45) were examined for congenital anomalies, using clinical/experimental descriptions to differentially diagnose possible ARBD. Enamel lead data served as a proxy for developmental exposure to tainted rum in a subsample...

  1. Flavonóides em seleções de acerola (Malpighia sp l.. 1- Teor de antocianinas e flavonóis totais Flavonoids in acerola (Malpighia sp L. selections. 1- Anthocyanins and flavonols content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Arroxelas Galvão de Lima

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Os flavonóides englobam classes de pigmentos naturais encontrados com freqüência nos vegetais. As antocianinas e os flavonóis são compostos que pertencem ao grupo dos flavonóides e são responsáveis pela coloração que varia de vermelho vivo à violeta e de branco à amarelo claro, respectivamente. A cor vermelha da acerola é decorrente da presença de antocianinas. Entretanto, a propagaç ão da aceloreira por sementes tem gerado frutos com coloração que varia de amarelo a vermelho púrpura. Dessa forma, há o interesse em difundir plantas com produção de frutos com coloração vermelho. Este trabalho teve como objetivo determinar o teor de antocianinas e flavonóis totais nas seleções de acerola - Barbados, Coopama, Flor Branca, Inada, Miró e Okinawa. Os frutos foram colhidos nos meses de março a junho/1999, com coloração vermelha uniforme, e analisados quanto aos teores de antocianinas e flavonóis totais. As seleções Inada e Barbados apresentaram os mais altos teores desses pigmentos, quando comparados aos das demais seleções, tornando-as agronomicamente interessantes.The flavonoids comprise a class of natural pigments that are frequently found in vegetables. The anthocyanins and flavonols are compounds which belong to the flavonoids group and they are responsible for red to violet and white to light-yellow coloration, respectively. The anthocyanins pigments are responsible for the red colour of the acerola fruit. However, the seed propagation of acerola trees has grown fruits which present colour variation from yellow to dark red. So, there is interest to spread acerola trees with red colour fruits. This paper aimed to determine the content of total anthocyanins and flavonols in selections of acerola - Barbados, Coopama, Flor Branca, Inada, Miró e Okinawa. Fruits were harvested based on homogeneous red colour, between the months of March and June/1999, and analysed with regard to the content of total anthocyanins and

  2. Neotropical planorbid snails with apertural lamellae: I. Biomphalaria helophila (Orbigny, 1835

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Lobato Paraense

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available A definition of Biomphalaria helophila (Orbigny, 1835 is presented, based on examination of the shell and reproductive system of topotypic specimens and extended to a number of samples from other localities. The following nominal species and subspecies, collected from type localities, proved junior synonyms of B. helophila: Planorbis albicans Pfeiffer, 1839; Planorbis dentatus Gould, 1844; Planorbis dentiferus CB Adams, 1845; Planorbis dentiferus edentatus CB Adams, 1851; Planorbis dentiens Morelet, 1849; Planorbula dentiens edentula Fischer & Crosse, 1880; Planorbis stagnicola Morelet, 1851; and Tropicorbis shimeki FC Baker, 1945. B. helophila was also identified in samples from Costa Rica, Guatemala, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and Barbados.

  3. Dust Transport Across the Atlantic Studied by Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar During the Saltrace Experiment in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouza Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the SALTRACE field experiment, conducted during June/July 2013, the Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic was analyzed by a set of ground based, in-situ and airborne instruments, including a 2-μm coherent DWL (Doppler wind lidar mounted onboard the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. An overview of the measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction, horizontal and vertical winds retrieved from the DWL are presented together with a brief description of the applied methods. The retrieved measurements provide direct observation of Saharan dust transport mechanisms across the Atlantic as well as island induced lee waves in the Barbados region.

  4. Responses of two genotypes of lambs on the infection of Haemonchus contortus and the level of energy supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Simon P Ginting; Aron Batubara; Endang Romjali; M Rangkuti; Subandriyo,

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the responses of lambs on the infection of Haemonchus contortus and the level of energy supplements. Forty eight male lambs, 3-4 months old were used in a factorial experimental design (2x2x2) which lasted for 9 weeks. The factors were breed (Local Sumatra and Sungai Putih: 50% Local Sumatra, 25% St. Croix; 25% Barbados Blackbelly), level of Haemonchus infection (3,000 L3 and 1,500 L3 per week) and level of energy supplement (2,900 kcal/kg DM and 2,300 kcal/k...

  5. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2012-01-01

    Dear TOJDE Readers,Welcome to the Volume 13 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 7 notes for Editor and 22 articles one book review of 57 authors from 12 different countries have been published. These published articles are from, Barbados, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.In general, around 13 articles and 4 notes for editors have been published in TOJDE so far. I would like to explain, why this time 22 articles and 8 submission...

  6. From Editor vol 11, No.3

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2010-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 11, Number: 3. In this issue it is published 3 notes for Editor, 12 articles, 2 book reviews. And this time, 32 authors from 10 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Barbados, Ghana, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, UAE and USA.“Developing and Validation A Usability Evaluation Tools For Distance Education Websites:Persian Version” has sent as Notes for editor se...

  7. Estudios Entomológicos "EL GUSANO DE LAS HOJAS DE LA YUCA "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego M. F. Luis

    1950-06-01

    Full Text Available Se le conocen muchas denominaciones, siendo las más comunes entre nosotros las de "gusano primavera". "gusano cachón", "gusano de temporadas". "gusano comedor de las hojas" y "gusano pintado", debido a que las larvas se presentan con colores muy variados. Es una mariposa crepuscular de la familia de los Sphingidae, sub-familia Sesiinae (Holland. Abunda en las regiones tropicales y subtropicales, continentales e insulares de América, es decir, desde el Brasil, hasta el Canadá y California, incluyendo las Antillas, Cuba, Puerto Rico, San Cristóbal y Barbados.

  8. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment SALTRACE 2013 - Overview and Early Results (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; Ansmann, A.; Reitebuch, O.; Freudenthaler, V.; Müller, T.; Kandler, K.; Althausen, D.; Busen, R.; Dollner, M.; Dörnbrack, A.; Farrell, D. A.; Gross, S.; Heimerl, K.; Klepel, A.; Kristensen, T. B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Minikin, A.; Prescod, D.; Prospero, J. M.; Rahm, S.; Rapp, M.; Sauer, D. N.; Schaefler, A.; Toledano, C.; Vaughan, M.; Wiegner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important player in the global climate system. In spite of substantial progress in the past decade, many questions in our understanding of the atmospheric and climate effects of mineral dust remain open such as the change of the dust size distribution during transport across the Atlantic Ocean and the associated impact on the radiation budget, the role of wet and dry dust removal mechanisms during transport, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds. To close gaps in our understanding of mineral dust in the climate system, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted in June/July 2013. SALTRACE is a German initiative combining ground-based and airborne in-situ and lidar measurements with meteorological data, long-term measurements, satellite remote sensing and modeling. During SALTRACE, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was based on Sal, Cape Verde, between 11 and 17 June, and on Barbados between 18 June and 11 July 2013. The Falcon was equipped with a suite of in-situ instruments for the measurement of microphysical and optical aerosol properties and with a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar. Ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments were deployed in Barbados and Puerto Rico. Mineral dust from several dust outbreaks was measured by the Falcon between Senegal and Florida. On the eastern side of the Atlantic, dust plumes extended up to 6 km altitude, while the dust layers in the Caribbean were mainly below 4.5 km. The aerosol optical thickness of the dust outbreaks studied ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 at 500 nm in Barbados. Highlights during SALTRACE included the sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June near Barbados. The event was also captured by the ground-based lidar and in-situ instrumentation. Another highlight was the formation of tropical storm

  9. Disease and intercolonial relations: small pox in the British Caribbean, 1902-1904

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pemberton, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of epidemic small pox in the Caribbean at the beginning of the 20th century aggravated the problems inherited from the 19th century posing further challenges for these territories. This study discusses the bitter controversy that it stimulated between Barbados and Trinidad and examines the course of and response to, the disease in both colonies. It is argued that the underlying economic and social implications of the epidemic underscore the relationship between trade and health and demonstrate how regional cooperation was possible even in the midst of rivalry.El brote de la epidemia de viruela en el Caribe a principios del siglo XX intensificó los problemas heredados del siglo XIX, el cual conllevó nuevos retos para estos territorios antillanos. Este ensayo considera la difícil controversia que surgió entre Barbados y Trinidad en relación a dicha epidemia y aborda el transcurso y las maneras en que enfrentaron dicha enfermedad ambas colonias. Se argumenta que las consecuencias económicas y sociales subyacentes a la epidemia revela el carácter de las relaciones comerciales y sanitarias y demuestra cómo aún en medio de rivalidades entre los territorios surgió una colaboración regional entre sus autoridades.

  10. EDUCAÇÃO AMBIENTAL: O DESPERTAR DE UMA PROPOSTA CRÍTICA PARA A FORMAÇÃO DO SUJEITO ECOLÓGICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira DA SILVA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O córrego Barbado, em Cuiabá-MT, a exemplo de outros córregos urbanos, tem sofrido todos os tipos de ações antrópicas, desde obras de canalizações e desvios de seu leito natural, quanto despejos de efluentes domésticos, lixos, destruição de sua mata ciliar e assoreamento. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar alguns aspectos da problemática hidroambiental deste córrego, de sua nascente até a sua foz, usando o monitoramento da qualidade de suas aguas por parâmetros físico-químicos, e por meio da análise da percepção dos moradores do seu entorno. Concluiu-se que o córrego Barbado necessita de projetos de recuperação que incluam desde a conscientização dos moradores do seu entorno sobre a sua importância para o meio ambiente, quanto de investimentos no setor de saneamento básico que priorize a coleta e tratamento de efluentes e a coleta de resíduos sólidos dos bairros que o circundam.

  11. Interannual Modulation of Subtropical Atlantic Boreal Summer Dust Variability by ENSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFlorio, Mike; Goodwin, Ian D.; Cayan, Dan; Miller, Arthur J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pierce, David; Russell, Lynn M.; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-01-01

    Dust variability in the climate system has been studied for several decades, yet there remains an incomplete understanding of the dynamical mechanisms controlling interannual and decadal variations in dust transport. The sparseness of multi-year observational datasets has limited our understanding of the relationship between climate variations and atmospheric dust. We use available observations and a century-length fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulation to show that the El Niño- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) exerts a control on North African dust transport during boreal summer. In CESM, this relationship is stronger over the dusty tropical North Atlantic than near Barbados, one of the few sites having a multi-decadal observed record. During strong La Niña summers in CESM, a statistically significant increase in lower tropospheric easterly wind is associated with an increase in North African dust transport over the Atlantic. Barbados dust and Pacific SST variability are only weakly correlated in both observations and CESM, suggesting that other processes are controlling the crossbasin variability of dust. We also use our CESM simulation to show that the relationship between downstream North African dust transport and ENSO fluctuates on multidecadal timescales and may be modulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Our findings indicate that existing observations of dust over the tropical North Atlantic are not extensive enough to completely describe the variability of dust and dust transport, and demonstrate the importance of global models to supplement and interpret observational records.

  12. Corporal punishment in elementary education: views of Barbadian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S; Payne, M A

    1994-04-01

    Most previous research has suggested that children often express little unconditional disapproval of the use of corporal punishment in schools. However, this might be expected to change when pupils become aware that such treatment is no longer permitted in many countries, or hear it labelled as "abuse." This paper reports on research conducted in elementary schools in the Caribbean island of Barbados, where head teachers (or their authorized deputies) are still permitted by law to use corporal punishment. Findings indicated that approximately three-quarters of pupils surveyed still approved use of corporal punishment with their own age group, although their comments also suggested that a considerable amount of routine (and illegal) "flogging" or "lashing" by regular classroom teachers occurred, which many wished to see stopped. The growing risk of clashes between parents and schools was also identified. While this and other recent studies in Barbados provide little evidence of support for the total abolition of corporal punishment within the educational system, it is hoped that research may have some role to play in exerting pressure on schools to eliminate some of their more ritualized and pedagogically counterproductive practices.

  13. Production, Characterization of Tannase from Penicillium montanense URM 6286 under SSF Using Agroindustrial Wastes, and Application in the Clarification of Grape Juice (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva de Lima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tannase is an enzyme that hydrolyzes esters and lateral bonds of tannins, such as tannic acid, releasing glucose and gallic acid and stands out in the clarification of wines and juices. Fungi of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium are excellent producers of this enzyme. The search for fungi that produce high levels of tannase as well as new substrates for the enzyme production by the SSF is required. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the production of tannase by Aspergillus and Penicillium species through SSF using leaves and agroindustrial waste barbados cherry and mangaba fruit as substrate, select the best producer, optimize production, characterize the crude enzyme extract, and apply it the clarification of grape juice. Selecting the best producer was performed by planning Placket-Burman and RSM. P. montanense showed highest activity with 41.64 U/mL after 72 h of fermentation residue using barbados cherry, with 3.5% tannic acid and 70% moisture. The enzyme showed the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 50°C. The tannase of P. montanense was stable over a wide pH range and temperature and, when applied to grape juice, showed higher efficiency by reducing 46% of the tannin content after incubation 120 m.

  14. Evidences of the Presence of Methane Seeps in the Colombian Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Adriana; Rangel-Buitrago, Nelson; Sellanes, Javier

    2010-05-01

    For the first time in the southern Caribbean Sea Margin of Colombia (between 450 - 700 m deep) we confirm the presence of methane seep communities near the deltas of the Magdalena and Sinu rivers. Some evidences of the occurrence of those communities include: i) bivalves constituents of marine chemosynthesis-based communities, which are indicators of reducing environments as vesicomyid and lucinid bivalves (Vesicomya caribbea, Calyptogena ponderosa, Ectenagena modioliforma, Lucinoma spp. and Graecina colombiensis), together with the rare solemyid clam Acharax caribbaea, ii) other seep-associated fauna such as the trochid snail Cataegis meroglypta, iii) the first report of vestimentiferan tubeworms for the area and, iv) the presence of authigenic carbonates; these constructions form hard substrates colonized by sessile fauna. Additionally, more than 20 species of benthic non-seep fauna were found associated in the area. The collected fauna exhibits an elevated taxonomic similarity to other modern and fossil seep communities from the Caribbean (Barbados Prism, Gulf of Mexico, Cenozoic seep taxa from Barbados, Trinidad and Venezuela). The presence of these chemosymbiotic species seems to be related to mud diapirism activity in the South West of the Colombian coast, this geologic characteristic indicates tectonic and depositional processes associated with the aforementioned deltas. Further research is necessary to establish biological and geological interactions, geochemical and geophysical controls, and organization of cold seeps communities in this unexplored area of the Caribbean. Keywords: Methane, Chemosynthesis-based communities,Bivalves, Mud diapirs, Colombian Caribbean Sea

  15. What Price Sugar? Land, Labor, and Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C. Littlefield

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Sugar, Slavery, and Society: Perspectives on the Caribbean, India, the Mascarenes, and the United States. Bernard Moitt (ed.. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2004. vii + 203 pp. (Cloth US $ 65.00 Tropical Babylons: Sugar and the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1680. Stuart B. Schwartz (ed.. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004. xiii + 347 pp. (Paper US $ 22.50 These two books illustrate the fascination that sugar, slavery, and the plantation still exercise over the minds of scholars. One of them also reflects an interest in the influence these have had on the modern world. For students of the history of these things the Schwartz collection is in many ways the more useful. It seeks to fill a lacuna left by the concentration of monographs on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, suggesting that we know less about the history of sugar than we thought we did. Perhaps in no other single place is such a range of information on so wide an area presented in such detail for so early a period. Ranging from Iberia to the Caribbean and including consumption as well as production of sugar, with a nod to the slave trade and a very useful note on weights and currencies, this volume is a gold mine of information. It considers (briefly the theoretical meaning as well as the growing of this important crop, contrasting its production in Iberia with that on the Atlantic islands of Madeira and the Canaries, colonized by Iberian powers, and continuing the contrast with São Tomé, off the coast of Africa, and on to Brazil and the Spanish American empire before ending with the British in Barbados. In the transit, it of necessity considers and complicates the meaning of “sugar revolution” and shows how scholars using that term do not always mean the same thing. John McCusker and Russell Menard, for example, tackling a cornerstone of the traditional interpretation of the development of sugar, argue that there

  16. Observation of Dust Aging Processes During Transport from Africa into the Caribbean - A Lagrangian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D. N.; Walser, A.; Dollner, M.; Reitebuch, O.; Gross, S.; Chouza, F.; Ansmann, A.; Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Kandler, K.; Schäfler, A.; Baumann, R.; Tegen, I.; Heinold, B.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are regularly transported over long distances impacting air quality, health, weather and climate thousands of kilometers downwind of the source. During transport, particle properties are modified thereby changing the associated impact on the radiation budget. Although mineral dust is of key importance for the climate system many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during long-range transport, the role of wet and dry removal mechanisms, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. In June/July 2013, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted to study the transport and transformation of Saharan mineral dust. Besides ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments deployed on Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was equipped with an extended aerosol in-situ instrumentation, a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar and instruments for standard meteorological parameters. During SALTRACE, five large dust outbreaks were studied by ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements between Senegal, Cape Verde, the Caribbean, and Florida. Highlights included the Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados. Between Cape Verde and Barbados, the aerosol optical thickness (500 nm) decreased from 0.54 to 0.26 and the stratification of the dust layers changed significantly from a rather homogenous structure near Africa to a 3-layer structure with embedded cumulus clouds in the Caribbean. In the upper part of the dust layers in the Caribbean, the aerosol properties were similar to the observations near Africa. In contrast, much more variability in the dust properties was observed between 0.7 and 2.5 km altitude probably due to interaction of the mineral dust with clouds. In our

  17. Intimate partner violence in the Caribbean: State, activist and media responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShong, Halimah A F; Haynes, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    Violence in the Caribbean is a major public health and criminal justice problem. In some Caribbean countries, women's share of morbidity and mortality due to violence outstrips men's, which demonstrates a reversal in how gender and violence have been typically and globally understood. This morbidity and mortality among women is frequently a consequence of intimate partner violence (IPV). Using qualitative analysis and feminist discourse and narrative analysis on data from Guyana, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Barbados, the authors of this paper contribute to the growing research on IPV. The central organising questions are how do state, activist and media responses reproduce and/or challenge asymmetrical relations of power and gender, and what does this mean for women's agency in the context of violent relationships. State, activist and media responses reveal how assumptions about gender and IPV contribute to a contradictory context in which women navigate their desired outcomes. PMID:25737200

  18. Timing of meltwater pulse 1a and climate responses to meltwater injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanford, Jennifer D.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Hunter, Sally E.;

    2006-01-01

    The temporal relationship between meltwater pulse 1a (mwp-1a) and the climate history of the last deglaciation remains a subject of debate. By combining the Greenland Ice Core Project d18O ice core record on the new Greenland ice core chronology 2005 timescale with the U/Th-dated Barbados coral...... record, we conclusively derive that mwp-1a did not coincide with the sharp Bølling warming but instead with the abrupt cooling of the Older Dryas. To evaluate whether there is a relationship between meltwater injections, North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation, and climate change, we present a high...... rises, and yet these periods were characterized by intense NADW slowdowns/shutdowns. Clearly, deepwater formation and climate are not simply controlled by the magnitude or rate of meltwater addition. Instead, our results emphasize that the location of meltwater pulses may be more important, with NADW...

  19. Innovating healthcare delivery to address noncommunicable diseases in low-income settings: the example of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piot, Peter; Aerts, Ann; Wood, David A; Lamptey, Peter; Oti, Samuel; Connell, Kenneth; Dorairaj, Prabhakaran; Boufford, Jo I; Caldwell, Aya; Perel, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    London Dialogue event, The Hospital Club, 24 Endell St, London, WC2H 9HQ, London, UK, 1 December 2015 Hypertension is a global health issue causing almost 10 million deaths annually, with a disproportionate number occurring in low- and middle-income countries. The condition can be managed effectively, but there is a need for innovation in healthcare delivery to alleviate its burden. This paper presents a number of innovative delivery models from a number of different countries, including Kenya, Ghana, Barbados and India. These models were presented at the London Dialogue event, which was cohosted by the Novartis Foundation and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Centre for Global Noncommunicable Diseases on 1 December 2015. It is argued that these models are applicable not only to hypertension, but provide valuable lessons to address other noncommunicable diseases. PMID:27291058

  20. Observations of Saharan dust in the Caribbean and Implications for Regional Climate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, L.; Einaudi, Franco

    2001-01-01

    Massive quantities of dust aerosol, originating at source locations in the Saharan desert are frequently transported westward across the Atlantic. Saharan dust has been frequently identified at ground-based stations in South America, on Barbados, in Florida and in Texas. Recently, in July of 2000, the Puerto Rican Dust Experiment (PRiDE), consisting of researchers from the U.S. Navy, NASA, the University of Miami and the University of Puerto Rico joined together to study this important phenomenon. Numerical forecast models tracked each dust event as the dust left the African continent and transversed the Atlantic. Ground-based, ship-based, airborne and satellite sensors were used to characterize the physical and radiative properties of the dust aerosol. The dust plays an important role in terms of radiative forcing of regional climate. Satellite sensors such as NASA's EOS-MODIS aboard the Terra satellite will provide important continuing information on the dust aerosol and its climatic effects.

  1. TEWS'98. Final report [5th annual International Science Camp: The Earth We Share 1998, Golden, CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mae C. Jemison

    1999-04-06

    The fifth annual International Science Camp The Earth We Share 1998 (TEWS'98) was held at the Colorado School of Mines located in Goldez Colorado. TEWS98 was a four week residential program which focused on providing a meaningful science education experience while developing critical thinking skills. Thirty three students, three teachers, four college interns and the camp administrator lived and worked together while developing solutions to several worldwide problems. These problems are called the Discovery Topics and they are: (1) design the worlds perfect house; (2) how many people can the world hold; and (3) predict the hot stocks for the year 2030. The participants, both students and staff came from different countries all over the world The following countries were represented: The United Kingdom, Sierra Leone (West Africa), Ireland, USA Nigeria, West Indies and Barbados.

  2. The application of HPLC ESI MS in the investigation of the flavonoids and flavonoid glycosides of a Caribbean Lamiaceae plant with potential for bioaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Sonia R; Peru, Kerry M; Fahlman, Brian; McMartin, Dena W; Headley, John V

    2015-01-01

    As part of an exchange technology program between the government of Barbados and Environment Canada, methanolic and aqueous extracts from the flavonoid-rich Lamiaceae family were characterized using negative-ion electrospray mass spectrometry. The species investigated is part of the Caribbean Pharmacopoeia, and is used for a variety of health issues, including colds, flu, diabetes, and hypertension. The extracts were investigated for structural elucidation of phenolics, identification of chemical taxonomic profile, and evidence of bio-accumulator potential. The methanolic and aqueous leaf extracts of Plectranthus amboinicus yielded rosmarinic acid, ladanein, cirsimaritin, and other methoxylated flavonoids. This genus also shows a tendency to form conjugates with monosaccharides, including glucose, galactose, and rhamnose. The aqueous extract yielded four isomeric rhamnosides. The formation of conjugates by Plectranthus amboinicus is thus evidence of high bioaccumulator significance. PMID:26357892

  3. Tropical forest sheep on legume forage/fuelwood fallows. [Desmodium ovalifoluim and Inga edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    A system being developed in Amazonian Ecuador is described in which the fallow period in shifting cultivation sequences is intensified by the use of the Asian perennial forage cover crop Desmodium ovalifolium under Inga edulis. Both species improve soil fertility and reduce erosion. D. ovalifolium provides forage for African tropical forest type sheep (Red Afro-Columbian x Barbados Black Belly) which are up to 3 times as productive as cattle and cause little soil compaction or erosion. I. edulis produces excellent fuelwood and charcoal in less than 6 years, has seeds enclosed in an edible sugary pulp and provides good bee forage. The system is compatible with traditional patterns of cultivation, forming a 6-year fallow in an 8-year field rotation with corn/beans and cassava. 23 references

  4. Log Books and the Law of Storms: Maritime Meteorology and the British Admiralty in the Nineteenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Simon

    2015-12-01

    This essay contributes to debates about the relationship between science and the military by examining the British Admiralty's participation in meteorological projects in the first half of the nineteenth century. It focuses on attempts to transform Royal Navy log books into standardized meteorological registers that would be of use to both science and the state. The essay begins with a discussion of Admiralty Hydrographer Francis Beaufort, who promoted the use of standardized systems for the observation of the weather at sea. It then examines the application of ships' logs to the science of storms. The essay focuses on the Army engineer William Reid, who studied hurricanes while stationed in Barbados and Bermuda. Reid was instrumental in persuading the Admiralty to implement a naval meteorological policy, something the Admiralty Hydrographer had struggled to achieve. The essay uses the reception and adoption of work on storms at sea to reflect on the means and ends of maritime meteorology in the mid-nineteenth century.

  5. The Complexity of Quantum States and Transformations: From Quantum Money to Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Aaronson, Scott

    2016-01-01

    These are lecture notes from a weeklong course in quantum complexity theory taught at the Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados, February 21-25, 2016. The focus is quantum circuit complexity---i.e., the minimum number of gates needed to prepare a given quantum state or apply a given unitary transformation---as a unifying theme tying together several topics of recent interest in the field. Those topics include the power of quantum proofs and advice states; how to construct quantum money schemes secure against counterfeiting; and the role of complexity in the black-hole information paradox and the AdS/CFT correspondence (through connections made by Harlow-Hayden, Susskind, and others). The course was taught to a mixed audience of theoretical computer scientists and quantum gravity / string theorists, and starts out with a crash course on quantum information and computation in general.

  6. ASAM v2.7: a compressible atmospheric model with a Cartesian cut cell approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jähn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the fully compressible, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model ASAM is presented. A cut cell approach is used to include obstacles and orography into the Cartesian grid. Discretization is realized by a mixture of finite differences and finite volumes and a state limiting is applied. An implicit time integration scheme ensures numerical stability around small cells. To make the model applicable for atmospheric problems, physical parameterizations like a Smagorinsky subgrid scale model, a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme, precipitation and vertical surface fluxes by a constant flux layer or a more complex soil model are implemented. Results for three benchmark test cases from the literature are shown. A sensitivity study regarding the development of a convective boundary layer together with island effects at Barbados is carried out to show the capability to perform real case simulations with ASAM.

  7. Non-linear growth analysis of Sumatera thin tail sheep and its cross breds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Suparyanto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Growth curve is a figure of individual ability to express its genetic potential to maximum size under the existingenvironmental condition. Three non-linear growth curves, von Bertalanffy, Logistic and Gompertz, were used to analyze the weight-age relationship for five genotypes of sheep. The data were collected from IP2TP Sei Putih, North Sumatera. Num ber of animals which were collected consisted of five genotypes i.e, indigenous Sumatera (n=275, St. Croix (n=571, St. Croix Cross (n=899, Barbados Blackbelly Cross (n=471 and composite (n=740. The three non-linear growth curves were compared to obtain the most suitable curve for describing the shape of growth curves among sheep genotypes. The growth curves of von Bertalanffy fitted better than the others. The results showed that regression parameters of B or M (integral constante were significantly different (P0.05. The data show that there was correlation between A and k.

  8. Medical Tourism in the Caribbean Islands: A Cure for Economies in Crisis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Connell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Small island states have increasingly sought new means of economic diversification. Several Caribbean states have begun to develop medical tourism, partly building on existing tourist-oriented economies. Medical tourism has boomed in this century in several states in Asia and in Central America. The Bahamas, Barbados and the Cayman Islands exemplify different strategies for medical tourism, in order to generate foreign exchange and new employment, and reduce costs from overseas referrals. Most medical tourism projects have been developed by overseas corporations and are oriented to a US market. Business principles rather than health care dominate development strategies, notably of emerging transnational medical corporations, and raise ethical issues. Success will be difficult to achieve in a crowded and competitive market.

  9. Intimate partner violence in the Caribbean: State, activist and media responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShong, Halimah A F; Haynes, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    Violence in the Caribbean is a major public health and criminal justice problem. In some Caribbean countries, women's share of morbidity and mortality due to violence outstrips men's, which demonstrates a reversal in how gender and violence have been typically and globally understood. This morbidity and mortality among women is frequently a consequence of intimate partner violence (IPV). Using qualitative analysis and feminist discourse and narrative analysis on data from Guyana, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Barbados, the authors of this paper contribute to the growing research on IPV. The central organising questions are how do state, activist and media responses reproduce and/or challenge asymmetrical relations of power and gender, and what does this mean for women's agency in the context of violent relationships. State, activist and media responses reveal how assumptions about gender and IPV contribute to a contradictory context in which women navigate their desired outcomes.

  10. New strategic directions for Caribbean CSM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Recent changes in the strategy of the Caribbean Contraceptive Social Marketing Project emphasize the condom, under the brand name, Panther. Since 1984, CCSMP began marketing their Perle rand of oral contraceptive, since dropped, in Barbados, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. Now wider commercial connections are envisioned, with support by CCSMP to promote generic brands. The Panther condom campaign will include an array of mass media, point-of-purchase and sporting event advertising. Pharmacies report that Panther is selling as well as the leading commercial brand. CCSMP is looking to introduce an ultra-thin condom and a vaginal foaming tablet. Market research, involving physicians and users as well as retail audits, indicates that although population in numbers alone is not a serious problem in the Caribbean, early pregnancy is a concern in the area. PMID:12341467

  11. Should cryptocurrencies be included in the portfolio of international reserves held by central banks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Moore

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In most countries, the central bank is required to hold reserve assets as a means of providing credibility for the value of the fiat currency. These assets can be in the form of gold, foreign exchange or some other internationally recognised reserve asset and are held to permit the country to engage in international transactions. Within recent years, cryptocurrencies have been increasingly utilised for international transactions, and it is possible that the use of these cryptocurrencies might expand in the future. This paper therefore examines the potential role of digital currency balances as part of the portfolio of external assets held by a central bank. Using the case of Barbados, the paper also provides a simulation of the effect holding some proportion of their asset-base would have had on the stability of the foreign reserves as well as the return on the portfolio of assets.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids in baked freshwater fish from south of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, A D; Visentainer, J V; Matsushita, M; de Souza, N E

    1997-03-01

    Lipid and fatty acid levels in the edible flesh of 17 baked freshwater fish from Brazil's southern region were determined. Analyses of fatty acids methyl esters were performed by gas chromatography. Palmitic acid (C16:0) was the predominant saturated fatty acid, accouting for 50-70% of total saturated acids. Linoleic acid (C18:2 omega 6), linolenic acid (C18:3 omega 3), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega 3) were the predominant polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFA). The data revealed that species such as barbado, corvina, pintado, and truta were good sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and that most freshwater fish examined were good sources of PUFA-omega 3.

  13. Treaty for the prohibition of nuclear weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Treaty of Tlatelolco enhances the security of the countries of the region by reducing the risk of a nuclear-arms race among them, with all the danger and cost that it would entail, and, as a contribution to the world-wide nuclear non-proliferation regime, it constitutes an important confidence-building measure by ensuring, through its control and verification system, that parties to the Treaty do not posses and will not acquire nuclear weapons. List of parties to the Treaty of Tlatelolco as of 31 July 1989: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil (not full party), Chile (not full party), Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela. (Argentina and Dominica have signed the Treaty)

  14. Conference on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States: year-end update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasek, P; Goree, L J

    1993-12-21

    A brief description is given of the background behind the Small Island States Global Conference scheduled for March 1994. Preliminary meetings led to the formation of a draft program of action pertaining to climatic change and sea level increases, natural and environmental disasters, freshwater resources, management of wastes, coastal and marine resources, land and energy resources, tourism and biodiversity resources, regional institutions and technical cooperation, and a variety of other topics. Little agreement was reached on implementation, monitoring, and review among member states, which called for additional meetings. The World Coast Conference, held in November 1993, focused on progressive sustainable development and integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). Participants agreed on the necessity to 1) strengthen state's capabilities for ICZM, 2) identify priorities, 3) set up comprehensive and flexible assessment mechanisms, 4) coordinate activities at all levels, and 5) address longterm concerns. Only two nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) sent reports on donor activities. Host country meetings were held in Barbados in preparation for the planned 1994 Conference and settlement of logistics. CNN will provide television coverage of the Conference and produce documentaries on small island states. General Assembly highlights included summary statements by Belgium, Vanuatu, Maldives, the Caribbean community, Korea, and Australia members. The Barbados Declaration, which is in process and will be adopted in some form at the 1994 Conference, may incorporate elements from the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development. The Ecojournalism workshop scheduled for Jamaica in January 1994 is aiming to instill awareness of the 1994 Conference and small island issues. 157 NGOs have received accreditation for the 1994 Conference, of which 50 are from small island states, 50 from developed countries, and 53 from nonisland developing countries. The NGO Liaison Committee

  15. Avaliação dos estoques pesqueiros de quatro espécies de grandes bagres (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae na bacia do rio Cuiabá, Pantanal norte, Brasil, utilizando alguns Pontos de Referência Biológicos Fisheries stock assessment of four large catfish (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae in the Cuiaba River basin, north Pantanal, Brazil, using some Biological Reference Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia A. F. Mateus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Os parâmetros de crescimento e mortalidade estimados a partir da estrutura em comprimento foram utilizados para avaliar o estado de explotação dos estoques de quatro espécies de grandes bagres da bacia do rio Cuiabá, Pantanal norte. As espécies estudadas foram o barbado, o cachara, o jaú e o pintado. As avaliações foram realizadas por meio do modelo de rendimento por recruta, considerando os Pontos de Referência Biológicos Fmax, F0,1, F = M e F BDR. As análises indicam que os estoques do pintado e do jaú estão bem conservados. Os estoques do cachara e, menos fortemente, o do barbado estão em iminente ameaça de sobrepesca na bacia do rio Cuiabá.The growth and mortality parameters estimated from length structure were used to evaluate the state of explotation of the stocks of four large catfish species from Cuiabá River basin, north Pantanal. The species studied were the Flatwhiskered catfish, the Jaú, the Barred sorubim, and the Spotted sorubim. The assessment were conducted with the yield per recruit model, and the Biological Reference Points Fmax, F0.1, F = M, and F BDR. The analysis indicates that the stocks of the Spotted sorubim, and of the Jaú are not overexploited. However, the stocks of the Barred sorubim, and, in lower degree, of the Flatwhiskered catfish of the Cuiabá River basin are in imminent threat of overfishing.

  16. Evaluation of meteoric calcite cements as a proxy material for mass-47 clumped isotope thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defliese, William F.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoric diagenetic cements are ubiquitous throughout geologic history, affecting most carbonate exposures worldwide. They can often be difficult to interpret, as it is usually difficult to separate the influences of water δ18O and temperature on isotopic signals contained within the carbonate rock body. Despite this difficulty in interpretation, meteoric phreatic cements can potentially be a useful proxy material, as they form slowly in equilibrium at mean annual temperature and are not affected by any biogenic effects that can bias other proxy materials. We applied the mass-47 clumped isotope paleothermometer to Pleistocene and Holocene carbonates from Bermuda and Barbados in order to investigate the effects of meteoric diagenesis on Δ47 signals, and to determine their suitability as a paleotemperature proxy. Phreatic calcite cements are found to record the same temperatures as unaltered carbonate sediments, while any sample exhibiting vadose characteristics is biased towards unreasonably hot apparent formation temperatures. Burial heating and re-equilibration are not geologically viable explanations for the anomalously hot temperatures recorded in vadose cements, as neither Bermuda or Barbados has any burial history. Instead, it is likely that precipitation in the vadose zone occurs on timescales quicker than isotopic equilibrium can be achieved, driven by a combination of CO2 degassing and evaporation, which have been previously shown to cause problems in speleothems and pedogenic carbonates. We conclude by suggesting that meteoric phreatic calcites may be an ideal phase for paleotemperature reconstruction, as they accurately record mean annual temperatures and form under equilibrium conditions, while also being resistant to further mineral driven diagenesis. Vadose cements, and any sample likely affected by processes similar to vadose diagenesis, should be avoided for climate reconstructions using the mass-47 clumped isotope thermometer.

  17. Conference on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States: year-end update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasek, P; Goree, L J

    1993-12-21

    A brief description is given of the background behind the Small Island States Global Conference scheduled for March 1994. Preliminary meetings led to the formation of a draft program of action pertaining to climatic change and sea level increases, natural and environmental disasters, freshwater resources, management of wastes, coastal and marine resources, land and energy resources, tourism and biodiversity resources, regional institutions and technical cooperation, and a variety of other topics. Little agreement was reached on implementation, monitoring, and review among member states, which called for additional meetings. The World Coast Conference, held in November 1993, focused on progressive sustainable development and integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). Participants agreed on the necessity to 1) strengthen state's capabilities for ICZM, 2) identify priorities, 3) set up comprehensive and flexible assessment mechanisms, 4) coordinate activities at all levels, and 5) address longterm concerns. Only two nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) sent reports on donor activities. Host country meetings were held in Barbados in preparation for the planned 1994 Conference and settlement of logistics. CNN will provide television coverage of the Conference and produce documentaries on small island states. General Assembly highlights included summary statements by Belgium, Vanuatu, Maldives, the Caribbean community, Korea, and Australia members. The Barbados Declaration, which is in process and will be adopted in some form at the 1994 Conference, may incorporate elements from the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development. The Ecojournalism workshop scheduled for Jamaica in January 1994 is aiming to instill awareness of the 1994 Conference and small island issues. 157 NGOs have received accreditation for the 1994 Conference, of which 50 are from small island states, 50 from developed countries, and 53 from nonisland developing countries. The NGO Liaison Committee

  18. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE 2013) - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Reitebuch, Oliver; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Althausen, Dietrich; Chouza, Fernando; Dollner, Maximilian; Farrell, David; Groß, Silke; Heinold, Bernd; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Omar, Ali; Prospero, Joseph; Sauer, Daniel; Schäfler, Andreas; Toledano, Carlos; Tegen, Ina

    2015-04-01

    Saharan mineral dust is regularly transported over long distances impacting air quality, health, weather and climate thousands of kilometers downwind of the Sahara. During transport, the properties of mineral dust may be modified thereby changing the associated impact on the radiation budget. Although mineral dust is of key importance for the climate system many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during long-range transport, the role of wet and dry removal mechanisms, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. To investigate the aging and modification of Saharan mineral dust during long-range transport across the Atlantic Ocean, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted in June/July 2013. SALTRACE was designed as a closure experiment combining ground-based lidar, in-situ and sun photometer instruments deployed on Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico, with airborne measurements of the DLR research aircraft Falcon, satellite observations and model simulations. During SALTRACE, mineral dust from five dust outbreaks was studied under different atmospheric conditions and a unique data set on the chemical, microphysical and optical properties of aged mineral dust was gathered. For the first time, Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June 2013 which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados was realized. Further highlights of SALTRACE include the formation and evolution of tropical storm Chantal in a dusty environment and the interaction of dust with mixed-phase clouds. In our presentation, we give an overview of the SALTRACE study, discuss the meteorological situation and the dust transport during SALTRACE and highlight selected results from SALTRACE.

  19. Uranium Series Diagenesis in Corals Exposed to Fresh Water: Toward Better Prospecting for Closed System Samples for High Accuracy Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, J.; Fairbanks, R.; Mortlock, R.; Bradtmiller, L.

    2005-12-01

    A better understanding of U-series diagenesis in corals exposed to the vadose and phreatic freshwater environments is required to help prospect for closed-system samples needed for high-accuracy dates. Disequilibrium U-series are common in corals exposed to fresh water and a priori screening is generally insufficient to reject samples prior to dating. As a result, a vast number of U-series dates reported in the literature are open system and numerous authors have resorted to various correction models (Bender et al., 1979; Gallup et al., 1994; Thompson et al., 2003; Villemant and Feuillet, 2003; and Scholz et al., 2004). The majority of studies assumes or models continuous or episodic addition of 234U and/or 230Th over time and relies on the low solubility of 230Th and/or 234Th. Several recent studies emphasize progressive production of 234U via α-recoil (Thompson et al., 2003; Villemant and Feuillet, 2003), however the application of these models may lead to over-parameterization and are mainly idiosyncratic to host sample locations (Scholz et al., 2004). Already, some studies make model corrections to open system ages and draw critical conclusions about sea level change (e.g. Scholz et al., 2004; Thompson and Goldstein, 2005). Characteristic of all of these studies is a general correlation between the 234U/238U activity ratio and the 230Th/238U activity ratio between intra-reef samples. On Barbados, the largest activity ratio offsets appear in the youngest samples exposed to fresh water; just the opposite finding of most diagenesis models. Our measurements are consistent with the observations of Scholz et al. (2004) from the Red Sea. The greatest addition of 234U, 230Th, and 231Pa to the Barbados samples occurred during the first exposure to fresh water, in this case Marine Isotope State 3 (MIS3), when 234U, 230Th, and 231Pa are added to samples in similar proportions, but varying amounts. The bulk of reef sands and rubble is aragonite, which releases U

  20. Tropical Atlantic SSTS at the Last Glacial Maximum derived from Sr/Ca ratios of fossil coral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A. L.; Saenger, C. P.

    2006-12-01

    The sensitivity of the tropics to climate change is a particularly controversial issue in paleoclimatology. At the heart of this controversy are disagreements amongst different proxy datasets regarding the amplitude of glacial-interglacial changes in temperature, particularly at the sea surface. Data obtained from the aragonitic skeletons of massive reef corals have contributed in no small measure to the debate, yielding LGM and deglacial SSTs 5-6°C cooler than today (Guilderson et al., 1994; McCulloch et al., 1999; Correge et al., 2004), that imply a high sensitivity of Earth's climate to changes in boundary conditions (Crowley, 2000). We used SIMS ion microprobe to analyze Sr/Ca ratios of small pieces of Montastrea coral retrieved from a Barbados drillcore (Guilderson et al., 2001). U/Th dates place the samples between 22 and 24 kyr BP. Localized areas of dissolution and re-growth of secondary (diagenetic) aragonite crystals were identified at centers of septa. Sr/Ca ratios of these crystals were higher than Sr/Ca ratios of original coral crystals preserved in adjacent fasciculi and yielded relatively cooler derived SSTs. The original coral crystals, recognized by their size and orientation, were selectively targeted for analysis using a 20 micron-diameter sample spot. Our calibration study using modern corals from Bermuda, St Croix (USVI) and Barbados indicates that Montastrea Sr/Ca is strongly correlated with SST and with annual extension (growth) rate (Saenger et al., 2006). Growth rate of the fossil corals was determined from measurement of daily growth bands identified in petrographic thin-sections. Application of a growth-dependent Sr/Ca-T calibration yielded Barbados SSTs that were, on average, 2.5°C cooler than today during the LGM and ~1°C cooler than today during Heinrich Event 2. Our LGM SSTs are consistent with the original CLIMAP estimates (CLIMAP, 1976) and with more recent Mg/Ca-based SSTs derived from calcitic foraminifera in the Caribbean

  1. EFEITO DE CALDAS SOBRE Corynespora cassiicola

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    Mercia Celoto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The target spot (Corynespora cassiicola, main leaf disease occurred in barbados cherry in the regionof Junqueirópolis, SP, causing severe defoliates of plants. After the cleaning prune, producers apply line sulfhur in plants, for presenting fungicidal, insecticide and acaricide action. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of line sulfhur (75% and 3% - used by producers, bordeaux mixture (75% and „calda Viçosa‟ (75% on Corynespora cassiicola. The syrups were incorporate into potato-dextrose-agar or spore suspension for determination of inhibition of the mycelia growth and spores germination. Leaves barbados cherry, with symptoms of target spot, were treated with syrups. In wet champer, high humidity, was verified that sporulation occured in lesions, however the spores lost viability by presence of syrups in surface. In vitro, line sulfhur to 75% inhibited completely the mycelia growth of the fungus. Line sulfhur, Bordeaux mixture and „calda Viçosa‟ inhibited completely the spores germination. For the reasons, the use of syrups in barbados cherry, can contribute in reduction of souce of inoculum of the pathogen. A mancha alvo (Corynespora cassiicola é a principal doença da cultura da acerola, na região de Junqueirópolis, SP, causando desfolha precoce nas plantas. Após a realização da poda de limpeza anual, os produtores aplicam a calda sulfocálcica nas plantas, por apresentar ação fungicida, inseticida e acaricida. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar em condições in vitro e in vivo o efeito das caldas sulfocálcica, bordalesa e Viçosa sobre Corynespora cassiicola. As caldas foram utilizadas nas seguintes concentrações: calda sulfocálcica (75 e 3% - concentração utilizada por produtores, calda Bordalesa (75% e calda Viçosa (75%. As caldas foram incorporadas em meio de batata-dextrose-ágar ou suspensão de esporos para determinação das inibições do crescimento micelial e da germinação de esporos

  2. Modification of Saharan Mineral Dust during Transport across the Atlantic Ocean - Overview and Results from the SALTRACE Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Reitebuch, Oliver; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Groß, Silke; Sauer, Daniel; Althausen, Dietrich; Toledano, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    At present one of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of global climate concerns the interaction of aerosols with clouds and atmospheric dynamics. In the climate system, mineral dust aerosol is of key importance, because mineral dust contributes to about half of the global annual particle emissions by mass. Although our understanding of the effects of mineral dust on the atmosphere and the climate improved during the past decade, many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during transport across the Atlantic Ocean and the associated impact on the radiation budget, the role of wet and dry dust removal mechanisms during transport, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted in June/July 2013 to investigate the transport and transformation of Saharan mineral dust during long-range transport from the Sahara across the Atlantic Ocean into the Caribbean. SALTRACE is a German initiative combining ground-based and airborne in-situ and lidar measurements with meteorological data, long-term measurements, satellite remote sensing and modeling which involved many national and international partners. During SALTRACE, the DLR Falcon research aircraft was based at Sal, Cape Verde, between 11 and 17 June 2013, and at Barbados between 18 June and 11 July 2013. The Falcon was equipped with a suite of in-situ instruments for the measurement of microphysical and optical aerosol properties, with sampling devices for offline particle analysis, with a nadir-looking 2-µm wind lidar, with dropsondes and instruments for standard meteorological parameters. Ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments were deployed in Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico. During SALTRACE, mineral dust from five dust outbreaks was studied by the Falcon research aircraft between Senegal, the Caribbean and Florida

  3. Response to the challenges of pandemic H1N1 in a small island state: the Barbadian experience

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    Ferdinand Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Having been overwhelmed by the complexity of the response needed for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic, public health professionals in the small island state of Barbados put various measures in place to improve its response in the event of a pandemic Methods Data for this study was collected using Barbados’ National Influenza Surveillance System, which was revitalized in 2007. It is comprised of ten sentinel sites which send weekly notifications of acute respiratory illness (ARI and severe acute respiratory illness (SARI to the Office of the National Epidemiologist. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, meetings of the National Pandemic Planning Committee and the Technical Command Committee were convened. The pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs implemented as a result of these meetings form the basis of the results presented in this paper. Results On June 3, 2009, Barbados reported its first case of 2009 H1N1. From June until October 2009, there were 155 laboratory confirmed cases of 2009 H1N1, with one additional case occurring in January 2010. For the outbreak period (June-October 2009, the surveillance team received reports of 2,483 ARI cases, compared to 412 cases for the same period in 2008. The total hospitalization rate due to SARIs for the year 2009 was 90.1 per 100,000 people, as compared to 7.3 per 100,000 people for 2008. Barbados’ pandemic response was characterized by a strong surveillance system combining active and passive surveillance, good risk communication strategy, a strengthened public and private sector partnership, and effective regional and international collaborations. Community restriction strategies such as school and workplace closures and cancellation of group events were not utilized as public health measures to delay the spread of the virus. Some health care facilities struggled with providing adequate isolation facilities. Conclusions The number of

  4. Antimony and arsenic biogeochemistry in the western Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Gregory A.; Cutter, Lynda S.; Featherstone, Alison M.; Lohrenz, Steven E.

    The subtropical to equatorial Atlantic Ocean provides a unique regime in which one can examine the biogeochemical cycles of antimony and arsenic. In particular, this region is strongly affected by inputs from the Amazon River and dust from North Africa at the surface, and horizontal transport at depth from high-latitude northern (e.g., North Atlantic Deep Water) and southern waters (e.g., Antarctic Bottom and Intermediate Waters). As a part of the 1996 Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's Contaminant Baseline Survey, data for dissolved As(III+V), As(III), mono- and dimethyl arsenic, Sb(III+V), Sb(III), and monomethyl antimony were obtained at six vertical profile stations and 44 sites along the 11,000 km transect from Montevideo, Uruguay, to Bridgetown, Barbados. The arsenic results were similar to those in other oceans, with moderate surface depletion, deep-water enrichment, a predominance of arsenate (>85% As(V)), and methylated arsenic species and As(III) in surface waters that are likely a result of phytoplankton conversions to mitigate arsenate "stress" (toxicity). Perhaps the most significant discovery in the arsenic results was the extremely low concentrations in the Amazon Plume (as low as 9.8 nmol/l) that appear to extend for considerable distances offshore in the equatorial region. The very low concentration of inorganic arsenic in the Amazon River (2.8 nmol/l; about half those in most rivers) is probably the result of intense iron oxyhydroxide scavenging. Dissolved antimony was also primarily in the pentavalent state (>95% antimonate), but Sb(III) and monomethyl antimony were only detected in surface waters and displayed no correlations with biotic tracers such as nutrients and chlorophyll a. Unlike As(III+V)'s nutrient-type vertical profiles, Sb(III+V) displayed surface maxima and decreased into the deep waters, exhibiting the behavior of a scavenged element with a strong atmospheric input. While surface water Sb had a slight correlation with

  5. Biogeography and potential exchanges among the atlantic Equatorial belt cold-seep faunas.

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    Karine Olu

    Full Text Available Like hydrothermal vents along oceanic ridges, cold seeps are patchy and isolated ecosystems along continental margins, extending from bathyal to abyssal depths. The Atlantic Equatorial Belt (AEB, from the Gulf of Mexico to the Gulf of Guinea, was one focus of the Census of Marine Life ChEss (Chemosynthetic Ecosystems program to study biogeography of seep and vent fauna. We present a review and analysis of collections from five seep regions along the AEB: the Gulf of Mexico where extensive faunal sampling has been conducted from 400 to 3300 m, the Barbados accretionary prism, the Blake ridge diapir, and in the Eastern Atlantic from the Congo and Gabon margins and the recently explored Nigeria margin. Of the 72 taxa identified at the species level, a total of 9 species or species complexes are identified as amphi-Atlantic. Similarity analyses based on both Bray Curtis and Hellinger distances among 9 faunal collections, and principal component analysis based on presence/absence of megafauna species at these sites, suggest that within the AEB seep megafauna community structure is influenced primarily by depth rather than by geographic distance. Depth segregation is observed between 1000 and 2000 m, with the middle slope sites either grouped with those deeper than 2000 m or with the shallower sites. The highest level of community similarity was found between the seeps of the Florida escarpment and Congo margin. In the western Atlantic, the highest degree of similarity is observed between the shallowest sites of the Barbados prism and of the Louisiana slope. The high number of amphi-atlantic cold-seep species that do not cluster according to biogeographic regions, and the importance of depth in structuring AEB cold-seep communities are the major conclusions of this study. The hydrothermal vent sites along the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR did not appear as "stepping stones" for dispersal of the AEB seep fauna, however, the south MAR and off axis regions

  6. Development and testing of a high-resolution model for tropospheric sulfate driven by observation-derived meteorology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, C.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental Chemistry Div.

    1994-05-01

    A high-resolution three-dimensional Eulerian transport and transformation model has been developed to simulate concentrations of tropospheric sulfate for specific times and locations; it was applied over the North Atlantic and adjacent continental regions during October and November, 1986. The model represents emissions of anthropogenic SO{sub 2} and sulfate and of biogenic sulfur species, horizontal and vertical transport, gas-phase oxidation of SO{sub 2} and dimethylsulfide, aqueous-phase oxidation of SO{sub 2}, and wet and dry deposition of SO{sub 2}, sulfate, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA). The meteorological driver is the 6-hour output from the forecast model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Calculated sulfate concentrations and column burdens, examined in detail for October 15 and October 22 at 6Z, are related to existing weather patterns. These results exhibit rich temporal and spatial structure; the characteristic (1/e) temporal autocorrelation time for the sulfate column burdens over the central North Atlantic averages 20 hours; 95% of the values were 25 hours or less. The characteristic distance of spatial autocorrelation over this region depends on direction and averages 1,600 km; with 10{sup th} percentile value of 400 km and 90{sup th} percentile value of 1,700 km. Daily average model sulfate concentrations at the lowest vertical accurately represent the spatial variability, temporal episodicity, and absolute magnitudes of surface concentrations measured by monitoring stations in Europe, Canada and Barbados.

  7. Major Energy Plants and Their Potential for Bioenergy Development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Hou, Shenglin; Su, Man; Yang, Mingfeng; Shen, Shihua; Jiang, Gaoming; Qi, Dongmei; Chen, Shuangyan; Liu, Gongshe

    2010-10-01

    China is rich in energy plant resources. In this article, 64 plant species are identified as potential energy plants in China. The energy plant species include 38 oilseed crops, 5 starch-producing crops, 3 sugar-producing crops and 18 species for lignocellulosic biomass. The species were evaluated on the basis of their production capacity and their resistance to salt, drought, and/or low temperature stress. Ten plant species have high production and/or stress resistance and can be potentially developed as the candidate energy plants. Of these, four species could be the primary energy plants in China: Barbados nut ( Jatropha curcas L.), Jerusalem artichoke ( Helianthus tuberosus L.), sweet sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor L.) and Chinese silvergrass ( Miscanthus sinensis Anderss.). We discuss the use of biotechnological techniques such as genome sequencing, molecular markers, and genetic transformation to improve energy plants. These techniques are being used to develop new cultivars and to analyze and manipulate genetic variation to improve attributes of energy plants in China.

  8. Turning coo-coo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Price

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The pairing of commeal and okra, which pops up everywhere in the Caribbean, nicely captures the amalgam of African and American resources that has produced so much of the region's cultures, and bears witness to the earliness of culinary creolization - on both sides of the Atlantic. Corn(maize is, of course, native to the New World, and okra (gumbo to the Old. The Dictionary of Jamaican English includes back-to-back entries on oka and okra - the former from a Yoruba word for corn, though in Jamaica it refers to a cassava mush served with an okra sauce (Cassidy & Le Page 1967:328. And while the Ewe word kukü means "corn dumpling" (Cassidy & Le Page 1967:135, its Caribbean cognates generally signal the presence of okra - as in Bahamian cuckoo soup (Holm 1982: 55. Just to the north in the United States, that classic of southern cuisine, fried okra, is made by coating the pods in cornmeal before dropping them in the bacon drippings. At the southern end of the Caribbean, the Brazilian dish called angu (from Yoruba - see Schneider 1991:14 is made with cornmeal (or cassava-flour; its Saramaka namesake (angu, though made with rice- or banana-flour, is usually served with an okra sauce. And in Barbados, cornmeal and okra comprise the essential ingredients of a national culinary tradition, which we will spell coo-coo.2

  9. Increase in African dust flux at the onset of commercial agriculture in the Sahel region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulitza, Stefan; Heslop, David; Pittauerova, Daniela; Fischer, Helmut W; Meyer, Inka; Stuut, Jan-Berend; Zabel, Matthias; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Collins, James A; Kuhnert, Henning; Schulz, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The Sahara Desert is the largest source of mineral dust in the world. Emissions of African dust increased sharply in the early 1970s (ref. 2), a change that has been attributed mainly to drought in the Sahara/Sahel region caused by changes in the global distribution of sea surface temperature. The human contribution to land degradation and dust mobilization in this region remains poorly understood, owing to the paucity of data that would allow the identification of long-term trends in desertification. Direct measurements of airborne African dust concentrations only became available in the mid-1960s from a station on Barbados and subsequently from satellite imagery since the late 1970s: they do not cover the onset of commercial agriculture in the Sahel region approximately 170 years ago. Here we construct a 3,200-year record of dust deposition off northwest Africa by investigating the chemistry and grain-size distribution of terrigenous sediments deposited at a marine site located directly under the West African dust plume. With the help of our dust record and a proxy record for West African precipitation we find that, on the century scale, dust deposition is related to precipitation in tropical West Africa until the seventeenth century. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, a sharp increase in dust deposition parallels the advent of commercial agriculture in the Sahel region. Our findings suggest that human-induced dust emissions from the Sahel region have contributed to the atmospheric dust load for about 200 years.

  10. Vertical wind retrieved by airborne lidar and analysis of island induced gravity waves in combination with numerical models and in situ particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Jähn, Michael; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the analysis of island induced gravity waves observed by an airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) during SALTRACE. First, the instrumental corrections required for the retrieval of high spatial resolution vertical wind measurements from an airborne DWL are presented and the measurement accuracy estimated by means of two different methods. The estimated systematic error is below -0.05 m s-1 for the selected case of study, while the random error lies between 0.1 and 0.16 m s-1 depending on the estimation method. Then, the presented method is applied to two measurement flights during which the presence of island induced gravity waves was detected. The first case corresponds to a research flight conducted on 17 June 2013 in the Cabo Verde islands region, while the second case corresponds to a measurement flight on 26 June 2013 in the Barbados region. The presence of trapped lee waves predicted by the calculated Scorer parameter profiles was confirmed by the lidar and in situ observations. The DWL measurements are used in combination with in situ wind and particle number density measurements, large-eddy simulations (LES), and wavelet analysis to determine the main characteristics of the observed island induced trapped waves.

  11. Increasing Public Access to University Qualifications: Evolution of The University of the West Indies Open Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the evolution of The University of the West Indies’ Open Campus (UWIOC, which is expected to expand service and increase access to the underserved communities of the Eastern Caribbean. At present, UWI, which caters to the needs of the 16 far flung countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean, has not been able to fully serve these countries, the UWI-12, in a way that is commensurate with their developmental needs. Historically, the institution has been dominated by campus-based education, and its three campuses have been poles of attraction for scholars and scholarship to the significant advantage of the countries in which they are located: Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Barbados. The University’s creation of an open campus, a fourth campus, enables it to expand its scope, enhance its appeal, and improve the efficiency of its services to individuals, communities, and countries. This new campus, a merger of UWI’s Outreach sector, which comprises the School of Continuing Studies, the Tertiary Level Institute Unit, and The UWI Distance Education Centre, will have a physical presence in each contributing country and will function as a network of real and virtual modes to deliver education and training to anyone with access to Internet facilities.

  12. Nations of the earth report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These books contain summaries of the national reports prepared for the UN Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro, June 1992. Summary reports of the following countries are included: V. 1) Algeria, Argentina, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Canada, Chad, China, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Djibouti, Egypt, Fiji, Finland, France, Guinea, Jordan, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Paraguay, Romania, Senegal, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Sweden, Tokelau, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Western Samoa, Yemen Arab Republic, Yugoslavia. V. 2) Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Bulgaria, Central African Republic, Colombia, Czech and Slovak Federal Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Japan, Kenya, Republic of Korea, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Lebanon, Lesotho, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Morocco, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Oman, Organization of Eastern Caribbean States, Pacific Islands Developing Countries, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Spain, Sudan, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Zimbabwe

  13. Saharan dust, climate variability, and asthma in Grenada, the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Martin, Francis E.; Behr, Joshua G.; Diaz, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    Saharan dust is transported across the Atlantic and interacts with the Caribbean seasonal climatic conditions, becoming respirable and contributing to asthma presentments at the emergency department. This study investigated the relationships among dust, climatic variables, and asthma-related visits to the emergency room in Grenada. All asthma visits to the emergency room ( n = 4411) over 5 years (2001-2005) were compared to the dust cover and climatic variables for the corresponding period. Variation in asthma was associated with change in dust concentration ( R 2 = 0.036, p population sizes, industrialization level, and economies. Therefore, different than from the studies in Trinidad and Barbados, Grenada is a non-industrialized low-income small island without major industrialized air pollution addition; asthma visits were inversely related to mean sea level pressure ( R 2 = 0.123, p = 0.006) and positively correlated with relative humidity ( R 2 = 0.593, p = 0.85). Saharan dust in conjunction with seasonal humidity allows for inhalable particulate matter that exacerbates asthma among residents in the Caribbean island of Grenada. These findings contribute evidence suggesting a broader public health impact from Saharan dust. Thus, this research may inform strategic planning of resource allocation among the Caribbean public health agencies.

  14. Impact of sheep stocking density and breed on behaviour of newly regrouped adult rams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engeldal SEC

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Placing animals in cages with certain density and good grouping were two important aspects needed in intensive livestock production system to produce optimal production and animal welfare. The objective of this study was to examine effect of stocking density, breed and elapse of time on behaviour of newly regrouped, unacquainted adult rams from three sheep breeds i.e. Barbados Blackbelly Cross, Local Garut and Composite Garut, as possible factor causing variation in welfare status. Instantaneous scan sampling was used for recording sheep behaviour at three different stocking densities. Thirty-six adult rams were used in this research and divided into three groups (n = 12 on the basis of breed. At each stocking density four rams of the same breed were observed during two consecutive days. The recorded behaviours were agonistic-, self-care-, exploratory-, aberrant-, mating-, locomotive- and standing behaviour. The results showed that during the entire experiment agonistic behaviour was observed at the highest frequency. Stocking density was found to have a significant effect on exploratory-, locomotive- and standing behaviour. The effect of breed was found to cause significant differences in agonistic-, self-care-, aberrant- and mating behaviour. Significant differences were also found between day 1 and day 2 of regrouping for agonistic-, exploratory, self-care- and mating behaviour. It is concluded that the three breeds do differ in their behavioural reactions to different stocking density levels and time needed for adaptation after regrouping

  15. The role of African dust in the formation of Quaternary soils on Mallorca, Spain and implications for the genesis of Red Mediterranean soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Avila, A.; Skipp, G.; Freeman, J.; Patterson, D.

    2010-01-01

    African dust additions explain the origin of terra rossa soils that are common on the carbonate-platform island of Mallorca, Spain. Mineralogical and geochemical analyses indicate that Quaternary carbonate eolianites on Mallorca have a very high purity, usually composed of more than 90% carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite, and aragonite). In contrast, terra rossa soils developed on these eolianites have lower carbonate contents and contain higher concentrations of quartz and other silicates. Analyses of immobile trace elements indicate that the non-carbonate fractions of the eolianites have distinctive Zr/Hf, La/Yb, Cr/Sc and Th/Ta values that differ from the superjacent terra rossa soils. These observations indicate that even if sufficient dissolution of the eolianite had taken place to create the soils by residual accumulation, immobile element ratios in the soils require an external source. However, Zr/Hf, La/Yb, Cr/Sc and Th/Ta values in the soils fall within the range of values for these element ratios in African dust collected on Barbados and mainland Spain. We conclude that the silicate fractions of terra rossa soils on Mallorca are derived mainly, though not wholly, from far-traveled African dust, and this process may explain the origin of other terra rossa soils found in southern Europe. ?? 2010.

  16. Impaired IQ and Academic Skills in Adults Who Experienced Moderate to Severe Infantile Malnutrition: A Forty-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waber, Deborah P.; Bryce, Cyralene P.; Girard, Jonathan M.; Zichlin, Miriam; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Galler, Janina R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate IQ and academic skills in adults who experienced an episode of moderate to severe infantile malnutrition and a healthy control group, all followed since childhood in the Barbados Nutrition Study. Methods IQ and academic skills were assessed in 77 previously malnourished adults (mean age=38.4 years; 53% male) and 59 controls (mean age=38.1 years; 54% male). Group comparisons were carried out by multiple regression and logistic regression, adjusted for childhood socioeconomic factors. Results The previously malnourished group showed substantial deficits on all outcomes relative to healthy controls (p<0.0001). IQ scores in the Intellectual Disability range (< 70) were 9 times more prevalent in the previously malnourished group (OR=9.18; 95% CI=3.50-24.13). Group differences in IQ of approximately one standard deviation were stable from adolescence through mid-life. Discussion Moderate to severe malnutrition during infancy is associated with a significantly elevated incidence of impaired IQ in adulthood, even when physical growth is completely rehabilitated. An episode of malnutrition during the first year of life carries risk for significant lifelong functional morbidity. PMID:23484464

  17. Health Equity Impacts of Medical Tourism in the Caribbean: The Need to Provide Actionable Guidance Regarding Balancing Local and Foreign Interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Hoffman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Medical tourism is a practice where individuals cross international borders with the intention of privately purchasing healthcare. Caribbean countries are increasingly entering into the medical tourism market, which presents both opportunities and dangers. Our previous fieldwork shows that medical tourism requires host countries to balance the interests of private developers and domestic actors, including those accessing healthcare locally. Discussions with stakeholders in Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Barbados and St Lucia demonstrate concrete instances of this problem. Firstly, medical tourism can enhance training and employment opportunities for domestic health-workers. In doing so, it may exacerbate the inequitable distribution of these workers between the public and private sectors. Secondly, the expansion of private medical services can provide locals with more care options. These facilities may also crowd out existing local operators and price out local consumers. Thirdly, medical tourism is hailed as potentially cross-subsidizing and strengthening the local public health system. It may also heighten health inequities and distract local attention from the needs of the public health sector. Caribbean stakeholders are aware of the promise and dangers of medical tourism. However, they lack clear advice from medical tourism researchers about how to navigate these issues, and specifically balancing local and foreign interests. We call on researchers to shift focus from highlighting the theoretical problems associated with medical tourism to providing concrete guidance to stakeholders in a position to decide whether or not to pursue medical tourism development and to shape this development when it takes place.

  18. Bajan Birds Pull Strings: Two Wild Antillean Species Enter the Select Club of String-Pullers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducatez, Simon; Lefebvre, Louis

    2016-01-01

    String-pulling is one of the most popular tests in animal cognition because of its apparent complexity, and of its potential to be applied to very different taxa. In birds, the basic procedure involves a food reward, suspended from a perch by a string, which can be reached by a series of coordinated pulling actions with the beak and holding actions of the pulled lengths of string with the foot. The taxonomic distribution of species that pass the test includes several corvids, parrots and parids, but in other families, data are much spottier and the number of individuals per species that succeed is often low. To date, the association between string-pulling ability and other cognitive traits was never tested. It is generally assumed that string-pulling is a complex form of problem-solving, suggesting that performance on string-pulling and other problem-solving tasks should be correlated. Here, we show that individuals of two innovative species from Barbados, the bullfinch Loxigilla barbadensis and the Carib grackle Quiscalus lugubris fortirostris, pass the string-pulling test. Eighteen of the 42 bullfinches tested succeeded, allowing us to correlate performance on this test to that on several other behavioral measurements. Surprisingly, string-pulling in bullfinches was unrelated to shyness, neophobia, problem-solving, discrimination and reversal learning performance. Only two of 31 grackles tested succeeded, precluding correlational analyses with other measures but still, the two successful birds largely differed in their other behavioral traits. PMID:27533282

  19. Reconsidering Melt-water Pulses 1A and 1B:Global Impacts of Rapid Sea-level Rise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Paul Liu; John D.Milliman

    2004-01-01

    Re-evaluation of the post-glacial sea level derived from the Barbados coral-reef borings suggests slightly revised depth ranges and timing of melt-water pulses MWP-1A(96-76 m, 14.3-14.0 ka cal BP)and 1B(58-45 m, 11.5-11.2 ka cal BP), respectively. Ages of non-reef sea-level indicators from the Sunda Shelf, the East China Sea and Yellow Sea for these two intervals are unreliable because of the well-documented radiocarbon(14C)plateau, but their vertical clustering corresponds closely with MWP-1A and 1B depth ranges. Close correlation of the revised sea-level curve with Greenland ice-core data suggests that the 14C plateau may be related to oceanographic-atmospheric changes due to rapid sea-level rise, fresh-water input, and impaired ocean circulation. MWP-1A appears to have occurred at the end of Blling Warm Transition, suggesting that the rapid sea-level rise may have resulted from lateral heat transport from low to high-latitude regions and subsequent abrupt ice-sheet collapses in both North America-Europe and Antarctica. An around 70 mm a-1 transgression during MWP-1A may have increased freshwater discharge to the North Atlantic by as much as an order of magnitude, thereby disturbing thermohaline circulation and initiating the Older Dryas global cooling.

  20. Anatomy of the western Java plate interface from depth-migrated seismic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, H.; Hindle, D.; Klaeschen, D.; Oncken, O.; Reichert, C.; Scholl, D.

    2009-01-01

    Newly pre-stack depth-migrated seismic images resolve the structural details of the western Java forearc and plate interface. The structural segmentation of the forearc into discrete mechanical domains correlates with distinct deformation styles. Approximately 2/3 of the trench sediment fill is detached and incorporated into frontal prism imbricates, while the floor sequence is underthrust beneath the d??collement. Western Java, however, differs markedly from margins such as Nankai or Barbados, where a uniform, continuous d??collement reflector has been imaged. In our study area, the plate interface reveals a spatially irregular, nonlinear pattern characterized by the morphological relief of subducted seamounts and thicker than average patches of underthrust sediment. The underthrust sediment is associated with a low velocity zone as determined from wide-angle data. Active underplating is not resolved, but likely contributes to the uplift of the large bivergent wedge that constitutes the forearc high. Our profile is located 100 km west of the 2006 Java tsunami earthquake. The heterogeneous d??collement zone regulates the friction behavior of the shallow subduction environment where the earthquake occurred. The alternating pattern of enhanced frictional contact zones associated with oceanic basement relief and weak material patches of underthrust sediment influences seismic coupling and possibly contributed to the heterogeneous slip distribution. Our seismic images resolve a steeply dipping splay fault, which originates at the d??collement and terminates at the sea floor and which potentially contributes to tsunami generation during co-seismic activity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Submarine groundwater discharge as an integral environmental "currency" limiting population and development within the ecosphere of small islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Ruth

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) from oceanic islands has been estimated to contribute over a third of the global SGD due to orographic precipitation, short aquifer pathways and poorly developed surface drainage. This seepage of groundwater across the sea floor connects land and coastal ocean resources, and is hereby proposed as a parameter to evaluate the interconnections between coastal environmental quality and coastal populations and development. Relatively few islands have been studied, but SGD is typically found to be an important, and often the only, source of nutrients to coastal waters. Freshwater and its pollutant load are delivered to the coastal zone via SGD with consequent impacts on tourism and fisheries thus linking the land-based and marine economic sectors. The characteristics of SGD were investigated on Barbados, Guam and Bimini, islands all of, at least partly, carbonate origin, This study evaluates the similarities and differences between these islands and assesses the applicability of using SGD as a parameter within a population--development--environment model. Model scenarios can be used to explore the integrated coastal impacts of wastewater treatment practices and changes in seasonal rainfall due to climate change. This study also presents novel analytical methods for SGD field data.

  2. Phylogeography and population dynamics of dengue viruses in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allicock, Orchid M; Lemey, Philippe; Tatem, Andrew J; Pybus, Oliver G; Bennett, Shannon N; Mueller, Brandi A; Suchard, Marc A; Foster, Jerome E; Rambaut, Andrew; Carrington, Christine V F

    2012-06-01

    Changes in Dengue virus (DENV) disease patterns in the Americas over recent decades have been attributed, at least in part, to repeated introduction of DENV strains from other regions, resulting in a shift from hypoendemicity to hyperendemicity. Using newly sequenced DENV-1 and DENV-3 envelope (E) gene isolates from 11 Caribbean countries, along with sequences available on GenBank, we sought to document the population genetic and spatiotemporal transmission histories of the four main invading DENV genotypes within the Americas and investigate factors that influence the rate and intensity of DENV transmission. For all genotypes, there was an initial invasion phase characterized by rapid increases in genetic diversity, which coincided with the first confirmed cases of each genotype in the region. Rapid geographic dispersal occurred upon each genotype's introduction, after which individual lineages were locally maintained, and gene flow was primarily observed among neighboring and nearby countries. There were, however, centers of viral diversity (Barbados, Puerto Rico, Colombia, Suriname, Venezuela, and Brazil) that were repeatedly involved in gene flow with more distant locations. For DENV-1 and DENV-2, we found that a "distance-informed" model, which posits that the intensity of virus movement between locations is inversely proportional to the distance between them, provided a better fit than a model assuming equal rates of movement between all pairs of countries. However, for DENV-3 and DENV-4, the more stochastic "equal rates" model was preferred. PMID:22319149

  3. On clocks and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Witte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cumulus clouds exhibit a life cycle that consists of: (a the growth phase (increasing size, most notably in the vertical direction; (b the mature phase (growth ceases; any precipitation that develops is strongest during this period; and (c the dissipation phase (cloud dissipates because of precipitation and/or entrainment; no more dynamical support. Although radar can track clouds over time and give some sense of the age of a cloud, most aircraft in situ measurements lack temporal context. We use large eddy simulations of trade wind cumulus cloud fields from cases during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX and Rain In Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO campaigns to demonstrate a potential cumulus cloud "clock". We find that the volume-averaged total water mixing ratio rt is a useful cloud clock for the 12 clouds studied. A cloud's initial rt is set by the subcloud mixed-layer mean rt and decreases monotonically from the initial value due primarily to entrainment. The clock is insensitive to aerosol loading, environmental sounding and extrinsic cloud properties such as lifetime and volume. In some cases (more commonly for larger clouds, multiple pulses of buoyancy occur, which complicate the cumulus clock by replenishing rt. The clock is most effectively used to classify clouds by life phase.

  4. Saharan dust contribution to the Caribbean summertime boundary layer - a lidar study during SALTRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Silke; Gasteiger, Josef; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Sauer, Daniel; Toledano, Carlos; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Dual-wavelength lidar measurements with the small lidar system POLIS of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München were performed during the SALTRACE experiment at Barbados in June and July 2013. Based on high-accuracy measurements of the linear depolarization ratio down to about 200 m above ground level, the dust volume fraction and the dust mass concentration within the convective marine boundary layer can be derived. Additional information from radiosonde launches at the ground-based measurement site provide independent information on the convective marine boundary layer height and the meteorological situation within the convective marine boundary layer. We investigate the lidar-derived optical properties, the lidar ratio and the particle linear depolarization ratio at 355 and 532 nm and find mean values of 0.04 (SD 0.03) and 0.05 (SD 0.04) at 355 and 532 nm, respectively, for the particle linear depolarization ratio, and (26 ± 5) sr for the lidar ratio at 355 and 532 nm. For the concentration of dust in the convective marine boundary layer we find that most values were between 20 and 50 µg m-3. On most days the dust contribution to total aerosol volume was about 30-40 %. Comparing the dust contribution to the column-integrated sun-photometer measurements we see a correlation between high dust contribution, high total aerosol optical depth and a low Angström exponent, and of low dust contribution with low total aerosol optical depth.

  5. Qualitative assessment of silver and gold nanoparticle synthesis in various plants: a photobiological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekharreddy, Pala; Usha Rani, Pathipati, E-mail: purani@iict.res.i [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Biology and Biotechnology Division (India); Sreedhar, Bojja [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory (India)

    2010-06-15

    The development of rapid and ecofriendly processes for the synthesis of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) nanoparticles is of great importance in the field of nanotechnology. In this study, the extracellular production of Ag and Au nanoparticles was carried out from the leaves of the plants, Tridax procumbens L. (Coat buttons), Jatropa curcas L. (Barbados nut), Calotropis gigantea L. (Calotropis), Solanum melongena L. (Eggplant), Datura metel L. (Datura), Carica papaya L. (Papaya) and Citrus aurantium L. (Bitter orange) by the sunlight exposure method. Qualitative comparisons of the synthesized nanoparticles between the plants were measured. Among these T. procumbens, J. curcas and C. gigantea plants synthesized <20 nm sized and spherical-shaped Ag particles, whereas C. papaya, D. metel and S. melongena produced <20 nm sized monodispersed Au particles. The amount of nanoparticles synthesized and its qualitative characterization was done by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used for structural confirmation. Further analysis carried out by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), provided evidence for the presence of amino groups, which increased the stability of the synthesized nanoparticles.

  6. METHODS OF TAXATION IN THE TAX HAVENS. EXAMPLES OF TAXATION IN THE BAHAMAS, BERMUDA AND THE CAYMAN ISLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENEA CONSTANTIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We should never trust appearances: "the drum, with all the noise it makes is not only filled with wind"[1]. This old oriental proverb perfectly illustrates our proposal regarding the "true false" tax havens. Only at the beginning of this century, learned before firms to exercise their activity in the national territory, returned to international trade. The continuous search for new outlets to escape the growing production, export them first and then they were implanted overseas sales platforms and then installing production. Zero Haven sites or havens with zero tax consisting essentially of small economies, the British colonies (Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, dependent territories of the Commonwealth (Bermuda or territories became independent (Antigua, Bahamas 1963 or Vanuatu 1980. Our study will analyze tax havens most common: Bahamas, Bermuda or the Cayman Islands, where we find all models of reception that can be viewed in other areas zero-haven: International Business Companies (Antigua, the Virgin Islands, Nevis exemption schemes to insurance companies or banks (Barbados, Vanuatu. The subject of tax evasion subject of much debate, targeting both the domestic economic space and the world. Unlike their concerns globally, domestic concerns to reduce tax evasion resumes, especially on taxation of small businesses, avoiding knowingly scope of tax havens.

  7. Sea-level records at ~80 ka from tectonically stable platforms: Florida and Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Halley, R.B.; Shinn, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies from technically active coasts on New Guinea and Barbados have suggested that sea level at ???80 ka was significantly lower than present, whereas data from the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America indicate an ???80 ka sea level close to that of the present. We determined ages of corals from a shallow submerged reef off the Florida Keys and an emergent marine deposit on Bermuda. Both localities are on tectonically stable platforms distant from plate boundaries. Uranium-series ages show that corals at both localities grew during the ???80 ka sea-level highstand, and geologic data show that sea level at that time was no lower than 7-9 m below present (Florida) and may have been 1-2 m above present (Bermuda). The ice-volume discrepancy of the 80 ka sea-level estimates is greater than the volume of the Greenland or West Antarctic ice sheets. Comparison of our ages with high-latitude insolation values indicates that the sea-level stand near the present at ???80 ka could have been orbitally forced.

  8. Bajan Birds Pull Strings: Two Wild Antillean Species Enter the Select Club of String-Pullers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Jean-Nicolas; Ducatez, Simon; Lefebvre, Louis

    2016-01-01

    String-pulling is one of the most popular tests in animal cognition because of its apparent complexity, and of its potential to be applied to very different taxa. In birds, the basic procedure involves a food reward, suspended from a perch by a string, which can be reached by a series of coordinated pulling actions with the beak and holding actions of the pulled lengths of string with the foot. The taxonomic distribution of species that pass the test includes several corvids, parrots and parids, but in other families, data are much spottier and the number of individuals per species that succeed is often low. To date, the association between string-pulling ability and other cognitive traits was never tested. It is generally assumed that string-pulling is a complex form of problem-solving, suggesting that performance on string-pulling and other problem-solving tasks should be correlated. Here, we show that individuals of two innovative species from Barbados, the bullfinch Loxigilla barbadensis and the Carib grackle Quiscalus lugubris fortirostris, pass the string-pulling test. Eighteen of the 42 bullfinches tested succeeded, allowing us to correlate performance on this test to that on several other behavioral measurements. Surprisingly, string-pulling in bullfinches was unrelated to shyness, neophobia, problem-solving, discrimination and reversal learning performance. Only two of 31 grackles tested succeeded, precluding correlational analyses with other measures but still, the two successful birds largely differed in their other behavioral traits. PMID:27533282

  9. “De Beach Belong to We!” Socio-economic Disparity and Islanders’ Rights of Access to the Coast in a Tourist Paradise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Toppin-Allahar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caribbean islands share a history of plantation economy in which the "1%" not only controlled the natural resources and economies of the region, but also owned the majority of the "99%" who were enslaved. This disparity in wealth approximated a racial divide in the society, as the wealthy minority was predominantly "white" while the dispossessed majority was mainly non-whites. While the coastlands were always of importance in these export-oriented agricultural colonies, beach and backshore lands unsuitable for agriculture were less so, often being utilized for boatyards/fishing depots, cemeteries and "tenantries" or squatter settlements housing the landless. Since World War II, and particularly since the Cuban revolution in 1960, beach-oriented tourism has become the leading economic activity in most Caribbean countries. Competition for coastal resources has generally been resolved in favour of foreign currency, transferring much coastal property to foreign ownership and increasingly shutting off the local population's access to the sea. As the majority of foreign investors and tourists are white, this also has racial connotations. This paper examines the legal and administrative responses to the challenges that this situation presents which have been adopted by the Anglo-Caribbean Small Island Developing States (SIDS, with particular reference to the islands of Jamaica, Barbados, Tobago and some of the member countries of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS. Las islas del Caribe comparten una historia de economía basada en plantaciones, en el que el 1% de la población controlaba los recursos naturales y la economía de la región, y al 99% restante, que vivía esclavizado. Esta diferencia en la riqueza traía consigo una división racial en la sociedad, ya que la minoría rica era principalmente "blanca", mientras que la mayoría desposeía era principalmente "no blanca". Mientras que las tierras costeras tenían siempre

  10. Airborne observations of cloud properties on HALO during NARVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Heike; Hansen, Akio; Ament, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The representation of cloud and precipitation processes is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate and weather predictions. To validate model predictions of convective processes over the Atlantic ocean, usually satellite data are used. However, satellite products provide just a coarse view with poor temporal resolution of convective maritime clouds. Aircraft-based observations offer a more detailed insight due to lower altitude and high sampling rates. The research aircraft HALO (High Altitude Long Range Research Aircraft) is operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). With a ceiling of 15 km, and a range of 10,000 km and more than 10 hours it is able to reach remote regions and operate from higher altitudes than most other research aircraft. Thus, it provides the unique opportunity to exploit regions of the atmosphere that cannot be easily accessed otherwise. Measurements conducted on HALO provide more detailed insights than achievable from satellite data. Therefore, this measurement platform bridges the gap between previous airborne measurements and satellites. The payload used for this study consists of, amongst others, a suite of passive microwave radiometers, a cloud radar, and a water vapor DIAL. To investigate cloud and precipitation properties of convective maritime clouds, the NARVAL (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies) campaign was conducted in winter 2013/2014 out of Barbados and Keflavik (Iceland). This campaign was one of the first that took place on the HALO aircraft. During the experiment's two parts 15 research flights were conducted (8 flights during NARVAL-South out of Barbados to investigate trade-wind cumuli and 7 flights out of Keflavik with focus on mid-latitude cyclonic systems). Flight durations were between five and nine hours, amounting to roughly 118 flight hours overall. 121 dropsondes were deployed. In fall 2016 two additional aircraft campaigns with the same payload will take place: The

  11. USGS contributions to earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D.; Caribbean Project Team, U.; Partners, C.

    2007-05-01

    USGS Caribbean Project Team: Lind Gee, Gary Gyure, John Derr, Jack Odum, John McMillan, David Carver, Jim Allen, Susan Rhea, Don Anderson, Harley Benz Caribbean Partners: Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade-PRSN, Juan Payero ISU-UASD,DR, Eduardo Camacho - UPAN, Panama, Lloyd Lynch - SRU,Gonzalo Cruz - UNAH,Honduras, Margaret Wiggins-Grandison - Jamaica, Judy Thomas - CERO Barbados, Sylvan McIntyre - NADMA Grenada, E. Bermingham - STRI. The magnitude-9 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of December 26, 2004, increased global awareness of the destructive hazard posed by earthquakes and tsunamis. In response to this tragedy, the US government undertook a collaborative project to improve earthquake and tsunami monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions, in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Seismically active areas of the Caribbean Sea region pose a tsunami risk for Caribbean islands, coastal areas along the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Nearly 100 tsunamis have been reported for the Caribbean region in the past 500 years, including 14 tsunamis reported in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Smithsonian Institute, the National Oceanic and Aeronautic Administration (NOAA), and several partner institutions in the Caribbean region. This presentation focuses on the deployment of nine broadband seismic stations to monitor earthquake activity in the Caribbean region that are affiliated with the Global Seismograph Network (GSN). By the end of 2006, five stations were transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Service (NEIS), and regional partners through Puerto Rico seismograph network (PRSN) Earthworm systems. The following stations are currently operating: SDDR - Sabaneta Dam Dominican Republic, BBGH - Gun Hill Barbados, GRGR - Grenville, Grenada, BCIP - Barro Colorado, Panama, TGUH - Tegucigalpa

  12. A focus on the consumer: social marketing for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaire, L E

    1985-01-01

    Social marketing is the application of commercial marketing principles to advance a social cause, issue, behavior, product, or service. Social marketing has added a framework to social efforts that heretofore lacked organization and has inspired projects that otherwise might never have been initiated. In the US, social marketing techniques have been particularly successful in the health field. Although advertising and other communications are central to social marketing, the discipline also depends upon other elements of what is termed the marketing mix: product, price, place, and promotion. Social marketing is a cyclical process involving 6 steps: analysis; planning; development, testing, and refining elements of the plan; implementation; assessment of in-market effectiveness; and feedback. In developing countries, health has similarly been the greatest beneficiary to date of applied social marketing techniques. Family planning programs and oral rehydration therapy (ORT) projects have used social marketing techniques effectively in numerous developing countries. Social marketing has been even more widely applied in the sale of contraceptives in developing countries. Contraceptive social marketing (CSM) programs are well established in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, Nepal, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico, and Egypt. More recently programs have been established in Honduras, Guatemala, Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia. SOMARC (Social Marketing for Change) is a project funded by the US Agency for International Development (AID) and is working with existing CSM programs and helping to launch new CSM programs. CSM programs are successfully functioning as legitimate marketing organizations in developing countries and are using local private sector resources in the process. Program results are encouraging. Social marketing requires both experience and sensitivity to local conditions. Many developing countries now have their own marketing resources

  13. Revisiting the 1761 Transatlantic Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Wronna, Martin; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami catalogs of the Atlantic include two transatlantic tsunamis in the 18th century the well known 1st November 1755 and the 31st March 1761. The 31st March 1761 earthquake struck Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. The earthquake occurred around noontime in Lisbon alarming the inhabitants and throwing down ruins of the past 1st November 1755 earthquake. According to several sources, the earthquake was followed by a tsunami observed as far as Cornwall (United Kingdom), Cork (Ireland) and Barbados (Caribbean). The analysis of macroseismic information and its compatibility with tsunami travel time information led to a source area close to the Ampere Seamount with an estimated epicenter circa 34.5°N 13°W. The estimated magnitude of the earthquake was 8.5. In this study, we revisit the tsunami observations, and we include a report from Cadiz not used before. We use the results of the compilation of the multi-beam bathymetric data, that covers the area between 34°N - 38°N and 12.5°W - 5.5°W and use the recent tectonic map published for the Southwest Iberian Margin to select among possible source scenarios. Finally, we use a non-linear shallow water model that includes the discretization and explicit leap-frog finite difference scheme to solve the shallow water equations in the spherical or Cartesian coordinate to compute tsunami waveforms and tsunami inundation and check the results against the historical descriptions to infer the source of the event. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3

  14. Bioclimatic comfort and the thermal perceptions and preferences of beach tourists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutty, Michelle; Scott, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The largest market segment of global tourism is coastal tourism, which is strongly dependent on the destination's thermal climate. To date, outdoor bioclimatic comfort assessments have focused exclusively on local residents in open urban areas, making it unclear whether outdoor comfort is perceived differently in non-urban environments or by non-residents (i.e. tourists) with different weather expectations and activity patterns. This study provides needed insight into the perception of outdoor microclimatic conditions in a coastal environment while simultaneously identifying important psychological factors that differentiate tourists from everyday users of urban spaces. Concurrent micrometeorological measurements were taken on several Caribbean beaches in the islands of Barbados, Saint Lucia and Tobago, while a questionnaire survey was used to examine the thermal comfort of subjects ( n = 472). Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) conditions of 32 to 39 °C were recorded, which were perceived as being "slightly warm" or "warm" by respondents. Most beach users (48 to 77 %) would not change the thermal conditions, with some (4 to 15 %) preferring even warmer conditions. Even at UTCI of 39 °C, 62 % of respondents voted for no change to current thermal conditions, with an additional 10 % stating that they would like to feel even warmer. These results indicate that beach users' thermal preferences are up to 18 °C warmer than the preferred thermal conditions identified in existing outdoor bioclimatic studies from urban park settings. This indicates that beach users hold fundamentally different comfort perceptions and preferences compared to people using urban spaces. Statistically significant differences ( p ≤ .05) were also recorded for demographic groups (gender, age) and place of origin (climatic region).

  15. Concentrations of Semivolatile Organic Compounds Associated with African Dust Air Masses in Mali, Cape Verde, Trinidad and Tobago, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, 2001-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mohammed, Azad; Simonich, Staci Massey

    2011-01-01

    Every year, billions of tons of fine particles are eroded from the surface of the Sahara Desert and the Sahel of West Africa, lifted into the atmosphere by convective storms, and transported thousands of kilometers downwind. Most of the dust is carried west to the Americas and the Caribbean in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). Dust air masses predominately impact northern South America during the Northern Hemisphere winter and the Caribbean and Southeastern United States in summer. Dust concentrations vary considerably temporally and spatially. In a dust source region (Mali), concentrations range from background levels of 575 micrograms per cubic meter (mu/u g per m3) to 13,000 mu/u g per m3 when visibility degrades to a few meters (Gillies and others, 1996). In the Caribbean, concentrations of 200 to 600 mu/u g per m3 in the mid-Atlantic and Barbados (Prospero and others, 1981; Talbot and others, 1986), 3 to 20 mu/u g per m3 in the Caribbean (Prospero and Nees, 1986; Perry and others, 1997); and >100 mu/u g per m3 in the Virgin Islands (this dataset) have been reported during African dust conditions. Mean dust particle size decreases as the SAL traverses from West Africa to the Caribbean and Americas as a result of gravitational settling. Mean particle size reaching the Caribbean is <1 micrometer (mu/u m) (Perry and others, 1997), and even finer particles are carried into Central America, the Southeastern United States, and maritime Canada. Particles less than 2.5 mu/u m diameter (termed PM2.5) can be inhaled deeply into human lungs. A large body of literature has shown that increased PM2.5 concentrations are linked to increased cardiovascular/respiratory morbidity and mortality (for example, Dockery and others, 1993; Penn and others, 2005).

  16. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN and ice nucleating particle (INP number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of number concentrations of aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (APC50, reservoir of favorable CCN and with radius > 250 nm (APC250, reservoir of favorable INP, as well as profiles of the aerosol particle surface area concentration (ASC, used in INP parameterization can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC with relative uncertainties of a factor of around 2 (APC50, and of about 25–50 % (APC250, ASC. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to identify mineral dust particles and to distinguish and separate the aerosol properties of basic aerosol types such as mineral dust and continental pollution (haze, smoke. We investigate the relationship between AEC and APC50, APC250, and ASC for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm and main aerosol types (dust, pollution, marine. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures of continental pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple relationship between APC50 and the CCN-reservoir particles (APCCCN and published INP parameterization schemes (with APC250 and ASC as input we finally compute APCCCN and INP concentration profiles. We apply the full methodology to a lidar observation of a heavy dust outbreak crossing Cyprus with dust up to 8 km height and to a case during which anthropogenic pollution dominated.

  17. Family planning costs and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Government sponsored family planning programs have had major success in declining birth rates in Barbados, China, Cuba, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Korea, Mexico, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, and Thailand. Non- government programs have had similar success in Brazil and Colombia. These programs have been estimated as preventing over 100 million births in China and 80 million in India. Research indicates that family planning programs can produce a 30-50% drop in fertility. Family planning information and some contraceptives can be best distributed through community organizations. Research also indicates male opposition has been a major factor in wider acceptance of family planning. Surveys indicate that 50% of the woman who want no additional children are not using any birth control. Many governments do not have the resource and money to implement programs. In the developing countries if those who were able to prevent the unwanted births had birth control, the population increases in those countries would have been 1.3% versus 2.2%. In earlier family planning programs foreign assistance paid over 80% of the cost, and national governments 20%; today this is reversed. The World Bank estimates that for major improvements in population growth and women's health, $7 billion will be needed yearly by the year 2000. The countries that have had the similar goals in development of human resources, social services, health, and education. They have attended to the status of women, female employment, and maternal and child health. Estimates are that 1.3 billion couples and individuals will need family planning services by the year 2000, and this will be a formidable task. This key elements of successful family planning programs are community participation, decentralization, and training.

  18. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. The Influence of African Dust on Air Quality in the Caribbean Basin: An Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrievals, Ground Observations, and Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Prospero, J. M.; Chin, M.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A.; Bian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term surface measurements in several locations extending from northeastern coast of South America to Miami in Florida have shown that African dust arrives in the Greater Caribbean Basin throughout a year. This long-range transported dust frequently elevates the level of particulate matter (PM) above the WHO guideline for PM10, which raises a concern of possible adverse impact of African dust on human health in the region. There is also concern about how future climate change might affect dust transport and its influence on regional air quality. In this presentation we provide a comprehensive characterization of the influence of African dust on air quality in the Caribbean Basin via integrating the ground observations with satellite retrievals and model simulations. The ground observations are used to validate and evaluate satellite retrievals and model simulations of dust, while satellite measurements and model simulations are used to extend spatial coverage of the ground observations. An analysis of CALIPSO lidar measurements of three-dimensional distribution of aerosols over 2007-2014 yields altitude-resolved dust mass flux into the region. On a basis of 8-year average and integration over the latitude zone of 0°-30°N, a total of 76 Tg dust is imported to the air above the Greater Caribbean Basin, of which 34 Tg (or 45%) is within the lowest 1 km layer and most relevant to air quality concern. The seasonal and interannual variations of the dust import are well correlated with ground observations of dust in Cayenne, Barbados, Puerto Rico, and Miami. We will also show comparisons of the size-resolved dust amount from both NASA GEOS-5 aerosol simulation and MERRA-2 aerosol reanalysis (i.e., column aerosol loading being constrained by satellite measurements of radiance at the top of atmosphere) with the ground observations and satellite measurement.

  20. Properties of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the trade wind marine boundary layer of the western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Benker, Nathalie; Hartmann, Markus; Prospero, Joseph M.; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Cloud optical properties in the trade winds over the eastern Caribbean Sea have been shown to be sensitive to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The objective of the current study was to investigate the CCN properties in the marine boundary layer (MBL) in the tropical western North Atlantic, in order to assess the respective roles of inorganic sulfate, organic species, long-range transported mineral dust and sea-salt particles. Measurements were carried out in June-July 2013, on the east coast of Barbados, and included CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions and offline analysis of sampled particulate matter (PM) and sampled accumulation mode particles for an investigation of composition and mixing state with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). During most of the campaign, significant mass concentrations of long-range transported mineral dust was present in the PM, and influence from local island sources can be ruled out. The CCN and particle number concentrations were similar to what can be expected in pristine marine environments. The hygroscopicity parameter κ was inferred, and values in the range 0.2-0.5 were found during most of the campaign, with similar values for the Aitken and the accumulation mode. The accumulation mode particles studied with TEM were dominated by non-refractory material, and concentrations of mineral dust, sea salt and soot were too small to influence the CCN properties. It is highly likely that the CCN were dominated by a mixture of sulfate species and organic compounds.

  1. Properties of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the trade wind marine boundary layer of the Eastern Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Kristensen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud optical properties in the trade winds over the Eastern Caribbean Sea have been shown to be sensitive to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations. The objective of the current study was to investigate the CCN properties in the marine boundary layer (MBL in the Eastern Caribbean, in order to assess the respective roles of organic species, long-range transported mineral dust, and sea salt particles. Measurements were carried out in June–July 2013, on the East Coast of Barbados and included CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions, as well as off-line analysis of sampled particulate matter (PM and sampled accumulation mode particles for an investigation of composition and mixing state with transmission electron microscopy (TEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. During most of the campaign, significant mass concentrations of long-range transported mineral dust was present in the PM, and influence from local island sources can be ruled out. The CCN and particle number concentrations were similar to what can be expected in pristine marine environments. The hygroscopicity parameter κ was inferred, and values in the range 0.2–0.5 were found during most of the campaign, with similar values for the Aitken and the accumulation mode. The accumulation mode particles studied with TEM were dominated by non-refractory material, and concentrations of mineral dust, sea salt, and soot were too small to influence the CCN properties. It is highly likely that the CCN were dominated by a mixture of sulphate species and organic compounds.

  2. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  3. Analysis of cervico-vaginal (Papanicolaou) smears, in girls 18 years and under.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussia, P R; Gay, G H E; Bruce, A

    2002-03-01

    This study was conducted retrospectively at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital and a private laboratory in Barbados to determine the types of epithelial abnormalities in cervico-vaginal Papanicolaou (Pap)-stained smears, and their clinical implications in Barbadian girls, 18 years and under, during the five-year period January 1995 to December 1999. Two hundred and sixty-five Pap smears from 236 patients were examined and the gynaecological history, initial and repeat Pap smear diagnoses, and histology reports of these patients were analyzed. Of the 236 first-visit smears, 94 (39.8%) were abnormal with 36 (15.3%) displaying cytologic features of squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SIL), (33 low grade and 3 high grade). A diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) was reported in the remaining 58 (24.5%) abnormal smears, of which 35 (60.3%) were suspected to be related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Twenty-two (23.4%) of these 94 patients, who had abnormal smears of either ASCUS or low grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (LSIL) were re-evaluated within six to twelve months of the initial abnormal Pap smear diagnosis. Eight of these 22 patients (36.4%) had histological diagnosis of LSIL inclusive of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN 1) and condylomata. High-risk HPV DNA types were detected in two of these eight patients (25%). The study confirms that sexually active teenage girls are at risk of developing SIL and high-risk HPV infection. Screening of sexually active teenaged girls by Pap smears followed by other appropriate investigative procedures is recommended. PMID:12089874

  4. Leptospiral proteins recognized during the humoral immune response to leptospirosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, H; Croda, J; Flannery, B; Mazel, M; Matsunaga, J; Galvão Reis, M; Levett, P N; Ko, A I; Haake, D A

    2001-08-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. An understanding of leptospiral protein expression regulation is needed to develop new immunoprotective and serodiagnostic strategies. We used the humoral immune response during human leptospirosis as a reporter of protein antigens expressed during infection. Qualitative and quantitative immunoblot analysis was performed using sera from 105 patients from Brazil and Barbados. Sera from patients with other diseases and healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Seven proteins, p76, p62, p48, p45, p41, p37, and p32, were identified as targets of the humoral response during natural infection. In both acute and convalescent phases of illness, antibodies to lipopolysaccharide were predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) while antibodies to proteins were exclusively IgG. Anti-p32 reactivity had the greatest sensitivity and specificity: positive reactions were observed in 37 and 84% of acute- and convalescent-phase sera, respectively, while only 5% of community control individuals demonstrated positive reactions. Six immunodominant antigens were expressed by all pathogenic leptospiral strains tested; only p37 was inconsistently expressed. Two-dimensional immunoblots identified four of the seven infection-associated antigens as being previously characterized proteins: LipL32 (the major outer membrane lipoprotein), LipL41 (a surface-exposed outer membrane lipoprotein), and heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK. Fractionation studies demonstrated LipL32 and LipL41 reactivity in the outer membrane fraction and GroEL and DnaK in the cytoplasmic fraction, while p37 appeared to be a soluble periplasmic protein. Most of the other immunodominant proteins, including p48 and p45, were localized to the inner membrane. These findings indicate that leptospiral proteins recognized during natural infection are potentially useful for serodiagnosis and may serve as targets for vaccine

  5. Ozone in the Atlantic Ocean marine boundary layer

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    Patrick Boylan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In situ atmospheric ozone measurements aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the 2008 Gas-Ex and AMMA research cruises were compared with data from four island and coastal Global Atmospheric Watch stations in the Atlantic Ocean to examine ozone transport in the marine boundary layer (MBL. Ozone measurements made at Tudor Hill, Bermuda, were subjected to continental outflow from the east coast of the United States, which resulted in elevated ozone levels above 50 ppbv. Ozone measurements at Cape Verde, Republic of Cape Verde, approached 40 ppbv in springtime and were influenced by outflow from Northern Africa. At Ragged Point, Barbados, ozone levels were ∼ 21 ppbv; back trajectories showed the source region to be the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Ozone measurements from Ushuaia, Argentina, indicated influence from the nearby city; however, the comparison of the daily maxima ozone mole fractions measured at Ushuaia and aboard the Gas-Ex cruise revealed that these were representative of background ozone in higher latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Diurnal ozone cycles in the shipborne data, frequently reaching 6–7 ppbv, were larger than most previous reports from coastal or island monitoring locations and simulations based on HOx photochemistry alone. However, these data show better agreement with recent ozone modeling that included ozone-halogen chemistry. The transport time between station and ship was estimated from HYSPLIT back trajectories, and the change of ozone mole fractions during transport in the MBL was estimated. Three comparisons showed declining ozone levels; in the subtropical and tropical North Atlantic Ocean the loss of ozone was < 1.5 ppbv day−1. Back trajectories at Ushuaia were too inconsistent to allow for this determination. Comparisons between ship and station measurements showed that ozone behavior and large-scale (∼ 1000 km multi-day transport features were well retained during transport in the MBL.

  6. Healing results in meniscus and articular cartilage photochemically welded with 1,8-naphthalimide dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Loyd, John D.; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1997-05-01

    Meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage do not heal spontaneously. In this paper results are described of studies of a procedure for evoking the healing response in such lesions by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Fifteen essentially mature Barbados sheep 40 - 60 pounds in weight received a 2 - 3 mm flap tear by incision in the red white zone of the medial meniscus oriented parallel to the table of the tibia. The animals were divided into four groups; Group I, no treatment; Group II, treatment by laser activated photoactive dyes; Group III, treatment by suturing; Group IV, treatment by laser irradiation only; Group V, treatment by photoactive dyes only. In another group of 12 sheep partial thickness flap tear was created by incision in the articular cartilage of the femoral condyle. These were divided into four groups as for the meniscus study, omitting the sutured control. Welds were made using the dimeric dye MBM Gold BW 012-012-012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9 nm argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes (360 J/cm2) with approximately 2 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hr, 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Gross appearance of menisci and cartilage in all welded knees was normal and all welds resisted deformation or loosening under forceful probing. Histology of studies of both tissues out to 6 moths disclosed close bonding of welded area, continuing healing response in the form of cellular recruitment and protein deposition and the absence of inflammatory response. Tissue erosion and arthritic changes were evident in all unwelded controls.

  7. A focus on the consumer: social marketing for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaire, L E

    1985-01-01

    Social marketing is the application of commercial marketing principles to advance a social cause, issue, behavior, product, or service. Social marketing has added a framework to social efforts that heretofore lacked organization and has inspired projects that otherwise might never have been initiated. In the US, social marketing techniques have been particularly successful in the health field. Although advertising and other communications are central to social marketing, the discipline also depends upon other elements of what is termed the marketing mix: product, price, place, and promotion. Social marketing is a cyclical process involving 6 steps: analysis; planning; development, testing, and refining elements of the plan; implementation; assessment of in-market effectiveness; and feedback. In developing countries, health has similarly been the greatest beneficiary to date of applied social marketing techniques. Family planning programs and oral rehydration therapy (ORT) projects have used social marketing techniques effectively in numerous developing countries. Social marketing has been even more widely applied in the sale of contraceptives in developing countries. Contraceptive social marketing (CSM) programs are well established in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, Nepal, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico, and Egypt. More recently programs have been established in Honduras, Guatemala, Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia. SOMARC (Social Marketing for Change) is a project funded by the US Agency for International Development (AID) and is working with existing CSM programs and helping to launch new CSM programs. CSM programs are successfully functioning as legitimate marketing organizations in developing countries and are using local private sector resources in the process. Program results are encouraging. Social marketing requires both experience and sensitivity to local conditions. Many developing countries now have their own marketing resources

  8. ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Dally

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el fin de determinar la tasa de ovulación, parición, tamaño de la camada y supervivencia embrionaria, 225 borregas de siete genotipos se examinaron mediante endoscopio 7-8 días después de su cruza. Como resultado se encontró que un mayor número de ovulaciones unilaterales sencillas y dobles procedieron del ovario derecho (P0.05. Por otra parte, no se encontró diferencia en la supervivencia embrionaria (P>0.01 al comparar entre ovulaciones sencillas, dobles y triples (69.8%, 76.0% y 63.0%, respectivamente ni entre las ovulaciones unilaterales y bilaterales. La línea cuatera Targhee seleccionada (TW produjo las camadas más numerosas (media = 2.0±1.4 mientras que el rebaño Targhee comercial produjo las menos numerosas. La línea ½ Targhee, ¼ Barbados, ¼ Dorset mostró la tasa de parición mayor (94%, seguida de la Polypay (87%, sin encontrarse diferencia (P>0.05 entre estas dos líneas. Se concluye que: el ovario derecho es más activo que el izquierdo en cuanto a la producción de óvulos, de entre los genotipos estudiados; las ovulaciones dobles fueron más frecuentes que las sencillas y triples, y la línea cuatera Targhee seleccionada produjo las camadas más numerosas en comparación con el hato comercial Targhee o sus cruzas.

  9. Age-Ratios and Condition of En Route Migrant Blackpoll Warblers in the British Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal, Clint W.

    2014-01-01

    The en route migration ecology of Blackpoll Warblers (Setophaga striata) is poorly understood, yet intriguing. Blackpoll Warblers undertake the longest open water migration of any wood warbler species, traveling from northeastern North America to South America, with the first potential landfall being the West Indies. This migration requires substantial energy reserves and subjects Blackpoll Warblers to unpredictable weather events, which may influence survival. Few studies have examined age ratios or condition of Blackpoll Warblers while the warblers are en route through the Caribbean region. I captured and banded Blackpoll Warblers in the British Virgin Islands over 10 consecutive autumn migrations. Ratios of hatch-year to adult Blackpoll Warblers were variable but averaged lower than the ratios reported at continental departure locations. Average mass of Blackpoll Warblers was less than that reported at continental departure locations, with 26% of adults and 40% of hatch-year birds below the estimated fat free mass; hatch-year birds were consistently in poorer condition than adults. Blackpoll Warblers captured in the British Virgin Islands were also in poorer condition than those reported from the Dominican Republic and Barbados; this may be because of the British Virgin Islands being the first landfall after the transatlantic crossing, whereas Blackpoll Warblers arriving at the other Caribbean study locations may have had opportunities for stopover prior to arrival or have departed from farther south on the continent. However, this suggests that the British Virgin Islands likely provide important stopover habitat as a first landfall location for Blackpoll Warblers arriving from the transatlantic migration route.

  10. Rediscovering medicinal plants' potential with OMICS: microsatellite survey in expressed sequence tags of eleven traditional plants with potent antidiabetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Dehury, Budheswar; Barooah, Madhumita; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Talukdar, Anupam Das

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines and traditionally used medicinal plants present an untapped potential for novel molecular target discovery using systems science and OMICS biotechnology driven strategies. Since up to 40% of the world's poor people have no access to government health services, traditional and folk medicines are often the only therapeutics available to them. In this vein, North East (NE) India is recognized for its rich bioresources. As part of the Indo-Burma hotspot, it is regarded as an epicenter of biodiversity for several plants having myriad traditional uses, including medicinal use. However, the improvement of these valuable bioresources through molecular breeding strategies, for example, using genic microsatellites or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) or Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)-derived SSRs has not been fully utilized in large scale to date. In this study, we identified a total of 47,700 microsatellites from 109,609 ESTs of 11 medicinal plants (pineapple, papaya, noyontara, bitter orange, bermuda brass, ratalu, barbados nut, mango, mulberry, lotus, and guduchi) having proven antidiabetic properties. A total of 58,159 primer pairs were designed for the non-redundant 8060 SSR-positive ESTs and putative functions were assigned to 4483 unique contigs. Among the identified microsatellites, excluding mononucleotide repeats, di-/trinucleotides are predominant, among which repeat motifs of AG/CT and AAG/CTT were most abundant. Similarity search of SSR containing ESTs and antidiabetic gene sequences revealed 11 microsatellites linked to antidiabetic genes in five plants. GO term enrichment analysis revealed a total of 80 enriched GO terms widely distributed in 53 biological processes, 17 molecular functions, and 10 cellular components associated with the 11 markers. The present study therefore provides concrete insights into the frequency and distribution of SSRs in important medicinal resources. The microsatellite markers reported here markedly add to the genetic

  11. Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP in Mono Amine Oxidase A (MAO-A Gene as a genetic marker for aggressiveness in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Handiwirawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the population, there are aggressive sheep in a small number which requires special management those specific animal house and routine management. The purpose of this study was to identify the variation of DNA marker SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism as a genetic marker for the aggressive trait in several of sheep breed. The identification of point mutations in exon 8 of MAO-A gene associated with aggressive behavior in sheep may be further useful to become of DNA markers for the aggressive trait in sheep. Five of sheep breed were used, i.e.: Barbados Black belly Cross sheep (BC, Composite Garut (KG, Local Garut (LG, Composite Sumatra (KS and St. Cross Croix (SC. Duration of ten behavior traits, blood serotonin concentrations and DNA sequence of exon 8 of MAO-A gene from the sheep aggressive and nonaggressive were observed. PROC GLM of SAS Ver. 9.0 program was used to analyze variable behavior and blood serotonin concentrations. DNA polymorphism in exon 8 of MAO-A gene was analyzed using the MEGA software Ver. 4.0. The results show that the percentage of the aggressive rams of each breed was less than 10 percent; except for the KS sheep is higher (23%. Based on the duration of behavior, aggressive sheep group was not significantly different with non aggressive sheep group, except duration of care giving and drinking behavior. It is known that concentration of blood serotonin in aggressive and non aggressive rams was not significantly different. The aggressive trait in sheep has a mechanism or a different cause like that occurs in mice and humans. In this study, aggressive behavior in sheep was not associated with a mutation in exon 8 of MAO-A gene.

  12. Estudios Entomológicos-El Gusano de las Hojas de la Yuca

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    Gallego M. F. Luis

    1950-12-01

    Full Text Available Se le conocen muchas denominaciones, siendo las más comunes entre nosotros las de "gusano primavera", "gusano cachón", "gusano de temporadas", "gusano comedor de las hojas" y "gusano pintado", debido a que las larvas se presentan con colores muy variados. El insecto es conocido desde el año de 1750, en que Linneo lo presentó a la ciencia en su "Systema Natura" (109 edición con e_ nombre de Dilophonota ello. Gundlach da muy buenos datos sobre él en su "Contribución a la Entomología Cubana -Lepidópteros", publicada en 1881; posteriormente, en 1907, fue pasado por Rothschild & Jordán, al género Erinnyis, siendo hoy conocido como Erinnyis ellow Rothschild & Jordán. Es una mariposa crepuscular de la familia de los Sphingidae, sub-familia Sesiinae (Holland. Abunda en las regiones tropicales y subtropicales, continentales e insulares de América, es decir, desde el Brasil hasta el Canadá y California, incluyendo las Antillas, Cuba, Puerto Rico, San Cristóbal y Barbados. Según algunos autores parece ser oriundo del continente y probablemente del Brasil, de donde también tiene origen su principal huésped, la yuca. De su aparición en Colombia no podemos afirmar con precisión desde qué tiempo viene ocasionando estragos, aunque nuestros viejos campesinos aseguran que el "gusano pintado de la yuca, es tan viejo en nuestros campos como lo es el mismo cultivo".

  13. Rocky desertification in Southwest China: Impacts, causes, and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongcheng; Lian, Yanqing; Qin, Xiaoqun

    2014-05-01

    Rocky desertification, which is relatively less well known than desertification, refers to the processes and human activities that transform a karst area covered by vegetation and soil into a rocky landscape. It has occurred in various countries and regions, including the European Mediterranean and Dinaric Karst regions of the Balkan Peninsula, Southwest China on a large scale, and alarmingly, even in tropical rainforests such as Haiti and Barbados, and has had tremendous negative impacts to the environment and social and economic conditions at local and regional scales. The goal of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the impacts, causes, and restoration measures of rocky desertification based on decades of studies in the southwest karst area of China and reviews of studies in Europe and other parts of the world. The low soil formation rate and high permeability of carbonate rocks create a fragile and vulnerable environment that is susceptible to deforestation and soil erosion. Other natural processes related to hydrology and ecology could exacerbate rocky desertification. However, disturbances from a wide variety of human activities are ultimately responsible for rocky desertification wherever it has occurred. This review shows that reforestation can be successful in Southwest China and even in the Dinaric Karst region when the land, people, water, and other resources are managed cohesively. However, new challenges may arise as more frequent droughts and extreme floods induced by global climate change and variability may slow the recovery process or even expand rocky desertification. This review is intended to bring attention to this challenging issue and provide information needed to advance research and engineering practices to combat rocky desertification and to aid in sustainable development.

  14. Cenozoic Methane-Seep Faunas of the Caribbean Region.

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    Steffen Kiel

    Full Text Available We report new examples of Cenozoic cold-seep communities from Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, and Venezuela, and attempt to improve the stratigraphic dating of Cenozoic Caribbean seep communities using strontium isotope stratigraphy. Two seep faunas are distinguished in Barbados: the late Eocene mudstone-hosted 'Joes River fauna' consists mainly of large lucinid bivalves and tall abyssochrysoid gastropods, and the early Miocene carbonate-hosted 'Bath Cliffs fauna' containing the vesicomyid Pleurophopsis, the mytilid Bathymodiolus and small gastropods. Two new Oligocene seep communities from the Sinú River basin in Colombia consist of lucinid bivalves including Elongatolucina, thyasirid and solemyid bivalves, and Pleurophopsis. A new early Miocene seep community from Cuba includes Pleurophopsis and the large lucinid Meganodontia. Strontium isotope stratigraphy suggests an Eocene age for the Cuban Elmira asphalt mine seep community, making it the oldest in the Caribbean region. A new basal Pliocene seep fauna from the Dominican Republic is characterized by the large lucinid Anodontia (Pegophysema. In Trinidad we distinguish two types of seep faunas: the mudstone-hosted Godineau River fauna consisting mainly of lucinid bivalves, and the limestone-hosted Freeman's Bay fauna consisting chiefly of Pleurophopsis, Bathymodiolus, and small gastropods; they are all dated as late Miocene. Four new seep communities of Oligocene to Miocene age are reported from Venezuela. They consist mainly of large globular lucinid bivalves including Meganodontia, and moderately sized vesicomyid bivalves. After the late Miocene many large and typical 'Cenozoic' lucinid genera disappeared from the Caribbean seeps and are today known only from the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. We speculate that the increasingly oligotrophic conditions in the Caribbean Sea after the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene may have been unfavorable for such large

  15. Progress with contraceptives and abortifacients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, A

    1992-10-01

    In Canada and most other comparatively rich countries, the total fertility rate (TFR) declined from approximately 2.5 in 1970 to 1.6-1.9 in 1990. The reduction was even greater in some countries such as China, Korea, Singapore, Mauritius, Barbados, Cuba, Guadeloupe, and Puerto Rico. TFR, however, has fallen little, if at all, in many poor countries; it remains at 8.1 in Kenya and has increased from already previously high levels in Somalia, Benin, Malawi, and Rwanda. The use of contraception has been instrumental in reducing fertility. An estimated 70% of married women in rich countries use contraceptives, and a larger proportion in Eastern Asia, but only less than 15% in Africa. Education for women generally increases the level of contraceptive use. Rates, however, depend upon the degree of both acceptance and availability. An estimated 20% of births in developing countries are unwanted, so it would seem that greater availability and variety of contraceptives could lead to reductions in fertility. Research into better contraceptive technology is frustrated by paternalism, most organized religions, concern over possible future legal liability, and fear of adverse health side effects, especially in North America. Depo-Provera and RU-486, for example, have yet to be licensed in Canada for use as contraceptive agents. Research nonetheless moves forward. A vaccine against pregnancy is reportedly being developed which may be available before the turn of the century. Clinical trials have been held, and the vaccine has been found to be effective in most women, lacking in side effects, and reversible. The prototype requires a series of injections. Elsewhere, the Alza Corporation of California is working on a transdermal patch to control fertility, while some success has been reported in trials of testosterone, alone or combined with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone, to suppress sperm production in men.

  16. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available -Gesa Mackenthun, Stephen Greenblatt, Marvelous Possessions: The wonder of the New World. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991. ix + 202 pp. -Peter Redfield, Peter Hulme ,Wild majesty: Encounters with Caribs from Columbus to the present day. An Anthology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. x + 369 pp., Neil L. Whitehead (eds -Michel R. Doortmont, Philip D. Curtin, The rise and fall of the plantation complex: Essays in Atlantic history. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990. xi + 222 pp. -Roderick A. McDonald, Hilary McD.Beckles, A history of Barbados: From Amerindian settlement to nation-state. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990. xv + 224 pp. -Gertrude J. Fraser, Hilary McD.Beckles, Natural rebels; A social history of enslaved black women in Barbados. New Brunswick NJ and London: Rutgers University Press and Zed Books, 1990 and 1989. ix + 197 pp. -Bridget Brereton, Thomas C. Holt, The problem of freedom: Race, labor, and politics in Jamaica and Britain, 1832-1938. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1991. xxxi + 517 pp. -Peter C. Emmer, A. Meredith John, The plantation slaves of Trinidad, 1783-1816: A mathematical and demographic inquiry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988. xvi + 259 pp. -Richard Price, Robert Cohen, Jews in another environment: Surinam in the second half of the eighteenth century. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1991. xv + 350 pp. -Russell R. Menard, Nigel Tattersfield, The forgotten trade: comprising the log of the Daniel and Henry of 1700 and accounts of the slave trade from the minor ports of England, 1698-1725. London: Jonathan Cape, 1991. ixx + 460 pp. -John D. Garrigus, James E. McClellan III, Colonialism and science: Saint Domingue in the old regime. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1992. xviii + 393 pp. -Lowell Gudmundson, Richard H. Collin, Theodore Roosevelt's Caribbean: The Panama canal, the Monroe doctrine, and the Latin American context. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University

  17. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols), n100, dry (particles with dry radius > 100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN), and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius > 250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5-2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25-50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine) and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input) and available INP parameterization schemes (with n250, dry and sdry as input) we finally compute

  18. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Frederick H. Smith; Caribbean Rum: A Social and Economic History (Franklin W. Knight Stephan Palmié; Wizards and Scientists: Explorations in Afro-Cuban Modernity and Tradition (Julie Skurski Miguel A. De la Torre; The Quest for the Cuban Christ: A Historical Search (Fernando Picó L. Antonio Curet, Shannon Lee Dawdy & Gabino La Rosa Corzo (eds.; Dialogues in Cuban Archaeology (David M. Pendergast Jill Lane; Blackface Cuba, 1840-1895 (Arthur Knight Hal Klepak; Cuba’s Military 1990-2005: Revolutionary Soldiers during Counter-Revolutionary Times (Antoni Kapcia Lydia Chávez (ed.; Capitalism, God, and a Good Cigar: Cuba Enters the Twenty-First Century (Ann Marie Stock Diane Accaria-Zavala & Rodolfo Popelnik (eds.; Prospero’s Isles: The Presence of the Caribbean in the American Imaginary (Sean X. Goudie Alexandra Isfahani-Hammond (ed.; The Masters and the Slaves: Plantation Relations and Mestizaje in American Imaginaries (Danielle D. Smith David J. Weber; Bárbaros: Spaniards and Their Savages in the Age of Enlightenment (Neil L. Whitehead Larry Gragg; Englishmen Transplanted: The English Colonization of Barbados, 1627-1660 (Richard S. Dunn Jon F. Sensbach; Rebecca’s Revival: Creating Black Christianity in the Atlantic World (Aaron Spencer Fogleman Jennifer L. Morgan; Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery (Verene A. Shepherd Jorge Luis Chinea; Race and Labor in the Hispanic Caribbean: The West Indian Immigrant Worker Experience in Nineteenth-Century Puerto Rico, 1800-1850 (Juan José Baldrich Constance R. Sutton (ed.; Revisiting Caribbean Labour: Essays in Honour of O. Nigel Bolland (Mary Chamberlain Gert Oostindie; Paradise Overseas: The Dutch Caribbean: Colonialism and its Transatlantic Legacies (Bridget Brereton Allan Pred; The Past Is Not Dead: Facts, Fictions, and Enduring Racial Stereotypes (Karen Fog Olwig James C. Riley; Poverty and Life Expectancy: The Jamaica

  19. Application and Validation of a GIS Model for Local Tsunami Vulnerability and Mortality Risk Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbitz, C. B.; Frauenfelder, R.; Kaiser, G.; Glimsdal, S.; Sverdrup-thygeson, K.; Løvholt, F.; Gruenburg, L.; Mc Adoo, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tōhoku tsunami caused a high number of fatalities and massive destruction. Data collected after the event allow for retrospective analyses. Since 2009, NGI has developed a generic GIS model for local analyses of tsunami vulnerability and mortality risk. The mortality risk convolves the hazard, exposure, and vulnerability. The hazard is represented by the maximum tsunami flow depth (with a corresponding likelihood), the exposure is described by the population density in time and space, while the vulnerability is expressed by the probability of being killed as a function of flow depth and building class. The analysis is further based on high-resolution DEMs. Normally a certain tsunami scenario with a corresponding return period is applied for vulnerability and mortality risk analysis. Hence, the model was first employed for a tsunami forecast scenario affecting Bridgetown, Barbados, and further developed in a forecast study for the city of Batangas in the Philippines. Subsequently, the model was tested by hindcasting the 2009 South Pacific tsunami in American Samoa. This hindcast was based on post-tsunami information. The GIS model was adapted for optimal use of the available data and successfully estimated the degree of mortality.For further validation and development, the model was recently applied in the RAPSODI project for hindcasting the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami in Sendai and Ishinomaki. With reasonable choices of building vulnerability, the estimated expected number of fatalities agree well with the reported death toll. The results of the mortality hindcast for the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami substantiate that the GIS model can help to identify high tsunami mortality risk areas, as well as identify the main risk drivers.The research leading to these results has received funding from CONCERT-Japan Joint Call on Efficient Energy Storage and Distribution/Resilience against Disasters (http://www.concertjapan.eu; project RAPSODI - Risk Assessment and design of

  20. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Zheng, Yonglan; Huo, Dezheng; Hou, Ningqi; Niu, Qun; Zvosec, Cecilia; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Hennis, Anselm J; Leske, Maria Cristina; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2012-07-01

    Recurrent mutations constituted nearly three quarters of all BRCA1 mutations and almost half of all BRCA2 mutations identified in the first cohort of the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study. To further characterize breast/ovarian cancer risks associated with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the African diaspora, we genotyped recurrent mutations among Nigerian, African American, and Barbadian breast cancer patients. A replication cohort of 356 Nigerian breast cancer patients was genotyped for 12 recurrent BRCA1/2 mutant alleles (Y101X, 1742insG, 4241delTG, M1775R, 4359insC, C64Y, 1623delTTAAA, Q1090X, and 943ins10 from BRCA1, and 1538delAAGA, 2630del11, and 9045delGAAA from BRCA2) by means of SNaPshot followed by direct sequencing or by direct sequencing alone. In addition, 260 African Americans and 118 Barbadians were genotyped for six of the recurrent BRCA1 mutations by SNaPshot assay. Of all the BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations we identified in the first cohort, six were identified in 11 patients in the replication study. These mutation carriers constitute 3.1 % [95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 1.6-5.5 %] of the replication cohort. By comparison, 6.9 % (95 % CI 4.7-9.7 %) of the discovery cohort carried BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations. For the subset of recurrent mutations we tested in breast cancer cases from Barbados or the United States, only two 943ins10 carriers were identified in African Americans. Nigerian breast cancer patients from Ibadan carry a broad and unique spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations. Our data suggest that BRCA1/2 mutation testing limited to recurrent mutations is not sufficient to understand the BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer risk in African populations in the diaspora. As the cost of Sanger sequencing is considerably reduced, deploying innovative technologies such as high throughput DNA sequencing of BRCA1/2 and other cancer susceptibility genes will be essential for identifying high-risk individuals and families to reduce the burden of aggressive early onset breast

  1. Tools for tracking progress. Indicators for sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    pollution; wastes; land use; accident risks; energy resources depletion; and deforestation. The provisional full set comprises 28 driving force indicators, 13 state indicators and 29 response action indicators. The provisional core list of ISED was presented at the International Workshop on CSD Indicators of Sustainable Development held in Barbados in December 1999. While the effort to improve upon the provisional full and core lists of ISED will continue for some time, it is planned to subject them to country testing on a limited scale. This is planned with the help of national teams engaged in formulating their sustainable energy strategies in collaboration with the IAEA. It is hoped that this work will help the Agency, on the one hand, in making useful contribution to the CSD work on energy-related issues and, on the other, in modifying its own databases and methodological tools so as to make them more responsive to sustainable energy development issues

  2. Subduction-to-Strike-Slip-Transition in the Southeastern Caribbean Imaged Using Deeply-Penetrating Seismic Reflection Lines and Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, T.; Vargas, C. A.; Mann, P.; Latchman, J.

    2010-12-01

    The subduction-to-strike-slip transition (SSST) zone of the southeastern Caribbean is one of thirty identified locations where active subduction and strike-slip tectonic styles transition along strongly curved and seismogenic plate boundaries. This SSST zone provides a field laboratory for understanding how sedimentary basins, faults, basement areas and subducted slabs change from an area of dominantly westward-directed subduction beneath the Lesser Antilles arc to an area of dominantly east-west strike-slip faulting along northern South America. We use two geophysical data types to image the lithosphere and study the relationships between lithospheric scale deformation and basin scale response to the transitional tectonic configuration. Interpretation of deeply-penetrating seismic reflection lines recorded down to 16 seconds two-way time, or depths of about 18 km, is combined with tomographic slices of the upper mantle and lower crust which were constructed using the coda method on ~ 700 earthquakes in the depth range of 70-250 km. Results from the tomographic study are compared with nine seismogenic zones in the southeast Caribbean SSST zone which are defined based on the depth, and focal mechanism of earthquake events. These zones include: (1) the Paria slab tear region; (2) Caribbean/South American strike-slip zone; (3) Hinge area separating continental margin in Trinidad from Tobago forearc basin; (4) Central Range -strike-slip fault zone, onshore Trinidad; (5) Underthrust zone of South American beneath southern onshore and offshore eastern Trinidad, including the prolific hydrocarbon-bearing Columbus Basin; (6) Venezuela foreland and fold-thrust belt; (7) flexural bulge area of oceanic crust located east of Barbados accretionary prism (BAP); (8) Subducted slab beneath the stabilized and supracomplex zones of the BAP; (9) Inner accretionary prism of the BAP. Primary controls on the seismogenic character of each curving tectonic belt include the strike of the

  3. A revision of the new world species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Facitrichophora, new genus (Diptera, Ephydridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Wayne N; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The New World species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Facitrichophora new genus, are revised. Fifteen new species are described (type locality in parenthesis): Facitrichophora atrellasp. n. (Costa Rica. Guanacaste: Murciélago [10°56.9'N, 85°42.5'W; sandy mud flats around mangrove inlet]), Facitrichophora carvalhorumsp. n. (Brazil. São Paulo: Praia Puruba [23°21'S, 44°55.6'W; beach]), Facitrichophora manzasp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla (12 km S; 10°24.5'N, 61°01.5'W), bridge over Nariva River), Facitrichophora panamasp. n. (Panama. Darien: Garachine [8°04'N, 78°22'W]), Polytrichophora adarcasp. n. (Barbados. Christ Church: Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary [13°04.2'N, 59°34.7'W; swamp]), Polytrichophora arnaudorumsp. n. (Mexico. Baja California. San Felipe [31°01.5'N, 114°50.4'W]), Polytrichophora barbasp. n. (Cuba. Sancti Spiritus: Topes de Collantes [21°54.4'N, 80°01.4'W, 670 m]), Polytrichophora flavellasp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6'S, 71°16.9'W; 250 m]), Polytrichophora marinoniorumsp. n. (Brazil. Paraná: Antonina [25°28.4'S, 48°40.9'W; mangal]), Polytrichophora rostrasp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6'S, 71°16.9'W; 250 m]), Polytrichophora sinuosasp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla [12 km S; 10°24'N, 61°02'W]), Polytrichophora mimbressp. n. (United States. New Mexico. Grant: Mimbres River [New Mexico Highway 61 & Royal John Mine Road; 32°43.8'N, 107°52'W; 1665 m]), Polytrichophora salixsp. n. (United States. Alaska. Matanuska-Susitna: Willow Creek [61°46.1'N, 150°04.2'W; 50 m]), Polytrichophora sturtevantorumsp. n. (United States. Tennessee. Shelby: Meeman Shelby State Park [Mississippi River; 35°20.4'N, 90°2.1'W; 98 m]), Polytrichophora prolatasp. n. (Belize. Stann Creek: Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary [16°45'N, 88°30'W]). All known New World species of both genera are described with an emphasis on structures of

  4. Dust and Air Quality Forecasting in the Eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy, A. M.; Reyes, A.; Farrell, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant amounts of dust travel across the northern tropical Atlantic to the Caribbean every year from the Sahara region. These dust concentrations in the Caribbean often exceed United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM 2.5) which could have serious implications for human health in the region. Air pollution has become a major issue in the Caribbean because of urban development, increased vehicle emissions and growing industrialisation. However, the majority of territories in the Caribbean do not have routine air quality monitoring programmes and several do not have or enforce air quality standards for PM2.5 and PM10. As a result, the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) has taken the initiative to provide dust and air quality forecasts for the Eastern Caribbean using the advanced WRF-Chem modeling system. The applications of the WRF-Chem modelling system at CIMH that are currently being focused on are the coupled weather prediction/dispersion model to simulate the release and transport of constituents, especially Saharan dust transport and concentration; and as a coupled weather/dispersion/air quality model with full interaction of chemical species with prediction of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10). This will include future applications in the prediction of ozone (O3) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation as well as examining dust radiative forcing and effects on atmospheric precipitation and dynamics. The simulations are currently initialised at 00Z for a seven day forecast and run at 36 km resolution with a planned second domain (at 12 km) for air quality forecasts. Preliminary results from this study will be presented and compared to other dust forecast models currently used in other regions. This work also complements in situ measurements at Ragged Point, Barbados (oldest dust record since 1965), Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana and Puerto Rico. The goal of this study

  5. Numerical Tsunami Hazard Assessment of the Only Active Lesser Antilles Arc Submarine Volcano: Kick 'em Jenny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondin, F. J. Y.; Dorville, J. F. M.; Robertson, R. E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc has potentially been hit by prehistorical regional tsunamis generated by voluminous volcanic landslides (volume > 1 km3) among the 53 events recognized so far. No field evidence of these tsunamis are found in the vincity of the sources. Such a scenario taking place nowadays would trigger hazardous tsunami waves bearing potentially catastrophic consequences for the closest islands and regional offshore oil platforms.Here we applied a complete hazard assessment method on the only active submarine volcano of the arc Kick 'em Jenny (KeJ). KeJ is the southernmost edifice with recognized associated volcanic landslide deposits. From the three identified landslide episodes one is associated with a collapse volume ca. 4.4 km3. Numerical simulations considering a single pulse collapse revealed that this episode would have produced a regional tsunami. An edifice current volume estimate is ca. 1.5 km3.Previous study exists in relationship to assessment of regional tsunami hazard related to shoreline surface elevation (run-up) in the case of a potential flank collapse scenario at KeJ. However this assessment was based on inferred volume of collapse material. We aim to firstly quantify potential initial volumes of collapse material using relative slope instability analysis (RSIA); secondly to assess first order run-ups and maximum inland inundation distance for Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago, i.e. two important economic centers of the Lesser Antilles. In this framework we present for seven geomechanical models tested in the RSIA step maps of critical failure surface associated with factor of stability (Fs) for twelve sectors of 30° each; then we introduce maps of expected potential run-ups (run-up × the probability of failure at a sector) at the shoreline.The RSIA evaluates critical potential failure surface associated with Fs sources characteristics are retrieved from numerical simulation using an hydraulic equations-based code (Volc

  6. Perspectives on communication problems in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwesa, B A

    1984-03-01

    The Caribbean is experiencing a host of serious socioeconomic problems that prevent the majority of the population from realizing and maintaining a satisfactory standard of living. Food and Nutrition Surveys of some countries identified a lack of information on health, food, and nutrition as a primary reason for the prevalence of malnutrition, infectious diseases, and nutrition related diseases. "Misinformation" creates an often insurmountable barrier to effective communication between source and receiver, in this case the health, food, and nutrition sector and the wider community. Misinformation occurs when the message is either incorrect, incomplete, inconsistent with other messages in the same program, or contradictory. This element of "misinformation" can negate the effectiveness of the message and an entire communication program. Some examples are cited which show that in programs aimed at effecting change in attitude or behavior it is essential to ensure that messages are clearly communicated to avoid misunderstanding and the right infrastructure is in place for the innovation proposed by the message to be carried out. In the Jamaica Nutrition Education Program (JNEP) were used to communicate the messages. Evaluation revealed that health staff were providing incorrect and contradictory advice about breastfeeding, which showed that they lacked basic information on the subject. In Barbados, despite an intensified health education campaign, face to face instruction in the clinics, and extensive use of the Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute (CFNI) Breastfeeding Package as well as other locally developed materials, a marked decline in breastfeeding was recorded over the 1969-81 survey period. Misinformation and misunderstanding among mothers were identified as the key reasons for the failure of breastfeeding. In relation to the decline in breaastfeeding and incorrect weaning practices, mass media was implicated as luring mothers away from natural feeding

  7. The application of Legacy Cycles in the development of Earth Science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K.; Abernathy, E.; Negrito, K.; McCall, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Institute for Geophysics in the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin actively contributes to K-12 education, including the development of rigorous Earth and Space Science curriculum designed for secondary school learning environments. Here we report on our efforts to apply an innovative new pedagogical approach, the Legacy Cycle, to scientific ocean drilling paleoclimate data from fossil corals collected offshore Barbados in 2006 and to the creation of a high school water resources education program for Texas high school students supported by a grant from the Texas Water Development Board. The Legacy Cycle makes use of the Internet and computer technology to engage students in extended inquiry learning. A series of inquiry activities are organized around a set of three driving questions, or challenges. Students mimic the work of scientists by generating ideas to address a given challenge, listening to multiple perspectives from experts on the topic, researching a set of sub-questions and revising their original ideas, testing their mettle with labs and quizzes, and finally composing a project or paper that answers the original challenge. The technology makes it easy for students to move through the challenges and the organizational framework since there are hyperlinks to each of the sections (and to reach the other challenges) at the bottom of each webpage. Students' final work is posted to the Internet for others to see, and in this way they leave behind their legacy. Our Legacy Cycle activities use authentic hydrologic, water quality, geochemical, geophysical data, as well as remotely sensed data such as is collected by satellites. They are aligned with the U.S. National Science Education Standards, the new Ocean, Climate and Earth Science Literacy Principles (in development), and the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Earth and Space Science. The work represents a collaboration involving teachers from The University of

  8. Afterthoughts on hospital ship during Harmony Mission-2015 oversea medical service%“和谐使命-2015”任务医院船海外医疗服务的实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙涛; 周山; 王志慧; 李欣; 徐世侠; 何立东; 吕伟

    2016-01-01

    On Sept 7, 2015, Chinese hospital ship Ark Peace left its home-port in Zhoushan, Zhejiang Province, for"Harmony Mission-2015", the fifth in a series of annual international humanitarian and free medical assistance endeavors by the PLA Navy.This mission lasted 142 days, involving a visit to Malaysia and participation in "Peace Friendship-2015 exercise",before she was dispatched to seven countries (regions) including Australia, Polynesia, USA, Mexico, Barbados, Grenada, Peru and provided a wide range of medical , humanitarian assistance to the last four countries .A total of 12 589 patients were treated on the main platform , 4852 patients by the 29 fore-lying medical corps , 59 surgeries performed , 46 patients hospitalized ,and 7130 CT and DR et al auxiliary examinations conducted during four mission stops .We organized academic exchanges , visits and interviews , get-togethers , dynamic and static exhibitions in each country .The experience from "Harmony mission-2015"is of great significance for such tasks in the future .%中国海军“和平方舟”号医院船于2015年9月7日从浙江舟山启航,执行“和谐使命-2015”任务。此次任务历时142 d,访问马来西亚并参加“和平友谊-2015”演习,访问澳大利亚、法属波利尼西亚、美国、墨西哥、巴巴多斯、格林纳达、秘鲁执行“和谐使命-2015”任务,并在后4个国家开展免费医疗与人道主义服务,医院船主平台共诊疗12589人次,派出29支医疗队前出诊疗4852人次,收治住院患者46人次,实施手术59例次,开展CT、DR等辅助检查7130人次,在各到访国还安排了学术交流、参观访问、文化联谊、动静态展示等系列活动。该文总结此次任务的做法与经验,为医院船建设及后续任务提供参考。

  9. Níveis de mercúrio em peixes consumidos pela comunidade indígena de Sai Cinza na Reserva Munduruku, Município de Jacareacanga, Estado do Pará, Brasil Mercury levels in fish consumed by the Sai Cinza indigenous community, Munduruku Reservation, Jacareacanga County, State of Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilson da Silva Brabo

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo consiste em avaliar os níveis de mercúrio no pescado consumido pela comunidade indígena de Sai Cinza (Reserva Munduruku no Estado do Pará, e associá-los com os hábitos de consumo da população. Um total de oitenta espécimes de peixes foram capturados. As determinações de Hg foram realizadas por absorção atômica. A concentração média de Hg nas espécies carnívoras foi de 0,293 µg/g (DP = 0,104 enquanto nas não carnívoras foi de 0,112 µg/g (DP = 0,036. As espécies referidas como de maior consumo ente os 330 indivíduos entrevistados foram: tucunaré, pacu, jaraqui, traíra, aracu, matrinchã e caratinga. As espécies com concentrações mais elevadas de Hg foram tucunaré e traíra, que estão entre os peixes mais consumidos. A freqüência de consumo constitui-se num fator importante na avaliação de risco de contaminação por mercúrio em comunidades que não têm outras alternativas de alimentação.This study evaluated fish consumption and mercury levels in fish consumed by an indigenous community in the State of Pará. Eighty fish samples were collected (barbado, surubim, traíra, tucunaré, piranha, aruanã, caratinga, aracu, mandiá, jandiá, and pacu. Mercury analysis was performed using a Mercury Analyzer HG-3500. Average mercury concentration in carnivorous species was 0.293 µg/g (SD = 0.104, while in non-carnivorous species it was 0.112 µg/g (SD = 0.036. Brazilian legislation establishes a maximum permissible limit of 0.5 µg/g for fish consumption. No significant correlation was found between fish length or weight and mercury concentration. Types of fish most frequently consumed by the community were tucunaré, pacu, jaraqui, traíra, aracu, matrinchã, and caratinga. Carnivorous species, especially tucunaré and traíra, amongst the most frequently eaten, had higher mercury levels than non-carnivorous species. Frequency of consumption is crucial to assess the risk of mercury contamination in

  10. The role of skeletal micro-architecture in diagenesis and dating of Acropora palmata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiak, P. J.; Andersen, M. B.; Hendy, E. J.; Potter, E. K.; Johnson, K. G.; Penkman, K. E. H.

    2016-06-01

    . Significantly, the best-preserved material in the fossil specimen yields a U-series age of 165 ± 8 ka, recording a paleo sea-level of -35 ± 7 msl during the MIS 6.5 interstadial on Barbados.

  11. Land-Sourced Pollution with an Emphasis on Domestic Sewage: Lessons from the Caribbean and Implications for Coastal Development on Indian Ocean and Pacific Coral Reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre DeGeorges

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses land-sourced pollution with an emphasis on domestic sewage in the Caribbean in relation to similar issues in the Indian Ocean and Pacific. Starting on a large-scale in the 1980s, tropical Atlantic coastlines of Florida and Caribbean islands were over-developed to the point that traditional sewage treatment and disposal were inadequate to protect fragile coral reefs from eutrophication by land-sourced nutrient pollution. This pollution caused both ecological and public health problems. Coral reefs were smothered by macro-algae and died, becoming rapidly transformed into weedy algal lawns, which resulted in beach erosion, and loss of habitat that added to fisheries collapse previously caused by over-fishing. Barbados was one of the first countries to recognize this problem and to begin implementation of effective solutions. Eastern Africa, the Indian Ocean Islands, Pacific Islands, and South East Asia, are now starting to develop their coastlines for ecotourism, like the Caribbean was in the 1970s. Tourism is an important and increasing component of the economies of most tropical coastal areas. There are important lessons to be learned from this Caribbean experience for coastal zone planners, developers, engineers, coastal communities and decision makers in other parts of the world to assure that history does not repeat itself. Coral reef die-off from land-sourced pollution has been eclipsed as an issue since the ocean warming events of 1998, linked to global warming. Addressing ocean warming will take considerable international cooperation, but much of the land-sourced pollution issue, especially sewage, can be dealt with on a watershed by watershed basis by Indian Ocean and Pacific countries. Failure to solve this critical issue can adversely impact both coral reef and public health with dire economic consequences, and will prevent coral reef recovery from extreme high temperature events. Sewage treatment, disposal options

  12. The impact of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams OP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O Peter AdamsFaculty of Medical Sciences, the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, St Michael, BarbadosBackground: Moderate-intensity exercise improves blood glucose (BG, but most people fail to achieve the required exercise volume. High-intensity exercise (HIE protocols vary. Maximal cycle ergometer sprint interval training typically requires only 2.5 minutes of HIE and a total training time commitment (including rest and warm up of 25 minutes per session. The effect of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels of people with and without diabetes is reviewed.Methods: HIE (≥80% maximal oxygen uptake, VO2max studies with ≤15 minutes HIE per session were reviewed.Results: Six studies of nondiabetics (51 males, 14 females requiring 7.5 to 20 minutes/week of HIE are reviewed. Two weeks of sprint interval training increased insulin sensitivity up to 3 days postintervention. Twelve weeks near maximal interval running (total exercise time 40 minutes/week improved BG to a similar extent as running at 65% VO2max for 150 minutes/week. Eight studies of diabetics (41 type 1 and 22 type 2 subjects were reviewed. Six were of a single exercise session with 44 seconds to 13 minutes of HIE, and the others were 2 and 7 weeks duration with 20 and 2 minutes/week HIE, respectively. With type 1 and 2 diabetes, BG was generally higher during and up to 2 hours after HIE compared to controls. With type 1 diabetics, BG decreased from midnight to 6 AM following HIE the previous morning. With type 2 diabetes, a single session improved postprandial BG for 24 hours, while a 2-week program reduced the average BG by 13% at 48 to 72 hours after exercise and also increased GLUT4 by 369%.Conclusion: Very brief HIE improves BG 1 to 3 days postexercise in both diabetics and nondiabetics. HIE is unlikely to cause hypoglycemia during and immediately after exercise. Larger and longer randomized studies are needed to determine the safety, acceptability, long

  13. Measurement of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in plastic resin pellets from remote islands : Toward establishment of baseline level for International Pellet Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, H.; Heskett, M.; Yamashita, R.; Yuyama, M.; Itoh, M.; Geok, Y. B.; Ogata, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Plastic resin pellets collected from remote islands in open oceans (Canary, St. Helena, Cocos, Hawaii, Maui Islands and Barbados) were sorted and yellowing polyethylene (PE) pellets were measured for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the degradation products (DDTs), and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) by gas chromatograph equipped with mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). PCBs were detected from all the pellet samples, confirming the global dispersion of PCBs. Median concentrations of PCBs (sum of 13 congeners : CB-66, CB-101, CB-110, CB-118, CB-105, CB-149, CB-153, CB-138, CB-128, CB-187, CB-180, CB-170, CB-206) in the remote island pellets ranged from 0.1 to 10 ng/g-pellet. These were one to three orders of magnitude lower than those observed for pellets from industrialized coastal zones (hundreds ng/g in Los Angeles, Boston, Tokyo; Ogata et al., 2009). Because these remote islands are far (>100 km) from industrialized zones, these concentrations (i.e., 0.1 to 10 ng/g-pellet) can be regarded as global "baseline" level of PCB pollution. Concentrations of DDTs in the remote island pellets ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 ng/g-pellet. At some locations, DDT was dominant over the degradation products (DDE and DDD), suggesting current usage of the pesticides in the islands. HCHs concentrations were 0.4 - 1.8 ng/g-pellet and lower than PCBs and DDTs, except for St. Helena Island at 18.8 ng/g-pellet where the current usage of the pesticides are of concern. The analyses of pellets from the remote islands provided "baseline" level of POPs (PCBs plastic debris which were contaminated in industrialized coastal zones may have rapidly transported to the remote islands before they would reach equilibrium (i.e., desorption completed). Because POPs concentrations in the other media are at trace levels in these remote environments, the sporadic high concentrations of POPs in the plastic debris may pose threat to the

  14. Vertical distribution of CCN properties in the Caribbean during SALTRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollner, Maximilian; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Walser, Adrian; Kristensen, Thomas; Groß, Silke; Chouza, Fernando; Freudenthaler, Volker; Schäfler, Andreas; Sauer, Daniel; Kujukovic, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of the atmosphere and the climate system since mineral dust acts as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) as well as ice nuclei (IN) and contributes significantly to the global annual particle emissions by mass. Every year, huge amounts of Saharan mineral dust is transported westward across the Atlantic Ocean into the Caribbean. During transport, the chemical and microphysical properties of the mineral dust may be modified thereby changing the CCN properties of the dust aerosol. During the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) in June/July 2013, CCN measurements were performed on the DLR Falcon research aircraft with a dual column Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC) first at Cape Verde then at the Caribbean. The CCNC provides information about concentration of CCN at two different supersaturations at the same time. For SALTRACE, one column of the CCNC was set to 0.2% supersaturation, whereas the second column was operated in scanning mode at different supersaturations between 0.1 and 0.5%. Additional CCN measurements by a ground-based single column CCNC were performed at Ragged Point, Barbados. During SALTRACE five mineral dust outbreaks were investigated. The CCN measurements in the Caribbean showed three layers with different CCN characteristics during these outbreaks. In the upper part (2.5 to 4.5 km) of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) in the Caribbean the aerosol properties are similar to the ones measured in the dust layer over Cape Verde and the CCNC measurements show low CCN concentrations and little activated fraction. In contrast, a higher variability was detected in the lower part (0.7 to 2.5 km) of the SAL. Within this layer a much higher CCN activation leads to a larger CCN concentration and cumulus clouds were frequently observed. Below 0.7 km also a high variability in activated fraction was observed, but CCN concentration was lower

  15. Origin of the diagenetic carbonate crusts and concretions from the mud volcanoes of the Nile deep-sea fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontharet, S.; Pierre, C.; Blanc Valleron, M.; Rouchy, J.; Fouquet, Y.; Bayon, G.

    2004-12-01

    Gulf of Mexico, Cascadia margin, Barbados prism). References: Aloisi G., Pierre C., Rouchy J.M., Foucher J.P., Woodside J. and the Medinaut Scientific Party, 2000. E.P.S.L., 184, 321-338. Loncke L., Gaullier V., Bellaiche G., and Mascle J., 2004. A.A.P.G. Bull

  16. 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U ages from a single fossil coral fragment by multi-collector magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Richard A.; Fairbanks, Richard G.; Chiu, Tzu-chien; Rubenstone, James

    2005-02-01

    The 230Th/ 234U/ 238U age dating of corals via alpha counting or mass spectrometry has significantly contributed to our understanding of sea level, radiocarbon calibration, rates of ocean and climate change, and timing of El Nino, among many applications. Age dating of corals by mass spectrometry is remarkably precise, but many samples exposed to freshwater yield inaccurate ages. The first indication of open-system 230Th/ 234U/ 238U ages is elevated 234U/ 238U initial values, very common in samples older than 100,000 yr. For samples younger than 100,000 yr that have 234U/ 238U initial values close to seawater, there is a need for age validation. Redundant 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U ages in a single fossil coral fragment are possible by Multi-Collector Magnetic Sector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-MS-ICPMS) and standard anion exchange column chemistry, modified to permit the separation of uranium, thorium, and protactinium isotopes from a single solution. A high-efficiency nebulizer employed for sample introduction permits the determination of both 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U ages in fragments as small as 500 mg. We have obtained excellent agreement between 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U ages in Barbados corals (30 ka) and suggest that the methods described in this paper can be used to test the 230Th/ 234U/ 238U age accuracy. Separate fractions of U, Th, and Pa are measured by employing a multi-dynamic procedure, whereby 238U is measured on a Faraday cup simultaneously with all minor isotopes measured with a Daly ion counting detector. The multi-dynamic procedure also permits correcting for both the Daly to Faraday gain and for mass discrimination during sample analyses. The analytical precision of 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U dates is generally better than ±0.3% and ±1.5%, respectively (2 Relative Standard deviation [RSD]). Additional errors resulting from uncertainties in the decay constant for 231Pa and from undetermined

  17. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available -Charles V. Carnegie, W. Jeffrey Bolster, Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the age of sail. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1997. xiv + 310 pp. -Stanley L. Engerman, Wim Klooster, Illicit Riches: Dutch trade in the Caribbean, 1648-1795. Leiden: KITLV Press, 1998. xiv + 283 pp. -Luis Martínez-Fernández, Emma Aurora Dávila Cox, Este inmenso comercio: Las relaciones mercantiles entre Puerto Rico y Gran Bretaña 1844-1898. San Juan: Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, 1996. xxi + 364 pp. -Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, Arturo Morales Carrión, Puerto Rico y la lucha por la hegomonía en el Caribe: Colonialismo y contrabando, siglos XVI-XVIII. San Juan: Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto Rico y Centro de Investigaciones Históricas, 1995. ix + 244 pp. -Herbert S. Klein, Patrick Manning, Slave trades, 1500-1800: Globalization of forced labour. Hampshire, U.K.: Variorum, 1996. xxxiv + 361 pp. -Jay R. Mandle, Kari Levitt ,The critical tradition of Caribbean political economy: The legacy of George Beckford. Kingston: Ian Randle, 1996. xxvi + 288., Michael Witter (eds -Kevin Birth, Belal Ahmed ,The political economy of food and agriculture in the Caribbean. Kingston: Ian Randle; London: James Currey, 1996. xxi + 276 pp., Sultana Afroz (eds -Sarah J. Mahler, Alejandro Portes ,The urban Caribbean: Transition to the new global economy. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1997. xvii + 260 pp., Carlos Dore-Cabral, Patricia Landolt (eds -O. Nigel Bolland, Ray Kiely, The politics of labour and development in Trinidad. Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago: The Press University of the West Indies, 1996. iii + 218 pp. -Lynn M. Morgan, Aviva Chomsky, West Indian workers and the United Fruit Company in Costa Rica, 1870-1940. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1996. xiii + 302 pp. -Eileen J. Findlay, Maria del Carmen Baerga, Genero y trabajo: La industria de la aguja en Puerto Rico y el Caribe hispánico. San Juan

  18. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available -Lennox Honychurch, Robert L. Paquette ,The lesser Antilles in the age of European expansion. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996. xii + 383 pp., Stanley L. Engerman (eds -Kevin A. Yelvington, Gert Oostindie, Ethnicity in the Caribbean: Essays in honor of Harry Hoetink. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1996. xvi + 239 pp. -Aisha Khan, David Dabydeen ,Across the dark waters: Ethnicity and Indian identity in the Caribbean. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1996. xi + 222 pp., Brinsley Samaroo (eds -Tracey Skelton, Ralph R. Premdas, Ethnic conflict and development: The case of Guyana. Brookfield VT: Ashgate, 1995. xi + 205 pp. -Rosemarijn Hoefte, Basdeo Mangru, A history of East Indian resistance on the Guyana sugar estates, 1869-1948. Lewiston NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996. xiv + 370 pp. -Rosemarijn Hoefte, Clem Seecharan, 'Tiger in the stars': The anatomy of Indian achievement in British Guiana 1919-29. London: Macmillan, 1997. xxviii + 401 pp. -Brian Stoddart, Frank Birbalsingh, The rise of Westindian cricket: From colony to nation. St. John's, Antigua: Hansib Publishing (Caribbean, 1996. 274 pp. -Donald R. Hill, Peter van Koningsbruggen, Trinidad Carnival: A quest for national identity. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1997. ix + 293 pp. -Peter van Koningsbruggen, John Cowley, Carnival, Canboulay and Calypso: Traditions in the making. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. xv + 293 pp. -Olwyn M. Blouet, George Gmelch ,The Parish behind God's back : The changing culture of rural Barbados. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1997. xii + 240 pp., Sharon Bohn Gmelch (eds -George Gmelch, Mary Chamberlain, Narratives of exile and return. London: Macmillan, 1997. xii + 236 pp. -Michèle Baj Strobel, Christiane Bougerol, Une ethnographie des conflits aux Antilles: Jalousie, commérages, sorcellerie. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1997. 161 pp. -Abdollah Dashti, Randy Martin, Socialist ensembles: Theater and state in Cuba and

  19. University contributions to the HPV vaccine and implications for access to vaccines in developing countries: addressing materials and know-how in university technology transfer policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crager, Sara E; Guillen, Ethan; Price, Matt

    2009-01-01

    , materials and knowledge, vaccines have the potential to be evaluated efficiently and cost-effectively via a pathway parallel to establishing bioequivalence for generic small molecule drugs. A new paradigm is needed that addresses the additional barriers that exist, outside of simply patent protection, to the generic production of vaccines and other biologics. One possible framework, which builds upon previous work on prize funds and patent pools, is discussed here: a Patents, Materials, and Know-how Pool (PMK Pool), based on the patent pool model such as those outlined in the Essential Medical Inventions Licensing Agency and proposals recently put forth by the governments of Barbados and Bolivia. University approaches to licensing vaccines and other biologics need to ensure access not only to patents, knowledge, and materials covered by intellectual property, but must also address the problem of access to materials and know-how that are often proprietary trade secrets. Universities should actively participate in the creation of this and other novel mechanisms, and in the meantime use currently available technology transfer mechanisms to ensure low-cost access to medicines in developing countries. PMID:19697749

  20. Educating and Preparing for Tsunamis in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Aliaga, B.; Edwards, S.

    2013-12-01

    warning system that serves regionally and delivers locally, saving lives and livelihoods, not only from tsunamis, but all coastal hazards. Through this and other platforms, physical and social scientists, emergency managers and elected officials have been working together via different mechanisms. Community based recognition programs, like the TsunamiReadyTM Program, regional tsunami exercises, sub-regional public education activities such as the Tsunami Smart campaigns, internet technologies, social media, meetings and conferences, identification of local and national champions, capitalization of news breaking tsunamis and earthquakes, economic resources for equipment and training have all been key to developing a tsunami safer Caribbean. Given these efforts, according to a 2013 survey, 93% of the countries covered by CARIBE EWS have tsunami response protocols in place, although much more work is required. In 2010 the US National Weather Service established the Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program as the first step towards a Caribbean Tsunami Warning Center in the region. In 2013 the Caribbean Tsunami Information Center was established in Barbados. Both these institutions which serve the region play a key role for promoting both the warning and educational components of the warning system.

  1. Ordenação de populações em amplas classes de nível de saúde, segundo um indicador abrangente definido por uma função discriminante linear Ranking of populations in broad classes of health levels according to a comprehensive indicador defined by a linear discriminant function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Ferreira Novo

    1985-08-01

    , were defined according to a criterion based on the rank of the sum of the normal reduced deviations calculated for the distributions of the values for each indicator. For the computation of discriminant function equations by the stepwise technique, reciprocal transformation was used for the four indicators expressed as ratios and for the other two their face values were used. Critical analysis of results as shown that the formula: Z = 2895/IMR + 2060/BR + 1000/MRIPD, can be used as a comprehensve indicator allowing the ranking of countries in broad classes of health levels, as follows: A - 737 or more; Denmark and Sweden; B - 637 |- 737: Australia, Netherland, England and Wales, Iceland, Luxembourg, Norway and Switzerland; C - 537 |- 637: Federal Republic of Germany, Canada, Scotland, Finland and Japan; D - 437 |- 537: Austria, Belgium, United States, France, Northern Ireland, Italy and New Zealand; E - 337 |- 437: Bulgaria, Spain, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Ireland, Israel and Singapore; F - 237 |- 337: Barbados, Costa Rica, Yugoslavia, Poland, Portugal and Romania; G - 137 |- 237: Chile, Guyana, Mauritius, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago and Uruguay; H - < 137: Egygt, Guatemala and Mexico.

  2. Recent improvements in earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, L.; Green, D.; McNamara, D.; Whitmore, P.; Weaver, J.; Huang, P.; Benz, H.

    2007-12-01

    Following the catastrophic loss of life from the December 26, 2004, Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. Government appropriated funds to improve monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), the Seismic Research Unit of the University of the West Indies, and other collaborating institutions in the Caribbean region. As part of this effort, the USGS is coordinating with Caribbean host nations to design and deploy nine new broadband and strong-motion seismic stations. The instrumentation consists of an STS-2 seismometer, an Episensor accelerometer, and a Q330 high resolution digitizer. Six stations are currently transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Center, where the data are redistributed to the NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers, regional monitoring partners, and the IRIS Data Management Center. Operating stations include: Isla Barro Colorado, Panama; Gun Hill Barbados; Grenville, Grenada; Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; Sabaneta Dam, Dominican Republic; and Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Three additional stations in Barbuda, Grand Turks, and Jamaica will be completed during the fall of 2007. These nine stations are affiliates of the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) and complement existing GSN stations as well as regional stations. The new seismic stations improve azimuthal coverage, increase network density, and provide on-scale recording throughout the region. Complementary to this network, NOAA has placed Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) stations at sites in regions with a history of generating destructive tsunamis. Recently, NOAA completed deployment of 7 DART stations off the coasts of Montauk Pt, NY; Charleston, SC; Miami, FL; San Juan, Puerto Rico; New

  3. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts

  4. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2000-07-01

    : The Press University of the West Indies, 1998. xviii + 152 pp. -Kris Lane, Hans Turley, Rum, sodomy, and the lash: Piracy, sexuality, and masculine identity. New York: New York University Press, 1999. lx + 199 pp. -Jonathan Schorsch, Eli Faber, Jews, slaves, and the slave trade: Setting the record straight. New York: New York University Press, 1998. xvii + 367 pp. -Bonham C. Richardson, Bridget Brereton ,The Colonial Caribbean in transition: Essays on postemancipation social and cultural history. Barbados: The Press University of the West Indies; Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1999. xxiii + 319 pp., Kevin A. Yelvington (eds -Ransford W. Palmer, Thomas Klak, Globalization and neoliberalism: The Caribbean context. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. xxiv + 319 pp. -Susan Saegert, Robert B. Potter ,Self-help housing, the poor, and the state in the Caribbean. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1997. xiv + 299 pp., Dennis Conway (eds -Peter Redfield, Michèle-Baj Strobel, Les gens de l'or: Mémoire des orpailleurs créoles du Maroni. Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe: Ibis Rouge, 1998. 400 pp. -Donald R. Hill, Louis Regis, The political calypso: True opposition in Trinidad and Tobago 1962-1987. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1999. xv + 277 pp. -A. James Arnold, Christiane P. Makward, Mayotte Capécia ou l'aliénation selon Fanon. Paris: Karthala, 1999. 230 pp. -Chris Bongie, Celia M. Britton, Edouard Glissant and postcolonial theory: Strategies of language and resistance. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999. xiv + 224 pp. -Chris Bongie, Anne Malena, The negotiated self: The dynamics of identity in Francophone Caribbean narrative. New York: Peter Lang, 1999. x + 192 pp. -Catherine A. John, Kathleen M. Balutansky ,Caribbean creolization: Reflections on the cultural dynamics of language, literature, and identity., Marie-Agnès Sourieau (eds -Leland Ferguson, Jay B. Haviser, African sites archaeology in the Caribbean. Princeton NJ: Markus

  5. New insights into the radiocarbon calibration based on 14C and U-Th dating of corals drilled offshore Tahiti (IODP Expedition #310)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Nicolas; Deschamps, Pierre; Bard, Edouard; Hamelin, Bruno; Camoin, Gilbert; Thomas, Alexander L.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2010-05-01

    Beyond the high-precision tree-ring calibration, the fossil corals are the most reliable archive that can be used to calibrate the radiocarbon time scale. In this contribution, we present a new radiocarbon dataset based on paired 14C and U-Th dating of fossil shallow-water tropical corals drilled offshore Tahiti during the IODP Expedition 310 'Tahiti Sea-Level'. Before 14C and U-Th analyses, rigorous screening criteria have been applied in order to select pristine aragonitic coral skeletons and avoid those displaying any post-mortem diagenesis that alters original ages. In particular, we made a significant effort to improve detection and quantification of very small amount of secondary calcite in the aragonitic coral lattice using X-ray diffraction measurements [1]. In addition, we apply a strict screening criterion based on δ234U. However, the new Tahiti dataset allow to refine the previous tolerance ranges previously adopted. More than 60 radiocarbon dates were processed at the Laboratoire de Mesure du Carbone 14 (Saclay, France) with the ARTEMIS AMS facility. This new Tahiti record provides new data to the radiocarbon calibration for two distinct time windows: for the interval between 29,200 and 36,200 years BP and for the last deglaciation period, with especially, a higher resolution (40 data) for the 14,000 - 16,000 years BP time interval. These new data extend the previous Tahiti record beyond 13,900 years BP which was the oldest U-Th age obtained on cores drilled onshore in the modern Tahiti barrier reef [2, 3]. These new results are compared with 14C chronologies from other corals, those of Barbados [4, 5] and those from other Pacific islands (Mururoa, Vanuatu, Marquesas, Christmas), and from the Cariaco Basin sediment [6, 7], the Iberian Margin sediment [8, 9] and the Bahamian speleothem [10] records. The new 14C dataset from the corals drilled offshore Tahiti allows to validate the precision and accuracy of other records either directly dated by U-Th or

  6. Detailed forest formation mapping in the land cover map series for the Caribbean islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, E. H.; Schill, S.; Pedreros, D. H.; Tieszen, L. L.; Kennaway, T.; Cushing, M.; Ruzycki, T.

    2006-12-01

    than when IKONOS or Landsat imagery was hand-digitized, as it was for the Dominican Republic (7) and Barbados. 1. T. Kennaway, E. H. Helmer. (Intl Inst of Tropical Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Río Piedras, Puerto Rico, 2006). 2. A. Areces-Mallea et al. (The Nature Conservancy, 1999). 3. E. H. Helmer, O. Ramos, T. Lopez, M. Quiñones, W. Diaz, Carib J Sci 38, 165-183 (2002). 4. C. Daly, E. H. Helmer, M. Quiñones, Int J Climatology 23, 1359-1381 (2003). 5. T. G. Farr, M. Kobrick, Eos Transactions 81, 583-585 (2000). 6. E. H. Helmer, B. Ruefenacht, Photogrammetric Eng Rem Sens 71, 1079-1089 (2005). 7. S. Hernández, M. Pérez. (Secretaría de Estado de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales de la República Dominicana, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, 2005).

  7. Book reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2011-06-01

    (reviewed by Anthony R. Stevens-Acevedo Chanting Down the New Jerusalem: Calypso, Christianity, and Capitalism in the Caribbean, by Francio Guadeloupe (reviewed by Catherine Benoît Once Jews: Stories of Caribbean Sephardim, by Josette Capriles Goldish (reviewed by Aviva Ben-Ur Black and White Sands: A Bohemian Life in the Colonial Caribbean, by Elma Napier (reviewed by Peter Hulme West Indian Slavery and British Abolition, 1783-1807, by David Beck Ryden (reviewed by Justin Roberts The Children of Africa in the Colonies: Free People of Color in Barbados in the Age of Emancipation, by Melanie J. Newton (reviewed by Olwyn M. Blouet Friends and Enemies: The Scribal Politics of Post/Colonial Literature, by Chris Bongie (reviewed by Jacqueline Couti Nationalism and the Formation of Caribbean Literature, by Leah Reade Rosenberg (reviewed by Bénédicte Ledent Signs of Dissent: Maryse Condé and Postcolonial Criticism, by Dawn Fulton (reviewed by Florence Ramond Jurney The Archaeology of the Caribbean, by Samuel M. Wilson (reviewed by Frederick H. Smith Crossing the Borders: New Methods and Techniques in the Study of Archaeological Materials from the Caribbean, edited by Corinne L. Hofman, Menno L.P. Hoogland & Annelou L. van Gijn (reviewed by Mark Kostro

  8. A revision of the new world species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Facitrichophora, new genus (Diptera, Ephydridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Mathis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The New World species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Fascitrichophora new genus, are revised. Fifteen new species are described (type locality in parenthesis: Fascitrishophora atrella sp. n. (Costa Rica. Guanacaste: Murciélago [10°56.9’N, 85°42.5’W; sandy mud flats around mangrove inlet], F. carvalhorum sp.n. (Brazil. São Paulo: Praia Puruba [23°21’S, 44°55.6’W; beach], F. manza sp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla (12 km S; 10°24.5’N, 61°01.5’W, bridge over Nariva River, F. panama sp. n. (Panama. Darien: Garachine [8°04’N, 78°22’W], Polytrichophora adarca sp. n. (Barbados. Christ Church: Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary [13°04.2’N, 59°34.7’W; swamp], P. arnaudorum sp. n. (Mexico. Baja California. San Felipe [31°01.5’N, 114°50.4’W], P. barba sp. n. (Cuba. Sancti Spiritus: Topes de Collantes [21°54.4’N, 80°01.4’W, 670 m], P. flavella sp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6’S, 71°16.9’W; 250 m], P. marinoniorum sp. n. (Brazil. Paraná: Antonina [25°28.4’S, 48°40.9’W; mangal], P. rostra sp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6’S, 71°16.9’W; 250 m], P. sinuosa sp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla [12 km S; 10°24’N, 61°02’W], P. mimbres sp. n. (United States. New Mexico. Grant: Mimbres River [New Mexico Highway 61 & Royal John Mine Road; 32°43.8’N, 107°52’W; 1665 m], P. salix sp. n. (United States. Alaska. Matanuska-Susitna: Willow Creek [61°46.1’N, 150°04.2’W; 50 m], P. sturtevantorum sp. n. (United States. Tennessee. Shelby: Meeman Shelby State Park [Mississippi River; 35°20.4’N, 90°2.1’W; 98 m], P. prolata sp. n. (Belize. Stann Creek: Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary [16°45’N, 88°30’W]. All known New World species of both genera are described with an emphasis on structures of the male terminalia, which are fully illustrated. Detailed locality data and distribution

  9. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    the consistency of EarthCARE retrievals, to support aerosol description in the EarthCARE simulator ECSIM, and to facilitate a uniform specification of broad-band aerosol optical properties, a hybrid end-to-end aerosol classification model (HETEAC) is developed which serves as a baseline for EarthCARE algorithm development and evaluation procedures. The model's theoretical description of aerosol microphysics (bi-modal size distribution, spectral refractive index, and particle shape distribution) is adjusted to experimental data of aerosol optical properties, i.e. lidar ratio, depolarization ratio, Ångström exponents (hybrid approach). The experimental basis is provided by ground-based observations with sophisticated multi-wavelength, polarization lidars applied in the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) and in dedicated field campaigns in the Sahara (SAMUM-1), Cape Verde (SAMUM-2), Barbados (SALTRACE), Atlantic Ocean (Polarstern and Meteor cruises), and Amazonia. The model is designed such that it covers the entire loop from aerosol microphysics via aerosol classification to optical and radiative properties of the respective types and allows consistency checks of modeled and measured parameters (end-to-end approach). Optical modeling considers scattering properties of spherical and non-spherical particles. A suitable set of aerosol types is defined which includes dust, clean marine, clean continental, pollution, smoke, and stratospheric aerosol. Mixtures of these types are included as well. The definition is consistent with CALIPSO approaches and will thus enable the establishment of a long-term global four-dimensional aerosol dataset.

  10. Book reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2009-12-01

    : Cultural and Natural Change at Port St. Charles, Barbados, c. 1750 BC – AD 1850 (Frederick H. Smith Reinaldo Funes Monzote, From Rainforest to Cane Field in Cuba: An Environmental History since 1492 (Bonham C. Richardson Jean Besson & Janet Momsen (eds., Caribbean Land and Development Revisited (Michaeline A. Crichlow César J. Ayala & Rafael Bernabe, Puerto Rico in the American Century: A History since 1898 (Juan José Baldrich Mindie Lazarus-Black, Everyday Harm: Domestic Violence, Court Rites, and Cultures of Reconciliation (Brackette F. Williams Learie B. Luke, Identity and Secession in the Caribbean: Tobago versus Trinidad, 1889-1980 (Rita Pemberton Michael E. Veal, Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae (Shannon Dudley Garth L. Green & Philip W. Scher (eds., Trinidad Carnival: The Cultural Politics of a Transnational Festival (Kim Johnson Jocelyne Guilbault, Governing Sound: The Cultural Politics of Trinidad’s Carnival Musics (Donald R. Hill Shannon Dudley, Music from Behind the Bridge: Steelband Spirit and Politics in Trinidad and Tobago (Stephen Stuempfle Kevin K. Birth, Bacchanalian Sentiments: Musical Experiences and Political Counterpoints in Trinidad (Philip W. Scher

  11. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Harassment Policy in Jamaica: The Absence of a National Sexual Harassment Policy, and the Way Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Peters

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the Caribbean only countries such as Belize, Bahamas and Guyana have legitimized legislation against sexual harassment. Countries such as Jamaica, Barbados and St. Kitts and Nevis have draft bills before parliament. In the Jamaican context, the country in September 1981 signed the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW which came into effect in 1984 which deals with the issue of sexual harassment under Articles 2 (Policy Measures and Legislation and Article 11 (Employment. The current study is an assessment of sexual harassment, components of sexual harassment and sexual harassment policies in Jamaica, and whether such policy would be effective within the context of the culture. The methodology that was utilized for the study was ethnography. Ethnography focuses on describing the cultural traits of a group and may also be used to explore and describe the relationship among variables. This qualitative methodology was thought to be most suited for the nature of research as it describes and situates the phenomenon of sexual harassment in a cultural context, both the broad Jamaican culture and the specific organizational culture. Six themes emerged from the current study. These are culture and perception of harassment; culture and element of harassment; culture and effectiveness of policy; power and power relations and gendered response to harassment. It was postulated and agreed upon that there is no definite definition for sexual harassment, it is fluid and based solely on one’s perception. One respondent said, “We’ve been unable to define sexual harassment it doesn’t have to be intentional or not. Sexual harassment is pretty much from the person’s perspective”. It was brought out during the study that culture would clearly define what is constituted as sexual harassment. A respondent in an elite interview stated that in a Jamaican context sexual harassment is very difficult to be

  12. Heating systems of special solar-greenhouses; Calefaccion solar de invernaderos especiales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriarte, Adolfo; Bistoni, Silvia [Universidad Nacional de Catamarca, Catamarca (Argentina); Saravia, Luis [INENCO, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    ambiente controlado (casa de vegetacion) y la segunda en un recinto protegido con media sombra. Debido al cambio de habitat de las estacas recien enraizadas (barbados) esta tecnica presenta el problema de bajos porcentajes de sobrevivencia. En el presente trabajo se describen las instalaciones y el funcionamiento de un invernadero rusticadero que tiene por finalidad controlar las condiciones ambientales asegurando un mayor nivel de sobrevivencia de las plantas. Este invernadero tiene doble cubierta de plastico, doble pared en los frontales y por debajo de la segunda cubierta una cortina desplazable de media - sombra aluminizada. El sistema de calefaccion tanto del invernadero como de las camas calientes se completa con colectores-intercambiadores de plastico colocados en los laterales norte y sur y un lecho de piedra. Se analiza el comportamiento termico del invernadero, y de los distintos elementos utilizados, como asi tambien las rutinas de funcionamiento de los mismos. El invernadero - rusticadero se comporto dentro de los niveles termicos previstos, destacandose la importante disminucion de perdidas convectivas y radiativas. Por otro lado, tanto el lecho de piedra como los colectores aportaron una cantidad apreciable de energia al sistema.

  13. The last interglacial period on the Pacific Coast of North America: Timing and paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Kennedy, G.L.; Rockwell, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    New, high-precision U-series ages of solitary corals (Balanophyllia elegans) coupled with molluscan faunal data from marine terraces on the Pacific Coast of North America yield information about the timing and warmth of the last interglacial sea-level highstand. Balanophyllia elegans takes up U in isotopic equilibrium with seawater during growth and shortly after death. Corals from the second terrace on San Clemente Island (offshore southern California), the third terrace on Punta Banda (on the Pacific Coast of northern Baja California), and the Discovery Point Formation on Isla de Guadalupe (in the Pacific Ocean offshore Baja California) date to the peak of the last interglacial period and have U-series ages ranging from ca. 123 to 114 ka. The first terrace on Punta Banda has corals with ages ranging from ca. 83 to 80 ka, which corresponds to a sea-level highstand formed in the late last interglacial period. U-series analyses of corals from the Cayucos terrace (central California) and the Nestor terrace at Point Loma (southern California) show that these fossils have evidence of open-system history, similar to what has been reported by other workers for the same localities. Nevertheless, a model of continuous, secondary U and Th uptake shows that two ages of corals are likely present at these localities, representing the ca. 105 and ca. 120 ka sea-level highstands reported elsewhere. U-series ages of last interglacial corals from the Pacific Coast overlap with, but are on average younger than the ages of corals from Barbados, the Bahamas, and Hawaii. This age difference is explained by the nature of the geomorphic response to sea-level change: fringing or barrier reefs on low-latitude coastlines have an accretionary growth style that keeps pace with rising sea level, whether on a tectonically rising or stable coastline. In contrast, midlatitude, high-energy coastlines are sites of platform cutting during the early part of a sea-level high stand and terrace

  14. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ileana Rodríguez; Transatlantic Topographies: Islands, Highlands, Jungles (Stuart McLean Eliga H. Gould, Peter S. Onuf (eds.; Empire and Nation: The American Revolution in the Atlantic World (Peter A. Coclanis Michael A. Gomez; Reversing Sail: A History of the African Diaspora (James H. Sweet Brian L. Moore, Michele A. Johnson; Neither Led Nor Driven: Contesting British Cultural Imperialism in Jamaica, 1865-1920 (Gad Heuman Erna Brodber; The Second Generation of Freemen in Jamaica, 1907-1944 (Michaeline A. Crichlow Steeve O. Buckridge; The Language of Dress: Resistance and Accommodation in Jamaica, 1760- 1890 (Jean Besson Deborah A. Thomas; Modern Blackness: Nationalism, Globalization, and the Politics of Culture in Jamaica (Charles V. Carnegie Carolyn Cooper; Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large (John D. Galuska Noel Leo Erskine; From Garvey to Marley: Rastafari Theology (Richard Salter Hilary McD Beckles; Great House Rules: Landless Emancipation and Workers’ Protest in Barbados, 1838?1938 (O. Nigel Bolland Woodville K. Marshall (ed.; I Speak for the People: The Memoirs of Wynter Crawford (Douglas Midgett Nathalie Dessens; Myths of the Plantation Society: Slavery in the American South and the West Indies (Lomarsh Roopnarine Michelle M. Terrell; The Jewish Community of Early Colonial Nevis: A Historical Archaeological Study (Mark Kostro Laurie A. Wilkie, Paul Farnsworth; Sampling Many Pots: An Archaeology of Memory and Tradition at a Bahamian Plantation (Grace Turner David Beriss; Black Skins, French Voices: Caribbean ethnicity and Activism in Urban France (Nadine Lefaucheur Karen E. Richman; Migration and Vodou (Natacha Giafferi Jean Moomou; Le monde des marrons du Maroni en Guyane (1772-1860: La naissance d’un peuple: Les Boni (Kenneth Bilby Jean Chapuis, Hervé Rivière; Wayana eitoponpë: (Une histoire (orale des Indiens Wayana (Dominique Tilkin Gallois Jesús Fuentes

  15. Adaptation to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risk in the Caribbean and South-East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolcemascolo, G. [Asian Disaster Preparedness Center ADPC, Pathumthani (Thailand); Collymore, J.; Keipi, K. [Inter-American Development Bank IDB, Christ Church (Barbados)

    2004-05-01

    Weather Events in the Caribbean and Asia, held in Barbados in July, 2003. Specialists from both the Caribbean and Southeast Asia were brought together to discuss current adaptation strategies to severe weather events and to explore possible strategies for addressing climate change in the critical sectors of water resources, tourism, agriculture and fisheries. These sectors were examined in each region with a view toward sharing a range of experiences and facilitating inter-regional information exchange. This publication brings together good practices identified through presentations and case studies prepared for the seminar, with a focus on practices that are both relevant and transferable between the regions. It is our hope that through this seminar, sustainable networks have been formed to carry on this mission long after the seminar's completion and that this paper will provide a useful departure point for future cooperation between the regions.

  16. Ore-forming fluid constraints on illite crystallinity (IC) at Dexing porphyry copper deposit, Jiangxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Zhangdong

    2001-01-01

    [1]uatier, M. D., Peacor, D. R., O’Neil, J. R., Smectite-illite transition in Barbados accretionary wedge sediments: TEM and AEM evidence for dissolution/crystallization at low temperature, Clays and Clay Minerals, 1992, 40(1): 65.[2]Eberl, D., Hower, J., Kinetics of illite formation, Geological Society of America Bulletin, 1976, 9: 1326[3]Elliott, W. C., Matisoff, G., Evaluation of kinetic models for smectite to illite transformation, Clays and Clay Minerals, 1996, 44(1): 77.[4]Ji Junfeng, Browne, P. R. L., Liu Yingjun et al., Kinetic model for the smectite to illite transformation in active geothermal system, Chinese Science Bulletin (in Chinese), 1997, 42 (21): 2313[5]Pollastro, R. M., Considerations and applications of the illite/smectite geothermometer in hydrocarbonbearing rocks of Miocene to Mississippian age, Clays and Clay Minerals, 1993, 41(1): 119[6]Harvey, C. C., Browne, P. R. L., Mixed-layer clay geothermometry in the Wairakei geothermal field, New Zealand, Clays and Clay Minerals, 1991, 39(3): 614[7]Whitney, G., Role of water in the smectite-to-illite reaction, Clays and Clay Minerals, 1990, 38 (2): 343.[8]Inoue, A., Kitagawa, R., Morphological characteristics of illitic clay minerals from a hydrothermal system, American Mineralogist, 1994, 79: 700.[9]Velde, B., Vasseur, G., Estimation of the diagenetic smectite to illite in time-temperature space, American Mineralogist, 1992, 77: 967.[10]hu Xun, Huang Chongke, Rui Zongyao et al., Dexing Porphyry Copper Deposit (in Chinese), Beijing: Geological Publishing House, 1983.[11]Kisch, H. J., Illite crystallinity: recommendation on sample preparation, X-ray diffraction settings and interlaboratory samples, Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 1991, 9: 665.[12]Eberl, D. D., Velde, B., Beyond the Kübler Index, Clay Minerals, 1989, 24(3): 571.[13]Srodon, J., Eberl, D. D., Illite. Micas, Reviews in Mineralogy (ed. Bailey, S. W.), 1984, 13: 495.[14]Yao, Y. C

  17. Curso diário e sazonal das trocas gasosas e do potencial hídrico foliar em aceroleiras Daily and seasonal course of gas exchange and leaf water potential in acerola plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REJANE JUREMA MANSUR CUSTÓDIO NOGUEIRA

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o curso diário e sazonal das trocas gasosas, da temperatura foliar e do potencial hídrico da acerola (Malpighia emarginata D.C., no campo. O experimento realizou-se no município de Paudalho, PE. Os valores da transpiração e do potencial da água foram, de modo geral, mais elevados no início da manhã e no final da tarde; os da resistência difusiva e temperatura foliar foram menores no início da manhã e no final da tarde. Houve uma limitação das trocas gasosas com o ambiente, em decorrência da redução da transpiração nas horas mais quentes do dia, sendo mais acentuada na estação seca e na matriz UFRPE 7. Os valores mínimos do potencial ocorreram na época seca, variando de -3,4 MPa (UFRPE 7 a -4,3 MPa (UFRPE 8, enquanto os valores máximos da resistência variaram de 16,30 s cm-1 (UFRPE 7 a 22,10 s cm-1 (UFRPE 8 na mesma estação. O potencial hídrico e a resistência difusiva mostraram forte correlação com o déficit de pressão de vapor. A maior capacidade fotossintética foi verificada em folhas maduras da matriz UFRPE 8. Os mecanismos fisiológicos apresentados pelas plantas demonstram que elas podem resistir a períodos de estresse hídrico quando estes se manifestam. A matriz UFRPE 8 é mais adaptada a períodos de estiagem do que a UFRPE 7.The daily and seasonal course of the gas exchanges, leaf temperature and water potential of Barbados cherry (Malpighia emarginata D.C. were evaluated under field conditions. The experiment was carried out in Paudalho, Pernambuco State, Brazil. Measurements of photosynthetic capacity in the wet season were also made. Changes in daily and seasonal behavior of gas exchange, water potential, and leaf temperature were observed. The transpiration and water potential measurements were higher at the beginning of the morning and at the end of the afternoon, while those for diffusive resistance and leaf temperature were lower at these same periods of the day

  18. CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX Caribbean and Western Atlantic Tsunami Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Whitmore, P.; Aliaga, B.; Huerfano Moreno, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions over the past 500 years. While most have been generated by local earthquakes, distant generated tsunamis can also affect the region. For example, waves from the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami were observed in Cuba, Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands, as well as Antigua, Martinique, Guadalupe and Barbados in the Lesser Antilles. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Although the tsunami generated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake claimed only a few lives, in the 1530 El Pilar, Venezuela; 1602 Port Royale, Jamaica; 1918 Puerto Rico; and 1946 Samaná, Dominican Republic tsunamis the death tolls ranged to over a thousand. Since then, there has been an explosive increase in residents, visitors, infrastructure, and economic activity along the coastlines, increasing the potential for human and economic loss. It has been estimated that on any day, upwards of more than 500,000 people could be in harm's way just along the beaches, with hundreds of thousands more working and living in the tsunamis hazard zones. Given the relative infrequency of tsunamis, exercises are a valuable tool to test communications, evaluate preparedness and raise awareness. Exercises in the Caribbean are conducted under the framework of the UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) and the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. On March 23, 2011, 34 countries and territories participated in the first CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX regional tsunami exercise, while in the second exercise on March 20, 2013 a total of 45 countries and territories participated. 481 organizations (almost 200 more than in 2011) also registered to receive the bulletins issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center and/or the Puerto Rico

  19. Quantification of subsurface pore pressure through IODP drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffer, D. M.; Flemings, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    It is critical to understand the magnitude and distribution of subsurface pore fluid pressure: it controls effective stress and thus mechanical strength, slope stability, and sediment compaction. Elevated pore pressures also drive fluid flows that serve as agents of mass, solute, and heat fluxes. The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) have provided important avenues to quantify pore pressure in a range of geologic and tectonic settings. These approaches include 1) analysis of continuous downhole logs and shipboard physical properties data to infer compaction state and in situ pressure and stress, 2) laboratory consolidation testing of core samples collected by drilling, 3) direct downhole measurements using pore pressure probes, 3) pore pressure and stress measurements using downhole tools that can be deployed in wide diameter pipe recently acquired for riser drilling, and 4) long-term monitoring of formation pore pressure in sealed boreholes within hydraulically isolated intervals. Here, we summarize key advances in quantification of subsurface pore pressure rooted in scientific drilling, highlighting with examples from subduction zones, the Gulf of Mexico, and the New Jersey continental shelf. At the Nankai, Costa Rican, and Barbados subduction zones, consolidation testing of cores samples, combined with analysis of physical properties data, indicates that even within a few km landward of the trench, pore pressures in and below plate boundary décollement zones reach a significant fraction of the lithostatic load (λ*=0.25-0.91). These results document a viable and quantifiable mechanism to explain the mechanical weakness of subduction décollements, and are corroborated by a small number of direct measurements in sealed boreholes and by inferences from seismic reflection data. Recent downhole measurements conducted during riser drilling using the modular formation dynamics tester wireline tool (MDT) in a forearc basin ~50

  20. Bookreviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Afro-Atlantic Dialogues: Anthropology in the Diaspora, edited by Kevin A. Yelvington (reviewed by Aisha Khan Central Africans, Atlantic Creoles, and the Foundation of the Americas, 1585-1660, by Linda M. Heywood & John K. Thornton (reviewed by James H. Sweet An Eye for the Tropics: Tourism, Photography, and Framing the Caribbean Picturesque, by Krista A. Thompson (reviewed by Carl Thompson Taíno Indian Myth and Practice: The Arrival of the Stranger King, by William F. Keegan (reviewed by Frederick H. Smith Historic Cities of the Americas: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, by David F. Marley (reviewed by Richard L. Kagan Arming Slaves: From Classical Times to the Modern Age, edited by Christopher Leslie Brown & Philip D. Morgan (reviewed by James Sidbury Sweet Negotiations: Sugar, Slavery, and Plantation Agriculture in Early Barbados, by Russell R. Menard (reviewed by Kenneth Morgan Jamaica in 1850 or, The Effects of Sixteen Years of Freedom on a Slave Colony, by John Bigelow (reviewed by Jean Besson Moral Capital: Foundations of British Abolitionism, by Christopher Leslie Brown (reviewed by Cassandra Pybus Caribbean Journeys: An Ethnography of Migration and Home in Three Family Networks, by Karen Fog Olwig (reviewed by George Gmelch Afro-Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation: Ethnicity, Exception, or Exit, by Reuel R. Rogers (reviewed by Kevin Birth Puerto Rican Arrival in New York: Narratives of the Migration, 1920-1950, edited by Juan Flores (reviewed by Wilson A. Valentín-Escobar The Conquest of History: Spanish Colonialism and National Histories in the Nineteenth Century, by Christopher Schmidt-Nowara (reviewed by Aline Helg Gender and Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World, edited by Pamela Scully & Diana Paton (reviewed by Bernard Moitt Gender and Democracy in Cuba, by Ilja A. Luciak (reviewed by Florence E. Babb The “New Man” in Cuba: Culture and Identity in the

  1. ICE-6G models of postglacial relative sea-level history applied to Holocene coral reef and mangrove records of the western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, M. A.; Peltier, W. R.; Drummond, R.; Gonzalez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fossil coral reefs and mangrove peat accumulations at western Caribbean sites along a latitudinal gradient from the Florida Keys through Belize and Panama provide dated and interpreted 8,000 year Holocene sea-level records for comparison with RSL predictions of the ICE-6G (VM5A, VM5B; L90) models of glacio-hydro-isostatic adjustment, with and without rotational feedback. These presumably passive continental margin sites provide the means to establish a N-S spatial trend in the varying influences of GIA, eustatic components of Holocene sea level, extent of forebulge collapse and influence of rotational feedback over a 20° latitudinal range. Previous ICE6G (VM5A) model-coral data comparisons for St Croix, USVI, Antigua, Martinique and Barbados (Toscano, Peltier and Drummond, 2011, QSR) along the eastern Caribbean plate and island arc illustrated the close model-data compatibility, the influence of rotational feedback acting as a significant factor in reducing misfits, and the need for high quality in situ data to confirm the extension of the proglacial forebulge into tropical latitudes. The gradient of western Caribbean continental shelf sites comprises a much more varied range of model-data relationships based on extensive combined Acropora palmata (reef crest coral) and Rhizophora mangle (microtidal mangrove) peat datasets in all cases. Starting at the northernmost region with the Florida Keys, there exist negative model misfits to the data, suggesting the possibility of a positive tectonic overprint upon expectations related to the glacial isostatic adjustment process acting alone, even though this region is normally believed to be tectonically stable. The largest multi-proxy database from Belize supports the likelihood of increasing rates of subsidence from north to south in the Belize Lagoon, which may account for numerous positive GIA model-data misfits. The southernmost site at Panama is most similar to Belize in the possible nature of tectonic influences on

  2. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1997-01-01

    NJ: Africa World Press, 1993. xxv + 115 pp. -Sandra Burr, Gretchen Gerzina, Black London: Life before emancipation. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1995. xii + 244 pp. -Carlene J. Edie, Trevor Munroe, The cold war and the Jamaican Left 1950-1955: Reopening the files. Kingston: Kingston Publishers, 1992. xii + 242 pp. -Carlene J. Edie, David Panton, Jamaica's Michael Manley: The great transformation (1972-92. Kingston: Kingston Publishers, 1993. xx + 225 pp. -Percy C. Hintzen, Cary Fraser, Ambivalent anti-colonialism: The United States and the genesis of West Indian independence, 1940-1964. Westport CT: Greenwood, 1994. vii + 233 pp. -Anthony J. Payne, Carlene J. Edie, Democracy in the Caribbean: Myths and realities. Westport CT: Praeger, 1994. xvi + 296 pp. -Alma H. Young, Jean Grugel, Politics and development in the Caribbean basin: Central America and the Caribbean in the New World Order. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. xii + 270 pp. -Alma H. Young, Douglas G. Lockhart ,The development process in small island states. London: Routledge, 1993. xv + 275 pp., David Drakakis-Smith, John Schembri (eds -Virginia Heyer Young, José Solis, Public school reform in Puerto Rico: Sustaining colonial models of development. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1994. x + 171 pp. -Carolyn Cooper, Christian Habekost, Verbal Riddim: The politics and aesthetics of African-Caribbean Dub poetry. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1993. vii + 262 pp. -Clarisse Zimra, Jaqueline Leiner, Aimé Césaire: Le terreau primordial. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 1993. 175 pp. -Clarisse Zimra, Abiola Írélé, Aimé Césaire: Cahier d'un retour au pays natal. With introduction, commentary and notes. Abiola Írélé. Ibadan: New Horn Press, 1994. 158 pp. -Alvina Ruprecht, Stella Algoo-Baksh, Austin C. Clarke: A biography. Barbados: The Press - University of the West Indies; Toronto: ECW Press, 1994. 234 pp. -Sue N. Greene, Glyne A. Griffith, Deconstruction, imperialism and the West Indian novel

  3. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1994-07-01

    Halebsky ,Cuba in transition: Crisis and transformation. With Carolee Bengelsdorf, Richard L. Harris, Jean Stubbs & Andrew Zimbalist. Boulder CO: Westview, 1992. xi + 244 pp., John M. Kirk (eds -Michiel Baud, Andrés L. Mateo, Mito y cultura en la era de Trujillo. Santo Domingo: Librería La Trinitario/Instituto del Libro, 1993. 224 pp. -Edgardo Meléndez, Andrés Serbin, Medio ambiente, seguridad y cooperacíon regional en el Caribe. Caracas: Editorial Nueva Sociedad, 1992. 147 pp. -Dean W. Collinwood, Michael Craton ,Islanders in the stream: A history of the Bahamian people. Volume One: From Aboriginal times to the end of slavery. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992. xxxiii + 455 pp., Gail Saunders (eds -Gary Brana-Shute, Alan A. Block, Masters of paradise: Organized crime and the internal revenue service in the Bahamas. New Brunswick NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1991. vii + 319 pp. -Michaeline Crichlow, Patrick Bryan, The Jamaican people 1880-1902. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1991. xiv + 300 pp. -Faye V Harrison, Lisa Douglass, The power of sentiment: Love, hierarchy, and the Jamaican family elite. Boulder CO: Westview, 1992. xviii + 298 pp. -Frank Jan van Dijk, Bob Marley, Songs of freedom: From 'Judge Not' to 'Redemption Song.' Kingston: Tuff Gong/Bob Marley Foundation / London : Island Records, 1992 (limited edition. 63 pp. + 4 compact discs. -Riva Berleant-Schiller, Veront M. Satchell, From plots to plantations: Land transactions in Jamaica, 1866-1900. Mona: University of the West Indies, 1990. xiii + 197 pp. -Hymie Rubenstein, Christine Barrow, Family, land and development in St. Lucia. Cave Hill, Barbados: Institute for social and economic studies (ISER, University of the West Indies, 1992. xii + 83 pp. -Bonham C. Richardson, Selwyn Ryan, Social and occupational stratification in contemporary Trinidad and Tobago. St. Augustine, Trinidad: ISER, 1991. xiv + 474 pp. -Bill Maurer, Roland Littlewood, Pathology and identity: The work of Mother Earth in Trinidad

  4. Estimative of the nutritional value of agroindustrial byproducts by using in vitro gas production techniqueEstimativa do valor nutricional de subprodutos agroindustriais pelo uso da técnica de produção de gás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzânia Sales Pereira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the total carbohydrates fractions and to estimate the digestion rate of non-fibrous carbohydrates of agroindustrial byproducts by using the gas production technique. The agroindustrial byproducts evaluated were the following: cashew, passion fruit, pineapple, barbados cherry, annatto and melon, and each sample was incubated in quadruplicate. After mixing all contents thoroughly, the bottles were placed in an incubator at 39ºC, and connecting the lid of each bottle to a pressure sensitive switch, a solenoid valve and a vent stem connector. Gas pressure measurements were made at 0, 3, 6, 12, 15, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, 40, 48, 60, 72, 96 e 120 hours post-inoculation. Blanks and an internal standard were included to enable adjustments in variation among readings. There was a high variation in nutritional composition of agroindustry byproducts, that cashew and annato presented the highest protein contents (159.3 and 135.3 g/kg of dry matter, respectively. Mellon and cashew presented the lowest values of total gas production (9.60 and 12.85 mL, respectively; and annato, pineapple and passion fruit presented highest gas volume (32.80; 28.16 and 22.54 mL, respectively, being the greatest percentages of phases from B2 fraction (64.27; 81.25 and 67.49%, respectively. Among the byproducts, pineapple and annatto stand out for the highest contribution of fibrous carbohydrate for total gas production, being B2 the main energy source for microbial growth, which is degraded at a slower rate than non-fibrous carbohydrate.Os objetivos deste trabalho foram determinar as frações de carboidratos totais e estimar a taxa de digestão dos carboidratos não-fibrosos de subprodutos agroindustriais, utilizando a técnica de produção de gás. Os subprodutos agroindustriais avaliados foram: caju, maracujá, abacaxi, acerola, urucum e melão, sendo cada amostra incubada em quadriplicata. Após mistura minuciosa de todos os conte

  5. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1995-01-01

    . Wickham-Crowley, Guerillas and Revolution in Latin America: A comparative Study of Insurgents and Regimes since 1956. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992. xx + 424 pp. -Robert E. Millette, Patrick A.M. Emmanuel, Elections and Party Systems in the Commonwealth Caribbean, 1944-1991. St. Michael, Barbados: Caribbean Development Research Services, 1992. viii + 111 pp. -Robert E. Millette, Donald C. Peters, The Democratic System in the Eastern Caribbean. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1992. xiv + 242 pp. -Pedro A. Cabán, Arnold H. Liebowitz, Defining status: A comprehensive analysis of United States Territorial Relations. Boston & Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff, 1989. xxii + 757 pp. -John O. Stewart, Stuart H. Surlin ,Mass media and the Caribbean. New York: Gordon & Breach, 1990. xviii + 471 pp., Walter C. Soderlund (eds -William J. Meltzer, Antonio V. Menéndez Alarcón, Power and television in Latin America: The Dominican Case. Westport CT: Praeger, 1992. 199 pp.

  6. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2003-07-01

    , Glenford D. Howe ,The empowering impulse: The nationalist tradition of Barbados. Kingston: Canoe Press, 2001. xiii + 354 pp., Don D. Marshall (eds -Jean Stubbs, Alejandro de la Fuente, A Nation for All: Race, Inequality, and Politics in Twentieth-Century Cuba. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001. xiv + 449 pp. -Sheryl L. Lutjens, Susan Kaufman Purcell ,Cuba: The contours of Change. Boulder CO: Lynne Rienner, 2000. ix + 155 pp., David J. Rothkopf (eds -Jean-Germain Gros, Robert Fatton Jr., Haiti's predatory republic: The unending transition to democracy. Boulder CO: Lynn Rienner, 2002. xvi + 237 pp. -Elizabeth McAlister, Beverly Bell, Walking on fire: Haitian Women's Stories of Survival and Resistance. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press, 2001. xx + 253 pp. -Gérard Collomb, Peter Hulme, Remnants of conquest: The island Caribs and their visitors, 1877-1998. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 371 pp. -Chris Bongie, Jeannie Suk, Postcolonial paradoxes in French Caribbean Writing: Césaire, Glissant, Condé. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. 216 pp. -Marie-Hélène Laforest, Caroline Rody, The Daughter's return: African-American and Caribbean Women's fictions of history. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. x + 267 pp. -Marie-Hélène Laforest, Isabel Hoving, In praise of new travelers: Reading Caribbean migrant women's writing. Stanford CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. ix + 374 pp. -Catherine Benoît, Franck Degoul, Le commerce diabolique: Une exploration de l'imaginaire du pacte maléfique en Martinique. Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe: Ibis Rouge, 2000. 207 pp. -Catherine Benoît, Margarite Fernández Olmos ,Healing cultures: Art and religion as curative practices in the Caribbean and its diaspora. New York: Palgrave, 2001. xxi + 236 pp., Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert (eds -Jorge Pérez Rolón, Charley Gerard, Music from Cuba: Mongo Santamaría, Chocolate Armenteros and Cuban musicians in the United States. Westport CT: Praeger, 2001. xi + 155 pp

  7. The three lost millennia of the last deglaciation (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Edouard

    2013-04-01

    collected in river mouths, and of sea-level rise as recorded in corals from Tahiti and Barbados. Various isotopic proxies of deep-sea ventilation have been used to identify variations during the H1 sub-phases of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), indicating that ocean heat transport was involved in the observed climate fluctuations. The various records documenting different climate parameters at many locations over the Earth can also be used in meaningful comparison with numerical model simulations performed in a transient mode. Collectively, these works allow to estimate the phase relationships between the causes (insolation and the greenhouse effect) and the often abrupt responses of the various components of the climate system, such as the atmosphere, oceans and ice sheets. Although these studies concern a naturally-occurring global warming that took place over a long time period, useful parallels will be drawn with the evolution of modern climate. In fact, the phase relationships between forcings (such as greenhouse gases and solar input) and changes in regional and global temperatures are also at the heart of modern global climate change. As for early deglaciation, the ocean can modulate warming regionally, thereby delaying, or even temporarily masking, long-term changes. Climate changes over the last century have been smaller in magnitude than those of the last deglaciation. Fortunately for us, there has been no recent collapse of gigantic ice masses such as the Laurentian and Fennoscandian ice sheets. However, most climate models show a 20 to 40% reduction of the MOC during the 21st century. Even if this change exerts only a minor influence on the projected magnitude of global warming, such a slowdown in ocean circulation change is generally sufficient to reduce the simulated warming over the North Atlantic with a resulting impact on adjacent continents, including Europe.

  8. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1992-01-01

    cemetery in Barbados, West Indies: a bioarcheological and ethnohistorical investigation, Carbonda

  9. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available -Peter Hulme, Simon Gikandi, Writing in limbo: Modernism and Caribbean literature. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1992. x + 260 pp. -Charles V. Carnegie, Alistair Hennessy, Intellectuals in the twentieth-century Caribbean (Volume 1 - Spectre of the new class: The Commonwealth Caribbean. London: Macmillan, 1992. xvii 204 pp. -Nigel Rigby, Anne Walmsley, The Caribbean artists movement, 1966-1972: A literary and cultural history. London: New Beacon Books, 1992. xx + 356 pp. -Carl Pedersen, Tyrone Tillery, Claude McKay: A black poet's struggle for identity. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992. xii + 235 pp. -Simone Dreyfus, Irving Rouse, The Tainos: Rise and decline of the people who greeted Columbus. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992. xii + 211 pp. -Louis Allaire, Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo, Cave of the Jagua: The mythological world of the Taino. Alburquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1988. xiii + 282 pp. -Irving Rouse, William F. Keegan, The people who discovered Columbus: The prehistory of the Bahamas. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1992. xx + 279 pp. -Neil L. Whitehead, Philip P. Boucher, Cannibal encounters: Europeans and Island Caribs, 1492-1763. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1992. xii + 217 pp. -Peter Kloos, Kaliña, des amérindiens à Paris: Photographies du prince Roland. Présentées par Gérard Collomb. Paris: Créaphis, 1992. 119 pp. -Maureen Warner-Lewis, Alan Gregor Cobley ,The African-Caribbean connection: Historical and cultural perspectives. Bridgetown, Barbados: Department of History, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, 1990. viii + 171 pp., Alvin Thompson (eds -H. Hoetink, Jean-Luc Bonniol, La couleur comme maléfice: une illustration créole de la généalogie des 'Blancs' et des 'Noirs'. Paris: Albin Michel, 1992. 304 pp. -Michael Aceto, Richard Price ,Two evenings in Saramaka. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1991. xvi + 417 pp., Sally Price (eds -Jorge P

  10. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1998-01-01

    , Volumen II (1937-1938. Santo Domingo: Fundación Cultural Dominicana, 1995. 427 pp. -Danielle Bégot, Elborg Forster ,Sugar and slavery, family and race: The letters and diary of Pierre Dessalles, Planter in Martinique, 1808-1856. Elborg & Robert Forster (eds. and trans.. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1996. 322 pp., Robert Forster (eds -Catherine Benoit, Richard D.E. Burton, La famille coloniale: La Martinique et la mère patrie, 1789-1992. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1994. 308 pp. -Roderick A. McDonald, Kathleen Mary Butler, The economics of emancipation: Jamaica & Barbados, 1823-1843. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995. xviii + 198 pp. -K.O. Laurence, David Chanderbali, A portrait of Paternalism: Governor Henry Light of British Guiana, 1838-48. Turkeyen, Guyana: Dr. David Chanderbali, Department of History, University of Guyana, 1994. xiii + 277 pp. -Mindie Lazarus-Black, Brian L. Moore, Cultural power, resistance and pluralism: Colonial Guyana 1838-1900. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press; Mona, Kingston: The Press-University of the West Indies, 1995. xv + 376 pp. -Madhavi Kale, K.O. Laurence, A question of labour: Indentured immigration into Trinidad and British Guiana, 1875-1917. Kingston: Ian Randle; London: James Currey, 1994. ix + 648 pp. -Franklin W. Knight, O. Nigel Bolland, On the March: Labour rebellions in the British Caribbean, 1934-39. Kingston: Ian Randle; London: James Currey, 1995. viii + 216 pp. -Linden Lewis, Kevin A. Yelvington, Producing power: Ethnicity, gender, and class in a Caribbean workplace. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995. xv + 286 pp. -Consuelo López Springfield, Alta-Gracia Ortíz, Puerto Rican women and work: Bridges in transnational labor. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1996. xi + 249 pp. -Peta Henderson, Irma McClaurin, Women of Belize: Gender and change in Central America. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1996. x + 218 pp. -Bonham C. Richardson, David M. Bush

  11. Prioritization of Eco-tourism Attractions (The target villages of Charmahal O Bakhtiar province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rahimi

    2012-01-01

    Yase chahDezakAvreganDastgerd ImamzadehChalvanSavadjanDimeWeigh.4335.2044.4773.6384.2040.2426.1993.2619.3725.3769.2719.2772Priority311216101275498 4- ConclusionAfter selecting the criteria and sub-criteria during weighing process in the Expert Choice software the designated choice were evaluated according to the criteria and sub-criteria and the village with the most and the least were selected which were Dahcheshme (0.6384 pts. and Dezak (0.2918 pts., respectively.Keywords: village, tourism, village with tourism objective, AHPReferencesBertolini.M, M,Braglia (2006: Aplication of the AHP Metodology in Making a Propozal for a Public Work Contract,17 january, International Journal of Project Management,Volume 24, Issue 5, Pages 422-430.Bender, M.Y.2008.Developmant of criteria and indicators for evaluating forest- based ecotourism destination: Adelphi study.M.Sc.thesis of West Virginia University.14p.Bowen.W.M (1990: Subjective judgments and Data Environment Analysis in Site Selection Computer, Environment and Urban Systems, Vol, 14, pp, 133-144.Bowen, William. M (1993: AHP: Multiple Criteria Evaluation, in Klosterman R.et al, Spreadsheet models for urban and regional analysis, New Brunswick: center for urban policy Research.Chiang Lee, Chien and Chung- Ping Chang (2008: Tourism development and economic growth: A closer look at panels, tourism management 29.Deng ,Jinyang, King, Brian and Thomas, Bauer (2002: Evaluation natural attractions for tourism, Annals of Tourism Research, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 422–438, 2002- 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Printed in Great Britainwww.elsevier.com/locate/atoures Dey, P.K, Ramcharan, E.K (2000: Analytic hierarchy process helpsselect site for limestone guarry expalision in Barbados. Journal of Environmental management.Harrison, D., & Schipani, S. (2007: Lao Tourism and Poverty Alleviation: Community-Based Tourism and the Private Sector. Current Issues in Tourism, 10(2/3, 194-230.Huang, M. et al.2006.comprehensive evaluation

  12. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dear TOJDE Readers,Welcome to the Volume 13 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 7 notes for Editor and 22 articles one book review of 57 authors from 12 different countries have been published. These published articles are from, Barbados, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.In general, around 13 articles and 4 notes for editors have been published in TOJDE so far. I would like to explain, why this time 22 articles and 8 submissions published in the articles and in notes for Editor Section respectively. First all, you should know that if a submission picks up from 3 TOJDE editors between 4.5 and 9 over all 9 credits, it means that this submission can be published in TOJDE in the coming issue. However, since the publishing priority of the accepted papers belongs to the highest scored ones, submissions which receive a score between 4.5 and 5 or 6 may wait and be archived for publishing later on. TOJDE administration respected this publishing rule up to now. Therefore, some accepted submissions which obtained over 4.5 have not been published up to now. These submissions were waiting for publishing in TOJDE in the future. In this issue, we decided to give them a chance to be published. For this reason, the current issue includes more papers than the previous issues. The 1st Notes for editor arrived from Russia written by Galina ARTYUSHINA and Olga SHEYPAK on Impacting Motivation In The Virtual Classroom. They mentioned that teachers, educational managers and learners must realize that new opportunities are offered by modern on-line communication. A person with basic Internet and Web skills is open to a new world of knowledge, from free Web surfing and self-organized education - through on-line resources and familiarization with Internet culture, its places, sites, search engines etc. - up to a more structured approach. The 2nd notes for editor is titled as “Use Of Libraries In Open And

  13. Measurement and evaluation of national family planning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, W P

    1967-03-01

    RESUMEN: En los últimos quince años diez paises han inaugurado programas nacionales de planeamiento familiar: India, Pakistán, Corea del Sur, Taiwan, Turquía, Malasia, Ceilán, Túez, la República Arabe Unida, y Marruecos. Otros paises, incluyendo Tailandia, Hong Kong, Singapur, Kenya, Barbados, Trinidad y los Estados Unidos, apoyan y/o estimulan actividades de planeamiento familiar. En la mayor parte de los casos la razón fundamental del programa ha sido que si la tasa de crecimiento poblacional disminuyera, aumentaría la tasa de crecimiento económico.Las metas de largo alcance, expresadas típicamente en términos de reducir las tasa.de de natalidad o de crecimiento, tienen su ejemplo en el propósito de Pakistán de reducir su tasa de crecimiento a 26 para 1970; el de Corea de reducir su tasa de natalidad a 20 para 1971; y el de India de reducir su tasa de natalidad a 25 para 1973.Los objectivos intermedios, que cubren diversos aspectos del pro grama, incluyen metas específicas para un determinado mes a año, considerando personal, la adquisición de anticonceptivos, y el número de usarios por método. Las metas específicas anuales de aceptantes de dispositivos intrauterinos (IUD), para Taiwán, Corea, Túnez, Pakistán e India, son comunes, tanto por la naturaleza del artefacto, como por la facilidad de medición de los que continúan utilizándolos. El programa de evaluación en Taiwán, que trata de medir por diversos medios los efectos inmediatos, mediatos y de largo plazo del programa de planeamiento familiar sirve de modelo. El propósito de la evaiuación de un programa de planeamiento familiar es contribuir a la efectividad y eficiencia del programa, midiendo y analizando su progreso. Las áreas a medir pueden ser clasificadas como- (1) conocimiento acerca de; (2) actitudes hacia; (3) práctica de control de natalidad; y (4) nivel de fecundidad.Un buen sistema de evaluación debería incluir: A. Un buen conjunto de estadísticas de servicio

  14. Measurement and evaluation of national family planning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, W P

    1967-03-01

    RESUMEN: En los últimos quince años diez paises han inaugurado programas nacionales de planeamiento familiar: India, Pakistán, Corea del Sur, Taiwan, Turquía, Malasia, Ceilán, Túez, la República Arabe Unida, y Marruecos. Otros paises, incluyendo Tailandia, Hong Kong, Singapur, Kenya, Barbados, Trinidad y los Estados Unidos, apoyan y/o estimulan actividades de planeamiento familiar. En la mayor parte de los casos la razón fundamental del programa ha sido que si la tasa de crecimiento poblacional disminuyera, aumentaría la tasa de crecimiento económico.Las metas de largo alcance, expresadas típicamente en términos de reducir las tasa.de de natalidad o de crecimiento, tienen su ejemplo en el propósito de Pakistán de reducir su tasa de crecimiento a 26 para 1970; el de Corea de reducir su tasa de natalidad a 20 para 1971; y el de India de reducir su tasa de natalidad a 25 para 1973.Los objectivos intermedios, que cubren diversos aspectos del pro grama, incluyen metas específicas para un determinado mes a año, considerando personal, la adquisición de anticonceptivos, y el número de usarios por método. Las metas específicas anuales de aceptantes de dispositivos intrauterinos (IUD), para Taiwán, Corea, Túnez, Pakistán e India, son comunes, tanto por la naturaleza del artefacto, como por la facilidad de medición de los que continúan utilizándolos. El programa de evaluación en Taiwán, que trata de medir por diversos medios los efectos inmediatos, mediatos y de largo plazo del programa de planeamiento familiar sirve de modelo. El propósito de la evaiuación de un programa de planeamiento familiar es contribuir a la efectividad y eficiencia del programa, midiendo y analizando su progreso. Las áreas a medir pueden ser clasificadas como- (1) conocimiento acerca de; (2) actitudes hacia; (3) práctica de control de natalidad; y (4) nivel de fecundidad.Un buen sistema de evaluación debería incluir: A. Un buen conjunto de estadísticas de servicio

  15. From Editor vol 11, No.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 11, Number: 3. In this issue it is published 3 notes for Editor, 12 articles, 2 book reviews. And this time, 32 authors from 10 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Barbados, Ghana, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, UAE and USA.“Developing and Validation A Usability Evaluation Tools For Distance Education Websites:Persian Version” has sent as Notes for editor section of TOJDE from Iran and written by Soheila HAFEZI, Ahmad FARAHI from Payame Noor University and Soheil Najafi MEHRI, Hosein MAHMOODI from Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University, Tehran.. Their paper involves that he content validity index was measured by set of ten experts, who evaluated each item individually. According to CVI, the final version of instrument was composed of 40 questions divided into 8 domains: Navigation, Functionality, Feedback, Control, Language, Consistency, Error prevention and correction, and Visual clarity. CVI score for each phrase was more than 0.75. According to our findings, this instrument has enough validity to apply in evaluation usability of educational websites of Persian distance education websites. However, instrument reliability can be measured in further study. The second notes for editor is titled as “A Critical Analysis Of Managerial Skills Competencies Of Secondary School Heads Trained Through Distance Mode of Allama Iqbal Open University” which is written by Muhammad AKHLAQ from Preston University, Islamabad, PAKISTAN and SHAZIA MUNAWAR SULEHRI from Ministry of Education, PAKISTAN. They mentioned in their paper to analyze the managerial skills competencies of secondary schools heads trained through distance mode of education in Pakistan. For this purpose a sample 300 secondary school teachers and 100 secondary schools head-teachers trained through distance mode and working in the Federal Government